Science.gov

Sample records for mitochondrial dna transit

  1. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  2. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  3. [Mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chang-Huang

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondria is an intracellular double membrane-bound structure and it can provide energy for intracellular metabolism. The metabolism includes Krebs cycle, beta-oxidation and lipid synthesis. The density of mitochondria is different in various tissues dependent upon the demands of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial diseases can occur by defects either in mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA. Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding for 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 mRNAs that are translated in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial genetic diseases are most resulted from defects in the mtDNA which may be point mutations, deletions, or mitochondrial DNA depletion. These patterns of inheritance in mitochondrial diseases include sporadic, maternally inherited, or of Mendelian inheritance. Mitochondrial DNA depletion is caused by defects in the nuclear genes that are responsible for maintenance of integrity of mtDNA or deoxyribonucelotide pools and mtDNA biogenesis. The mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS) includes the following categories: progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), predominant myopathy, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), sensory-ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) and hepato-encephalopathy. The most common tissues or organs involved in MDS and related disorders include the brain, liver and muscles. These involved genes are divided into two groups including 1) DNA polymerase gamma (POLG, POLG2) and Twinkle genes whose products function directly at the mtDNA replication fork, and 2) adenine nucleotide translocator 1, thymidine phosphorylase, thymidine kinase 2, deoxyguanosine kinase, ADP-forming succinyl-CoA synthetase ligase, MPV17 whose products supply the mitochondria with deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pools needed for mtDNA replication, and possible mutation in the RRM2B gene. The development has provided new information about the importance of the biosynthetic pathway of the nucleotides for mtDNA replication

  4. Mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cardiac manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Noh, Yeonhee; Xu, Zhelong; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells, have their own DNA (mtDNA). They regulate the transport of metabolites and ions, which determine cell physiology, survival, and death. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including impaired oxidative phosphorylation, preferentially affects heart function via imbalance of energy supply and demand. Recently, mitochondrial mutations and associated mitochondrial dysfunction were suggested as a causal factor of cardiac manifestations. Oxidative stress largely influences mtDNA stability due to oxidative modifications of mtDNA. Furthermore, the continuous replicative state of mtDNA and presence of minimal nucleoid structure render mitochondria vulnerable to oxidative damage and subsequent mutations, which impair mitochondrial functions. However, the occurrence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in the same mitochondrion or cell and presence of nuclear DNA-encoded mtDNA repair systems raise questions regarding whether oxidative stress-mediated mtDNA mutations are the major driving force in accumulation of mtDNA mutations. Here, we address the possible causes of mitochondrial DNA mutations and their involvement in cardiac manifestations. Current strategies for treatment related to mitochondrial mutations and/or dysfunction in cardiac manifestations are briefly discussed. PMID:27100514

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed. PMID:20307565

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments.

  7. Self-similar mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, Nestor N; Glazier, James A

    2004-01-01

    We show that repeated sequences, like palindromes (local repetitions) and homologies between two different nucleotide sequences (motifs along the genome), compose a self-similar (fractal) pattern in mitochondrial DNA. This self-similarity comes from the looplike structures distributed along the genome. The looplike structures generate scaling laws in a pseudorandom DNA walk constructed from the sequence, called a Lévy flight. We measure the scaling laws from the generalized fractal dimension and singularity spectrum for mitochondrial DNA walks for 35 different species. In particular, we report characteristic loop distributions for mammal mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15371639

  8. Tracking Mitochondrial DNA In Situ.

    PubMed

    Ligasová, Anna; Koberna, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The methods of the detection of (1) non-labeled and (2) BrdU-labeled mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are described. They are based on the production of singlet oxygen by monovalent copper ions and the subsequent induction of DNA gaps. The ends of interrupted DNA serve as origins for the labeling of mtDNA by DNA polymerase I or they are utilized by exonuclease that degrades DNA strands, unmasking BrdU in BrdU-labeled DNA. Both methods are sensitive approaches without the need of additional enhancement of the signal or the use of highly sensitive optical systems. PMID:26530676

  9. Respiratory complex I dysfunction due to mitochondrial DNA mutations shifts the voltage threshold for opening of the permeability transition pore toward resting levels.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Anna Maria; Angelin, Alessia; Ghelli, Anna; Mariani, Elisa; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; Rugolo, Michela

    2009-01-23

    We have studied mitochondrial bioenergetics in HL180 cells (a cybrid line harboring the T14484C/ND6 and G14279A/ND6 mtDNA mutations of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, leading to an approximately 50% decrease of ATP synthesis) and XTC.UC1 cells (derived from a thyroid oncocytoma bearing a disruptive frameshift mutation in MT-ND1, which impairs complex I assembly). The addition of rotenone to HL180 cells and of antimycin A to XTC.UC1 cells caused fast mitochondrial membrane depolarization that was prevented by treatment with cyclosporin A, intracellular Ca2+ chelators, and antioxidant. Both cell lines also displayed an anomalous response to oligomycin, with rapid onset of depolarization that was prevented by cyclosporin A and by overexpression of Bcl-2. These findings indicate that depolarization by respiratory chain inhibitors and oligomycin was due to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). A shift of the threshold voltage for PTP opening close to the resting potential may therefore be the underlying cause facilitating cell death in diseases affecting complex I activity. This study provides a unifying reading frame for previous observations on mitochondrial dysfunction, bioenergetic defects, and Ca2+ deregulation in mitochondrial diseases. Therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing the PTP voltage threshold may be instrumental in ameliorating the course of complex I-dependent mitochondrial diseases. PMID:19047048

  10. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  11. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Evolution in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen D.; Sage, Richard D.; Prager, Ellen M.; Ritte, Uzi; Wilson, Allan C.

    1983-01-01

    This study extends knowledge of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in mice to include 208 animals belonging to eight species in the subgenus Mus. Highly purified mtDNA from each has been subjected to high-resolution restriction mapping with respect to the known sequence of one mouse mtDNA. Variation attributed to base substitutions was encountered at about 200 of the 300 cleavage sites examined, and a length mutation was located in or near the displacement loop. The variability of different functional regions in this genome was as follows, from least to most: ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, known proteins, displacement loop and unidentified reading frames.—Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the utility of the Sage and Marshall revision of mouse classification, according to which there are at least four species of commensal mice and three species of aboriginal mice in the complex that was formerly considered to be one species. The most thoroughly studied of these species is Mus domesticus, the house mouse of Western Europe and the Mediterranean region, which is the mitochondrial source of all 50 of the laboratory strains examined and of the representatives of wild house mice introduced by Europeans to North and South America during the past few hundred years.—The level of mtDNA variation among wild representatives of (M. musculus) and several other mammalian species. By contrast, among the many laboratory strains that are known or suspected to stem from the pet mouse trade, there is little interstrain variation, most strains having the "old inbred" type of domesticus mtDNA, whose frequency in the 145 wild mice examined is low, about 0.04. Also notable is the apparent homogeneity of mtDNA in domesticus races that have fixed six or more fused chromosomes and the close relationship of some of these mtDNAs to those of karyotypically normal mice.—In addition, this paper discusses fossil and other evidence for the view that in mice, as in many other mammals, the average

  14. Mitochondrial DNA: A Blind Spot in Neuroepigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana; Chen, Hu

    2012-01-01

    Neuroepigenetics, which includes nuclear DNA modifications such as 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydoxymethylcytosine and modifications of nuclear proteins such as histones, is emerging as the leading field in molecular neuroscience. Historically, a functional role for epigenetic mechanisms, including in neuroepigenetics, has been sought in the area of the regulation of nuclear transcription. However, one important compartment of mammalian cell DNA, different from nuclear but equally important for physiological and pathological processes (including in the brain), mitochondrial DNA has for the most part not had a systematic epigenetic characterization. The importance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (particularly its mutations) in central nervous system physiology and pathology has long been recognized. Only recently have mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, including the discovery of mitochondrial DNA-methyltransferases and the presence and the functionality of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in mitochondrial DNA (e.g., in modifying the transcription of mitochondrial genome), been unequivocally recognized as a part of mammalian mitochondrial physiology. Here we summarize for the first time evidence supporting the existence of these mechanisms and we propose the term “mitochondrial epigenetics” to be used when referring to them. Currently, neuroepigenetics does not include mitochondrial epigenetics - a gap that we expect to close in the near future. PMID:22639700

  15. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for a large group of inherited metabolic disorders most of which are due to a dysfunctional mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and, consequently, deficient energy production. MRC function depends on the coordinated expression of both nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes. Thus, mitochondrial diseases can be caused by genetic defects in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome, or in the cross-talk between the two. This impaired cross-talk gives rise to so-called nuclear-mitochondrial intergenomic communication disorders, which result in loss or instability of the mitochondrial genome and, in turn, impaired maintenance of qualitative and quantitative mtDNA integrity. In children, most MRC disorders are associated with nuclear gene defects rather than alterations in the mtDNA itself. The mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders with an autosomal recessive pattern of transmission that have onset in infancy or early childhood and are characterized by a reduced number of copies of mtDNA in affected tissues and organs. The MDSs can be divided into least four clinical presentations: hepatocerebral, myopathic, encephalomyopathic and neurogastrointestinal. The focus of this review is to offer an overview of these syndromes, listing the clinical phenotypes, together with their relative frequency, mutational spectrum, and possible insights for improving diagnostic strategies. PMID:24708634

