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Sample records for mitochondrial chaperonin genes

  1. Disease-Associated Mutations in the HSPD1 Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of the Mitochondrial HSP60/HSP10 Chaperonin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bross, Peter; Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) forms together with heat shock protein 10 (HSP10) double-barrel chaperonin complexes that are essential for folding to the native state of proteins in the mitochondrial matrix space. Two extremely rare monogenic disorders have been described that are caused by missense mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes the HSP60 subunit of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex. Investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders have revealed that different degrees of reduced HSP60 function produce distinct neurological phenotypes. While mutations with deleterious or strong dominant negative effects are not compatible with life, HSPD1 gene variations found in the human population impair HSP60 function and depending on the mechanism and degree of HSP60 dys- and mal-function cause different phenotypes. We here summarize the knowledge on the effects of disturbances of the function of the HSP60/HSP10 chaperonin complex by disease-associated mutations.

  2. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex.

    PubMed

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-05-12

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  3. Crystal structure of the human mitochondrial chaperonin symmetrical football complex

    PubMed Central

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Yaniv, Oren; Parnas, Avital; Frolow, Felix; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondria harbor a single type I chaperonin system that is generally thought to function via a unique single-ring intermediate. To date, no crystal structure has been published for any mammalian type I chaperonin complex. In this study, we describe the crystal structure of a football-shaped, double-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin complex at 3.15 Å, which is a novel intermediate, likely representing the complex in an early stage of dissociation. Interestingly, the mitochondrial chaperonin was captured in a state that exhibits subunit asymmetry within the rings and nucleotide symmetry between the rings. Moreover, the chaperonin tetradecamers show a different interring subunit arrangement when compared to GroEL. Our findings suggest that the mitochondrial chaperonins use a mechanism that is distinct from the mechanism of the well-studied Escherichia coli system. PMID:25918392

  4. Identification of elements that dictate the specificity of mitochondrial Hsp60 for its co-chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Parnas, Avital; Nisemblat, Shahar; Weiss, Celeste; Levy-Rimler, Galit; Pri-Or, Amir; Zor, Tsaffrir; Lund, Peter A; Bross, Peter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    Type I chaperonins (cpn60/Hsp60) are essential proteins that mediate the folding of proteins in bacteria, chloroplast and mitochondria. Despite the high sequence homology among chaperonins, the mitochondrial chaperonin system has developed unique properties that distinguish it from the widely-studied bacterial system (GroEL and GroES). The most relevant difference to this study is that mitochondrial chaperonins are able to refold denatured proteins only with the assistance of the mitochondrial co-chaperonin. This is in contrast to the bacterial chaperonin, which is able to function with the help of co-chaperonin from any source. The goal of our work was to determine structural elements that govern the specificity between chaperonin and co-chaperonin pairs using mitochondrial Hsp60 as model system. We used a mutagenesis approach to obtain human mitochondrial Hsp60 mutants that are able to function with the bacterial co-chaperonin, GroES. We isolated two mutants, a single mutant (E321K) and a double mutant (R264K/E358K) that, together with GroES, were able to rescue an E. coli strain, in which the endogenous chaperonin system was silenced. Although the mutations are located in the apical domain of the chaperonin, where the interaction with co-chaperonin takes place, none of the residues are located in positions that are directly responsible for co-chaperonin binding. Moreover, while both mutants were able to function with GroES, they showed distinct functional and structural properties. Our results indicate that the phenotype of the E321K mutant is caused mainly by a profound increase in the binding affinity to all co-chaperonins, while the phenotype of R264K/E358K is caused by a slight increase in affinity toward co-chaperonins that is accompanied by an alteration in the allosteric signal transmitted upon nucleotide binding. The latter changes lead to a great increase in affinity for GroES, with only a minor increase in affinity toward the mammalian mitochondrial co-chaperonin

  5. Identification of Elements That Dictate the Specificity of Mitochondrial Hsp60 for Its Co-Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Celeste; Levy-Rimler, Galit; Pri-Or, Amir; Zor, Tsaffrir; Lund, Peter A.; Bross, Peter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    Type I chaperonins (cpn60/Hsp60) are essential proteins that mediate the folding of proteins in bacteria, chloroplast and mitochondria. Despite the high sequence homology among chaperonins, the mitochondrial chaperonin system has developed unique properties that distinguish it from the widely-studied bacterial system (GroEL and GroES). The most relevant difference to this study is that mitochondrial chaperonins are able to refold denatured proteins only with the assistance of the mitochondrial co-chaperonin. This is in contrast to the bacterial chaperonin, which is able to function with the help of co-chaperonin from any source. The goal of our work was to determine structural elements that govern the specificity between chaperonin and co-chaperonin pairs using mitochondrial Hsp60 as model system. We used a mutagenesis approach to obtain human mitochondrial Hsp60 mutants that are able to function with the bacterial co-chaperonin, GroES. We isolated two mutants, a single mutant (E321K) and a double mutant (R264K/E358K) that, together with GroES, were able to rescue an E. coli strain, in which the endogenous chaperonin system was silenced. Although the mutations are located in the apical domain of the chaperonin, where the interaction with co-chaperonin takes place, none of the residues are located in positions that are directly responsible for co-chaperonin binding. Moreover, while both mutants were able to function with GroES, they showed distinct functional and structural properties. Our results indicate that the phenotype of the E321K mutant is caused mainly by a profound increase in the binding affinity to all co-chaperonins, while the phenotype of R264K/E358K is caused by a slight increase in affinity toward co-chaperonins that is accompanied by an alteration in the allosteric signal transmitted upon nucleotide binding. The latter changes lead to a great increase in affinity for GroES, with only a minor increase in affinity toward the mammalian mitochondrial co-chaperonin

  6. Chaperonins.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, N A; White, H E; Saibil, H R

    1998-01-01

    The molecular chaperones are a diverse set of protein families required for the correct folding, transport and degradation of other proteins in vivo. There has been great progress in understanding the structure and mechanism of action of the chaperonin family, exemplified by Escherichia coli GroEL. The chaperonins are large, double-ring oligomeric proteins that act as containers for the folding of other protein subunits. Together with its co-protein GroES, GroEL binds non-native polypeptides and facilitates their refolding in an ATP-dependent manner. The action of the ATPase cycle causes the substrate-binding surface of GroEL to alternate in character between hydrophobic (binding/unfolding) and hydrophilic (release/folding). ATP binding initiates a series of dramatic conformational changes that bury the substrate-binding sites, lowering the affinity for non-native polypeptide. In the presence of ATP, GroES binds to GroEL, forming a large chamber that encapsulates substrate proteins for folding. For proteins whose folding is absolutely dependent on the full GroE system, ATP binding (but not hydrolysis) in the encapsulating ring is needed to initiate protein folding. Similarly, ATP binding, but not hydrolysis, in the opposite GroEL ring is needed to release GroES, thus opening the chamber. If the released substrate protein is still not correctly folded, it will go through another round of interaction with GroEL. PMID:9657960

  7. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical 'football' complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60-Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  8. Crystallization and structure determination of a symmetrical ‘football’ complex of the mammalian mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 chaperonins

    PubMed Central

    Nisemblat, Shahar; Parnas, Avital; Yaniv, Oren; Azem, Abdussalam; Frolow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60–Hsp10 complex assists the folding of various proteins impelled by ATP hydrolysis, similar to the bacterial chaperonins GroEL and GroES. The near-atomic structural details of the mitochondrial chaperonins are not known, despite the fact that almost two decades have passed since the structures of the bacterial chaperonins became available. Here, the crystallization procedure, diffraction experiments and structure determination by molecular replacement of the mammalian mitochondrial chaperonin HSP60 (E321K mutant) and its co-chaperonin Hsp10 are reported. PMID:24419632

  9. The purified and recombinant Legionella pneumophila chaperonin alters mitochondrial trafficking and microfilament organization.

    PubMed

    Chong, Audrey; Lima, Celia A; Allan, David S; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Garduño, Rafael A

    2009-11-01

    A portion of the total cellular pool of the Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, HtpB, is found on the bacterial cell surface, where it can mediate invasion of nonphagocytic cells. HtpB continues to be abundantly produced and released by internalized L. pneumophila and may thus have postinvasion functions. We used here two functional models (protein-coated beads and expression of recombinant proteins in CHO cells) to investigate the competence of HtpB in mimicking early intracellular trafficking events of L. pneumophila, including the recruitment of mitochondria, cytoskeletal alterations, the inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and association with the endoplasmic reticulum. Microscopy and flow cytometry studies indicated that HtpB-coated beads recruited mitochondria in CHO cells and U937-derived macrophages and induced transient changes in the organization of actin microfilaments in CHO cells. Ectopic expression of HtpB in the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells also led to modifications in actin microfilaments similar to those produced by HtpB-coated beads but did not change the distribution of mitochondria. Association of phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads with the endoplasmic reticulum was not consistently detected by either fluorescence or electron microscopy studies, and only a modest delay in the fusion of TrOv-labeled lysosomes with phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads was observed. HtpB is the first Legionella protein and the first chaperonin shown to, by means of our functional models, induce mitochondrial recruitment and microfilament rearrangements, two postinternalization events that typify the early trafficking of virulent L. pneumophila. PMID:19687203

  10. Streptococcus suis Serotypes Characterized by Analysis of Chaperonin 60 Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brousseau, Ronald; Hill, Janet E.; Préfontaine, Gabrielle; Goh, Swee-Han; Harel, Josée; Hemmingsen, Sean M.

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important pathogen of swine which occasionally infects humans as well. There are 35 serotypes known for this organism, and it would be desirable to develop rapid methods methods to identify and differentiate the strains of this species. To that effect, partial chaperonin 60 gene sequences were determined for the 35 serotype reference strains of S. suis. Analysis of a pairwise distance matrix showed that the distances ranged from 0 to 0.275 when values were calculated by the maximum-likelihood method. For five of the strains the distances from serotype 1 were greater than 0.1, and for two of these strains the distances were were more than 0.25, suggesting that they belong to a different species. Most of the nucleotide differences were silent; alignment of protein sequences showed that there were only 11 distinct sequences for the 35 strains under study. The chaperonin 60 gene phylogenetic tree was similar to the previously published tree based on 16S rRNA sequences, and it was also observed that strains with identical chaperonin 60 gene sequences tended to have identical 16S rRNA sequences. The chaperonin 60 gene sequences provided a higher level of discrimination between serotypes than the 16S RNA sequences provided and could form the basis for a diagnostic protocol. PMID:11571190

  11. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  12. Ancient allelism at the cytosolic chaperonin-alpha-encoding gene of the zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Figueroa, F; Mayer, W E; Klein, J

    2000-01-01

    The T-complex protein 1, TCP1, gene codes for the CCT-alpha subunit of the group II chaperonins. The gene was first described in the house mouse, in which it is closely linked to the T locus at a distance of approximately 11 cM from the Mhc. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in which the T homolog is linked to the class I Mhc loci, the TCP1 locus segregates independently of both the T and the Mhc loci. Despite its conservation between species, the zebrafish TCP1 locus is highly polymorphic. In a sample of 15 individuals and the screening of a cDNA library, 12 different alleles were found, and some of the allelic pairs were found to differ by up to nine nucleotides in a 275-bp-long stretch of sequence. The substitutions occur in both translated and untranslated regions, but in the former they occur predominantly at synonymous codon sites. Phylogenetically, the alleles fall into two groups distinguished also by the presence or absence of a 10-bp insertion/deletion in the 3' untranslated region. The two groups may have diverged as long as 3.5 mya, and the polymorphic differences may have accumulated by genetic drift in geographically isolated populations. PMID:10628990

  13. New GroEL-like chaperonin of bacteriophage OBP Pseudomonas fluorescens suppresses thermal protein aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Sokolova, Olga S; Kurochkina, Lidia P

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we discovered and studied the first virus-encoded chaperonin of bacteriophage EL Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gene product (gp) 146. In the present study, we performed bioinformatics analysis of currently predicted GroEL-like proteins encoded by phage genomes in comparison with cellular and mitochondrial chaperonins. Putative phage chaperonins share a low similarity and do not form a monophyletic group; nevertheless, they are closer to bacterial chaperonins in the phylogenetic tree. Experimental investigation of putative GroEL-like chaperonin proteins has been continued by physicochemical and functional characterization of gp246 encoded by the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage OBP. Unlike the more usual double-ring architecture of chaperonins, including the EL gp146, the recombinant gp246 produced by Escherichia coli cells has been purified as a single heptameric ring. It possesses ATPase activity and does not require a co-chaperonin for its function. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gp246 is able to suppress the thermal protein inactivation and aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner, thus indicating chaperonin function. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis revealed the different conformational states of OBP chaperonin, depending on the bound nucleotide. PMID:27247423

  14. Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies by the chaperonin 60 gene identification method and reverse checkerboard hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, S H; Santucci, Z; Kloos, W E; Faltyn, M; George, C G; Driedger, D; Hemmingsen, S M

    1997-01-01

    A previous study (S. H. Goh et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:818-823, 1996) demonstrated that a 600-bp region of the chaperonin 60 (Cpn60) genes from various bacterial isolates could be amplified by PCR with a pair of degenerate primers and that the products could be used as species-specific probes for Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, and S. schleiferi. To further validate the utility of bacterial Cpn60 genes as universal targets for bacterial identification (ID), reverse checkerboard chemiluminescent hybridization experiments were performed with DNA probes from 34 different Staphylococcus species and subspecies. With the exception of probes from the Cpn60 genes of S. intermedius and S. delphini, which cross hybridized, all were species specific. Two subspecies of both S. capitis and S. cohnii were differentiated from one another, while DNAs from the two S. schleiferi subspecies cross hybridized. When 40 known Staphylococcus isolates were tested in a blind experiment by the Cpn60 gene method, 36 strains, representing six species and one subspecies (S. sciuri, S. caseolyticus, S. hominis, S. warneri, S. hyicus, S. haemolyticus, and S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus), were correctly identified. DNA from the four remaining isolates, known to be S. hyicus bovine strains, failed to hybridize to DNA from the S. hyicus target strain or any other Staphylococcus species. However, DNAs from these S. hyicus isolates did cross hybridize with each other. New DNA sequence data and evidence from previous studies suggest some genetic divergence between the two groups of S. hyicus isolates. Our results demonstrate that this Cpn60 gene-based ID method has the potential to be a basic method for bacterial ID. Studies are in progress to further validate the utility of this Cpn60 gene system for ID of Staphylococcus and other genera, including those of slow-growing microorganisms. PMID:9399505

  15. Chaperonin Cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of Green Algae and Plants Function as Hetero-oligomeric Ring Complexes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-01-01

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor “heptamers” interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α7β7. It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins. PMID:22518837

  16. Identification of a novel BBS gene (BBS12) highlights the major role of a vertebrate-specific branch of chaperonin-related proteins in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Zaghloul, Norann A; Vicaire, Serge; Jacquelin, Cecile; Plewniak, Frederic; Leitch, Carmen C; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Friederich, Evelyne; Thibault, Christelle; Danse, Jean-Marc; Verloes, Alain; Bonneau, Dominique; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poch, Olivier; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is primarily an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive impairment, polydactyly, and kidney anomalies. The disorder is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 BBS genes identified to date, which account for ~70% of affected families. We have combined single-nucleotide-polymorphism array homozygosity mapping with in silico analysis to identify a new BBS gene, BBS12. Patients from two Gypsy families were homozygous and haploidentical in a 6-Mb region of chromosome 4q27. FLJ35630 was selected as a candidate gene, because it was predicted to encode a protein with similarity to members of the type II chaperonin superfamily, which includes BBS6 and BBS10. We found pathogenic mutations in both Gypsy families, as well as in 14 other families of various ethnic backgrounds, indicating that BBS12 accounts for approximately 5% of all BBS cases. BBS12 is vertebrate specific and, together with BBS6 and BBS10, defines a novel branch of the type II chaperonin superfamily. These three genes are characterized by unusually rapid evolution and are likely to perform ciliary functions specific to vertebrates that are important in the pathophysiology of the syndrome, and together they account for about one-third of the total BBS mutational load. Consistent with this notion, suppression of each family member in zebrafish yielded gastrulation-movement defects characteristic of other BBS morphants, whereas simultaneous suppression of all three members resulted in severely affected embryos, possibly hinting at partial functional redundancy within this protein family. PMID:17160889

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  18. Evolution of mitochondrial gene order in Annelida.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Anne; Golombek, Anja; Gerth, Michael; Schwarz, Francine; Struck, Torsten H; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Annelida is a highly diverse animal group with over 21,000 described species. As part of Lophotrochozoa, the vast majority of annelids are currently classified into two groups: Errantia and Sedentaria, together forming Pleistoannelida. Besides these taxa, Sipuncula, Amphinomidae, Chaetopteridae, Oweniidae and Magelonidae can be found branching at the base of the tree. Comparisons of mitochondrial genomes have been used to investigate phylogenetic relationship within animal taxa. Complete annelid mitochondrial genomes are available for some Sedentaria and Errantia and in most cases exhibit a highly conserved gene order. Only two complete genomes have been published from the basal branching lineages and these are restricted to Sipuncula. We describe the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences for all other basal branching annelid families: Owenia fusiformis (Oweniidae), Magelona mirabilis (Magelonidae), Eurythoe complanata (Amphinomidae), Chaetopterus variopedatus and Phyllochaetopterus sp. (Chaetopteridae). The mitochondrial gene order of all these taxa is substantially different from the pattern found in Pleistoannelida. Additionally, we report the first mitochondrial genomes in Annelida that encode genes on both strands. Our findings demonstrate that the supposedly highly conserved mitochondrial gene order suggested for Annelida is restricted to Pleistoannelida, representing the ground pattern of this group. All investigated basal branching annelid taxa show a completely different arrangement of genes than observed in Pleistoannelida. The gene order of protein coding and ribosomal genes in Magelona mirabilis differs only in two transposition events from a putative lophotrochozoan ground pattern and might be the closest to an ancestral annelid pattern. The mitochondrial genomes of Myzostomida show the conserved pattern of Pleistoannelida, thereby supporting their inclusion in this taxon. PMID:26299879

  19. How do chaperonins fold protein?

    PubMed Central

    Motojima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein folding is a biological process that is essential for the proper functioning of proteins in all living organisms. In cells, many proteins require the assistance of molecular chaperones for their folding. Chaperonins belong to a class of molecular chaperones that have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism by which a chaperonin mediates the folding of proteins is still controversial. Denatured proteins are folded in the closed chaperonin cage, leading to the assumption that denatured proteins are completely encapsulated inside the chaperonin cage. In contrast to the assumption, we recently found that denatured protein interacts with hydrophobic residues at the subunit interfaces of the chaperonin, and partially protrude out of the cage. In this review, we will explain our recent results and introduce our model for the mechanism by which chaperonins accelerate protein folding, in view of recent findings.

  20. Functionality and Evolutionary History of the Chaperonins in Thermophilic Archaea. A Bioinformatical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlin, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    We used bioinformatics methods to study phylogenetic relations and differentiation patterns of the archaeal chaperonin 60 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP60) genes in support of the study of differential expression patterns of the three chaperonin genes encoded in Sulfolobus shibatae.

  1. New progress in snake mitochondrial gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nian; Zhao, Shujin

    2009-08-01

    To further understand the evolution of snake mitochondrial genomes, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences were determined for representative species from two snake families: the Many-banded krait, the Banded krait, the Chinese cobra, the King cobra, the Hundred-pace viper, the Short-tailed mamushi, and the Chain viper. Thirteen protein-coding genes, 22-23 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2 control regions were identified in these mtDNAs. Duplication of the control region and translocation of the tRNAPro gene were two notable features of the snake mtDNAs. These results from the gene rearrangement comparisons confirm the correctness of traditional classification schemes and validate the utility of comparing complete mtDNA sequences for snake phylogeny reconstruction. PMID:19479623

  2. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  3. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt. PMID:27350246

  4. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  5. Cpn20: siamese twins of the chaperonin world.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Celeste; Bonshtien, Anat; Farchi-Pisanty, Odelia; Vitlin, Anna; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-02-01

    The chloroplast cpn20 protein is a functional homolog of the cpn10 co-chaperonin, but its gene consists of two cpn10-like units joined head-to-tail by a short chain of amino acids. This double protein is unique to plastids and was shown to exist in plants as well plastid-containing parasites. In vitro assays showed that this cpn20 co-chaperonin is a functional homolog of cpn10. In terms of structure, existing data indicate that the oligomer is tetrameric, yet it interacts with a heptameric cpn60 partner. Thus, the functional oligomeric structure remains a mystery. In this review, we summarize what is known about this distinctive chaperonin and use a bioinformatics approach to examine the expression of cpn20 in Arabidopsis thaliana relative to other chaperonin genes in this species. In addition, we examine the primary structure of the two homologous domains for similarities and differences, in comparison with cpn10 from other species. Lastly, we hypothesize as to the oligomeric structure and raison d'être of this unusual co-chaperonin homolog. PMID:19031045

  6. The complexity of chloroplast chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Nisemblat, Shahar; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2013-12-01

    Type I chaperonins are large oligomeric protein ensembles that are involved in the folding and assembly of other proteins. Chloroplast chaperonins and co-chaperonins exist in multiple copies of two distinct isoforms that can combine to form a range of labile oligomeric structures. This complex system increases the potential number of chaperonin substrates and possibilities for regulation. The incorporation of unique subunits into the oligomer can modify substrate specificity. Some subunits are upregulated in response to heat shock and some show organ-specific expression, whereas others possess additional functions that are unrelated to their role in protein folding. Accumulating evidence suggests that specific subunits have distinct roles in biogenesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). PMID:24035661

  7. CHAPERONIN 20 mediates iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) activity independent of its co-chaperonin role in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kuo, W Y; Huang, C H; Liu, A C; Cheng, C P; Li, S H; Chang, W C; Weiss, C; Azem, A; Jinn, T L

    2013-01-01

    Iron superoxide dismutases (FeSODs; FSDs) are primary antioxidant enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. The stromal FSD1 conferred the only detectable FeSOD activity, whereas the thylakoid membrane- and nucleoid-co-localized FSD2 and FSD3 double mutant showed arrested chloroplast development. FeSOD requires cofactor Fe for its activity, but its mechanism of activation is unclear. We used reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gel filtration chromatography, LC-MS/MS, protoplast transient expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) analyses to identify and characterize a factor involved in FeSOD activation. We identified the chloroplast-localized co-chaperonin CHAPERONIN 20 (CPN20) as a mediator of FeSOD activation by direct interaction. The relationship between CPN20 and FeSOD was confirmed by in vitro experiments showing that CPN20 alone could enhance FSD1, FSD2 and FSD3 activity. The in vivo results showed that CPN20-overexpressing mutants and mutants with defective co-chaperonin activity increased FSD1 activity, without changing the chaperonin CPN60 protein level, and VIGS-induced downregulation of CPN20 also led to decreased FeSOD activity. Our findings reveal that CPN20 can mediate FeSOD activation in chloroplasts, a role independent of its known function in the chaperonin system. PMID:23057508

  8. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  9. Mitochondrial complex 1 gene analysis in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Dhananjay; Nayak, Bhagabat; Singh, Manvendra; Sharma, Namrata; Tandon, Radhika; Sinha, Rajesh; Titiyal, Jeewan S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Keratoconus is characterized by the thinning of corneal stroma, resulting in reduced vision. The exact etiology of keratoconus (KC) is still unknown. The involvement of oxidative stress (OS) in this disease has been reported. However, the exact mechanism of OS in keratoconus is still unknown. Thus we planned this study to screen mitochondrial complex I genes for sequence changes in keratoconus patients and controls, as mitochondrial complex I is the chief source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Methods A total of 20 keratoconus cases and 20 healthy controls without any ocular disorder were enrolled in this study. Mitochondrial complex I genes (ND1, 2, 3, 4, 4L, 5, and 6) were amplified in all patients and controls using 12 pairs of primers by PCR. After sequencing, DNA sequences were analyzed against the mitochondrial reference sequence NC_012920. Haplogroup frequency based Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was constructed to determine whether the gene pool of keratoconus patients is closer to major populations in India. Results DNA sequencing revealed a total 84 nucleotide variations in patients and 29 in controls. Of 84 nucleotide changes, 18 variations were non-synonymous and two novel frame-shift mutations were detected in cases. Non-synonymous mtDNA sequence variations may account for increased ROS and decreased ATP production. This ultimately leads to OS; which is a known cause for variety of corneal abnormalities. Haplotype analysis showed that most of the patients were clustered under the haplogroups: T, C4a2a, R2’TJ, M21’Q1a, M12’G2a2a, M8’CZ and M7a2a, which are present as negligible frequency in normal Indian population, whereas only few patients were found to be a part of the other haplogroups like U7 (Indo-European), R2 and R31, whose origin is contentious. Conclusions Mt complex I sequence variations are the main cause of elevated ROS production which leads oxidative stress. This oxidative stress then starts a cascade of

  10. Isolation and characterization of a Paracentrotus lividus cDNA encoding a stress-inducible chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Antonietta Ragusa, Maria; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Liegro, Italia Di; Rinaldi, Anna Maria

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous proteins that facilitate protein folding in an adenosine triphosphate–dependent manner. Here we report the isolation of a sea urchin cDNA (Plhsp60) coding for mitochondrial chaperonin (Cpn60), whose basal expression is further enhanced by heat shock. The described cDNA corresponds to a full-length mRNA encoding a protein of 582 amino acids, the first 32 of which constitute a putative mitochondrial targeting leader sequence. Comparative analysis has demonstrated that this protein is highly conserved in evolution. PMID:11147969

  11. Mutations in nuclear genes alter post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial genes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear gene products are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. To better understand the roles of these nuclear genes, we exploited the mitochondrial encoded S-type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) and developed a nove...

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonin-60 homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, T H; Coates, A R; Butcher, P D; Hickman, C J; Shinnick, T M

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein and a 10-kDa protein are two of the more strongly immunoreactive components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The 65-kDa antigen has homology with members of the GroEL or chaperonin-60 (Cpn60) family of heat shock proteins. The 10-kDa antigen has homology with the GroES or chaperonin-10 family of heat shock proteins. These two proteins are encoded by separate genes in M. tuberculosis. The studies reported here reveal that M. tuberculosis contains a second Cpn60 homolog located 98 bp downstream of the 10-kDa antigen gene. The second Cpn60 homolog (Cpn60-1) displays 61% amino acid sequence identity with the 65-kDa antigen (Cpn60-2) and 53% and 41% identity with the Escherichia coli GroEL protein and the human P60 protein, respectively. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 bp upstream of the translation start of the Cpn60-1 homolog and protein purification studies indicate that the cpn60-1 gene is expressed as an approximately 60-kDa polypeptide. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7681982

  13. Characterization of group II chaperonins from an acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yohei Y; Tsuchida, Kanako; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ogawa, Naoki; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Yuji C; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Chaperonins are a type of molecular chaperone that assist in the folding of proteins. Group II chaperonins play an important role in the proteostasis in the cytosol of archaea and eukarya. In this study, we expressed, purified, and characterized group II chaperonins from an acidothermophilic archaeon Picrophilus torridus. Two genes exist for group II chaperonins, and both of the gene products assemble to form double-ring complexes similar to other archaeal group II chaperonins. One of the Picrophilus chaperonins, PtoCPNα, was able to refold denatured GFP at 50 °C. As expected, PtoCPNα exhibited an ATP-dependent conformational change that is observed by the change in fluorescence and diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT). In contrast, PtoCPNα lost its protein folding ability at moderate temperatures, becoming unable to interact with unfolded proteins. At lower temperatures, the release rate of the captured GFP from PtoCPNα was accelerated, and the affinity of denatured protein to PtoCPNα was weakened at the lower temperatures. Unexpectedly, in the DXT experiment, the fine motions were enhanced at the lower temperatures. Taken together, the results suggest that the fine tilting motions of the apical domain might correlate with the affinity of group II chaperonins for denatured proteins. PMID:27398315

  14. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  15. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Bonshtien, Anat L.; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of α and β subunits (α7β7 ch-cpn60) and one composed of all β subunits (β14 ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 μM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of α7β7 ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of β14 ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that β14 is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  16. Differential effects of co-chaperonin homologs on cpn60 oligomers.

