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Sample records for mit gem basierter

  1. GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The prime scientific objectives of the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX, GEMS, are to determine the effects of the spin of black holes, the configurations of the magnetic fields of magnetars, and the structure of the supernova shocks which accelerate cosmic rays. In the cases of both stellar black holes and supermassive black holes, sensitivity to 1% polarization is needed to make diagnostic measurements of the net polarizations predicted for probable disk and corona models. GEMS can reach this goal for several Seyferts and quasars and measure the polarizations of representatives of a variety of other classes of X-ray sources, such as rotation-powered and accretion-powered pulsars. GEMS uses foil mirrors to maximize the collecting area achievable within the SMEX constraints. The polarimeters at the mirror foci are Time Projection Chambers which use the photoelectic effect to measure the polarization of the incident photon. We have built laboratory models with good efficiency and modulation in the 2-10 keV range. An attached small student experiment would add 0.5 keV sensitivity for bright soft sources. The instrument has a point spread function which allows measurement of structures in the brighter nearby supernova remnants. GEMS' Orbital Sciences spacecraft will rotate at a rate of 0.1 revolutions per minute during observations, so that systematic errors due to the detector can be detected and corrected. A program of 35 sources can be observed in 9 months. GEMS is designed for a two year lifetime which will allow a General Observer program that would more than double the number of sources measured. For subsets of black holes, neutron stars and supernova remnants, GEMS will measure the polarization of several sources, solving important questions while establishing the sensitivity required for future missions.

  2. DT Gem - ein RRab-Stern mit leichtem Blazhko-Effekt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maintz, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    CCD observations of the RRab star DT Gem (RA = 06 06 58.09, DE = +25 24 02.0 (2000)) were obtained at my private observatory. For DT Gem 8 maxima were obtained. The amplitude of the light-curve varies epoch to epoch. So does the stepness of the rising and descending branch also. These variations are due to a small Blazhko effect. The observations will be continued to find the Blazhko period. Elements of DT Gem are revised as: DT Gem: Max = 2456355.4134 + 0.611283 * E, which is shorter than given in GCVS. Phased lightcurves of DT Gem provided by IOMC, SuperWASP, ASAS and NSVS are given.

  3. Gem Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    World Gem Laboratory, Inc.'s cathodoluminoscope is an instrument that magnifies a specimen and produces heat-generated light emissions that bring out features important in gemological analysis. It can indicate whether a stone can be successfully cut, useful in the study of growth and strain patterns in diamonds, detection of dyes in jade, and analysis of the growth and structure of rubies and sapphires. In combination with other tests these analyses can separate synthetic from natural gems.

  4. Mechanism of GEMS formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R

    2004-03-10

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were examined using 200 keV analytical transmission electron microscopy. The morphologies and crystallography of embedded relict grains reveal that GEMS are pseudomorphs formed by irradiation processing of crystals free-floating in space. Some GEMS retain a compositional and morphological ''memory'' of the crystal from which they formed. Pseudomorphism rules out condensation, annealing, flash heating, or shock melting as alternative mechanisms of GEMS formation. A significant and often dominant fraction of the atoms in GEMS were sputtered deposited from other grains. Therefore, a normal (solar) isotopic composition is not a reliable indicator of whether GEMS formed in the solar system or in presolar interstellar or circumstellar environments.

  5. Not Your Ordinary GEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from NASA's Stennis Space Center, Geophex devised a new design for broadband electromagnetic sensors. Geophex developed a patented sensing technology, capable not only of coastal monitoring, but also a variety of other functions, including environmental pollution characterization, groundwater contamination detection, archaeological study, and mineral detection. The new technology is offered in several of the company's products the GEM-2, GEM-2A, and the GEM-3. The Geophex products consist of two primary electromagnetic coils, which are stimulated by alternating currents that generate a magnetic field in the object targeted for investigation. GEM-2 is a handheld, lightweight, programmable, digital device. GEM-2A is an airborne version of the sensor. Suspended from a helicopter, the GEM-2A is used to search for mineral deposits and to survey large tracts of land. The GEM-3 is capable of detecting buried landmines and other active munitions. GEM-3 identifies landmines by their brand names. Because each landmine has its own unique electromagnetic response to the broad frequency band emitted by the GEM-3, bomb identification and disposal strategies are made easier.

  6. GEM: Performance and aging tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.S.; Kadyk, J.; Han, S.H.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Wenzel, W.; Pitts, K.; Martin, M.D.; Hutchins, J.B.

    1999-06-01

    Performance and aging tests have been done to characterize Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs), including further design improvements such as a thicker GEM and a closed GEM. Since the effective GEM gain is typically smaller than the absolute GEM gain, due to trapping of avalanche electrons at the bottom GEM electrode, the authors performed field simulations and measurements for better understanding, and discuss methods to eliminate this effect. Other performance parameters of the GEMs are also presented, including absolute GEM gain, short-term and long-term gain stabilities.

  7. Origins of GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  8. New Approach for 2D Readout of GEM Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hasell, Douglas K

    2011-10-29

    Detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplication (GEM) technology are becoming more and more widely used in nuclear and high energy physics and are being applied in astronomy, medical physics, industry, and homeland security. GEM detectors are thin, low mass, insensitive to magnetic fields, and can currently provide position resolutions down to {approx}50 microns. However, the designs for reconstructing the position, in two dimensions (2D), of the charged particles striking a GEM detector are often complicated to fabricate and expensive. The objective of this proposal is to investigate a simpler procedure for producing the two dimensional readout layer of GEM detectors using readily available printed circuit board technology which can be tailored to the detector requirements. We will use the established GEM laboratory and facilities at M.I.T. currently employed in developing GEM detectors for the STAR forward tracking upgrade to simplify the testing and evaluation of the new 2D readout designs. If this new design proves successful it will benefit future nuclear and high energy physics experiments already being planned and will similarly extend and simplify the application of GEM technology to other branches of science, medicine, and industry. These benefits would be not only in lower costs for fabrication but also it increased flexibility for design and application.

  9. The GEM Silicon Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.B.

    1993-09-01

    The GEM Collaboration has produced a baseline design for the GEM detector. The baseline design of the GEM Silicon Tracking System (STS) is discussed in this article. Mechanical and electrical engineering progress on the GEM STS is described. Results from simulations of detector performance and the implications on engineering issues are described.

  10. Impact of GEM foil hole geometry on GEM detector gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Nolvi, A.; Veenhof, R.; Tuominen, E.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed 3D imaging of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foil hole geometry was realized. Scanning White Light Interferometry was used to examine six topological parameters of GEM foil holes from both sides of the foil. To study the effect of the hole geometry on detector gain, the ANSYS and Garfield ++ software were employed to simulate the GEM detector gain on the basis of SWLI data. In particular, the effective gain in a GEM foil with equally shaped holes was studied. The real GEM foil holes exhibited a 4% lower effective gain and 6% more electrons produced near the exit electrode of the GEM foil than the design anticipated. Our results indicate that the GEM foil hole geometry affects the gain performance of GEM detectors.

  11. Mit Mathematik zu Mehr Intelligenz in der Logistik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhring, Rolf H.; Schenk, Michael

    Die Lösung logistischer Probleme ist ein wichtiger Aspekt menschlichen Handelns seit Menschen gemeinsam zielgerichtet tätig wurden. Die Grundlagen dessen, was wir heute Logistik nennen, entstammen dem militärischen Bereich. So basierte z. B. das römische Imperium in starkem Maße auf militärisch-logistischen Glanzleistungen. Ob damals bereits mathematische Überlegungen eine Rolle spielten, wissen wir heute nicht. Jedoch versuchte z. B. Napoleon, der mit den bedeutendsten Mathematikern seiner Zeit befreundet war, den Transport seiner Truppen und die Verbreitung von Informationen zu optimieren und strategisch einzusetzen.1,2

  12. A Hidden GEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Samia

    2012-01-01

    The internet abounds with free science education applications. But, on their own, these applications have limited capacity to teach students curricular concepts or skills. The author integrated several free web-based applications into a broader pedagogical approach called T-GEM, in which the teacher guides student investigations. In this article,…

  13. GEM Technical Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-31

    The GEM collaboration was formed in June 1991 to develop a major detector for the SSC. The primary physics objectives of GEM are those central to the motivation for the SSC, to study high p{sub T} physics - exemplified by the search for Higgs bosons - and to search for new physics beyond the standard model. The authors present in this Technical Design Report (TDR) a detector with broad capabilities for the discovery and subsequent study of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass and flavor, and other physics requiring precise measurements of gammas, electrons, and muons - hence the name, GEM. In addition, as a design goal, they have taken care to provide the robustness needed to do the physics that requires high luminosity. Finally, good coverage and hermeticity allow the detection of missing transverse energy, E{sub T}. The GEM design emphasizes clean identification and high resolution measurement of the primary physics signatures for high p{sub T} physics. The approach is to make precise energy measurements that maximize the sensitivity to rare narrow resonances, to detect the elementary interaction products (quarks, leptons, and photons), and to build in the features required to reduce backgrounds.

  14. Progress on large area GEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Marco; Duarte Pinto, Serge; Alfonsi, Matteo; Brock, Ian; Croci, Gabriele; David, Eric; de Oliveira, Rui; Ropelewski, Leszek; Taureg, Hans; van Stenis, Miranda

    2011-02-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) manufacturing technique has recently evolved to allow the production of large area GEMs. A novel approach based on single mask photolithography eliminates the mask alignment issue, which limits the dimensions in the traditional double mask process. Moreover, a splicing technique overcomes the limited width of the raw material. Stretching and handling issues in large area GEMs have also been addressed. Using the new improvements it was possible to build a prototype triple-GEM detector of ˜2000 cm2 active area, aimed at an application for the TOTEM T1 upgrade. Further refinements of the single mask technique allow great control over the shape of the GEM holes and the size of the rims, which can be tuned as needed. In this framework, simulation studies can help to understand the GEM behavior depending on the hole shape.

  15. The performance of Glass GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Fushie, T.; Kishimito, S.; Guèrard, B.; Uesaka, M.

    2014-11-01

    Here we report the performance of Glass gas electron multipliers (Glass GEMs), which were fabricated with photo-etchable glass. The photo-etchable glass used for substrate is called PEG3 (Hoya Corporation). With this material, we succeeded in fabricating a Glass GEM that was 680 μ m-thick with a hole diameter of 170 μ m and Cr and Cu layer electrodes. A Glass GEM has advantages such as good uniformity, high gain, a flat surface without stretching, cylindrical holes, and the absence of outgassing from the material. We successfully operated a Glass GEM having 100 × 100 m 2 effective area with various gas mixtures. The energy resolution for 5.9 keV X-rays was 18%, obtained by uniform irradiation of the entire effective area. The gas gain of the Glass GEM reached up to 90,000 with a gas mixture of Ne/C 4 (90:10). The Glass GEM was also operated with Ar/C 4 and Ar/C 4 gas. The gain stability measured for Glass GEM showed no significant increase or decrease as a function of elapsed time from applying high voltage. The gain stability over 15 hours of operation was about 10% in high-count-rate irradiation. Gain mapping across the Glass GEM showed good uniformity with a standard deviation of about 10%.

  16. Characterisations of GEM detector prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Rajendra Nath; Nanda, Amit; Rudra, Sharmili; Bhattacharya, P.; Sahoo, Sumanya Sekhar; Biswas, S.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.; Sahu, P. K.; Sahu, S.

    2016-07-01

    At NISER-IoP detector laboratory an initiative is taken to build and test Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for ALICE experiment. The optimisation of the gas flow rate and the long-term stability test of the GEM detector are performed. The method and test results are presented.

  17. On the Origin of GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2004-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) are a major component of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) their physical and chemical characteristics show marked similarities to contemporary interstellar dust. Recent oxygen isotopic measurements confirm that at least a small fraction (less than 5%) of GEMS are demonstrably presolar, while the remainder have ratios that are indistinguishable from solar values. GEMS with solar oxygen isotopic compositions either (1) had their isotopic compositions homogenized through processing in the interstellar medium (ISM), or (2) formed in the early solar system. Isotopic homogenization necessarily implies chemical homogenization, so (interstellar) GEMS compositions should reflect the average composition of dust in the local ISM. We performed a systematic examination of the bulk chemistry of GEMS in primitive IDPs in order to test this hypothesis.

  18. Deep-Sky Companions: Southern Gems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Stephen James

    2013-05-01

    Preface; 1. How to use this book; 2. The southern gems; Appendix A. Southern gems: basic data; Appendix B. Forty-two additional southern gems in Dunlop's catalogue; Appendix C. A brief history of early telescopic exploration of the far-southern skies; Appendix D. Photo credits; The southern gems checklist; Index; Wide-field star charts.

  19. Giotto Extended Mission (GEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, D. E. B.; Grensemann, M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the Giotto Extended Mission (GEM), are to determine the composition and physical state of the Grigg Skjellerup Comet's nucleus; to determine the processes that govern the composition and distribution of neutral and ionized species in the cometary atmosphere. Giotto consists of a single European Space Agency (ESA) spacecraft that was launched in 1985 from Center Spatial Guyanis in French Guiana on an Ariane launch vehicle. After a successful launch into geostationary orbit and a heliocentric transfer trajectory, the spacecraft successfully encountered Halley's Comet in 1986. One month after encountering Halley's Comet, Mar. 1986, the spacecraft was placed in hibernation in a heliocentric orbit slightly less than 1 AU. Between Feb. and Jul. 1990 the spacecraft was successfully reactivated, checked out, and placed on a trajectory course to intercept comet Grigg Skjellerup. The spacecraft has been in hibernation since Jul. 1990. Information is presented in tabular form in the following areas: coverage goals, Deep Space Network Support, frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  20. Origin and properties of GEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Z R; Bradley, J P

    2006-04-11

    GEMS are to the outer solar system what chondrules are to the inner solar system. Ten years after it was first proposed that GEMS are the long-sought interstellar amorphous silicates, ion microprobe measurements have confirmed that some of them are indeed interstellar amorphous silicates. The new challenges are to obtain even higher precision isotope measurements from these submicrometer-sized objects and to clarify how and where they originally formed. Individual GEMS exhibit a strikingly narrow (0.1-0.5 {micro}m diameter) size distribution and they are systematically depleted from solar abundances in S/Si, Mg/Si, Ca/Si and Fe/Si, implying that they formed by a common mechanism. Mineralogical and petrographic evidence suggest that irradiation processing may be that mechanism. Recent nanometer-scale compositional mapping using new-generation transmission electron microscopes reveals that truly pristine GEMS may be relatively rare and new metrics need to be developed to distinguish the primordial properties of GEMS from more recent secondary alteration effects.

  1. Representation of Clinical Nursing Protocols Using GEM II & GEM Cutter

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karen A.; Woodcock, Michael W.; Harris, Marcelline R.

    2010-01-01

    The machineable representation and execution of clinical guidelines has been the focus of research efforts for some time, however there is less examination of whether the methods and techniques for guidelines are sufficient for clinical protocols. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of using the Guideline Elements Model II (GEM II) and GEM Cutter for the representation of clinical protocols, specifically clinical protocols commonly used by nurses. After downloading the GEM Cutter 2.5, we decomposed a set of clinical protocols and analyzed the completeness in which elemental protocol data was represented. One of the most complicated of these protocols (extravasations of infused medication) is presented as an example. While GEM II adequately represents core elements of clinical protocols at the high level, it was not possible to adequately represent sequence and associated role based permissions via use of conditional criteria at branching and procedural levels. Functionality of the tool would also be enhanced with more robust terminology management and support for multi-authoring. PMID:21347008

  2. The GEMS Kit Builder's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jan; Sneider, Cary; Gould, Alan; Barber, Jacqueline; Hosoume, Kimi; Tucker, Laura; Willard, Carolyn

    For many educators, gathering, organizing, and maintaining materials involved in inquiry-based science and math activities can seem daunting. This handbook is designed to help teachers in the task of gathering and maintaining materials to make kits for 42 activities derived from the Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) Program at the…

  3. GEM - The Global Earthquake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, A.

    2009-04-01

    Over 500,000 people died in the last decade due to earthquakes and tsunamis, mostly in the developing world, where the risk is increasing due to rapid population growth. In many seismic regions, no hazard and risk models exist, and even where models do exist, they are intelligible only by experts, or available only for commercial purposes. The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) answers the need for an openly accessible risk management tool. GEM is an internationally sanctioned public private partnership initiated by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) which will establish an authoritative standard for calculating and communicating earthquake hazard and risk, and will be designed to serve as the critical instrument to support decisions and actions that reduce earthquake losses worldwide. GEM will integrate developments on the forefront of scientific and engineering knowledge of earthquakes, at global, regional and local scale. The work is organized in three modules: hazard, risk, and socio-economic impact. The hazard module calculates probabilities of earthquake occurrence and resulting shaking at any given location. The risk module calculates fatalities, injuries, and damage based on expected shaking, building vulnerability, and the distribution of population and of exposed values and facilities. The socio-economic impact module delivers tools for making educated decisions to mitigate and manage risk. GEM will be a versatile online tool, with open source code and a map-based graphical interface. The underlying data will be open wherever possible, and its modular input and output will be adapted to multiple user groups: scientists and engineers, risk managers and decision makers in the public and private sectors, and the public-at- large. GEM will be the first global model for seismic risk assessment at a national and regional scale, and aims to achieve broad scientific participation and independence. Its development will occur in a

  4. MIT: Shaping the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Kenneth R., Ed.

    This book provides 16 essays by faculty and staff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) concerning what MIT is like today and offering a guide to its possible future. Emphasis is placed on local, national, and global issues, providing a current sampling of the state of concerns and opinions around MIT. Topics include the question of…

  5. Mining for Gems: The Making of Readers and Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Considers how to develop students' passion for language and how to get them to stop and look at word choice. Defines a "gem" as a word, phrase, or sentence that is particularly remarkable or moving. Describes working with students to notice the gems, design gem journals, write their own gems, and to create future gems. (SC)

  6. Introduction: ISC-GEM catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helffrich, George

    2015-02-01

    This Special Issue of Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors documents the intent, logistical efforts and methods used in producing the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalog (1900-2009). It represents a significant achievement in both the manpower and the methods used to yield a homogeneous catalog from the earliest days of global seismic instrumentation. The catalog should present researchers with a resource to assess seismicity rates, locations and mechanisms uniformly in the instrumental era.

  7. GEM: The GAAIN Entity Mapper

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Peehoo; Ambite, Jose-Luis; Toga, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a software system solution that significantly simplifies data sharing of medical data. This system, called GEM (for the GAAIN Entity Mapper), harmonizes medical data. Harmonization is the process of unifying information across multiple disparate datasets needed to share and aggregate medical data. Specifically, our system automates the task of finding corresponding elements across different independently created (medical) datasets of related data. We present our overall approach, detailed technical architecture, and experimental evaluations demonstrating the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:26665184

  8. Leading a successful iGEM team.

    PubMed

    Materi, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition allows undergraduate teams to develop projects in synthetic biology within the context of a large, international Jamboree. Organizing and managing a successful iGEM team is an exercise in advanced agile project development. While many of the principles applicable to such teams are derived from management of agile software teams, iGEM presents several unique challenges. PMID:22328439

  9. GEM: Statistical weather forecasting procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM) Program was to develop a weather forecast guidance system that would: predict between 0 to 6 hours all elements in the airways observations; respond instantly to the latest observed conditions of the surface weather; process these observations at local sites on minicomputing equipment; exceed the accuracy of current persistence predictions at the shortest prediction of one hour and beyond; exceed the accuracy of current forecast model output statistics inside eight hours; and be capable of making predictions at one location for all locations where weather information is available.

  10. The GEMS-2 SEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillier, S.; De Raucourt, S.; Mimoun, D.; Lognonne, P.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Pike, W. T.; Banerdt, B.; Laudet, P.; Kerjean, L.; Hurst, K. J.; Zweifel, P.; Mance, D.; Roll, R.; Bierwirth, M.; Gagnepain-Beyneix, J.; Nibut, T.; Robert, O.; Gabsi, T.; Pot, O.; Lecomte, B.; Schibler, P.; Mocquet, A.; Garcia, R.

    2011-12-01

    The SEIS experiment is the primary payload of the Geophysical Monitoring Station (GEMS) Mission Proposal, submitted to NASA in the frame of the 2010 Discovery program, and recently selected for the phase A study. The objective of the GEMS SEIS experiment is the determination of the deep internal structure of Mars. In particular, geophysical parameters of first importance, such as the state (liquid/solid) and size of the core, as well as structure of the mantle and shape of discontinuities will be determined by the experiment. It will measure seismic activity in a very broad band of signal, from the tidal frequencies (0.05 mHz) up to the short period frequencies (50 Hz), to address the widest range of scientific questions, from the state of the inner core to the meteoritic rate measurement. Infrasound, which might be associated to dust devils and atmospheric discharge, will be also monitored. The instrument integrates a Very Broad Band (VBB) 3 axis seismometer, completed by another trihedron of MEMS short period seismometers, environmental sensors for pressure, wind and temperature, and an infrasound sensor is additionally considered. The sensors will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from the Phoenix lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The sensor assembly, which contains all seismic sensors, the leveling system, as well as house-keeping and temperature measurements, will be deployed on the soil in order to allow the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. Thanks to the wind and thermal shield, together with the sensors' specific containers (vacuum sphere for VBBs), long term VBB bias will be protected from both temperature and pressure variations (as well as passively compensated), allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment. A dedicated electronics will manage the overall experiment and ultra-low noise, space qualified 24 bits A/D converters will perform the acquisition. The

  11. ROLE OF GEMS IN INDIAN MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S.R.N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is the first attempt in introducing the medicinal importance of gems as found in the Sanskrit text ‘Rasaratnasamuccaya’, which has been rendered an English translation here. The modern physicians and gemologists will find this study quite useful in continuing research and, thus, develop a new field of gem medicine. PMID:22556526

  12. Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project Overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize Project (GEM) is a collaborative effort of public and private sector researchers to broaden and enhance the maize germplasm base. The GEM Project has cooperators from 26 private companies, 17 Universities, 7 USDA-ARS Research Units, 1 NGO, and 12 international pub...

  13. REGISTRATION OF MAIZE GERMPLASM LINE GEMS-0067

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GEMS-0067 is a partially inbred germplasm line released by Truman State University (TSU) in accordance with the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) protocol. This line is being released for use in the development of genetically diverse, elite, amylomaize class VII parental lines possessing modifie...

  14. The GEM-T2 gravitational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F. J.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.; Robbins, J. W.; Williamson, R. G.; Engelis, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The GEM-T2 is the latest in a series of Goddard Earth Models of the terrestrial field. It was designed to bring modeling capabilities one step closer towards ultimately determining the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite's radial position to an accuracy of 10-cm RMS (root mean square). It also improves models of the long wavelength geoid to support many oceanographic and geophysical applications. The GEM-T2 extends the spherical harmonic field to include more than 600 coefficients above degree 36 (which was the limit for its predecessor, GEM-T1). Like GEM-T1, it was produced entirely from satellite tracking data, but it now uses nearly twice as many satellites (31 vs. 17), contains four times the number of observations (2.4 million), has twice the number of data arcs (1132), and utilizes precise laser tracking from 11 satellites. The estimation technique for the solution has been augmented to include an optimum data weighting procedure with automatic error calibration for the gravitational parameters. Results for the GEM-T2 error calibration indicate significant improvement over previous satellite-only models. The error of commission in determining the geoid has been reduced from 155 cm in GEM-T1 to 105 cm for GEM-T2 for the 36 x 36 portion of the field, and 141 cm for the entire model. The orbital accuracies achieved using GEM-T2 are likewise improved. Also, the projected radial error on the TOPEX satellite orbit indicates 9.4 cm RMS for GEM-T2, compared to 24.1 cm for GEM-T1.

  15. The GEM-T2 gravitational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F. J.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.

    1990-01-01

    The GEM-T2 is the latest in a series of Goddard Earth Models of the terrestrial field. It was designed to bring modeling capabilities one step closer towards ultimately determining the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite's radial position to an accuracy of 10-cm RMS (root mean square). It also improves models of the long wavelength geoid to support many oceanographic and geophysical applications. The GEM-T2 extends the spherical harmonic field to include more than 600 coefficients above degree 36 (which was the limit for its predecessor, GEM-T1). Like GEM-T1, it was produced entirely from satellite tracking data, but it now uses nearly twice as many satellites (31 vs. 17), contains four times the number of observations (2.4 million), has twice the number of data arcs (1132), and utilizes precise laser tracking from 11 satellites. The estimation technique for the solution has been augmented to include an optimum data weighting procedure with automatic error calibration for the gravitational parameters. Results for the GEM-T2 error calibration indicate significant improvement over previous satellite-only models. The error of commission in determining the geoid has been reduced from 155 cm in GEM-T1 to 105 cm for GEM-T2 for the 36 x 36 portion of the field, and 141 cm for the entire model. The orbital accuracies achieved using GEM-T2 are likewise improved. Also, the projected radial error on the TOPEX satellite orbit indicates 9.4 cm RMS for GEM-T2, compared to 24.1 cm for GEM-T1.

  16. A GEM of a Resource: The Gateway to Educational Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickner, Marilyn; Barkhouse, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Describes GEM (Gateway to Educational Materials) that provides easy, fast, and free access to lesson plans, curriculum units, and other educational materials on the Internet. Discusses interaction between users and content providers; GEM versus search engines; how a GEM record is created; and the metadata used in GEM records. (LRW)

  17. Commercial and Cost Effective Production of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Craig

    2009-03-31

    The nuclear and high energy physics research community is constantly searching for new and improved tracking and radiation detectors. The introduction of micropattern detectors has opened new opportunities for improving the rate capabilities, as well as the spatial and time resolution of particle detectors in these applications. GEM detectors in particular have received enormous interest for use in detectors planned for a number of new and upgraded experiments at many different research facilities. These include both the STAR and PHENIX experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and at the future electron-positron Linear Collider. At the present time, CERN is not able to supply foils in sufficient quantities to accommodate the needs of these experiments. Compounding this problem, there is a strong interest in GEM foils for numerous other applications, such as in astrophysics, medical imaging and detectors for homeland security. It would therefore be of significant benefit to the research community to develop a commercial source of GEM foils for all of these applications. Tech-Etch is in a unique position to develop this technology for commercial use. Tech-Etch has not only experience in numerous related high precision etched Kapton® products, but it also has strong ties with several research institutions (namely Brookhaven, Yale and MIT) that can help develop and evaluate the performance of the GEM foils produced at Tech-Etch. Additionally, since Tech-Etch is a small company, it also has the capability to produce a large variety of part configurations, as well as the flexibility to shift production methods, equipment, and chemistry to optimize the GEM foil manufacturing process without being constrained by existing work running on high volume continuous coil equipment.