  16. Mitochondrial DNA with a large-scale deletion causes two distinct mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-09-01

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (ΔmtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ΔmtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ΔmtDNA (mito-miceΔ). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ΔmtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ΔmtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ΔmtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-miceΔ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome-like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of mtDNA in various tissues reached >70-80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ΔmtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice. PMID:23853091

  17. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    PubMed

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide. PMID:24617463

  18. Mitochondrial DNA variants in obesity.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Wiegand, Susanna; Biebermann, Heike; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Teumer, Alexander; Rosskopf, Dieter; Rimmbach, Christian; Schreiber, Stefan; Jacobs, Gunnar; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke

    2014-01-01

    Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI) variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s) in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0). For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC) sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2). SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger) in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002) located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039). These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048). Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between mothers and their

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Wiegand, Susanna; Biebermann, Heike; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Teumer, Alexander; Rosskopf, Dieter; Rimmbach, Christian; Schreiber, Stefan; Jacobs, Gunnar; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke

    2014-01-01

    Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI) variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s) in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0). For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC) sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI≥30 kg/m2) and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2). SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger) in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002) located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039). These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048). Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between

  20. Mitochondrial DNA plasticity is an essential inducer of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, W T Y; Cain, J E; Cuddihy, A; Johnson, J; Dickinson, A; Yeung, K-Y; Kumar, B; Johns, T G; Watkins, D N; Spencer, A; St John, J C

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA has been implicated in diseases such as cancer, its role remains to be defined. Using three models of tumorigenesis, namely glioblastoma multiforme, multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma, we show that mitochondrial DNA plays defining roles at early and late tumour progression. Specifically, tumour cells partially or completely depleted of mitochondrial DNA either restored their mitochondrial DNA content or actively recruited mitochondrial DNA, which affected the rate of tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, non-depleted tumour cells modulated mitochondrial DNA copy number at early and late progression in a mitochondrial DNA genotype-specific manner. In glioblastoma multiforme and osteosarcoma, this was coupled with loss and gain of mitochondrial DNA variants. Changes in mitochondrial DNA genotype affected tumour morphology and gene expression patterns at early and late progression. Importantly, this identified a subset of genes that are essential to early progression. Consequently, mitochondrial DNA and commonly expressed early tumour-specific genes provide novel targets against tumorigenesis. PMID:27551510

  1. Mitochondrial DNA plasticity is an essential inducer of tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W T Y; Cain, J E; Cuddihy, A; Johnson, J; Dickinson, A; Yeung, K-Y; Kumar, B; Johns, T G; Watkins, D N; Spencer, A; St John, J C

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA has been implicated in diseases such as cancer, its role remains to be defined. Using three models of tumorigenesis, namely glioblastoma multiforme, multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma, we show that mitochondrial DNA plays defining roles at early and late tumour progression. Specifically, tumour cells partially or completely depleted of mitochondrial DNA either restored their mitochondrial DNA content or actively recruited mitochondrial DNA, which affected the rate of tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, non-depleted tumour cells modulated mitochondrial DNA copy number at early and late progression in a mitochondrial DNA genotype-specific manner. In glioblastoma multiforme and osteosarcoma, this was coupled with loss and gain of mitochondrial DNA variants. Changes in mitochondrial DNA genotype affected tumour morphology and gene expression patterns at early and late progression. Importantly, this identified a subset of genes that are essential to early progression. Consequently, mitochondrial DNA and commonly expressed early tumour-specific genes provide novel targets against tumorigenesis. PMID:27551510

  2. (Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  3. Borrowing nuclear DNA helicases to protect mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases. PMID:25984607

  4. Mitochondrial Disorders of DNA Polymerase γ Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linsheng; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Wolff, Daynna J.

    2011-01-01

    Context Primary mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the most common causes of inherited disorders predominantly involving the neuromuscular system. Advances in the molecular study of mitochondrial DNA have changed our vision and our approach to primary mitochondrial disorders. Many of the mitochondrial disorders are caused by mutations in nuclear genes and are inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Among the autosomal inherited mitochondrial disorders, those related to DNA polymerase γ dysfunction are the most common and the best studied. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and being familiar with the recent advances in laboratory diagnosis of this group of mitochondrial disorders are essential for pathologists to interpret abnormal histopathology and laboratory results and to suggest further studies for a definitive diagnosis. Objectives To help pathologists better understand the common clinical syndromes originating from mutations in DNA polymerase γ and its associated proteins and use the stepwise approach of clinical, laboratory, and pathologic diagnosis of these syndromes. Data Sources Review of pertinent published literature and relevant Internet databases. Conclusions Mitochondrial disorders are now better recognized with the development of molecular tests for clinical diagnosis. A cooperative effort among primary physicians, diagnostic pathologists, geneticists, and molecular biologists with expertise in mitochondrial disorders is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. PMID:21732785

  5. Role and Treatment of Mitochondrial DNA-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Several sporadic neurodegenerative diseases display phenomena that directly or indirectly relate to mitochondrial function. Data suggesting altered mitochondrial function in these diseases could arise from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reviewed. Approaches for manipulating mitochondrial function and minimizing the downstream consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed. PMID:21902672

  6. Cryptic crested newt diversity at the Eurasian transition: the mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Near Eastern Triturus newts.

    PubMed

    Wielstra, B; Themudo, G Espregueira; Güçlü, O; Olgun, K; Poyarkov, N A; Arntzen, J W

    2010-09-01

    Crested newts of the Triturus karelinii group occur in a phylogeographically understudied region: the Near East. Controversy surrounds the systematic position of these newts within the complete crested newt assemblage (the Triturus cristatus superspecies). We explore the situation using mitochondrial sequence data (ND2 and ND4, approximately 1.7kb) and employing different methods of phylogenetic inference (Bayesian inference and Maximum Likelihood using mixed models) and molecular dating (r8s and BEAST). The T. karelinii group is monophyletic and constitutes one of four main lineages in the T. cristatus superspecies. The separation of the T. karelinii group from the remaining crested newts around 9Ma is related to the formation of the Mid-Aegean Trench, which separated the Balkan and Anatolian landmasses. The T. karelinii group comprises three geographically structured clades (eastern, central and western). The genetic divergence shown by these clades is comparable to that among recognized crested newt species. We suggest the uplift of the Armenian Plateau to be responsible for the separation of the eastern clade around 7Ma, and the re-establishment of a marine connection between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean at the end of the Messinian Salinity Crisis to have caused the split between the central and western clade around 5.5Ma. Genetic structuring within the three clades dates to the Quaternary Ice Age (<2.59Ma) and is associated with alternating periods of isolation and reconnection caused by periodic changes in sea level and surface runoff. PMID:20435147

  7. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and genetic factors play an important role in its genesis. Although mutations in tumor suppressors and oncogenes encoded by the nuclear genome are known to play a critical role in breast tumorigenesis, the contribution of the mitochondrial genome to this process is unclear. Like the nuclear genome, the mitochondrial genome also encodes proteins critical for mitochondria functions such as oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which is known to be defective in cancer including breast cancer. Due to limited repair mechanisms compared to that for nuclear DNA (nDNA), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is more susceptible to mutations. Thus changes in mitochondrial genes could also contribute to the development of breast cancer. In this review we discuss mtDNA mutations that affect OXPHOS. Continuous acquisition of mtDNA mutations and selection of advantageous mutations ultimately leads to generation of cells that propagate uncontrollably to form tumors. Since irreversible damage to OXPHOS leads to a shift in energy metabolism towards enhanced aerobic glycolysis in most cancers, mutations in mtDNA represent an early event during breast tumorigenesis, and thus may serve as potential biomarkers for early detection and prognosis of breast cancer. Because mtDNA mutations lead to defective OXPHOS, development of agents that target OXPHOS will provide specificity for preventative and therapeutic agents against breast cancer with minimal toxicity. PMID:24140413

  8. Mitochondrial DNA under siege in avian phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Zink, Robert M; Barrowclough, George F

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been the workhorse of research in phylogeography for almost two decades. However, concerns with basing evolutionary interpretations on mtDNA results alone have been voiced since the inception of such studies. Recently, some authors have suggested that the potential problems with mtDNA are so great that inferences about population structure and species limits are unwarranted unless corroborated by other evidence, usually in the form of nuclear gene data. Here we review the relative merits of mitochondrial and nuclear phylogeographical studies, using birds as an exemplar class of organisms. A review of population demographic and genetic theory indicates that mitochondrial and nuclear phylogeographical results ought to concur for both geographically unstructured populations and for populations that have long histories of isolation. However, a relatively common occurrence will be shallow, but geographically structured mtDNA trees--without nuclear gene corroboration--for populations with relatively shorter periods of isolation. This is expected because of the longer coalescence times of nuclear genes (approximately four times that of mtDNA); such cases do not contradict the mtDNA inference of recent isolation and evolutionary divergence. Rather, the nuclear markers are more lagging indicators of changes in population structure. A review of the recent literature on birds reveals the existence of relatively few cases in which nuclear markers contradict mitochondrial markers in a fashion not consistent with coalescent theory. Preliminary information from nuclear genes suggests that mtDNA patterns will prove to be robust indicators of patterns of population history and species limits. At equilibrium, mitochondrial loci are generally a more sensitive indicator of population structure than are nuclear loci, and mitochondrial estimates of F(ST)-like statistics are generally expected to exceed nuclear ones. Hence, invoking behavioural or ecological

  9. [Diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA].