    PubMed

    Bonshtien, Anat L; Parnas, Avital; Sharkia, Rajach; Niv, Adina; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Azem, Abdussalam; Weiss, Celeste

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the relationship between chaperonin/co-chaperonin binding, ATP hydrolysis, and protein refolding in heterologous chaperonin systems from bacteria, chloroplast, and mitochondria. We characterized two types of chloroplast cpn60 oligomers, ch-cpn60 composed of alpha and beta subunits (alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60) and one composed of all beta subunits (beta(14) ch-cpn60). In terms of ATPase activity, the rate of ATP hydrolysis increased with protein concentration up to 60 microM, reflecting a concentration at which the oligomers are stable. At high concentrations of cpn60, all cpn10 homologs inhibited ATPase activity of alpha(7)beta(7) ch-cpn60. In contrast, ATPase of beta(14) ch-cpn60 was inhibited only by mitochondrial cpn10, supporting previous reports showing that beta(14) is functional only with mitochondrial cpn10 and not with other cpn10 homologs. Surprisingly, direct binding assays showed that both ch-cpn60 oligomer types bind to bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast cpn10 homologs with an equal apparent affinity. Moreover, mitochondrial cpn60 binds chloroplast cpn20 with which it is not able to refold denatured proteins. Protein refolding experiments showed that in such instances, the bound protein is released in a conformation that is not able to refold. The presence of glycerol, or subsequent addition of mitochondrial cpn10, allows us to recover enzymatic activity of the substrate protein. Thus, in our systems, the formation of co-chaperonin/chaperonin complexes does not necessarily lead to protein folding. By using heterologous oligomer systems, we are able to separate the functions of binding and refolding in order to better understand the chaperonin mechanism. PMID:19224397

  17. Expression and Functional Characterization of the First Bacteriophage-Encoded Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Orlov, Victor N.; Robben, Johan; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2012-01-01

    Chaperonins promote protein folding in vivo and are ubiquitously found in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. The first viral chaperonin GroEL ortholog, gene product 146 (gp146), whose gene was earlier identified in the genome of bacteriophage EL, has been shown to be synthesized during phage propagation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The recombinant gp146 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized by different physicochemical methods for the first time. Using serum against the recombinant protein, gp146's native substrate, the phage endolysin gp188, has been immunoprecipitated from the lysate of EL-infected bacteria and identified by mass spectrometry. In vitro experiments have shown that gp146 has a protective effect against endolysin thermal inactivation and aggregation, providing evidence of its chaperonin function. The phage chaperonin has been found to have the architecture and some properties similar to those of GroEL but not to require cochaperonin for its functional activity. PMID:22787217

  18. Validation of Mitochondrial Gene Delivery in Liver and Skeletal Muscle via Hydrodynamic Injection Using an Artificial Mitochondrial Reporter DNA Vector.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Ishikawa, Takuya; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-12-01

    For successful mitochondrial transgene expression, two independent processes, i.e., developing a mitochondrial gene delivery system and construction of DNA vector to achieve mitochondrial gene expression, are required. To date, very few studies dealing with mitochondrial gene delivery have been reported and, in most cases, transgene expression was not validated, because the construction of a reporter DNA vector for mitochondrial gene expression is the bottleneck. In this study, mitochondrial transgene expression by the in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery of an artificial mitochondrial reporter DNA vector via hydrodynamic injection is demonstrated. In the procedure, a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA) is rapidly injected. We designed and constructed pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) as a mitochondrial reporter DNA vector that possesses a mitochondrial heavy strand promoter (HSP) and an artificial mitochondrial genome with the reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase gene that records adjustments to the mitochondrial codon system. We delivered the pDNA into mouse liver mitochondria by hydrodynamic injection, and detected exogenous mRNA in the liver using reverse transcription PCR analysis. The hydrodynamic injection of pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) resulted in the expression of the Nluc luciferase protein in liver and skeletal muscle. Our mitochondrial transgene expression reporter system would contribute to mitochondrial gene therapy and further studies directed at mitochondrial molecular biology. PMID:26567847

  19. Oligodendroglial differentiation induces mitochondrial genes and inhibition of mitochondrial function represses oligodendroglial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Robert; Wong, Alice; Silva, Jillian; Li, Ming; Itoh, Aki; Horiuchi, Makoto; Itoh, Takayuki; Pleasure, David; Cortopassi, Gino

    2011-01-01

    Demyelination occurs in multiple inherited mitochondrial diseases. We studied which genes were induced as a consequence of differentiation in rodent and human oligodendroglia. Cholesterol, myelin and mitochondrial genes were significantly increased with oligodendroglial differentiation. Mitochondrial DNA content per cell and acetyl CoA-related transcripts increased significantly; thus, the large buildup of cholesterol necessary for myelination appears to require mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA. Oligodendroglia were treated with low doses of the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone to test the dependence of differentiation on mitochondrial function. Undifferentiated cells were resistant to rotenone, whereas differentiating cells were much more sensitive. Very low doses of rotenone that did not affect viability or ATP synthesis still inhibited differentiation, as measured by reduced levels of the myelin transcripts 2′,3′-Cyclic Nucleotide-3′-Phosphodiesterase and Myelin Basic Protein. Thus, mitochondrial transcripts and mtDNA are amplified during oligodendroglial differentiation, and differentiating oligodendroglia are especially sensitive to mitochondrial inhibition, suggesting mechanisms for demyelination observed in mitochondrial disease. PMID:20005986

  20. Codon usage trend in mitochondrial CYB gene.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-07-15

    Here we reported the pattern of codon usage and the factors which influenced the codon usage pattern in mitochondrial cytochrome B (MT-CYB) gene among pisces, aves and mammals. The F1 axis of correspondence analysis showed highly significant positive correlation with nucleobases A3, C and C3 and significant negative correlation with T and T3 while F2 of correspondence analysis showed significant positive correlation with C and C3 and significant negative correlation with A and A3. From the neutrality plot, it was evident that the GC12 was influenced by mutation pressure and natural selection with a ratio of 0.10/0.90=0.11 in pisces, 0.024/0.976=0.0245 in aves and in mammals 0.215/0.785=0.273, which indicated that the role of natural selection was more than mutation pressure on structuring the bases at the first and second codon positions. Natural selection played the major role; but compositional constraint and mutation pressure also played a significant role in codon usage pattern. Analysis of codon usage pattern has contributed to the better understanding of the mechanism of distribution of codons and the evolution of MT-CYB gene. PMID:27063508

  1. Gene therapy for the treatment of mitochondrial DNA disorders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert W

    2005-02-01

    Despite recent epidemiological studies confirming that mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders due to mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome are amongst the most common inherited human diseases, realistic therapeutic strategies for these patients remain limited. The disappointing response to various vitamins, cofactors and electron acceptors that have been administered to patients in an attempt to bypass the underlying respiratory chain defect, coupled with the complexities of human mitochondrial genetics, means that novel and innovative means are required to offer realistic treatments. Several 'gene therapy' strategies have therefore been proposed to treat patients with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, and although these are not without their own inherent problems, several exciting approaches promise much in the near future. This review will provide a basic background to mitochondrial genetics and mitochondrial DNA disorders before introducing the various strategies being tested in vitro at present, in cell culture and animal models, and, in the example of therapeutic exercise, in patients themselves. PMID:15757380

  2. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  3. Chloroplast β chaperonins from A. thaliana function with endogenous cpn10 homologs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vitlin, Anna; Weiss, Celeste; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Rasouly, Aviram; Levin, Doron; Pisanty-Farchi, Odelia; Breiman, Adina; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-09-01

    The involvement of type I chaperonins in bacterial and organellar protein folding has been well-documented. In E. coli and mitochondria, these ubiquitous and highly conserved proteins form chaperonin oligomers of identical 60 kDa subunits (cpn60), while in chloroplasts, two distinct cpn60 α and β subunit types co-exist together. The primary sequence of α and β subunits is ~50% identical, similar to their respective homologies to the bacterial GroEL. Moreover, the A. thaliana genome contains two α and four β genes. The functional significance of this variability in plant chaperonin proteins has not yet been elucidated. In order to gain insight into the functional variety of the chloroplast chaperonin family members, we reconstituted β homo-oligomers from A. thaliana following their expression in bacteria and subjected them to a structure-function analysis. Our results show for the first time, that A. thaliana β homo-oligomers can function in vitro with authentic chloroplast co-chaperonins (ch-cpn10 and ch-cpn20). We also show that oligomers made up of different β subunit types have unique properties and different preferences for co-chaperonin partners. We propose that chloroplasts may contain active β homo-oligomers in addition to hetero-oligomers, possibly reflecting a variety of cellular roles. PMID:21633907

  4. Ordered biological nanostructures formed from chaperonin polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The following application relates to nanotemplates, nanostructures, nanoarrays and nanodevices formed from wild-type and mutated chaperonin polypeptides, methods of producing such compositions, methods of using such compositions and particular chaperonin polypeptides that can be utilized in producing such compositions.

  5. Ordered Nanostructures Made Using Chaperonin Polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan; McMillan, Robert; Paavola, Chad; Mogul, Rakesh; Kagawa, Hiromi

    2004-01-01

    A recently invented method of fabricating periodic or otherwise ordered nanostructures involves the use of chaperonin polypeptides. The method is intended to serve as a potentially superior and less expensive alternative to conventional lithographic methods for use in the patterning steps of the fabrication of diverse objects characterized by features of the order of nanometers. Typical examples of such objects include arrays of quantum dots that would serve as the functional building blocks of future advanced electronic and photonic devices. A chaperonin is a double-ring protein structure having a molecular weight of about 60 plus or minus 5 kilodaltons. In nature, chaperonins are ubiquitous, essential, subcellular structures. Each natural chaperonin molecule comprises 14, 16, or 18 protein subunits, arranged as two stacked rings approximately 16 to 18 nm tall by approximately 15 to 17 nm wide, the exact dimensions depending on the biological species in which it originates. The natural role of chaperonins is unknown, but they are believed to aid in the correct folding of other proteins, by enclosing unfolded proteins and preventing nonspecific aggregation during assembly. What makes chaperonins useful for the purpose of the present method is that under the proper conditions, chaperonin rings assemble themselves into higher-order structures. This method exploits such higher-order structures to define nanoscale devices. The higher-order structures are tailored partly by choice of chemical and physical conditions for assembly and partly by using chaperonins that have been mutated. The mutations are made by established biochemical techniques. The assembly of chaperonin polypeptides into such structures as rings, tubes, filaments, and sheets (two-dimensional crystals) can be regulated chemically. Rings, tubes, and filaments of some chaperonin polypeptides can, for example, function as nano vessels if they are able to absorb, retain, protect, and release gases or

  6. Mitochondrial Cyclic AMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Mediates Mitochondrial Gene Expression and Neuronal Survival*S

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junghee; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Simon, David K.; Aminova, Lyaylya R.; Andreyev, Alexander Y.; Kushnareva, Yulia E.; Murphy, Anne N.; Lonze, Bonnie E.; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Ginty, David D.; Ferrante, Robert J.; Ryu, Hoon; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a widely expressed transcription factor whose role in neuronal protection is now well established. Here we report that CREB is present in the mitochondrial matrix of neurons and that it binds directly to cyclic AMP response elements (CREs) found within the mitochondrial genome. Disruption of CREB activity in the mitochondria decreases the expression of a subset of mitochondrial genes, including the ND5 subunit of complex I, down-regulates complex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration, and increases susceptibility to 3-nitropropionic acid, a mitochondrial toxin that induces a clinical and pathological phenotype similar to Huntington disease. These results demonstrate that regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by mitochondrial CREB, in part, underlies the protective effects of CREB and raise the possibility that decreased mitochondrial CREB activity contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal loss associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:16207717

  7. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-01

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases. PMID:25634573

  8. Archaeal-like chaperonins in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Robb, Frank T

    2010-11-23

    Chaperonins (CPN) are ubiquitous oligomeric protein machines that mediate the ATP-dependent folding of polypeptide chains. These chaperones have not only been assigned stress response and normal housekeeping functions but also have a role in certain human disease states. A longstanding convention divides CPNs into two groups that share many conserved sequence motifs but differ in both structure and distribution. Group I complexes are the well known GroEL/ES heat-shock proteins in bacteria, that also occur in some species of mesophilic archaea and in the endosymbiotic organelles of eukaryotes. Group II CPNs are found only in the cytosol of archaea and eukaryotes. Here we report a third, divergent group of CPNs found in several species of bacteria. We propose to name these Group III CPNs because of their distant relatedness to both Group I and II CPNs as well as their unique genomic context, within the hsp70 operon. The prototype Group III CPN, Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans chaperonin (Ch-CPN), is able to refold denatured proteins in an ATP-dependent manner and is structurally similar to the Group II CPNs, forming a 16-mer with each subunit contributing to a flexible lid domain. The Group III CPN represent a divergent group of bacterial CPNs distinct from the GroEL/ES CPN found in all bacteria. The Group III lineage may represent an ancient horizontal gene transfer from an archaeon into an early Firmicute lineage. An analysis of their functional and structural characteristics may provide important insights into the early history of this ubiquitous family of proteins. PMID:21057109

  9. Evolutionary relationship of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins across grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome studies were done across taxa to provide a basic understanding of genome evolution regarding nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins and their conservation in grass species. Two different mitochondria-related gene sets, one from rice and another from Arabidopsis, were us...

  10. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  11. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Barton, Gregory P; Sepe, Joseph J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Diffee, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  12. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  13. Limitations of allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oca-Cossio, Jose; Kenyon, Lesley; Hao, Huiling; Moraes, Carlos T

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of expressing mitochondrial DNA-coded genes in the nuclear-cytoplasmic compartment provides an attractive system for genetic treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations. In theory, by recoding mitochondrial genes to adapt them to the universal genetic code and by adding a DNA sequence coding for a mitochondrial-targeting sequence, one could achieve correct localization of the gene product. Such transfer has occurred in nature, and certain species of algae and plants express a number of polypeptides that are commonly coded by mtDNA in the nuclear-cytoplasmic compartment. In the present study, allotopic expression of three different mtDNA-coded polypeptides (ATPase8, apocytochrome b, and ND4) into COS-7 and HeLa cells was analyzed. Among these, only ATPase8 was correctly expressed and localized to mitochondria. The full-length, as well as truncated forms, of apocytochrome b and ND4 decorated the periphery of mitochondria, but also aggregated in fiber-like structures containing tubulin and in some cases also vimentin. The addition of a hydrophilic tail (EGFP) to the C terminus of these polypeptides did not change their localization. Overexpression of molecular chaperones also did not have a significant effect in preventing aggregations. Allotopic expression of apocytochrome b and ND4 induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in transfected cells, which can lead to cell death. Our observations suggest that only a subset of mitochondrial genes can be replaced allotopically. Analyses of the hydrophobic patterns of different polypeptides suggest that hydrophobicity of the N-terminal segment is the main determinant for the importability of peptides into mammalian mitochondria. PMID:14573482

  14. Cellular Chaperonin CCTγ Contributes to Rabies Virus Replication during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  15. Cellular chaperonin CCTγ contributes to rabies virus replication during infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen; Zhou, Jiyong

    2013-07-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  16. The Legionella pneumophila Chaperonin - An Unusual Multifunctional Protein in Unusual Locations.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Rafael A; Chong, Audrey; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Allan, David S

    2011-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, high temperature protein B (HtpB), was discovered as a highly immunogenic antigen, only a few years after the identification of L. pneumophila as the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. As its counterparts in other bacterial pathogens, HtpB did not initially receive further attention, particularly because research was focused on a few model chaperonins that were used to demonstrate that chaperonins are essential stress proteins, present in all cellular forms of life and involved in helping other proteins to fold. However, chaperonins have recently attracted increasing interest, particularly after several reports confirmed their multifunctional nature and the presence of multiple chaperonin genes in numerous bacterial species. It is now accepted that bacterial chaperonins are capable of playing a variety of protein folding-independent roles. HtpB is clearly a multifunctional chaperonin that according to its location in the bacterial cell, or in the L. pneumophila-infected cell, plays different roles. HtpB exposed on the bacterial cell surface can act as an invasion factor for non-phagocytic cells, whereas the HtpB released in the host cell can act as an effector capable of altering organelle trafficking, the organization of actin microfilaments and cell signaling pathways. The road to discover the multifunctional nature of HtpB has been exciting and here we provide a historical perspective of the key findings linked to such discovery, as well as a summary of the experimental work (old and new) performed in our laboratory. Our current understanding has led us to propose that HtpB is an ancient protein that L. pneumophila uses as a key molecular tool important to the intracellular establishment of this fascinating pathogen. PMID:21713066

  17. Polymorphisms in mitochondrial genes and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Sauver, Jennifer St; Cerhan, James R.; Isaya, Grazia; Schaid, Daniel J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrion, conventionally thought to be an organelle specific to energy metabolism, is in fact multi-functional and implicated in many diseases, including cancer. To evaluate whether mitochondria-related genes are associated with increased risk for prostate cancer, we genotyped 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mitochondrial genome (mtSNPs) and 376 tagSNPs localized to 78 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. The tagSNPs were selected to achieve ≥80% coverage based on linkage disequilibrium. We compared allele and haplotype frequencies in ~1000 prostate cancer cases with ~500 population controls. An association with prostate cancer was not detected for any of the mtSNPs individually or for 10 mitochondrial common haplotypes when evaluated using a global score statistic. For the nuclear-encoded genes, none of the tagSNPs were significantly associated with prostate cancer after adjusting for multiple testing. Nonetheless, we evaluated unadjusted p-values by comparing our results with those from the CGEMS phase I data set. Seven tagSNPs had unadjusted p-values ≤ 0.05 in both our data and in CGEMS (two SNPs were identical and five were in strong linkage disequilibrium with CGEMS SNPs). These seven SNPs (rs17184211, rs4147684, rs4233367, rs2070902, rs3829037, rs7830235, and rs1203213) are located in genes MTRR, NDUFA9, NDUFS2, NDUFB9 and COX7A2, respectively. Five of the seven SNPs were further included in the CGEMS phase II study, however, none of the findings for these were replicated. Overall, these results suggest that polymorphisms in the mitochondrial genome and those in the nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes evaluated are not substantial risk factors for prostate cancer. PMID:19064571

  18. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  19. Genomic modulation of mitochondrial respiratory genes in the hypertrophied heart reflects adaptive changes in mitochondrial and contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized the coordinate induction of mitochondrial regulatory genes in the hypertrophied right ventricle to sustain mitochondrial respiratory capacity and contractile function in response to increased load. Wistar rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (11% O(2)) or normoxia for 2 wk. Cardiac...

  20. Molecular mechanisms of extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangementin plethodontid salamanders

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-06-01

    Extensive gene rearrangement is reported in the mitochondrial genomes of lungless salamanders (Plethodontidae). In each genome with a novel gene order, there is evidence that the rearrangement was mediated by duplication of part of the mitochondrial genome, including the presence of both pseudogenes and additional, presumably functional, copies of duplicated genes. All rearrangement-mediating duplications include either the origin of light strand replication and the nearby tRNA genes or the regions flanking the origin of heavy strand replication. The latter regions comprise nad6, trnE, cob, trnT, an intergenic spacer between trnT and trnP and, in some genomes, trnP, the control region, trnF, rrnS, trnV, rrnL, trnL1, and nad1. In some cases, two copies of duplicated genes, presumptive regulatory regions, and/or sequences with no assignable function have been retained in the genome following the initial duplication; in other genomes, only one of the duplicated copies has been retained. Both tandem and non-tandem duplications are present in these genomes, suggesting different duplication mechanisms. In some of these mtDNAs, up to 25 percent of the total length is composed of tandem duplications of non-coding sequence that includes putative regulatory regions and/or pseudogenes of tRNAs and protein-coding genes along with otherwise unassignable sequences. These data indicate that imprecise initiation and termination of replication, slipped-strand mispairing, and intra-molecular recombination may all have played a role in generating repeats during the evolutionary history of plethodontid mitochondrial genomes.

  1. The impact of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functioning on the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major factors implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The maintenance of healthy mitochondria is a very complex process coordinated bi-genomically. Here, we review association studies on mitochondrial haplogroups and subhaplogroups, discussing the underlying molecular mechanisms. We also focus on variation in the nuclear genes (NDUFV2, PGC-1alpha, HSPA9, LRPPRC, MTIF3, POLG1, and TFAM encoding NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, mortalin, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein, translation initiation factor 3, mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma, and mitochondrial transcription factor A, respectively) primarily linked to regulation of mitochondrial functioning that recently have been associated with PD risk. Possible interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variants and related proteins are discussed. PMID:24532986

  2. The Impact of Mitochondrial DNA and Nuclear Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functioning on the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major factors implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathogenesis. The maintenance of healthy mitochondria is a very complex process coordinated bi-genomically. Here, we review association studies on mitochondrial haplogroups and subhaplogroups, discussing the underlying molecular mechanisms. We also focus on variation in the nuclear genes (NDUFV2, PGC-1alpha, HSPA9, LRPPRC, MTIF3, POLG1, and TFAM encoding NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, mortalin, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein, translation initiation factor 3, mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma, and mitochondrial transcription factor A, respectively) primarily linked to regulation of mitochondrial functioning that recently have been associated with PD risk. Possible interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variants and related proteins are discussed. PMID:24532986

  3. Genes or culture: are mitochondrial genes associated with tool use in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.)?

    PubMed

    Bacher, K; Allen, S; Lindholm, A K; Bejder, L; Krützen, M

    2010-09-01

    Some bottlenose dolphins use marine sponges as foraging tools ('sponging'), which appears to be socially transmitted from mothers mainly to their female offspring. Yet, explanations alternative to social transmission have been proposed. Firstly, the propensity to engage in sponging might be due to differences in diving ability caused by variation of mitochondrial genes coding for proteins of the respiratory chain. Secondly, the cultural technique of sponging may have selected for changes in these same genes (or other autosomal ones) among its possessors. We tested whether sponging can be predicted by mitochondrial coding genes and whether these genes are under selection. In 29 spongers and 54 non-spongers from two study sites, the non-coding haplotype at the HVRI locus was a significant predictor of sponging, whereas the coding mitochondrial genes were not. There was no evidence of selection in the investigated genes. Our study shows that mitochondrial gene variation is unlikely to be a viable alternative to cultural transmission as a primary driver of tool use in dolphins. PMID:20582623

  4. Decrypting the Mitochondrial Gene Pool of Modern Panamanians

    PubMed Central

    Angerhofer, Norman; Ekins, Jayne E.; Olivieri, Anna; Woodward, Scott R.; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Motta, Jorge; Achilli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The Isthmus of Panama–the narrow neck of land connecting the northern and southern American landmasses–was an obligatory corridor for the Paleo-Indians as they moved into South America. Archaeological evidence suggests an unbroken link between modern natives and their Paleo-Indian ancestors in some areas of Panama, even if the surviving indigenous groups account for only 12.3% of the total population. To evaluate if modern Panamanians have retained a larger fraction of the native pre-Columbian gene pool in their maternally-inherited mitochondrial genome, DNA samples and historical records were collected from more than 1500 volunteer participants living in the nine provinces and four indigenous territories of the Republic. Due to recent gene-flow, we detected ∼14% African mitochondrial lineages, confirming the demographic impact of the Atlantic slave trade and subsequent African immigration into Panama from Caribbean islands, and a small European (∼2%) component, indicating only a minor influence of colonialism on the maternal side. The majority (∼83%) of Panamanian mtDNAs clustered into native pan-American lineages, mostly represented by haplogroup A2 (51%). These findings reveal an overwhelming native maternal legacy in today's Panama, which is in contrast with the overall concept of personal identity shared by many Panamanians. Moreover, the A2 sub-clades A2ad and A2af (with the previously named 6 bp Huetar deletion), when analyzed at the maximum level of resolution (26 entire mitochondrial genomes), confirm the major role of the Pacific coastal path in the peopling of North, Central and South America, and testify to the antiquity of native mitochondrial genomes in Panama. PMID:22675545

  5. Decrypting the mitochondrial gene pool of modern Panamanians.

    PubMed

    Perego, Ugo A; Lancioni, Hovirag; Tribaldos, Maribel; Angerhofer, Norman; Ekins, Jayne E; Olivieri, Anna; Woodward, Scott R; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Motta, Jorge; Achilli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The Isthmus of Panama--the narrow neck of land connecting the northern and southern American landmasses--was an obligatory corridor for the Paleo-Indians as they moved into South America. Archaeological evidence suggests an unbroken link between modern natives and their Paleo-Indian ancestors in some areas of Panama, even if the surviving indigenous groups account for only 12.3% of the total population. To evaluate if modern Panamanians have retained a larger fraction of the native pre-Columbian gene pool in their maternally-inherited mitochondrial genome, DNA samples and historical records were collected from more than 1500 volunteer participants living in the nine provinces and four indigenous territories of the Republic. Due to recent gene-flow, we detected ~14% African mitochondrial lineages, confirming the demographic impact of the Atlantic slave trade and subsequent African immigration into Panama from Caribbean islands, and a small European (~2%) component, indicating only a minor influence of colonialism on the maternal side. The majority (~83%) of Panamanian mtDNAs clustered into native pan-American lineages, mostly represented by haplogroup A2 (51%). These findings reveal an overwhelming native maternal legacy in today's Panama, which is in contrast with the overall concept of personal identity shared by many Panamanians. Moreover, the A2 sub-clades A2ad and A2af (with the previously named 6 bp Huetar deletion), when analyzed at the maximum level of resolution (26 entire mitochondrial genomes), confirm the major role of the Pacific coastal path in the peopling of North, Central and South America, and testify to the antiquity of native mitochondrial genomes in Panama. PMID:22675545

  6. Suppression of cytoplasmic male sterility by nuclear genes alters expression of a novel mitochondrial gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M; Brown, G G

    1991-01-01

    To identify regions of the mitochondrial genome that potentially could specify the "Polima" (pol) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) of Brassica napus, transcripts of 14 mitochondrial genes from nap (male fertile), pol (male sterile), and nuclear fertility-restored pol cytoplasm plants were analyzed. Transcriptional differences among these plants were detected only with the ATPase subunit 6 (atp6) gene. Structural analysis of the atp6 gene regions of pol and nap mitochondrial DNAs showed that rearrangements in the pol mitochondrial genome occurring upstream of atp6 have generated a chimeric 224-codon open reading frame, designated orf224, that is cotranscribed with atp6. In CMS plants, most transcripts of this region are dicistronic, comprising both orf224 and atp6 sequences. Nuclear restorer genes at either of two distinct loci appear to specifically alter this transcript pattern such that monocistronic atp6 transcripts predominate. The differences in expression of this region appear to result, in part, from differential processing of a tRNA-like element comprising a tRNA pseudogene present immediately upstream of atp6 in both the sterile and fertile mitochondrial DNAs. Possible mechanisms by which expression of the orf224/atp6 locus and the Polima CMS trait may be specifically related are considered. PMID:1840901

  7. Review: Progress in the Researches on Insect Mitochondrial Genome and Analysis of Gene Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li; Jianyu, Gao; Haiyu, Liu; Wanzhi, Cai

    2009-04-01

    Insect mitochondrial genome is a double-stranded circular genomes which range from 14,503 bp to 19,571 bp in size. Nearly all the sequenced insect mitochondrial genomes encode 37 genes: two for rRNAs, 13 for proteins and 22 for tRNAs. This review compares and summarizes the features of complete mitochondrial genomes from 175 sequenced species of insects in 22 orders. The genomic organization, contents, gene order, and rearrangements of gene order are analyzed.

  8. Biogenesis of mitochondria: the mitochondrial gene (aap1) coding for mitochondrial ATPase subunit 8 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Macreadie, I G; Novitski, C E; Maxwell, R J; John, U; Ooi, B G; McMullen, G L; Lukins, H B; Linnane, A W; Nagley, P

    1983-01-01

    A mitochondrial gene (denoted aap1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis of a region of mtDNA between the oxi3 and oli2 genes. The reading frame of the aap1 gene specifies a hydrophobic polypeptide containing 48 amino acids. The functional nature of this reading frame was established by sequence analysis of a series of mit- mutants and revertants. Evidence is presented that the aap1 gene codes for a mitochondrially synthesized polypeptide associated with the mitochondrial ATPase complex. This polypeptide (denoted subunit 8) is a proteolipid whose size has been previously assumed to be 10 kilodaltons based on its mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, but the sequence of the aap1 gene predicts a molecular weight of 5,815 for this protein. PMID:6223276

  9. Mitochondrial gene expression, antioxidant responses, and histopathology after cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Al Kaddissi, Simone; Legeay, Alexia; Elia, Antonia Concetta; Gonzalez, Patrice; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Simon, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cadmium effects on the transcription of mitochondrial genes of Procambarus clarkii after acute (0.05, 0.5, and 5 mg Cd/L; 4-10 days) and chronic exposures (10 μg Cd/L; 30-60 days). Transcriptional responses of cox1, atp6, and 12S using quantitative real-time RT-PCR were assessed in gills and hepatopancreas. Additionally, the expression levels of genes involved in detoxification and/or oxidative stress responses [mt, sod(Mn)] and enzymatic activities of antioxidants (SOD, CAT, GPX, and GST) were analyzed. The histopathological effects in hepatopancreas of crayfish were evaluated by light microscopy. Relationships between endpoints at different levels of biological organization and Cd bioaccumulation were also examined. Cd induced high levels of bioaccumulation, which was followed by mitochondrial dysfunction and histological alterations in both experiments. Moreover, perturbations in the defence mechanisms against oxidative stress tended to increase with time. Results also showed that molecular responses can vary depending on the intensity and duration of the chemical stress applied to the organisms and that the study of mt gene expression levels seemed to be the best tool to assess Cd intoxication. PMID:23065898

  10. Effects of dietary fatty acids on mitochondrial phospholipid compositions, oxidative status and mitochondrial gene expression of zebrafish at different ages.

    PubMed

    Betancor, M B; Almaida-Pagán, P F; Hernández, A; Tocher, D R

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL) and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, oxidative status (TBARS content and SOD activity) and mtDNA gene expression of muscle and liver were analyzed in zebrafish fed two diets with lipid supplied either by rapeseed oil (RO) or a blend 60:40 of RO and DHA500 TG oil (DHA). Two feeding trials were performed using zebrafish from the same population of two ages (8 and 21 months). Dietary FA composition affected fish growth in 8-month-old animals, which could be related to an increase in stress promoted by diet composition. Lipid peroxidation was considerably higher in mitochondria of 8-month-old zebrafish fed the DHA diet than in animals fed the RO diet. This could indicate higher oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, very likely due to increased incorporation of DHA in PL of mitochondrial membranes. Lipids would be among the first molecules affected by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation could propagate oxidative reactions that would damage other molecules, including mtDNA. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and gene expression of 21-month-old fish showed lower responsiveness to diet composition than those of younger fish. Differences found in the effect of diet composition on mitochondrial lipids between the two age groups could be indicating age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes. PMID:26156499

  11. Disorders of phospholipid metabolism: an emerging class of mitochondrial disease due to defects in nuclear genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ya-Wen; Claypool, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The human nuclear and mitochondrial genomes co-exist within each cell. While the mitochondrial genome encodes for a limited number of proteins, transfer RNAs, and ribosomal RNAs, the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. Of the multitude of mitochondrial disorders known to date, only a fifth are maternally inherited. The recent characterization of the mitochondrial proteome therefore serves as an important step toward delineating the nosology of a large spectrum of phenotypically heterogeneous diseases. Following the identification of the first nuclear gene defect to underlie a mitochondrial disorder, a plenitude of genetic variants that provoke mitochondrial pathophysiology have been molecularly elucidated and classified into six categories that impact: (1) oxidative phosphorylation (subunits and assembly factors); (2) mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression; (3) mitochondrial protein import and assembly; (4) mitochondrial quality control (chaperones and proteases); (5) iron–sulfur cluster homeostasis; and (6) mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion). Here, we propose that an additional class of genetic variant be included in the classification schema to acknowledge the role of genetic defects in phospholipid biosynthesis, remodeling, and metabolism in mitochondrial pathophysiology. This seventh class includes a small but notable group of nuclear-encoded proteins whose dysfunction impacts normal mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism. The resulting human disorders present with a diverse array of pathologic consequences that reflect the variety of functions that phospholipids have in mitochondria and highlight the important role of proper membrane homeostasis in mitochondrial biology. PMID:25691889

  12. Disorders of phospholipid metabolism: an emerging class of mitochondrial disease due to defects in nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Wen; Claypool, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The human nuclear and mitochondrial genomes co-exist within each cell. While the mitochondrial genome encodes for a limited number of proteins, transfer RNAs, and ribosomal RNAs, the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. Of the multitude of mitochondrial disorders known to date, only a fifth are maternally inherited. The recent characterization of the mitochondrial proteome therefore serves as an important step toward delineating the nosology of a large spectrum of phenotypically heterogeneous diseases. Following the identification of the first nuclear gene defect to underlie a mitochondrial disorder, a plenitude of genetic variants that provoke mitochondrial pathophysiology have been molecularly elucidated and classified into six categories that impact: (1) oxidative phosphorylation (subunits and assembly factors); (2) mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression; (3) mitochondrial protein import and assembly; (4) mitochondrial quality control (chaperones and proteases); (5) iron-sulfur cluster homeostasis; and (6) mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion). Here, we propose that an additional class of genetic variant be included in the classification schema to acknowledge the role of genetic defects in phospholipid biosynthesis, remodeling, and metabolism in mitochondrial pathophysiology. This seventh class includes a small but notable group of nuclear-encoded proteins whose dysfunction impacts normal mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism. The resulting human disorders present with a diverse array of pathologic consequences that reflect the variety of functions that phospholipids have in mitochondria and highlight the important role of proper membrane homeostasis in mitochondrial biology. PMID:25691889

  13. Progressive mitochondrial myopathy, deafness, and sporadic seizures associated with a novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) gene.