  18. Commercial and cost effective production of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Crary, David

    2010-05-05

    The nuclear and high energy physics research community is constantly searching for new and improved tracking and radiation detectors. The introduction of micropattern detectors has opened new opportunities for improving the rate capabilities, as well as the spatial and time resolution of particle detectors in these applications. GEM detectors in particular have received enormous interest for use in detectors planned for a number of new and upgraded experiments at many different research facilities. These include both the STAR and PHENIX experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, experiments at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and at the future electron-positron Linear Collider. At the present time, CERN is not able to supply foils in sufficient quantities to accommodate the needs of these experiments. Compounding this problem, there is a strong interest in GEM foils for numerous other applications, such as in astrophysics, medical imaging and detectors for homeland security. It would therefore be of significant benefit to the research community to develop a commercial source of GEM foils for all of these applications. Tech-Etch is in a unique position to develop this technology for commercial use. Tech-Etch has not only experience in numerous related high precision etched Kapton® products, but it also has strong ties with several research institutions (namely Brookhaven, Yale and MIT) that can help develop and evaluate the performance of the GEM foils produced at Tech-Etch. Additionally, since Tech-Etch is a small company, it also has the capability to produce a large variety of part configurations, as well as the flexibility to shift production methods, equipment, and chemistry to optimize the GEM foil manufacturing process without being constrained by existing work running on high volume continuous coil equipment.

  19. GEMS: Building Blocks of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, H. A.; Bradley, J. P.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Noguchi, T.; Dobrica, E.; Engrand, C.; Brownlee, D. E.

    2014-09-01

    Upon consideration of terrestrial alteration effects and instrumental limitations, we find that GEMS, glass with embedded metal and sulfides, in cometary dust remain the best candidate for surviving interstellar amorphous silicates.

  20. The GEMS Model of Volunteer Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III; Deppe, Catherine A.; Castillo, Jaime X.; Wells, Betty J.

    1998-01-01

    Describes GEMS, a spiral model that profiles volunteer administration. Components include Generate, Educate, Mobilize, and Sustain, four sets of processes that span volunteer recruitment and selection to retention or disengagement. (SK)

  1. Data Analysis And Polarization Measurements With GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission was selected by NASA for flight in 2014. GEMS will make the first sensitive survey of X-ray polarization across a wide range of source classes including black hole and neutron star binaries, AGN of different types, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect. The GEMS detectors image the charge tracks of photoelectrons produced by 2 - 10 keV X-rays. The initial direction of the photoelectron is determined by the linear polarization of the photon. We present an overview of the data analysis challenges and methods for GEMS, including procedures for producing optimally filtered images of the charge tracks and estimating their initial directions. We illustrate our methods using laboratory measurements of polarized and unpolarized X-rays with flight-like detectors as well as from simulated tracks. We also present detailed simulations exploring the statistics of polarization measurements appropriate for GEMS, and make comparisons with previous work.

  2. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  3. MPD work at MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    1991-01-01

    MPD work at MIT is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following subject areas are covered: the MIT program, its goals, achievements, and roadblocks; quasi one-dimensional modeling; two-dimensional modeling - transport effects and Hall effect; microscopic instabilities in MPD flows and modified two stream instability; electrothermal stability theory; separation of onset and anode depletion; exit plane spectroscopic measurements; phenomena of onset as performance limiter; explanations of onset; geometry effects on onset; onset at full ionization and its consequences; relationship to anode depletion; summary on self-field MPD; applied field MPD - the logical growth path; the case for AF; the challenges of AF MPD; and recommendations.

  4. Does Comet WILD-2 contain Gems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, M.; Ishii, H.; Dai, Z. R.; Toppani, A.; Joswiak, D. J.; Leroux, H.; Zolensky, M.; Keller, L. P.; Browning, N. D.

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that Comet Wild-2 dust should resemble anhydrous carbon-rich, chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere because some CP IDPs are suspected to be from comets. The rarity of carbonaceous grains and presolar silicates, as well as the presence of high-temperature inner solar nebula minerals in the Wild-2 sample (e.g. osbornite and melilite), appear incompatible with most CP IDPs. However, it is premature to draw firm conclusions about the mineralogy of comet Wild-2 because only approx. 1% of the sample has been examined. The most abundant silicates in CP IDPs are GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides). Nonsolar O isotopic compositions confirm that at least some GEMS in IDPs are presolar amorphous silicates. The presence or absence of GEMS in the Wild-2 sample is important because it addresses, (a) the relationship between CP IDPs and comets, and (b) the hypothesis that other GEMS in IDPs formed in the solar nebula. Here we show that most of the GEMSlike materials so far identified in Stardust aerogel were likely impact generated during collection. At the nanometer scale, they are compositionally and crystallographically distinct from GEMS in IDPs.

  5. Optical quality assurance of GEM foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildén, T.; Brücken, E.; Heino, J.; Kalliokoski, M.; Karadzhinova, A.; Lauhakangas, R.; Tuominen, E.; Turpeinen, R.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis software was developed for the high aspect ratio optical scanning system in the Detector Laboratory of the University of Helsinki and the Helsinki Institute of Physics. The system is used e.g. in the quality assurance of the GEM-TPC detectors being developed for the beam diagnostics system of the SuperFRS at future FAIR facility. The software was tested by analyzing five CERN standard GEM foils scanned with the optical scanning system. The measurement uncertainty of the diameter of the GEM holes and the pitch of the hole pattern was found to be 0.5 μm and 0.3 μm, respectively. The software design and the performance are discussed. The correlation between the GEM hole size distribution and the corresponding gain variation was studied by comparing them against a detailed gain mapping of a foil and a set of six lower precision control measurements. It can be seen that a qualitative estimation of the behavior of the local variation in gain across the GEM foil can be made based on the measured sizes of the outer and inner holes.

  6. An implementation framework for GEM encoded guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Gershkovich, P.; Shiffman, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Access to timely decision support information is critical for delivery of high-quality medical care. Transformation of clinical knowledge that is originally expressed in the form of a guideline to a computable format is one of the main obstacles to the integration of knowledge sharing functionality into computerized clinical systems. The Guideline Element Model (GEM) provides a methodology for such a transformation. Although the model has been used to store heterogeneous guideline knowledge, it is important to demonstrate that GEM markup facilitates guideline implementation. This report demonstrates the feasibility of implementation of GEM-encoded guideline recommendations using Apache Group s Cocoon Web Publishing Framework. We further demonstrate how XML-based programming allows for maintaining the separation of guideline content from processing logic and from presentation format. Finally, we analyze whether the guideline authors original intent has been sufficiently captured and conveyed to the end user. PMID:11825181

  7. Abdichtungen mit Bitumenbahnen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Axel C.; Unger, Wolfram

    Das Werk Bauwerksabdichtung von Karl Lufsky, im allgemeinen Sprachgebrauch auch Der Lufsky genannt, war immer das Standardwerk für Flächenabdichtungen mit Bitumenwerkstoffen. Karl Lufsky war erst Mitarbeiter des Geschäftsführers Otto Latendorf der 1924 in Berlin gegründeten Firma ARIDO Abdichtungs-GmbH und später ihr Geschäftsführer [8.1]. Eine Baustelle war seit 1950 der Keller der neuen Sowjetischen Botschaft Unter den Linden. Eines Tages sprach dort einer der russischen Ingenieur-Offiziere Otto Latendorf an und fragte ihn, ob er wohl eine schriftliche Zusammenfassung aller technischen Probleme der bituminösen Bauwerksabdichtung für ihn verfassen könnte. Mit dieser Schrift würde er sich dann zu seinem Abschlussexamen in Moskau melden. Vergüten wollte er den Arbeitsaufwand mit Lebensmittellieferungen. Otto Latendorf willigte ein und machte sich gemeinsam mit Karl Lufsky an die Arbeit. Dies war offensichtlich der Impuls für Karl Lufsky, einige Zeit später im Leipziger Teubner Verlag die erste Auflage des Buchs "Bauwerksabdichtungen“ herauszugeben, womit der Grundstein gelegt wurde, aus einer "Moskauer Examensarbeit“ in den letzten 50 Jahren ein bedeutendes Fachbuch zu machen.

  8. Development of a GEM Electronic Board (GEB) for triple-GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspell, P.; Dabrowski, M.; Conde Garcia, A.; De Lentdecker, G.; Marinov, A.; De Oliveira, R.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Yang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Developed for use with triple GEM detectors, the GEM Electronic Board (GEB) forms a crucial part of the electronics readout system being developed as part of the CMS muon upgrade program. The objective of the GEB is threefold; to provide stable powering and ground for the VFAT3 front ends, to enable high-speed communication between 24 VFAT3 front ends and an optohybrid, and to shield the GEM detector from electromagnetic interference. The paper describes the concept and design of a large-size GEB in detail, highlighting the challenges in terms of design and feasibility of this deceptively difficult system component.

  9. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  10. The GEMS-2 Seis Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoun, D.; de Raucourt, S.; Lognonne, P.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Gagnepain-Beyneix, J.; Pike, T.; Nebut, T.; Tillier, S.; Robert, O.; Gabsi, T.; Pot, O.; Lecomte, B.; Escande, N.; Mocquet, A.; Zweifel, P.; Mance, D.; Roll, R.; Bierwirth, M.

    2010-12-01

    of data will be made on the basis of raw compressed data, plus an excerpt of the high frequency events of the day. The proposed instrument has been developed up to PDR in the frame of the ExoMars Humbold payload. Most critical parts have been tested, including shock tests for pivot, electronics components and displacement sensors. TRL 6 is expected at the end of 2011. SEIS has been proposed onboard the GEMS Mission Proposal, submitted to NASA in the frame of the 2010 Discovery AO.

  11. Performance of the GEM electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Ma

    1993-06-25

    The GEM EM calorimeter is optimized for the best energy, position, angular resolution and jet rejection. The detailed simulation results are presented. In the barrel with LKr, an energy resolution of about 6%/{radical}{direct_sum}0.4%, pointing resolution of 40mrad/{radical}E + 0.5mrad, and jet rejection of a factor of 5 are expected.

  12. Gravitational field modes GEM 3 and 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Wagner, C. A.; Putney, B. H.; Sandson, M. L.; Brownd, J. E.; Richardson, J. A.; Taylor, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A refinement in the satellite geopotential solution for a Goddard Earth Model (GEM 3) was obtained. The solution includes the addition of two low inclination satellites, SAS at 3 deg and PEOLE at 15 deg, and is based upon 27 close earth satellites containing some 400,000 observations of electronic, laser, and optical data. In addition, a new combination satellite/gravimetry solution (GEM 4) was derived. The new model includes 61 center of mass tracking station locations with data from GRARR, Laser, MOTS, Baker-Nunn, and NWL Tranet Doppler tracking sites. Improvement was obtained for the zonal coefficients of the new models and is shown by tests on the long period perturbations of the orbits. Individual zonal coefficients agree very closely among different models that contain low inclination satellites. Tests of models with surface gravity data show that the GEM 3 satellite model has significantly better agreement with the gravimetry data than the GEM 1 satellite model, and that it also has better agreement with the gravimetry data than the 1969 SAO Standard Earth 2 model.

  13. Development of GEMs at Hampton University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, Anusha; Kohl, Michael; MUSE Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Two GEM telescopes each consisting of three 10×10 cm2 triple-GEM chambers 30-40 cm apart were built, tested and operated by the Hampton group. They are read out with APV25 frontend chips and FPGA based digitizing electronics developed by INFN Rome. The telescopes served as luminosity monitors for the OLYMPUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, Germany, with positron and electron beams at 2 GeV. The telescopes have been recycled to serve as the beam particle tracker of the MUSE experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. In the identical configuration as in OLYMPUS, the telescope was limiting the accepted trigger rate in the test measurements. Therefore, an effort is ongoing to improve the GEM readout speed to meet the trigger rate at the design intensity of the MUSE experiment. Further, the Hampton group is responsible for the DarkLight phase-I lepton tracker which is in preparation at the low energy-recovering facility (LERF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, USA, sponsored by the National Science Foundation through a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) grant. The group's activities on GEM detector development will be summarized, and the achieved performance and the current effort to further improvements will be discussed.

  14. Initial Tests of Commercially Manufactured Large GEM Foils and EIC Triple-GEM Detector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraishan, Amani

    2015-10-01

    Tracking detectors exist in many different varieties and operate on different physical principles, depending on the type of particle that has to be tracked, on the desired spatial resolution, and on the area that has to be covered. Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors, operating on the principle of electron amplification in gases, provide good spatial resolution for charged particles and can be built with large sensitive areas. Currently CERN is the only main distributor of large area GEM foils, and will be hard pressed to keep up with the increasing demand. To help satisfy the GEM foil demand, the commercialization of large area GEM foils via the single mask process has been established by Tech-Etch of Plymouth, MA, USA. Here we present our initial quality assurance tests of the foil's electrical and geometrical properties for sizes up to 40 X 40 cm2. Using our electrical and optical measurement setup, we also measured 10 X 10 cm2 GEMs produced by CERN and compare it with the Tech-Etch foils. Furthermore, we will present initial R&D design work done toward building a potential triple-GEM tracking detector to be used at a future experiment at an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) facility.

  15. Study of Ion Back Flow suppression with thick COBRA GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, K.

    2014-03-01

    Ion Back Flow (IBF) suppression is essential to avoid a space-charge distortion of the electric field under a high rate condition in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). A GEM technology is one possible solution to achieve a small IBF and to keep a good performance in terms of particle tracking and particle identification at high rates in TPC. We developed Thick COBRA GEMs to investigate the capability of further IBF suppression. It was found that the COBRA GEM can suppress IBF more effectively compared to a standard GEM. IBF reaches about 0.1-0.5% with a stack configuration consisting of one standard GEM facing to the drift field and two COBRA GEMs. In this paper, the current status of development of COBRA GEM is described.

  16. Gravity model improvement using GEOS-3 (GEM 9 and 10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Laubscher, R. E.; Wagner, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of collocation permitted GEM 9 to be a larger field than previous derived satellite models, GEM 9 having harmonics complete to 20 x 20 with selected higher degree terms. The satellite data set has approximately 840,000 observations, of which 200,000 are laser ranges taken on 9 satellites equipped with retroreflectors. GEM 10 is complete to 22 x 22 with selected higher degree terms out to degree and order 30 amounting to a total of 592 coefficients. Comparisons with surface gravity and altimeter data indicate a substantial improvement in GEM 9 over previous satellite solutions; GEM 9 is in even closer agreement with surface data than the previously published GEM 6 solution which contained surface gravity. In particular the free air gravity anomalies calculated from GEM 9 and a surface gravity solution are in excellent agreement for the high degree terms.

  17. Europa Imaging Highlights during GEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the two year Galileo Europa Mission (GEM), NASA's Galileo spacecraft will focus intensively on Jupiter's intriguing moon, Europa. This montage shows samples of some of the features that will be imaged during eight successive orbits. The images in this montage are in order of increasing orbit from the upper left (orbit 11) to the lower right (orbit 19).

    DESCRIPTIONS AND APPROXIMATE RESOLUTIONSTriple bands and dark spots

    1.6 kilometers/pixelConamara Chaos

    1.6 kilometers/pixelMannan'an Crater

    1.6 kilometers/ pixelCilix

    1.6 kilometers/pixelAgenor Linea and Thrace Macula

    2 kilometers/pixelSouth polar terrain

    2 kilometers/pixelRhadamanthys Linea

    1.6 kilometers/pixelEuropa plume search

    7 kilometers/pixel

    1. Triple bands and dark spots were the focus of some images from Galileo's eleventh orbit of Jupiter. Triple bands are multiple ridges with dark deposits along the outer margins. Some extend for thousands of kilometers across Europa's icy surface. They are cracks in the ice sheet and indicate the great stresses imposed on Europa by tides raised by Jupiter, as well as Europa's neighboring moons, Ganymede and Io. The dark spots or 'lenticulae' are spots of localized disruption.

    2. The Conamara Chaos region reveals icy plates which have broken up, moved, and rafted into new positions. This terrain suggests that liquid water or ductile ice was present near the surface. On Galileo's twelfth orbit of Jupiter, sections of this region with resolutions as high as 10 meters per picture element will be obtained.

    3. Mannann'an Crater is a feature newly discovered by Galileo in June 1996. Color and high resolution images (to 40 meters per picture element) from Galileo's fourteenth orbit of Jupiter will offer a close look at the crater and help characterize how impacts affect the icy surface of this moon.

    4. Cilix, a large mound about 1.5 kilometers high, is the center of Europa's coordinate system. Its concave top and what may be flow

  18. Europa Imaging Highlights during GEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the two year Galileo Europa Mission (GEM), NASA's Galileo spacecraft will focus intensively on Jupiter's intriguing moon, Europa. This montage shows samples of some of the features that will be imaged during eight successive orbits. The images in this montage are in order of increasing orbit from the upper left (orbit 11) to the lower right (orbit 19).

    DESCRIPTIONS AND APPROXIMATE RESOLUTIONSTriple bands and dark spots

    1.6 kilometers/pixelConamara Chaos

    1.6 kilometers/pixelMannan'an Crater

    1.6 kilometers/ pixelCilix

    1.6 kilometers/pixelAgenor Linea and Thrace Macula

    2 kilometers/pixelSouth polar terrain

    2 kilometers/pixelRhadamanthys Linea

    1.6 kilometers/pixelEuropa plume search

    7 kilometers/pixel

    1. Triple bands and dark spots were the focus of some images from Galileo's eleventh orbit of Jupiter. Triple bands are multiple ridges with dark deposits along the outer margins. Some extend for thousands of kilometers across Europa's icy surface. They are cracks in the ice sheet and indicate the great stresses imposed on Europa by tides raised by Jupiter, as well as Europa's neighboring moons, Ganymede and Io. The dark spots or 'lenticulae' are spots of localized disruption.

    2. The Conamara Chaos region reveals icy plates which have broken up, moved, and rafted into new positions. This terrain suggests that liquid water or ductile ice was present near the surface. On Galileo's twelfth orbit of Jupiter, sections of this region with resolutions as high as 10 meters per picture element will be obtained.

    3. Mannann'an Crater is a feature newly discovered by Galileo in June 1996. Color and high resolution images (to 40 meters per picture element) from Galileo's fourteenth orbit of Jupiter will offer a close look at the crater and help characterize how impacts affect the icy surface of this moon.

    4. Cilix, a large mound about 1.5 kilometers high, is the center of Europa's coordinate system. Its concave top and what may be flow

  19. Building the GEM Faulted Earth database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchfield, N. J.; Berryman, K. R.; Christophersen, A.; Thomas, R. F.; Wyss, B.; Tarter, J.; Pagani, M.; Stein, R. S.; Costa, C. H.; Sieh, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    The GEM Faulted Earth project is aiming to build a global active fault and seismic source database with a common set of strategies, standards, and formats, to be placed in the public domain. Faulted Earth is one of five hazard global components of the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) project. A key early phase of the GEM Faulted Earth project is to build a database which is flexible enough to capture existing and variable (e.g., from slow interplate faults to fast subduction interfaces) global data, and yet is not too onerous to enter new data from areas where existing databases are not available. The purpose of this talk is to give an update on progress building the GEM Faulted Earth database. The database design conceptually has two layers, (1) active faults and folds, and (2) fault sources, and automated processes are being defined to generate fault sources. These include the calculation of moment magnitude using a user-selected magnitude-length or magnitude-area scaling relation, and the calculation of recurrence interval from displacement divided by slip rate, where displacement is calculated from moment and moment magnitude. The fault-based earthquake sources defined by the Faulted Earth project will then be rationalised with those defined by the other GEM global components. A web based tool is being developed for entering individual faults and folds, and fault sources, and includes capture of additional information collected at individual sites, as well as descriptions of the data sources. GIS shapefiles of individual faults and folds, and fault sources will also be able to be uploaded. A data dictionary explaining the database design rationale, definitions of the attributes and formats, and a tool user guide is also being developed. Existing national databases will be uploaded outside of the fault compilation tool, through a process of mapping common attributes between the databases. Regional workshops are planned for compilation in areas where existing

  20. GEM Workshop on Intercalibrating Cusp Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    On October 9, 1990, a lively group of more than 60 scientists from around the world gathered at Northeastern University's Henderson House in Weston, Mass., to spend 4 days in concentrated efforts to unravel the complexities of cusp/cleft theory and observations.Plans for the National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop were formulated at the previous GEM workshop convened by Ted Rosenberg at the University of Maryland in October 1989, where participants agreed that the first task of the first GEM campaign—attacking problems of the magnetopause, boundary layers, and their signatures in the ionosphere—should be the identification of cusp signatures in ground-based and airborne data by intercalibrating with spacecraft data on direct overflights.

  1. GAS eleven node thermal model (GEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    1988-01-01

    The Eleven Node Thermal Model (GEM) of the Get Away Special (GAS) container was originally developed based on the results of thermal tests of the GAS container. The model was then used in the thermal analysis and design of several NASA/GSFC GAS experiments, including the Flight Verification Payload, the Ultraviolet Experiment, and the Capillary Pumped Loop. The model description details the five cu ft container both with and without an insulated end cap. Mass specific heat values are also given so that transient analyses can be performed. A sample problem for each configuration is included as well so that GEM users can verify their computations. The model can be run on most personal computers with a thermal analyzer solution routine.

  2. X-Ray Polarimetry with GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The polarization properties of cosmic X-ray sources are still largely unexplored. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) will carry out the first sensitive X-ray polarization survey of a wide range of sources including; accreting compact objects (black holes and neutron stars), AGN, supernova remnants, magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect to achieve high polarization sensitivity in the 2 - 10 keV band. I will provide an update of the project status, illustrate the expected performance with several science examples, and provide a brief overview of the data analysis challenges

  3. Gallium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thrustor Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design of a new type of two-stage pulsed electromagnetic accelerator, the gallium electromagnetic (GEM) thruster. A schematic illustration of the GEM thruster concept is given in Fig. 1. In this concept, liquid gallium propellant is pumped into the first stage through a porous metal electrode using an electromagneticpump[l]. At a designated time, a pulsed discharge (approx.10-50 J) is initiated in the first stage, ablating the liquid gallium from the porous electrode surface and ejecting a dense thermal gallium plasma into the second state. The presence of the gallium plasma in the second stage serves to trigger the high-energy (approx.500 I), send-stage puke which provides the primary electromagnetic (j x B) acceleration.

  4. Galium Electromagnetic (GEM) Thruster Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design of a new type of two-stage pulsed electromagnetic accelerator, the gallium electromagnetic (GEM) thruster. A schematic illustration of the GEM thruster concept is given. In this concept, liquid gallium propellant is pumped into the first stage through a porous metal electrode using an electromagnetic pump. At a designated time, a pulsed discharge (approx. 10-50 J) is initiated in the first stage, ablating the liquid gallium from the porous electrode surface and ejecting a dense thermal gallium plasma into the second state. The presence of the gallium plasma in the second stage serves to trigger the high-energy (approx. 500 J), second-stage pulse which provides the primary electromagnetic (j x B) acceleration.

  5. Nebraska NativeGEM (Geospatial Extension Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent

    2004-01-01

    This proposal, Nebraska NativeGEM (Geospatial Extension Model) features a unique diversity component stemming from the exceptional reputation NNSGC has built by delivering geospatial science experiences to Nebraska s Native Americans. For 7 years, NNSGC has partner4 with the 2 tribal colleges and 4 reservation school districts in Nebraska to form the Nebraska Native American Outreach Program (NNAOP), a partnership among tribal community leaders, academia, tribal schools, and industry reaching close to 1,OOO Native American youth, over 1,200 community members (Lehrer & Zendajas, 2001).NativeGEM addresses all three key components of Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) goals for advancing decision support, education, and workforce development through the GES. The existing long term commitments that the NNSGC and the GES have in these areas allow for the pursuit of a broad range of activities. NativeGEM builds upon these existing successful programs and collaborations. Outcomes and metrics for each proposed project are detailed in the Approach section of this document.

  6. FSelector: a Ruby gem for feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The FSelector package contains a comprehensive list of feature selection algorithms for supporting bioinformatics and machine learning research. FSelector primarily collects and implements the filter type of feature selection techniques, which are computationally efficient for mining large datasets. In particular, FSelector allows ensemble feature selection that takes advantage of multiple feature selection algorithms to yield more robust results. FSelector also provides many useful auxiliary tools, including normalization, discretization and missing data imputation. Availability: FSelector, written in the Ruby programming language, is free and open-source software that runs on all Ruby supporting platforms, including Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. FSelector is available from https://rubygems.org/gems/fselector and can be installed like a breeze via the command gem install fselector. The source code is available (https://github.com/need47/fselector) and is fully documented (http://rubydoc.info/gems/fselector/frames). Contact: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov or bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22942017

  7. Comparative verification between GEM model and official aviation terminal forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    The Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM) model uses the local standard airways observation (SAO) to predict hour-by-hour the following elements: temperature, pressure, dew point depression, first and second cloud-layer height and amount, ceiling, total cloud amount, visibility, wind, and present weather conditions. GEM is superior to persistence at all projections for all elements in a large independent sample. A minute-by-minute GEM forecasting system utilizing the Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) is under development.

  8. Optical and electrical performance of commercially manufactured large GEM foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posik, M.; Surrow, B.

    2015-12-01

    With interest in large area GEM foils increasing and CERN being the only main distributor, keeping up with the demand for GEM foils will be difficult. Thus the commercialization of GEMs is being established by Tech-Etch of Plymouth, MA, USA using single-mask techniques. We report here on the first of a two step quality verification of the commercially produced 10×10 cm2 and 40×40 cm2 GEM foils, which includes characterizing their electrical and geometrical properties. We have found that the Tech-Etch foils display excellent electrical properties, as well as uniform and consistent hole diameters comparable to established foils produced by CERN.

  9. GEM Building Taxonomy (Version 2.0)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brzev, S.; Scawthorn, C.; Charleson, A.W.; Allen, L.; Greene, M.; Jaiswal, Kishor; Silva, V.

    2013-01-01

    /7/8/IRRE9/10/RSH3+RWO211/FW12/13/ which can be read as (1) Direction = [DX or DY] (the building has the same lateral load-resisting system in both directions); (2) Material = [Unreinforced Masonry + solid fired clay bricks + cement: lime mortar]; (3) Lateral Load-Resisting System = [Wall]; (4) Date of construction = [pre-1939]; (5) Heaight = [exactly 2 storeys]; (6) Occupancy = [residential, unknown type]; (7) Building Position = [unknown = no entry]; (8) Shape of building plan = [unknown = no entry]; (9) Structural irregularity = [regular]; (10) Exterior walls = [unknown = no entry]; (11) Roof = [Shape: pitched and hipped, Roof covering: clay tiles, Roof system material: wood, Roof system type: wood trusses]; (12) Floor = [Floor system: Wood, unknown]; (13) Foundation = [unknown = no entry]. Mapping of GEM Building Taxonomy to selected taxonomies is included in the report -- for example, the above building would be referenced by previous structural taxonomies as: PAGER-STR as UFB or UFB4, by the World Housing Encyclopedia as 7 or 8 and by the European Macroseismic Scale (98) as M5. The Building Taxonomy data model is highly flexible and has been incorporated within a relational database architecture. Due to its ability to represent building typologies using a shorthand form, it is also possible to use the taxonomy for non-database applications, and we discuss possible application of adaptation for Building Information Modelling (BIM) systems, and for the insurance industry. The GEM Building Taxonomy was independently evaluated and tested by the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI), which received 217 TaxT reports from 49 countries, representing a wide range of building typologies, including single and multi-storey buildings, reinforced and unreinforced masonry, confined masonry, concrete, steel, wood, and earthern buildings used for residential, commercial, industrial, and educational occupancy. Based on these submissions and other feedback, the EERI

  10. GEMS at the galactic cosmic-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A. J.; Davis, A. M.; Levine, J.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.