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, Marta; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases associated with mutations within mitochondrial genome are a subgroup of metabolic disorders since their common consequence is reduced metabolic efficiency caused by impaired oxidative phophorylation and shortage of ATP. Although the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins (approximately 1500) is encoded by nuclear genome, mtDNA encodes 11 subunits of respiratory chain complexes, 2 subunits of ATP synthase, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs. Up to now, more than 250 pathogenic mutations have been described within mtDNA. The most common are point mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial tRNAs such as 3243A-->G and 8344T-->G that cause, respectively, MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) or MIDD (maternally-inherited diabetes and deafness) and MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres) syndromes. There have been also found mutations in genes encoding subunits of ATP synthase such as 8993T-->G substitution associated with NARP (neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa) syndrome. It is worth to note that mitochondrial dysfunction can also be caused by mutations within nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. PMID:21913424

  10. Maintenance and Expression of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 proteins that are essential for the function of the oxidative phosphorylation system, which is composed of four respiratory-chain complexes and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Remarkably, the maintenance and expression of mtDNA depend on the mitochondrial import of hundreds of nuclear-encoded proteins that control genome maintenance, replication, transcription, RNA maturation, and mitochondrial translation. The importance of this complex regulatory system is underscored by the identification of numerous mutations of nuclear genes that impair mtDNA maintenance and expression at different levels, causing human mitochondrial diseases with pleiotropic clinical manifestations. The basic scientific understanding of the mechanisms controlling mtDNA function has progressed considerably during the past few years, thanks to advances in biochemistry, genetics, and structural biology. The challenges for the future will be to understand how mtDNA maintenance and expression are regulated and to what extent direct intramitochondrial cross talk between different processes, such as transcription and translation, is important. PMID:27023847

  11. [Progress of enzyme in mitochondrial DNA repair system].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ke-Jun; Wang, Zhen-Cheng; Wang, Xue-Min

    2004-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport system and the rRNAs and tRNAs required for constructing the mitochondrial translational machinery. Each subunit encoded by mtDNA is essential for normal oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, integrity of the mtDNA is crucial for the survival of organisms. It has long been held that there is no DNA repair in mitochondria. But in recent years,a number of repair factors have been found in mitochondrial extracts, suggesting the presence of DNA repair in mitochondria. This review summarized recent progress of enzyme in mitochondrial DNA repair processes. PMID:15640002

  12. Prevalence of rare mitochondrial DNA mutations in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Lebre, Anne Sophie; Jardel, Claude; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Hoarau, Claire; Maoulida, Hassani; Charrier, Nathanaël; Gai, Xiaowu; Xie, Hongbo M; Ferre, Marc; Fragaki, Konstantina; Hardy, Gaëlle; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte; Marlin, Sandrine; Dhaenens, Claire Marie; Slama, Abdelhamid; Rocher, Christophe; Paul Bonnefont, Jean; Rötig, Agnès; Aoutil, Nadia; Gilleron, Mylène; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Reynier, Pascal; Ceresuela, Jennifer; Jonard, Laurence; Devos, Aurore; Espil-Taris, Caroline; Martinez, Delphine; Gaignard, Pauline; Le Quan Sang, Kim-Hanh; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Falk, Marni J; Florentz, Catherine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases are rare disorders whose prevalence is estimated around 1 in 5000. Patients are usually tested only for deletions and for common mutations of mtDNA which account for 5–40% of cases, depending on the study. However, the prevalence of rare mtDNA mutations is not known. Methods We analysed the whole mtDNA in a cohort of 743 patients suspected of manifesting a mitochondrial disease, after excluding deletions and common mutations. Both heteroplasmic and homoplasmic variants were identified using two complementary strategies (Surveyor and MitoChip). Multiple correspondence analyses followed by hierarchical ascendant cluster process were used to explore relationships between clinical spectrum, age at onset and localisation of mutations. Results 7.4% of deleterious mutations and 22.4% of novel putative mutations were identified. Pathogenic heteroplasmic mutations were more frequent than homoplasmic mutations (4.6% vs 2.8%). Patients carrying deleterious mutations showed symptoms before 16 years of age in 67% of cases. Early onset disease (<1 year) was significantly associated with mutations in protein coding genes (mainly in complex I) while late onset disorders (>16 years) were associated with mutations in tRNA genes. MTND5 and MTND6 genes were identified as ‘hotspots’ of mutations, with Leigh syndrome accounting for the large majority of associated phenotypes. Conclusions Rare mitochondrial DNA mutations probably account for more than 7.4% of patients with respiratory chain deficiency. This study shows that a comprehensive analysis of mtDNA is essential, and should include young children, for an accurate diagnosis that is now accessible with the development of next generation sequencing technology. PMID:23847141

  13. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by six hours after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by twelve hours after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and “foaming” of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence

  14. Mitochondrial DNA replacement versus nuclear DNA persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serva, Maurizio

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we consider two populations whose generations are not overlapping and whose size is large. The number of males and females in both populations is constant. Any generation is replaced by a new one and any individual has two parents concerning nuclear DNA and a single one (the mother) concerning mtDNA. Moreover, at any generation some individuals migrate from the first population to the second. In a finite random time T, the mtDNA of the second population is completely replaced by the mtDNA of the first. In the same time, the nuclear DNA is not completely replaced and a fraction F of the ancient nuclear DNA persists. We compute both T and F. Since this study shows that complete replacement of mtDNA in a population is compatible with the persistence of a large fraction of nuclear DNA, it may have some relevance for the 'out of Africa'/multiregional debate in palaeoanthropology.

  15. Characterization of mitochondrial DNA in primary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Giannattasio, S; Pucci, A; Lippolis, R; Camaschella, C; Marra, E

    1995-12-29

    With the aim of studying the involvement of the mitochondrial genome in the impairment of heart function, mitochondrial DNA was analyzed by modified primer shift-polymerase chain reaction in a panel of young patients affected by primary cardiomyopathies. Mitochondrial DNA molecules harboring the 7436 bp deletion were specifically found in cardiomyopathic patients as compared with a panel of control subjects. The 4977 bp deletion was commonly detected among the subjects analyzed whereas none of the specific tRNA gene point mutations generally associated with the cardiomyopathic trait were detected. The presence of the 7436 bp deletion as a consequence of a premature aging of the heart muscle, secondary to heart dysfunction, is discussed. PMID:8747493

  16. Mitochondrial DNA hypomethylation in chrome plating workers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linqing; Xia, Bo; Yang, Xueqin; Ding, Hong; Wu, Desheng; Zhang, Huimin; Jiang, Gaofeng; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong

    2016-01-22

    A matched case-control study was conducted to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) exposure and variation in mitochondrial (mt) DNA methylation. We enrolled 29 pairs of subjects in this study; Cr exposure was confirmed in the cases by detecting blood Cr and other metal ion concentrations. DNA damage caused by Cr exposure was determined in terms of binucleated micronucleus frequency (BNMN) and mtDNA copy number. Finally, a Sequenom MassARRAY platform was applied to inspect the DNA methylation levels of mitochondrially encoded tRNA phenylalanine (MT-TF), mitochondrially encoded 12S RNA (MT-RNR1), and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) genes. The blood Cr ion concentration and micronucleus frequency of the Cr-exposed group were higher than those of the control group, whereas the mtDNA copy number remained unchanged. The methylation levels of MT-TF and MT-RNR1 but not LINE-1 were significantly lower in Cr-exposed workers. Pearson correlation analysis showed that workers with higher blood Cr ion concentrations exhibited lower MT-TF and MT-RNR1 gene methylation, and multiple linear regression analysis indicated that CpG sites 1 and 2 in MT-TF and CpG site 6 in MT-RNR1 were affected. These results suggested that methylation level of mtDNA has the possibility of acting as an alternative effect biomarker for Cr exposure. PMID:26656300

  17. Mitochondrial DNA-deficient models and aging.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Abdullah; Akman, Serif