    PubMed

    Cardaioli, Elena; Malfatti, Edoardo; Da Pozzo, Paola; Gallus, Gian Nicola; Carluccio, Maria Alessandra; Rufa, Alessandra; Volpi, Nila; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2011-04-15

    We sequenced the mitochondrial genome from a patient with progressive mitochondrial myopathy associated with deafness, sporadic seizures, and histological and biochemical features of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. Direct sequencing showed a heteroplasmic mutation at nucleotide 12262 in the tRNASer(AGY) gene. RFLP analysis confirmed that 63% of muscle mtDNA harboured the mutation, while it was absent in all the other tissues. The mutation is predicted to influence the functional behaviour of the aminoacyl acceptor stem of the tRNA. Several point mutations on mitochondrial tRNA genes have been reported in patients affected by encephalomyopathies, but between them only four were reported for tRNASer(AGY). PMID:21257182

  14. Construction of a yeast strain devoid of mitochondrial introns and its use to screen nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Séraphin, B; Boulet, A; Simon, M; Faye, G

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed a respiring yeast strain devoid of mitochondrial introns to screen nuclear pet- mutants for those that play a direct role in mitochondrial intron excision. Intron-less mitochondria are introduced by cytoduction into pet- strains that have been made rho0; cytoductants therefrom recover respiratory competency if the original pet- mutation is required only for mitochondrial splicing. By this means, we have identified 11 complementation groups of such genes. Their total number may be estimated as about 18. Images PMID:3309947

  15. Mitochondrial gene order change in Schistosoma (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Schistosomatidae).

    PubMed

    Webster, Bonnie L; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    In the flatworm genus Schistosoma, species of which include parasites of biomedical and veterinary importance, mitochondrial gene order is radically different in some species. A PCR-based survey of 19 schistosomatid spp. established which of 14 Schistosoma spp. have the ancestral (plesiomorphic) or derived gene order condition. A phylogeny for Schistosoma was estimated and used to infer the origin of the gene order change which is present in all members of a clade containing Schistosoma incognitum and members of the traditionally recognised Schistosoma indicum, Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosomahaematobium spp. groups. Schistosoma turkestanicum, with the plesiomorphic gene order state, is sister to this clade. Common interval analysis suggests change in gene order, from ancestral to derived, consisted of two sequential transposition events: (a) nad1_nad3 to nad3_nad1 and (b) [atp6,nad2]_[nad3,-nad1,cox1,rrnL,rrnS,cox2,nad6] to [nad3,nad1,cox1,rrnL,rrnS,cox2,nad6]_[atp6,nad2], where gene order offragments within square brackets remain unchanged. Gene order change is rare in parasitic flatworms and is a robust synapomorphy for schistosome spp. that exhibit it. The schistosomatid phylogeny casts some doubt on the origin of Schistosoma (Asian or African), highlights the propensity for species to hosts witch amongst mammalian (definitive) hosts, and indicates the likely importance of snail (intermediate)hosts in determining and defining patterns of schistosome radiation and continental invasion. Mitogenomic sampling of Schistosoma dattai and Schistosoma harinasutai to determine gene order, and within key species, especially S. turkestanicum and S. incognitum, to determine ancestral ranges, may help discover the geographic origins of gene order change in the genus. Samples of S. incognitum from India and Thailand suggest this taxon may include cryptic species. PMID:23362512

  16. Detection of gene-anchored amplification polymorphism (GAAP) in the vicinity of plant mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Loridon, K; Saumitou-Laprade, P

    2002-05-01

    A simple, semi-automatable method was established for assessing polymorphism in plant mitochondrial genome. A set of 41 mitochondrial markers based on the published Arabidopsis thaliana sequence was developed in Brassicaceae using a gene-anchored amplification polymorphism (GAAP) strategy. PCR primers were selected based on conserved coding regions of mitochondrial genes and used to amplify the corresponding 5' and/or 3' non-coding flanking regions in order to maximise sequence variability between haplotypes. The variations in fragment size were analysed on a LiCor DNA sequencer, but the methodology is compatible with various sequencing systems using denaturing polyacrylamide gels. One advantage of the method is that GAAP products can be directly sequenced (without any cloning steps) through labelled M13 consensus sequences. Mitochondrial GAAP loci gave clear and simple patterns (one or two bands) that were easy to score and highly reproducible. Nearly all mitochondrial loci examined in A. thaliana were conserved within the Brassicaceae family, and half of the primers generated products when DNA from a distant species, Beta vulgaris (Chenopodiaceae), was used as template. The GAAP markers revealed low levels of polymorphism within species but exhibited a high level of polymorphism among genera and families. Our results showed some discrepancies with respect to the published mtDNA sequence of A. thaliana. PMID:12073035

  17. Regulation of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, T A; Evangelista, C; Trumpower, B L

    1995-01-01

    Selection for mutants which release glucose repression of the CYB2 gene was used to identify genes which regulate repression of mitochondrial biogenesis. We have identified two of these as the previously described GRR1/CAT80 and ROX3 genes. Mutations in these genes not only release glucose repression of CYB2 but also generally release respiration of the mutants from glucose repression. In addition, both mutants are partially defective in CYB2 expression when grown on nonfermentable carbon sources, indicating a positive regulatory role as well. ROX3 was cloned by complementation of a glucose-inducible flocculating phenotype of an amber mutant and has been mapped as a new leftmost marker on chromosome 2. The ROX3 mutant has only a modest defect in glucose repression of GAL1 but is substantially compromised in galactose induction of GAL1 expression. This mutant also has increased SUC2 expression on nonrepressing carbon sources. We have also characterized the regulation of CYB2 in strains carrying null mutation in two other glucose repression genes, HXK2 and SSN6, and show that HXK2 is a negative regulator of CYB2, whereas SSN6 appears to be a positive effector of CYB2 expression. PMID:7592476

  18. High Variability of Mitochondrial Gene Order among Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Aguileta, Gabriela; de Vienne, Damien M.; Ross, Oliver N.; Hood, Michael E.; Giraud, Tatiana; Petit, Elsa; Gabaldón, Toni

    2014-01-01

    From their origin as an early alpha proteobacterial endosymbiont to their current state as cellular organelles, large-scale genomic reorganization has taken place in the mitochondria of all main eukaryotic lineages. So far, most studies have focused on plant and animal mitochondrial (mt) genomes (mtDNA), but fungi provide new opportunities to study highly differentiated mtDNAs. Here, we analyzed 38 complete fungal mt genomes to investigate the evolution of mtDNA gene order among fungi. In particular, we looked for evidence of nonhomologous intrachromosomal recombination and investigated the dynamics of gene rearrangements. We investigated the effect that introns, intronic open reading frames (ORFs), and repeats may have on gene order. Additionally, we asked whether the distribution of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) evolves independently to that of mt protein-coding genes. We found that fungal mt genomes display remarkable variation between and within the major fungal phyla in terms of gene order, genome size, composition of intergenic regions, and presence of repeats, introns, and associated ORFs. Our results support previous evidence for the presence of mt recombination in all fungal phyla, a process conspicuously lacking in most Metazoa. Overall, the patterns of rearrangements may be explained by the combined influences of recombination (i.e., most likely nonhomologous and intrachromosomal), accumulated repeats, especially at intergenic regions, and to a lesser extent, mobile element dynamics. PMID:24504088

  19. Identification and mapping of tRNA genes on the Helianthus annuus mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L R; Veronico, P; Gallerani, R

    1996-01-01

    The physical map for seventeen tRNA genes on the mitochondrial genome of the dicotyledonous plant Helianthus annuus has been established. Eleven are genuine mitochondrial genes, while the other six show a high degree of similarity with the chloroplast counterparts. The genes, with the exception of the genuine trnS(GCT) and of the chloroplast-like trnV and trnP, are expressed. The comparison of the organization of some tRNA genes in the H. annuus mitochondrial genome with that of similar genes detectable in other plants reveals that their association is common to several dicotyledons. PMID:8722570

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Pseudocellus pearsei (Chelicerata: Ricinulei) and a comparison of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in Arachnida

    PubMed Central

    Fahrein, Kathrin; Talarico, Giovanni; Braband, Anke; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomes are widely utilized for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses among animals. In addition to sequence data the mitochondrial gene order and RNA secondary structure data are used in phylogenetic analyses. Arachnid phylogeny is still highly debated and there is a lack of sufficient sequence data for many taxa. Ricinulei (hooded tickspiders) are a morphologically distinct clade of arachnids with uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Results The first complete mitochondrial DNA genome of a member of the Ricinulei, Pseudocellus pearsei (Arachnida: Ricinulei) was sequenced using a PCR-based approach. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular duplex DNA molecule with a size of 15,099 bp, showing the complete set of genes usually present in bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. Five tRNA genes (trnW, trnY, trnN, trnL(CUN), trnV) show different relative positions compared to other Chelicerata (e.g. Limulus polyphemus, Ixodes spp.). We propose that two events led to this derived gene order: (1) a tandem duplication followed by random deletion and (2) an independent translocation of trnN. Most of the inferred tRNA secondary structures show the common cloverleaf pattern except tRNA-Glu where the TψC-arm is missing. In phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, Bayesian inference) using concatenated amino acid and nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes the basal relationships of arachnid orders remain unresolved. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses (ML, MP, BI) of arachnid mitochondrial genomes fail to resolve interordinal relationships of Arachnida and remain in a preliminary stage because there is still a lack of mitogenomic data from important taxa such as Opiliones and Pseudoscorpiones. Gene order varies considerably within Arachnida – only eight out of 23 species have retained the putative arthropod ground pattern. Some gene order changes are valuable characters in phylogenetic analysis of intraordinal

  1. Genetic Variants in Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Genes Influence AIDS Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sher L.; Lautenberger, James A.; Chinn, Leslie Wei; Malasky, Michael; Sezgin, Efe; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The human mitochondrial genome includes only 13 coding genes while nuclear-encoded genes account for 99% of proteins responsible for mitochondrial morphology, redox regulation, and energetics. Mitochondrial pathogenesis occurs in HIV patients and genetically, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with presumed functional differences have been associated with differential AIDS progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 904 of the estimated 1,500 genes that specify nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (NEMPs) influence AIDS progression among HIV-1 infected patients. We examined NEMPs for association with the rate of AIDS progression using genotypes generated by an Affymetrix 6.0 genotyping array of 1,455 European American patients from five US AIDS cohorts. Successfully genotyped SNPs gave 50% or better haplotype coverage for 679 of known NEMP genes. With a Bonferroni adjustment for the number of genes and tests examined, multiple SNPs within two NEMP genes showed significant association with AIDS progression: acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 4 (ACSM4) on chromosome 12 and peroxisomal D3,D2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (PECI) on chromosome 6. Conclusions Our previous studies on mitochondrial DNA showed that European haplogroups with presumed functional differences were associated with AIDS progression and HAART mediated adverse events. The modest influences of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes found in the current study add support to the idea that mitochondrial function plays a role in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:20877624

  2. Physella acuta: atypical mitochondrial gene order among panpulmonates (Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Journey R.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Adema, Coen M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) sequences are frequently used for phylogenetic reconstruction and for identification of species of molluscs. This study expands the phylogenetic range of Hygrophila (Panpulmonata) for which such sequence data are available by characterizing the full mt genome of the invasive freshwater snail Physella acuta (Physidae). The mt genome sequences of two P. acuta isolates from Stubblefield Lake, New Mexico, USA, differed in length (14,490 vs 14,314 bp) and showed 11.49% sequence divergence, whereas ITS1 and ITS2 sequences from the nuclear genome differed by 1.75%. The mt gene order of P. acuta (cox1, P, nad6, nad5, nad1, D, F, cox2, Y, W, nad4L, C, Q, atp6, R, E, rrnS, M, T, cox3, I, nad2, K, V, rrnL, L1, A, cytb, G, H, L2, atp8, N, nad2, S1, S2, nad4) differs considerably from the relatively conserved gene order within Panpulmonata. Phylogenetic trees show that the 13 protein-encoding mt gene sequences (equivalent codons) of P. acuta group according to gastropod phylogeny, yet branch lengths and dN/dS ratios for P. acuta indicate elevated amino acid substitutions relative to other gastropods. This study indicates that mt sequences of P. acuta are phylogenetically informative despite a considerable intraspecific divergence and the atypical gene order in its mt genome. PMID:25368439

  3. An engineered chaperonin caging a guest protein: Structural insights and potential as a protein expression tool

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Masahiro; Hata, Jun-Ichi; Shomura, Yasuhito; Itami, Keisuke; Yoshida, Takao; Izumoto, Yoshitaka; Togi, Akiko; Ideno, Akira; Yasunaga, Takuo; Miki, Kunio; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The structure of a chaperonin caging a substrate protein is not quite clear. We made engineered group II chaperonins fused with a guest protein and analyzed their structural and functional features. Thermococcus sp. KS-1 chaperonin α-subunit (TCP) which forms an eightfold symmetric double-ring structure was used. Expression plasmids were constructed which carried two or four TCP genes ligated head to tail in phase and a target protein gene at the 3′ end of the linked TCP genes. Electron microscopy showed that the expressed gene products with the molecular sizes of ~120 kDa (di-TCP) and ~230 kDa (tetra-TCP) formed double-ring complexes similar to those of wild-type TCP. The tetra-TCP retained ATPase activity and its thermostability was significantly higher than that of the wild type. A 260-kDa fusion protein of tetra-TCP and green fluorescent protein (GFP, 27 kDa) was able to form the double-ring complexes with green fluorescence. Image analyses indicated that the GFP moiety of tetra-TCP/GFP fusion protein was accommodated in the central cavity, and tetra-TCP/GFP formed the closed-form similar to that crystallographically resolved in group II chaperonins. Furthermore, it was suggested that caging GFP expanded the cavity around the bottom. Using this tetra-TCP fusion strategy, two virus structural proteins (21–25 kDa) toxic to host cells or two antibody fragments (25–36 kDa) prone to aggregate were well expressed in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli. These fusion products also assembled to double-ring complexes, suggesting encapsulation of the guest proteins. The antibody fragments liberated by site-specific protease digestion exhibited ligand-binding activities. PMID:15659368

  4. Repeated, recent and diverse transfers of a mitochondrial gene to the nucleus in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Adams, K L; Daley, D O; Qiu, Y L; Whelan, J; Palmer, J D

    2000-11-16

    A central component of the endosymbiotic theory for the bacterial origin of the mitochondrion is that many of its genes were transferred to the nucleus. Most of this transfer occurred early in mitochondrial evolution; functional transfer of mitochondrial genes has ceased in animals. Although mitochondrial gene transfer continues to occur in plants, no comprehensive study of the frequency and timing of transfers during plant evolution has been conducted. Here we report frequent loss (26 times) and transfer to the nucleus of the mitochondrial gene rps10 among 277 diverse angiosperms. Characterization of nuclear rps10 genes from 16 out of 26 loss lineages implies that many independent, RNA-mediated rps10 transfers occurred during recent angiosperm evolution; each of the genes may represent a separate functional gene transfer. Thus, rps10 has been transferred to the nucleus at a surprisingly high rate during angiosperm evolution. The structures of several nuclear rps10 genes reveal diverse mechanisms by which transferred genes become activated, including parasitism of pre-existing nuclear genes for mitochondrial or cytoplasmic proteins, and activation without gain of a mitochondrial targeting sequence. PMID:11099041

  5. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder.Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing.A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNAWe describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  6. Inventory of the Human Mitochondrial Gene Expression Machinery with Links to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shutt, Timothy E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA encodes thirty-seven essential genes required for ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation, instability or misregulation of which is associated with human diseases and aging. Other than the mtDNA-encoded RNA species (thirteen mRNAs, 12S and 16S rRNAs, and twenty-two tRNAs), the many remaining factors needed for mitochondrial gene expression (i.e. transcription, RNA processing/modification and translation), including a dedicated set of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, are products of nuclear genes that are imported into the mitochondrial matrix. Herein, we inventory the human mitochondrial gene expression machinery, and while doing so highlight specific associations of these regulatory factors with human disease. Major new breakthroughs have been made recently in this burgeoning area that set the stage for exciting future studies on the key outstanding issue of how mitochondrial gene expression is regulated differentially in vivo. This should promote a greater understanding of why mtDNA mutations and dysfunction cause the complex and tissue-specific pathology characteristic of mitochondrial disease states and how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to more common human pathology and aging. PMID:20544879

  7. Glucose repression of yeast mitochondrial transcription: kinetics of derepression and role of nuclear genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ulery, T L; Jang, S H; Jaehning, J A

    1994-01-01

    Yeast mitochondrial transcript and gene product abundance has been observed to increase upon release from glucose repression, but the mechanism of regulation of this process has not been determined. We report a kinetic analysis of this phenomenon, which demonstrates that the abundance of all classes of mitochondrial RNA changes slowly relative to changes observed for glucose-repressed nuclear genes. Several cell doublings are required to achieve the 2- to 20-fold-higher steady-state levels observed after a shift to a nonrepressing carbon source. Although we observed that in some yeast strains the mitochondrial DNA copy number also increases upon derepression, this does not seem to play the major role in increased RNA abundance. Instead we found that three- to sevenfold increases in RNA synthesis rates, measured by in vivo pulse-labelling experiments, do correlate with increased transcript abundance. We found that mutations in the SNF1 and REG1 genes, which are known to affect the expression of many nuclear genes subject to glucose repression, affect derepression of mitochondrial transcript abundance. These genes do not appear to regulate mitochondrial transcript levels via regulation of the nuclear genes RPO41 and MTF1, which encode the subunits of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase. We conclude that a nuclear gene-controlled factor(s) in addition to the two RNA polymerase subunits must be involved in glucose repression of mitochondrial transcript abundance. Images PMID:8289797

  8. Multiple losses and transfers to the nucleus of two mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase genes during angiosperm evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, K L; Rosenblueth, M; Qiu, Y L; Palmer, J D

    2001-01-01

    Unlike in animals, the functional transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus is an ongoing process in plants. All but one of the previously reported transfers in angiosperms involve ribosomal protein genes. Here we report frequent transfer of two respiratory genes, sdh3 and sdh4 (encoding subunits 3 and 4 of succinate dehydrogenase), and we also show that these genes are present and expressed in the mitochondria of diverse angiosperms. Southern hybridization surveys reveal that sdh3 and sdh4 have been lost from the mitochondrion about 40 and 19 times, respectively, among the 280 angiosperm genera examined. Transferred, functional copies of sdh3 and sdh4 were characterized from the nucleus in four and three angiosperm families, respectively. The mitochondrial targeting presequences of two sdh3 genes are derived from preexisting genes for anciently transferred mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of the unique presequences of the nuclear genes and the recent mitochondrial gene losses, we infer that each of the seven nuclear sdh3 and sdh4 genes was derived from a separate transfer to the nucleus. These results strengthen the hypothesis that angiosperms are experiencing a recent evolutionary surge of mitochondrial gene transfer to the nucleus and reveal that this surge includes certain respiratory genes in addition to ribosomal protein genes. PMID:11454775

  9. Dietary fatty acids affect mitochondrial phospholipid compositions and mitochondrial gene expression of rainbow trout liver at different ages.

    PubMed

    Almaida-Pagán, P F; De Santis, C; Rubio-Mejía, O L; Tocher, D R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are among the first responders to various stressors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and organisms. Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL), particularly cardiolipin (CL), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, liver mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, lipid peroxidation, and mtDNA gene expression were analyzed in rainbow trout fed three diets with the same base formulation but with lipid supplied either by fish oil (FO), rapeseed oil (RO), or high DHA oil (DHA) during 6 weeks. Specifically, two feeding trials were performed using fish from the same population of two ages (1 and 3 years), and PL class compositions of liver mitochondria, fatty acid composition of individual PL classes, TBARS content, and mtDNA expression were determined. Dietary fatty acid composition strongly affected mitochondrial membrane composition from trout liver but observed changes did not fully reflect the diet, particularly when it contained high DHA. The changes were PL specific, CL being particularly resistant to changes in DHA. Some significant differences observed in expression of mtDNA with diet may suggest long-term dietary effects in mitochondrial gene expression which could affect electron transport chain function. All the changes were influenced by fish age, which could be related to the different growth rates observed between 1- and 3-year-old trout but that could also indicate age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes. PMID:25398637

  10. Whole Cell Formaldehyde Cross-Linking Simplifies Purification of Mitochondrial Nucleoids and Associated Proteins Involved in Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Nina; Hensen, Fenna; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Ives, Daniel; Gloerich, Jolein; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA/protein complexes (nucleoids) appear as discrete entities inside the mitochondrial network when observed by live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence. This somewhat trivial observation in recent years has spurred research towards isolation of these complexes and the identification of nucleoid-associated proteins. Here we show that whole cell formaldehyde crosslinking combined with affinity purification and tandem mass-spectrometry provides a simple and reproducible method to identify potential nucleoid associated proteins. The method avoids spurious mitochondrial isolation and subsequent multifarious nucleoid enrichment protocols and can be implemented to allow for label-free quantification (LFQ) by mass-spectrometry. Using expression of a Flag-tagged Twinkle helicase and appropriate controls we show that this method identifies many previously identified nucleoid associated proteins. Using LFQ to compare HEK293 cells with and without mtDNA, but both expressing Twinkle-FLAG, identifies many proteins that are reduced or absent in the absence of mtDNA. This set not only includes established mtDNA maintenance proteins but also many proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism and translation and therefore represents what can be considered an mtDNA gene expression proteome. Our data provides a very valuable resource for both basic mitochondrial researchers as well as clinical geneticists working to identify novel disease genes on the basis of exome sequence data. PMID:25695250

  11. Evolution of the mitochondrial genome in snakes: Gene rearrangements and phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jie; Li, Hongdan; Zhou, Kaiya

    2008-01-01

    Background Snakes as a major reptile group display a variety of morphological characteristics pertaining to their diverse behaviours. Despite abundant analyses of morphological characters, molecular studies using mitochondrial and nuclear genes are limited. As a result, the phylogeny of snakes remains controversial. Previous studies on mitochondrial genomes of snakes have demonstrated duplication of the control region and translocation of trnL to be two notable features of the alethinophidian (all serpents except blindsnakes and threadsnakes) mtDNAs. Our purpose is to further investigate the gene organizations, evolution of the snake mitochondrial genome, and phylogenetic relationships among several major snake families. Results The mitochondrial genomes were sequenced for four taxa representing four different families, and each had a different gene arrangement. Comparative analyses with other snake mitochondrial genomes allowed us to summarize six types of mitochondrial gene arrangement in snakes. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (BI, ML, MP, NJ) arrived at a similar topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene arrangements in snakes. Conclusion The phylogenetic relationships among the major families of snakes are in accordance with the mitochondrial genomes in terms of gene arrangements. The gene arrangement in Ramphotyphlops braminus mtDNA is inferred to be ancestral for snakes. After the divergence of the early Ramphotyphlops lineage, three types of rearrangements occurred. These changes involve translocations within the IQM tRNA gene cluster and the duplication of the CR. All phylogenetic methods support the placement of Enhydris plumbea outside of the (Colubridae + Elapidae) cluster, providing mitochondrial genomic evidence for the familial rank of Homalopsidae. PMID:19038056

  12. Potential efficacy of mitochondrial genes for animal DNA barcoding: a case study using eutherian mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A well-informed choice of genetic locus is central to the efficacy of DNA barcoding. Current DNA barcoding in animals involves the use of the 5' half of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 gene (CO1) to diagnose and delimit species. However, there is no compelling a priori reason for the exclusive focus on this region, and it has been shown that it performs poorly for certain animal groups. To explore alternative mitochondrial barcoding regions, we compared the efficacy of the universal CO1 barcoding region with the other mitochondrial protein-coding genes in eutherian mammals. Four criteria were used for this comparison: the number of recovered species, sequence variability within and between species, resolution to taxonomic levels above that of species, and the degree of mutational saturation. Results Based on 1,179 mitochondrial genomes of eutherians, we found that the universal CO1 barcoding region is a good representative of mitochondrial genes as a whole because the high species-recovery rate (> 90%) was similar to that of other mitochondrial genes, and there were no significant differences in intra- or interspecific variability among genes. However, an overlap between intra- and interspecific variability was still problematic for all mitochondrial genes. Our results also demonstrated that any choice of mitochondrial gene for DNA barcoding failed to offer significant resolution at higher taxonomic levels. Conclusions We suggest that the CO1 barcoding region, the universal DNA barcode, is preferred among the mitochondrial protein-coding genes as a molecular diagnostic at least for eutherian species identification. Nevertheless, DNA barcoding with this marker may still be problematic for certain eutherian taxa and our approach can be used to test potential barcoding loci for such groups. PMID:21276253

  13. Extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangement in a genus of plant parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nematodes Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis are two of the only animals known to have multipartite mitochondrial genomes. In such genomes, mitochondrial genes are distributed on multiple circles. The entire sequence of a nematode (Radopholus similis) that belongs to the same superfamily (...

  14. The mitochondrial genome of the onychophoran Opisthopatus cinctipes (Peripatopsidae) reflects the ancestral mitochondrial gene arrangement of Panarthropoda and Ecdysozoa.

    PubMed

    Braband, Anke; Cameron, Stephen L; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Daniels, Savel R; Mayer, Georg

    2010-10-01

    The ancestral genome composition in Onychophora (velvet worms) is unknown since only a single species of Peripatidae has been studied thus far, which shows a highly derived gene order with numerous translocated genes. Due to this lack of information from Onychophora, it is difficult to infer the ancestral mitochondrial gene arrangement patterns for Panarthropoda and Ecdysozoa. Hence, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of the onychophoran Opisthopatus cinctipes, a representative of Peripatopsidae. Our data show that O. cinctipes possesses a highly conserved gene order, similar to that found in various arthropods. By comparing our results to those from different outgroups, we reconstruct the ancestral gene arrangement in Panarthropoda and Ecdysozoa. Our phylogenetic analysis of protein-coding gene sequences from 60 protostome species (including outgroups) provides some support for the sister group relationship of Onychophora and Arthropoda, which was not recovered by using a single species of Peripatidae, Epiperipatus biolleyi, in a previous study. A comparison of the strand-specific bias between onychophorans, arthropods, and a priapulid suggests that the peripatid E. biolleyi is less suitable for phylogenetic analyses of Ecdysozoa using mitochondrial genomic data than the peripatopsid O. cinctipes. PMID:20493270

  15. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit (MRPS) genes: A putative role in human disease.

    PubMed

    Gopisetty, Gopal; Thangarajan, Rajkumar

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are prominently understood as power houses producing ATP the primary energy currency of the cell. However, mitochondria are also known to play an important role in apoptosis and autophagy, and mitochondrial dysregulation can lead to pathological outcomes. Mitochondria are known to contain 1500 proteins of which only 13 are coded by mitochondrial DNA and the rest are coded by nuclear genes. Protein synthesis in mitochondria involves mitochondrial ribosomes which are 55-60S particles and are composed of small 28S and large 39S subunits. A feature of mammalian mitoribosome which differentiate it from bacterial ribosomes is the increased protein content. The human mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) gene family comprises of 30 genes which code for mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit and 50 genes for the large subunit. The present review focuses on the mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit genes (MRPS), presents an overview of the literature and data gleaned from publicly available gene and protein expression databases. The survey revealed aberrations in MRPS gene expression patterns in varied human diseases indicating a putative role in their etiology. PMID:27170550

  17. Independent replication of mitochondrial genes supports the transcriptional program in developing fiber cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants exist both as a "master circle" chromosome and as numerous subgenomic sublimons that are generated by intramolecular recombination. Differential stability or replication of these sublimons allows individual mitochondrial gene copy numbers to vary indepe...