    2007-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays probably predominantly originate from shock-accelerated gas and dust in superbubbles. It is usually assumed that the shock-accelerated dust is quickly destroyed by sputtering. However, it may be that some of the dust can survive bombardment by the high-metallicity gas in the superbubble interior, and that some of that dust has been incorporated into solar system materials. Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain enigmatic submicron components called GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides). These GEMS have properties that closely match those expected of a population of surviving shock-accelerated dust at the GCR source (Westphal and Bradley in Astrophys. J. 617:1131, 2004). In order to test the hypothesis that GEMS are synthesized from shock-accelerated dust in superbubbles, we plan to measure the relative abundances of Fe, Zr, and Mo isotopes in GEMS using the new Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer at Argonne National Laboratory. If GEMS are synthesized from shock-accelerated dust in superbubbles, they should exhibit isotopic anomalies in Fe, Zr and Mo: specificially, enhancements in the r-only isotopes {sup 96}Zr and {sup 100}Mo, and separately in {sup 58}Fe, should be observed. We review also recent developments in observations of GEMS, laboratory synthesis of GEMS-like materials, and implications of observations of GEMS-like materials in Stardust samples.

  11. PROGRAM COORDINATION FOR THE GULF ECOLOGICAL MANAGMENT SITES (GEMS) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf Ecological Management Site (GEMS) Program is an initiative of the Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) and the five Gulf of Mexico states. It provides a regional framework for focusing attention on ecologically important Gulf habitats. The GEMS Program coordinates and utilizes ...

  12. The Grief Evaluation Measure (GEM): An Initial Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, John R.; Baker, John; Matteis, Margherite; Rosenthal, Saul; Ware, Eugenia S.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Grief Evaluation Measure (GEM), a new instrument designed to screen for the development of a complicated mourning response in a bereaved adult. The GEM provides a quantitative and qualitative assessment of risk factors, including the mourner's loss and medical history, coping resources before and after…

  13. Network Information Discovery and Retrieval of Educational Materials: GEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Stuart A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the GEM (Gateway to Educational Materials) project that was developed to provide retrieval of lesson plans and teacher guides on the Internet . Discusses the development of a metadata set for controlled description based on the Dublin Core, distributing GEM metadata on the World Wide Web, and future…

  14. Guidance Exploration Model (GEM) 1978-79. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, M. Candice, Comp.

    The original program goal for development was to provide implementation of a Guidance Exploratory Model (GEM) at the elementary level which combines career education, guidance, exploration and academics. During the planning stages of GEM, monies were received from Title IV-B to purchase books and audio-visual materials to initiate the concept…

  15. The Ozone Layer. UNEP/GEMS Environment Library No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya).

    Since the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) was created, more than a dozen years ago, public understanding of the environmental issues confronting our planet has increased enormously. The Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) has provided several environmental assessments. The aim of the UNEP/GEMS Environment Library is to provide…

  16. Diffraction measurements with a boron-based GEM neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, Gabriele; Albani, Giorgia; Cazzaniga, Carlo; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Schooneveld, Erik; Claps, Gerardo; Cremona, Anna; Grosso, Giovanni; Muraro, Andrea; Murtas, Fabrizio; Rebai, Marica; Scherillo, Antonella; Tardocchi, Marco; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The research of reliable substitutes of 3He detectors is an important task for the affordability of new neutron scattering instrumentation for future spallation sources like the European Spallation Source. GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier)-based detectors represent a valid alternative since they can combine high-rate capability, coverage of up to 1\\ \\text{m}^{2} area and good intrinsic spatial resolution (for this detector class it can be better than 0.5 mm). The first neutron diffraction measurements performed using a borated GEM detector are reported. The detector has an active area of 10 \\times 5\\ \\text{cm}^{2} and is equipped with a borated cathode. The GEM detector was read out using the standard ISIS Data Acquisition System. The comparison with measurements performed with standard 3He detectors shows that the broadening of the peaks measured on the diffractogram obtained with the GEM is 20-30% wider than the one obtained by 3He tubes but the active area of the GEM is twice that of 3He tubes. The GEM resolution is improved if half of its active area is considered. The signal-to-background ratio of the GEM is about 1.5 to 2 times lower than that of 3He. This measurement proves that GEM detectors can be used for neutron diffraction measurements and paves the way for their use at future neutron spallation sources.

  17. MIT-CSR XIS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report outlines the proposers' progress toward MIT's contribution to the X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) experiment on the Japanese ASTRO-E mission. The report discusses electrical system design, mechanical system design, and ground support equipment.

  18. GEMS X-ray Polarimeter Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Strohmayer, Tod; Kallman, Tim; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) is an X-ray polarization telescope selected as a NASA small explorer satellite mission. The X-ray Polarimeter on GEMS uses a Time Projection Chamber gas proportional counter to measure the polarization of astrophysical X-rays in the 2-10 keV band by sensing the direction of the track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray. We have simulated the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter to polarized X-rays. We use the simulation package Penelope to model the physics of the interaction of the initial photoelectron with the detector gas and to determine the distribution of charge deposited in the detector volume. We then model the charge diffusion in the detector,and produce simulated track images. Within the track reconstruction algorithm we apply cuts on the track shape and focus on the initial photoelectron direction in order to maximize the overall sensitivity of the instrument, using this technique we have predicted instrument modulation factors nu(sub 100) for 100% polarized X-rays ranging from 10% to over 60% across the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We also discuss the simulation program used to develop and model some of the algorithms used for triggering, and energy measurement of events in the polarimeter.

  19. Extending the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Instrumental Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Engdhal, Bob; Storchak, Dmitry; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harris, James

    2015-04-01

    After a 27-month project funded by the GEM Foundation (www.globalquakemodel.org), in January 2013 we released the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900 2009) (www.isc.ac.uk/iscgem/index.php) as a special product to use for seismic hazard studies. The new catalogue was necessary as improved seismic hazard studies necessitate that earthquake catalogues are homogeneous (to the largest extent possible) over time in their fundamental parameters, such as location and magnitude. Due to time and resource limitation, the ISC-GEM catalogue (1900-2009) included earthquakes selected according to the following time-variable cut-off magnitudes: Ms=7.5 for earthquakes occurring before 1918; Ms=6.25 between 1918 and 1963; and Ms=5.5 from 1964 onwards. Because of the importance of having a reliable seismic input for seismic hazard studies, funding from GEM and two commercial companies in the US and UK allowed us to start working on the extension of the ISC-GEM catalogue both for earthquakes that occurred beyond 2009 and for earthquakes listed in the International Seismological Summary (ISS) which fell below the cut-off magnitude of 6.25. This extension is part of a four-year program that aims at including in the ISC-GEM catalogue large global earthquakes that occurred before the beginning of the ISC Bulletin in 1964. In this contribution we present the updated ISC GEM catalogue, which will include over 1000 more earthquakes that occurred in 2010 2011 and several hundreds more between 1950 and 1959. The catalogue extension between 1935 and 1949 is currently underway. The extension of the ISC-GEM catalogue will also be helpful for regional cross border seismic hazard studies as the ISC-GEM catalogue should be used as basis for cross-checking the consistency in location and magnitude of those earthquakes listed both in the ISC GEM global catalogue and regional catalogues.

  20. The gated electrostatic mass spectrometer (GEMS): definition and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Federico A; Jones, Hollis H; Lee, Jeffrey G

    2008-10-01

    GEMS is a new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electrostatic energy analyzer. Mass resolution equals the energy analyzer kinetic energy resolution, which is set by its slit size. In GEMS, monochromatic ions enter the entrance slit at random times, and the gated ion deflection produced by the electrostatic field in the analyzer rejects ions that are inside the analyzer at gate onset, detecting those entering the analyzer after gate onset. This provides mass separation while overcoming the temporal and spatial spread problems typical of TOF applications. Paradoxically, GEMS works because all ion masses follow identical trajectories. GEMS is easily multiplied into two-dimensional arrays to increase sensitivity in space applications, requires relatively low voltages, and uses only a few electrical connections. Thus, it is easy to package GEMS as a small, low-power instrument for applications in harsh environments. A disadvantage of GEMS is that its output is the integral of the TOF spectrum and the derivative of the raw data must be taken, a procedure that is likely to add noise. A version of GEMS detecting un-deflected ions (u-GEMS) has been tested to demonstrate the time-integrated feature of the raw data but without the benefit of energy analysis. This paper describes GEMS implemented with the small deflection energy analyzer (SDEA), a compact version of the parallel plate energy analyzer. SDEA is described both analytically and with ion trajectory simulations using the ion trajectory simulation software SIMION; the results are then used to describe GEMS and compute its performance. PMID:18718764

  1. MIT research in telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    Ongoing MIT research in telerobotics (vehicles capable of some autonomous sensing and manipulating, having some remote supervisory control by people) and teleoperation (vehicles for sensing and manipulating which are fully controlled remotely by people) is discussed. The current efforts mix human and artificial intelligence/control. The idea of adjustable impedance at either end of pure master-slave teleoperation, and simultaneous coordinated control of teleoperator/telerobotic systems which have more than six degrees of freedom (e.g., a combined vehicle and arm, each with five or six DOF) are discussed. A new cable-controlled parallel link arm which offers many advantages over conventional arms for space is briefly described. Predictor displays to compensate for time delay in teleoperator loops, the use of state estimation to help human control decisions in space, and ongoing research in supervisory command language are covered. Finally, efforts to build a human flyable real-time dynamic computer-graphic telerobot simulator are described. These projects represent most, but not all, of the telerobotics research in our laboratory, supported by JPL, NASA Ames and NOAA.

  2. Heavy metals in Ratnapura alluvial gem sediments, Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vithanage, M. S.; Hettiarachchi, J. K.; Rajapaksha, A. U.; Wijesekara, H.; Hewawasam, T.

    2011-12-01

    The valuable gems in Sri Lanka are found from the sedimentary gem deposits in Ratnapura District, which are found as alluvial deposits some are about >50 m deep. Gem bearing gravel layer is taken out from the mine, washed by panning to recover the gem minerals in the heavy mineral fraction, is a common practice in the gem mining area. Gem bearing sediment layer is associated with different heavy minerals in which different trace metals as Co, Cr, Cu, Al, Zr, Pb and As also can be present. During panning, the sediment is washed away and the heavy metals attached to the sediments are released into the environment. Hence we studied the lability and bioavailability of arsenic and other heavy metals from the gem sediments. Sediment samples were collected from 15 small scale gem mines (3 soil layers- top, gem mineral layer and layer below gem bearing gravel layer), air dried and sieved to obtain <63μm fraction. Bioavailable, exchangeable and residual fractions were 0.01M CaCl2, 1M NaOAc, pH 8.2 and microwave digestion using HF, HNO3 and HClO4. Filtered samples were analyzed for As, Co, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Pb and Fe using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GBC 933AA). Total digestion results in different layers indicated that heavy metals show an increasing pattern with depth. About 4 gem bearing gravel layers were consist of high concentrations of Ni (>150 mg/kg), Cu (>150 mg/kg), Pb (>400 mg/kg), Zn (>600 mg/kg) and Co ions (>100 mg/kg). Arsenite in the gem sediments were low and recorded as <5mg/kg. Total arsenic analysis is under investigation. Highest concentrations for bioavailable and exchangeable (leach to water) metals were Fe>Co>Zn>Mn>Ni>Cu>Pb. Sediments from few gem pits showed considerably high concentrations of metals analyzed. In some places Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn reported high in bioavailable fractions 70, 25, 20, 10 mg/kg respectively. Mobilization of these metals may increase due to changes in the pH and the presence of other ions in the environment. High

  3. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, ED; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  4. GEM-based detectors for thermal and fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Foggetta, L.; Muraro, A.; Valente, P.

    2015-06-01

    Lately the problem of 3He replacement for neutron detection stimulated an intense activity research on alternative technologies based on alternative neutron converters. This paper presents briefly the results obtained with new GEM detectors optimized for fast and thermal neutrons. For thermal neutrons, we realized a side-on GEM detector based on a series of boron-coated alumina sheets placed perpendicularly to the incident neutron beam direction. This prototype has been tested at n@BTF photo-production neutron facilty in order to test its effectiveness under a very high flux gamma background. For fast neutrons, we developed new GEM detectors (called nGEM) for the CNESM diagnostic system of the SPIDER NBI prototype for ITER (RFX-Consortium, Italy) and as beam monitor for fast neutrons lines at spallation sources. The nGEM is a Triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with a polyethylene layer used to convert fast neutrons into recoil protons through the elastic scattering process. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a medium size (30 × 25 cm2 active area) nGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beam line.

  5. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  6. Method and apparatus for detecting gem-polyhalogenated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, deceased, William G.; Anderson, legal representative, Johanna S.

    1990-01-01

    A method and optrode for detecting gem polyhalogenated hydrocarbons in a sample fluid based on a single phase Fujiwara reaction as provided. The method comprises contacting a reaction mixture with a sample fluid which contains the gem-polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. The reaction mixture comprises an aqueous solution of pyridine or derivative thereof and a hindered nitrogen base. Upon contact a fluorescent and/or chromgenic reaction product forms whose fluorescence and/or absorbance is related to the concentration of gem-polyhalogenated hydrocarbons in the sample fluid.

  7. Image examination of comet Hale-Bopp and α Gem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusha; Zhang, Bairong; Wang, Feng

    A new Astronomy Video Image Acquisition System (AVIAS) is used in the image processing of comet Hale-Bopp and α Gem which were recorded by a video camera (Panasonic-NV-S880EN) on May 1, 1997. It is shown that the details of multi-integration images for comet Hale-Bopp and α Gem are more distinct than that of single image. The faint star near α Gem cannot be found in the single frame image but can be recognized in the multi-integration image.

  8. The GEM (Gravity-Electro-Magnetism) Theory of Field Unification and its Application to Human Flight and Gravity Wave Production and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2005-02-01

    Theoretical progress on the GEM (Gravity-Electro-Magnetism) unification theory is summarized as applied to human flight and dynamically modified gravity fields and waves, as well as progress towards a GEMS (GEMStrong) theory. The GEM theory in the static Newtonian limit is the portion of the Kaluza-Klein action that is quadratic in first derivatives of the metric and in Poynting Flux that appears in the form of a VBE ("Vacuum Bernoulli Equation"). This shows Gravitational energy density to be equated to an EM dynamic pressure that is quadratic in the local Poynting Flux: g2/(2π G) + S2/(c2 L)= Constant, where g and S are the local gravity and Poynting vector magnitudes, respectively, and where L is the Lagrangian density of the vacuum EM field. The VBE can be used to understand anomalous weight loss reported in gyroscope experiments and to understand possible gravity modification for human flight. The GEM gravity modification theory is extended to predict a VHE (Vacuum Hall Effect). Methods for creating dynamic gravity fields via VHE for production and detection of high frequency gravity fields involve electric quadrapole fields normal to static magnetic fields. In terms of fundamental GEM theory, the important value of the proton to electron mass ratio Rm =1836 in the theory is linked, via the MIT Bag Model, to the value of the reciprocal fine structure constant: Rm=αs/α where αs =13.34 is the asymptotic Strong Force coupling constant. An experiment was performed using this theory that validated the anomalous gyroscope effects predicted by Kosyrev and others, that rotating EM fields appear to create lifting forces. The theory appears to offer insights into enhanced forms of propellant-less propulsion.

  9. Gem and Mineral Shows as Geologic Teaching Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordua, William Sinclair

    1988-01-01

    Gem and mineral shows are excellent nontraditional opportunities for community education and outreach by geology teachers. Discusses initial club contacts, displays, shows, and the advantages of show participation to academic geologists. (CW)

  10. A gravity model for crustal dynamics (GEM-L2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.; Wagner, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Laser Geodynamics Satellite (Lageos) was the first NASA satellite which was placed into orbit exclusively for laser ranging applications. Lageos was designed to permit extremely accurate measurements of the earth's rotation and the movement of the tectonic plates. The Goddard earth model, GEM-L2, was derived mainly on the basis of the precise laser ranging data taken on many satellites. Douglas et al. (1984) have demonstrated the utility of GEM-L2 in detecting the broadest ocean circulations. As Lageos data constitute the most extensive set of satellite laser observations ever collected, the incorporation of 2-1/2 years of these data into the Goddard earth models (GEM) has substantially advanced the geodynamical objectives. The present paper discusses the products of the GEM-L2 solution.

  11. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  12. Measurement Of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seongtae; Baldelomar, Edwin; Sosebee, Mark; White, Andy; Yu, Jaehoon; Park, Kwangjune

    2011-06-01

    The High Energy Physics group of the University of Texas at Arlington has been developing gas electron multiplier detectors to use them as sensitive gap detectors in digital hadron calorimeters for the International Linear Collider, a future high energy particle accelerator. For this purpose, we constructed numerous GEM detectors that employ double GEM layers. In this study, two kinds of prototype GEM detectors were tested; one with 28x28 cm{sup 2} active area double GEM structure with a 3 mm drift gap, a 1 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap and the other with two 3x3 cm{sup 2} GEM foils in the amplifier stage with a 5 mm drift gap, a 2 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap. The detectors' characteristics from exposure to high-energy charged particles and other radiations were measured using cosmic rays and {sup 55}Fe radioactive source. From the {sup 55}Fe tests, we observed two well separated characteristic X-ray emission peaks and confirmed the detectors' functionality. We also measured chamber gains to be over 6000 at a high voltage of 395 V across each GEM electrode. The responses to cosmic rays show the spectra that fit well to Landau distributions as expected from minimum ionizing particles.

  13. GEMS Revealed: Spectrum Imaging of Aggregate Grains in Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Christoffersen, R.

    2005-01-01

    Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) of cometary origin contain abundant materials that formed in the early solar nebula. These materials were transported outward and subsequently mixed with molecular cloud materials and presolar grains in the region where comets accreted [1]. GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of these primitive anhydrous IDPs, along with crystalline Mg-rich silicates, Fe-Ni sulfides, carbonaceous material, and other trace phases. Some GEMS grains (5%) are demonstrably presolar based on their oxygen isotopic compositions [2]. However, most GEMS grains are isotopically solar and have bulk chemical compositions that are incompatible with inferred compositions of interstellar dust, suggesting a solar system origin [3]. An alternative hypothesis is that GEMS grains represent highly irradiated interstellar grains whose oxygen isotopic compositions were homogenized through processing in the interstellar medium (ISM) [4]. We have obtained the first quantitative X-ray maps (spectrum images) showing the distribution of major and minor elements in individual GEMS grains. Nanometer-scale chemical maps provide critical data required to evaluate the differing models regarding the origin of GEMS grains.

  14. SSC analysis of the GEMs for reactivity control in PRISM

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Rodnizki, J.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of three Gas Expansion Modules (GEMS) utilized the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept, PRISM, was analyzed using the computer code, SSC. GE has submitted the PRISM design for a Preapplication Safety Evaluation Report (PSER). The draft PSER indicated a potential weakness in the Unscrammed Loss of Flow (ULOF) event, and GE modified the design by adding three GEMs. The PRISM design was analyzed by SSC for two cases. First, the design's original response to a ULOF where one Electro Magnetic (EM) pump fails to produce a coastdown was analyzed. Then the revised design with the GEMs included was analyzed. The original design had little or no safety margin for this case. The peak fuel temperature in the hot channel was predicted to be 1358K, which is above the solidus temperature of the fuel. However, after the GEMs were added, the loss of one EM pump coastdown became a benign event. The GEM feedback was predicted by SSC to dominate the other reactivity feedbacks and the GEMS, essentially, responded like passive control rods. The fuel temperature quickly dropped below operating temperatures, while the margin to sodium boiling was predicted to be greater than 350K.

  15. SSC analysis of the GEMs for reactivity control in PRISM

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Rodnizki, J.

    1992-12-31

    The performance of three Gas Expansion Modules (GEMS) utilized the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept, PRISM, was analyzed using the computer code, SSC. GE has submitted the PRISM design for a Preapplication Safety Evaluation Report (PSER). The draft PSER indicated a potential weakness in the Unscrammed Loss of Flow (ULOF) event, and GE modified the design by adding three GEMs. The PRISM design was analyzed by SSC for two cases. First, the design`s original response to a ULOF where one Electro Magnetic (EM) pump fails to produce a coastdown was analyzed. Then the revised design with the GEMs included was analyzed. The original design had little or no safety margin for this case. The peak fuel temperature in the hot channel was predicted to be 1358K, which is above the solidus temperature of the fuel. However, after the GEMs were added, the loss of one EM pump coastdown became a benign event. The GEM feedback was predicted by SSC to dominate the other reactivity feedbacks and the GEMS, essentially, responded like passive control rods. The fuel temperature quickly dropped below operating temperatures, while the margin to sodium boiling was predicted to be greater than 350K.

  16. GEM Detectors for Muon Tomography of Nuclear Contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, Amilkar; Gnanvo, Kondo; Grasso, Leonard; Locke, Judson; Mitra, Debasis; Hohlmann, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The construction of a Muon Tomography station is presented. Muon Tomography (MT), based on scattering of cosmic ray muons, is an improvement to actual portal monitors at borders, since the current techniques use regular radiation detection that are not very sensitive to nuclear contraband (U, Pu), if these materials are well shielded to absorb emanating radiation. We use a low mass, high spatial resolution (˜50 μm) Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for MT to overcome the intrinsic limitations. The prototype MT station employs 6 tracking stations based on 33cm x 33cm triple-GEM detectors with 2D readout. The detectors are arranged into tracking superlayers at the top and bottom of the probed volume. Due to the excellent spatial resolution of GEM, it is sufficient to use few cm gap between tracking stations. We present details of the production and assembly of the GEM-based tracking stations in collaboration with CERN-GDD lab and RD51 experiment as well as the design of the corresponding front-end electronics and readout system. Discussion about GEM detectors in two sides of the probed volume for a complete muon tracking, and large-area (1m x 1m) GEM-based MT station prototype to be tested under realistic conditions, are made. )

  17. Measurement Of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongtae; Baldelomar, Edwin; Park, Kwangjune; Sosebee, Mark; White, Andy; Yu, Jaehoon

    2011-06-01

    The High Energy Physics group of the University of Texas at Arlington has been developing gas electron multiplier detectors to use them as sensitive gap detectors in digital hadron calorimeters for the International Linear Collider, a future high energy particle accelerator. For this purpose, we constructed numerous GEM detectors that employ double GEM layers. In this study, two kinds of prototype GEM detectors were tested; one with 28×28 cm2 active area double GEM structure with a 3 mm drift gap, a 1 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap and the other with two 3×3 cm2 GEM foils in the amplifier stage with a 5 mm drift gap, a 2 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap. The detectors' characteristics from exposure to high-energy charged particles and other radiations were measured using cosmic rays and 55Fe radioactive source. From the 55Fe tests, we observed two well separated characteristic X-ray emission peaks and confirmed the detectors' functionality. We also measured chamber gains to be over 6000 at a high voltage of 395 V across each GEM electrode. The responses to cosmic rays show the spectra that fit well to Landau distributions as expected from minimum ionizing particles.

  18. Using GEM-encoded guidelines to generate medical logic modules.

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, A.; Shiffman, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Among the most effective strategies for changing the process and outcomes of clinical care are those that make use of computer-mediated decision support. A variety of representation models that facilitate computer-based implementation of medical knowledge have been published, including the Guideline Elements Model (GEM) and the Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). We describe an XML-based application that facilitates automated generation of partially populated MLMs from GEM-encoded guidelines. These MLMs can be further edited and shared among Arden-compliant information systems to provide decision support. Our work required three steps: (a) Knowledge extraction from published guideline documents using GEM, (b) Mapping GEM elements to the MLM slots, and (c) XSL transformation of the GEM-encoded guideline. Processing of a sample guideline generated 15 MLMs, each corresponding to a conditional or imperative element in the GEM structure. Mechanisms for linking various MLMs are necessary to represent the complexity of logic typical of a guideline. PMID:11825147

  19. 3D Observation of GEMS by Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, Junya; Miyake, Akira; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Messenger, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silicates in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) coming from comets are dominated by glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS). GEMS grains are submicron-sized rounded objects (typically 100-500) nm in diameter) with anaometer-sized (10-50 nm) Fe-Ni metal and sulfide grains embedded in an amorphous silicate matrix. Several formation processes for GEMS grains have been proposed so far, but these models are still being debated [2-5]. Bradley et al. proposed that GEMS grains are interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk and that they are amorphiation products of crystalline silicates in the interstellar medium by sputter-deposition of cosmic ray irradiation, similar to space weathering [2,4]. This consideration is based on the observation of nano-sized crystals (approximately 10 nm) called relict grains in GEMS grains and their shapes are pseudomorphs to the host GEMS grains. On the other hand, Keller and Messenger proposed that most GEMS formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas [3,5]. This model is based on the fact that most GEMS grains have solar isotopic compositions and have extremely heterogeneous and non-solar elemental compositions. Keller and Messenger (2011) also reported that amorphous silicates in GEMS grains are surrounded by sulfide grains, which formed as sulfidization of metallic iron grains located on the GEMS surface. The previous studies were performed with 2D observation by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). In order to understand the structure of GEMS grains described above more clearly, we observed 3D structure of GEMS grains by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL) at Kyoto University. Electron tomography gives not only 3D structures but also gives higher spatial resolution (approximately a few nm) than that in conventional 2D image, which is restricted by

  20. MIT January Operational Internship Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosanac, Natasha; DeVivero, Charlie; James, Jillian; Perez-Martinez, Carla; Pino, Wendy; Wang, Andrew; Willett, Ezekiel; Williams, Kwami

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the MIT January Operational Internship Experience (JOIE) program. The topics include: 1) Landing and Recovery; 2) Transportation; 3) Shuttle Processing; 4) Constellation Processing; 5) External Tank; 6) Launch Pad; 7) Ground Operations; 8) Hypergolic Propellants; 9) Environmental; 10) Logistics; 11) Six Sigma; 12) Systems Engineering; and 13) Human Factors.

  1. Forward GEM Tracker (FGT) at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2012-10-01

    As part of our program to understand the internal structure of the proton, we have and will continue mid-rapidity (-1<η<1) W and di-jet measurements in p+p collisions at √s = 500GeV. The ongoing STAR W program is exploring the longitudinal spin contribution of anti-u and anti-d quarks to the proton spin. The gluon spin contribution can be probed through di-jet measurements. The Forward GEM Tracker (FGT) at STAR will enhance the charged sign separation for high pT tracks in the pseudo-rapidity range of 1.0<η<2.0, and therefore allows an extension of W and di-jet measurements at forward pseudo-rapidity. We will present the status of the FGT assembly and completion along with projections for future W and di-jet measurements. We will discuss studies that explore the possibilities of using the FGT to reconstruct jets in the forward direction.