    2007-04-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 subunits of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme complexes I, III, IV, and V except complex II. MtDNA is more sensitive to oxidative damage than nuclear DNA. MtDNA defects are involved in many pathologies including aging. Several mtDNA-deficient cell culture, yeast, and animal models were generated to study the role of mtDNA in many physiological processes. Ethidium bromide (EB), an agent that is known to inhibit mtDNA replication with a negligible effect on nuclear DNA, is generally used to generate mtDNA-deficient models. The antibiotics chloramphenicol and doxycycline, which were known to inhibit mitochondrial translation, were also used to generate the same phenotype. Cultured mtDNA-deficient cells need uridine and pyruvate to survive. At the organismal level, uridine can be supplemented, but pyruvate supplementation can cause a worser phenotype because of lactic acidosis. In C. elegans, EB, when used during larval development, increases life span, but decreases, when used after the beginning of adult stage. This should be kept in mind since mitochondria-related genes are generally detected in genome-wide screening studies for longevity. We believe that conditional knockout studies need to be carried out for these genes after reaching adulthood. MtDNA mutator mouse did not show an increase of free radical production. Therefore, the downstream phenomena to mtDNA defects are likely ineffective pyrimidine synthesis (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, DHODH, needs a functional respiratory chain) and excess NADH (decreased NAD pool) in addition to free radicals. PMID:17460185

  18. Restoration of normal embryogenesis by mitochondrial supplementation in pig oocytes exhibiting mitochondrial DNA deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cagnone, Gael L. M.; Tsai, Te-Sha; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Matthews, Pamela; Gould, Jodee; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Elgass, Kirstin D.; Wong, Ashley S. A.; Wu, Lindsay E.; McKenzie, Matthew; Sinclair, David A.; John, Justin C. St.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of women fail to achieve pregnancy due to either failed fertilization or embryo arrest during preimplantation development. This often results from decreased oocyte quality. Indeed, reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number (mitochondrial DNA deficiency) may disrupt oocyte quality in some women. To overcome mitochondrial DNA deficiency, whilst maintaining genetic identity, we supplemented pig oocytes selected for mitochondrial DNA deficiency, reduced cytoplasmic maturation and lower developmental competence, with autologous populations of mitochondrial isolate at fertilization. Supplementation increased development to blastocyst, the final stage of preimplantation development, and promoted mitochondrial DNA replication prior to embryonic genome activation in mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes but not in oocytes with normal levels of mitochondrial DNA. Blastocysts exhibited transcriptome profiles more closely resembling those of blastocysts from developmentally competent oocytes. Furthermore, mitochondrial supplementation reduced gene expression patterns associated with metabolic disorders that were identified in blastocysts from mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes. These results demonstrate the importance of the oocyte’s mitochondrial DNA investment in fertilization outcome and subsequent embryo development to mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes. PMID:26987907

  19. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    PubMed

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust. PMID:21883207

  20. PCR-Based Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, Mitochondrial DNA Damage, and Nuclear DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P; Rooney, John P; Ryde, Ian T; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role that DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit, we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  1. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Content and Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Matthew R.; Shen, Min; Liu, Chin-San; DiVita, Margaret; He, Xingzhou; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Smoky coal contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and has been strongly implicated in etiology of lung cancer in Xuan Wei, China. While PAHs have been demonstrated to form bulky adducts in nuclear DNA, they have a 90-fold greater affinity for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). To compensate for mitochondrial dysfunction or damage, mtDNA content is thought to increase. We conducted a population-based case-control study of lung cancer in Xuan Wei, China hypothesizing that mtDNA content is associated with lung cancer risk. Cases (n = 122) and controls (n = 121) were individually matched on age (±2yrs), sex, village of residence, and type of heating/cooking fuel currently used. Lifetime smoky coal use and potential confounders were determined with questionnaires. mtDNA was extracted from sputum and content was determined with quantitative RT-PCR. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. mtDNA content was dichotomized at the median based on the distribution among the controls. mtDNA content > 157 was associated with a 2-fold increase in lung cancer risk (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.0–3.2) compared with those with ≤157 copies. Risk was higher among those >57 years of age compared with those ≤ 57 years (p interaction = 0.01). In summary, mtDNA content was positively associated with lung cancer risk. Furthermore, there was some evidence that mtDNA content was more strongly associated with lung cancer risk among older individuals. However, due to the small sample size, additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations. PMID:18691788

  3. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype predicts deafness risk

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchin, T.; Cortopassi, G.

    1995-12-18

    Since mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) does not recombine in humans, once deleterious variation arises within a particular mtDNA clone it remains linked to that clonal type. An A to G mutation at mtDNA position 1555 confers matrilineal deafness among Asians and others. Two major mtDNA types (I and II) have been defined in Asians by D-loop sequencing. We have determined the D-loop sequence of 8 unrelated deaf Asians bearing the 1555G mutation, and find that 7 are of type II, whereas only one is of type I. Thus the frequency of the 1555G mutation is higher in type II mtDNA than type I (P = 0.035, binomial test), and persons with type II mtDNA are more likely to become deaf. Type II mtDNAs are rare in the Caucasian population, which may explain the rarity of this form of deafness in the United States. Negative Darwinian selection is expected to rapidly eliminate mtDNAs bearing severely deleterious mutations; but mildly deleterious mutations whose phenotype is expressed after reproduction should persist on the mtDNA background in which they arose. Thus determination of mtDNA clonal type has the potential to predict human risk for diseases that are the result of mildly deleterious mtDNA mutations which confer a post-reproductive phenotype. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Complete Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in Iranians

    PubMed Central

    Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Denisova, Galina; Perkova, Maria; Farjadian, Shirin; Yepiskoposyan, Levon

    2013-01-01

    Due to its pivotal geographical location and proximity to transcontinental migratory routes, Iran has played a key role in subsequent migrations, both prehistoric and historic, between Africa, Asia and Europe. To shed light on the genetic structure of the Iranian population as well as on the expansion patterns and population movements which affected this region, the complete mitochondrial genomes of 352 Iranians were obtained. All Iranian populations studied here exhibit similarly high diversity values comparable to the other groups from the Caucasus, Anatolia and Europe. The results of AMOVA and MDS analyses did not associate any regional and/or linguistic group of populations in the Anatolia/Caucasus and Iran region pointing to close genetic positions of Persians and Qashqais to each other and to Armenians, and Azeris from Iran to Georgians. By reconstructing the complete mtDNA phylogeny of haplogroups R2, N3, U1, U3, U5a1g, U7, H13, HV2, HV12, M5a and C5c we have found a previously unexplored genetic connection between the studied Iranian populations and the Arabian Peninsula, India, Near East and Europe, likely the result of both ancient and recent gene flow. Our results for Persians and Qashqais point to a continuous increase of the population sizes from ∼24 kya to the present, although the phase between 14-24 kya is thought to be hyperarid according to the Gulf Oasis model. Since this would have affected hunter-gatherer ranges and mobility patterns and forced them to increasingly rely on coastal resources, this transition can explain the human expansion across the Persian Gulf region. PMID:24244704

  5. Complete mitochondrial DNA diversity in Iranians.

    PubMed

    Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Denisova, Galina; Perkova, Maria; Farjadian, Shirin; Yepiskoposyan, Levon

    2013-01-01

    Due to its pivotal geographical location and proximity to transcontinental migratory routes, Iran has played a key role in subsequent migrations, both prehistoric and historic, between Africa, Asia and Europe. To shed light on the genetic structure of the Iranian population as well as on the expansion patterns and population movements which affected this region, the complete mitochondrial genomes of 352 Iranians were obtained. All Iranian populations studied here exhibit similarly high diversity values comparable to the other groups from the Caucasus, Anatolia and Europe. The results of AMOVA and MDS analyses did not associate any regional and/or linguistic group of populations in the Anatolia/Caucasus and Iran region pointing to close genetic positions of Persians and Qashqais to each other and to Armenians, and Azeris from Iran to Georgians. By reconstructing the complete mtDNA phylogeny of haplogroups R2, N3, U1, U3, U5a1g, U7, H13, HV2, HV12, M5a and C5c we have found a previously unexplored genetic connection between the studied Iranian populations and the Arabian Peninsula, India, Near East and Europe, likely the result of both ancient and recent gene flow. Our results for Persians and Qashqais point to a continuous increase of the population sizes from ∼24 kya to the present, although the phase between 14-24 kya is thought to be hyperarid according to the Gulf Oasis model. Since this would have affected hunter-gatherer ranges and mobility patterns and forced them to increasingly rely on coastal resources, this transition can explain the human expansion across the Persian Gulf region. PMID:24244704

  6. Sequencing mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms by hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, M.S.; Lockhart, D.J.; Hubbell, E.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA chips for genetic analysis, using human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a model. The DNA chips are made up of ordered arrays of DNA oligonucleotide probes, synthesized on a glass substrate using photolithographic techniques. The synthesis site for each different probe is specifically addressed by illumination of the substrate through a photolithographic mask, achieving selective deprotection Nucleoside phosphoramidites bearing photolabile protecting groups are coupled only to exposed sites. Repeated cycles of deprotection and coupling generate all the probes in parallel. The set of 4{sup N} N-mer probes can be synthesized in only 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N steps. Any subset can be synthesized in 4N or fewer steps. Sequences amplified from the D-loop region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were fluorescently labelled and hybridized to DNA chips containing probes specific for mtDNA. Each nucleotide of a 1.3 kb region spanning the D loop is represented by four probes on the chip. Each probe has a different base at the position of interest: together they comprise a set of A, C, G and T probes which are otherwise identical. In principle, only one probe-target hybrid will be a perfect match. The other three will be single base mismatches. Fluorescence imaging of the hybridized chip allows quantification of hybridization signals. Heterozygous mixtures of sequences can also be characterized. We have developed software to quantitate and interpret the hybridization signals, and to call the sequence automatically. Results of sequence analysis of human mtDNAs will be presented.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in a maternal lineage of Holstein cows.