  18. Compilation and classification of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Veronico, P; Gallerani, R; Ceci, L R

    1996-01-01

    This compilation reports the tRNA genes detected on higher plant mitochondrial genomes subdivided into the widely accepted categories of 'genuine' and 'chloroplast-like' genes. Moreover, it includes a list of pseudo or truncated genes divided in the same way. PMID:8710486

  19. Compilation and classification of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Veronico, P; Gallerani, R; Ceci, L R

    1996-06-15

    This compilation reports the tRNA genes detected on higher plant mitochondrial genomes subdivided into the widely accepted categories of 'genuine' and 'chloroplast-like' genes. Moreover, it includes a list of pseudo or truncated genes divided in the same way. PMID:8710486

  20. Expression profiling of Drosophila mitochondrial genes via deep mRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Tatiana Teixeira; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian; Ottenwälder, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in several cellular processes. Nevertheless, very little is known about patterns of gene expression of genes encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) for transcription profiling of genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura. The analysis of males and females in both species indicated that the expression pattern was conserved between the two species, but differed significantly between both sexes. Interestingly, mRNA levels were not only different among genes encoded by separate transcription units, but also showed significant differences among genes located in the same transcription unit. Hence, mRNA abundance of genes encoded by mtDNA seems to be heavily modulated by post-transcriptional regulation. Finally, we also identified several transcripts with a noncanonical structure, suggesting that processing of mitochondrial transcripts may be more complex than previously assumed. PMID:19843606

  1. In vitro interactions of the aphid endosymbiotic SymL chaperonin with barley yellow dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Filichkin, S A; Brumfield, S; Filichkin, T P; Young, M J

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-vector relationships suggest that there are specific interactions between BYDV virions and the aphid's cellular components. However, little is known about vector factors that mediate virion recognition, cellular trafficking, and accumulation within the aphid. Symbionins are molecular chaperonins produced by intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria and are the most abundant proteins found in aphids. To elucidate the potential role of symbionins in BYDV transmission, we have isolated and characterized two new symbionin symL genes encoded by the endosymbionts which are harbored by the BYDV aphid vectors Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae. Endosymbiont symL-encoded proteins have extensive homology with the pea aphid SymL and Escherichia coli GroEL chaperonin. Recombinant and native SymL proteins can be assembled into oligomeric complexes which are similar to the GroEL oligomer. R. padi SymL protein demonstrates an in vitro binding affinity for BYDV and its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. In contrast to the R. padi SymL, the closely related GroEL does not exhibit a significant binding affinity either for BYDV or for its recombinant readthrough polypeptide. Comparative sequence analysis between SymL and GroEL was used to identify potential SymL-BYDV binding sites. Affinity binding of SymL to BYDV in vitro suggests a potential involvement of endosymbiotic chaperonins in interactions with virions during their trafficking through the aphid. PMID:8985385

  2. Tripartite mitochondrial genome of spinach: physical structure, mitochondrial gene mapping, and locations of transposed chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1986-01-01

    A complete physical map of the spinach mitochondrial genome has been established. The entire sequence content of 327 kilobase pairs (kb) is postulated to occur as a single circular molecule. Two directly repeated elements of approximately 6 kb, located on this "master chromosome", are proposed to participate in an intragenomic recombination event that reversibly generates two "subgenomic" circles of 93 kb and 234 kb. The positions of protein and ribosomal RNA-encoding genes, determined by heterologous filter hybridizations, are scattered throughout the genome, with duplicate 26S rRNA genes located partially or entirely within the 6 kb repeat elements. Filter hybridizations between spinach mitochondrial DNA and cloned segments of spinach chloroplast DNA reveal at least twelve dispersed regions of inter-organellar sequence homology. Images PMID:3016660

  3. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Widespread sampling of vertebrates, which comprise the majority of published animal mitochondrial genomes, has led to the view that mitochondrial gene rearrangements are relatively rare, and that gene orders are typically stable across major taxonomic groups. In contrast, more limited sampling within the Phylum Mollusca has revealed an unusually high number of gene order arrangements. Here we provide evidence that the lability of the molluscan mitochondrial genome extends to the family level by describing extensive gene order changes that have occurred within the Vermetidae, a family of sessile marine gastropods that radiated from a basal caenogastropod stock during the Cenozoic Era. Results Major mitochondrial gene rearrangements have occurred within this family at a scale unexpected for such an evolutionarily young group and unprecedented for any caenogastropod examined to date. We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of four species (Dendropoma maximum, D. gregarium, Eualetes tulipa, and Thylacodes squamigerus) and the partial mitochondrial genomes of two others (Vermetus erectus and Thylaeodus sp.). Each of the six vermetid gastropods assayed possessed a unique gene order. In addition to the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 37 genes, additional tRNA genes were evident in D. gregarium (trnK) and Thylacodes squamigerus (trnV, trnLUUR). Three pseudogenes and additional tRNAs found within the genome of Thylacodes squamigerus provide evidence of a past duplication event in this taxon. Likewise, high sequence similarities between isoaccepting leucine tRNAs in Thylacodes, Eualetes, and Thylaeodus suggest that tRNA remolding has been rife within this family. While vermetids exhibit gene arrangements diagnostic of this family, they also share arrangements with littorinimorph caenogastropods, with which they have been linked based on sperm morphology and primary sequence-based phylogenies. Conclusions We have uncovered major changes in gene

  4. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Bell, Matthew; Ejiofor, Shannon; Zurcher, Grant; Petersen, Dennis R.; Ronis, Martin J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic ethanol administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative stress is a factor that triggers mitochondrial biogenesis after chronic ethanol feeding. If our hypothesis is correct, co-administration of antioxidants should prevent upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Methods Rats were fed an ethanol-containing diet intragastrically by total enteral nutrition for 150 days, in the absence or presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1.7 g/kg/day; control rats were administered isocaloric diets where carbohydrates substituted for ethanol calories. Results Ethanol administration significantly increased hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced as decreased liver total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio. These effects were inhibited by co-administration of ethanol and NAC. Chronic ethanol increased the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes including peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA; co-administration of ethanol and NAC prevented these effects. Chronic ethanol administration was associated with decreased mitochondrial mass, inactivation and depletion of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV, and increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative damage, effects that were not prevented by NAC. Conclusions These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by chronic ethanol triggered the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in rat liver, because an antioxidant such as NAC prevented both effects. Because NAC did not prevent liver mitochondrial oxidative damage, extra-mitochondrial effects of reactive oxygen species may regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. In spite of the induction of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis genes by

  5. Mitochondrial Homeostasis Molecules: Regulation by a Trio of Recessive Parkinson's Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are small organelles that produce the majority of cellular energy as ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and rare familial forms of PD provide valuable insight into the pathogenic mechanism underlying mitochondrial impairment, even though the majority of PD cases are sporadic. The regulation of mitochondria is crucial for the maintenance of energy-demanding neuronal functions in the brain. Mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagic degradation are the major regulatory pathways that preserve optimal mitochondrial content, structure and function. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of the mitochondrial quality control mechanisms, emphasizing regulatory molecules in mitophagy and biogenesis that specifically interact with the protein products of three major recessive familial PD genes, PINK1, Parkin and DJ-1. PMID:25548534

  6. The Molecular Basis of Hyperthermophily: The Role of HSP60/Chaperonins In Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kagawa, Hiromi

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we aim to understand how S. shibatae copes with high temperatures. In particular, we investigated the role of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60 or chaperonin) with the hypothesis that chaperonin stabilizes the cell membrane under stressful conditions. To prove the hypothesis, this year two questions were addressed: (1) Is the chaperonin localized in the cytoplasm or on the cell membrane? (2) Does the chaperonin show affinity to lipid in vivo? In addition to those, we intensively studied newly discovered chaperonin-related protein, gamma, to understand how it influenced the function of the other components of chaperonin and how their combined activities contributed to hyperthermophily.

  7. The mitochondrial genome of the stramenopile alga Chrysodidymus synuroideus. Complete sequence, gene content and genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Joby M.; Goff, Megan; Graham, James; Ocampo, Christopher; Lang, B. Franz; Seif, Elias; Burger, Gertraud

    2000-01-01

    This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence from a photosynthetic member of the stramenopiles, the chrysophyte alga Chrysodidymus synuroideus. The circular-mapping mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 34 119 bp contains 58 densely packed genes (all without introns) and five unique open reading frames (ORFs). Protein genes code for components of respiratory chain complexes, ATP synthase and the mitoribosome, as well as one product of unknown function, encoded in many other protist mtDNAs (YMF16). In addition to small and large subunit ribosomal RNAs, 23 tRNAs are mtDNA-encoded, permitting translation of all codons present in protein-coding genes except ACN (Thr) and CGN (Arg). The missing tRNAs are assumed to be imported from the cytosol. Comparison of the C.synuroideus mtDNA with that of other stramenopiles allowed us to draw conclusions about mitochondrial genome organization, expression and evolution. First, we provide evidence that mitochondrial ORFs code for highly derived, unrecognizable versions of ribosomal or respiratory genes otherwise ‘missing’ in a particular mtDNA. Secondly, the observed constraints in mitochondrial genome rearrangements suggest operon-based, co-ordinated expression of genes functioning in common biological processes. Finally, stramenopile mtDNAs reveal an unexpectedly low variability in genome size and gene complement, testifying to substantial differences in the tempo of mtDNA evolution between major eukaryotic lineages. PMID:10871400

  8. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ∼50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype. PMID:25800673

  9. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  10. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates.

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, R. A.; Paavola, C. D.; Howard, J.; Chan, S. L.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Trent, J. D.; Materials Science Division; NASA Ames Research Center; SETI Inst.

    2002-12-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 m in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  11. Brief Report: High Frequency of Biochemical Markers for Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism: No Association with the Mitochondrial Aspartate/Glutamate Carrier "SLC25A12" Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Catarina; Coutinho, Ana M.; Diogo, Luisa; Grazina, Manuela; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa; Ataide, Assuncao; Almeida, Joana; Borges, Luis; Oliveira, Catarina; Oliveira, Guiomar; Vicente, Astrid M.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we confirm the previously reported high frequency of biochemical markers of mitochondrial dysfunction, namely hyperlactacidemia and increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, in a significant fraction of 210 autistic patients. We further examine the involvement of the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier gene ("SLC25A12") in…

  12. Gene organization and characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of Hainan black goat (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangtao; Zhao, Wei; Niu, Lili; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Hainan black goat was determined for the first time by the PCR-based method. The total length of the mitogenome was 16,641 bp, including 33.54% A, 26.04% C, 27.31% T, 13.11% G. The genome structure contained 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 1 control region (D-loop region). These results have extended more detail information of mitochondrial genome, thus being useful for further study on the genetic divergence and phylogenetic resolution of global goats. PMID:25211090

  13. A nuclear genetic lesion affecting Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial translation is complemented by a homologous Bacillus gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S I; Stange-Thomann, N; Martins, O; Hong, K W; Söll, D; Fox, T D

    1997-01-01

    A novel Bacillus gene was isolated and characterized. It encodes a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pet112p, a protein that has no characterized relative and is dispensable for cell viability but required for mitochondrial translation. Expression of the Bacillus protein in yeast, modified to ensure mitochondrial targeting, partially complemented the phenotype of the pet112-1 mutation, demonstrating a high degree of evolutionary conservation for this as yet unidentified component of translation. PMID:9287027

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence and gene organization of Tridentiger trigonocephalus (Gobiidae: Gobionellinae) with phylogenetic consideration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongqing; Ma, Hongyu; Ma, Chunyan; Zhang, Fengying; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lingbo

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome plays an important role in studies of genome-level characteristics and phylogenetic relationships. Here we determined the complete mitogenome sequence of Tridentiger trigonocephalus (Perciformes, Gobiidae), and discovered its phylogenetic relationship. This circular genome was 16 662 bp in length, and consisted of 37 typical genes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes. The gene order of T. trigonocephalus mitochondrial genome was identical to those observed in most other vertebrates. Of 37 genes, 28 were encoded by heavy strand, while the others were encoded by light strand. The phylogenetic tree constructed by 13 concatenated protein-coding genes showed that T. trigonocephalus was closest to T. bifasciatus, and then to T. barbatus among the 20 species within suborder Gobioidei. This work should facilitate the studies on population genetic diversity, and molecular evolution in Gobioidei fishes. PMID:26370266

  15. Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondrial Genes in Yeast: Dependence on Input Bias of Mitochondrial DNA and Preliminary Investigations of the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Birky, C. William; Demko, Catherine A.; Perlman, Philip S.; Strausberg, Robert

    1978-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previous studies on the inheritance of mitochondrial genes controlling antibiotic resistance have shown that some crosses produce a substantial number of uniparental zygotes , which transmit to their diploid progeny mitochondrial alleles from only one parent. In this paper, we show that uniparental zygotes are formed especially when one parent (majority parent) contributes substantially more mitochondrial DNA molecules to the zygote than does the other (minority) parent. Cellular contents of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are increased in these experiments by treatment with cycloheximide, alpha-factor, or the uvsρ5 nuclear mutation. In such a biased cross, some zygotes are uniparental for mitochondrial alleles from the majority parent, and the frequency of such zygotes increases with increasing bias. In two- and three-factor crosses, the cap1, ery1, and oli1 loci behave coordinately, rather than independently; minority markers tend to be transmitted or lost as a unit, suggesting that the uniparental mechanism acts on entire mtDNA molecules rather than on individual loci. This rules out the possibility that uniparental inheritance can be explained by the conversion of minority markers to the majority alleles during recombination. Exceptions to the coordinate behavior of different loci can be explained by marker rescue via recombination. Uniparental inheritance is largely independent of the position of buds on the zygote. We conclude that it is due to the failure of minority markers to replicate in some zygotes, possibly involving the rapid enzymatic destruction of such markers. We have considered two general classes of mechanisms: (1) random selection of molecules for replication, as for example by competition for replicating sites on a membrane; and (2) differential marking of mtDNA molecules in the two parents, possibly by modification enzymes, followed by a mechanism that "counts" molecules and replicates only the majority type. These

  16. Yeast PPR proteins, watchdogs of mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Christopher J; Golik, Pawel; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins are a family of ubiquitous RNA-binding factors, found in all the Eukaryotic lineages, and are particularly numerous in higher plants. According to recent bioinformatic analyses, yeast genomes encode from 10 (in S. pombe) to 15 (in S. cerevisiae) PPR proteins. All of these proteins are mitochondrial and very often interact with the mitochondrial membrane. Apart from the general factors, RNA polymerase and RNase P, most yeast PPR proteins are involved in the stability and/or translation of mitochondrially encoded RNAs. At present, some information concerning the target RNA(s) of most of these proteins is available, the next challenge will be to refine our understanding of the function of the proteins and to resolve the yeast PPR-RNA-binding code, which might differ significantly from the plant PPR code. PMID:24184848

  17. Gene clusters for ribosomal proteins in the mitochondrial genome of a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M; Oda, K; Yamato, K; Ohta, E; Nakamura, Y; Nozato, N; Akashi, K; Ohyama, K

    1992-01-01

    We detected 16 genes for ribosomal proteins in the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. The genes formed two major clusters, rps12-rps7 and rps10-rpl2-rps19-rps3-rpl16-rpl5- rps14-rps8- rpl6-rps13-rps11-rps1, very similar in organization to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein operons (str and S10-spc-alpha operons, respectively). In contrast, rps2 and rps4 genes were located separately in the liverwort mitochondrial genome (the latter was part of the alpha operon in E. coli). Furthermore, several ribosomal proteins encoded by the liverwort mitochondrial genome differed substantially in size from their counterparts in E. coli and liverwort chloroplast. PMID:1620617

  18. Gene organization and complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Linwu mallard.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ke-Xiong; Liu, Li-Li; Yu, Qi-Fang; He, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Linwu mallard is an excellent native breeds from Hunan province in China. This is the first study to determine the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of L. mallard using PCR-based amplification and Sanger sequencing. The characteristic of the entire mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail, with the base composition of 29.19% A, 22.19% T, 32.83% C, 15.79% G in the L. mallard (16,605 bp in length). It contained 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of L. mallard will be useful for the phylogenetics of poultry, and be available as basic data for the genetics and breeding. PMID:24938102

  19. The mitochondrial genome of Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A: complete nucleotide sequence and gene organization.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S E; Cockburn, A F; Seawright, J A

    1993-12-01

    The complete sequence (15,455 bp) of the mitochondrial DNA of the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A is reported. This genome is compact and very A+T rich (77.4% A+T). It contains genes for 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), and 13 subunits of the mitochondrial inner membrane respiratory complexes. The gene arrangement is the same as in Drosophila yakuba, except that the positions of two contiguous tRNAs are reversed and a third tRNA is transcribed from the complementary strand. Protein-coding genes, rRNAs, and most tRNAs were similar to D. yakuba. Two tRNAs had nonstandard secondary structures comparable with those of nematode mitochondrial tRNAs. The very small putative control region (625 bp) contains no sequence motifs similar to those used in vertebrates and other insects for initiation of transcription and replication. PMID:8112570

  20. Mitochondrial content is central to nuclear gene expression: Profound implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Muir, Rebecca; Diot, Alan; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    We review a recent paper in Genome Research by Guantes et al. showing that nuclear gene expression is influenced by the bioenergetic status of the mitochondria. The amount of energy that mitochondria make available for gene expression varies considerably. It depends on: the energetic demands of the tissue; the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutant load; the number of mitochondria; stressors present in the cell. Hence, when failing mitochondria place the cell in energy crisis there are major effects on gene expression affecting the risk of degenerative diseases, cancer and ageing. In 2015 the UK parliament approved a change in the regulation of IVF techniques, allowing "Mitochondrial replacement therapy" to become a reproductive choice for women at risk of transmitting mitochondrial disease to their children. This is the first time that this technique will be available. Therefore understanding the interaction between mitochondria and the nucleus has never been more important. PMID:26725055

  1. Mitochondrial content is central to nuclear gene expression: Profound implications for human health

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Rebecca; Diot, Alan

    2016-01-01

    We review a recent paper in Genome Research by Guantes et al. showing that nuclear gene expression is influenced by the bioenergetic status of the mitochondria. The amount of energy that mitochondria make available for gene expression varies considerably. It depends on: the energetic demands of the tissue; the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutant load; the number of mitochondria; stressors present in the cell. Hence, when failing mitochondria place the cell in energy crisis there are major effects on gene expression affecting the risk of degenerative diseases, cancer and ageing. In 2015 the UK parliament approved a change in the regulation of IVF techniques, allowing “Mitochondrial replacement therapy” to become a reproductive choice for women at risk of transmitting mitochondrial disease to their children. This is the first time that this technique will be available. Therefore understanding the interaction between mitochondria and the nucleus has never been more important. PMID:26725055

  2. Complete sequence and gene organization of the mitochondrial genome of Asio flammeus (Strigiformes, strigidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Song, Tao; Pan, Tao; Sun, Xiaonan; Sun, Zhonglou; Qian, Lifu; Zhang, Baowei

    2016-07-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome was determined for Asio flammeus, which is distributed widely in geography. The length of the complete mitochondrial genome was 18,966 bp, containing 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), and 1 non-coding region (D-loop). All the genes were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand. The D-loop of A. flammeus contained many tandem repeats of varying lengths and repeat numbers. The molecular-based phylogeny showed that our species acted as the sister group to A. capensis and the supported Asio was the monophyletic group. PMID:25980662

  3. Insertion near the mitochondrial tyrosine tRNA gene in patients with mitochondrial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Y.; Nonaka, I.; Horai, S.

    1994-09-01

    The 3243 mutation commonly found in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) has been occasionally detected in patients with chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia (CPEO). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon, an extensive mitochondrial (mt) DNA study was performed on such a patient (3243-CPEO). The newly discovered insertion was located in the noncoding region between cytrochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and tyrosine tRNA. The insertion was not found in 58 or 22 CPEO patients with or without mtDNA large-scale deletion but in another 3243-CPEO patient. In addition, the insertion was present in 1 of 116 normal Japanese, who had no 3243 mutation, and in 3 of 68 3243-MELAS patients. These results raise the possibility that the phenotypic expression of the 3243 mutation could be modulated or arranged by additional mtDNA mutations.

  4. Improved systematic tRNA gene annotation allows new insights into the evolution of mitochondrial tRNA structures and into the mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jühling, Frank; Pütz, Joern; Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Middendorf, Martin; Florentz, Catherine; Stadler, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are present in all types of cells as well as in organelles. tRNAs of animal mitochondria show a low level of primary sequence conservation and exhibit ‘bizarre’ secondary structures, lacking complete domains of the common cloverleaf. Such sequences are hard to detect and hence frequently missed in computational analyses and mitochondrial genome annotation. Here, we introduce an automatic annotation procedure for mitochondrial tRNA genes in Metazoa based on sequence and structural information in manually curated covariance models. The method, applied to re-annotate 1876 available metazoan mitochondrial RefSeq genomes, allows to distinguish between remaining functional genes and degrading ‘pseudogenes’, even at early stages of divergence. The subsequent analysis of a comprehensive set of mitochondrial tRNA genes gives new insights into the evolution of structures of mitochondrial tRNA sequences as well as into the mechanisms of genome rearrangements. We find frequent losses of tRNA genes concentrated in basal Metazoa, frequent independent losses of individual parts of tRNA genes, particularly in Arthropoda, and wide-spread conserved overlaps of tRNAs in opposite reading direction. Direct evidence for several recent Tandem Duplication-Random Loss events is gained, demonstrating that this mechanism has an impact on the appearance of new mitochondrial gene orders. PMID:22139921

  5. Biased introgression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes: a comparison of diploid and haplodiploid systems.

    PubMed

    Patten, Manus M; Carioscia, Sara A; Linnen, Catherine R

    2015-10-01

    Hybridization between recently diverged species, even if infrequent, can lead to the introgression of genes from one species into another. The rates of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression often differ, with some taxa showing biases for mitochondrial introgression and others for nuclear introgression. Several hypotheses exist to explain such biases, including adaptive introgression, sex differences in dispersal rates, sex-specific prezygotic isolation and sex-specific fitness of hybrids (e.g. Haldane's rule). We derive a simple population genetic model that permits an analysis of sex-specific demographic and fitness parameters and measures the relative rates of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression between hybridizing pairs. We do this separately for diploid and haplodiploid species. For diploid taxa, we recover results consistent with previous hypotheses: an excess of one sex among the hybridizing migrants or sex-specific prezygotic isolation causes a bias for one type of marker or the other; when Haldane's rule is obeyed, we find a mitochondrial bias in XY systems and a nuclear bias in ZW systems. For haplodiploid taxa, the model reveals that owing to their unique transmission genetics, they are seemingly assured of strong mitochondrial biases in introgression rates, unlike diploid taxa, where the relative fitness of male and female hybrids can tip the bias in either direction. This heretofore overlooked aspect of hybridization in haplodiploids provides what is perhaps the most likely explanation for differential introgression of mitochondrial and nuclear markers and raises concerns about the use of mitochondrial DNA barcodes for species delimitation in these taxa. PMID:26173469

  6. Recent stable insertion of mitochondrial DNA into an Arabidopsis polyubiquitin gene by nonhomologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Sun, C W; Callis, J

    1993-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a newly identified polyubiquitin gene (UBQ13) from the Columbia ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that the gene contained a 3.9-kb insertion in the coding region. All subclones of the 3.9-kb insert hybridized to isolated mitochondrial DNA. The insert was found to consist of at least two, possibly three, distinct DNA segments from the mitochondrial genome. A 590-bp region of the insert is nearly identical to the Arabidopsis mitochondrial nad1 gene. UBQ13 restriction fragments in total cellular DNA from ecotypes Ler, No-0, Be-0, WS, and RLD were identified and, with the exception of Be-0, their sizes were equivalent to that predicted from the corresponding ecotype Columbia UBQ13 restriction fragment without the mitochondrial insert. Isolation by polymerase chain reaction and sequence determination of UBQ13 sequences from the other ecotypes showed that all lacked the mitochondrial insert. All ecotypes examined, except Columbia, contain intact open reading frames in the region of the insert, including four ubiquitin codons which Columbia lacks. This indicates that the mitochondrial DNA in UBQ13 in ecotype Columbia is the result of an integration event that occurred after speciation of Arabidopsis rather than a deletion event that occurred in all ecotypes except Columbia. This stable movement of mitochondrial DNA to the nucleus is so recent that there are few nucleotide changes subsequent to the transfer event. This allows for precise analysis of the sequences involved and elucidation of the possible mechanism. The presence of intron sequences in the transferred nucleic acid indicates that DNA was the transfer intermediate. The lack of sequence identity between the integrating sequence and the target site, represented by the other Arabidopsis ecotypes, suggests that integration occurred via nonhomologus recombination. This nuclear/organellar gene transfer event is strikingly similar to the experimentally accessible process of nuclear

  7. Deregulation of genes related to iron and mitochondrial metabolism in refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    del Rey, Mónica; Benito, Rocío; Fontanillo, Celia; Campos-Laborie, Francisco J; Janusz, Kamila; Velasco-Hernández, Talía; Abáigar, María; Hernández, María; Cuello, Rebeca; Borrego, Daniel; Martín-Zanca, Dionisio; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mills, Ken I; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M

    2015-01-01

    The presence of SF3B1 gene mutations is a hallmark of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). However, the mechanisms responsible for iron accumulation that characterize the Myelodysplastic Syndrome with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS) are not completely understood. In order to gain insight in the molecular basis of MDS-RS, an integrative study of the expression and mutational status of genes related to iron and mitochondrial metabolism was carried out. A total of 231 low-risk MDS patients and 81 controls were studied. Gene expression analysis revealed that iron metabolism and mitochondrial function had the highest number of genes deregulated in RARS patients compared to controls and the refractory cytopenias with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD). Thus mitochondrial transporters SLC25 (SLC25A37 and SLC25A38) and ALAD genes were over-expressed in RARS. Moreover, significant differences were observed between patients with SF3B1 mutations and patients without the mutations. The deregulation of genes involved in iron and mitochondrial metabolism provides new insights in our knowledge of MDS-RS. New variants that could be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases have been identified. PMID:25955609

  8. Deregulation of Genes Related to Iron and Mitochondrial Metabolism in Refractory Anemia with Ring Sideroblasts

    PubMed Central

    del Rey, Mónica; Benito, Rocío; Fontanillo, Celia; Campos-Laborie, Francisco J.; Janusz, Kamila; Velasco-Hernández, Talía; Abáigar, María; Hernández, María; Cuello, Rebeca; Borrego, Daniel; Martín-Zanca, Dionisio; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mills, Ken I.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of SF3B1 gene mutations is a hallmark of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). However, the mechanisms responsible for iron accumulation that characterize the Myelodysplastic Syndrome with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS) are not completely understood. In order to gain insight in the molecular basis of MDS-RS, an integrative study of the expression and mutational status of genes related to iron and mitochondrial metabolism was carried out. A total of 231 low-risk MDS patients and 81 controls were studied. Gene expression analysis revealed that iron metabolism and mitochondrial function had the highest number of genes deregulated in RARS patients compared to controls and the refractory cytopenias with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD). Thus mitochondrial transporters SLC25 (SLC25A37 and SLC25A38) and ALAD genes were over-expressed in RARS. Moreover, significant differences were observed between patients with SF3B1 mutations and patients without the mutations. The deregulation of genes involved in iron and mitochondrial metabolism provides new insights in our knowledge of MDS-RS. New variants that could be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases have been identified. PMID:25955609

  9. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Is Responsive to Starvation Stress and Developmental Transition in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Aubie K.; Kalem, Murat C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosoma cruzi parasites causing Chagas disease are passed between mammals by the triatomine bug vector. Within the insect, T. cruzi epimastigote-stage cells replicate and progress through the increasingly nutrient-restricted digestive tract, differentiating into infectious, nonreplicative metacyclic trypomastigotes. Thus, we evaluated how nutrient perturbations or metacyclogenesis affects mitochondrial gene expression in different insect life cycle stages. We compared mitochondrial RNA abundances in cultures containing fed, replicating epimastigotes, differentiating cultures containing both starved epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes and epimastigote starvation cultures. We observed increases in mitochondrial rRNAs and some mRNAs in differentiating cultures. These increases predominated only for the edited CYb mRNA in cultures enriched for metacyclic trypomastigotes. For the other transcripts, abundance increases were linked to starvation and were strongest in culture fractions with a high population of starved epimastigotes. We show that loss of both glucose and amino acids results in rapid increases in RNA abundances that are quickly reduced when these nutrients are returned. Furthermore, the individual RNAs exhibit distinct temporal abundance patterns, suggestive of multiple mechanisms regulating individual transcript abundance. Finally, increases in mitochondrial respiratory complex subunit mRNA abundances were not matched by increases in abundances of nucleus-encoded subunit mRNAs, nor were there statistically significant increases in protein levels of three nucleus-encoded subunits tested. These results show that, similarly to that in T. brucei, the mitochondrial genome in T. cruzi has the potential to alter gene expression in response to environmental or developmental stimuli but for an as-yet-unknown purpose. IMPORTANCE Chagas disease is caused by insect-transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi. Halting T. cruzi’s life cycle in one of its

  10. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy: novel pathogenic mutations in thymidine phosphorylase gene in two Italian brothers.

    PubMed

    Libernini, Laura; Lupis, Chiara; Mastrangelo, Mario; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Leuzzi, Vincenzo

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE, MIM 603041) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder occurring due to mutations in a nuclear gene coding for the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP). Clinical features of MNGIE include gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis or ophthalmoparesis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, and signs of mitochondrial dysfunction in tissues. We report the clinical and molecular findings in two brothers in whom novel TYMP gene mutations (c.215-13_215delinsGCGTGA; c.1159 + 2T > A) were associated with different clinical presentations and outcomes. PMID:22618301

  11. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  12. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenhome, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    We have completed sequencing segments of the maize mitochondrial (mt) DNA that contains all five of the exons (A-E) of the gene (nad1) for subunit I of the respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase. Analysis of these sequences indicates that exons B and C are joined by a continuous group II intron, but the remaining exons are associated with partial group II introns and are encoded at widely separated locations in the maize mtDNA molecule. We have shown that mature transcripts of the maize nad1 gene contain 23 edited nucleotides, and that transcripts of maize and soybean mat-r genes contain 15 and 14 edits, respectively. The majority of edits in nad1 transcripts result in amino acid replacements that increase similarity between the maize NAD1 protein and NAD1 proteins of other plant species and of animal species. We found that the intron between exons b and c is not edited. From data obtained using PCR and sequencing we have shown that transcripts containing all possible exon combinations exist in maize mitochondria.

  13. Palindromic Genes in the Linear Mitochondrial Genome of the Nonphotosynthetic Green Alga Polytomella magna

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy; Hua, Jimeng; Archibald, John M.; Lee, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Organelle DNA is no stranger to palindromic repeats. But never has a mitochondrial or plastid genome been described in which every coding region is part of a distinct palindromic unit. While sequencing the mitochondrial DNA of the nonphotosynthetic green alga Polytomella magna, we uncovered precisely this type of genic arrangement. The P. magna mitochondrial genome is linear and made up entirely of palindromes, each containing 1–7 unique coding regions. Consequently, every gene in the genome is duplicated and in an inverted orientation relative to its partner. And when these palindromic genes are folded into putative stem-loops, their predicted translational start sites are often positioned in the apex of the loop. Gel electrophoresis results support the linear, 28-kb monomeric conformation of the P. magna mitochondrial genome. Analyses of other Polytomella taxa suggest that palindromic mitochondrial genes were present in the ancestor of the Polytomella lineage and lost or retained to various degrees in extant species. The possible origins and consequences of this bizarre genomic architecture are discussed. PMID:23940100

  14. Palindromic genes in the linear mitochondrial genome of the nonphotosynthetic green alga Polytomella magna.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Hua, Jimeng; Archibald, John M; Lee, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Organelle DNA is no stranger to palindromic repeats. But never has a mitochondrial or plastid genome been described in which every coding region is part of a distinct palindromic unit. While sequencing the mitochondrial DNA of the nonphotosynthetic green alga Polytomella magna, we uncovered precisely this type of genic arrangement. The P. magna mitochondrial genome is linear and made up entirely of palindromes, each containing 1-7 unique coding regions. Consequently, every gene in the genome is duplicated and in an inverted orientation relative to its partner. And when these palindromic genes are folded into putative stem-loops, their predicted translational start sites are often positioned in the apex of the loop. Gel electrophoresis results support the linear, 28-kb monomeric conformation of the P. magna mitochondrial genome. Analyses of other Polytomella taxa suggest that palindromic mitochondrial genes were present in the ancestor of the Polytomella lineage and lost or retained to various degrees in extant species. The possible origins and consequences of this bizarre genomic architecture are discussed. PMID:23940100

  15. The Mechanism and Function of Group II Chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Tom; Dalton, Kevin; Frydman, Judith

    2015-09-11

    Protein folding in the cell requires the assistance of enzymes collectively called chaperones. Among these, the chaperonins are 1-MDa ring-shaped oligomeric complexes that bind unfolded polypeptides and promote their folding within an isolated chamber in an ATP-dependent manner. Group II chaperonins, found in archaea and eukaryotes, contain a built-in lid that opens and closes over the central chamber. In eukaryotes, the chaperonin TRiC/CCT is hetero-oligomeric, consisting of two stacked rings of eight paralogous subunits each. TRiC facilitates folding of approximately 10% of the eukaryotic proteome, including many cytoskeletal components and cell cycle regulators. Folding of many cellular substrates of TRiC cannot be assisted by any other chaperone. A complete structural and mechanistic understanding of this highly conserved and essential chaperonin remains elusive. However, recent work is beginning to shed light on key aspects of chaperonin function and how their unique properties underlie their contribution to maintaining cellular proteostasis. PMID:25936650

  16. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  17. Chaperonin polymers in archaea: The cytoskeleton of prokaryotes?