  2. Embedded controller for GEM detector readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabołotny, Wojciech M.; Byszuk, Adrian; Chernyshova, Maryna; Cieszewski, Radosław; Czarski, Tomasz; Dominik, Wojciech; Jakubowska, Katarzyna L.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Poźniak, Krzysztof; Rzadkiewicz, Jacek; Scholz, Marek

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the embedded controller used for the multichannel readout system for the GEM detector. The controller is based on the embedded Mini ITX mainboard, running the GNU/Linux operating system. The controller offers two interfaces to communicate with the FPGA based readout system. FPGA configuration and diagnostics is controlled via low speed USB based interface, while high-speed setup of the readout parameters and reception of the measured data is handled by the PCI Express (PCIe) interface. Hardware access is synchronized by the dedicated server written in C. Multiple clients may connect to this server via TCP/IP network, and different priority is assigned to individual clients. Specialized protocols have been implemented both for low level access on register level and for high level access with transfer of structured data with "msgpack" protocol. High level functionalities have been split between multiple TCP/IP servers for parallel operation. Status of the system may be checked, and basic maintenance may be performed via web interface, while the expert access is possible via SSH server. System was designed with reliability and flexibility in mind.

  3. GEMS: The destiny of Blue Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häußler, Boris; Bell, Eric F.; Barden, Marco; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Borch, Andrea; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Heymans, Catherine; Jahnke, Knud; Jogee, Shardha; Koposov, Sergey E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Peng, Chien Y.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Wolf, Christian

    2007-05-01

    One of the key predictions of hierarchical galaxy formation models is that a significant fraction of elliptical galaxies form in late merging events. One of the most important observations of such an assembly is the existence of blue spheroidal galaxies, which have spheroid-dominated morphologies and blue colors indicating recent star formation, as an intermediate step in the evolution of elliptical galaxies. We present results from the GEMS survey showing the properties of these galaxies derived from 2-D galaxy fitting of the ˜8000 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the 28'x28' HST mosaic. For the first time we were able to divide the observed population of blue elliptical galaxies into sub-populations of different stellar masses. We found that massive blue ellipticals are likely to be the progenitors of red elliptical galaxies while low-mass blue ellipticals have half-light radii considerably in excess of those measured for low-mass present day elliptical galaxies and instead have larger sizes similar to present-day disk-dominated systems with substantial bulges (see Figure)

  4. Correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 and estimated mercury emissions in China, South Asia, Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia derived from observations in northwest and southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X. W.; Zhang, H.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.; Zhou, L. X.; Fang, S. X.

    2014-09-01

    Correlation analysis between atmospheric mercury (Hg) and other trace gases are useful for identification of sources and constraining regional estimated Hg emissions. Emissions of Hg in Asia contribute significantly to the global budget of atmospheric Hg. However, due to the lack of reliable data on the source strength, large uncertainties remain in the emission inventories of Hg in Asia. In the present study, we calculated the correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 for mainland China, South Asia, Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia using the ground-based observations at three remote sites in northwest and southwest China, and applied the values to estimate GEM emissions in the four source regions. The geometric mean of the GEM / CO correlation slopes for mainland China, South Asia, Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia were 7.3 ± 4.3, 7.8 ± 6.4, 7.8 ± 5.0, and 13.4 ± 9.5 pg m-3 ppb-1, respectively. The values in the same source regions were 240 ± 119, 278 ± 164, 315 ± 289 pg m-3 ppm-1 for the GEM / CO2 correlation slopes; and 33.3 ± 30.4, 27.4 ± 31.0, 23.5 ± 15.3, and 20.5 ± 10.0 pg m-3 ppb-1 for the GEM / CH4 correlation slopes, respectively. These values were the first reported correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 in four important source regions of Asia except the GEM / CO ratios in mainland China. The correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2 and GEM / CH4 in Asia were relatively higher than those observed in Europe, North America and South Africa, which may highlight GEM emissions from non-ferrous smelting, mercury mining, natural sources and historical deposited mercury (re-emission) in Asia. Using the observed GEM / CO and GEM / CO2 slopes, and the recently reported emission inventories of CO and CO2, the annual GEM emissions in mainland China, South Asia, Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia were estimated to be in the ranges of 1071-1187 t, 340-470 t, 125 t, and 54-90 t, respectively. The estimate

  5. Innovative genomic collaboration using the GENESIS (GEM.app) platform.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Michael; Falk, Marni J; Gai, Xiaowu; Postrel, Richard; Schüle, Rebecca; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing has led to an unparalleled pace of Mendelian disease gene discovery in recent years. To address the challenges of analysis and sharing of large datasets, we had previously introduced the collaborative web-based GEM.app software [Gonzalez et al., ]. Here, we are presenting the results of using GEM.app over nearly 3 years and introducing the next generation of this platform. First, GEM.app has been renamed to GENESIS since it is now part of "The Genesis Project" (501c3), a not-for-profit foundation that is committed to providing the best technology to enable research scientists and to connecting patients and clinicians to genomic information. Second, GENESIS (GEM.app) has grown to nearly 600 registered users from 44 countries, who have collectively achieved 62 gene identifications or published studies that have expanded phenotype/genotype correlations. Our concept of user-driven data sharing and matchmaking is now the main cause for gene discoveries within GENESIS. In many of these findings, researchers from across the globe have been connected, which gave rise to the genetic evidence needed to successfully pinpoint-specific gene mutations that explained patients' disease. Here, we present an overview of the various novel insights that have been made possible through the data-sharing capabilities of GENESIS/GEM.app. PMID:26173844

  6. Continuous health monitoring of graphite epoxy motorcases (GEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Richard D.; Luzio, Marco A.; Miller, Ronnie K.; Pollock, Adrian A.

    2003-08-01

    With the increasing use of advanced composite materials in aircraft, automobiles, military hardware, and aerospace composites (such as rocket motorcases) a sizable need for composite health assessment measures exist, particularly where there is risk of failure due to high mechanical and thermal stresses. For most epoxy-based laminate composites, even low-momentum impacts can lead to "barely visible impact damage" (BVD), corresponding to a significant weakening of the composite. This weakening can lead to sudden and catastrophic failure when the material is subjected to normal operating loads. Following the explosion of Delta 241 (IIR-1) on Jaunary 17th, 1997, the failure investigation board concluded that an entire fleet of Graphite Epoxy Motorcases (GEMs) should be instrumented with a health monitoring system. This system would provide continuous structural health data on the GEM from initial acceptance testing through final erection on the launch pad. The result presented here contribute significantly to the understanding of the acoustic properties of the GEM casing, and make a substantial advancement in the theoretical phase of the source location algorithm development. When the system is complete it will continuously monitor the structural health of the GEMs, communicate wirelessly with base stations, operate autonomously for extended periods, and fit unobtrusively on the GEM itself.

  7. Development of Resistive Electrode Gas Electron Multiplier (RE-GEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, A.; Tamagawa, T.; Iwahashi, T.; Asami, F.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hayato, A.; Hamagaki, H.; Gunji, T.; Akimoto, R.; Nukariya, A.; Hayashi, S.; Ueno, K.; Ochi, A.; Oliveria, R.

    2012-01-01

    We successfully produced Resistive-Electrode Gas Electron Multiplier (RE-GEM) which has resistive electrodes instead of the metal ones which are employed for the standard GEM foils. RE-GEM has a resistive electrode of 25 micron-thick and an insulator layer of 100 micron-thick. The hole structure of RE-GEM is a single conical with the wider and narrower hole diameters of 80 micron and 60 micron, respectively. A hole pitch of RE-GEM is 140 micron. We obtained the maximum gain of about 600 and the typical energy resolution of about 20% (FWHM) at an applied voltage between the resistive electrodes of 620 V, using a collimated 8 keV X-rays from a generator in a gas mixture of 70% Ar and 30% CO2 by volume at the atmospheric pressure. We measured the effective gain as a function of the electric field of the drift region and obtained the maximum gain at an drift field of 0.5 kV/cm.

  8. The Bisa GEM-Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, Lori; Daerden, Frank

    2013-04-01

    GEM-Mars is a three-dimensional general circulation model of the Mars atmosphere extending from the surface to approximately 170 km based on the latest version of the GEM (Global Environmental Mesoscale) model, the operational data assimilation and weather forecasting system for Canada [Côté et al., 1998]. The dynamical core is an implicit two-time-level semi-Lagrangian scheme on an Arakawa C-grid with a terrain-following, log-hydrostatic-pressure vertical coordinate discretized on a Charney-Phillips grid. The model has both a hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic formulation, providing a single platform for simulations on a variety of horizontal scales. The model code is fully parallelized using OMP and MPI. The GCM includes the relevant physical processes such as CO2 condensation, planetary boundary layer mixing, gravity wave drag and surface parameterizations. A simple water cycle, basic gas-phase chemistry and passive tracers are also included in the model. Because of the vertical extent of the model, UV heating, non-LTE effects and molecular diffusion are also included. Dust is prescribed using the MGS scenario for total opacities and a Conrath profile shape. In the dust radiative transfer code, dust optical properties are based on the Wolff et al [2006, 2009] data. Temperatures in the lower and middle atmosphere have been evaluated using TES [Smith, 2004] and MCS [Kleinbohl et al. 2009] data. Winds and atmospheric circulation (mass stream functions) have been compared with the literature and show a good correspondence to other Mars GCMs. In parallel, active lifting and settling of size-distributed dust has also been implemented. The soil model has been improved to better match surface and near-surface temperatures from the Viking Landers, Phoenix [Davy et al. 2010], and TES. Near-surface winds and friction velocities have been compared with the literature and show reasonable performance. Condensation of CO2 in surface ice has been validated using CO2 ice mass

  9. Correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 and estimated mercury emissions in China, South Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia derived from observations in northwestern and southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X. W.; Zhang, H.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X. B.; Zhou, L. X.; Fang, S. X.

    2015-01-01

    Correlation analyses between atmospheric mercury (Hg) and other trace gases are useful for identification of sources and constraining regional Hg emissions. Emissions of Hg in Asia contribute significantly to the global budget of atmospheric Hg. However, due to the lack of reliable data on the source strength, large uncertainties remain in the emission inventories of Hg in Asia. In the present study, we calculated the correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 for mainland China, South Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia using the ground-based observations at three remote sites in northwestern and southwestern China, and applied these values to estimate GEM emissions in the four source regions. The geometric mean GEM / CO correlation slopes for mainland China, South Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula, and Central Asia were 7.3 ± 4.3, 7.8 ± 6.4, 7.8 ± 5.0, and 13.4 ± 9.5 pg m-3 ppb-1, respectively, and values in the same source regions were 33.3 ± 30.4, 27.4 ± 31.0, 23.5 ± 15.3, and 20.5 ± 10.0 pg m-3 ppb-1 for the GEM / CH4 correlation slopes, respectively. The geometric means of GEM / CO2 correlation slopes for mainland China, South Asia, and Central Asia were 240 ± 119, 278 ± 164, 315 ± 289 pg m-3 ppm-1, respectively. These values were the first reported correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 in four important source regions of Asia, not including the GEM / CO ratios in mainland China. The correlation slopes of GEM / CO, GEM / CO2, and GEM / CH4 in Asia were relatively higher than those observed in Europe, North America, and South Africa, which may highlight GEM emissions from non-ferrous smelting, large-scale and artisanal mercury and gold production, natural sources, and historically deposited mercury (re-emission) in Asia. Using the observed GEM / CO and GEM / CO2 slopes, and the recently reported emission inventories of CO and CO2, the annual GEM emissions in mainland China, South Asia, the Indochinese

  10. Educational Outreach at MIT PSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, P.; Thomas, P.; Censabella, V.

    2001-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. Seeking to generate excitement about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. Key to the success of these tours is the interactive ``C-Mod, Jr.," which helps students understand magnetic confinement in MIT's Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ``Mr. Magnet" Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he reached 77 schools -- 30,000 teachers and students. We have also collaborated with the MIT Museum to create an interactive plasma demonstration device which students and the general public can use to create plasmas from different gasses. Pinch and deflection magnets are moveable along the axis of the display, allowing investigation of the magnetic behavior of plasmas.

  11. The GEMS X-Ray Polarlimeter: Instrument Concpet and Calibration Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The instrument and detector concepts for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimetry mission will be presented. The calibration requirements for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters in general and GEMS in particular will be discussed.

  12. GEM400: A front-end chip based on capacitor-switch array for pixel-based GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. S.; Jiang, X. S.; Liu, G.; Wang, N.; Sheng, H. Y.; Zhuang, B. A.; Zhao, J. W.

    2012-03-01

    The upgrade of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) needs two-dimensional position-sensitive detection equipment to improve the experimental performance. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector, in particular, pixel-based GEM detector has good application prospects in the domain of synchrotron radiation. The read-out of larger scale pixel-based GEM detector is difficult for the high density of the pixels (PAD for collecting electrons). In order to reduce the number of cables, this paper presents a read-out scheme for pixel-based GEM detector, which is based on System-in-Package technology and ASIC technology. We proposed a circuit structure based on capacitor switch array circuit, and design a chip GEM400, which is a 400 channels ASIC. The proposed circuit can achieve good stability and low power dissipation. The chip is implemented in a 0.35μm CMOS process. The basic functional circuitry in ths chip includes analog switch, analog buffer, voltage amplifier, bandgap and control logic block, and the layout of this chip takes 5mm × 5mm area. The simulation results show that the chip can allow the maximum amount of input charge 70pC on the condition of 100pF external integrator capacitor. Besides, the chip has good channel uniformity (INL is better than 0.1%) and lower power dissipation.

  13. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  14. An infrared spectral match between GEMS and interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Keller, L. P.; Snow, T. P.; Hanner, M. S.; Flynn, G. J.; Gezo, J. C.; Clemett, S. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bowey, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectral properties of silicate grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were compared with those of astronomical silicates. The approximately 10-micrometer silicon-oxygen stretch bands of IDPs containing enstatite (MgSiO3), forsterite (Mg2SiO4), and glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS) exhibit fine structure and bandwidths similar to those of solar system comets and some pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars. Some GEMS exhibit a broad, featureless silicon-oxygen stretch band similar to those observed in interstellar molecular clouds and young stellar objects. These GEMS provide a spectral match to astronomical "amorphous" silicates, one of the fundamental building blocks from which the solar system is presumed to have formed.

  15. Difluoromethylation and gem-difluorocyclopropenation with difluorocarbene generated by decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao-Yun; Lin, Jin-Hong; Zheng, Jian; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2015-05-25

    Difluoromethylation of the activated X-H bond (X = N, O and S) and aliphatic thiols, and gem-difluorocyclopropenation of alkynes with difluorocarbene generated in situ from difluoromethylene phosphobetaine (Ph3P(+)CF2CO2(-)) by decarboxylation occurred smoothly without the presence of any base or other additives. PMID:25918009

  16. Gravitational field models for the earth (GEM 1 and 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Wagner, C. A.; Smith, D. E.; Andson, M. L.; Brownd, J. E.; Richardson, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Two models of the earth's gravitational field have been computed at Goddard Space Flight Center. The first, Goddard Earth Model 1 (GEM 1), has been derived from satellite tracking data. The second, Goddard Earth Model 2 (GEM 2), has been derived from a combination of satellite tracking and surface gravimetric data. The geopotential models are represented in spherical harmonics complete to degree and order 16 for the combined solution and complete to degree and order 12 for the satellite solution. Both solutions include zonal terms to degree 21 and related satellite resonant coefficients to degree 22. The satellite data consisted primarily of optical data processed on 300 weekly orbital arcs for 25 close earth satellites. Surface gravity data were employed in the form of 5 deg x 5 deg mean free-air gravity anomalies providing about 70% world coverage. Station locations were obtained for 46 tracking sites by combining electronic, laser, and additional optical tracking data with the above satellite data. Analysis of the radial positions of these stations and a value of mean gravity on the geoid indicated a mean equatorial radius for the earth of about 6378145 meters. Results of geopotential tests on satellite data not used in the solution show that better agreement was obtained with the GEM 1 and GEM 2 models than with the 1969 Smithsonian Standard Earth 2 model.

  17. On algorithmic optimization of histogramming functions for GEM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rafał D.; Czarski, Tomasz; Kolasinski, Piotr; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Linczuk, Maciej; Byszuk, Adrian; Chernyshova, Maryna; Juszczyk, Bartlomiej; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Wojenski, Andrzej; Zabolotny, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    This article concerns optimization methods for data analysis for the X-ray GEM detector system. The offline analysis of collected samples was optimized for MATLAB computations. Compiled functions in C language were used with MEX library. Significant speedup was received for both ordering-preprocessing and for histogramming of samples. Utilized techniques with obtained results are presented.

  18. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) was selected by NASA for flight in 2014 to make a sensitive search for X-ray polarization from a wide set of source classes, including stellar black holes, Seyfert galaxies and quasars, blazars, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Among the primary scientific objectives are determining the effects of the spin of black holes and the geometry of supermassive black hole accretion, determining the configurations of the magnetic fields and the X-ray emission of magnetars, and determining the magnetic structure of the supernova shocks in which cosmic rays are accelerated. GEMS will observe 23 targets during a 16 month prime mission, in observations that will be able to reach predicted levels of polarization. The mission can be extended to provide a guest observer phase. The GEMS instrument has time projection chamber polarimeters with high 2-10 keV efficiency at the focus of thin foil mirrors. The 4.5 m focal length mirrors will be deployed on an extended boom. The spacecraft with the instrument is rotated with a period of about 10 minutes to enable measurement and correction of systematic errors. A small Bragg reflection soft X-ray experiment takes advantage of this rotation to obtain a measurement at 0.5 keV. The design of the GEMS instrument and the mission, the expected performance and the planned science program will be discussed.

  19. The Greenhouse Gases. UNEP/GEMS Environment Library No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya).

    Since the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) was created, more than a dozen years ago, public understanding of the environmental issues confronting our planet has increased enormously. The Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) has provided several environmental assessments including urban air pollution, climate modification,…

  20. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and hence material perfection, improves. The ultimate prize for man-made diamond is surely not in the synthesis of gem stones, but in delivering technological solutions enabled by diamond to the challenges facing our society today. If the special properties are to be exploited to their full potential, at least four crucial factors must be considered. First, there must be sufficient scientific understanding of diamond to make applications effective, efficient and economical. Secondly, the means of fabrication and control of properties have to be achieved so that diamond's role can be optimised. Thirdly, it is not enough that its properties are superior to existing materials: they must be so much better that it is worth initiating new technologies to exploit them. Finally, any substantial applications will have to address the society's major needs worldwide. The clear technology drivers for the 21st century come from the biomedical technologies, the demand for energy subject to global constraints, and the information technologies, where perhaps diamond will provide the major enabling technology [1]. The papers in this volume concern the solid state physics of diamond, and primarily concern the first two factors: understanding, and control of properties. They address many of the outstanding basic problems, such as the identification of existing defects, which affect the material's properties, both desirable and less so. Regarding future substantial applications, one paper discusses

  1. Continuous health monitoring of Graphite Epoxy Motorcases (GEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Richard D.; Schaafsma, David T.; Shen, H. Warren; Carlos, Mark F.; Miller, Ronnie K.; Shepherd, Brent

    2001-07-01

    Following the explosion of Delta 241 (IIR-1) on January 17th, 1997, the failure investigation board concluded that the Graphite Epoxy Motorcases (GEM's) should be inspected for damage just prior to launch. Subsequent investigations and feedback from industry led to an Aerospace Corporation proposal to instrument the entire fleet of GEM's with a continuous health monitoring system. The period of monitoring would extend from the initial acceptance testing through final erection on the launch pad. As this proposal demonstrates, (along with the increasing use of advanced composite materials in aircraft, automobiles, military hardware, and aerospace components such as rocket motorcases) a sizable need for composite health assessment measures exist. Particularly where continuous monitoring is required for the detection of damage from impacts and other sources of high mechanical and thermal stresses. Even low-momentum impacts can lead to barely visible impact damage (BVID), corresponding to a significant weakening of the composite. This damage, undetectable by visual inspection, can in turn lead to sudden and catastrophic failure when the material is subjected to a normal operating load. There is perhaps no system with as much potential for truly catastrophic failure as a rocket motor. We will present an update on our ongoing efforts with the United States Air Force Delta II Program Office, and The Aerospace Corporation. This will cover the development of a local, portable, surface-mounted, fiberoptic sensor based impact damage monitor designed to operate on a Delta II GEM during transport, storage, and handling. This system is designed to continuously monitor the GEMs, to communicate wirelessly with base stations and maintenance personnel, to operate autonomously for extended periods, and to fit unobtrusively on the GEM itself.

  2. Improvement in the geopotential derived from satellite and surface data /Gem 7 and 8/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Lerch, F. J.; Brownd, J. E.; Richardson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A refinement has been obtained in the earth's gravitational field by using satellite and surface data. In addition to a more complete treatment of data previously employed on 27 satellites, the new satellite solution Gem 7 (Goddard Earth Model 7) includes 64,000 laser measurements taken on seven satellites. Gem 7, containing 400 harmonic terms, is complete through degree and order 16. The companion solution Gem 8 combines the same satellite data as Gem 7 with surface gravimetry over 39% of the earth. Gem 8 is complete to degree and order 25. Extensive tests on data independent of the solution show that the undulations of the geoidal surface computed by Gem 7 have an accuracy of about 2.5 m (rms). The overall accuracy of the geoid calculated by Gem 8 is estimated to be about 4 m (rms). The new combination solution is the first to show signs of 'convection rolls' in the upper mantle below the Pacific Ocean.

  3. Positive Werkzeuge mit hohem IQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luik, Matthias

    Fräsen ist ein Verfahren, auf welches im modernen Produktionsprozess nicht verzichtet werden kann. Dabei stellt die zunehmende Komplexität der zu fertigenden Bauteile ganz neue Herausforderungen an ein Werkzeug. Konnten früher Bauteile nur mit hohem Aufwand durch Erodieren oder Außenräumen hergestellt werden, müssen heute bereits Fräswerkzeuge für solche Bearbeitungsaufgaben aus Zeitund Kostengründen eingesetzt werden. Dies führt dazu, dass viele Bauteile heute in einer Aufspannung bearbeitbar sind, welche früher nur durch mehrmaliges Umspannen erzeugt werden konnten. Um Bearbeitungszeiten und -kosten dabei gering zu halten, müssen aber dennoch universelle Werkzeuge eingesetzt werden, welche für verschiedenste Bearbeitungsaufgaben ausgelegt sind.

  4. GEM1: First-year modeling and IT activities for the Global Earthquake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Giardini, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2009-04-01

    GEM is a public-private partnership initiated by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to build an independent standard for modeling and communicating earthquake risk worldwide. GEM is aimed at providing authoritative, open information about seismic risk and decision tools to support mitigation. GEM will also raise risk awareness and help post-disaster economic development, with the ultimate goal of reducing the toll of future earthquakes. GEM will provide a unified set of seismic hazard, risk, and loss modeling tools based on a common global IT infrastructure and consensus standards. These tools, systems, and standards will be developed in partnership with organizations around the world, with coordination by the GEM Secretariat and its Secretary General. GEM partners will develop a variety of global components, including a unified earthquake catalog, fault database, and ground motion prediction equations. To ensure broad representation and community acceptance, GEM will include local knowledge in all modeling activities, incorporate existing detailed models where possible, and independently test all resulting tools and models. When completed in five years, GEM will have a versatile, penly accessible modeling environment that can be updated as necessary, and will provide the global standard for seismic hazard, risk, and loss models to government ministers, scientists and engineers, financial institutions, and the public worldwide. GEM is now underway with key support provided by private sponsors (Munich Reinsurance Company, Zurich Financial Services, AIR Worldwide Corporation, and Willis Group Holdings); countries including Belgium, Germany, Italy, Singapore, Switzerland, and Turkey; and groups such as the European Commission. The GEM Secretariat has been selected by the OECD and will be hosted at the Eucentre at the University of Pavia in Italy; the Secretariat is now formalizing the creation of the GEM Foundation. Some of GEM's global

  5. The determination of the orbit of the Japanese satellite Ajisai and the GEM-T1 and GEM-T2 gravity field models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese Experimental Geodetic Satellite Ajisai was launched on August 12, 1986. In response to the TOPEX-POSEIDON mission requirements, the GSFC Space Geodesy Branch and its associates are producing improved models of the Earth's gravitational field. With the launch of Ajisai, precise laser data is now available which can be used to test many current gravity models. The testing of the various gravity field models show improvements of more than 70 percent in the orbital fits when using GEM-T1 and GEM-T2 relative to results obtained with the earlier GEM-10B model. The GEM-T2 orbital fits are at the 13-cm level (RMS). The results of the tests with the various versions of the GEM-T1 model indicate that the addition of satellite altimetry and surface gravity anomalies as additional data types should improve future gravity field models.

  6. Respiratory morbidities among working children of gem polishing industries, India.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, R R; Saha, A; Parikh, J R

    2009-02-01

    There are millions of working children worldwide. In gem polishing industry, exposure to occupational hazards of dust and chemicals used in polishing of gemstone may result in respiratory symptoms and respiratory disorders. The present study included 586 exposed and 569 comparison group subjects. Data was collected through personal interview, clinical examination, and chest radiography. The respiratory morbidity was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms and chest radiography. The study variables included age, sex, daily working hours, and duration of exposure. The mean age of the child laborers was 11.31 +/- 5.34 years. Prevalence of respiratory morbidity was significantly high in the female child laborers. The other study variables namely age, duration of exposure, and daily working hours were found to be statistically non-significant. The prevalence of respiratory morbidity among child laborers of gem polishing industry in Jaipur was found to be 7%. PMID:19318508

  7. Fast modular data acquisition system for GEM-2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprowicz, G.; Byszuk, Adrian; Wojeński, A.; Zienkiewicz, P.; Czarski, T.; Chernyshova, M.; Poźniak, K.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Zabolotny, W.; Juszczyk, B.

    2014-11-01

    A novel approach to two dimensional Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector readout is presented. Unlike commonly used methods, based on discriminators and analogue FIFOs, the method developed uses simulta- neously sampling high speed ADCs with fast hybrid integrator and advanced FPGA-based processing logic to estimate the energy of every single photon. Such a method is applied to every GEM strip / pixel signal. It is especially useful in case of crystal-based spectrometers for soft X-rays, 2D imaging for plasma tomography and all these applications where energy resolution of every single photon is required. For the purpose of the detector readout, a novel, highly modular and extendable conception of the measurement platform was developed. It is evolution of already deployed measurement system for JET Spectrometer.