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, W W; Laipis, P J

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrial genotypes are shown to exist within one Holstein cow maternal lineage. They were detected by the appearance of an extra Hae III recognition site in one genotype. The nucleotide sequence of this region has been determined and the genotypes are distinguished by an adenine/guanine base transition which creates the new Hae III site. This point mutation occurs within an open reading frame at the third position of a glycine codon and therefore does not alter the amino acid sequence. The present pattern of genotypes within the lineage demands that multiple shifts between genotypes must have occurred within the past 20 years with the most rapid shift taking place in no more than 4 years and indicates that mitochondrial DNA polymorphism can occur between maternally related mammals. The process that gave rise to different genotypes in one lineage is clearly of fundamental importance in understanding intraspecific mitochondrial polymorphism and evolution in mammals. Several potential mechanisms for rapid mitochondrial DNA variation are discussed in light of these results. Images PMID:6289312

  8. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  9. Barriers to male transmission of mitochondrial DNA in sperm development.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Steven Z; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2012-03-13

    Across the eukaryotic phylogeny, offspring usually inherit their mitochondrial genome from only one of two parents: in animals, the female. Although mechanisms that eliminate paternally derived mitochondria from the zygote have been sought, the developmental stage at which paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA is restricted is unknown in most animals. Here, we show that the mitochondria of mature Drosophila sperm lack DNA, and we uncover two processes that eliminate mitochondrial DNA during spermatogenesis. Visualization of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids revealed their abrupt disappearance from developing spermatids in a process requiring the mitochondrial nuclease, Endonuclease G. In Endonuclease G mutants, persisting nucleoids are swept out of spermatids by a cellular remodeling process that trims and shapes spermatid tails. Our results show that mitochondrial DNA is eliminated during spermatogenesis, thereby removing the capacity of sperm to transmit the mitochondrial genome to the next generation. PMID:22421049

  10. Tissue mitochondrial DNA changes. A stochastic system.

    PubMed

    Kopsidas, G; Kovalenko, S A; Heffernan, D R; Yarovaya, N; Kramarova, L; Stojanovski, D; Borg, J; Islam, M M; Caragounis, A; Linnane, A W

    2000-06-01

    Several lines of evidence support the view that the bioenergetic function of the mitochondria in postmitotic tissue deteriorates during normal aging. Skeletal muscle is one such tissue that undergoes age-related fiber loss and atrophy and an age-associated rise in the number of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient fibers. With such metabolic pressure placed on skeletal muscle it would be an obvious advantage to supplement the cellular requirement for energy by up-regulating glycolysis, and alternative pathway for energy synthesis. Analysis of rat skeletal muscle utilizing antibodies directed against key enzymes involved in glycolysis has provided evidence of an age-associated increase in the enzymes involved in glycolysis. Fructose-6-phosphate kinase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase protein levels appeared to increase in the soleus, gracilis, and quadriceps muscle from aged rats. The increase in the level of these proteins appeared to correlate to a corresponding decrease in the amount of cytochrome c oxidase protein measured in the same tissue. Together these results are interpreted to represent a general upregulation of glycolysis that occurs in response to the age-associated decrease in mitochondrial energy capacity. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mutations may accumulate with advancing age until they reach a threshold level were they impinge on the bioenergy capacity of the cell or tissue. Evidence indicates that mtDNA from the skeletal muscle of both aged rats and humans not only undergoes changes at the nucleotide sequence level (mutations and DNA damage), but also undergoes modifications at the tertiary level to generate unique age-related conformational mtDNA species. One particular age-related conformational form was only detected in aged rat tissues with high demands on respiration, specifically in heart, kidney, soleus muscle, and, to a lesser extent, the quadriceps muscle. The age-related form was not

  11. Assignment of two mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides to human mitochondrial DNA and their use in the study of intracellular mitochondrial interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, N.A.; Wallace, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrially synthesized marker polypeptides, MV-1 and MV-2, were found in human HeLa and HT1080 cells. These were assigned to the mitochondrial DNA in HeLa-HT1080 hybrids and hybrids by demonstrating their linkage to cytoplasmic genetic markers. These markers include mitochondrial DNA restriction site polymorphisms and resistance to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. In the absence of chloramphenicol, the expression of MV-1 and MV-2 in hybrids and hybrids was found to be directly proportional to the ratio of the parental mitochondrial DNAs. In the presence of chloramphenicol, the marker polypeptide linked to the chloramphenicol-sensitive mitochondrial DNA continued to be expressed. This demonstrated that resistant and sensitive mitochondrial DNAs can cooperate within a cell for gene expression and that the CAP-resistant allele was dominant or codominant to sensitive. Such cooperation suggests that mitochondrial DNAs can be exchanged between mitochondria.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA perspective of Serbian genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Slobodan; Malyarchuk, Boris; Aleksic, Jelena M; Derenko, Miroslava; Topalovic, Vladanka; Litvinov, Andrey; Stevanovic, Milena; Kovacevic-Grujicic, Natasa

    2015-03-01

    Although south-Slavic populations have been studied to date from various aspects, the population of Serbia, occupying the central part of the Balkan Peninsula, is still genetically understudied at least at the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. We analyzed polymorphisms of the first and the second mtDNA hypervariable segments (HVS-I and HVS-II) and informative coding-region markers in 139 Serbians to shed more light on their mtDNA variability, and used available data on other Slavic and neighboring non-Slavic populations to assess their interrelations in a broader European context. The contemporary Serbian mtDNA profile is consistent with the general European maternal landscape having a substantial proportion of shared haplotypes with eastern, central, and southern European populations. Serbian population was characterized as an important link between easternmost and westernmost south-Slavic populations due to the observed lack of genetic differentiation with all other south-Slavic populations and its geographical positioning within the Balkan Peninsula. An increased heterogeneity of south Slavs, most likely mirroring turbulent demographic events within the Balkan Peninsula over time (i.e., frequent admixture and differential introgression of various gene pools), and a marked geographical stratification of Slavs to south-, east-, and west-Slavic groups, were also found. A phylogeographic analyses of 20 completely sequenced Serbian mitochondrial genomes revealed not only the presence of mtDNA lineages predominantly found within the Slavic gene pool (U4a2a*, U4a2a1, U4a2c, U4a2g, HV10), supporting a common Slavic origin, but also lineages that may have originated within the southern Europe (H5*, H5e1, H5a1v) and the Balkan Peninsula in particular (H6a2b and L2a1k). PMID:25418795

  13. Mitochondrial DNA variation in Nicobarese Islanders.

    PubMed

    Prasad, B V; Ricker, C E; Watkins, W S; Dixon, M E; Rao, B B; Naidu, J M; Jorde, L B; Bamshad, M

    2001-10-01

    The aboriginal populations living in the Nicobar Islands are hypothesized to be descendants of people who were part of early human dispersals into Southeast Asia. However, analyses of ethnographic histories, languages, morphometric data, and protein polymorphisms have not yet resolved which worldwide populations are most closely related to the Nicobarese. Thus, to explore the origins and affinities of the Nicobar Islanders, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 sequence data from 33 Nicobarese Islanders and compared their mtDNA haplotypes to those of neighboring East Asians, mainland and island Southeast Asians, Indians, Australian aborigines, Pacific Islanders, and Africans. Unique Nicobarese mtDNA haplotypes, including five Nicobarese mtDNA haplotypes linked to the COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion, are most closely related to mtDNA haplotypes from mainland Southeast Asian Mon-Kmer-speaking populations (e.g., Cambodians). Thus, the dispersal of southern Chinese into mainland Southeast Asia may have included a westward expansion and colonization of the islands of the Andaman Sea. PMID:11758691

  14. Quantitative PCR for detection of DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Takanori; Yamanaka, Mayumi; Nakamura, Atori; Terashita, Tomoki; Kawano, Shinji; Ikeda, Shogo

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) has been employed to detect DNA damage and repair in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of human and several model organisms. The assay also permits the quantitation of relative mtDNA copy number in cells. Here, we developed the QPCR assay primers and reaction conditions for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an important model of eukaryote biology, not previously described. Under these conditions, long targets (approximately 10kb) in mtDNA were quantitatively amplified using 0.1ng of crude DNA templates without isolation of mitochondria and mtDNA. Quantitative detection of oxidative DNA damage in mtDNA was illustrated by using a DNA template irradiated with UVA in the presence of riboflavin. The damage to mtDNA in S. pombe cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and paraquat was also quantitatively measured. Finally, we found that mtDNA copy number in S. pombe cells increased after transition into a stationary phase and that the damage to mtDNA due to endogenous cellular processes accumulated during chronological aging. PMID:27236021