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  18. Gene Arrangement Convergence, Diverse Intron Content, and Genetic Code Modifications in Mitochondrial Genomes of Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O.; González-Halphen, Diego; Lewis, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of our knowledge about mitochondrial genomes of Viridiplantae comes from land plants, but much less is known about their green algal relatives. In the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyta), only one representative mitochondrial genome is currently available—that of Acutodesmus obliquus. Our study adds nine completely sequenced and three partially sequenced mitochondrial genomes spanning the phylogenetic diversity of Sphaeropleales. We show not only a size range of 25–53 kb and variation in intron content (0–11) and gene order but also conservation of 13 core respiratory genes and fragmented ribosomal RNA genes. We also report an unusual case of gene arrangement convergence in Neochloris aquatica, where the two rns fragments were secondarily placed in close proximity. Finally, we report the unprecedented usage of UCG as stop codon in Pseudomuriella schumacherensis. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes yield a fully resolved, well-supported phylogeny, showing promise for addressing systematic challenges in green algae. PMID:25106621

  19. Species boundaries of Gulf of Mexico vestimentiferans (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae) inferred from mitochondrial genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pia Miglietta, Maria; Hourdez, Stephane; Cowart, Dominique A.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Fisher, Charles

    2010-11-01

    At least six morphospecies of vestimentiferan tubeworms are associated with cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The physiology and ecology of the two best-studied species from depths above 1000 m in the upper Louisiana slope (Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi) are relatively well understood. The biology of one rare species from the upper slope (escarpiid sp. nov.) and three morphospecies found at greater depths in the GOM (Lamellibrachia sp. 1, L. sp. 2, and Escarpia laminata) are not as well understood. Here we address species distributions and boundaries of cold-seep tubeworms using phylogenetic hypotheses based on two mitochondrial genes. Fragments of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit rDNA (16S) and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes were sequenced for 167 vestimentiferans collected from the GOM and analyzed in the context of other seep vestimentiferans for which sequence data were available. The analysis supported five monophyletic clades of vestimentiferans in the GOM. Intra-clade variation in both genes was very low, and there was no apparent correlation between the within-clade diversity and collection depth or location. Two of the morphospecies of Lamellibrachia from different depths in the GOM could not be distinguished by either mitochondrial gene. Similarly, E. laminata could not be distinguished from other described species of Escarpia from either the west coast of Africa or the eastern Pacific using COI. We suggest that the mitochondrial COI and 16S genes have little utility as barcoding markers for seep vestimentiferan tubeworms.

  20. Potential impact of human mitochondrial replacement on global policy regarding germline gene modification.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Previous discussions regarding human germline gene modification led to a global consensus that no germline should undergo genetic modification. However, the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, having conducted at the UK Government's request a scientific review and a wide public consultation, provided advice to the Government on the pros and cons of Parliament's lifting a ban on altering mitochondrial DNA content of human oocytes and embryos, so as to permit the prevention of maternal transmission of mitochondrial diseases. In this commentary, relevant ethical and biomedical issues are examined and requirements for proceeding with this novel procedure are suggested. Additionally, potentially significant impacts of the UK legalization on global policy concerning germline gene modification are discussed in the context of recent advances in genome-editing technology. It is concluded that international harmonization is needed, as well as further ethical and practical consideration, prior to the legalization of human mitochondrial replacement. PMID:24832374

  1. New genes and pathomechanisms in mitochondrial disorders unraveled by NGS technologies.

    PubMed

    Legati, Andrea; Reyes, Aurelio; Nasca, Alessia; Invernizzi, Federica; Lamantea, Eleonora; Tiranti, Valeria; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lamperti, Costanza; Ardissone, Anna; Moroni, Isabella; Robinson, Alan; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the diagnostic screening for rare disease entities, including primary mitochondrial disorders, particularly those caused by nuclear gene defects. NGS approaches are able to identify the causative gene defects in small families and even single individuals, unsuitable for investigation by traditional linkage analysis. These technologies are contributing to fill the gap between mitochondrial disease cases defined on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and biochemical readouts, which still outnumber by approximately 50% the cases for which a molecular-genetic diagnosis is attained. We have been using a combined, two-step strategy, based on targeted genes panel as a first NGS screening, followed by whole exome sequencing (WES) in still unsolved cases, to analyze a large cohort of subjects, that failed to show mutations in mtDNA and in ad hoc sets of specific nuclear genes, sequenced by the Sanger's method. Not only this approach has allowed us to reach molecular diagnosis in a significant fraction (20%) of these difficult cases, but it has also revealed unexpected and conceptually new findings. These include the possibility of marked variable penetrance of recessive mutations, the identification of large-scale DNA rearrangements, which explain spuriously heterozygous cases, and the association of mutations in known genes with unusual, previously unreported clinical phenotypes. Importantly, WES on selected cases has unraveled the presence of pathogenic mutations in genes encoding non-mitochondrial proteins (e.g. the transcription factor E4F1), an observation that further expands the intricate genetics of mitochondrial disease and suggests a new area of investigation in mitochondrial medicine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26968897

  2. Host mitochondrial association evolved in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii via neofunctionalization of a gene duplicate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other warm-blooded animals, the ability to associate with host mitochondria (HMA) is driven by a locally expanded gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. The importance of copy number in the e...

  3. Complete Sequence and Gene Organization of the Mitochondrial Genome of the Land Snail Albinaria Coerulea

    PubMed Central

    Hatzoglou, E.; Rodakis, G. C.; Lecanidou, R.

    1995-01-01

    The complete sequence (14,130 bp) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the land snail Albinaria coerulea was determined. It contains 13 protein, two rRNA and 22 tRNA genes. Twenty-four of these genes are encoded by one and 13 genes by the other strand. The gene arrangement shares almost no similarities with that of two other molluscs for which the complete gene content and arrangement are known, the bivalve Mytilus edulis and the chiton Katharina tunicata; the protein and rRNA gene order is similar to that of another terrestrial gastropod, Cepaea nemoralis. Unusual features include the following: (1) the absence of lengthy noncoding regions (there are only 141 intergenic nucleotides interspersed at different gene borders, the longest intergenic sequence being 42 nucleotides), (2) the presence of several overlapping genes (mostly tRNAs), (3) the presence of tRNA-like structures and other stem and loop structures within genes. An RNA editing system acting on tRNAs must necessarily be invoked for posttranscriptional extension of the overlapping tRNAs. Due to these features, and also because of the small size of its genes (e.g., it contains the smallest rRNA genes among the known coelomates), it is one of the most compact mitochondrial genomes known to date. PMID:7498775

  4. Molecular systematics of the genus Sigmodon: results from mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Dallas D.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Sigmodon Say and Ord, 1825 were examined using sequence data from multiple gene regions, including exon 1 of the nuclear-encoded interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein, intron 7 of the nuclear beta-fibrinogen gene, and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from 27 individuals representing 11 species of Sigmodon. Nuclear genes were analyzed independently, combined with each other, and combined with the mitochondrial data. Topologies were constructed using parsimony and Bayesian methods, with nodal support provided by bootstrap and posterior probability values. All analyses recovered four independent clades (I–IV), each representing unique species groups: hispidus, fulviventer, peruanus, and alstoni. The analyses from the combined data also provided support for relationships previously proposed within those species groups. PMID:20407590

  5. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  6. Increased Incidence of Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase 1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Xiumei; Wu, Bailin; Wang, Jian; Lu, Cuiling; Gao, Huafang; Qiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), also known as premature ovarian failure (POF), is defined as more than six months of cessation of menses before the age of 40 years, with two serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels (at least 1 month apart) falling in the menopause range. The cause of POI remains undetermined in the majority of cases, although some studies have reported increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in idiopathic POF. The role of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of POI has not been studied extensively. This aim of this study was to uncover underlying mitochondrial genetic defects in patients with POI. The entire region of the mitochondrial genome was amplified in subjects with idiopathic POI (n=63) and age-matched healthy female controls (n=63) using nine pair sets of primers, followed by screening of the mitochondrial genome using an Illumina MiSeq. We identified a total of 96 non-synonymous mitochondrial variations in POI patients and 93 non-synonymous variations in control subjects. Of these, 21 (9 in POI and 12 in control) non-synonymous variations had not been reported previously. Eight mitochondrial cytochrome coxidase 1 (MT-CO1) missense variants were identified in POI patients, whereas only four missense mutations were observed in controls. A high incidence of MT-CO1 missense variants were identified in POI patients compared with controls, and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (13/63 vs. 5/63, p=0.042). Our results show that patients with primary ovarian insufficiency exhibit an increased incidence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene mutations, suggesting that MT-CO1 gene mutation may be causal in POI. PMID:26225554

  7. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E.; Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M.; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24 h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3 h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection. PMID:24184327

  8. StAR enhances transcription of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteases involved in its own degradation.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of Tubulipora flabellaris (Bryozoa: Stenolaemata): the first representative from the class Stenolaemata with unique gene order.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming'an; Shen, Xin; Liu, Huilian; Liu, Xixing; Wu, Zhigang; Liu, Bin

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial genomes play a significant role in the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships within metazoans. There are still many controversies concerning the phylogenetic position of the phylum Bryozoa. In this research, we have finished the complete mitochondrial genome of one bryozoan (Tubulipora flabellaris), which is the first representative from the class Stenolaemata. The complete mitochondrial genome of T. flabellaris is 13,763bp in length and contains 36 genes, which lacks the atp8 gene in contrast to the typical metazoan mitochondrial genomes. Gene arrangement comparisons indicate that the mitochondrial genome of T. flabellaris has unique gene order when compared with other metazoans. The four known bryozoans complete mitochondrial genomes also have very different gene arrangements, indicates that bryozoan mitochondrial genomes have experienced drastic rearrangements. To investigate the phylogenetic relationship of Bryozoa, phylogenetic analyses based on amino acid sequences of 11 protein coding genes (excluding atp6 and atp8) from 26 metazoan complete mitochondrial genomes were made utilizing Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian methods, respectively. The results indicate the monopoly of Lophotrochozoa and a close relationship between Chaetognatha and Bryozoa. However, more evidences are needed to clarify the relationship between two groups. Lophophorate appeared to be polyphyletic according to our analyses. Meanwhile, neither analysis supports close relationship between Branchiopod and Phoronida. Four bryozoans form a clade and the relationship among them is T. flabellaris+(F. hispida+(B. neritina+W. subtorquata)), which is in coincidence with traditional classification system. PMID:21867967

  10. FOXO3a regulates reactive oxygen metabolism by inhibiting mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ferber, E C; Peck, B; Delpuech, O; Bell, G P; East, P; Schulze, A

    2012-06-01

    Forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXOs) are important targets of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, and are key regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis and response to oxidative stress. FOXOs have been shown to have tumour suppressor function and are important for stem cell maintenance. We have performed a detailed analysis of the transcriptional programme induced in response to Forkhead-box protein O3a (FOXO3a) activation. We observed that FOXO3a activation results in the repression of a large number of nuclear-encoded genes with mitochondrial function. Repression of these genes was mediated by FOXO3a-dependent inhibition of c-Myc. FOXO3a activation also caused a reduction in mitochondrial DNA copy number, expression of mitochondrial proteins, respiratory complexes and mitochondrial respiratory activity. FOXO3a has been previously implicated in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through induction of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD2). We observed that reduction in ROS levels following FOXO3a activation was independent of SOD2, but required c-Myc inhibition. Hypoxia increases ROS production from the mitochondria, which is required for stabilisation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). FOXO3a activation blocked the hypoxia-dependent increase in ROS and prevented HIF-1α stabilisation. Our data suggest that FOXO factors regulate mitochondrial activity through inhibition of c-Myc function and alter the hypoxia response. PMID:22139133

  11. FOXO3a regulates reactive oxygen metabolism by inhibiting mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, E C; Peck, B; Delpuech, O; Bell, G P; East, P; Schulze, A

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXOs) are important targets of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, and are key regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis and response to oxidative stress. FOXOs have been shown to have tumour suppressor function and are important for stem cell maintenance. We have performed a detailed analysis of the transcriptional programme induced in response to Forkhead-box protein O3a (FOXO3a) activation. We observed that FOXO3a activation results in the repression of a large number of nuclear-encoded genes with mitochondrial function. Repression of these genes was mediated by FOXO3a-dependent inhibition of c-Myc. FOXO3a activation also caused a reduction in mitochondrial DNA copy number, expression of mitochondrial proteins, respiratory complexes and mitochondrial respiratory activity. FOXO3a has been previously implicated in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through induction of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD2). We observed that reduction in ROS levels following FOXO3a activation was independent of SOD2, but required c-Myc inhibition. Hypoxia increases ROS production from the mitochondria, which is required for stabilisation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). FOXO3a activation blocked the hypoxia-dependent increase in ROS and prevented HIF-1α stabilisation. Our data suggest that FOXO factors regulate mitochondrial activity through inhibition of c-Myc function and alter the hypoxia response. PMID:22139133

  12. Thyroid hormone-regulated brain mitochondrial genes revealed by differential cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Núñez, E; Menéndez-Hurtado, A; Garesse, R; Santos, A; Perez-Castillo, A

    1995-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) plays a critical role in the development of the central nervous system and its deficiency during the early neonatal period results in severe brain damage. However the mechanisms involved and the genes specifically regulated by T3 during brain development are largely unknown. By using a subtractive hybridization technique we have isolated a number of cDNAs that represented mitochondrial genes (12S and 16S rRNAs and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III). The steady state level of all three RNAs was reduced in hypothyroid animals during the postnatal period and T3 administration restored control levels. During fetal life the level of 16S rRNA was decreased in the brain of hypothyroid animals, suggesting a prenatal effect of thyroid hormone on brain development. Since T3 does not affect the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the results suggest that the effect of T3 is at transcriptional and/or postranscriptional level. In addition, the transcript levels for two nuclear-encoded mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunits: subunits IV and VIc were also decreased in the brains of hypothyroid animals. Hypothyroidism-induced changes in mitochondrial RNAs were followed by a concomitant 40% decrease in cytochrome c oxidase activity. This study shows that T3 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function in the neonatal brain and, more importantly, provides a molecular basis for the specific action of this hormone in the developing brain. Images PMID:7635984

  13. Effects of TCDD on the Expression of Nuclear Encoded Mitochondrial Genes

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 μg/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 hrs) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change|>1.5 and P-value <0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a dose response (0.03 to 300 μg/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 hrs. Dose responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of the 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:20399798

  14. Effects of TCDD on the expression of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes

    SciTech Connect

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2010-07-15

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 {mu}g/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 h) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change| > 1.5 and P-value < 0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a sigmoidal or exponential dose-response profile (0.03 to 300 {mu}g/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 h. Dose-responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of all 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence and gene organization of Chinese indigenous chickens with phylogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, F P; Fan, H Y; Li, G H; Zhang, B K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Chinese indigenous Jinhu Black-bone and Rugao chickens. The two chicken mitochondrial genomes were deposited in GenBank under accession Nos. KP742951 and KR347464, respectively. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Jinhu Black-bone and Rugao chickens were sequenced and found to span 16,785 and 16,786 bp, respectively, and consisted of 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA), 13 protein-coding genes, and one control region (D-loop). The majority of genes were positioned on the H-strand, and the ND6 and eight tRNA genes were found to be encoded on the L-strand. The mitogenomes showed a similar gene order to that of the published Gallus gallus genome, as neither included a control region. The overall base composition of the genome of the two chickens was A = 30.22/30.28%, G = 13.57/13.49%, T = 23.74/23.76%, and C = 32.48/32.48%. Nucleotide skewness of the coding strands of the two chicken genomes (AT-skew = 0.12, GC-skew = -0.41) was biased towards T and G. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 29 subspecies, and the molecular genetic relationship among the 29 subspecies was identical to that of traditional taxonomy. PMID:27421002

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome DNA sequence for two ophiuroids and a holothuroid: the utility of protein gene sequence and gene maps in the analyses of deep deuterostome phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Scouras, Andrea; Beckenbach, Karen; Arndt, Allan; Smith, Michael J

    2004-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been determined for the holothuroid Cucumaria miniata and two ophiuroid species Ophiopholis aculeata and Ophiura lütkeni. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes for the asteroid Pisaster ochraceus has been completed. Maximum-likelihood and LogDet distance analyses of concatenated protein-coding sequences produced a series of trees that did not conclusively support generally accepted models of echinoderm phylogeny. The ophiuroid data consistently demonstrated accelerated nucleotide divergence rates and lack of stationarity. This confounds the phylogenetic analyses. Molecular investigations using individual protein-coding gene alignments demonstrated that the cytochrome b gene exhibits the least deviation in rate and stationarity and generated some trees consistent with proposed echinoderm phylogenies. Phylogenies based on echinoderm mitochondrial gene rearrangements also proved problematic because of extensive variation in gene order between and within classes. A comparison of the two distinctive ophiuroid mitochondrial gene orders supports the hypothesis that O. lütkeni has a more derived mitochondrial gene order versus O. aculeata. The variation in the echinoderm mitochondrial gene maps reinforces the limitations of the application of mitochondrial gene rearrangements as a global phylogenetic tool. PMID:15019608

  17. Nutrition Therapy for Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestinal Encephalopathy with Homozygous Mutation of the TYMP Gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Wei; Wang, Fang; Wu, Dong; Qian, Jiaming; Kang, Junren; Li, Hailong; Ma, Enling

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is characterized by significant gastrointestinal dysmotility. Early and long-term nutritional therapy is highly recommended. We report a case of MNGIE in a patient who was undergoing long-term nutrition therapy. The patient was diagnosed with a serious symptom of fatty liver and hyperlipidemia complications, along with homozygous mutation of the thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP) gene (c.217G > A). To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a case. Herein, we describe preventive measures for the aforementioned complications and mitochondrial disease-specific nutritional therapy. PMID:25954734

  18. Nutrition Therapy for Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestinal Encephalopathy with Homozygous Mutation of the TYMP Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Fang; Wu, Dong; Qian, Jiaming; Kang, Junren; Li, Hailong; Ma, Enling

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is characterized by significant gastrointestinal dysmotility. Early and long-term nutritional therapy is highly recommended. We report a case of MNGIE in a patient who was undergoing long-term nutrition therapy. The patient was diagnosed with a serious symptom of fatty liver and hyperlipidemia complications, along with homozygous mutation of the thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP) gene (c.217G > A). To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a case. Herein, we describe preventive measures for the aforementioned complications and mitochondrial disease-specific nutritional therapy. PMID:25954734

  19. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  20. Multisystem disorder associated with a missense mutation in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Wibrand, F; Ravn, K; Schwartz, M; Rosenberg, T; Horn, N; Vissing, J

    2001-10-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome b mutations have been reported to have a homogenous phenotype of pure exercise intolerance. We describe a novel mutation in the cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA (A15579G) associated with a selective decrease of muscle complex III activity in a patient who, besides severe exercise intolerance, also has multisystem manifestations (deafness, mental retardation, retinitis pigmentosa, cataract, growth retardation, epilepsy). The point mutation is heteroplasmic in muscle (88%) and leukocytes (15%), and changes a highly conserved tyrosine to cysteine at amino acid position 278. PMID:11601507

  1. Thymidine phosphorylase gene mutations in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slama, A; Lacroix, C; Plante-Bordeneuve, V; Lombès, A; Conti, M; Reimund, J M; Auxenfants, E; Crenn, P; Laforêt, P; Joannard, A; Seguy, D; Pillant, H; Joly, P; Haut, S; Messing, B; Said, G; Legrand, A; Guiochon-Mantel, A

    2005-04-01

    The mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) syndrome is characterized by the association of gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms. It is a rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions and/or depletion. It is caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) gene mutations resulting in a complete abolition of TP activity. We tested 31 unrelated patients presenting either with a complete MNGIE syndrome (8 patients), a severe intestinal pseudo-obstruction (10 patients), and multiple deletions and/or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (13 patients). All the tested patients presenting with a complete MNGIE had increased thymidine levels in plasma and urine, and no TP activity. The group with pseudo-obstruction syndrome had normal or partial reduction of TP activity. We found pathogenic mutations on TP gene only in the MNGIE syndrome group: all the MNGIE patients were compound heterozygous or homozygous for mutations in the TP gene. Eight of these mutations are yet unreported, confirming the lack of genotype/phenotype correlation in this syndrome. Enzymatic activity and thymidine level are thus rapid diagnosis tests to detect MNGIE affected patients prior to genetic testing for patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:15781193

  2. Identification and mapping of trnI, trnE and trnfM genes in the sunflower mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L R; Veronico, P; Siculella, L; Gallerani, R

    1995-01-01

    Three sunflower mitochondrial HindIII restriction fragments containing the tRNA genes trnI, trnE and trnfM have been sequenced. The genes are present in single copy on the whole genome and are transcribed. Hybridization experiments and sequence analysis of the HindIII fragments allowed the precise mapping and orientation of each gene on the sunflower mitochondrial genome. PMID:7579587

  3. In vitro stabilization and in vivo solubilization of foreign proteins by the beta subunit of a chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain KOD1.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Z; Fujiwara, S; Kohda, K; Takagi, M; Imanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the beta subunit of a molecular chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. strain KOD1 (cpkB) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The cpkB gene is composed of 1,641 nucleotides, encoding a protein (546 amino acids) with a molecular mass of 59,140 Da. The enhancing effect of CpkB on enzyme stability was examined by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Purified recombinant CpkB prevents thermal denaturation and enhances thermostability of ADH. CpkB requires ATP for its chaperonin function at a low CpkB concentration; however, CpkB functions without ATP when present in excess. In vivo chaperonin function for the solubilization of insoluble proteins was also studied by coexpressing CpkB and CobQ (cobryic acid synthase), indicating that CpkB is useful for solubilizing the insoluble proteins in vivo. These results suggest that the beta subunit plays a major role in chaperonin activity and is functional without the alpha subunit. PMID:9023959

  4. Characteristic features of the nucleotide sequences of yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes as analyzed by computer program GeneMark.

    PubMed

    Isono, K; McIninch, J D; Borodovsky, M

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence data for yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) genes were analyzed by the computer program GeneMark which predicts the presence of likely genes in sequence data by calculating statistical biases in the appearance of consecutive nucleotides. The program uses a set of standard sequence data for this calculation. We used this program for the analysis of yeast nucleotide sequence data containing MRP genes, hoping to obtain information as to whether they share features in common that are different from other yeast genes. Sequence data sets for ordinary yeast genes and for 27 known MRP genes were used. The MRP genes were nicely predicted as likely genes regardless of the data sets used, whereas other yeast genes were predicted to be likely genes only when the data set for ordinary yeast genes was used. The assembled sequence data for chromosomes II, III, VIII and XI as well as the segmented data for chromosome V were analyzed in a similar manner. In addition to the known MRP genes, eleven ORF's were predicted to be likely MRP genes. Thus, the method seems very powerful in analyzing genes of heterologous origins. PMID:7719921

  5. Discovery of the rpl10 Gene in Diverse Plant Mitochondrial Genomes and Its Probable Replacement by the Nuclear Gene for Chloroplast RPL10 in Two Lineages of Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Nakao; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of plants are much larger than those of mammals and often contain conserved open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function. Here, we show that one of these conserved ORFs is actually the gene for ribosomal protein L10 (rpl10) in plant. No rpl10 gene has heretofore been reported in any mitochondrial genome other than the exceptionally gene-rich genome of the protist Reclinomonas americana. Conserved ORFs corresponding to rpl10 are present in a wide diversity of land plant and green algal mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial rpl10 genes are transcribed in all nine land plants examined, with five seed plant genes subject to RNA editing. In addition, mitochondrial-rpl10-like cDNAs were identified in EST libraries from numerous land plants. In three lineages of angiosperms, rpl10 is either lost from the mitochondrial genome or a pseudogene. In two of them (Brassicaceae and monocots), no nuclear copy of mitochondrial rpl10 is identifiably present, and instead a second copy of nuclear-encoded chloroplast rpl10 is present. Transient assays using green fluorescent protein indicate that this duplicate gene is dual targeted to mitochondria and chloroplasts. We infer that mitochondrial rpl10 has been functionally replaced by duplicated chloroplast counterparts in Brassicaceae and monocots. PMID:19934175

  6. [Complete sequence and gene organization of the Tibetan chicken mitochondrial genome].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiao-Mei; Liang, Yu; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shu-Qing; Zheng, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jun

    2006-07-01

    Using PCR amplification, sequencing and assembling, we obtained the complete mitochondrial genome of Tibetan chicken. The complete mitochondrial genome was 16 783 bp in length. It contained 37 genes (13 protein coding genes, 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA) and a control region. The deduced restriction map revealed a unique pattern of Dra I restriction in Tibetan chicken. Phylogenetic trees based on the D-loop locus and the 13 protein coding genes by Neighbor-joining and Maximum Parsimony analysis indicated that the red junglefowl was the direct ancestor of Tibetan chicken and Tibetan chicken was closest to white leghorn and white plymouth rock, although the evolution of Tibetan chicken appeared to be relatively independent from them. A possible explanation is that the ancestor of Tibetan chicken lived in a relatively isolated environment after entering into the high altitude area and developed unique genetic characters. PMID:16825161

  7. Towards germline gene therapy of inherited mitochondrial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Woodward, Joy; Sanchis, Dario Melguizo; Ma, Hong; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Kang, Eunju; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Ramsey, Cathy; Masterson, Keith; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with serious human diseases and inherited from mother's eggs. Here we investigated the feasibility of mtDNA replacement in human oocytes by spindle transfer (ST). Of 106 human oocytes donated for research, 65 were subjected to reciprocal ST and 33 served as controls. Fertilization rate in ST oocytes (73%) was similar to controls (75%). However, a significant portion of ST zygotes (52%) displayed abnormal fertilization as determined by irregular number of pronuclei. Among normally fertilized ST zygotes, blastocyst development (62%) and embryonic stem cell (ESC) isolation (38%) rates were comparable to controls. All ESC lines derived from ST zygotes displayed normal euploid karyotypes and contained exclusively donor mtDNA. The mtDNA can be efficiently replaced in human oocytes. Although some ST oocytes displayed abnormal fertilization, remaining embryos were capable of developing to blastocysts and producing ESCs similar to controls. PMID:23103867

  8. Bi-allelic CLPB mutations cause cataract, renal cysts, nephrocalcinosis and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, a novel disorder of mitochondrial protein disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, Marta; Shahni, Rojeen; Saldanha, José W; Murphy, Elaine; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoff, William Van't; Heales, Simon; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-03-01

    Whole exome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic cause of mitochondrial disease in two siblings with a syndrome of congenital lamellar cataracts associated with nephrocalcinosis, medullary cysts and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Autosomal recessive inheritance in a gene encoding a mitochondrially targeted protein was assumed; the only variants which satisfied these criteria were c.1882C>T (p.Arg628Cys) and c.1915G>A (p.Glu639Lys) in the CLPB gene, encoding a heat shock protein/chaperonin responsible for disaggregating mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. Functional studies, including quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Western blot, support pathogenicity of these mutations. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that the mutations disrupt interactions between subunits so that the CLPB hexamer cannot form or is unstable, thus impairing its role as a protein disaggregase. We conclude that accumulation of protein aggregates underlies the development of cataracts and nephrocalcinosis in CLPB deficiency, which is a novel genetic cause of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. A common mitochondrial cause for 3-methylglutaconic aciduria appears to be disruption of the architecture of the mitochondrial membranes, as in Barth syndrome (tafazzin deficiency), Sengers syndrome (acylglycerol kinase deficiency) and MEGDEL syndrome (impaired remodelling of the mitochondrial membrane lipids because of SERAC1 mutations). We now propose that perturbation of the mitochondrial membranes by abnormal protein aggregates leads to 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in CLPB deficiency. PMID:25595726

  9. Strikingly Bacteria-Like and Gene-Rich Mitochondrial Genomes throughout Jakobid Protists

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Gertraud; Gray, Michael W.; Forget, Lise; Lang, B. Franz

    2013-01-01

    The most bacteria-like mitochondrial genome known is that of the jakobid flagellate Reclinomonas americana NZ. This genome also encodes the largest known gene set among mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs), including the RNA subunit of RNase P (transfer RNA processing), a reduced form of transfer–messenger RNA (translational control), and a four-subunit bacteria-like RNA polymerase, which in other eukaryotes is substituted by a nucleus-encoded, single-subunit, phage-like enzyme. Further, protein-coding genes are preceded by potential Shine–Dalgarno translation initiation motifs. Whether similarly ancestral mitochondrial characters also exist in relatives of R. americana NZ is unknown. Here, we report a comparative analysis of nine mtDNAs from five distant jakobid genera: Andalucia, Histiona, Jakoba, Reclinomonas, and Seculamonas. We find that Andalucia godoyi has an even larger mtDNA gene complement than R. americana NZ. The extra genes are rpl35 (a large subunit mitoribosomal protein) and cox15 (involved in cytochrome oxidase assembly), which are nucleus encoded throughout other eukaryotes. Andalucia cox15 is strikingly similar to its homolog in the free-living α-proteobacterium Tistrella mobilis. Similarly, a long, highly conserved gene cluster in jakobid mtDNAs, which is a clear vestige of prokaryotic operons, displays a gene order more closely resembling that in free-living α-proteobacteria than in Rickettsiales species. Although jakobid mtDNAs, overall, are characterized by bacteria-like features, they also display a few remarkably divergent characters, such as 3′-tRNA editing in Seculamonas ecuadoriensis and genome linearization in Jakoba libera. Phylogenetic analysis with mtDNA-encoded proteins strongly supports monophyly of jakobids with Andalucia as the deepest divergence. However, it remains unclear which α-proteobacterial group is the closest mitochondrial relative. PMID:23335123

  10. SCS1, a multicopy suppressor of hsp60-ts mutant alleles, does not encode a mitochondrially targeted protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Y; Hallberg, R L

    1995-01-01

    We identified and isolated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene which, when overexpressed, suppressed the temperature-sensitive phenotype of cells expressing a mutant allele of the gene encoding the mitochondrial chaperonin, Hsp60. This gene, SCS1 (suppressor of chaperonin sixty-1), encodes a 757-amino-acid protein of as yet unknown function which, nonetheless, has human, rice, and Caenorhabditis elegans homologs with high degrees (ca. 60%) of amino acid sequence identity. SCS1 is not an essential gene, but SCS1-null strains do not grow above 37 degrees C and show some growth-related defects at 30 degrees C as well. This gene is expressed at both 30 and 38 degrees C, producing little or no differences in mRNA levels at these two temperatures. Overexpression of SCS1 could not complement an HSP60-null allele, indicating that suppression was not due to the bypassing of Hsp60 activity. Of 10 other hsp60-ts alleles tested, five could also be suppressed by SCS1 overexpression. There were no common mutant phenotypes of the strains expressing these alleles that give any clue as to why they were suppressible while others were not. An epitope (influenza virus hemagglutinin)-tagged form of SCS1 in single copy complemented an SCS1-null allele. The Scs1-hemagglutinin protein was found to be at comparable levels and in similar multiply modified forms in cells growing at both 30 and 38 degrees C. Surprisingly, when localized either by cell fractionation procedures or by immunocytochemistry, these proteins were found not in mitochondria but in the cytosol. The overexpression of SCS1 had significant effects on the cellular levels of mRNAs encoding the proteins Cpn10 and Mgel, two other mitochondrial protein cochaperones, but not on mRNAs encoding a number of other mitochondrial or cytosolic proteins analyzed. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7565713

  11. Whole mitochondrial genome analysis in two families with dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy: detection of mutations in MT-ND2 and MT-TL1 genes.