  8. The Dynamical Evolution of the Multiple Stellar System α Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, M.; Docobo, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The sextuple system Castor (α Gem) comprises of a visual binary (Castor A and B) with an orbital period of approximately 460 years. Each of these components is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of only a few days. In addition, a distant double-lined spectroscopic eclipsing binary (Castor C, or YY Gem), with an orbital period of less than 1 day, is considered to be in orbit around them with a period of roughly 14 000 years or more. In this contribution, we study the long-term dynamics of this hierarchical system. Many orbital elements still remain unknown, mainly those regarding the AB-C system. Apart from the direct integration of the equations of motion for the quadruple (Aa,Ab)-(Ba,Bb) system, we also perform a qualitative analysis of the global system by means of numerical techniques in order to find the most distinctive features of its dynamics.

  9. Reaction of alpha-gem-trichlorocarbonyl compounds with conjugated alkadienes

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, V.V.; Zubritskii, L.M.; Gorbunkov, V.D.; Petrov, A.A.

    1986-04-10

    Chloral and gem-trichloroacetone add to 1,3-alkadienes in the presence of copper(I) chloride with the formation of the corresponding ..gamma..,delta-unsaturated ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..epsilon-trichlorocarbonyl compounds as mixtures of the E and Z isomers in a ratio in the order of 85:15. The reaction takes place under mild conditions and gives a high yield of the final products.

  10. The gas electron multiplier (GEM): Operating principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Introduced by the author in 1997, The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) constitutes a powerful addition to the family of fast radiation detectors; originally developed for particle physics experiments, the device and has spawned a large number of developments and applications; a web search yields more than 400 articles on the subject. This note is an attempt to summarize the status of the design, developments and applications of the new detector.

  11. Structure of the Martian atmosphere from Epsilon Gem occultation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Information about Martian atmospheric scale heights derived from observations of the occultation of Epsilon Gem by Mars on April 8, 1976 has been collected. The observations give data in the altitude range of about 50 to 80 km. A rough, unweighted average of results so far available yields a temperatue of approximately 165 K. Excursions of about + or - 4 K about this mean may be present as a function of both altitude and areographic coordinates.

  12. Structure of the Martian atmosphere from Epsilon Gem occultation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Information has been collected on Martian atmospheric scale heights derived from observations of the occultation of Epsilon Gem by Mars on Apr. 8, 1976; the observations give data in the altitude range of approximately 50-80 km. A rough, unweighted average of results so far available yields a temperature of approximately 165 K. Excursions of plus or minus 40 K about this mean may be present as a function of both altitude and areographic coordinates.

  13. Serial data acquisition for GEM-2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Piotr; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Czarski, Tomasz; Linczuk, Maciej; Byszuk, Adrian; Chernyshova, Maryna; Juszczyk, Bartlomiej; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Wojenski, Andrzej; Zabolotny, Wojciech; Zienkiewicz, Pawel; Mazon, Didier; Malard, Philippe; Herrmann, Albrecht; Vezinet, Didier

    2014-11-01

    This article debates about data fast acquisition and histogramming method for the X-ray GEM detector. The whole process of histogramming is performed by FPGA chips (Spartan-6 series from Xilinx). The results of the histogramming process are stored in an internal FPGA memory and then sent to PC. In PC data is merged and processed by MATLAB. The structure of firmware functionality implemented in the FPGAs is described. Examples of test measurements and results are presented.

  14. Targeting SMN to Cajal bodies and nuclear gems during neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Navascues, Joaquin; Berciano, Maria T.; Tucker, Karen E.

    2006-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a central feature of neuronal differentiation. PC12 cells are a good model system for studying the peripheral nervous system and the outgrowth of neurites. In addition to the dramatic changes observed in the cytoplasm, neuronal differentiation is also accompanied by striking changes in nuclear morphology. The large and sustained increase in nuclear transcription during neuronal differentiation requires synthesis of a large number of factors involved in pre-mRNA processing. We show that the number and composition of the nuclear subdomains called Cajal bodies and gems changes during the course of N-ras-induced neuritogenesis in the PC12-derived cell line UR61. The Cajal bodies found in undifferentiated cells are largely devoid of the survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein product. As cells shift to a differentiated state, SMN is not only globally upregulated, but is progressively recruited to Cajal bodies. Additional SMN foci (also known as Gemini bodies, gems) can also be detected. Using dual-immunogold labeling electron microscopy and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the coilin protein, we show that gems clearly represent a distinct category of nuclear body. PMID:15164213

  15. A refined gravity model from Lageos /GEM-L2/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    Lageos satellite laser ranging (SLR) data taken over a 2.5 yr period were employed to develop the Goddard Earth Model GEM-L2, a refined gravity field model. Additional data was gathered with 30 other satellites, resulting in spherical harmonics through degree and order 20, based on over 600,000 measurements. The Lageos data was accurate down to 10 cm, after which the GEM 9 data were used to make adjustments past order 7. The resolution of long wavelength activity, through degree and order 4, was made possible by the Lageos data. The GEM-L2 model features a 20 x 20 geopotential, tracking station coordinates (20), 5-day polar motion and A1-UT1 values, and a GM value of 398,600.607 cu km/sq sec. The accuracy of station positioning has been raised to within 6 cm total position globally and within 1.8 cm in baselines. It is concluded that SLR is useful for measuring tectonic plate motions and inter-plate deformations.

  16. GEMS: a web server for biclustering analysis of expression data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Jiun; Kasif, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The advent of microarray technology has revolutionized the search for genes that are differentially expressed across a range of cell types or experimental conditions. Traditional clustering methods, such as hierarchical clustering, are often difficult to deploy effectively since genes rarely exhibit similar expression pattern across a wide range of conditions. Biclustering of gene expression data (also called co-clustering or two-way clustering) is a non-trivial but promising methodology for the identification of gene groups that show a coherent expression profile across a subset of conditions. Thus, biclustering is a natural methodology as a screen for genes that are functionally related, participate in the same pathways, affected by the same drug or pathological condition, or genes that form modules that are potentially co-regulated by a small group of transcription factors. We have developed a web-enabled service called GEMS (Gene Expression Mining Server) for biclustering microarray data. Users may upload expression data and specify a set of criteria. GEMS then performs bicluster mining based on a Gibbs sampling paradigm. The web server provides a flexible and an useful platform for the discovery of co-expressed and potentially co-regulated gene modules. GEMS is an open source software and is available at . PMID:15980544

  17. UV emission from he M1 supergiant TV Gem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1982-01-01

    Low and high dispersion ultraviolet spectra were obtained of the M1 supergiant TV Gem with IUE. Previous IUE observations of this late type supergiant revealed unexpected UV continuum emission, perhaps arising from an early B companion. Low resolution spectra obtained approximately one year apart suggest that the strong Si III in combination perhaps with O I at wavelengths approximately 1300 A varies considerably with time. Large variation in the column density is required to explain these changes. Sporadic mass expulsion with mass loss rates dM/dt approximately 0.00001 solar mass yr minus 1st power from the M supergiant could lead to a dense circumstellar wind near the hot early companion, and thus could account for these observed variations in equivalent width. The high resolution spectrum in the 2000 to 3200 A wavelength range is characterized by narrow absorption lines primarily due to Fe II, Mn II and Mg II (h and k), which are skewed in profile with an extended red wing. This profile structure is tentatively attributed to interstellar absorption and an intervening differentially moving cloud in the direction of Gem OB1, of which TV Gem is a known association member.

  18. Development of near infrared spectrometer for gem materials study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindata, W.; Meesiri, W.; Wongkokua, W.

    2015-07-01

    Most of gem materials can be characterized by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Normally, mid infrared absorption technique has been applied for investigating fundamental vibrational modes. However, for some gem materials, such as tourmaline, NIR is a better choice due to differentiation. Most commercial NIR spectrometers employ complicated dispersive grating or Fourier transform techniques. In this work, we developed a filter type NIR spectrometer with the availability of high efficiency and low-cost narrow bandpass NIR interference filters to be taught in a physics laboratory. The instrument was designed for transmission-mode configuration. A 50W halogen lamp was used as NIR source. There were fourteen NIR filters mounted on a rotatory wheel for wavelength selection ranging from 1000-1650 nm with steps of 50 nm. A 1.0 mm diameter of InGaAs photodiode was used as the detector for the spectrometer. Hence, transparent gem materials can be used as samples for experiment. Student can learn vibrational absorption spectroscopy as well as Beer-Lambert law from the development of this instrument.

  19. The TOTEM GEM Telescope (T2) at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, M.; Berretti, M.; David, E.; Garcia, F.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Oliveri, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Scribano, A.; Turini, N.; van Stenis, M.

    2011-06-01

    The TOTEM T2 telescope will measure inelastically produced charged particles in the forward region of the LHC Interaction Point 5. Each arm of the telescope consists in a set of 20 triple-GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) detectors with tracking and trigger capabilities. The GEM technology has been considered for the design of TOTEM very forward T2 telescopes thanks to its characteristics: large active areas, good position and timing resolution, excellent rate capability and radiation hardness. Each of the four T2 half arms has been fully assembled and equipped with electronics at CERN and systematically tested in the SPS beam line H8 in 2008/09. After some optimization, the operation of the GEM chambers was fully satisfactory and the T2 telescopes were installed and commissioned in their final positions at the LHC interaction point. During the first LHC run (December 2009) the T2 telescopes have collected data, at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV. We will present here the performances of the detector and the preliminary results obtained using the data collected.

  20. Improvement in the geopotential derived from satellite and surface data (GEM 7 and 8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Lerch, F. J.; Brownd, J. E.; Richardson, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A refinement was obtained in the earth's gravitational field using satellite and surface data. In addition to a more complete treatment of data previously employed on 27 satellites, the new satellite solution (Goddard Earth Model 7) includes 64,000 laser measurements taken on 7 satellites during the international satellite geodesy experiment (ISAGEX) program. The GEM 7, containing 400 harmonic terms, is complete through degree and order 16. The companion solution GEM 8 combines the same satellite data as in GEM 7 with surface gravimetry over 39% of the earth. The GEM 8 is complete to degree and order 25. Extensive tests on data independent of the solution show that the undulation of the geoidal surface computed by GEM 7 has an accuracy of about 3m (rms). The overall accuracy of the geoid estimated by GEM 8 is estimated to be about 4-1/4m (rms), an improvement of almost 1m over previous solutions.

  1. Unfälle mit Pkw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Heinz

    Der Verkehrsunfall ereignete sich innerorts auf einer Kreuzung mit rechts vor links Regelung. Es galt dort die allgemeine Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung auf 50 km/h. Zur Unfallzeit war es hell und trocken. Die Fahrbahn hatte eine Schwarzdecke.

  2. Synthesis of GEMS from Shock-accelerated Crystalline Dust in Superbubbles: Model and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Bradley, John P.

    2005-01-01

    GEMS (Glass Embedded with Metals and Sulfides) are highly enigmatic yet common components of anhydrous IDPs. We have recently proposed a model of GEMS formation from shock-accelerated crystalline dust in superbubbles[1] which explains the three most perplexing properties of GEMS: pseudomorphism[2], their chemistry[3], and their size range. In this Abstract, we briefly review the main points of the model, and suggest tests that will either prove or rule out this hypothesis.

  3. Photovoltaik Hybrid-Solarzellen mit Nanopartikeln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leute, Angelika

    2004-09-01

    Die organische Photovoltaik auf der Basis halbleitender Polymere bietet eine kostengünstige Alternative zu Solarzellen aus Silizium. Allerdings weisen die organischen Materialien relativ schlechte Ladungstransporteigenschaften auf. Hybrid-Solarzellen, in denen Polymere mit geeigneten anorganischen Halbleitern kombiniert sind, besitzen einerseits die praktischen Vorteile der Organik und andererseits die hohe Elektronenbeweglichkeit der anorganischen Materialien. Wissenschaftler der Technischen Universität Eindhoven haben kürzlich Hybrid-Solarzellen vorgestellt, die aus einem halbleitenden Polymer mit Zinkoxid-Nanopartikeln bestehen.

  4. Workstation-assisted education at MIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champine, George A.

    1992-06-01

    MIT launched a major new initiative called Project Athena in 1983 to improve the quality of education through the introduction of a high-quality computing infrastructure throughout the campus. Implementation of the Project Athena computing environment required eight years, cost about 100 million, and was sponsored by Digital Equipment and IBM in addition to MIT. The Athena computing environment is based almost entirely on workstations from these two vendors using the Unix operating system. Project Athena is now complete. The resulting computer system has been turned over to the campus computing organization for ongoing operation and maintenance. The computing environment available at MIT for education has been significantly improved. Students are graduating today that have never known life at MIT without the ubiquitous availability of high-quality computing. This article provides an overview of the initial objectives and strategies of Project Athena at MIT relative to its educational use. The specific strategies that MIT employed in the use of work-stations in educational are then described. These strategies are contrasted with other available strategies. Specific examples of the use of workstations are presented. An important element in current and future education delivery is multimedia. Athena in conjunction with the MIT Media Lab has one of the largest efforts in multimedia development of any of the universities, and MIT is using multimedia in education on a daily basis. A new laboratory, the Center for Educational Computing Initiatives, has been established with a major focus on multimedia. Finally the lessons learned from Athena relative to its primary objective — that of improving education — are reviewed.

  5. The GEM project: An international collaboration to survey galacticradiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, S.; Canon, V.; Casas, R.; Umana, A.; Tello, C.; Villela,T.; Bersanelli, M.; Bensadoun, M.; deAmici, G.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G.; Witebsky, C.

    1996-05-11

    The GEM (Galactic Emission Mapping) project is an international collaboration established with the aim of surveying the full sky at long wavelengths with a multi-frequency radio telescope. A total of 745 hours of observation at 408 MHz were completed from an Equatorial site in Colombia. The observations cover the celestial band O-h < alpha < 24(h), and -24 degrees 22 minutes < delta < +35 degrees 37 minutes. Preliminary results of this partial survey will be discussed. A review of the instrumental setup and a similar to 10 degrees resolution sky map at 408 MHz is presented.

  6. Reconstruction Software for High Multiplicity Events in GEM Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, M.; Avati, V.; Bossini, E.; Brogi, P.; Brücken, E.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Österberg, K.; Scribano, A.; Turini, N.; Welti, J.

    2012-08-01

    We present a general description of the offline software developed for the reconstruction of inelastic events by the TOTEM T2 telescope at the LHC. Tracking reconstruction in the OMS forward region, where T2 is installed, is challenged by a large amount of charged particles generated by the interaction with the material placed between the IP and T2. In this contribution we describe the simulation of the T2 GEM chambers as well as the reconstruction procedures employed to track the particles in such severe environment. The strategy for the telescope alignment and the measurement of the charged particle pseudorapidity distribution is finally presented.

  7. Simulation of the GEM silicon central tracker using GEANT

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, M.L.; Kinnison, W.W.

    1994-01-01

    The silicon central tracker of the GEM detector has been simulated using the high energy physics simulations code GEANT. This paper will describe the level of detail of the geometry of the tracker that is in the code, including the silicon detectors themselves as well as all non-sensitive volumes such as support structures; the digitization, or detector response to particles, of the silicon detectors; the coordinate reconstruction from the digitizations, and some of the results of the simulations regarding the detector performance.

  8. Overview of the Gems Model of Volunteer Administration (Generate, Educate, Mobilize and Sustain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III

    2012-01-01

    To organize and coordinate the efforts of many volunteers, a framework for volunteer engagement is needed. The "GEMS" Model of volunteer administration was developed to assist Extension professionals and volunteer coordinators to effectively administer volunteer programs without delivering the program themselves. The GEMS Model is…

  9. The GEMS X-Ray Polarimeter: Instrument Concept and Calibration Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The instrument and detector concepts for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimetry mission will be presente d. The calibration requirements for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters in general and GEMS in particular will be discussed.

  10. 16 CFR 23.25 - Misuse of the word “gem.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misuse of the word âgem.â 23.25 Section 23.25 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.25 Misuse of the word “gem.” (a) It is unfair...

  11. 16 CFR 23.25 - Misuse of the word “gem.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Misuse of the word âgem.â 23.25 Section 23.25 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.25 Misuse of the word “gem.” (a) It is unfair...

  12. 16 CFR 23.25 - Misuse of the word “gem.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Misuse of the word âgem.â 23.25 Section 23.25 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.25 Misuse of the word “gem.” (a) It is unfair...

  13. 16 CFR 23.25 - Misuse of the word “gem.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Misuse of the word âgem.â 23.25 Section 23.25 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.25 Misuse of the word “gem.” (a) It is unfair...

  14. 16 CFR 23.25 - Misuse of the word “gem.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Misuse of the word âgem.â 23.25 Section 23.25 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.25 Misuse of the word “gem.” (a) It is unfair...

  15. GEM RUSSET: A LONG RUSSET POTATO VARIETY WITH EXCELLENT FRESH MARKET AND FRENCH FRY PROCESSING QUALITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gem Russet, a new medium maturing, long russet potato variety, was released in 2000 by the USDA/ARS and the experiment stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. It is suited for use in the fresh, frozen-fried processing, and dehydration markets. Total tuber yield of Gem Russet is similar to that ...

  16. Possible Gems and Ultra-Fine Grained Polyphase Units in Comet Wild 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainsforth, Z.; Butterworth, A. L.; Jilly-Rehak, C. E.; Westphal, A. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D.; Ogliore, R. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bechtel, H. A.; Ebel, D. S.; Huss, G. R.; Sandford, S. A.; White, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    GEMS and ultrafine grained polyphase units (UFG-PU) in anhydrous IDPs are probably some of the most primitive materials in the solar system. UFG-PUs contain nanocrystalline silicates, oxides, metals and sulfides. GEMS are rounded approximately 100 nm across amorphous silicates containing embedded iron-nickel metal grains and sulfides. GEMS are one of the most abundant constituents in some anhydrous CPIDPs, often accounting for half the material or more. When NASA's Stardust mission returned with samples from comet Wild 2 in 2006, it was thought that UFG-PUs and GEMS would be among the most abundant materials found. However, possibly because of heating during the capture process in aerogel, neither GEMS nor UFG-PUs have been clearly found.

  17. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and hence material perfection, improves. The ultimate prize for man-made diamond is surely not in the synthesis of gem stones, but in delivering technological solutions enabled by diamond to the challenges facing our society today. If the special properties are to be exploited to their full potential, at least four crucial factors must be considered. First, there must be sufficient scientific understanding of diamond to make applications effective, efficient and economical. Secondly, the means of fabrication and control of properties have to be achieved so that diamond's role can be optimised. Thirdly, it is not enough that its properties are superior to existing materials: they must be so much better that it is worth initiating new technologies to exploit them. Finally, any substantial applications will have to address the society's major needs worldwide. The clear technology drivers for the 21st century come from the biomedical technologies, the demand for energy subject to global constraints, and the information technologies, where perhaps diamond will provide the major enabling technology [1]. The papers in this volume concern the solid state physics of diamond, and primarily concern the first two factors: understanding, and control of properties. They address many of the outstanding basic problems, such as the identification of existing defects, which affect the material's properties, both desirable and less so. Regarding future substantial applications, one paper discusses

  18. Great Explorations in Math and Science[R] (GEMS[R]) Space Science. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Great Explorations in Math and Science[R] (GEMS[R]) Space Science" is an instructional sequence for grades 3-5 that covers fundamental concepts, including planetary sizes and distance, the Earth's shape and movement, gravity, and moon phases and eclipses. Part of the "GEMS"[R] core curriculum, "GEMS[R] Space Science" uses the solar system as the…

  19. MIT 12 Tesla Coil test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, M. M.; Hoenig, M. O.

    1985-07-01

    Test results from the MIT 12 Tesla Coil experiment are presented. The coil was tested in the High Field Test Facility (HFTF) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in October 1984 and January 1985. The experiment measured the performance of an Internally Cooled, Cabled Superconductor (ICCS) of practical size, intended for use in magnetic fusion experiments. The MIT coil carried 15 kA at 11 T for 5 min with no sign of instability. A half turn length in a 10 T field was able to absorb a heat load in 4 msec of more than 200 mJ sub cm of cable volume while carrying a current of 12 kA. The MIT coil successfully met the performance requirements of the Department of Energy's 12 Tesla Coil Program.

  20. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  1. Coordinated Chemical and Isotopic Studies of GEMS in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cometary IDPs contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula [1]. Following their accretion, these materials have remained relatively unaltered because of the lack of parent body hydrothermal alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these IDPs because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars [e.g. 2]. Amorphous silicates (in the form of GEMS grains) are a major component of cometary IDPs and so a major objective of this work is to elucidate their origins. In rare cases, GEMS grains have highly anomalous O isotopic compositions that establish their origins as circumstellar condensates [3]. Here we present data on a systematic study of the silicate components within a primitive IDP.

  2. GEM-type detectors using LIGA and etchable glass technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, S.K.; Kim, J.G.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Chang, S.; Jackson, K.H.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.A.; Cho, G.

    2001-11-02

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMS) have been made by a deep X-ray lithography technique (LIGA process) using synchrotron radiation on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and by UV processes using a UV etchable glass. Gain, stability and rate capability for these detectors are described.The LIGA detectors described consist of PMMA sheets of various thicknesses, 125mm to 350mm, and have 150mm x 150mm square holes spaced with a pitch of 300mm. Thin copper electrodes are plated on the top and bottom surfaces using a Damascene method, followed by electroless plating of the copper onto a palladium-tin base layer. For various thicknesses of PMMA measurements have been made of absolute gain vs. voltage, time stability of gain, and rate capability. The operating gas mixture was usually Ar/CO2 (70/30) gas, but some tests were also done using P10 gas. We also made GEM-like detectors using the UV etchable glass called Foturan, patterned by exposure to UV light and subsequent etching. A few measurements using these detectors will be reported, including avalanche gain and time stability.

  3. The stable K0 giant star β Gem

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2014-12-01

    A nine-season spectroscopic study of the photosphere of β Gem (K0 III) shows this low-luminosity giant to be stable, with no effective temperature variations above ∼2 K, and no secular temperature variations over the 2002-2010 time span above 0.2 K per year. The radial-velocity variations are consistent with an orbital variation of ∼40 m s{sup –1}. The projected rotation rate is found to be 1.70 ± 0.20 km s{sup –1} with a macroturbulence dispersion of 4.53 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. The third-signature plot is also invariant and shows a granulation velocity gradient 20% smaller than the solar gradient. The absolute shift of the third-signature plot gives a blueshift-corrected radial velocity of 3385 ± 70 m s{sup –1}. Bisector mapping of the Fe I λ6253 line yields a flux deficit of 12% ± 1% in area, somewhat smaller than for other giants, but the shape and the position of the peak at 4.8 km s{sup –1} is consistent with other giants. All of the investigated photospheric parameters are consistent with β Gem being a low-luminosity giant in agreement with its absolute magnitude.

  4. Measurements of GEM fluxes and atmospheric mercury concentrations (GEM, RGM and Hg p) from an agricultural field amended with biosolids in Southern Ont., Canada (October 2004-November 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobbett, Frank D.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

    Five weeks of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particle bound mercury (Hg p) concentrations as well as fluxes of GEM were measured at Maryhill, Ontario, Canada above a biosolids amended field. The study occurred during the autumn of 2004 (October-November) to capture the effects of cool weather conditions on the behaviour of mercury in the atmosphere. The initial concentration of total mercury (Hg) in the amended soil was relatively low (0.4 μg g -1±10%). A micrometeorological approach was used to infer the flux of GEM using a continuous two-level sampling system with inlets at 0.40 and 1.25 m above the soil surface to measure the GEM concentration gradient. The required turbulent transfer coefficients were derived from meteorological parameters measured on site. The average GEM flux over the study was 0.1±0.2 ng m -2 h -1(±one standard deviation). The highest averaged hourly GEM fluxes occurred when the averaged net radiation was highest, although the slight diurnal patterns observed were not statistically significant for the complete flux data series. GEM emission fluxes responded to various local events including the passage of a cold front when the flux increased to 2 ng m -2 h -1 and during a biosolids application event at an adjacent field when depositional fluxes peaked at -3 ng m -2 h -1. Three substantial rain events during the study kept the surface soil moisture near field capacity and only slightly increased the GEM flux. Average concentrations of RGM (2.3±3.0 pg m -3), Hg p (3.0±6.2 pg m -3) and GEM (1.8±0.2 ng m -3) remained relatively constant throughout the study except when specific local events resulted in elevated concentrations. The application of biosolids to an adjacent field produced large increases in Hg p (25.8 pg m -3) and RGM (21.7 pg m -3) concentrations only when the wind aligned to impact the experimental equipment. Harvest events (corn) in adjacent fields also corresponded to higher

  5. Incentives in IT Yield Success at MIT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Describes the role of information technology (IT) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, explaining that attention to the unique characteristics of an MIT education and incentives for sustainable change are central to its IT efforts. Discusses various IT initiatives, such as Project Athena, provision on campus, international efforts, and…

  6. Erfahrungen mit den Pentax SDHF-Refraktoren.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lignie, J.

    1996-10-01

    Behandelt werden: die SDHF-Refraktoren, mechanische Eigenschaften und Verarbeitung, die Montierung MS-3n, Beobachtungen mit der SDHF-Optik und optische Qualität, der 75 SDHF, der 105 SDHF. Fotografischer Teil: die Pentax 645 als Astrokamera, fotografische Abbildung der Objektive zur Pentax 645 und der SDHF-Optik, Zubehör.

  7. Wrestling with Pedagogical Change: The TEAL Initiative at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Lori

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, the physics department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had a problem. The department was responsible for teaching the two required physics courses that are part of the General Institute Requirements (GIRs), MIT's core curriculum--Physics I (mechanics, or in MIT parlance, 8.01) and Physics II (electricity and…

  8. Reactivity worth of gas expansion modules (GEMs) in the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.R.; Nelson, J.V.; Burke, T.M.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.; Bennett, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A new passive shutdown device called a gas expansion module (GEM) has been developed at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory to insert negative reactivity during a primary system loss of flow in a liquid-metal reactor (LMR). A GEM is a hollow removable core component which is sealed at the top and open at the bottom. An argon gas bubble trapped inside the assembly expands when core inlet pressure decreases (caused by a flow reduction) and expels sodium from the assembly. The GEMs are designed so that the level of the liquid-sodium primary system coolant within a GEM is above the top of the core when the primary pumps are operating at full flow and is below the bottom of the core when the primary pumps are off. When a GEM is placed at the boundary of the core and radial reflector, the drop in sodium level increases core neutron leakage and inserts negative reactivity. The results of these measurements confirm the effectiveness of GEMs in adding negative reactivity in loss-of-flow situations. It follows, therefore, that the inherent safety of LMRs, comparable in size to the FFTF, can be enhanced by the use of GEMs.