  15. Acceptance of domestic cat mitochondrial DNA in a criminal proceeding.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Kun, Teri J; Netzel, Linda R; Wictum, Elizabeth E; Halverson, Joy L

    2014-11-01

    Shed hair from domestic animals readily adheres to clothing and other contact items, providing a source of transfer evidence for criminal investigations. Mitochondrial DNA is often the only option for DNA analysis of shed hair. Human mitochondrial DNA analysis has been accepted in the US court system since 1996. The murder trial of the State of Missouri versus Henry L. Polk, Jr. represents the first legal proceeding where cat mitochondrial DNA analysis was introduced into evidence. The mitochondrial DNA evidence was initially considered inadmissible due to concerns about the cat dataset and the scientific acceptance of the marker. Those concerns were subsequently addressed, and the evidence was deemed admissible. This report reviews the case in regards to the cat biological evidence and its ultimate admission as generally accepted and reliable. Expansion and saturation analysis of the cat mitochondrial DNA control region dataset supported the initial interpretation of the evidence. PMID:25086413

  16. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  17. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  18. Acceptance of Domestic Cat Mitochondrial DNA in a Criminal Proceeding

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Leslie A.; Grahn, Robert A.; Kun, Teri J.; Netzel, Linda R.; Wictum, Elizabeth E.; Halverson, Joy L.

    2014-01-01

    Shed hair from domestic animals readily adheres to clothing and other contact items, providing a source of transfer evidence for criminal investigations. Mitochondrial DNA is often the only option for DNA analysis of shed hair. Human mitochondrial DNA analysis has been accepted in the US court system since 1996. The murder trial of the State of Missouri versus Henry L. Polk, Jr. represents the first legal proceeding where cat mitochondrial DNA analysis was introduced into evidence. The mitochondrial DNA evidence was initially considered inadmissible due to concerns about the cat dataset and the scientific acceptance of the marker. Those concerns were subsequently addressed, and the evidence was deemed admissible. This report reviews the case in regards to the cat biological evidence and its ultimate admission as generally accepted and reliable. Expansion and saturation analysis of the cat mitochondrial DNA control region dataset supported the initial interpretation of the evidence. PMID:25086413

  19. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description MPV17 -related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an inherited disorder that can ...

  20. Urinary mitochondrial DNA is a biomarker of mitochondrial disruption and renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Ryan M.; Stallons, L. Jay; Kneff, Joshua E.; Alge, Joseph L.; Harmon, Jennifer L.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Arthur, John M.; Beeson, Craig C.; Chan, Sherine L.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the initiation and progression of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, no biomarkers exist linking renal injury to mitochondrial function and integrity. To this end, we evaluated urinary mitochondrial DNA (UmtDNA) as a biomarker of renal injury and function in humans with AKI following cardiac surgery. mtDNA was isolated from the urine of patients following cardiac surgery and quantified by qPCR. Patients were stratified into no AKI, stable AKI and progressive AKI groups based on Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) staging. UmtDNA was elevated in progressive AKI patients, and was associated with progression of patients with AKI at collection to higher AKIN stages. To evaluate the relationship of UmtDNA to measures of renal mitochondrial integrity in AKI, mice were subjected to sham surgery or varying degrees of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. UmtDNA increased in mice after 10-15 minutes of ischemia and positively correlated with ischemia time. Furthermore, UmtDNA was predictive of AKI in the mouse model. Finally, UmtDNA levels were negatively correlated with renal cortical mtDNA and mitochondrial gene expression. These translational studies demonstrate that UmtDNA is associated with recovery from AKI following cardiac surgery by serving as an indicator of mitochondrial integrity. Thus, UmtDNA may serve as valuable biomarker for the development of mitochondrial targeted therapies in AKI. PMID:26287315

  1. Characterization of Nucleotide Misincorporation Patterns in the Iceman's Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Background The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation (“miscoding lesions”) has been the object of extensive investigations. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350–5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp) mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85%) of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine→thymine/guanine→adenine) transitions and

  2. Mitochondrial DNA: impacting central and peripheral nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Because of their high-energy metabolism, neurons are highly dependent on mitochondria, which generate cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. The mitochondrial genome encodes for critical components of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway machinery, and therefore mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause energy production defects that frequently have severe neurological manifestations. Here, we review the principles of mitochondrial genetics and focus on prototypical mitochondrial diseases to illustrate how primary defects in mtDNA or secondary defects in mtDNA due to nuclear genome mutations can cause prominent neurological and multisystem features. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases, the cellular mechanisms that protect mitochondrial integrity, and the prospects for therapy. PMID:25521375

  3. Defects in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated by the DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Nucleotide precursors for mtDNA replication arise from the mitochondrial salvage pathway originating from transport of nucleosides, or alternatively from cytoplasmic reduction of ribonucleotides. Defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mtDNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mtDNA depletion syndromes (MDS) such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mtDNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mtDNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2) and nucleotide metabolism (TYMP, TK2, DGOUK, and RRM2B) that cause instability of mtDNA and mitochondrial disease. PMID:22176657

  4. Mitochondrial DNA and Functional Investigations into the Radiosensitivity of Four Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Steven B.; Maguire, David; Zhang, Mei; Tian, Yeping; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Amy; Casey-Sawicki, Katherine; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Yin, Liangjie; Guo, Yongson; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Chun; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Swarts, Steven; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Zhang, Lurong; Okunieff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether genetic radiosensitivity-related changes in mtDNA/nDNA ratios are significant to mitochondrial function and if a material effect on mtDNA content and function exists. BALB/c (radiosensitive), C57BL/6 (radioresistant), and F1 hybrid mouse strains were exposed to total body irradiation. Hepatic genomic DNA was extracted, and mitochondria were isolated. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ROS, and calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling were measured. Radiation influenced strain-specific survival in vivo. F1 hybrid survival was influenced by maternal input. Changes in mitochondrial content corresponded to survival in vivo among the 4 strains. Calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling was strain dependent. Isolated mitochondria from BALB/c mice were significantly more sensitive to calcium overload than mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice. Maternal input partially influenced the recovery effect of radiation on calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling in F1 hybrids; the hybrid with a radiosensitive maternal lineage exhibited a lower rate of recovery. Hybrids had a survival rate that was biased toward maternal input. mtDNA content and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTP) measured in these strains before irradiation reflected a dominant input from the parent. After irradiation, the MPTP opened sooner in radiosensitive and hybrid strains, likely triggering intrinsic apoptotic pathways. These findings have important implications for translation into predictors of radiation sensitivity/resistance. PMID:24688546

  5. Mitochondrial DNA damage induced autophagy, cell death, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, Bennett; Hunter, Senyene E.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria contain multiple small genomes. While these organelles have efficient base excision removal of oxidative DNA lesions and alkylation damage, many DNA repair systems that work on nuclear DNA damage are not active in mitochondria. What is the fate of DNA damage in the mitochondria that cannot be repaired or that overwhelms the repair system? Some forms of mitochondrial DNA damage can apparently trigger mitochondrial DNA destruction, either via direct degradation or through specific forms of autophagy, such as mitophagy. However, accumulation of certain types of mitochondrial damage, in the absence of DNA ligase III (Lig3) or exonuclease G (EXOG), enzymes required for repair, can directly trigger cell death. This review examines the cellular effects of persistent damage to mitochondrial genomes and discusses the very different cell fates that occur in response to different kinds of damage. PMID:26709760

  6. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and replication in reprogramming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    St John, Justin C

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, it was thought that the role of the mitochondrial genome was confined to encoding key proteins that generate ATP through the process of oxidative phosphorylation in the electron transfer chain. However, with increasing new evidence, it is apparent that the mitochondrial genome has a major role to play in a number of diseases and phenotypes. For example, mitochondrial variants and copy number have been implicated in the processes of fertilisation outcome and development and the onset of tumorigenesis. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes have been implicated in a variety of diseases and most likely account for the adaptation that our ancestors achieved in order that they were fit for their environments. The mechanisms, which enable the mitochondrial genome to either protect or promote the disease phenotype, require further elucidation. However, there appears to be significant 'crosstalk' between the chromosomal and mitochondrial genomes that enable this to take place. One such mechanism is the regulation of DNA methylation by mitochondrial DNA, which is often perturbed in reprogrammed cells that have undergone dedifferentiation and affects mitochondrial DNA copy number. Furthermore, it appears that the mitochondrial genome interacts with the chromosomal genome to regulate the transcription of key genes at certain stages during development. Additionally, the mitochondrial genome can accumulate a series of mtDNA variants, which can lead to diseases such as cancer. It is likely that a combination of certain mitochondrial variants and aberrant patterns of mtDNA copy number could indeed account for many diseases that have previously been unaccounted for. This review focuses on the role that the mitochondrial genome plays especially during early stages of development and in cancer. PMID:26827792