    PubMed

    Alila, Olfa Fersi; Rebai, Emna Mkaouar; Tabebi, Mouna; Tej, Amel; Chamkha, Imen; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Bouguila, Jihene; Tilouche, Samia; Soyah, Nejla; Boughamoura, Lamia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2016-07-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leading to mitochondrial dysfunction can cause cardiomyopathy and heart failure. These mutations were described in the mt-tRNA genes and in the mitochondrial protein-coding genes. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic defect in two patients belonging to two families with cardiac dysfunction associated to a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. The sequencing analysis of the whole mitochondrial DNA in the two patients and their parents revealed the presence of known polymorphisms associated to cardiomyopathy and two pathogenic mutations in DNA extracted from blood leucocytes: the heteroplasmic m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene in patient A; and the homoplasmic m.5182C > T mutation in the ND2 gene in patient B. Secondary structure analysis of the ND2 protein further supported the deleterious role of the m.5182C > T mutation, as it was found to be involved an extended imbalance in its hydrophobicity and affect its function. In addition, the mitochondrial variants identified in patients A and B classify both of them in the same haplogroup H2a2a1. PMID:26258512

  12. Identification of the gene encoding the mitochondrial elongation factor G in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, C; Makris, A; Patriotis, C; Bear, S E; Tsichlis, P N

    1993-01-01

    Protein synthesis in cytosolic and rough endoplasmic reticulum associated ribosomes is directed by factors, many of which have been well characterized. Although these factors have been the subject of intense study, most of the corresponding factors regulating protein synthesis in the mitochondrial ribosomes remain unknown. In this report we present the cloning and initial characterization of the gene encoding the rat mitochondrial elongation factor-G (rEF-Gmt). The rat gene encoding EF-Gmt (rMef-g) maps to rat chromosome 2 and it is expressed in all tissues with highest levels in liver, thymus and brain. Its DNA sequence predicts a 752 amino acid protein exhibiting 72% homology to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial elongation factor-G (YMEF-G), 62% and 61% homology to the Thermus thermophilus and E. coli elongation factor-G (EF-G) respectively and 52% homology to the rat elongation factor-2 (EF-2). The deduced amino acid sequence of EF-G contains characteristic motifs shared by all GTP binding proteins. Therefore, similarly to other elongation factors, the enzymatic function of EF-Gmt is predicted to depend on GTP binding and hydrolysis. EF-Gmt differs from its cytoplasmic homolog, EF-2, in that it contains an aspartic acid residue at amino acid position 621 which corresponds to the EF-2 histidine residue at position 715. Since this histidine residue, following posttranslational modification into diphthamide, appears to be the sole cellular target of diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa endotoxin A, we conclude that EF-Gmt will not be inactivated by these toxins. The severe effects of these toxins on protein elongation in tissues expressing EF-Gmt suggest that EF-Gmt and EF-2 exhibit nonoverlapping functions. The cloning and characterization of the mammalian mitochondrial elongation factor G will permit us to address its role in the regulation of normal mitochondrial function and in disease states attributed to mitochondrial dysfunction. Images

  13. Mitochondrial genomes of Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae): evidence for conserved gene order in annelida.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert M; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2005-02-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are useful tools for inferring evolutionary history. However, many taxa are poorly represented by available data. Thus, to further understand the phylogenetic potential of complete mitochondrial genome sequence data in Annelida (segmented worms), we examined the complete mitochondrial sequence for Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and an estimated 80% of the sequence of Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae). These genomes have remarkably similar gene orders to previously published annelid genomes, suggesting that gene order is conserved across annelids. This result is interesting, given the high variation seen in the closely related Mollusca and Brachiopoda. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and gene order all support the recent hypothesis that Sipuncula and Annelida are closely related. Our findings suggest that gene order data is of limited utility in annelids but that sequence data holds promise. Additionally, these genomes show AT bias (approximately 66%) and codon usage biases but have a typical gene complement for bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15483328

  14. Screen for mitochondrial DNA copy number maintenance genes reveals essential role for ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoh, Atsushi; Cannino, Giuseppe; Gerards, Mike; Buckley, Suzanne; Kazancioglu, Selena; Scialo, Filippo; Lihavainen, Eero; Ribeiro, Andre; Dufour, Eric; Jacobs, Howard T

    2014-01-01

    The machinery of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is only partially characterized and is of wide interest due to its involvement in disease. To identify novel components of this machinery, plus other cellular pathways required for mtDNA viability, we implemented a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells, assaying for loss of fluorescence of mtDNA nucleoids stained with the DNA-intercalating agent PicoGreen. In addition to previously characterized components of the mtDNA replication and transcription machineries, positives included many proteins of the cytosolic proteasome and ribosome (but not the mitoribosome), three proteins involved in vesicle transport, some other factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis or nuclear gene expression, > 30 mainly uncharacterized proteins and most subunits of ATP synthase (but no other OXPHOS complex). ATP synthase knockdown precipitated a burst of mitochondrial ROS production, followed by copy number depletion involving increased mitochondrial turnover, not dependent on the canonical autophagy machinery. Our findings will inform future studies of the apparatus and regulation of mtDNA maintenance, and the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics and signaling in modulating mtDNA copy number. PMID:24952591

  15. The Mitochondrial Genome of Soybean Reveals Complex Genome Structures and Gene Evolution at Intercellular and Phylogenetic Levels

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shengxin; Wang, Yankun; Lu, Jiangjie; Gai, Junyi; Li, Jijie; Chu, Pu; Guan, Rongzhan; Zhao, Tuanjie

    2013-01-01

    Determining mitochondrial genomes is important for elucidating vital activities of seed plants. Mitochondrial genomes are specific to each plant species because of their variable size, complex structures and patterns of gene losses and gains during evolution. This complexity has made research on the soybean mitochondrial genome difficult compared with its nuclear and chloroplast genomes. The present study helps to solve a 30-year mystery regarding the most complex mitochondrial genome structure, showing that pairwise rearrangements among the many large repeats may produce an enriched molecular pool of 760 circles in seed plants. The soybean mitochondrial genome harbors 58 genes of known function in addition to 52 predicted open reading frames of unknown function. The genome contains sequences of multiple identifiable origins, including 6.8 kb and 7.1 kb DNA fragments that have been transferred from the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, respectively, and some horizontal DNA transfers. The soybean mitochondrial genome has lost 16 genes, including nine protein-coding genes and seven tRNA genes; however, it has acquired five chloroplast-derived genes during evolution. Four tRNA genes, common among the three genomes, are derived from the chloroplast. Sizeable DNA transfers to the nucleus, with pericentromeric regions as hotspots, are observed, including DNA transfers of 125.0 kb and 151.6 kb identified unambiguously from the soybean mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes, respectively. The soybean nuclear genome has acquired five genes from its mitochondrial genome. These results provide biological insights into the mitochondrial genome of seed plants, and are especially helpful for deciphering vital activities in soybean. PMID:23431381

  16. A One-Megabase Physical Map Provides Insights on Gene Organization in the Enormous Mitochondrial Genome of Cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber has one of the largest mitochondrial genomes known among all eukaryotes, due in part to the accumulation of short repetitive-DNA motifs. Recombination among these repetitive DNAs produces rearrangements affecting organization and expression of mitochondrial genes. In order to more efficie...

  17. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  18. Rearrangement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in flat bugs (Hemiptera: Aradidae).

    PubMed

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Shao, Renfu; Shi, Aimin; Bai, Xiaoshuan; Zheng, Xiaorong; Heiss, Ernst; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The typical insect mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which contains a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha (suborder Heteroptera). The arrangement of mt genes in these true bugs is usually the same as the ancestral mt gene arrangement of insects. Rearrangement of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, however, has been found in two subfamilies of flat bugs (Mezirinae and Calisiinae, family Aradidae). In this study, we sequenced the complete mt genomes of four species from three other subfamilies (Aradinae, Carventinae and Aneurinae). We found tRNA gene rearrangement in all of these four species. All of the rearranged tRNA genes are located between the mitochondrial control region and cox1, indicating this region as a hotspot for gene rearrangement in flat bugs; the rearrangement is likely caused by events of tandem duplication and random deletion of genes. Furthermore, our phylogenetic and dating analyses indicated that the swap of positions between trnQ and trnI occurred ~162 million years ago (MYA) in the most recent common ancestor of the five subfamilies of flat bugs investigated to date, whereas the swap of positions between trnC and trnW occurred later in the lineage leading to Calisiinae, and the translocation of trnC and trnY occurred later than 134 MYA in the lineage leading to Aradinae. PMID:27180804

  19. Probable presence of an ubiquitous cryptic mitochondrial gene on the antisense strand of the cytochrome oxidase I gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondria mediate most of the energy production that occurs in the majority of eukaryotic organisms. These subcellular organelles contain a genome that differs from the nuclear genome and is referred to as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite a disparity in gene content, all mtDNAs encode at least two components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, including cytochrome c oxidase I (Cox1). Presentation of the hypothesis A positionally conserved ORF has been found on the complementary strand of the cox1 genes of both eukaryotic mitochondria (protist, plant, fungal and animal) and alpha-proteobacteria. This putative gene has been named gau for gene antisense ubiquitous in mtDNAs. The length of the deduced protein is approximately 100 amino acids. In vertebrates, several stop codons have been found in the mt gau region, and potentially functional gau regions have been found in nuclear genomes. However, a recent bioinformatics study showed that several hypothetical overlapping mt genes could be predicted, including gau; this involves the possible import of the cytosolic AGR tRNA into the mitochondria and/or the expression of mt antisense tRNAs with anticodons recognizing AGR codons according to an alternative genetic code that is induced by the presence of suppressor tRNAs. Despite an evolutionary distance of at least 1.5 to 2.0 billion years, the deduced Gau proteins share some conserved amino acid signatures and structure, which suggests a possible conserved function. Moreover, BLAST analysis identified rare, sense-oriented ESTs with poly(A) tails that include the entire gau region. Immunohistochemical analyses using an anti-Gau monoclonal antibody revealed strict co-localization of Gau proteins and a mitochondrial marker. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis could be tested by purifying the gau gene product and determining its sequence. Cell biological experiments are needed to determine the physiological role of this protein. Implications of

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the fire coral-inhabiting barnacle Megabalanus ajax (Sessilia: Balanidae): gene rearrangements and atypical gene content.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Chu, Ka Hou; Chan, Benny Kwok Kan; Tsang, Ling Ming

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Megabalanus ajax Darwin, 1854 (Sessilia: Balanidae) is reported. Compared to typical gene content of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, duplication of one tRNA gene (trnL2) and absence of another tRNA gene (trnS1) are identified in M. ajax mitochondrial genome. There is a replacement of one tRNA (trnS1) by another tRNA (trnL2) in M. ajax mitochondrial genome compared to Megabalanus volcano mitochondrial genome. Inversion of a six-gene block (trnP-nd4L-nd4-trnH-nd5-trnF) is found between M. ajax/M. volcano and Tetraclita japonica mitochondrial genomes. With reference to the pancrustacean mitochondrial ground pattern, there is an inversion of a large gene block from the light strand to heavy strand in the two Megabalanus mitochondrial genomes, including three PCGs and two tRNAs (nd4L-nd4-trnH-nd5-trnF). Furthermore, four tRNAs (trnA, trnE, trnQ and trnC) exhibit translocation, while translocation and inversion occur in three tRNAs (trnP, trnY and trnK). PMID:25050875

  1. Mitochondrially-targeted expression of a cytoplasmic male sterility-associated orf220 gene causes male sterility in Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The novel chimeric open reading frame (orf) resulting from the rearrangement of a mitochondrial genome is generally thought to be a causal factor in the occurrence of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). Both positive and negative correlations have been found between CMS-associated orfs and the occurrence of CMS when CMS-associated orfs were expressed and targeted at mitochondria. Some orfs cause male sterility or semi-sterility, while some do not. Little is currently known about how mitochondrial factor regulates the expression of the nuclear genes involved in male sterility. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological function of a candidate CMS-associated orf220 gene, newly isolated from cytoplasmic male-sterile stem mustard, and show how mitochondrial retrograde regulated nuclear gene expression is related to male sterility. Results It was shown that the ORF220 protein can be guided to the mitochondria using the mitochondrial-targeting sequence of the β subunit of F1-ATPase (atp2-1). Transgenic stem mustard plants expressed the chimeric gene containing the orf220 gene and a mitochondrial-targeting sequence of the β subunit of F1-ATPase (atp2-1). Transgenic plants were male-sterile, most being unable to produce pollen while some could only produce non-vigorous pollen. The transgenic stem mustard plants also showed aberrant floral development identical to that observed in the CMS stem mustard phenotype. Results obtained from oligooarray analysis showed that some genes related to mitochondrial energy metabolism were down-regulated, indicating a weakening of mitochondrial function in transgenic stem mustard. Some genes related to pollen development were shown to be down-regulated in transgenic stem mustard and the expression of some transcription factor genes was also altered. Conclusion The work presented furthers our understanding of how the mitochondrially-targeted expression of CMS-associated orf220 gene causes male sterility through

  2. The Yeast Gene, MDM20, Is Necessary for Mitochondrial Inheritance and Organization of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Greg J.; King, Edward J.; Shaw, Janet M.

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the growing bud inherits a portion of the mitochondrial network from the mother cell soon after it emerges. Although this polarized transport of mitochondria is thought to require functions of the cytoskeleton, there are conflicting reports concerning the nature of the cytoskeletal element involved. Here we report the isolation of a yeast mutant, mdm20, in which both mitochondrial inheritance and actin cables (bundles of actin filaments) are disrupted. The MDM20 gene encodes a 93-kD polypeptide with no homology to other characterized proteins. Extra copies of TPM1, a gene encoding the actin filament–binding protein tropomyosin, suppress mitochondrial inheritance defects and partially restore actin cables in mdm20Δ cells. Synthetic lethality is also observed between mdm20 and tpm1 mutant strains. Overexpression of a second yeast tropomyosin, Tpm2p, rescues mutant phenotypes in the mdm20 strain to a lesser extent. Together, these results provide compelling evidence that mitochondrial inheritance in yeast is an actin-mediated process. MDM20 and TPM1 also exhibit the same pattern of genetic interactions; mutations in MDM20 are synthetically lethal with mutations in BEM2 and MYO2 but not SAC6. Although MDM20 and TPM1 are both required for the formation and/or stabilization of actin cables, mutations in these genes disrupt mitochondrial inheritance and nuclear segregation to different extents. Thus, Mdm20p and Tpm1p may act in vivo to establish molecular and functional heterogeneity of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9105043

  3. Clinical and Neuroimaging Features in Two Children with Mutations in the Mitochondrial ND5 Gene.

    PubMed

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, P S; Taly, Arun B; Govindaraju, Chikkanna; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Arvinda, Hanumanthapura R; Nagappa, Madhu; Sinha, Sanjib; Khan, Nahid Akthar; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 5 gene (MT-ND5) has been implicated as an important genetic cause of childhood mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. This study reports the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in two pediatric patients with mutations in the ND5 gene of mitochondrial DNA. The 8-month-old boy with m.13513 G>A mutation presented with infantile basal ganglia stroke syndrome secondary to mineralizing angiopathy. The 7-year-old girl with the m.13514A>G mutation had episodic regression, progressive ataxia, optic atrophy, and hyperactivity. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed bilateral symmetrical signal intensity changes in the thalamus, tectal plate, and inferior olivary nucleus, which subsided on follow-up image. Both the patients had a stable course. Familiarity with the various phenotypic and magnetic resonance imaging findings and the clinical course in childhood mitochondrial encephalomyopathies may help the physician in targeted metabolic-genetic testing and prognostication. PMID:25974876

  4. A Mutation in the Mitochondrial Fission Gene Dnm1l Leads to Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafian, Houman; Docherty, Louise; Leo, Vincenzo; Towlson, Christopher; Neilan, Monica; Steeples, Violetta; Lygate, Craig A.; Hough, Tertius; Townsend, Stuart; Williams, Debbie; Wells, Sara; Norris, Dominic; Glyn-Jones, Sarah; Land, John; Barbaric, Ivana; Lalanne, Zuzanne; Denny, Paul; Szumska, Dorota; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Griffin, Julian L.; Hargreaves, Iain; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Cheeseman, Michael; Watkins, Hugh; Dear, T. Neil

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l) gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease. PMID:20585624

  5. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060253

  6. Partial kinetoplast-mitochondrial gene organization and expression in the respiratory deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    PubMed

    Maslov, D A; Nawathean, P; Scheel, J

    1999-04-30

    In plant-dwelling trypanosomatids from the genus Phytomonas, mitochondrial functions, such as cytochrome mediated respiration, ATP production and Krebs cycle, are missing, and cell energetics is based on the glycolysis. Using Blue Native/Tricine-SDS two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis, we observed that mitochondrial respiratory Complexes III (cytochrome bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase) were absent in Phytomonas serpens; however, Complex V (ATPase) was present. A deletion of the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COIII) and apocytochrome b (Cyb) was identified within the 6234 bp sequenced region of the 31 kb maxicircle kinetoplast DNA. Genes, found in this region, include 12S and 9S ribosomal RNAs, subunits 7, 8 and 9 of NADH dehydrogenase (ND7, ND8 and ND9) and subunit 6 of ATPase (A6 or MURF4), as well as the genes (MURF1, MURF5 and G3) with unknown function. Most genes are actively transcribed and some mRNAs are edited. Fully edited mRNAs for A6 and G3 were abundant, while edited ND7 transcripts were rare, and only partially edited and pre-edited transcripts for ND8 were detected. The data show that the mitochondrial genome of P. serpens is functional, although its functions may be limited to expressing the ATPase and, possibly, NADH dehydrogenase complexes. PMID:10340485

  7. Maintenance and Integrity of the Mitochondrial Genome: a Plethora of Nuclear Genes in the Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Contamine, Véronique; Picard, Marguerite

    2000-01-01

    Instability of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is a general problem from yeasts to humans. However, its genetic control is not well documented except in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From the discovery, 50 years ago, of the petite mutants by Ephrussi and his coworkers, it has been shown that more than 100 nuclear genes directly or indirectly influence the fate of the rho+ mtDNA. It is not surprising that mutations in genes involved in mtDNA metabolism (replication, repair, and recombination) can cause a complete loss of mtDNA (rho0 petites) and/or lead to truncated forms (rho−) of this genome. However, most loss-of-function mutations which increase yeast mtDNA instability act indirectly: they lie in genes controlling functions as diverse as mitochondrial translation, ATP synthase, iron homeostasis, fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial morphology, and so on. In a few cases it has been shown that gene overexpression increases the levels of petite mutants. Mutations in other genes are lethal in the absence of a functional mtDNA and thus convert this petite-positive yeast into a petite-negative form: petite cells cannot be recovered in these genetic contexts. Most of the data are explained if one assumes that the maintenance of the rho+ genome depends on a centromere-like structure dispensable for the maintenance of rho− mtDNA and/or the function of mitochondrially encoded ATP synthase subunits, especially ATP6. In fact, the real challenge for the next 50 years will be to assemble the pieces of this puzzle by using yeast and to use complementary models, especially in strict aerobes. PMID:10839818

  8. Multiple Origins of Eukaryotic cox15 Suggest Horizontal Gene Transfer from Bacteria to Jakobid Mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    He, Ding; Fu, Cheng-Jie; Baldauf, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The most gene-rich and bacterial-like mitochondrial genomes known are those of Jakobida (Excavata). Of these, the most extreme example to date is the Andalucia godoyi mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), including a cox15 gene encoding the respiratory enzyme heme A synthase (HAS), which is nuclear-encoded in nearly all other mitochondriate eukaryotes. Thus cox15 in eukaryotes appears to be a classic example of mitochondrion-to-nucleus (endosymbiotic) gene transfer, with A. godoyi uniquely retaining the ancestral state. However, our analyses reveal two highly distinct HAS types (encoded by cox15-1 and cox15-2 genes) and identify A. godoyi mitochondrial cox15-encoded HAS as type-1 and all other eukaryotic cox15-encoded HAS as type-2. Molecular phylogeny places the two HAS types in widely separated clades with eukaryotic type-2 HAS clustering with the bulk of α-proteobacteria (>670 sequences), whereas A. godoyi type-1 HAS clusters with an eclectic set of bacteria and archaea including two α-proteobacteria missing from the type-2 clade. This wide phylogenetic separation of the two HAS types is reinforced by unique features of their predicted protein structures. Meanwhile, RNA-sequencing and genomic analyses fail to detect either cox15 type in the nuclear genome of any jakobid including A. godoyi. This suggests that not only is cox15-1 a relatively recent acquisition unique to the Andalucia lineage but also the jakobid last common ancestor probably lacked both cox15 types. These results indicate that uptake of foreign genes by mtDNA is more taxonomically widespread than previously thought. They also caution against the assumption that all α-proteobacterial-like features of eukaryotes are ancient remnants of endosymbiosis. PMID:26412445

  9. Mitochondrial-related gene expression changes are sensitive to agonal-pH state: implications for brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vawter, MP; Tomita, H; Meng, F; Bolstad, B; Li, J; Evans, S; Choudary, P; Atz, M; Shao, L; Neal, C; Walsh, DM; Burmeister, M; Speed, T; Myers, R; Jones, EG; Watson, SJ; Akil, H; Bunney, WE

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects in gene expression have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We have now contrasted control brains with low pH versus high pH and showed that 28% of genes in mitochondrial-related pathways meet criteria for differential expression. A majority of genes in the mitochondrial, chaperone and proteasome pathways of nuclear DNA-encoded gene expression were decreased with decreased brain pH, whereas a majority of genes in the apoptotic and reactive oxygen stress pathways showed an increased gene expression with a decreased brain pH. There was a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial DNA gene expression with increased agonal duration. To minimize effects of agonal-pH state on mood disorder comparisons, two classic approaches were used, removing all subjects with low pH and agonal factors from analysis, or grouping low and high pH as a separate variable. Three groups of potential candidate genes emerged that may be mood disorder related: (a) genes that showed no sensitivity to pH but were differentially expressed in bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder; (b) genes that were altered by agonal-pH in one direction but altered in mood disorder in the opposite direction to agonal-pH and (c) genes with agonal-pH sensitivity that displayed the same direction of changes in mood disorder. Genes from these categories such as NR4A1 and HSPA2 were confirmed with Q-PCR. The interpretation of postmortem brain studies involving broad mitochondrial gene expression and related pathway alterations must be monitored against the strong effect of agonal-pH state. Genes with the least sensitivity to agonal-pH could present a starting point for candidate gene search in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:16636682

  10. Mitochondrial-related gene expression changes are sensitive to agonal-pH state: implications for brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Vawter, M P; Tomita, H; Meng, F; Bolstad, B; Li, J; Evans, S; Choudary, P; Atz, M; Shao, L; Neal, C; Walsh, D M; Burmeister, M; Speed, T; Myers, R; Jones, E G; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial defects in gene expression have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We have now contrasted control brains with low pH versus high pH and showed that 28% of genes in mitochondrial-related pathways meet criteria for differential expression. A majority of genes in the mitochondrial, chaperone and proteasome pathways of nuclear DNA-encoded gene expression were decreased with decreased brain pH, whereas a majority of genes in the apoptotic and reactive oxygen stress pathways showed an increased gene expression with a decreased brain pH. There was a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial DNA gene expression with increased agonal duration. To minimize effects of agonal-pH state on mood disorder comparisons, two classic approaches were used, removing all subjects with low pH and agonal factors from analysis, or grouping low and high pH as a separate variable. Three groups of potential candidate genes emerged that may be mood disorder related: (a) genes that showed no sensitivity to pH but were differentially expressed in bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder; (b) genes that were altered by agonal-pH in one direction but altered in mood disorder in the opposite direction to agonal-pH and (c) genes with agonal-pH sensitivity that displayed the same direction of changes in mood disorder. Genes from these categories such as NR4A1 and HSPA2 were confirmed with Q-PCR. The interpretation of postmortem brain studies involving broad mitochondrial gene expression and related pathway alterations must be monitored against the strong effect of agonal-pH state. Genes with the least sensitivity to agonal-pH could present a starting point for candidate gene search in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:16636682

  11. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of a mitochondrial gene sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvolo, M.; Disotell, T.R.; Allard, M.W. ); Brown, W.M. ); Honeycutt, R.L. )

    1991-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene have been determined for five primate species, siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus), crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), and green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops), and compared with published sequences of other primate and nonprimate species. Comparisons of cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences provide clear-cut evidence from the mitochondrial genome for the separation of the African ape trichotomy into two evolutionary lineages, one leading to gorillas and the other to humans and chimpanzees. Several different tree-building methods support this same phylogenetic tree topology. The comparisons also yield trees in which a substantial length separates the divergence point of gorillas from that of humans and chimpanzees, suggesting that the lineage most immediately ancestral to humans and chimpanzees may have been in existence for a relatively long time.