  9. The conserved GTPase Gem1 regulates endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria connections

    PubMed Central

    Kornmann, Benoît; Osman, Christof; Walter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through specialized protein complexes. We recently identified the ER–mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethering complex, which plays a role in phospholipid exchange between the two organelles. ERMES also has been implicated in the coordination of mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial DNA replication, and mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting that these interorganelle contact sites play central regulatory roles in coordinating various aspects of the physiology of the two organelles. Here we purified ERMES complexes and identified the Ca2+-binding Miro GTPase Gem1 as an integral component of ERMES. Gem1 regulates the number and size of the ERMES complexes. In vivo, association of Gem1 to ERMES required the first of Gem1’s two GTPase domains and the first of its two functional Ca2+-binding domains. In contrast, Gem1’s second GTPase domain was required for proper ERMES function in phospholipid exchange. Our results suggest that ERMES is not a passive conduit for interorganellar lipid exchange, but that it can be regulated in response to physiological needs. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the metazoan Gem1 ortholog Miro-1 localizes to sites of ER–mitochondrial contact, suggesting that some of the features ascribed to Gem1 may be evolutionarily conserved. PMID:21825164

  10. GEM, a member of the GRAM domain family of proteins, is part of the ABA signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Nuria; Fernández-Marcos, María; Costas, Celina; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Pichel, Antonio; Caro, Elena; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is fundamental for plant development. Multiple factors have been identified that participate in the ABA signaling network, although a role of many proteins still await to be demonstrated. Here we have investigated the role of GEM (GL2 EXPRESSION MODULATOR), originally annotated as an ABA-responsive protein. GEM contains a GRAM domain, a feature shared with other eight Arabidopsis proteins for which we propose the name of GRE (GEM-RELATED) proteins. We found that (i) GEM expression responds to ABA, (ii) its promoter contains ABRE sites required for ABA response, and (iii) GEM expression depends on members of the ABA signaling pathway. This is consistent with the expression pattern of GEM during development in plant locations were ABA is known to play a direct role. We also found that GEM binds various phospholipids, e.g. mono and diphosphates and phosphatidic acid, suggesting a potential link of GEM with membrane-associated processes. Consistent with this, we found that the phosphoinositol-4-phosphate kinase PIP5K9 binds GEM in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated a role of GEM in seed dormancy. Together, our data led us to propose that GEM is an ABA-responsive protein that may function downstream of ABI5 as part of the ABA signaling pathway. PMID:26939893

  11. GEM, a member of the GRAM domain family of proteins, is part of the ABA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Nuria; Fernández-Marcos, María; Costas, Celina; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Pichel, Antonio; Caro, Elena; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is fundamental for plant development. Multiple factors have been identified that participate in the ABA signaling network, although a role of many proteins still await to be demonstrated. Here we have investigated the role of GEM (GL2 EXPRESSION MODULATOR), originally annotated as an ABA-responsive protein. GEM contains a GRAM domain, a feature shared with other eight Arabidopsis proteins for which we propose the name of GRE (GEM-RELATED) proteins. We found that (i) GEM expression responds to ABA, (ii) its promoter contains ABRE sites required for ABA response, and (iii) GEM expression depends on members of the ABA signaling pathway. This is consistent with the expression pattern of GEM during development in plant locations were ABA is known to play a direct role. We also found that GEM binds various phospholipids, e.g. mono and diphosphates and phosphatidic acid, suggesting a potential link of GEM with membrane-associated processes. Consistent with this, we found that the phosphoinositol-4-phosphate kinase PIP5K9 binds GEM in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated a role of GEM in seed dormancy. Together, our data led us to propose that GEM is an ABA-responsive protein that may function downstream of ABI5 as part of the ABA signaling pathway. PMID:26939893

  12. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12 GeV program at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for the Proton Polarimeter Back Tracker (BT) of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS BT GEM trackers consist of two sets of five large GEM chambers of size 60×200 cm2. The GEM chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules, each with an active area of 60×50 cm2. We have built and tested several prototypes and the construction of GEM modules for SBS BT is ongoing. We describe in this paper the design and construction of the GEM module prototype as well as the preliminary results on performance from tests carried out in our detector lab and during test beam at Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab).

  13. Accuracy of the GEM-T2 geopotential from Geosat and ERS 1 crossover altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Klokočník, J.

    1994-05-01

    Extensive analyses of altimetrically determined sea height differences at crossovers have been used to assess the accuracy of the GEM-T2 geopotential. The orbits used were determined with GEM-T2 for Geosat in its 17-day Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) in 1986-1989 and ERS 1 in both its 3-day ERM in 1991-1992 and its 35-day ERM in 1992. The data examined are completely independent of the data used in GEM-T2's development though GEM-T2 had considerable use of Doppler tracking information on Geosat. The test of the radial accuracy of the ERS 1 orbit (98.5° inclination) is especially significant because it is not ``close'' to any other orbit well represented in GEM-T2. The assessment consists of a comparison of observed mean height differences at thousands of distinct geographic locations with error projections from the GEM-T2 covariance matrix which was estimated from other data sources. This first comprehensive, independent test of the purely radial accuracy of an orbit-geopotential model clearly shows that the covariant predictions for GEM-T2 are broadly reliable for this purpose. Thus, the agreement of crossover predictions and observations suggests that the total radial errors for these ERMs, due to only to GEM-T2 (but excluding the effects of initial state error) are about 23 cm for Geosat and 115 cm (rms) for ERS 1. However, there is little detailed agreement of measurements and predictions for ERS 1 and only partial agreement in detail for Geosat. Our 30,000 mean crossover discrepancies for Geosat (derived from ERM cycles 1-44) are also shown to reduce substantially the crossover height differences in cycles 45-61, almost exactly as predicted if these are the true GEM-T2 errors for this orbit.

  14. Characterization of a scintillating GEM detector with low energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M R; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E

    2008-11-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector is being developed with the aim of using it for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in charged particle therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF(4) scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. In such a system, light quanta are emitted by the scintillating gas mixture during the electron avalanches in the GEM holes when radiation traverses the detector. The light intensity distribution is proportional to the energy deposited in the detector's sensitive volume by the beam. In the present work, we investigated the optimization of the scintillating GEM detector light yield. The light quanta are detected by means of a CCD camera or a photomultiplier tube coupled to a monochromator. The GEM charge signal is measured simultaneously. We have found that with 60 microm diameter double conical GEM holes, a brighter light signal and a higher electric signal are obtained than with 80 microm diameter holes. With an Ar + 8% CF(4) volume concentration, the highest voltage across the GEMs and the largest light and electric signals were reached. Moreover, we have found that the emission spectrum of Ar/CF(4) is independent of (1) the voltages applied across the GEMs, (2) the x-ray beam intensity and (3) the GEM hole diameter. On the other hand, the ratio of Ar to CF(4) peaks in the spectrum changes when the concentration of the latter gas is varied. PMID:18854612

  15. The RDT-RPC technology option of GEM

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-29

    A muon system for the GEM SSCL detector based on Round Drift Tubes (RDT) has many attractive features. The Pt-trigger and beam crossing tag for the RDT tracking system can be accomplishment by either a PWC system, similar but less costly in design than Cathode Strip Chambers, or by a promising new type of RPC chamber. Given the economic construction of these chamber technologies a system can be envisioned with both good momentum reconstruction performance and pattern recognition capabilities. Full-scale chamber prototypes based on the RDT and RPC technologies have been constructed and tested successfully at the Texas Test Rig. Spatial resolutions have been measured in two designs of RDT chambers which meet or exceed the baseline resolution requirement of 100{mu}m per chamber layer.

  16. How Complete is the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Catalog?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    In January, 2013, the International Seismological Centre (ISC), in collaboration with the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) effort, released a new global earthquake catalog, covering the time period from 1900 through the end of 2009. The ISC-GEM catalog effort made substantial improvements over existing catalogs by adding new phase data, relocating all events using one method, and reviewing and revising magnitudes. In order to use this catalog for global earthquake studies, I determined the magnitude of completeness (Mc) as a function of time. First, I divided the catalog into 7 time periods based on major changes in catalog processing and data availability. For each time period, I used 4 objective methods to determine Mc, with uncertainties determined by non-parametric bootstrapping. Due to differences between the 4 methods, the final Mc was determined subjectively by examining the features that each method focused on in both the cumulative and binned magnitude frequency distributions (MFD). Features which were subjectively rejected as correct Mc determinations included complications in the MFD at high magnitudes well above a linear portion of the MFD, large curvature of the MFD at magnitudes below smaller curvatures, and changes in the MFD that were actually in an increase above a Gutenberg-Richter distribution with decreasing magnitude. The high end of the bootstrap confidence range was preferred so that there is 95% confidence that Mc is not underestimated. The time periods and Mc values are: 1900-1917, Mc=7.7; 1918-1939 Mc=6.8; 1940-1954, Mc=6.8; 1955-1963, Mc=6.5; 1964-1975, Mc=6.0; 1976-2003, Mc=5.8; and 2004-2009, Mc=5.7. Using these Mc values for the longest time periods they are valid for (e.g. 1918-2009, 1940-2009,...) the data fits a Gutenberg-Richter relationship with b=1.0 and a=8.3, within 1 std. dev, with no declustering. The exception is for time periods that include 1900-1917 in which there are only 28 events with M≥Mc and the largest event is only

  17. Performance simulation studies for the ALICE TPC GEM upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, M.

    2016-07-01

    To be able to exploit the anticipated interaction rate of 50 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions during run 3 of the LHC (beyond 2019), the ALICE TPC will be upgraded to allow continuous readout. As this is not possible with the current Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) based amplification, the readout will be replaced with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) readout chambers that can suppress ~ 99% of the ion back flow. The space charge of the remaining 1% ion back flow, however, will cause significant distortions to the measured tracks of order cm. Simulation studies to characterize the distortions and test correction strategies have been performed, which show that the intrinsic momentum resolution, without these distortions, can be recovered.

  18. A spectrophotometric study of IR Gem at outburst and quiescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinswog, Laurie; Szkody, Paula; Garnavich, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Optical spectra with 2.5-A resolution obtained throughout the orbit of IR Gem during a five-day sequence beginning at an outburst state and ending at quiescence are compared with B magnitude and IUE spectra obtained throughout other quiescent-state orbits. No obvious second component is found in the emission lines. In contrast to previous results, little high-excitation He II 4686-A emission is noted, and no variation of the equivalent widths of the Balmer emission is found over the orbital cycle. The results suggest that large changes in the excitation level and in the modulation from a heated zone can take place during different quiescent states, possibly due to the interoutburst phase.

  19. Particle tracking with a Timepix based triple GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, S. P.; Murtas, F.; Alozy, J.; Curioni, A.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Silari, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper details the response of a triple GEM detector with a 55 μmetre pitch pixelated ASIC for readout. The detector is operated as a micro TPC with 9.5 cm3 sensitive volume and characterized with a mixed beam of 120 GeV protons and positive pions. A process for reconstruction of incident particle tracks from individual ionization clusters is described and scans of the gain and drift fields are performed. The angular resolution of the measured tracks is characterized. Also, the readout was operated in a mixed mode where some pixels measure drift time and others charge. This was used to measure the energy deposition in the detector and the charge cloud size as a function of interaction depth. The future uses of the device, including in microdosimetry are discussed.

  20. Gem-quality Turkish purple jade: Geological and mineralogical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoğlu, Murat; Başevirgen, Yasemin; Chamberlain, Steven C.

    2012-02-01

    In the Harmancık-Bursa region of the western Anatolia (Turkey), an extensive contact metamorphic aureole at the border between the Late Mesozoic coherent metaclastic rocks of blueschist facies and the Early Senozoic intrusive granodiorite stock hosts an interesting and unique gem material with a mineral assemblage consisting mainly of jadeite, quartz, orthoclase, epidote, chloritoid, and phlogopite as identified by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and polarized-light microscopy. In addition, chemical analyses performed with X-ray fluorescence and inductive-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy show that the mass of the metamorphic aureole has a silica-rich, calc-alkaline chemical content. Therefore, some rock building elements (such as Al, Ca, Na, K, P, Sr, and B of which characterize an acidic-neutral rock formation) and trace elements (such as Fe, Cr, Mn, Be, Cu, Ga, La, Ni, Pb, and Zn) are remarkable high ratios. Pale purple-colored gem material of this composition appears to be unique to Turkey, also is only found in one narrow provenance in Turkey. Therefore, it is specially called "Turkish (and/or Anatolian) purple jade" on the worldwide gem market. Even though the mineral jadeite is the principal constituent, 40% by volume as determined with petrographic thin-section examination under a polarized-light microscope, the material cannot be considered pure jadeite. Specific gravity measurements of the jade using a hydrostatic balance confirm that it has a heterogeneous structure. The measured average specific gravity of 3.04, is significantly lower than the normal range for characterized jadeites of 3.24-3.43. Turkish purple jade samples were examined in detail using dispersive confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (DCμRS) as well as other well-known analytical methods. The resulting strong micro-Raman bands that peaked at 1038, 984, 697, 571, 521, 464, 430, 372, 326, 307, 264, and 201 cm -1 are characteristics of the Turkish purple jade. The first most

  1. Synthesis of enones, pyrazolines and pyrrolines with gem-difluoroalkyl side chains

    PubMed Central

    El Dine, Assaad Nasr; Khalaf, Ali; Grée, Danielle; Tasseau, Olivier; Fares, Fares; Jaber, Nada; Lesot, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Summary Starting from easily accessible gem-difluoropropargylic derivatives, a DBU-mediated isomerisation affords enones in fair yields with a gem-difluoroalkyl chain. These derivatives were used to prepare pyrazolines and pyrrolines with the desired gem-difluoroalkyl side chain by cyclocondensations in good yields and with excellent stereoselectivity. A one-pot process was also successfully developed for these sequential reactions. By carrying out various types of Pd-catalyzed coupling reactions for compounds with a p-bromophenyl substituent a route to focused chemical libraries was demonstrated. PMID:24204405

  2. Synthesis of enones, pyrazolines and pyrrolines with gem-difluoroalkyl side chains.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Assaad Nasr; Khalaf, Ali; Grée, Danielle; Tasseau, Olivier; Fares, Fares; Jaber, Nada; Lesot, Philippe; Hachem, Ali; Grée, René

    2013-01-01

    Starting from easily accessible gem-difluoropropargylic derivatives, a DBU-mediated isomerisation affords enones in fair yields with a gem-difluoroalkyl chain. These derivatives were used to prepare pyrazolines and pyrrolines with the desired gem-difluoroalkyl side chain by cyclocondensations in good yields and with excellent stereoselectivity. A one-pot process was also successfully developed for these sequential reactions. By carrying out various types of Pd-catalyzed coupling reactions for compounds with a p-bromophenyl substituent a route to focused chemical libraries was demonstrated. PMID:24204405

  3. Characteristics of a glass gem with a guard-ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Takahashi, H.

    2013-11-01

    We recently developed a Glass GEM (G-GEM), and it exhibited a superior performance compared with other gaseous detectors. We are currently developing a G-GEM with a single-sided guard ring structure, in order to improve its spark tolerance. In this research, we compared its performance with that of a conventional hole structure. The single-sided guard-ring structure has shown strong polarity when it was operated upside down, however, the similar output pulse shapes were observed for both cases. The gain curves were consistent with simulation results. The energy resolutions were also compared.

  4. Editorial: Reviewer selection process and new areas of expertise in GEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Balikhin, Michael; Kepko, Larry; Rodger, Alan; Wang, Yuming

    2016-06-01

    One method of selecting potential reviewers for papers submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research Space Physics is to filter the user database within the Geophysical Electronic Manuscript System (GEMS) by areas of expertise. The list of these areas in GEMS can be self selected by users in their profile settings. The Editors have added 18 new entries to this list, an increase of 33% more than the previous 55 entries. All space physicists are strongly encouraged to update their profile settings in GEMS, especially their areas of expertise selections, and details of how to do this are provided.

  5. Characterization of a GEM-based fast neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, B.; Marocco, D.; Villari, R.; Murtas, F.; Rodionov, R.

    2014-03-01

    The neutron efficiency of a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM)-based detector designed for fast neutron measurements in fusion devices was determined through the combined use of Monte Carlo (MCNPX) calculations and analysis of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutron irradiation experiments. The detector, characterized by a triple GEM structure flushed with a Ar/CO2/CF4 - 45/15/40 gas mixture, features a digital read-out system and has two sub-units for the detection of 2.5+14 MeV neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons (UDD and UDT, respectively). The pulse height spectra (PHS) determined from the curves of experimental efficiency as a function of the detector's high voltage (HV) and the MCNPX-simulated PHS were compared using a fitting routine that finds the best match between the experimental and simulated PHS by assuming a parametric model for the relation between HV (that determines the detector's gain) and the energy deposited in the gas. This led to express the experimental neutron efficiency as a function of the discrimination level set on the deposited energy (energy threshold). The detector sensitivity to γ-rays was also analyzed and the operational range in which the γ-ray contribution to the signal is not negligible was determined. It is found that this detector can reach a maximum neutron efficiency of ~1×10-3 counts/n at 2.5 MeV (UDD sub-unit) and of ~4×10-3 counts/n at 14 MeV (UDT and UDD sub-units).

  6. GEMS and New Pre-Accretionally Irradiated RELICT Grains in Interplanetary Dust - The Plot Thickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J.

    1995-09-01

    The hypothesis that GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) might be the long-sought interstellar silicate grains is undergoing close scrutiny [1-3]. GEMS are proposed to be interstellar because: (a) they are abundant in cometary IDPs; (b) they were irradiated prior to incorporation into IDPs; (c) both their size distribution and Oamorphous silicate" microstructures are consistent with those of interstellar silicates; (d) they contain nanometer-sized (superparamagnetic) alpha-iron inclusions, which provides a simple explanation for the observed interstellar grain alignment and polarization [4,5]. Challenges to the GEMS hypothesis include the following: (a) GEMS may have formed and been irradiated in the solar nebula rather than a presolar interstellar environment; (b) non-solar isotope abundances have yet to be measured in GEMS; (c) the irradiation regime required to produce the observed effects in GEMS might be incompatible with the interstellar medium; (b) relationships between GEMS and carbon (e.g. core/mantle) need clarification; (c) major element abundances in GEMS should be consistent with observed interstellar gas phase depletions [2,3]. GEMS may indeed have formed in the solar nebula, in which case they would be the oldest known solar nebula solids [2]. An interstellar origin for GEMS does not require detection of non-solar isotope abundances [6]. Irradiation experiments are in progress to simulate the properties of GEMS. The petrographic relationship between GEMS and carbon in IDPs is being investigated (by examining IDPs embedded and thin-sectioned in carbon-free media). Major element abundances in GEMS are being evaluated in terms on interstellar gas phase abundances. For example, sulfur is not highly depleted in the interstellar gas, implying that it must be significantly depleted in interstellar grains [3]. GEMS are significantly depleted in sulfur relative to solar abundances. Analytical electron

  7. Interpreting the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) Findings on Sanitation, Hygiene, and Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Jonny; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-05-01

    In this Perspective on the GEMS study by Kelly Baker and colleagues, Jonny Crocker and Jamie Bartram consider the implications of associations found and not found between diarrheal disease and sanitation and hygiene. PMID:27138924

  8. Development of the GEM-MSTPC for studies of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, K.; Arai, I.; Ishiyama, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Tanaka, M. H.; Miyatake, H.; Hirayama, Y.; Imai, N.; Fuchi, Y.; Jeong, S. C.; Nomura, T.; Mizoi, Y.; Das, S. K.; Fukuda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Makii, H.; Mitsuoka, S.

    2010-08-12

    We have developed an active-target type gas-detector, a Gas Electron Multiplier Multiple-Sampling and Tracking Proportional Chamber (GEM-MSTPC) operating with low-pressure He-base mixed gas, where He is used as a target for studies of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates. Different kinds of 400 {mu}m thick GEMs were examined. The gain stability was examined with a configuration of GEMs of 400 {mu}m in thickness fabricated in different ways, against the injection rate of low-energy heavy ions of 10{sup 5} particles per second. The gain of GEM with Cu electrodes coated by Au was observed to be stable up to the injection rate of 10{sup 5} particles per second.

  9. Gain Characteristics of a 100 μm thick Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, J. A.; Natal da Luz, H.; Carvalho, X.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Amaro, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    The standard Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) invented by F. Sauli [1] consists of high density holes etched in 50 μm thick copper clad Kapton foil. This study, however, investigated the basic charge gain characteristics of a non-standard 100 μm thick Gas Electron Multiplier, fabricated using the same wet chemical etch process at CERN. It was possible to sustain charge gains of 3× 103 and 1× 104 using single and double stage configurations, respectively, operated in an Ar(70%)-CO2(30%) gas mixture. These values are similar to those achieved with standard GEMs. Crucially, we found that the thicker GEM is more robust as it withstood sparking without catastrophic failure. We also measured the gain dependence on ambient variables such as pressure and temperature and found the gain sensitivity to be 4.0 K/mbar, compared with 1.55 K/mbar for the standard GEM.

  10. Upgrade of the CMS muon system with triple-GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abi Akl, M.; Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, W.; Altieri, P.; Aly, R.; Ashfaq, A.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barria, P.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Cai, J.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Conde Garcia, A.; Dabrowski, M. M.; De Lentdecker, G.; De Oliveira, R.; de Robertis, G.; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Elmetenawee, W.; Fabrice, G.; Ferry, S.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Guiducci, L.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hassan, A.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kim, H.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Maerschalk, T.; Magazzu, G.; Maggi, M.; Maghrbi, Y.; Magnani, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Merlin, J. A.; Mohammed, N.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Phipps, M.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Pugliese, G.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ramkrishna, S.; Ranieri, A.; Riccardi, C.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; Roychoddhury, S.; Ryu, M. S.; Ryu, G.; Safonov, A.; Sakharov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Swain, S. K.; Talvitie, J. P.; Tamma, C.; Tatarinov, A.; Turini, N.; Tuuva, T.; Twigger, J.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; van Stenis, M.; Venditi, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2014-10-01

    The CMS collaboration considers upgrading the muon forward region which is particularly affected by the high-luminosity conditions at the LHC. The proposal involves Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers, which are able to handle the extreme particle rates expected in this region along with a high spatial resolution. This allows to combine tracking and triggering capabilities, which will improve the CMS muon High Level Trigger, the muon identification and the track reconstruction. Intense R&D has been going on since 2009 and it has lead to the development of several GEM prototypes and associated detector electronics. These GEM prototypes have been subjected to extensive tests in the laboratory and in test beams at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). This contribution will review the status of the CMS upgrade project with GEMs and its impact on the CMS performance.

  11. The gain in Thick GEM multipliers and its time-evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M.; Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Makke, N.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Novakova, K.; Novy, J.; Panzieri, D.; Pereira, F. A.; Santos, C. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schopferer, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-03-01

    In the context of a project to upgrade the gas photon detectors of COMPASS RICH-1, we have performed an R&D programme aimed to develop photon detectors based on multi-layer arrangements of thick GEM electron multipliers coupled to a CsI photoconverter. For this purpose, thick GEMs have been characterised in detail including the gain performance, its dependance on the geometrical parameters and its time-evolution, a feature exhibited by the gas detectors with open insulator surfaces. The variation due to this evolution drammatically depends on the parameters themselves. In the present article we summarise the outcomes of the studies dedicated to the thick GEM gain and its evolution versus time. We also include a qualitative model which accounts for the peculiar details of the observed thick GEM gain time-evolution.

  12. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  13. eGEMs: Pragmatic Publishing to Build a Learning Health System.

    PubMed

    Holve, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Data Methods (EDM) Forum announces the launch of eGEMs (Generating Evidence and Methods to improve patient outcomes), a new, free, open access, peer-reviewed e-publication. eGEMs aims to disseminate innovative ideas about how electronic clinical data (ECD) can be leveraged in comparative effectiveness research (CER), patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) and quality improvement (QI). eGEMs seeks submissions in four main topic areas: analytic methods, clinical informatics, governance, and the learning health system. The goal of eGEMs is ultimately to promote dialogue and the sharing of ideas between researchers and other stakeholders in a credible and timely way, extending the efforts of the EDM Forum. PMID:25848553

  14. eGEMs: Pragmatic Publishing to Build a Learning Health System

    PubMed Central

    Holve, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Data Methods (EDM) Forum announces the launch of eGEMs (Generating Evidence and Methods to improve patient outcomes), a new, free, open access, peer-reviewed e-publication. eGEMs aims to disseminate innovative ideas about how electronic clinical data (ECD) can be leveraged in comparative effectiveness research (CER), patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) and quality improvement (QI). eGEMs seeks submissions in four main topic areas: analytic methods, clinical informatics, governance, and the learning health system. The goal of eGEMs is ultimately to promote dialogue and the sharing of ideas between researchers and other stakeholders in a credible and timely way, extending the efforts of the EDM Forum. PMID:25848553

  15. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Jamil, M; Rhee, J T; Kim, H G; Ahmad, Farzana; Jeon, Y J

    2014-10-22

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5cm(2) configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSP_BIC_HP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSP_BERT_HP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. PMID:25464183

  16. Flight research with the MIT Daedalus prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussolari, Steven R.; Youngren, Harold H.; Langford, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The MIT Light Eagle human-powered aircraft underwent long-duration testing over Rogers Dry Lake in California during January, 1987. Designed as a prototype for the MIT Daedalus Project, the Light Eagle's forty-eight flights provided pilot training, established new distance records for human-powered flight, and provided quantitative data through a series of instrumented flight experiments. The experiments focused on: (1) evaluating physiological loads on the pilot, (2) determining airframe power requirements, and (3) developing an electronic flight control system. This paper discusses the flight test program, its results and their implications for the follow-on Daedalus aircraft, and the potential uses of the Light Eagle as a low Reynolds number testbed.

  17. Gem GTPase acts upstream Gmip/RhoA to regulate cortical actin remodeling and spindle positioning during early mitosis.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Cuvillier, Olivier; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2014-11-01

    Gem is a small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein within the Ras superfamily, involved in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel activity and cytoskeleton reorganization. Gem overexpression leads to stress fiber disruption, actin and cell shape remodeling and neurite elongation in interphase cells. In this study, we show that Gem plays a crucial role in the regulation of cortical actin cytoskeleton that undergoes active remodeling during mitosis. Ectopic expression of Gem leads to cortical actin disruption and spindle mispositioning during metaphase. The regulation of spindle positioning by Gem involves its downstream effector Gmip. Knockdown of Gmip rescued Gem-induced spindle phenotype, although both Gem and Gmip accumulated at the cell cortex. In addition, we implicated RhoA GTPase as an important effector of Gem/Gmip signaling. Inactivation of RhoA by overexpressing dominant-negative mutant prevented normal spindle positioning. Introduction of active RhoA rescued the actin and spindle positioning defects caused by Gem or Gmip overexpression. These findings demonstrate a new role of Gem/Gmip/RhoA signaling in cortical actin regulation during early mitotic stages. PMID:25173885

  18. Grundlegende Steuerungsverfahren im heterogenen Logistiknetz mit Kanban

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickmann, Eva; Dickmann, Philipp; Lödding, Hermann; Möller, Niklas; Rücker, Thomas; Schneider, Herfried M.; Zäh, Michael F.