  7. Tissue-specific modulation of mitochondrial DNA segregation by a defect in mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Riikka; Marttinen, Paula; Stewart, James B; Neil Dear, T; Battersby, Brendan J

    2016-02-15

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that divide and fuse by remodeling an outer and inner membrane in response to developmental, physiological and stress stimuli. These events are coordinated by conserved dynamin-related GTPases. The dynamics of mitochondrial morphology require coordination with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to ensure faithful genome transmission, however, this process remains poorly understood. Mitochondrial division is linked to the segregation of mtDNA but how it affects cases of mtDNA heteroplasmy, where two or more mtDNA variants/mutations co-exist in a cell, is unknown. Segregation of heteroplasmic human pathogenic mtDNA mutations is a critical factor in the onset and severity of human mitochondrial diseases. Here, we investigated the coupling of mitochondrial morphology to the transmission and segregation of mtDNA in mammals by taking advantage of two genetically modified mouse models: one with a dominant-negative mutation in the dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 or Dnm1l) that impairs mitochondrial fission and the other, heteroplasmic mice segregating two neutral mtDNA haplotypes (BALB and NZB). We show a tissue-specific response to mtDNA segregation from a defect in mitochondrial fission. Only mtDNA segregation in the hematopoietic compartment is modulated from impaired Dnm1l function. In contrast, no effect was observed in other tissues arising from the three germ layers during development and in mtDNA transmission through the female germline. Our data suggest a robust organization of a heteroplasmic mtDNA segregating unit across mammalian cell types that can overcome impaired mitochondrial division to ensure faithful transmission of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:26681804

  8. Mitochondrial DNA damage and efficiency of ATP biosynthesis: mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Beregovskaya, N; Maiboroda, R

    1995-01-21

    The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ageing processes and in malignant transformation of a cell is discussed. A mathematical model of the mtDNA population in a cell and in tissue is constructed. The model describes the effects of mtDNA damages accumulated during ageing and some features of malignant transformation and regeneration. PMID:7891454

  9. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) regulates the calcium threshold for the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Dipayan; Artiga, Daniel J; Abiria, Sunday A; Clapham, David E

    2016-03-29

    During the mitochondrial permeability transition, a large channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane opens, leading to the loss of multiple mitochondrial solutes and cell death. Key triggers include excessive reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial calcium overload, factors implicated in neuronal and cardiac pathophysiology. Examining the differential behavior of mitochondrial Ca(2+)overload inDrosophilaversus human cells allowed us to identify a gene,MCUR1, which, when expressed inDrosophilacells, conferred permeability transition sensitive to electrophoretic Ca(2+)uptake. Conversely, inhibiting MCUR1 in mammalian cells increased the Ca(2+)threshold for inducing permeability transition. The effect was specific to the permeability transition induced by Ca(2+), and such resistance to overload translated into improved cell survival. Thus,MCUR1expression regulates the Ca(2+)threshold required for permeability transition. PMID:26976564

  10. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edith E; Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Feichtinger, René G; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 ρ(0) cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in ρ(0) cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:22222373

  11. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication and human disease.

    PubMed

    Copeland, William C

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated by the DNA polymerase g in concert with accessory proteins such as the mtDNA helicase, single stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Nucleotide precursors for mtDNA replication arise from the mitochondrial salvage pathway originating from transport of nucleosides, or alternatively from cytoplasmic reduction of ribonucleotides. Defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mtDNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mtDNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mtDNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mtDNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2) and nucleotide metabolism (TYMP, TK2, DGOUK, and RRM2B) that cause instability of mtDNA and mitochondrial disease. PMID:22176657

  12. Modeling of antigenomic therapy of mitochondrial diseases by mitochondrially addressed RNA targeting a pathogenic point mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Yann; Heckel, Anne-Marie; Vysokikh, Mikhail; Dovydenko, Ilya; Meschaninova, Mariya; Rötig, Agnès; Munnich, Arnold; Venyaminova, Alya; Tarassov, Ivan; Entelis, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Defects in mitochondrial genome can cause a wide range of clinical disorders, mainly neuromuscular diseases. Presently, no efficient therapeutic treatment has been developed against this class of pathologies. Because most of deleterious mitochondrial mutations are heteroplasmic, meaning that wild type and mutated forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) coexist in the same cell, the shift in proportion between mutant and wild type molecules could restore mitochondrial functions. Recently, we developed mitochondrial RNA vectors that can be used to address anti-replicative oligoribonucleotides into human mitochondria and thus impact heteroplasmy level in cells bearing a large deletion in mtDNA. Here, we show that this strategy can be also applied to point mutations in mtDNA. We demonstrate that specifically designed RNA molecules containing structural determinants for mitochondrial import and 20-nucleotide sequence corresponding to the mutated region of mtDNA, are able to anneal selectively to the mutated mitochondrial genomes. After being imported into mitochondria of living human cells in culture, these RNA induced a decrease of the proportion of mtDNA molecules bearing a pathogenic point mutation in the mtDNA ND5 gene. PMID:24692550

  13. Decreased mitochondrial tRNALys steady-state levels and aminoacylation are associated with the pathogenic G8313A mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Bacman, Sandra R; Atencio, David P; Moraes, Carlos T

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial tRNA genes cause a number of multisystemic disorders. A G-to-A transition at position 8313 (G8313A) transition in the mitochondrial tRNALys gene has been associated with a childhood syndrome characterized by gastrointestinal-system involvement and encephaloneuropathy. We have used transmitochondrial cybrid clones harbouring patient-derived mitochondrial DNA with the G8313A mutation for the study of the molecular pathogenesis. Our results showed that mutant mitochondrial cybrids respired poorly, and had severely defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and respiratory-chain-enzyme activity. Mutant cybrids also showed a marked decrease in tRNALys steady-state levels and aminoacylation, suggesting that these molecular abnormalities may underlie the pathogenesis of the mitochondrial G8313A mutation. PMID:12737626

  14. Proteomic Dissection of the Mitochondrial DNA Metabolism Apparatus in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    SAlly A. Mackenzie

    2004-01-06

    This study involves the investigation of nuclear genetic components that regulate mitochondrial genome behavior in higher plants. The approach utilizes the advanced plant model system of Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and functionally characterize multiple components of the mitochondrial DNA replication, recombination and mismatch repair system and their interaction partners. The rationale for the research stems from the central importance of mitochondria to overall cellular metabolism and the essential nature of the mitochondrial genome to mitochondrial function. Relatively little is understood about mitochondrial DNA maintenance and transmission in higher eukaryotes, and the higher plant mitochondrial genome displays unique properties and behavior. This investigation has revealed at least three important properties of plant mitochondrial DNA metabolism components. (1) Many are dual targeted to mitochondrial and chloroplasts by novel mechanisms, suggesting that the mitochondria a nd chloroplast share their genome maintenance apparatus. (2)The MSH1 gene, originating as a component of mismatch repair, has evolved uniquely in plants to participate in differential replication of the mitochondrial genome. (3) This mitochondrial differential replication process, termed substoichiometric shifting and also involving a RecA-related gene, appears to represent an adaptive mechanism to expand plant reproductive capacity and is likely present throughout the plant kingdom.

  15. Mitochondrial regulation of cancer associated nuclear DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Chenghui; Naito, Akihiro; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Evans, Teresa T.; Douglas, Michael G.; Cooney, Craig A.; Fan Chunyang; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2007-12-21

    The onset and progression of cancer is associated with the methylation-dependent silencing of specific genes, however, the mechanism and its regulation have not been established. We previously demonstrated that reduction of mitochondrial DNA content induces cancer progression. Here we found that mitochondrial DNA-deficient LN{rho}0-8 activates the hypermethylation of the nuclear DNA promoters including the promoter CpG islands of the endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin. These are unmethylated and the corresponding gene products are expressed in the parental LNCaP containing mitochondrial DNA. The absence of mitochondrial DNA induced DNA methyltransferase 1 expression which was responsible for the methylation patterns observed. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase eliminated hypermethylation and expressed gene products in LN{rho}0-8. These studies demonstrate loss or reduction of mitochondrial DNA resulted in the induction of DNA methyltransferase 1, hypermethylation of the promoters of endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin, and reduction of the corresponding gene products.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups modify the risk of osteoarthritis by altering mitochondrial function and intracellular mitochondrial signals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hezhi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Li, Fengjie; Shi, Hao; Ma, Lin; Du, Miaomiao; You, Yanting; Qiu, Ruyi; Nie, Hezhongrong; Shen, Lijun; Bai, Yidong; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-04-01