  12. Multiple Conserved Heteroplasmic Sites in tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Badawi, Myriam; Moumen, Bouziane; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial genome structure and organization are relatively conserved among metazoans. However, in many isopods, especially the terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the mitochondrial genome consists of both ∼14-kb linear monomers and ∼28-kb circular dimers. This unusual organization is associated with an ancient and conserved constitutive heteroplasmic site. This heteroplasmy affects the anticodon of a tRNA gene, allowing this single locus to function as a "dual" tRNA gene for two different amino acids. Here, we further explore the evolution of these unusual mitochondrial genomes by assembling complete mitochondrial sequences for two additional Oniscidean species, Trachelipus rathkei and Cylisticus convexus. Strikingly, we find evidence of two additional heteroplasmic sites that also alter tRNA anticodons, creating additional dual tRNA genes, and that are conserved across both species. These results suggest that the unique linear/circular organization of isopods' mitochondrial genomes may facilitate the evolution of stable mitochondrial heteroplasmies, and, conversely, once such heteroplasmies have evolved, they constrain the multimeric structure of the mitochondrial genome in these species. Finally, we outline some possible future research directions to identify the factors influencing mitochondrial genome evolution in this group. PMID:25911226

  13. Multiple Conserved Heteroplasmic Sites in tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Badawi, Myriam; Moumen, Bouziane; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome structure and organization are relatively conserved among metazoans. However, in many isopods, especially the terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the mitochondrial genome consists of both ∼14-kb linear monomers and ∼28-kb circular dimers. This unusual organization is associated with an ancient and conserved constitutive heteroplasmic site. This heteroplasmy affects the anticodon of a tRNA gene, allowing this single locus to function as a “dual” tRNA gene for two different amino acids. Here, we further explore the evolution of these unusual mitochondrial genomes by assembling complete mitochondrial sequences for two additional Oniscidean species, Trachelipus rathkei and Cylisticus convexus. Strikingly, we find evidence of two additional heteroplasmic sites that also alter tRNA anticodons, creating additional dual tRNA genes, and that are conserved across both species. These results suggest that the unique linear/circular organization of isopods’ mitochondrial genomes may facilitate the evolution of stable mitochondrial heteroplasmies, and, conversely, once such heteroplasmies have evolved, they constrain the multimeric structure of the mitochondrial genome in these species. Finally, we outline some possible future research directions to identify the factors influencing mitochondrial genome evolution in this group. PMID:25911226

  14. MitoNuc: a database of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. Update 2002.

    PubMed

    Attimonelli, Marcella; Catalano, Domenico; Gissi, Carmela; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Santamaria, Monica; Pesole, Graziano; Saccone, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria, besides their central role in energy metabolism, have recently been found to be involved in a number of basic processes of cell life and to contribute to the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. All functions of mitochondria depend on the interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes. Mitochondrial genomes have been extensively sequenced and analysed and data have been collected in several specialised databases. In order to collect information on nuclear coded mitochondrial proteins we developed MitoNuc, a database containing detailed information on sequenced nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in Metazoa. The MitoNuc database can be retrieved through SRS and is available via the web site http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/mitochondriome where other mitochondrial databases developed by our group, the complete list of the sequenced mitochondrial genomes, links to other mitochondrial sites and related information, are available. The MitoAln database, related to MitoNuc in the previous release, reporting the multiple alignments of the relevant homologous protein coding regions, is no longer supported in the present release. In order to keep the links among entries in MitoNuc from homologous proteins, a new field in the database has been defined: the cluster identifier, an alpha numeric code used to identify each cluster of homologous proteins. A comment field derived from the corresponding SWISS-PROT entry has been introduced; this reports clinical data related to dysfunction of the protein. The logic scheme of MitoNuc database has been implemented in the ORACLE DBMS. This will allow the end-users to retrieve data through a friendly interface that will be soon implemented. PMID:11752284

  15. MitoNuc: a database of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. Update 2002

    PubMed Central

    Attimonelli, Marcella; Catalano, Domenico; Gissi, Carmela; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Santamaria, Monica; Pesole, Graziano; Saccone, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria, besides their central role in energy metabolism, have recently been found to be involved in a number of basic processes of cell life and to contribute to the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. All functions of mitochondria depend on the interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes. Mitochondrial genomes have been extensively sequenced and analysed and data have been collected in several specialised databases. In order to collect information on nuclear coded mitochondrial proteins we developed MitoNuc, a database containing detailed information on sequenced nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in Metazoa. The MitoNuc database can be retrieved through SRS and is available via the web site http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/mitochondriome where other mitochondrial databases developed by our group, the complete list of the sequenced mitochondrial genomes, links to other mitochondrial sites and related information, are available. The MitoAln database, related to MitoNuc in the previous release, reporting the multiple alignments of the relevant homologous protein coding regions, is no longer supported in the present release. In order to keep the links among entries in MitoNuc from homologous proteins, a new field in the database has been defined: the cluster identifier, an alpha numeric code used to identify each cluster of homologous proteins. A comment field derived from the corresponding SWISS-PROT entry has been introduced; this reports clinical data related to dysfunction of the protein. The logic scheme of MitoNuc database has been implemented in the ORACLE DBMS. This will allow the end-users to retrieve data through a friendly interface that will be soon implemented. PMID:11752284

  16. Timing major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in species relationships of Polygonia butterflies (Nymphalidae: Nymphalini)

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Weingartner, Elisabet; Warren, Andrew D; Nylin, Sören

    2009-01-01

    Background Major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in estimating species relationships is an increasingly common finding in animals. Usually this is attributed to incomplete lineage sorting, but recently the possibility has been raised that hybridization is important in generating such phylogenetic patterns. Just how widespread ancient and/or recent hybridization is in animals and how it affects estimates of species relationships is still not well-known. Results We investigate the species relationships and their evolutionary history over time in the genus Polygonia using DNA sequences from two mitochondrial gene regions (COI and ND1, total 1931 bp) and four nuclear gene regions (EF-1α, wingless, GAPDH and RpS5, total 2948 bp). We found clear, strongly supported conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences in estimating species relationships in the genus Polygonia. Nodes at which there was no conflict tended to have diverged at the same time when analyzed separately, while nodes at which conflict was present diverged at different times. We find that two species create most of the conflict, and attribute the conflict found in Polygonia satyrus to ancient hybridization and conflict found in Polygonia oreas to recent or ongoing hybridization. In both examples, the nuclear gene regions tended to give the phylogenetic relationships of the species supported by morphology and biology. Conclusion Studies inferring species-level relationships using molecular data should never be based on a single locus. Here we show that the phylogenetic hypothesis generated using mitochondrial DNA gives a very different interpretation of the evolutionary history of Polygonia species compared to that generated from nuclear DNA. We show that possible cases of hybridization in Polygonia are not limited to sister species, but may be inferred further back in time. Furthermore, we provide more evidence that Haldane's effect might not be as strong a process in

  17. A FastA based compilation of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sagliano, A; Volpicella, M; Gallerani, R; Ceci, L R

    1998-01-01

    A new version of the compilation of higher plant mitochondrial tRNA genes (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/service ) has been obtained by means of the FastA program for similarity searching in nucleotide sequence Databases. This approach improves the previous collection, which was based on literature data analysis. The current compilation contains 158 sequences with an increase of 43 units. In this paper, some interesting features of the new entries are briefly presented. PMID:9399821

  18. BBS10 encodes a vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein and is a major BBS locus.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Muller, Jean; Rix, Suzanne; Badano, José L; Leitch, Carmen C; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Corbani, Sandra; Jalk, Nadine; Vicaire, Serge; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; Lacombe, Didier; Holder, Muriel; Odent, Sylvie; Holder, Susan; Brooks, Alice S; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Silva, Eduardo D; Da Silva, Eduardo; Rossillion, Béatrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Leheup, Bruno; Verloes, Alain; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Mégarbané, André; Poch, Olivier; Bonneau, Dominique; Beales, Philip L; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Katsanis, Nicholas; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-05-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Although nine BBS genes have been cloned, they explain only 40-50% of the total mutational load. Here we report a major new BBS locus, BBS10, that encodes a previously unknown, rapidly evolving vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein. We found BBS10 to be mutated in about 20% of an unselected cohort of families of various ethnic origins, including some families with mutations in other BBS genes, consistent with oligogenic inheritance. In zebrafish, mild suppression of bbs10 exacerbated the phenotypes of other bbs morphants. PMID:16582908

  19. High throughput gene complementation screening permits identification of a mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis (ρ(-)) mutant.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Prasanth; Procaccio, Vincent; Scheffler, Immo E; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    To identify nuclear DNA (nDNA) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) gene mutations using cultured cells, we have developed a complementation system based on retroviral transduction with a full length cDNA expression library and selection for OXHOS function by growth in galactose. We have used this system to transduce the Chinese hamster V79-G7 OXPHOS mutant cell line with a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The complemented cells were found to have acquired the cDNA for the bS6m polypeptide of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. bS6m is a 14 kDa polypeptide located on the outside of the mitochondrial 28S ribosomal subunit and interacts with the rRNA. The V79-G7 mutant protein was found to harbor a methionine to threonine missense mutation at codon 13. The hamster bS6m null mutant could also be complemented by its orthologs from either mouse or human. bS6m protein tagged at its C-terminus by HA, His or GFP localized to the mitochondrion and was fully functional. Through site-directed mutagenesis we identified the probable RNA interacting residues of the bS6m peptide and tested the functional significance of mammalian specific C-terminal region. The N-terminus of the bS6m polypeptide functionally corresponds to that of the prokaryotic small ribosomal subunit, but deletion of C-terminal residues along with the zinc ion coordinating cysteine had no functional effect. Since mitochondrial diseases can result from hundreds to thousands of different nDNA gene mutations, this one step viral complementation cloning may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of a range of nDNA mitochondrial disease mutations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26946086

  20. A putative mitochondrial fission gene from the ectomycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii Vittad.: cloning, characterisation and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Guidi, C; Zeppa, S; Barbieri, E; Zambonelli, A; Polidori, E; Potenza, L; Stocchi, V

    2003-11-01

    Mitochondrial binary division is a complex process occurring in multiple steps, mediated by several proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a mitochondrial membrane protein, Fis1p, is required for the proper assembly of the mitochondrial division apparatus. In this study, we report the cloning, characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of Tbfis1, a gene from the ectomycorrhizal ascomycetous truffle Tuber borchii, encoding for an orthologue of S. cerevisiae Fis1p. The Tbfis1 coding region consists of a 468-nucleotide open reading frame interrupted by four introns, which encodes for a polypeptide of 155 amino acids, having a predicted transmembrane domain structure typical of the Fis1p Family. Southern blot analysis revealed that Tbfis1 is a single-copy gene in the T. borchii genome. Tbfis1 is highly expressed during the first stages of T. borchii fruit body ripening, while its expression decreases during T. borchii mycelium ageing. Also, Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed Tbfis1 expression in the symbiotic phase of the fungus life cycle. Phylogenetic analysis allowed the identification of Tbfis1 orthologues in filamentous fungi, yeasts, plants, worms, flies and mammals, indicating that the function of the protein coded by this gene has been conserved during evolution. PMID:12910371

  1. Nuclear gene mutations as the cause of mitochondrial complex III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Complex III (CIII) deficiency is one of the least common oxidative phosphorylation defects associated to mitochondrial disease. CIII constitutes the center of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, as well as a crossroad for several other metabolic pathways. For more than 10 years, of all the potential candidate genes encoding structural subunits and assembly factors, only three were known to be associated to CIII defects in human pathology. Thus, leaving many of these cases unresolved. These first identified genes were MT-CYB, the only CIII subunit encoded in the mitochondrial DNA; BCS1L, encoding an assembly factor, and UQCRB, a nuclear-encoded structural subunit. Nowadays, thanks to the fast progress that has taken place in the last 3–4 years, pathological changes in seven more genes are known to be associated to these conditions. This review will focus on the strategies that have permitted the latest discovery of mutations in factors that are necessary for a correct CIII assembly and activity, in relation with their function. In addition, new data further establishing the molecular role of LYRM7/MZM1L as a chaperone involved in CIII biogenesis are provided. PMID:25914718

  2. Mitochondrial genomes of praying mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment of tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Lan, Xu-E; Zhu, Wen-Bo; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) contain a conserved set of 37 genes for an extensive diversity of lineages. Previously reported dictyopteran mitogenomes share this conserved mitochondrial gene arrangement, although surprisingly little is known about the mitogenome of Mantodea. We sequenced eight mantodean mitogenomes including the first representatives of two families: Hymenopodidae and Liturgusidae. Only two of these genomes retain the typical insect gene arrangement. In three Liturgusidae species, the trnM genes have translocated. Four species of mantis (Creobroter gemmata, Mantis religiosa, Statilia sp., and Theopompa sp.-HN) have multiple identical tandem duplication of trnR, and Statilia sp. additionally includes five extra duplicate trnW. These extra trnR and trnW in Statilia sp. are erratically arranged and form another novel gene order. Interestingly, the extra trnW is converted from trnR by the process of point mutation at anticodon, which is the first case of tRNA reassignment for an insect. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed amongst mantodean mitogenomes with variable copies of tRNA according to comparative analysis of codon usage. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the characteristics of tRNA only possess limited phylogenetic information in this research. Nevertheless, these features of gene rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment provide valuable information toward understanding mitogenome evolution in insects. PMID:27157299

  3. Mitochondrial genomes of praying mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment of tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Lan, Xu-e; Zhu, Wen-bo; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) contain a conserved set of 37 genes for an extensive diversity of lineages. Previously reported dictyopteran mitogenomes share this conserved mitochondrial gene arrangement, although surprisingly little is known about the mitogenome of Mantodea. We sequenced eight mantodean mitogenomes including the first representatives of two families: Hymenopodidae and Liturgusidae. Only two of these genomes retain the typical insect gene arrangement. In three Liturgusidae species, the trnM genes have translocated. Four species of mantis (Creobroter gemmata, Mantis religiosa, Statilia sp., and Theopompa sp.-HN) have multiple identical tandem duplication of trnR, and Statilia sp. additionally includes five extra duplicate trnW. These extra trnR and trnW in Statilia sp. are erratically arranged and form another novel gene order. Interestingly, the extra trnW is converted from trnR by the process of point mutation at anticodon, which is the first case of tRNA reassignment for an insect. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed amongst mantodean mitogenomes with variable copies of tRNA according to comparative analysis of codon usage. Combined with phylogenetic analysis, the characteristics of tRNA only possess limited phylogenetic information in this research. Nevertheless, these features of gene rearrangement, duplication, and reassignment provide valuable information toward understanding mitogenome evolution in insects. PMID:27157299

  4. Octocoral Mitochondrial Genomes Provide Insights into the Phylogenetic History of Gene Order Rearrangements, Order Reversals, and Cnidarian Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Diego F.; Baco, Amy R.

    2015-01-01

    We use full mitochondrial genomes to test the robustness of the phylogeny of the Octocorallia, to determine the evolutionary pathway for the five known mitochondrial gene rearrangements in octocorals, and to test the suitability of using mitochondrial genomes for higher taxonomic-level phylogenetic reconstructions. Our phylogeny supports three major divisions within the Octocorallia and show that Paragorgiidae is paraphyletic, with Sibogagorgia forming a sister branch to the Coralliidae. Furthermore, Sibogagorgia cauliflora has what is presumed to be the ancestral gene order in octocorals, but the presence of a pair of inverted repeat sequences suggest that this gene order was not conserved but rather evolved back to this apparent ancestral state. Based on this we recommend the resurrection of the family Sibogagorgiidae to fix the paraphyly of the Paragorgiidae. This is the first study to show that in the Octocorallia, mitochondrial gene orders have evolved back to an ancestral state after going through a gene rearrangement, with at least one of the gene orders evolving independently in different lineages. A number of studies have used gene boundaries to determine the type of mitochondrial gene arrangement present. However, our findings suggest that this method known as gene junction screening may miss evolutionary reversals. Additionally, substitution saturation analysis demonstrates that while whole mitochondrial genomes can be used effectively for phylogenetic analyses within Octocorallia, their utility at higher taxonomic levels within Cnidaria is inadequate. Therefore for phylogenetic reconstruction at taxonomic levels higher than subclass within the Cnidaria, nuclear genes will be required, even when whole mitochondrial genomes are available. PMID:25539723

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart): a novel gene arrangement among arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Vanholme, Bartel; Tirry, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background The apparent scarcity of available sequence data has greatly impeded evolutionary studies in Acari (mites and ticks). This subclass encompasses over 48,000 species and forms the largest group within the Arachnida. Although mitochondrial genomes are widely utilised for phylogenetic and population genetic studies, only 20 mitochondrial genomes of Acari have been determined, of which only one belongs to the diverse order of the Sarcoptiformes. In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the European house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, the most important member of this largely neglected group. Results The mitochondrial genome of D. pteronyssinus is a circular DNA molecule of 14,203 bp. It contains the complete set of 37 genes (13 protein coding genes, 2 rRNA genes and 22 tRNA genes), usually present in metazoan mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial gene order differs considerably from that of other Acari mitochondrial genomes. Compared to the mitochondrial genome of Limulus polyphemus, considered as the ancestral arthropod pattern, only 11 of the 38 gene boundaries are conserved. The majority strand has a 72.6% AT-content but a GC-skew of 0.194. This skew is the reverse of that normally observed for typical animal mitochondrial genomes. A microsatellite was detected in a large non-coding region (286 bp), which probably functions as the control region. Almost all tRNA genes lack a T-arm, provoking the formation of canonical cloverleaf tRNA-structures, and both rRNA genes are considerably reduced in size. Finally, the genomic sequence was used to perform a phylogenetic study. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analysis clustered D. pteronyssinus with Steganacarus magnus, forming a sistergroup of the Trombidiformes. Conclusion Although the mitochondrial genome of D. pteronyssinus shares different features with previously characterised Acari mitochondrial genomes, it is unique in many ways. Gene order is extremely rearranged

  6. Versatile platform for nanotechnology based on circular permutations of chaperonin protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor); Chan, Suzanne L. (Inventor); Li, Yi-Fen (Inventor); McMillan, R. Andrew (Inventor); Kagawa, Hiromi (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides chaperonin polypeptides which are modified to include N-terminal and C-terminal ends that are relocated from the central pore region to various different positions in the polypeptide which are located on the exterior of the folded modified chaperonin polypeptide. In the modified chaperonin polypeptide, the naturally-occurring N-terminal and C-terminal ends are joined together directly or with an intervening linker peptide sequence. The relocated N-terminal or C-terminal ends can be covalently joined to, or bound with another molecule such as a nucleic acid molecule, a lipid, a carbohydrate, a second polypeptide, or a nanoparticle. The modified chaperonin polypeptides can assemble into double-ringed chaperonin structures. Further, the chaperonin structures can organize into higher order structures such as nanofilaments or nanoarrays which can be used to produce nanodevices and nanocoatings.

  7. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU).

    PubMed

    Chemello, Francesco; Mammucari, Cristina; Gherardi, Gaia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Cagnin, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca(2 +) uptake. Cytosolic Ca(2 +) transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca(2 +) regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca(2 +) transients elicit large increases in the [Ca(2 +)] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca(2 +)]mt). Mitochondrial Ca(2 +) uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2 +) uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2 +) uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection). Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) (GSE60931). PMID:26484227

  8. The role of SIGMAR1 gene mutation and mitochondrial dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kohji; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Tagashira, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients exhibit diverse pathologies such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neurons. Five to ten percent of patients have familial ALS, a form of the disease caused by mutations in ALS-related genes, while sporadic forms of the disease occur in 90-95% of patients. Recently, it was reported that familial ALS patients exhibit a missense mutation in SIGMAR1 (c.304G > C), which encodes sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), substituting glutamine for glutamic acid at amino acid residue 102 (p.E102Q). Expression of that mutant Sig-1R(E102Q) protein reduces mitochondrial ATP production, inhibits proteasome activity and causes mitochondrial injury, aggravating ER stress-induced neuronal death in neuro2A cells. In this issue, we discuss mechanisms underlying mitochondrial impairment seen in ALS motor neurons and propose that therapies that protect mitochondria might improve the quality of life (QOL) of ALS patients and should be considered for clinical trials. PMID:25704016

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels. PMID:19048493

  10. Mitochondrial Myopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Sideroblastic Anemia (MLASA) Plus Associated with a novel De Novo Mutation (m.8969G>A) in the Mitochondrial Encoded ATP6 gene

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Tang, Sha; Wang, Jing; Donti, Taraka R.; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Luchak, J. Michael; Chen, Li-Chieh; Schmitt, Eric S.; Niu, Zhiyv; Erana, Rodrigo; Hunter, Jill V.; Graham, Brett H.; Wong, Lee-Jun; Scaglia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is a rare mitochondrial disorder that has previously been associated with mutations in PUS1 and YARS2. In the present report, we describe a 6 year old male with an MLASA plus phenotype. This patient had features of MLASA in the setting of developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, agenesis of the corpus callosum, failure to thrive, and stroke-like episodes. Sequencing of the mitochondrial genome identified a novel de novo, heteroplasmic mutation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoded ATP6 gene (m.8969G>A, p.S148N). Whole exome sequencing did not identify mutations or variants in PUS1 or YARS2 or any known nuclear genes that could affect mitochondrial function and explain this phenotype. Studies of fibroblasts derived from the patient revealed a decrease in oligomycin-sensitive respiration, a finding which is consistent with a complex V defect. Thus, this mutation in MT-ATP6 may represent the first mtDNA point mutation associated with the MLASA phenotype. PMID:25037980

  11. Independent replication of mitochondrial genes supports the transcriptional program in developing fiber cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Song, Xianliang; Naoumkina, Marina; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fang, David D

    2014-07-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants exist both as a "master circle" chromosome and as numerous subgenomic sublimons that are generated by intramolecular recombination. Differential stability or replication of these sublimons allows individual mitochondrial gene copy numbers to vary independently between different cell types and developmental stages. Our objective was to determine the relationship between mitochondrial gene copy number and transcript abundance in the elongating fiber cells of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). We compared RNA and DNA from cotton fiber cells at five developmental time points from early elongation through secondary cell wall thickening from the Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) short fiber mutant and its wild type near isogenic line (NIL) DP5690. Mitochondrial gene copy number decreased from 3 to 8-DPA in the developing cotton fiber cells while transcript levels remained low. As secondary cell wall biosynthesis began in developing fibers, the expression levels and copy numbers of mitochondrial genes involved in energy production and respiration were up-regulated in wild type cotton DP5690. However, the short fiber mutant Li2, failed to increase expression of these genes, which include three subunits of ATP synthase, atp1, atp8 and atp9 and two cytochrome genes cox1 and cob. At the same time, Li2 failed to increase the copy numbers of these highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, we found that when mitochondrial genes were highly transcribed, they also had very high copy numbers. This observation suggests that in developing cotton fibers, increased mitochondrial sublimon replication may support increases in gene transcription. PMID:24768176

  12. DNA sequence of the Xenopus laevis mitochondrial heavy and light strand replication origins and flanking tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J F; Ma, D P; Wilson, R K; Roe, B A

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the primary structure of the two regions of the Xenopus laevis mitochondrial genome which encompass the origins of heavy (H) and light (L) strand replication. The first segment, which consists of 2398 nucleotides, contains the displacement loop (D-loop), the tRNA genes for threonine, proline and phenylalanine, the origin of H-strand replication, and the promoters of H- and L-strand transcription. The second segment, which consists of 447 nucleotides, contains the L-strand replication origin flanked by the tRNA genes for tryptophan, alanine, asparagine, cysteine, and tyrosine. A comparison of the sequences of the Xenopus laevis mitochondrial L-strand replication origin region and the eight tRNA genes with their counterparts from the mammalian mitochondrial genomes reveals that these regions are quite homologous, while its D-loop region shows only slight homology with those of the mammalian mitochondrial genomes. PMID:6308566

  13. Mutations in Nuclear Gene Cyt-4 of Neurospora Crassa Result in Pleiotropic Defects in Processing and Splicing of Mitochondrial Rnas

    PubMed Central

    Dobinson, K. F.; Henderson, M.; Kelley, R. L.; Collins, R. A.; Lambowitz, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear cyt-4 mutants of Neurospora crassa have been shown previously to be defective in splicing the group I intron in the mitochondrial large rRNA gene and in 3' end synthesis of the mitochondrial large rRNA. Here, Northern hybridization experiments show that the cyt-4-1 mutant has alterations in a number of mitochondrial RNA processing pathways, including those for cob, coI, coII and ATPase 6 mRNAs, as well as mitochondrial tRNAs. Defects in these pathways include inhibition of 5' and 3' end processing, accumulation of aberrant RNA species, and inhibition of splicing of both group I introns in the cob gene. The various defects in mitochondrial RNA synthesis in the cyt-4-1 mutant cannot be accounted for by deficiency of mitochondrial protein synthesis or energy metabolism, and they suggest that the cyt-4-1 mutant is defective in a component or components required for processing and/or turnover of a number of different mitochondrial RNAs. Defective splicing of the mitochondrial large rRNA intron in the cyt-4-1 mutant may be a secondary effect of failure to synthesize pre-rRNAs having the correct 3' end. However, a similar explanation cannot be invoked to account for defective splicing of the cob pre-mRNA introns, and the cyt-4-1 mutation may directly affect splicing of these introns. PMID:2478417

  14. Gene Expression Profiling Specifies Chemokine, Mitochondrial and Lipid Metabolism Signatures in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Luana Tatiana Albuquerque; Robottom-Ferreira, Anna Beatriz; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Toledo-Pinto, Thiago Gomes; Rosa Brito, Tiana; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Sandoval, Felipe Galvan; Jardim, Márcia Rodrigues; Antunes, Sérgio Gomes; Shannon, Edward J.; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Williams, Diana Lynn; Moraes, Milton Ozório

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we performed microarray experiments in Schwann cells infected with live M. leprae and identified novel differentially expressed genes (DEG) in M. leprae infected cells. Also, we selected candidate genes associated or implicated with leprosy in genetic studies and biological experiments. Forty-seven genes were selected for validation in two independent types of samples by multiplex qPCR. First, an in vitro model using THP-1 cells was infected with live Mycobacterium leprae and M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). In a second situation, mRNA obtained from nerve biopsies from patients with leprosy or other peripheral neuropathies was tested. We detected DEGs that discriminate M. bovis BCG from M. leprae infection. Specific signatures of susceptible responses after M. leprae infection when compared to BCG lead to repression of genes, including CCL2, CCL3, IL8 and SOD2. The same 47-gene set was screened in nerve biopsies, which corroborated the down-regulation of CCL2 and CCL3 in leprosy, but also evidenced the down-regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, and the up-regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and ubiquitination. Finally, a gene expression signature from DEG was identified in patients confirmed of having leprosy. A classification tree was able to ascertain 80% of the cases as leprosy or non-leprous peripheral neuropathy based on the expression of only LDLR and CCL4. A general immune and mitochondrial hypo-responsive state occurs in response to M. leprae infection. Also, the most important genes and pathways have been highlighted providing new tools for early diagnosis and treatment of leprosy. PMID:23798993

  15. Population-level expression variability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Mandhan, Ishita; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondria contain multiple copies of a circular genome made up of double-stranded DNA (mtDNA) that encodes proteins involved in cellular respiration. Transcript abundance of mtDNA-encoded genes varies between human individuals, yet the level of variation in the general population has not been systematically assessed. In the present study, we revisited large-scale RNA sequencing data generated from lymphoblastoid cell lines of HapMap samples of European and African ancestry to estimate transcript abundance and quantify expression variation for mtDNA-encoded genes. In both populations, we detected up to over 100-fold difference in mtDNA gene expression between individuals. The marked variation was not due to differences in mtDNA copy number between individuals, but was shaped by the transcription of hundreds of nuclear genes. Many of these nuclear genes were co-expressed with one another, resulting in a module-enriched co-expression network. Significant correlations in expression between genes of the mtDNA and nuclear genomes were used to identify factors involved with the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In conclusion, we determined the baseline amount of variability in mtDNA gene expression in general human populations and cataloged a complete set of nuclear genes whose expression levels are correlated with those of mtDNA-encoded genes. Our findings will enable the integration of information from both mtDNA and nuclear genetic systems, and facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial functions. PMID:24398800

  16. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome and Novel Gene Arrangement of the Unique-Headed Bug Stenopirates sp. (Hemiptera: Enicocephalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hu; Liu, Hui; Shi, Aimin; Štys, Pavel; Zhou, Xuguo; Cai, Wanzhi

    2012-01-01

    Many of true bugs are important insect pests to cultivated crops and some are important vectors of human diseases, but few cladistic analyses have addressed relationships among the seven infraorders of Heteroptera. The Enicocephalomorpha and Nepomorpha are consider the basal groups of Heteroptera, but the basal-most lineage remains unresolved. Here we report the mitochondrial genome of the unique-headed bug Stenopirates sp., the first mitochondrial genome sequenced from Enicocephalomorpha. The Stenopirates sp. mitochondrial genome is a typical circular DNA molecule of 15, 384 bp in length, and contains 37 genes and a large non-coding fragment. The gene order differs substantially from other known insect mitochondrial genomes, with rearrangements of both tRNA genes and protein-coding genes. The overall AT content (82.5%) of Stenopirates sp. is the highest among all the known heteropteran mitochondrial genomes. The strand bias is consistent with other true bugs with negative GC-skew and positive AT-skew for the J-strand. The heteropteran mitochondrial atp8 exhibits the highest evolutionary rate, whereas cox1 appears to have the lowest rate. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed between the variation of nucleotide substitutions and the GC content of each protein-coding gene. A microsatellite was identified in the putative control region. Finally, phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that Enicocephalomorpha is the sister group to all the remaining Heteroptera. PMID:22235294

  17. PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat) proteins in mammals: important aids to mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2008-11-15

    Genes encoding PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat)-containing proteins constitute one of the largest gene families in plants. The majority of these proteins are predicted to target organelles and to bind to RNA. Strikingly, there is a dearth of these proteins in mammals, although genomic searches reveal six candidates, all of which are also predicted to target the mitochondrion. Two of these proteins, POLRMT (the mitochondrial RNA polymerase) and MRPS27, a mitoribosomal protein, are involved in transcription and translation respectively. PTCD1 (pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1) and PTCD3 are predicted to be involved in the assembly of respiratory chain complexes, whereas mutations in one other protein, LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette), have been shown to cause defects in the levels of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal member of the respiratory chain. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Xu et al. turn their attention to the remaining candidate, PTCD2. Depletion in a mouse model led to deficiencies of the third complex of the respiratory chain that caused profound ultrastructural changes in the heart. The exact molecular function of PTCD2 remains unclear, but depletion leads to an apparent lack of processing of the mitochondrial transcript encoding apocytochrome b, a critical member of complex III. These data are consistent with PTCD2 playing an important role in the post-transcriptional expression of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:18939947

  18. Genetic Differentiation of the Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase c Subunit I Gene in Genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Gentekaki, Eleni; Yi, Zhenzhen; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. Methodology/Principal findings We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. Conclusions Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp. PMID:24204730

  19. Interactive Effects of Dietary Lipid and Phenotypic Feed Efficiency on the Expression of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Involved in the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Eya, Jonathan C.; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O.; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish. PMID:25853266

  20. Stress and corticosteroids regulate rat hippocampal mitochondrial DNA gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Richard G; Seligsohn, Ma'ayan; Rubin, Todd G; Griffiths, Brian B; Ozdemir, Yildirim; Pfaff, Donald W; Datson, Nicole A; McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in stress and circadian regulation, and produce many actions via the GC receptor (GR), which is classically understood to function as a nuclear transcription factor. However, the nuclear genome is not the only genome in eukaryotic cells. The mitochondria also contain a small circular genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that encodes 13 polypeptides. Recent work has established that, in the brain and other systems, the GR is translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that stress and corticosteroids have a direct influence on mtDNA transcription and mitochondrial physiology. To determine if stress affects mitochondrially transcribed mRNA (mtRNA) expression, we exposed adult male rats to both acute and chronic immobilization stress and examined mtRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. We found that acute stress had a main effect on mtRNA expression and that expression of NADH dehydrogenase 1, 3, and 6 (ND-1, ND-3, ND-6) and ATP synthase 6 (ATP-6) genes was significantly down-regulated. Chronic stress induced a significant up-regulation of ND-6 expression. Adrenalectomy abolished acute stress-induced mtRNA regulation, demonstrating GC dependence. ChIP sequencing of GR showed that corticosterone treatment induced a dose-dependent association of the GR with the control region of the mitochondrial genome. These findings demonstrate GR and stress-dependent transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial genome in vivo and are consistent with previous work linking stress and GCs with changes in the function of brain mitochondria. PMID:27457949

  1. Association of Genes, Pathways, and Haplogroups of the Mitochondrial Genome with the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqing; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Caberto, Christian; Kazma, Remi; Lum-Jones, Annette; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loïc Le; Stram, Daniel O.; Saxena, Richa; Cheng, Iona

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes for the synthesis of 13 proteins that are essential for the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Inherited variation in mitochondrial genes may influence cancer development through changes in mitochondrial proteins, altering the OXPHOS process, and promoting the production of reactive oxidative species. To investigate the role of the OXPHOS pathway and mitochondrial genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, we tested 185 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs), located in 13 genes that comprise four complexes of the OXPHOS pathway and mtSNP groupings for rRNA and tRNA, in 2,453 colorectal cancer cases and 11,930 controls from the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Using the sequence kernel association test, we examined the collective set of 185 mtSNPs, as well as subsets of mtSNPs grouped by mitochondrial pathways, complexes, and genes, adjusting for age, sex, principal components of global ancestry, and self-reported maternal race/ethnicity. We also tested for haplogroup associations using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for the same covariates. Stratified analyses were conducted by self-reported maternal race/ethnicity. In European Americans, a global test of all genetic variants of the mitochondrial genome identified an association with CRC risk (P = 0.04). In mtSNP-subset analysis, the NADH dehydrogenase 2 (MT-ND2) gene in Complex I was associated with CRC risk at a P-value of 0.001 (q = 0.015). In addition, haplogroup T was associated with CRC risk (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.19–2.33, P = 0.003). No significant mitochondrial pathway and gene associations were observed in the remaining four racial/ethnic groups—African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians. In summary, our findings suggest that variations in the mitochondrial genome and particularly in the MT-ND2 gene may play a role in CRC risk among European Americans, but not in other maternal racial/ethnic groups. Further replication is warranted and future

  2. Association of Genes, Pathways, and Haplogroups of the Mitochondrial Genome with the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: The Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqing; Beckman, Kenneth B; Caberto, Christian; Kazma, Remi; Lum-Jones, Annette; Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Stram, Daniel O; Saxena, Richa; Cheng, Iona

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes for the synthesis of 13 proteins that are essential for the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Inherited variation in mitochondrial genes may influence cancer development through changes in mitochondrial proteins, altering the OXPHOS process, and promoting the production of reactive oxidative species. To investigate the role of the OXPHOS pathway and mitochondrial genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, we tested 185 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs), located in 13 genes that comprise four complexes of the OXPHOS pathway and mtSNP groupings for rRNA and tRNA, in 2,453 colorectal cancer cases and 11,930 controls from the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Using the sequence kernel association test, we examined the collective set of 185 mtSNPs, as well as subsets of mtSNPs grouped by mitochondrial pathways, complexes, and genes, adjusting for age, sex, principal components of global ancestry, and self-reported maternal race/ethnicity. We also tested for haplogroup associations using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for the same covariates. Stratified analyses were conducted by self-reported maternal race/ethnicity. In European Americans, a global test of all genetic variants of the mitochondrial genome identified an association with CRC risk (P = 0.04). In mtSNP-subset analysis, the NADH dehydrogenase 2 (MT-ND2) gene in Complex I was associated with CRC risk at a P-value of 0.001 (q = 0.015). In addition, haplogroup T was associated with CRC risk (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.19-2.33, P = 0.003). No significant mitochondrial pathway and gene associations were observed in the remaining four racial/ethnic groups--African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians. In summary, our findings suggest that variations in the mitochondrial genome and particularly in the MT-ND2 gene may play a role in CRC risk among European Americans, but not in other maternal racial/ethnic groups. Further replication is warranted and future studies

  3. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  4. MIDAS/GPP34, a nuclear gene product, regulates total mitochondrial mass in response to mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nakashima-Kamimura, Naomi; Asoh, Sadamitsu; Ishibashi, Yoshitomo; Mukai, Yuri; Shidara, Yujiro; Oda, Hideaki; Munakata, Kae; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2005-11-15

    To investigate the regulatory system in mitochondrial biogenesis involving crosstalk between the mitochondria and nucleus, we found a factor named MIDAS (mitochondrial DNA absence sensitive factor) whose expression was enhanced by the absence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In patients with mitochondrial diseases, MIDAS expression was increased only in dysfunctional muscle fibers. A majority of MIDAS localized to mitochondria with a small fraction in the Golgi apparatus in HeLa cells. To investigate the function of MIDAS, we stably transfected HeLa cells with an expression vector carrying MIDAS cDNA or siRNA. Cells expressing the MIDAS protein and the siRNA constitutively showed an increase and decrease in the total mass of mitochondria, respectively, accompanying the regulation of a mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin. In contrast, amounts of the mitochondrial DNA, RNA and proteins did not depend upon MIDAS. Thus, MIDAS is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial lipids, leading to increases of total mitochondrial mass in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:16263763

  5. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene mcu

    PubMed Central

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E.; Hines, Kevin J.; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R.; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L.; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function and, when cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations become too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+-permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+-regulated transcription factor CREB directly bound the mcu promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulate mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+-dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+-uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25737585

  6. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene MCU.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E; Hines, Kevin J; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett A; Cheung, Joseph Y; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2015-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function, and when cytosolic Ca2+ concentration becomes too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+ -permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+ -regulated transcription factor CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein) directly bound the MCU promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulates mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+ -dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+ uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:25737585

  7. Profiling of genes central to human mitochondrial energy metabolism following low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.; Masha, Roland; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    Background: Wound healing involves three overlapping phases: inflammation, granulation and tissue remodelling. If this process is disrupted, delayed wound healing ensues, a common complication seen in diabetic patients. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been found to promote healing in such patients. However, the exact mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Purpose: This study aimed to profile the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial respiration. Materials and Methods: Diabetic wounded fibroblast cells were exposed to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 and incubated for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis. The array contained genes important for each of the mitochondrial complexes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were also determined post-irradiation by ATP luminescence. Results: Genes involved in complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), COX6B2 and COX6C, and PPA1 which is involved in complex V (ATP synthase) were significantly up-regulated. There was a significant increase in ATP levels in diabetic wounded cells post-irradiation. Discussion and Conclusion: LILI stimulates the ETC at a transcriptional level, resulting in an increase in ATP. This study helps understand the mechanisms of LILI in diabetic wound healing, and gives information on activation of genes in response to LILI.