    In vielen Unternehmen werden heterogene (verschiedene) Steuerungen in einem abgestimmten Konzept kombiniert. Je nach Anwendungsfall und Rahmenbedingungen werden Kombinationen allgemein bekannter Steuerungen oder Steuerungsvarianten gemischt eingesetzt, um eine optimale Steuerung für unterschiedliche Fälle zu erreichen. Hierbei stehen neben den bekannten und weit verbreiteten Methoden, wie Material Requirements Planning (MRP) oder Kanban, auch weniger bekannte oder neue Methoden zur Auswahl, wie die Produktionssteuerung mit dezentraler, bestandsorientierter Fertigungsregelung (DBF). Kanban ist ein simples und effizientes Steuerungskonzept, das in der klassischen Form für spezifische einfache Anwendungsfälle umsetzbar ist. Hochentwickelte Steuerungsalgorithmen können helfen, komplexe Abläufe optimal abzubilden. Mit einer grundlegenden Vereinfachung der Abläufe kann allerdings in vielen Fällen ein wesentlich stärkerer und umfassender Verbesserungseffekt erzielt werden. Die wesentliche Fragestellung sollte folglich lauten: Warum ist der Ablauf nicht mit einer einfachen Steuerung wie Kanban abzubilden? Um die Vorteile des Konzepts auch in untypischen Bereichen anwenden zu können, sind jedoch verschiedene Varianten oder Kanban-ähnliche Steuerungsmethoden entstanden. Darüber hinaus sind in der Praxis hybride Steuerungen im Einsatz, welche so kombiniert werden, dass die Zusammensetzung anspruchsvolle Eigenschaftsbilder noch exakt abbildet. In der Praxis basieren die Steuerungsentscheidungen nur zu einem kleinen Teil auf den eigentlichen Steuerungsalgorithmen, wie sie uns das MRP-System zur Verfügung stellt. Moderne Steuerungswelten" schließen alle relevanten Informationsquellen in eine heterogene Entscheidungsmatrix mit ein. Letztlich zählt nicht, ob die Entscheidung auf den Informationen aus dem MRP-System oder auf Softfacts basierend getroffen wurde, sondern nur, ob die Entscheidung erfolgreich war.

  19. Systematic measurements of the gain and the energy resolution of single and double mask GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Schmidt, D. J.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Garabatos, C.; Hehner, J.; Kleipa, V.; Morhardt, T.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.; Wiechula, J.

    2016-07-01

    Systematic studies on the gain and the energy resolution have been carried out by varying the voltage across the GEM foils for both single mask and double mask triple GEM detector prototypes. Variation of the gain and the energy resolution has also been measured by varying either the drift voltage, transfer voltage and induction voltage keeping other voltages constant. The results of the systematic measurements have been presented.

  20. BoNuS: Development and Use of a Radial TPC using Cylindrical GEMs

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Fenker; Nathan Baillie; Peter Bradshaw; S. Bultmann; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Michael Christy; Gail Dodge; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Josh Evans; Robert Fersch; Kevin Giovanetti; Keith Griffioen; Mikayel Ispiryan; Chandana Jayalath; Narbe Kalantarians; Cynthia Keppel; Sebastian Kuhn; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Vladas Tvaskis; Jixie Zhang

    2007-11-28

    To provide new access to information about nucleon structure from electron-neutron interactions, a specialized aystem of target and detector was developed at Jefferson Lab. It allows identification and measurement of spectator protons produced in e X scattering events. The detector is a radial time-projection chamber optimized for the acceptance of low-momentum protons. Gas gain is provided by three cascaded curved Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs), the first application of GEMs in any configuration other than flat.

  1. Public release of the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900-2009)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storchak, Dmitry A.; Di Giacomo, Domenico; Bondára, István; Engdahl, E. Robert; Harris, James; Lee, William H.K.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Bormann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The International Seismological Centre–Global Earthquake Model (ISC–GEM) Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900–2009) is the result of a special effort to substantially extend and improve currently existing global catalogs to serve the requirements of specific user groups who assess and model seismic hazard and risk. The data from the ISC–GEM Catalogue would be used worldwide yet will prove absolutely essential in those regions where a high seismicity level strongly correlates with a high population density.

  2. Development of GEM-Based Digital Hadron Calorimetry Using the SLAC KPiX Chip

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.; /Texas U., Arlington /Washington U., Seattle /Unlisted /SLAC

    2012-04-12

    The development of Digital Hadron Calorimetry for the SiD detector Concept for the International Linear Collider is described. The jet energy requirements of the ILC physics program are discussed. The concept of GEM-based digital hadron calorimetry is presented, followed by a description of, and results from, prototype detectors. Plans are described for the construction of 1m{sup 2} GEM-DHCAL planes to be tested as part of a future calorimeter stack.

  3. Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (gems) Over the Korea Peninsula and Asia-Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasnik, J.; Stephens, M.; Baker, B.; Randall, C.; Ko, D. H.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, E. S.; Chang, S.; Park, J. M.; SEO, S. B.; Youk, Y.; Kong, J. P.; Lee, D.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Introduction: The Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) is one of two instruments manifested aboard the South Korean Geostationary Earth Orbit KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite-2B (GEO-KOMPSAT-2B or GK2B), which is scheduled to launch in 2018. Jointly developed/built by KARI and Ball Aerospace, GEMS is a geostationary UV-Vis hyperspectral imager designed to monitor trans-boundary tropospheric pollution events over the Korean peninsula and Asia-Pacific region. The spectrometer provides high temporal and spatial resolution (3.5 km N/S by 7.2 km E/W) measurements of ozone, its precursors, and aerosols. Over the short-term, hourly measurements by GEMS will improve early warnings for potentially dangerous pollution events and monitor population exposure. Over the 10-year mission-life, GEMS will serve to enhance our understanding of long-term climate change and broader air quality issues on both a regional and global scale. The GEMS sensor design and performance are discussed, which includes an overview of measurement capabilities and the on-orbit concept of operations. GEMS Sensor Overview: The GEMS hyperspectral imaging system consists of a telescope and Offner grating spectrometer that feeds a single CCD detector array. A spectral range of 300-500 nm and sampling of 0.2 nm enables NO2, SO2, HCHO, O3, and aerosol retrieval. The GEMS field of regard (FOR), which extends from 5°S to 45°N in latitude and 75°E to 145°E in longitude, is operationally achieved using an onboard two-axis scan mirror. On-orbit, the radiometric calibration is maintained using solar measurements, which are performed using two onboard diffusers: a working diffuser that is deployed routinely for the purpose of solar calibration, and a reference diffuser that is deployed sparingly for the purpose of monitoring working diffuser performance degradation.

  4. Development of GEM trigger electronics for the J-PARC E16 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Y.; Hamada, E.; Ikeno, M.; Kawama, D.; Morino, Y.; Nakai, W.; Ozawa, K.; Sendai, H.; Takahashi, T. N.; Tanaka, M. M.; Uchida, T.; Yokkaichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    At the J-PARC E16 experiment[1], we measure mass spectra of vector mesons in nuclei from the e+e- decay channel with high precision and high statistics. We have developed the trigger system consisting of newly developed ASD ASICs which can extract signals from the GEM foil used as a cathode plane of the induction gap in a GEM chamber and digital electronics using FPGAs which processes binary signals from the ASIC.

  5. Mishap Investigation Team (MIT) - Barksdale AFB, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepaniak, Philip

    2005-01-01

    The Shuttle Program is organized to support a Shuttle mishap using the resources of the MIT. The afternoon of Feb. 1, 2003, the MIT deployed to Barksdale AFB. This location became the investigative center and interim storage location for crewmembers received from the Lufkin Disaster Field Office (DFO). Working under the leadership of the MIT Lead, the medical team executed a short-term plan that included search, recovery, and identification including coordination with the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Temporary operations was set up at Barksdale Air Force Base for two weeks. During this time, coordination with the DFO field recovery teams, AFIP personnel, and the crew surgeons was on going. In addition, the crewmember families and NASA management were updated daily. The medical team also dealt with public reports and questions concerning biological and chemical hazards, which were coordinated with SPACEHAB, Inc., Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Medical Operations and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Space Medicine office. After operations at Barksdale were concluded the medical team transitioned back to Houston and a long-term search, recovery and identification plan was developed.

  6. iGEMS: an integrated model for identification of alternative exon usage events.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sanjana; Szkop, Krzysztof J; Nakhuda, Asif; Gallagher, Iain J; Murie, Carl; Brogan, Robert J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Atherton, Philip J; Kujala, Urho M; Gustafsson, Thomas; Larsson, Ola; Timmons, James A

    2016-06-20

    DNA microarrays and RNAseq are complementary methods for studying RNA molecules. Current computational methods to determine alternative exon usage (AEU) using such data require impractical visual inspection and still yield high false-positive rates. Integrated Gene and Exon Model of Splicing (iGEMS) adapts a gene-level residuals model with a gene size adjusted false discovery rate and exon-level analysis to circumvent these limitations. iGEMS was applied to two new DNA microarray datasets, including the high coverage Human Transcriptome Arrays 2.0 and performance was validated using RT-qPCR. First, AEU was studied in adipocytes treated with (n = 9) or without (n = 8) the anti-diabetes drug, rosiglitazone. iGEMS identified 555 genes with AEU, and robust verification by RT-qPCR (∼90%). Second, in a three-way human tissue comparison (muscle, adipose and blood, n = 41) iGEMS identified 4421 genes with at least one AEU event, with excellent RT-qPCR verification (95%, n = 22). Importantly, iGEMS identified a variety of AEU events, including 3'UTR extension, as well as exon inclusion/exclusion impacting on protein kinase and extracellular matrix domains. In conclusion, iGEMS is a robust method for identification of AEU while the variety of exon usage between human tissues is 5-10 times more prevalent than reported by the Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium using RNA sequencing. PMID:27095197

  7. iGEMS: an integrated model for identification of alternative exon usage events

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Sanjana; Szkop, Krzysztof J.; Nakhuda, Asif; Gallagher, Iain J.; Murie, Carl; Brogan, Robert J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Atherton, Philip J.; Kujala, Urho M.; Gustafsson, Thomas; Larsson, Ola; Timmons, James A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarrays and RNAseq are complementary methods for studying RNA molecules. Current computational methods to determine alternative exon usage (AEU) using such data require impractical visual inspection and still yield high false-positive rates. Integrated Gene and Exon Model of Splicing (iGEMS) adapts a gene-level residuals model with a gene size adjusted false discovery rate and exon-level analysis to circumvent these limitations. iGEMS was applied to two new DNA microarray datasets, including the high coverage Human Transcriptome Arrays 2.0 and performance was validated using RT-qPCR. First, AEU was studied in adipocytes treated with (n = 9) or without (n = 8) the anti-diabetes drug, rosiglitazone. iGEMS identified 555 genes with AEU, and robust verification by RT-qPCR (∼90%). Second, in a three-way human tissue comparison (muscle, adipose and blood, n = 41) iGEMS identified 4421 genes with at least one AEU event, with excellent RT-qPCR verification (95%, n = 22). Importantly, iGEMS identified a variety of AEU events, including 3′UTR extension, as well as exon inclusion/exclusion impacting on protein kinase and extracellular matrix domains. In conclusion, iGEMS is a robust method for identification of AEU while the variety of exon usage between human tissues is 5–10 times more prevalent than reported by the Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium using RNA sequencing. PMID:27095197

  8. Performance Evaluation of the COBRA GEM for the Application of the TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, Kohei; Hamagaki, Hideki; Gunji, Taku; Yamaguchi, Yorito

    2014-09-01

    Suppression of the back-drifting ions from avalanche region to drift space (IBF: Ion Backflow) is the key for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) since IBF easily distorts the drift field. To suppress IBF, Gating Grid system is widely used for the TPC but this limits the data taking rate. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has advantages in the reduction of IBF and high rate capability. By adopting GEM, it is possible to run a TPC continuously under high rate and high multiplicity conditions. Motivated by the study of IBF reduction for RICH with Thick COBRA, which has been developed by F. A. Amero et al., we developed COBRA GEMs for the application of a TPC. With a stack configuration, IBF reaches about 0.1 ~ 0.5%, which is ×5--10 better IBF than the standard GEMs. However, the measured energy resolution with COBRA is 20% (σ) and this is much worse than the resolution with standard GEMs. Measurement of long-time stability of gain indicates that gain of COBRA varies significantly due to charging up effect. Simulation studies based on Garfield++ are performed for understanding quantitatively the reasons of worse energy resolution and instability of gain. In this presentation, we will report the simulation studies together with the measured performance of the COBRA GEM.

  9. A new gravitational model for the earth from satellite tracking data - GEM-T1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F. J.; Putney, B. H.; Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    A computation of a terrestrial gravitational field model called the Goddard Earth Model GEM-T1 is discussed and compared to previous models, including the GEM-L2. The software tools were redesigned for the model, allowing for the optimization of the technique of relative data weighting and model estimation used in GEM solutions. The GEM-T1 model provides a simultaneous solution for a gravity model in spherical harmonics complete to degree and order 36, a subset of 66 ocean tidal coefficients for the long-wavelength components of 12 major tides, and 5-day averaged earth rotation and polar motion parameters for the 1980 period on. GEM-T1 was derived from satellite tracking data acquired on 17 different satellites whose inclinations ranged from 15 degrees to polar. A simulation of the TOPEX/POSEIDON orbit using the covariances of the GEM-T1 model was made. Estimated radial error for the simulation was reduced to less than 30 cm rms.

  10. Performance of a Medium-Size Area nGEM Detector for Neutron Beam Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Albani, G.; Muraro, A.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.; Grosso, G.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    Fast neutron detectors with a sub-centimetric space resolution are required in order to qualify neutron beams in applications related to magnetically-controlled nuclear fusion plasmas and to spallation sources. Based on the results obtained with small area prototypes, the first medium-size (20 x 35.2 cm2 active area) nGEM detector has been realized for both the CNESM diagnostic system of the SPIDER NBI prototype for ITER and as a beam monitor for fast neutrons beam lines at spallation sources, too. The nGEM is a Triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with polyethylene layers used to convert fast neutrons into recoil protons through the elastic scattering process. This paper describes the performance of the medium-size nGEM detector tested at the VESUVIO beam line of the ISIS spallation source. Being this detector the actual largest area fast neutron detector based on the GEM technology, particular attention was paid in the study of detector response in different points over the active area. Measurements of GEM counting rate (both as a function of VGEM and of time) and of the capability of the detector to reconstruct the beam in different positions are presented. This detector serves as a basis for the realization of an even larger area detector that will be used in the MITICA NBI prototype for ITER that represents the evolution of SPIDER.

  11. Properties of the Flight Model Gas Electron Multiplier for the GEMS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, Yoko; Kitaguchi, Takao; Hayato, Asami; Tamagawa, Toru; Iwakiri, Wataru; Asami, Fumi; Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Kaneko, Kenta; Enoto, Teruaki; Black, Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We present the gain properties of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) foil in pure dimethyl ether (DME) at 190 Torr. The GEM is one of the micro pattern gas detectors and it is adopted as a key part of the X-ray polarimeter for the GEMS mission. The X-ray polarimeter is a time projection chamber operating in pure DME gas at 190 Torr. We describe experimental results of (1) the maximum gain the GEM can achieve without any discharges, (2) the linearity of the energy scale for the GEM operation, and (3) the two-dimensional gain variation of the active area. First, our experiment with 6.4 keV X-ray irradiation of the whole GEM area demonstrates that the maximum effective gain is 2 x 10(exp 4) with the applied voltage of 580 V. Second, the measured energy scale is linear among three energies of 4.5, 6.4, and 8.0 keV. Third, the two-dimensional gain mapping test derives the standard deviation of the gain variability of 7% across the active area.

  12. GEM*STAR: Time for an Alternative Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2011-10-01

    The presumption that nuclear reactors will retain their role in global energy production is constantly being challenged - even more so following recent events at Fukushima. Nuclear energy, despite being ``green,'' has inexorably been coupled in the public mind with three paramount concerns: safety, weapons proliferation, and waste (and then ultimately cost). Over the past four decades, the safety of deployed fleets has greatly improved, yet the capital and political costs of a ``nuclear energy option'' appear insurmountable in several countries. The US approach to civilian nuclear energy has become deeply entrenched, first through choices made by the military, and then by the deployed nuclear reactor fleet. This extends to the research agencies as well, to the point where basic sciences and nuclear energy operate in separate spheres. But technologies and priorities have changed, and the time has arrived where a transformative re-think of nuclear energy is not only possible, but urgent. And nuclear physicists are uniquely positioned to accomplish this. This talk will show that by asking, and answering,``what would an accelerator-driven civilian nuclear energy program look like,'' ADNA Corporation's GEM*STAR design directly addresses all three fundamental concerns: safety, proliferation, and waste - and also the final hurdle: cost. GEM*STAR is not an ``add-on'' (to either Project-X, or GEN III+), but rather a base-line energy production capacity, for either electricity or transport fuel production. It integrates and advances the molten-salt reactor technology developed at ORNL, the MW beam accelerator technologies developed by basic sciences, and a reactor/target design optimized for accelerator driven-systems. The results include: the ability to use LWR spent fuel without reprocessing or additional waste; the ability to use natural uranium; no critical mass ever present; orders-of-magnitude less volatile radioactivity in the core; more efficient use of, and deeper

  13. The liquid helium thermosyphon for the GEM detector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.

    1993-05-04

    The GEM detector magnet, a horizontal solenoid 19.5 m in diameter and wound with a niobium-titanium cable in conduit, will be located with it`s axis 19.5 m below grade. The conductor is wound on the inside of an aluminum bobbin which is cooled by liquid helium which flows by natural convection in a thermosyphon loop from a large storage dewar located at the ground surface. The function of the thermosyphon system is to absorb the environmental heat load as well as any internally generated heat. In the first category is included that heat which is transfered to the magnet by way of the mechanical supports, the insulation and the current leads. The internally generated heat includes the resistive heating within the normally conducting conductor splices and the inductive heating of the bobbin during current transients. Though similar systems have been employed elsewhere, there are some unique aspects to the present design. By taking advantage of the large vertical head available, the parallel heat exchanger passes within the magnet remain sub-cooled, thus insuring single phase coolant within the magnet. It is believed that this will be the first instance of such a large vertical head being used to this advantage in a helium system.

  14. GEMS Observations of Obscured Galactic Bulge Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Douglas; Saracino, Sara; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Ferraro, Francesco; Lanzoni, Barbara; Mauro, Francesco; Villanova, Sandro; Moni Bidin, Christian; Miocchi, Paolo; Massari, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We will present results for several heavily obscured Galactic globular clusters lying in the bulge, including Liller 1 and NGC 6624. The observations were obtained exploiting the exceptional high-resolution capabilities of the near-IR camera GSAOI combined with the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System at the GEMINI South Telescope. The images in the J and K bands are generally sub-0.1", only slightly larger than the diffraction limit of the telescope, yielding the deepest and most accurate color-magnitude diagrams obtained so far from the ground for these clusters. We derived the structural and physical properties of both clusters, supplementing the GEMS data with data from the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea project. We were also able to investigate the age of NGC 6624. We find that Liller 1 is significantly less concentrated and less extended than previously thought. We estimated the mass of Liller 1 to be 2.3 million solar masses, comparable to that of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy. Also, Liller 1 has the second-highest collision rate among all star clusters in the Galaxy, thus confirming that it is an ideal environment for the formation of collisional objects (such as millisecond pulsars). The NGC 6624 CMD reveals the second knee of the mainsequence and allows us to determine a very accurate age of 12.0 +-0.5 Gyr.

  15. On-sky validation of LIFT on GEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantet, Cedric; Meimon, Serge; Conan, Jean-Marc; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Laser assisted adaptive optics systems rely on Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wave-Front Sensors (WFS) for high order aberration measurements, and rely on Natural Guide Stars (NGS) WFS to complement the measurements on low orders such as tip-tilt and focus. The sky-coverage of the whole system is therefore related to the limiting magnitude of the NGS WFS. LIFT is a novel WFS based on the analysis of a well corrected full aperture short exposure image, simply with a small astigmatism offset. It allows a 1 magnitude gain over the usually used 2x2 Shack-Hartmann WFS. Its noise propagation is comparable to a 4-pixel pyramid sensor without modulation. Besides, it requires a much more simple hardware, making it a reliable and easy to set up solution. Early this year, LIFT came out of the lab and has been tested on GEMS, the multiconjugate adaptive optics system of Gemini South. We present here the first on-sky IR wave-front sensing data obtained with LIFT. We show that these results constitute a clear on-sky demonstration of the LIFT concept.

  16. Radiation tests for a single-GEM-loaded gaseous detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyong Sei; Hong, Byungsik; Park, Sung Keun; Kim, Sang Yeol

    2014-11-01

    We report on a systematic study of a single-gas-electron-multiplier (GEM)-loaded gaseous detector developed for precision measurements of high-energy particle beams and for dose verification in particle therapy. In the present study, a 256-channel prototype detector having an active area of 16 × 16 cm2 and operating using a continuous current-integration-mode signal-processing method was manufactured and tested with X-rays emitted from a 70-kV X-ray generator and 43-MeV protons provided by the MC50 proton cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The amplified detector response was measured for X-rays with an intensity of about 5 × 106 Hz cm-2. The linearity of the detector response to the particle flux was examined and validated by using 43-MeV proton beams. The non-uniform development of the amplification for the gas electrons in space was corrected by applying a proper calibration to the channel responses of the measured beam-profile data. We conclude from the radiation tests that the detector developed in the present study will allow us to perform quality measurements of various high-energy particle beams and to apply the technology to dose-verification measurements in particle therapy.

  17. Geopotential models of the Earth from satellite tracking, altimeter and surface gravity observations: GEM-T3 and GEM-T3S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.; Williamson, R. G.; Chinn, D. S.; Chan, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Improved models of the Earth's gravitational field have been developed from conventional tracking data and from a combination of satellite tracking, satellite altimeter and surface gravimetric data. This combination model represents a significant improvement in the modeling of the gravity field at half-wavelengths of 300 km and longer. Both models are complete to degree and order 50. The Goddard Earth Model-T3 (GEM-T3) provides more accurate computation of satellite orbital effects as well as giving superior geoidal representation from that achieved in any previous GEM. A description of the models, their development and an assessment of their accuracy is presented. The GEM-T3 model used altimeter data from previous satellite missions in estimating the orbits, geoid, and dynamic height fields. Other satellite tracking data are largely the same as was used to develop GEM-T2, but contain certain important improvements in data treatment and expanded laser tracking coverage. Over 1300 arcs of tracking data from 31 different satellites have been used in the solution. Reliable estimates of the model uncertainties via error calibration and optimal data weighting techniques are discussed.

  18. The MIT Program, Competition, and Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, Hale V.

    2013-01-01

    The MIT program in x-ray astronomy was, and still is, diverse and productive. Bruno Rossi and later George Clark, as the nominal leaders of the “x-ray astronomy group” created a “hands-off” culture wherein individual researchers could develop their own independent programs. Walter Lewin, Claude Canizares, and I as well as those in the next academic generations, e.g., Saul Rappaport and George Ricker, were able to thrive in this environment. MIT researchers were principal investigators or providers of x-ray instruments on sounding rockets and balloons in the 1960s and then in later years on nine satellite missions, OSO-7, SAS-3, HEAO-1, Einstein, ASCA, RXTE, Chandra, HETE-2, and Suzaku. Such a diverse program involved collaborations with other institutions and of course striving for primacy in discovery and competition for NASA resources. Looking back, I see a high degree of ethical behavior among the observational x-ray community during those years. In competition, we remembered that we might well be collaborating the following year and behaved accordingly. Many of us in the x-ray community had been friends since graduate school days and did not want to lose those relationships. Am I viewing the past through rose colored glasses? I think not. A vignette on this topic: In 1967, I was debating vigorously with Herb Gursky of AS&E about which institution, MIT or AS&E, should be the lead on the fourth paper (Oda et al. 1967, ApJ 148, L5) based on data from the 1966 AS&E rocket flight which had led to Allan Sandage’s (and Japanese) identification of Sco X-1 (Sandage, et al. 1966, ApJ. 146, 316). I and my Italian colleague, Gianfranco Spada, and our Japanese colleague, Minoru Oda, both then visiting MIT, had actively supported that flight. After one rather heated discussion with Herb about this, - I was the heated one; he always remained calm - he left my office saying: “Hale, however this comes out, let’s remain friends.” I treasured that comment and

  19. MIT Space Engineering Research Center testbed programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at M.I.T., started in July 1988, has completed two and one-half years of research. This Semi-Annual Report presents annotated viewgraph material presented at the January 1991 Steering Committee and Technical Representative Review. The objective of the Space Engineering Research Center is to develop and disseminate a unified technology of controlled structures. There has been continued evolution of the concept of intelligent structures (including in this past year the first successful embedding of a microelectronic component into a structural element).

  20. Identifying the Source of Gem Diamonds: Requirements for a Certification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigley, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    Recent civil conflicts in several countries, in which profits from the sales of gem diamonds have supported the rival factions, have forced the jewelry industry to confront the need to certify the geographic sources of gem diamonds. The goals of this program are to prohibit the sale of so-called "conflict diamonds", and to prevent the loss of consumer confidence. Efforts to identify unique characteristics of gem diamonds have been hampered so far by the absence of chemical or physical features that are diagnostic of particular sources, and the lack of a representative collection of diamonds from major producing areas that would be required for a rigorous scientific study. The jewelry industry has therefore adopted plans to track gem diamonds from the mine through the manufacturing process to the consumer. Practical requirements for implementation of such a certification system will be summarized. Any proposed solutions for determining the sources of gem diamonds by some analytical technique, or for following diamonds from the mine, must take into account the annual production of several tens of millions of carats of rough diamonds, which are transformed during manufacturing into several hundreds of millions of polished gemstones (with an average weight of only about 0.03 carat, or 0.006 gram).

  1. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) GEM Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; J. Schroeder; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. Using the SAPHIRE analysis engine and relational database is a complementary program called GEM. GEM has been designed to simplify using existing PRA analysis for activities such as the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program. In this report, the theoretical framework behind GEM-type calculations are discussed in addition to providing guidance and examples for performing evaluations when using the GEM software. As part of this analysis framework, the two types of GEM analysis are outlined, specifically initiating event (where an initiator occurs) and condition (where a component is failed for some length of time) assessments.

  2. Production status of the JLAB Hall-A GEM and Si μstrip Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, E.; Bellini, V.; Capogni, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; Diefenbach, J.; De Leo, R.; De Persio, F.; Frullani, S.; Giuliani, F.; Lucentini, M.; Meddi, F.; Minutoli, Saverio; Musico, Paolo; Noto, F.; De Oliveira, R.; Perrino, R.; Santavenere, F.; Urciuoli, G.