  8. Activation of a Mitochondrial ATPase Gene Induces Abnormal Seed Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins are widespread in living organisms. Some of the AAA-type ATPases possess metalloprotease activities. Other members constitute the 26S proteasome complexes. In recent years, a few AAA members have been implicated in vesicle-mediated secretion, membrane fusion, cellular organelle biogenesis, and hypersensitive responses (HR) in plants. However, the physiological roles and biochemical activities of plant AAA proteins have not yet been defined at the molecular level, and regulatory mechanisms underlying their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a mitochondrial AAA protein, ATPase-in-Seed-Development (ASD), induces morphological and anatomical defects in seed maturation. The ASD gene is expressed at a high level during the seed maturation process and in mature seeds but is repressed rapidly in germinating seeds. Transgenic plants overexpressing the ASD gene are morphologically normal. However, seed formation is severely disrupted in the transgenic plants. The ASD gene is induced by abiotic stresses, such as low temperatures and high salinity, in an abscisic acid (ABA)- dependent manner. The ASD protein possesses ATPase activity and is localized into the mitochondria. Our observations suggest that ASD may play a role in seed maturation by influencing mitochondrial function under abiotic stress. PMID:21359673

  9. The first complete mitochondrial genome sequences of Amblypygi (Chelicerata: Arachnida) reveal conservation of the ancestral arthropod gene order.

    PubMed

    Fahrein, Kathrin; Masta, Susan E; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2009-05-01

    Amblypygi (whip spiders) are terrestrial chelicerates inhabiting the subtropics and tropics. In morphological and rRNA-based phylogenetic analyses, Amblypygi cluster with Uropygi (whip scorpions) and Araneae (spiders) to form the taxon Tetrapulmonata, but there is controversy regarding the interrelationship of these three taxa. Mitochondrial genomes provide an additional large data set of phylogenetic information (sequences, gene order, RNA secondary structure), but in arachnids, mitochondrial genome data are missing for some of the major orders. In the course of an ongoing project concerning arachnid mitochondrial genomics, we present the first two complete mitochondrial genomes from Amblypygi. Both genomes were found to be typical circular duplex DNA molecules with all 37 genes usually present in bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. In both species, gene order is identical to that of Limulus polyphemus (Xiphosura), which is assumed to reflect the putative arthropod ground pattern. All tRNA gene sequences have the potential to fold into structures that are typical of metazoan mitochondrial tRNAs, except for tRNA-Ala, which lacks the D arm in both amblypygids, suggesting the loss of this feature early in amblypygid evolution. Phylogenetic analysis resulted in weak support for Uropygi being the sister group of Amblypygi. PMID:19448726

  10. Nucleotide Sequence and Gene Organization of the Starfish Asterina Pectinifera Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, S.; Himeno, H.; Miura, K. I.; Watanabe, K.

    1995-01-01

    The 16,260-bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the starfish Asterina pectinifera has been sequenced. The genes for 13 proteins, two rRNAs and 22 tRNAs are organized in an extremely economical fashion, similar to those of other animal mtDNAs, with some of the genes overlapping each other. The gene organization is the same as that for another echinoderm, sea urchin, except for the inversion of a 4.6-kb segment that contains genes for two proteins, 13 tRNAs and the 16S rRNA. Judging from the organization of the protein coding genes, mammalian mtDNAs resemble the sea urchin mtDNA more than that of the starfish. The region around the 3' end of the 12S rRNA gene of the starfish shows a high similarity with those for vertebrates. This region encodes a possible stem and loop structure; similar potential structures occur in this region of vertebrate mtDNAs and also in nonmitochondrial small subunit rRNA. A similar stem and loop structure is also found at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA genes in A. pectinifera, in another starfish Pisaster ochraceus, in vertebrates and in Drosophila, but not in sea urchins. The full sequence data confirm the presumption that AGA/AGG, AUA and AAA codons, respectively, code for serine, isoleucine, and asparagine in the starfish mitochondria, and that AGA/AGG codons are read by tRNA(GCU)(Ser), which possesses a truncated dihydrouridine arm, that was previously suggested from a partial mtDNA sequence. The structural characteristics of tRNAs and possible mechanisms for the change in the mitochondrial genetic code are also discussed. PMID:7672576

  11. Genetic divergence and molecular phylogenetics of Puntius spp. based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Pallavi; Goswami, M; Nautiyal, P; Malakar, A K; Nagpure, N S

    2012-12-01

    Puntius is an important genus of freshwater food and ornamental fish belonging to the family Cyprinidae. A total of 60 samples from twelve species of the genus Puntius were collected from eight sampling sites of eight Indian Rivers. Twelve species of Puntius (P. chola, P. sophore, P. filamentosus, P. fasciatus, P. vittatus, P. chelynoides, P. gonionotus, P. denisonii, P. ticto, P. gelius, P. conchonius and P. sarana) were investigated using 60 partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cyt b, 1096 bp) gene to estimate genetic divergence and to establish the phylogenetic relationship. The average intraspecies diversity was estimated as 0.002, whereas the average interspecies diversity was estimated as 0.177. The sequence analysis of the Cyt b gene revealed four distinct groups, which are genetically distinct species and exhibited identical phylogenetic relationship. The present study validated the utility of the Cyt b gene in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies. PMID:22943631

  12. Preliminary study on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences and phylogeny of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Peijun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2005-09-01

    A 605 bp section of mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene from Paralichthys olivaceus, Pseudorhombus cinnamomeus, Psetta maxima and Kareius bicoloratus, which represent 3 families of Order Pleuronectiformes was amplified by PCR and sequenced to show the molecular systematics of Pleuronectiformes for comparison with related gene sequences of other 6 flatfish downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis based on genetic distance from related gene sequences of 10 flatfish showed that this method was ideal to explore the relationship between species, genera and families. Phylogenetic trees set-up is based on neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods that accords to the general rule of Pleuronectiformes evolution. But they also resulted in some confusion. Unlike data from morphological characters, P. olivaceus clustered with K. bicoloratus, but P. cinnamomeus did not cluster with P. olivaceus, which is worth further studying.

  13. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Maize.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial genome encodes proteins essential for mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis. Nuclear gene products, however, are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and the elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. We are exploiting a unique collection of maiz...

  14. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements at low taxonomic levels: three distinct mitogenome gene orders in the genus Pseudoniphargus (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Stokkan, Morten; Jurado-Rivera, Jose A; Juan, Carlos; Jaume, Damià; Pons, Joan

    2016-09-01

    A comparison of mitochondrial genomes of three species of the amphipod Pseudoniphargus revealed the occurrence of a surprisingly high level of gene rearrangement involving protein-coding genes that is a rare phenomenon at low taxonomic levels. The three Pseudoniphargus mitogenomes also display a unique gene arrangement with respect to either the presumed Pancrustacean order or those known for other amphipods. Relative long non-coding sequences appear adjacent to the putative breakage points involved in gene rearrangements of protein coding genes. Other details of the newly obtained mitochondrial genomes - e.g., gene content, nucleotide composition and codon usage - are similar to those found in the mitogenomes of other amphipod species studied. They all contain the typical mitochondrial genome set consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, and two rRNAS, as well as a large control region. The secondary structures and characteristics of tRNA and ribosomal mitochondrial genes of these three species are also discussed. PMID:26329687

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to mitochondrial uncoupling protein genes UCP2 and UCP3 affect mitochondrial metabolism and healthy aging in female nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangkyu; Myers, Leann; Ravussin, Eric; Cherry, Katie E; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2016-08-01

    Energy expenditure decreases with age, but in the oldest-old, energy demand for maintenance of body functions increases with declining health. Uncoupling proteins have profound impact on mitochondrial metabolic processes; therefore, we focused attention on mitochondrial uncoupling protein genes. Alongside resting metabolic rate (RMR), two SNPs in the promoter region of UCP2 were associated with healthy aging. These SNPs mark potential binding sites for several transcription factors; thus, they may affect expression of the gene. A third SNP in the 3'-UTR of UCP3 interacted with RMR. This UCP3 SNP is known to impact UCP3 expression in tissue culture cells, and it has been associated with body weight and mitochondrial energy metabolism. The significant main effects of the UCP2 SNPs and the interaction effect of the UCP3 SNP were also observed after controlling for fat-free mass (FFM) and physical-activity related energy consumption. The association of UCP2/3 with healthy aging was not found in males. Thus, our study provides evidence that the genetic risk factors for healthy aging differ in males and females, as expected from the differences in the phenotypes associated with healthy aging between the two sexes. It also has implications for how mitochondrial function changes during aging. PMID:26965008

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction induces SESN2 gene expression through Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Garaeva, Alisa A; Kovaleva, Irina E; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-01-01

    We found that inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes III (myxothiazol) and I (piericidin A) in some epithelial carcinoma cell lines induce transcription of the p53-responsive SESN2 gene that plays an important role in stress response and homeostatic regulation. However, the effect did not depend on p53 because i) there was no induction of p53 after the treatment with piericidin A; ii) after the treatment with myxothiazol the peak of SESN2 gene upregulation occurred as early as 5h, before the onset of p53 activation (13h); iii) a supplementation with uridine that abolishes the p53 activation in response to myxothiazol did not abrogate the induction of SESN2 transcripts; iv) in the p53 negative HCT116 p53 -/- cells SESN2 transcription could be also induced by myxothiazol. In response to the respiratory chain inhibitors we observed an induction of ATF4, the key transcription factor of the integrated stress response (ISR). We found that the induction of SESN2 transcripts could be prevented by the ISR inhibitory small molecule ISRIB. Also, by inhibiting or overexpressing ATF4 with specific shRNA or ATF4-expressing constructs, respectively, we have confirmed the role of ATF4 in the SESN2 gene upregulation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. At a distance of 228 bp upstream from the SESN2 transcription start site we found a candidate sequence for the ATF4 binding site and confirmed its requirement for the induction of SESN2 in luciferase reporter experiments. We suggest that the upregulation of SESN2 by mitochondrial dysfunction provides a homeostatic feedback that attenuates biosynthetic processes during temporal losses of energy supply from mitochondria thereby assisting better adaptation and viability of cells in hostile environments. PMID:26771712

  17. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate

    PubMed Central

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Pernas, Lena F.; Parker, Michelle L.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Boyle, Jon P.

    2016-01-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant relative Hammondia hammondi, but not another close relative, Neospora caninum. Using cross-species complementation, we determined that the MAF1 locus harbors multiple distinct paralogs that differ in their ability to mediate HMA, and that only T. gondii and H. hammondi harbor HMA+ paralogs. Additionally, we found that exogenous expression of an HMA+ paralog in T. gondii strains that do not normally exhibit HMA provides a competitive advantage over their wild-type counterparts during a mouse infection. These data indicate that HMA likely evolved by neofunctionalization of a duplicate MAF1 copy in the common ancestor of T. gondii and H. hammondi, and that the neofunctionalized gene duplicate is selectively advantageous. PMID:26920761

  18. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate.

    PubMed

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D; Danielson, Jeffrey J; Pernas, Lena F; Parker, Michelle L; Boulanger, Martin J; Dubey, Jitender P; Boyle, Jon P

    2016-05-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant relative Hammondia hammondi, but not another close relative, Neospora caninum Using cross-species complementation, we determined that the MAF1 locus harbors multiple distinct paralogs that differ in their ability to mediate HMA, and that only T. gondii and H. hammondi harbor HMA(+) paralogs. Additionally, we found that exogenous expression of an HMA(+) paralog in T. gondii strains that do not normally exhibit HMA provides a competitive advantage over their wild-type counterparts during a mouse infection. These data indicate that HMA likely evolved by neofunctionalization of a duplicate MAF1 copy in the common ancestor of T. gondii and H. hammondi, and that the neofunctionalized gene duplicate is selectively advantageous. PMID:26920761

  19. MitBASE pilot: a database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and its regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    de Pinto, B; Malladi, S B; Altamura, N

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the EU BIOTECH PROGRAM and within the 'MITBASE: a comprehensive and integrated database on mtDNA' project, we have prepared a pilot database (MitBASE Pilot) on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and its regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MitBASE Pilot includes nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins as well as nuclear genes encoding products which are localised in other sub-cellular compartments but nevertheless interact with mitochondrial functions. Genes have been classified on the basis of the mitochondrial process in which they participate and the mitochondrial phenotype of the gene knockout. The structure of the MitBASE Pilot database has been conceived for a flexible organisation of the information. An intuitive visual query system has been developed which allows users to select information in different combinations, both in the query and the output format, according to their needs. MitBASE Pilot is a relational database, is maintained at the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and is available at the World Wide Web site http://www3.ebi.ac. uk/Research/Mitbase/mitbiog.pl PMID:9847161

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Euphausia pacifica (Malacostraca: Euphausiacea) reveals a novel gene order and unusual tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Wang, Haiqing; Wang, Minxiao; Liu, Bin

    2011-11-01

    Euphausiid krill are dominant organisms in the zooplankton population and play a central role in marine ecosystems. Euphausia pacifica (Malacostraca: Euphausiacea) is one of the most important and dominant crustaceans in the North Pacific Ocean. In this paper, we described the gene content, organization, and codon usage of the E. pacifica mitochondrial genome. The mitochondrial genome of E. pacifica is 16 898 bp in length and contains a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. Translocation of three transfer RNAs (trnL(1), trnL(2), and trnW) was found in the E. pacifica mitochondrial genome when comparing with the pancrustacean ground pattern. The rate of K(a)/K(s) in 13 protein-coding genes among three krill is much less than 1, which indicates a strong purifying selection within this group. The largest noncoding region in the E. pacifica mitochondrial genome contains one section with tandem repeats (4.7 x 154 bp), which are the largest tandem repeats found in malacostracan mitochondrial genomes so far. All analyses based on nucleotide and amino acid data strongly support the monophyly of Stomatopoda, Penaeidae, Caridea, Brachyura, and Euphausiacea. The Bayesian analysis of nucleotide and amino acid datasets strongly supports the close relationship between Euphausiacea and Decapoda, which confirms traditional findings. The maximum likelihood analysis based on amino acid data strongly supports the close relationship between Euphausiacea and Penaeidae, which destroys the monophyly of Decapoda. PMID:22017501

  1. The mitochondrial genome of Euphausia superba (Prydz Bay) (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Euphausiacea) reveals a novel gene arrangement and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Wang, Haiqing; Ren, Jianfeng; Tian, Mei; Wang, Minxiao

    2010-02-01

    Euphausiid krill are dominant organisms in the zooplankton population and play a central role in marine ecosystems. In this paper, we described the gene organization, gene rearrangement and codon usage in the mitochondrial genome of Euphausia superba Dana 1852 (sampling from Prydz Bay, PB). The mitochondrial genome of E. superba is more than 15,498 bp in length (partial non-coding region was not determined). Translocation of four tRNAs (trnL ( 1 ), trnL ( 2 ), trnW and trnI) and duplication of one tRNA (trnN) were founded in the mitochondrial genome of E. superba when comparing its genome with the pancrustacean ground pattern. To investigate the phylogenetic relationship within Malacostraca, phylogenetic trees based on currently available malacostracan mitochondrial genomes were built with the maximum likelihood and the Bayesian models. All analyses based on nucleotide and amino acid data strongly support the monophyly of Stomatopoda, Penaeidae, Caridea, and Brachyura, which is consistent with previous research. However, the taxonomic position of Euphausiacea within Malacostraca is unstable. From comparing the mitochondrial genome between E. superba (PB) and E. superba (sampling from Weddell Sea, WS), we found that nad2 gene contains maximal variation with 61 segregating sites, following by nad5 gene which has 12 segregating sites. Thus, nad2 and nad5 genes may be used as potential molecular markers to study the inherit diversity among different E. superba groups, which would be helpful to the exploitation and management of E. superba resources. PMID:19578978

  2. Massive difference in synonymous substitution rates among mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear genes of Phaeocystis algae.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Arrigo, Kevin R; Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Allen, Andrew E

    2014-02-01

    We are just beginning to understand how mutation rates differ among mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear genomes. In most seed plants the mitochondrial mutation rate is estimated to be lower than those of the plastid and nucleus, whereas in the red alga Porphyra the opposite is true, and in certain green algae all three genomes appear to have similar rates of mutation. Relative rate statistics of organelle vs nuclear genes, however, are lacking for lineages that acquired their plastids through secondary endosymbiosis, but recent organelle DNA analyses suggest that they may differ drastically from what is observed in lineages with primary plastids, such as green plants and red algae. Here, by measuring synonymous nucleotide substitutions, we approximate the relative mutation rates within the haptophyte genus Phaeocystis, which has a red-algal-derived, secondary plastid. Synonymous-site divergence data indicate that for Phaeocystis antarctica and P. globosa the mitochondrial mutation rate is 10 and 3 times that of the plastid and nucleus, respectively. This differs drastically from relative rate estimates for primary-plastid-bearing lineages and presents a much more dynamic view of organelle vs nuclear mutation rates across the eukaryotic domain. PMID:24216019

  3. Mitochondrial genome of the Komodo dragon: efficient sequencing method with reptile-oriented primers and novel gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Yoshinori; Endo, Hideki

    2004-04-30

    The mitochondrial genome of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) was nearly completely sequenced, except for two highly repetitive noncoding regions. An efficient sequencing method for squamate mitochondrial genomes was established by combining the long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology and a set of reptile-oriented primers designed for nested PCR amplifications. It was found that the mitochondrial genome had novel gene arrangements in which genes from NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 to proline tRNA were extensively shuffled with duplicate control regions. These control regions had 99% sequence similarity over 700 bp. Although snake mitochondrial genomes are also known to possess duplicate control regions with nearly identical sequences, the location of the second control region suggested independent occurrence of the duplication on lineages leading to snakes and the Komodo dragon. Another feature of the mitochondrial genome of the Komodo dragon was the considerable number of tandem repeats, including sequences with a strong secondary structure, as a possible site for the slipped-strand mispairing in replication. These observations are consistent with hypotheses that tandem duplications via the slipped-strand mispairing may induce mitochondrial gene rearrangements and may serve to maintain similar copies of the control region. PMID:15449544

  4. [Sequence variation of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and phylogenetic relationships among twelve species of Charadriiformes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Qian; Li, Yu-Xiang; Guo, Yu-Mei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2003-05-01

    Studies of the phylogenetic relationships of the Charadriiformes have been largely based on conservative morphological characters. During the past 10 years, many studies on the evolutionary biology of birds adopted phylogenetic information obtained from mitochondrial DNA, but few work on the Charadriiformes has been reported to date. Therefore, phylogenetic relationships and classification of the Charadriiformes remains controversial. In this study, we try to shed light on these relationships via DNA sequence analysis of the mitochondrial Cyt b gene in 12 species of Charadriiformes. It was a preliminary study of the origin and evolution of the species by using nucleotide sequence data. Using the well-known PCR techniques, the complete mitochondrial Cyt b gene sequences were amplified and sequenced respectively from Charadrius mongolus, Charadrius alexandrinus, Numenius madagascariensis, Numenius arquat, Numenius phaeopus, Tringa totanus, Tringa glareola, Xenus cineres, Arenaria interpres, Calidris tenuirostris, Recurvirostra avosetts and Haematopus ostralensis. The 1143 bp long DNA sequences of the gene from these species were obtained, in which 381 variable sites were identified without insertions or deletions. The nucleic acid sequence variation of the mitochondrial Cyt b gene was 5.16%-16.01% among these species. Phylogenetic trees constructed using the NJ method, MP method and ML method with Ciconia ciconia as the outgroup indicate that the 12 species of Charadriiformes examined in this study are clustered in two major clades. The first clade includes T. totanus, T. glareola, A. interpres, C. tenuirostris, X. cineres, N. madagascariensis, N. arquata and N. phaeopus. The second one includes C. mongolus, C. alexandrinus, R. avosetts and H. ostralensis. Our molecular data show that the phylogenetic relationships among species of Scolopacidae are consistent with the classification based on morphological studies; R. avosetts and H. ostralensis are relatively closer

  5. Mitochondrial Genes Reveal Triatoma jatai as a Sister Species to Triatoma costalimai (Reduviidae: Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Teves, Simone Caldas; Gardim, Sueli; Carbajal de la Fuente, Ana Laura; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; dos Santos Mallet, Jacenir Reis; da Rosa, João Aristeu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Triatoma jatai was described using a set of morphological structures from specimens collected in Paranã municipality of Tocantins State, Brazil. Under a Bayesian framework and using two mitochondrial genes (16S and COI), phylogenetic analysis recovered T. jatai as a sister species to Triatoma costalimai with higher genetic distances than between other well-recognized species. Our results agree with previous suggestions based on morphometric analysis. In the light of the non-monophyly of Matogrossensis subcomplex, the inclusion of T. jatai shall be considered for reevaluating this group. PMID:26787157

  6. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between

  7. Intraisolate Mitochondrial Genetic Polymorphism and Gene Variants Coexpression in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Denis; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Labridy, Manuel; Roy-Bolduc, Alice; Daubois, Laurence; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are multinucleated and coenocytic organisms, in which the extent of the intraisolate nuclear genetic variation has been a source of debate. Conversely, their mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) have appeared to be homogeneous within isolates in all next generation sequencing (NGS)-based studies. Although several lines of evidence have challenged mtDNA homogeneity in AMF, extensive survey to investigate intraisolate allelic diversity has not previously been undertaken. In this study, we used a conventional polymerase chain reaction -based approach on selected mitochondrial regions with a high-fidelity DNA polymerase, followed by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Two isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis were used, one cultivated in vitro for several generations (DAOM-197198) and the other recently isolated from the field (DAOM-242422). At different loci in both isolates, we found intraisolate allelic variation within the mtDNA and in a single copy nuclear marker, which highlighted the presence of several nonsynonymous mutations in protein coding genes. We confirmed that some of this variation persisted in the transcriptome, giving rise to at least four distinct nad4 transcripts in DAOM-197198. We also detected the presence of numerous mitochondrial DNA copies within nuclear genomes (numts), providing insights to understand this important evolutionary process in AMF. Our study reveals that genetic variation in Glomeromycota is higher than what had been previously assumed and also suggests that it could have been grossly underestimated in most NGS-based AMF studies, both in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, due to the presence of low-level mutations. PMID:25527836

  8. Mitochondrial gene arrangement of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus L.: conservation of major features among arthropod classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staton, J. L.; Daehler, L. L.; Brown, W. M.; Jacobs, D. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Numerous complete mitochondrial DNA sequences have been determined for species within two arthropod groups, insects and crustaceans, but there are none for a third, the chelicerates. Most mitochondrial gene arrangements reported for crustaceans and insect species are identical or nearly identical to that of Drosophila yakuba. Sequences across 36 of the gene boundaries in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of a representative chelicerate. Limulus polyphemus L., also reveal an arrangement like that of Drosophila yakuba. Only the position of the tRNA(LEU)(UUR) gene differs; in Limulus it is between the genes for tRNA(LEU)(CUN) and ND1. This positioning is also found in onychophorans, mollusks, and annelids, but not in insects and crustaceans, and indicates that tRNA(LEU)(CUN)-tRNA(LEU)(UUR)-ND1 was the ancestral gene arrangement for these groups, as suggested earlier. There are no differences in the relative arrangements of protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes between Limulus and Drosophila, and none have been observed within arthropods. The high degree of similarity of mitochondrial gene arrangements within arthropods is striking, since some taxa last shared a common ancestor before the Cambrian, and contrasts with the extensive mtDNA rearrangements occasionally observed within some other metazoan phyla (e.g., mollusks and nematodes).

  9. Assembled Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes, as well as Nuclear Genes, Place the Parasite Family Cynomoriaceae in the Saxifragales.

    PubMed

    Bellot, Sidonie; Cusimano, Natalie; Luo, Shixiao; Sun, Guiling; Zarre, Shahin; Gröger, Andreas; Temsch, Eva; Renner, Susanne S

    2016-01-01

    Cynomoriaceae, one of the last unplaced families of flowering plants, comprise one or two species or subspecies of root parasites that occur from the Mediterranean to the Gobi Desert. Using Illumina sequencing, we assembled the mitochondrial and plastid genomes as well as some nuclear genes of a Cynomorium specimen from Italy. Selected genes were also obtained by Sanger sequencing from individuals collected in China and Iran, resulting in matrices of 33 mitochondrial, 6 nuclear, and 14 plastid genes and rDNAs enlarged to include a representative angiosperm taxon sampling based on data available in GenBank. We also compiled a new geographic map to discern possible discontinuities in the parasites' occurrence. Cynomorium has large genomes of 13.70-13.61 (Italy) to 13.95-13.76 pg (China). Its mitochondrial genome consists of up to 49 circular subgenomes and has an overall gene content similar to that of photosynthetic angiosperms, while its plastome retains only 27 of the normally 116 genes. Nuclear, plastid and mitochondrial phylogenies place Cynomoriaceae in Saxifragales, and we found evidence for several horizontal gene transfers from different hosts, as well as intracellular gene transfers. PMID:27358425

  10. Assembled Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes, as well as Nuclear Genes, Place the Parasite Family Cynomoriaceae in the Saxifragales

    PubMed Central

    Bellot, Sidonie; Cusimano, Natalie; Luo, Shixiao; Sun, Guiling; Zarre, Shahin; Gröger, Andreas; Temsch, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Cynomoriaceae, one of the last unplaced families of flowering plants, comprise one or two species or subspecies of root parasites that occur from the Mediterranean to the Gobi Desert. Using Illumina sequencing, we assembled the mitochondrial and plastid genomes as well as some nuclear genes of a Cynomorium specimen from Italy. Selected genes were also obtained by Sanger sequencing from individuals collected in China and Iran, resulting in matrices of 33 mitochondrial, 6 nuclear, and 14 plastid genes and rDNAs enlarged to include a representative angiosperm taxon sampling based on data available in GenBank. We also compiled a new geographic map to discern possible discontinuities in the parasites’ occurrence. Cynomorium has large genomes of 13.70–13.61 (Italy) to 13.95–13.76 pg (China). Its mitochondrial genome consists of up to 49 circular subgenomes and has an overall gene content similar to that of photosynthetic angiosperms, while its plastome retains only 27 of the normally 116 genes. Nuclear, plastid and mitochondrial phylogenies place Cynomoriaceae in Saxifragales, and we found evidence for several horizontal gene transfers from different hosts, as well as intracellular gene transfers. PMID:27358425