    2013-08-01

    We developed and tested a new charged particle tracking system, able to operate in high luminosity experiments, which will be installed at Jefferson Laboratory HallA (VA, USA) for optimally exploit the new 12 GeV energy electron beam available at the end of 2013. The tracker is made of six GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) large chambers and two 10×20 cm2 planes of SIlicon microstrip Detectors (SIDs). Each GEM chamber is composed by three 40×50 cm2 GEM modules, with two-dimensional strip readout, with expected spatial resolution of about 70 μm. The same dedicated acquisition system will be used for both detectors (GEM & SID) for a grand total of more than 50,000 channels. The readout electronics is divided into two parts: the front-end cards (based on the existing APV25 chip), hosted on the detectors periphery and the digitizer, a multi purpose VME-64x/VXS board located far from the high radiation environment. The very same electronics has been adopted by the Olympus experiment (DESY, Hamburg, D) to read out the six GEM chambers of its luminosity monitor. The developed detectors and electronics are now ready for the production, which will last for the next 2 years.

  3. Gravity model improvement using GEOS 3 /GEM 9 and 10/. [and Seasat altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Wagner, C. A.; Klosko, S. M.; Laubscher, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although errors in previous gravity models have produced large uncertainties in the orbital position of GEOS 3, significant improvement has been obtained with new geopotential solutions, Goddard Earth Model (GEM) 9 and 10. The GEM 9 and 10 solutions for the potential coefficients and station coordinates are presented along with a discussion of the new techniques employed. Also presented and discussed are solutions for three fundamental geodetic reference parameters, viz. the mean radius of the earth, the gravitational constant, and mean equatorial gravity. Evaluation of the gravity field is examined together with evaluation of GEM 9 and 10 for orbit determination accuracy. The major objectives of GEM 9 and 10 are achieved. GEOS 3 orbital accuracies from these models are about 1 m in their radial components for 5-day arc lengths. Both models yield significantly improved results over GEM solutions when compared to surface gravimetry, Skylab and GEOS 3 altimetry, and highly accurate BE-C (Beacon Explorer-C) laser ranges. The new values of the parameters discussed are given.

  4. An improved error assessment for the GEM-T1 gravitational model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Marsh, J. G.; Klosko, S. M.; Patel, G. B.; Chinn, D. S.; Pavlis, E. C.; Wagner, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    Several tests have been designed to estimate the correct error variances for the GEM-T1 gravitational solution that was derived exclusively from satellite tracking data. The basic method uses both independent and dependent subset data solutions and produces a coefficient-by-coefficient estimate of the model uncertainties. The GEM-T1 errors have been further analyzed using a method based on eigenvalue-eigenvector analysis, which calibrates the entire covariance matrix. Dependent satellite data sets and independent altimetric, resonant satellite, and surface gravity data sets all confirm essentially the same error assessment. The calibration test results yield very stable calibration factors, which vary only by approximately 10 percent over the range of tests performed. Based on these calibrated error estimates, GEM-T1 is a significantly improved solution, which to degree and order 8 is twice as accurate as earlier satellite derived models like GEM-L2. Also, by being complete to degree and order 36, GEM-T1 is more complete and has significantly reduced aliasing effects that were present in previous models.

  5. Applications of Mapping and Tomographic Techniques in Gem Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Gem Sciences are scientific studies of gemstones - their genesis, provenance, synthesis, enhancement, treatment and identification. As high quality forms of specific minerals, the gemstones exhibit unusual physical properties that are usually unseen in the regular counterparts. Most gemstones are colored by trace elements incorporated in the crystal lattice during various growth stages; forming coloration zones of various scales. Studying the spectral and chemical contrast across color zones helps elucidating the origins of colors. These are done by UV-visible spectrometers with microscope and LA-ICPMS in modern gemological laboratories. In the case of diamonds, their colored zones arise from various structural defects incorporated in different growth zones and are studied with FTIR spectrometers with IR microscope and laser photoluminescence spectrometers. Advancement in modern synthetic techniques such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has created some problem for identification. Some exploratory experiments in carbon isotope mapping were done on diamonds using SIMS. The most important issue in pearls is to identify one particular pearl being a cultured one or a natural pearl. The price difference can be enormous. Classical way of such identification is done by x-ray radiographs, which clearly show the bead and the nacre. Modern cultured pearl advancement has eliminated the need for an artificial bead, but a small piece of tissue instead. Nowadays, computer x-ray tomography (CT) scanning devices are used to depict the clear image of the interior of a pearl. In the Chinese jade market, filling fissures with epoxy and/or wax are very commonly seen. We are currently exploring Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique to map the distribution of artificial resin within a polycrystalline aggregates.

  6. Decadal predictions with the HiGEM high resolution global coupled climate model: description and basic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffrey, L. C.; Hodson, D.; Robson, J.; Stevens, D. P.; Hawkins, E.; Polo, I.; Stevens, I.; Sutton, R. T.; Lister, G.; Iwi, A.; Smith, D.; Stephens, A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the development and basic evaluation of decadal predictions produced using the HiGEM coupled climate model. HiGEM is a higher resolution version of the HadGEM1 Met Office Unified Model. The horizontal resolution in HiGEM has been increased to 1.25° × 0.83° in longitude and latitude for the atmosphere, and 1/3° × 1/3° globally for the ocean. The HiGEM decadal predictions are initialised using an anomaly assimilation scheme that relaxes anomalies of ocean temperature and salinity to observed anomalies. 10 year hindcasts are produced for 10 start dates (1960, 1965,..., 2000, 2005). To determine the relative contributions to prediction skill from initial conditions and external forcing, the HiGEM decadal predictions are compared to uninitialised HiGEM transient experiments. The HiGEM decadal predictions have substantial skill for predictions of annual mean surface air temperature and 100 m upper ocean temperature. For lead times up to 10 years, anomaly correlations (ACC) over large areas of the North Atlantic Ocean, the Western Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean exceed values of 0.6. Initialisation of the HiGEM decadal predictions significantly increases skill over regions of the Atlantic Ocean, the Maritime Continent and regions of the subtropical North and South Pacific Ocean. In particular, HiGEM produces skillful predictions of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre for up to 4 years lead time (with ACC > 0.7), which are significantly larger than the uninitialised HiGEM transient experiments.

  7. Physik gestern und heute: Visualisierung mit der Schlierenmethode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Der Name des österreichischen Forschers Ernst Mach ist heute noch mit der Schallgeschwindigkeit verbunden. Diese Auszeichnung resultiert aus Machs Untersuchungen, wie sich Projektile mit Überschallgeschwindigkeit durch die Luft bewegen. Gerade in jüngster Zeit hat die Anwendung derartiger Methoden durch technische Modifikationen wieder einen Aufschwung erfahren.

  8. The M.I.T. INSITE Space System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyros, Kreon L.

    1989-01-01

    The M.I.T. INSITE (INstitutional Space Inventory TEchniques) system, a management information system developed specifically to provide facilities management information for decision making in the planning stages, is described. Since 1973, M.I.T. has shared the INSITE technology with a consortium of users from academic, health care, corporate and…

  9. Historisches Rätsel Physik mit Gewehr und Eiern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loos, Andreas

    2003-11-01

    Es fing schon gut an: Mit zehn Jahren saß der begabte Junge bereits in der Universität, wo ihn kein Geringerer als sein Vater persönlich unterrichtete. Damit schlug dieser zwei Fliegen mit einer Klappe: Sein Sohn lernte etwas Gescheites, und er war zugleich in sicherer Obhut.

  10. MMPI and MIT Discriminators of Biogenic and Psychogenic Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Male patients complaining of impotence (N=32) were administered the Male Impotence Test (MIT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The results suggested that the MIT is without value for differentiating between psychogenic and biogenic impotence, whereas two rules from the MMPI appropriately classified 90 percent of the…

  11. Optical characterization of synthetic faceted gem materials grown from hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Taijin; Shigley, James E.

    1998-10-01

    Various non-destructive optical characterization techniques have been used to characterize and identify synthetic gem materials grown from hydrothermal solutions, to include ruby, sapphire, emerald, amethyst and ametrine (amethyst-citrine), from their natural counterparts. The ability to observe internal features, such as inclusions, dislocations, twins, color bands, and growth zoning in gem materials is strongly dependent on the observation techniques and conditions, since faceted gemstones have many polished surfaces which can reflect and scatter light in various directions which can make observation difficult. However, diagnostic gemological properties of these faceted synthetic gem materials can be obtained by choosing effective optical characterization methods, and by modifying optical instruments. Examples of some of the distinctive features of synthetic amethyst, ametrine, pink quartz, ruby and emerald are presented to illustrate means of optical characterization of gemstones. The ability to observe defects by light scattering techniques is discussed.

  12. Study of gain variation as a function of physical parameters of GEM foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Supriya

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC has planned to upgrade the TPC by replacing the MWPC with GEM based detecting elements to restrict the IBF to a tolerable value. However the variation of the gain as a function of physical parameters of industrially produced large size GEM foils is needed to be studied as a part of the QA procedure for the detector. The size of the electron avalanche and consequently the gain for GEM based detectors depend on the electric field distribution inside the holes. Geometry of a hole plays an important role in defining the electric field inside it. In this work we have studied the variation of the gain as a function of the hole diameters using Garfield++ simulation package.

  13. Improved model of the Earth's gravitational field: GEM-T1

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.G.; Lerch, F.J.; Christodoulidis, D.C.; Putney, B.H.; Felsentreger, T.L.; Sanchez, B.V.; Smith, D.E.; Klosko, S.M.; Martin, T.V.; Pavlis, E.C.

    1987-07-01

    Goddard Earth Model T1 (GEM-T1), which was developed from an analysis of direct satellite tracking observations, is the first in a new series of such models. GEM-T1 is complete to degree and order 36. It was developed using consistent reference parameters and extensive earth and ocean tidal models. It was simultaneously solved for gravitational and tidal terms, earth orientation parameters, and the orbital parameters of 580 individual satellite arcs. The solution used only satellite tracking data acquired on 17 different satellites and is predominantly based upon the precise laser data taken by third generation systems. In all, 800,000 observations were used. A major improvement in field accuracy was obtained. For marine geodetic applications, long wavelength geoidal modeling is twice as good as in earlier satellite-only GEM models. Orbit determination accuracy has also been substantially advanced over a wide range of satellites that have been tested.

  14. Coordinated Chemical and Isotropic Studies of IDPS: Comparison of Circumstellar and Solar GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2007-01-01

    Silicate stardust in IDPs and meteorites include forsterite, amorphous silicates, and GEMS grains [1]. Amorphous presolar silicates are much less abundant than expected based on astronomical models [2], possibly destroyed by parent body alteration. A more accurate accounting of presolar silicate mineralogy may be preserved in anhydrous IDPs. Here we present results of coordinated TEM and isotopic analyses of an anhydrous IDP (L2005AL5) that is comprised of crystalline silicates and sulfides, GEMS grains, and equilibrated aggregates embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. Nanometer-scale quantitative compositional maps of all grains in two microtome thin sections were obtained with a JEOL 2500SE. These sections were then subjected to O and N isotopic imaging with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L. Coordinated high resolution chemical maps and O isotopic com-positions were obtained on 11 GEMS grains, 8 crystalline grains, and 6 equilibrated aggregates.

  15. OSG-GEM: Gene Expression Matrix Construction Using the Open Science Grid.

    PubMed

    Poehlman, William L; Rynge, Mats; Branton, Chris; Balamurugan, D; Feltus, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technology has revolutionized the study of gene expression while introducing significant computational challenges for biologists. These computational challenges include access to sufficient computer hardware and functional data processing workflows. Both these challenges are addressed with our scalable, open-source Pegasus workflow for processing high-throughput DNA sequence datasets into a gene expression matrix (GEM) using computational resources available to U.S.-based researchers on the Open Science Grid (OSG). We describe the usage of the workflow (OSG-GEM), discuss workflow design, inspect performance data, and assess accuracy in mapping paired-end sequencing reads to a reference genome. A target OSG-GEM user is proficient with the Linux command line and possesses basic bioinformatics experience. The user may run this workflow directly on the OSG or adapt it to novel computing environments. PMID:27499617

  16. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in the determination of gem provenance: beryls

    SciTech Connect

    McManus, Catherine E.; McMillan, Nancy J.; Harmon, Russell S.; Whitmore, Robert C.; De Lucia, Frank C. Jr.; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2008-11-01

    The provenance of gem stones has been of interest to geologists, gemologists, archeologists, and historians for centuries. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a minimally destructive tool for recording the rich chemical signatures of gem beryls (aquamarine, goshenite, heliodor, and morganite). Broadband LIBS spectra of 39 beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) specimens from 11 pegmatite mines in New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine (USA) are used to assess the potential of using principal component analysis of LIBS spectra to determine specimen provenance. Using this technique, beryls from the three beryl-bearing zones in the Palermo no. 1 pegmatite (New Hampshire) can be recognized. However, the compositional variation within this single mine is comparable to that in beryls from all three states. Thus, a very large database with detailed location metadata will be required to routinely determine gem beryl provenance.

  17. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in the determination of gem provenance: beryls.

    PubMed

    McManus, Catherine E; McMillan, Nancy J; Harmon, Russell S; Whitmore, Robert C; De Lucia, Frank C; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2008-11-01

    The provenance of gem stones has been of interest to geologists, gemologists, archeologists, and historians for centuries. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a minimally destructive tool for recording the rich chemical signatures of gem beryls (aquamarine, goshenite, heliodor, and morganite). Broadband LIBS spectra of 39 beryl (Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18)) specimens from 11 pegmatite mines in New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine (USA) are used to assess the potential of using principal component analysis of LIBS spectra to determine specimen provenance. Using this technique, beryls from the three beryl-bearing zones in the Palermo #1 pegmatite (New Hampshire) can be recognized. However, the compositional variation within this single mine is comparable to that in beryls from all three states. Thus, a very large database with detailed location metadata will be required to routinely determine gem beryl provenance. PMID:19122706

  18. OSG-GEM: Gene Expression Matrix Construction Using the Open Science Grid

    PubMed Central

    Poehlman, William L.; Rynge, Mats; Branton, Chris; Balamurugan, D.; Feltus, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technology has revolutionized the study of gene expression while introducing significant computational challenges for biologists. These computational challenges include access to sufficient computer hardware and functional data processing workflows. Both these challenges are addressed with our scalable, open-source Pegasus workflow for processing high-throughput DNA sequence datasets into a gene expression matrix (GEM) using computational resources available to U.S.-based researchers on the Open Science Grid (OSG). We describe the usage of the workflow (OSG-GEM), discuss workflow design, inspect performance data, and assess accuracy in mapping paired-end sequencing reads to a reference genome. A target OSG-GEM user is proficient with the Linux command line and possesses basic bioinformatics experience. The user may run this workflow directly on the OSG or adapt it to novel computing environments. PMID:27499617

  19. An improved model of the Earth's gravitational field: GEM-T1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Lerch, F. J.; Christodoulidis, D. C.; Putney, B. H.; Felsentreger, T. L.; Sanchez, B. V.; Smith, D. E.; Klosko, S. M.; Martin, T. V.; Pavlis, E. C.

    1987-01-01

    Goddard Earth Model T1 (GEM-T1), which was developed from an analysis of direct satellite tracking observations, is the first in a new series of such models. GEM-T1 is complete to degree and order 36. It was developed using consistent reference parameters and extensive earth and ocean tidal models. It was simultaneously solved for gravitational and tidal terms, earth orientation parameters, and the orbital parameters of 580 individual satellite arcs. The solution used only satellite tracking data acquired on 17 different satellites and is predominantly based upon the precise laser data taken by third generation systems. In all, 800,000 observations were used. A major improvement in field accuracy was obtained. For marine geodetic applications, long wavelength geoidal modeling is twice as good as in earlier satellite-only GEM models. Orbit determination accuracy has also been substantially advanced over a wide range of satellites that have been tested.

  20. Further developments and beam tests of the gas electron multiplier (GEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlloch, J.; Bressan, A.; Capeáns, M.; Gruwé, M.; Hoch, M.; Labbé, J. C.; Placci, A.; Ropelewski, L.; Sauli, F.

    1998-12-01

    We describe the development and operation of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), a thin insulating foil metal-clad on both sides and perforated by a regular pattern of small holes. The mesh can be incorporated into the gas volume of an active detector to provide a first amplification channel for electrons, or used as stand alone. We report on the basic properties of GEMs manufactured with different geometries and operated in several gas mixtures as well as on their long-term stability after accumulation of charge equivalent to several years of operation in high-luminosity experiments. Optimized GEMs reach gains close to 10 000 at safe operating voltages, permitting the detection of ionizing tracks, without other amplifying elements, on a simple Printed Circuit Board (PCB), opening new possibilities for detector design.

  1. A COMSOL-GEMS interface for modeling coupled reactive-transport geochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Vahid Jafari; Li, Chang; Verba, Circe; Ideker, Jason H.; Isgor, O. Burkan

    2016-07-01

    An interface was developed between COMSOL MultiphysicsTM finite element analysis software and (geo)chemical modeling platform, GEMS, for the reactive-transport modeling of (geo)chemical processes in variably saturated porous media. The two standalone software packages are managed from the interface that uses a non-iterative operator splitting technique to couple the transport (COMSOL) and reaction (GEMS) processes. The interface allows modeling media with complex chemistry (e.g. cement) using GEMS thermodynamic database formats. Benchmark comparisons show that the developed interface can be used to predict a variety of reactive-transport processes accurately. The full functionality of the interface was demonstrated to model transport processes, governed by extended Nernst-Plank equation, in Class H Portland cement samples in high pressure and temperature autoclaves simulating systems that are used to store captured carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs.

  2. Python based integration of GEM detector electronics with JET data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabołotny, Wojciech M.; Byszuk, Adrian; Chernyshova, Maryna; Cieszewski, Radosław; Czarski, Tomasz; Dalley, Simon; Hogben, Colin; Jakubowska, Katarzyna L.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Poźniak, Krzysztof; Rzadkiewicz, Jacek; Scholz, Marek; Shumack, Amy

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the system integrating the dedicated measurement and control electronic systems for Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors with the Control and Data Acquisition system (CODAS) in the JET facility in Culham, England. The presented system performs the high level procedures necessary to calibrate the GEM detector and to protect it against possible malfunctions or dangerous changes in operating conditions. The system also allows control of the GEM detectors from CODAS, setting of their parameters, checking their state, starting the plasma measurement and to reading the results. The system has been implemented using the Python language, using the advanced libraries for implementation of network communication protocols, for object based hardware management and for data processing.

  3. Gemcitabine-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM-ANPs) inhibit PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, special attention has been given to the nanomaterial application in tumor treatment. Here, a modified desolvation-cross-linking method was successfully applied to fabricate gemcitabine-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM-ANPs), with 110 and 406 nm of mean diameter, respectively. The aim of this study was to assess the drug distribution, side effects, and antitumor activity of GEM-ANPs in vivo. The metabolic viability and flow cytometry analysis revealed that both GEM-ANPs, especially 406-nm GEM-ANPs, could effectively inhibit the metabolism and proliferation and promote the apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma (PANC-1) in vitro. Intravenous injection of 406-nm GEM-ANPs exhibited a significant increase of gemcitabine in the pancreas, liver, and spleen of Sprague–Dawley rats (p < 0.05). Moreover, no signs of toxic side effects analyzed by blood parameter changes were observed after 3 weeks of administration although a high dose (200 mg/kg) of GEM-ANPs were used. Additionally, in PANC-1-induced tumor mice, intravenous injection of 406-nm GEM-ANPs also could effectively reduce the tumor volume by comparison with free gemcitabine. With these findings, albumin nanosphere-loading approach might be efficacious to improve the antitumor activity of gemcitabine, and the efficacy is associated with the size of GEM-ANPs. PMID:23594566

  4. Gemcitabine-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM-ANPs) inhibit PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Di, Yang; Jin, Chen; Fu, Deliang; Yang, Feng; Jiang, Yongjian; Yao, Lie; Hao, Sijie; Wang, Xiaoyi; Subedi, Sabin; Ni, Quanxing

    2013-04-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, special attention has been given to the nanomaterial application in tumor treatment. Here, a modified desolvation-cross-linking method was successfully applied to fabricate gemcitabine-loaded albumin nanospheres (GEM-ANPs), with 110 and 406 nm of mean diameter, respectively. The aim of this study was to assess the drug distribution, side effects, and antitumor activity of GEM-ANPs in vivo. The metabolic viability and flow cytometry analysis revealed that both GEM-ANPs, especially 406-nm GEM-ANPs, could effectively inhibit the metabolism and proliferation and promote the apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma (PANC-1) in vitro. Intravenous injection of 406-nm GEM-ANPs exhibited a significant increase of gemcitabine in the pancreas, liver, and spleen of Sprague-Dawley rats ( p < 0.05). Moreover, no signs of toxic side effects analyzed by blood parameter changes were observed after 3 weeks of administration although a high dose (200 mg/kg) of GEM-ANPs were used. Additionally, in PANC-1-induced tumor mice, intravenous injection of 406-nm GEM-ANPs also could effectively reduce the tumor volume by comparison with free gemcitabine. With these findings, albumin nanosphere-loading approach might be efficacious to improve the antitumor activity of gemcitabine, and the efficacy is associated with the size of GEM-ANPs.

  5. Absence of the Thorpe–Ingold Effect by gem-Diphenyl Groups in Ring-Closing Enyne Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Jin; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Lee, Daesung

    2007-01-01

    In tandem ring-closing metathesis of alkynyl silaketals containing two different tethered olefins, the gem-dimethyl group showed the expected Thorpe-Ingold effect, thereby giving good level of group selectivity. Unexpectedly, however, the corresponding gem-diphenyl group did not show any Thorpe-Ingold effect for the ring closure reaction. PMID:18046462

  6. MAXI/GSC detection of a possible X-ray flare from an dMe binary system YY Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Tsuboi, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.

    2015-09-01

    MAXI/GSC observed a possible X-ray flare from a dMe binary system YY Gem. The MAXI/GSC nova alert system triggered on the flare-like event from the position consistent with the active binary system YY Gem during a scan transit at 01:29:00 UT on September 24th 2015.

  7. Science and Math Explorations for Young Children: A GEMS/PEACHES Handbook for Early Childhood Educators, Childcare Providers, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Katharine; Blinderman, Ellen; Boffen, Beatrice; Echols, Jean; House, Patricia A.; Hosoume, Kimi; Kopp, Jaine

    This handbook is designed to help readers understand the educational philosophy and practice of the PEACHES (Primary Explorations for Children and Educators in Science) and GEMS (Great Explorations in Math and Science) programs, and to assist in using GEMS/PEACHES teachers' guides in schools and child care centers. The handbook outlines techniques…

  8. Last glacial maximum constraints on the Earth System model HadGEM2-ES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response of the atmospheric and land surface components of the CMIP5/AR5 Earth System model HadGEM2-ES to pre-industrial (PI: AD 1860) and last glacial maximum (LGM: 21 kyr) boundary conditions. HadGEM2-ES comprises atmosphere, ocean and sea-ice components which are interactively coupled to representations of the carbon cycle, aerosols including mineral dust and tropospheric chemistry. In this study, we focus on the atmosphere-only model HadGEM2-A coupled to terrestrial carbon cycle and aerosol models. This configuration is forced with monthly sea surface temperature and sea-ice fields from equivalent coupled simulations with an older version of the Hadley Centre model, HadCM3. HadGEM2-A simulates extreme cooling over northern continents and nearly complete die back of vegetation in Asia, giving a poor representation of the LGM environment compared with reconstructions of surface temperatures and biome distributions. The model also performs significantly worse for the LGM in comparison with its precursor AR4 model HadCM3M2. Detailed analysis shows that the major factor behind the vegetation die off in HadGEM2-A is a subtle change to the temperature dependence of leaf mortality within the phenology model of HadGEM2. This impacts on both snow-vegetation albedo and vegetation dynamics. A new set of parameters is tested for both the pre-industrial and LGM, showing much improved coverage of vegetation in both time periods, including an improved representation of the needle-leaf forest coverage in Siberia for the pre-industrial. The new parameters and the resulting changes in global vegetation distribution strongly impact the simulated loading of mineral dust, an important aerosol for the LGM. The climate response in an abrupt 4× pre-industrial CO2 simulation is also analysed and shows modest regional impacts on surface temperatures across the Boreal zone.

  9. Formation of GEMS from shock-accelerated crystalline dust in Superbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A; Bradley, J P

    2004-12-08

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain enigmatic sub-micron components called GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides). The compositions and structures of GEMS indicate that they have been processed by exposure to ionizing radiation but details of the actual irradiation environment(s) have remained elusive. Here we propose a mechanism and astrophysical site for GEMS formation that explains for the first time the following key properties of GEMS; they are stoichiometrically enriched in oxygen and systematically depleted in S, Mg, Ca and Fe (relative to solar abundances), most have normal (solar) oxygen isotopic compositions, they exhibit a strikingly narrow size distribution (0.1-0.5 {micro}m diameter), and some of them contain ''relict'' crystals within their silicate glass matrices. We show that the compositions, size distribution, and survival of relict crystals are inconsistent with amorphization by particles accelerated by diffusive shock acceleration. Instead, we propose that GEMS are formed from crystalline grains that condense in stellar outflows from massive stars in OB associations, are accelerated in encounters with frequent supernova shocks inside the associated superbubble, and are implanted with atoms from the hot gas in the SB interior. We thus reverse the usual roles of target and projectile. Rather than being bombarded at rest by energetic ions, grains are accelerated and bombarded by a nearly monovelocity beam of atoms as viewed in their rest frame. Meyer, Drury and Ellison have proposed that galactic cosmic rays originate from ions sputtered from such accelerated dust grains. We suggest that GEMS are surviving members of a population of fast grains that constitute the long-sought source material for galactic cosmic rays. Thus, representatives of the GCR source material may have been awaiting discovery in cosmic dust labs for the last thirty years.

  10. Solving spatial inverse problems using the probability perturbation method: An S-GEMS implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Caers, Jef

    2008-09-01

    The probability perturbation method (PPM) is introduced as a flexible and efficient sampling technique for generating inverse solutions under a given prior geological constraint (prior model). In this paper, we present a methodology for producing software code that runs PPM within a public domain geostatistical software called the Stanford Geostatistical Earth Modeling Software (S-GEMS). The challenge in creating such code lies in the great diversity of forward models as well as prior models that can be handled by the PPM. Therefore, our software solution must be highly flexible and extensible such that it can be tailored to the various applications at hand. Our implementation has two main objectives: (1) to create an integrated working environment which provides users easy access to functionalities of the PPM through a general user interface as well as visualize results; (2) allow the users to plug-in their application specific code into the PPM algorithm workflow. We provide a two-part solution. The first part, which is hard-coded in S-GEMS as a plug-in module, runs the Dekker-Brent optimization algorithm to control the parameter perturbation needed for the inversion. It generates the PPM user interface and allows visualization of the spatial domain of interest using S-GEMS graphics capability. The second part is coded in object-oriented Python scripts and is used to control the PPM execution in S-GEMS. Users can program their particular needs in scripts and load them into S-GEMS as part of the PPM workflow. The same mechanism can be used to extend the capabilities of PPM itself by implementing new PPM variants in Python and making them a part of the base class hierarchy. Case studies are used to demonstrate the flexibility of our code. This approach requires the user to adapt only a small amount of python code, without modifying, or re-compiling the core S-GEMS code.