    Haplogroup G predisposes one to an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA) occurrence, while haplogroup B4 is a protective factor against OA onset. However, the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, by using trans-mitochondrial technology, we demonstrate that the activity levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and III are higher in G cybrids than in haplogroup B4. Increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) promotes mitochondrial-related ATP generation in G cybrids, thereby shifting the ATP generation from glycolysis to OXPHOS. Furthermore, we found that lower glycolysis in G cybrids decreased cell viability under hypoxia (1% O2) compared with B4 cybrids. In contrast, G cybrids have a lower NAD(+)/NADH ratio and less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under both hypoxic (1% O2) and normoxic (20% O2) conditions than B4 cybrids, indicating that mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathways (retrograde signaling) differ between these cybrids. Gene expression profiling of G and B4 cybrids using next-generation sequencing technology showed that 404 of 575 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between G and B4 cybrids are enriched in 17 pathways, of which 11 pathways participate in OA. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses confirmed that G cybrids had lower glycolysis activity than B4 cybrids. In addition, we confirmed that the rheumatoid arthritis pathway was over-activated in G cybrids, although the remaining 9 pathways were not further tested by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtDNA haplogroup G may increase the risk of OA by shifting the metabolic profile from glycolysis to OXPHOS and by over-activating OA-related signaling pathways. PMID:26705675

  17. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are known to cause an array of diverse disorders, most of which are maternally inherited, and all of which are associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism. It is now emerging that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are also linked to other complex traits, including neurodegenerative diseases, ageing and cancer. Here we discuss insights into the roles of mtDNA mutations in a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the interesting genetic characteristics of the mitochondrial genome and challenges in studying its contribution to pathogenesis. PMID:23154810

  18. Usefulness of microchip electrophoresis for the analysis of mitochondrial DNA in forensic and ancient DNA studies.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Antonio; Albarran, Cristina; Martín, Pablo; García, Pilar; Capilla, Javier; García, Oscar; de la Rua, Concepción; Izaguirre, Neskuts; Pereira, Filipe; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, António; Sancho, Manuel

    2006-12-01

    We evaluate the usefulness of a commercially available microchip CE (MCE) device in different genetic identification studies performed with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) targets, including the haplotype analysis of HVR1 and HVR2 and the study of interspecies diversity of cytochrome b (Cyt b) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) mitochondrial genes in forensic and ancient DNA samples. The MCE commercial system tested in this study proved to be a fast and sensitive detection method of length heteroplasmy in cytosine stretches produced by 16 189T>C transitions in HVR1 and by 309.1 and 309.2 C-insertions in HVR2. Moreover, the quantitative analysis of PCR amplicons performed by LIF allowed normalizing the amplicon input in the sequencing reactions, improving the overall quality of sequence data. These quantitative data in combination with the quantification of genomic mtDNA by real-time PCR has been successfully used to evaluate the PCR efficiency and detection limit of full sequencing methods of different mtDNA targets. The quantification of amplicons also provided a method for the rapid evaluation of PCR efficiency of multiplex-PCR versus singleplex-PCR to amplify short HV1 amplicons (around 100 bp) from severely degraded ancient DNA samples. The combination of human-specific (Cyt b) and universal (16S rRNA) mtDNA primer sets in a single PCR reaction followed by MCE detection offers a very rapid and simple screening test to differentiate between human and nonhuman hair forensic samples. This method was also very efficient with degraded DNA templates from forensic hair and bone samples, because of its applicability to detect small amplicon sizes. Future possibilities of MCE in forensic DNA typing, including nuclear STRs and SNP profiling are suggested. PMID:17120261

  19. Gene therapy for the treatment of mitochondrial DNA disorders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert W

    2005-02-01

    Despite recent epidemiological studies confirming that mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders due to mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome are amongst the most common inherited human diseases, realistic therapeutic strategies for these patients remain limited. The disappointing response to various vitamins, cofactors and electron acceptors that have been administered to patients in an attempt to bypass the underlying respiratory chain defect, coupled with the complexities of human mitochondrial genetics, means that novel and innovative means are required to offer realistic treatments. Several 'gene therapy' strategies have therefore been proposed to treat patients with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, and although these are not without their own inherent problems, several exciting approaches promise much in the near future. This review will provide a basic background to mitochondrial genetics and mitochondrial DNA disorders before introducing the various strategies being tested in vitro at present, in cell culture and animal models, and, in the example of therapeutic exercise, in patients themselves. PMID:15757380

  20. Gastrointestinal dysmotility in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy is caused by mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Sebastiani, Mariangela; De Giorgio, Roberto; Travaglini, Claudia; Tancredi, Andrea; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Bellan, Marzio; Cossarizza, Andrea; Hirano, Michio; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2008-10-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a life-threatening condition of unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be a feature of mitochondrial disorders, such as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene. MNGIE patients show elevated circulating levels of thymidine and deoxyuridine, and accumulate somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. The present study aimed to clarify the molecular basis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in MNGIE. Using laser capture microdissection, we correlated the histopathological features with mtDNA defects in different tissues from the gastrointestinal wall of five MNGIE and ten control patients. We found mtDNA depletion, mitochondrial proliferation, and smooth cell atrophy in the external layer of the muscularis propria, in the stomach and in the small intestine of MNGIE patients. In controls, the lowest amounts of mtDNA were present at the same sites, as compared with other layers of the gastrointestinal wall. We also observed mitochondrial proliferation and mtDNA depletion in small vessel endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, visceral mitochondrial myopathy likely causes gastrointestinal dysmotility in MNGIE patients. The low baseline abundance of mtDNA molecules may predispose smooth muscle cells of the muscularis propria external layer to the toxic effects of thymidine and deoxyuridine, and exposure to high circulating levels of nucleosides may account for the mtDNA depletion observed in the small vessel wall. PMID:18787099

  1. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of the Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼1.2–1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼0.5–2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  3. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. Results To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546) and complete mtDNA (7) sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%), detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62%) of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Conclusion Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV)1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the proposed southern coastal

  4. Sephardic signature in haplogroup T mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Felice L

    2012-01-01

    A rare combination of mutations within mitochondrial DNA subhaplogroup T2e is identified as affiliated with Sephardic Jews, a group that has received relatively little attention. Four investigations were pursued: Search of the motif in 250 000 control region records across 8 databases, comparison of frequencies of T subhaplogroups (T1, T2b, T2c, T2e, T4, T*) across 11 diverse populations, creation of a phylogenic median-joining network from public T2e control region entries, and analysis of one Sephardic mitochondrial full genomic sequence with the motif. It was found that the rare motif belonged only to Sephardic descendents (Turkey, Bulgaria), to inhabitants of North American regions known for secret Spanish–Jewish colonization, or were consistent with Sephardic ancestry. The incidence of subhaplogroup T2e decreased from the Western Arabian Peninsula to Italy to Spain and into Western Europe. The ratio of sister subhaplogroups T2e to T2b was found to vary 40-fold across populations from a low in the British Isles to a high in Saudi Arabia with the ratio in Sephardim more similar to Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Italy than to hosts Spain and Portugal. Coding region mutations of 2308G and 14499T may locate the Sephardic signature within T2e, but additional samples and reworking of current T2e phylogenetic branch structure is needed. The Sephardic Turkish community has a less pronounced founder effect than some Ashkenazi groups considered singly (eg, Polish), but other comparisons of interest await comparable averaging. Registries of signatures will benefit the study of populations with a large number of smaller-size founders. PMID:22108605

  5. [Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphism in Different Populations of Spangled Orloff Chickens].

    PubMed

    Oyuna, N Yu; Moiseyeva, I G; Sevastianova, A A; Vakhrameev, A B; Alexandrov, A V; Kuzevanova, A Yu; Alimov, A A; Sulimova, G E

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, the genetic diversity of the Spangled Orloff chickens was studied by analyzing the polymorphism of the hypervariable region in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Samples for the analysis were collected at the farms ofthe All-Russia Poultry Research and Technological Institute (VNITIP), the All-Russia Institute of Farm Animal Genetics and Breeding (VNIIGRZh), and the Moscow Zoo. The D-loop partial sequences (between nucleotide positions 57 and 523) were determined according to the reference sequence of Gallus gallus spadiceus mtDNA, NC_007235 in 39 individuals obtained from these populations (GenBank Accession Nos. KM391754-KM391792). In the analyzed mtDNA fragment, a total of 20 polymorphic sites localized between positions 167 and 368, as well as at position 446, were described in Spangled Orloff chickens. One polymorphic site at position 221 (haplogroup E, haplotype ORL-2) was unique. All of the identified nucleotide changes were transition-type substitutions. Overall, based on the analysis of poly- morphic sites in the hypervariable fragment of the D-loop of Spangled Orloff chicken mtDNA, we found seven haplotypes belonging to four haplogroups (A, B, C, and E). Haplogroup E (haplotypes ORL-1, ORL-2, and ORL-3) was present in the majority of the studied individual, with the frequencies of 0.77 in the total sample and 0.47 in the VNIIGRZh farm population. Haplogroups A (haplotypes ORL-4 and ORL-7), B (ORL-6), and C (ORL-5) were found only in samples from the VNIIGRZh farm. The studied mtDNA region revealed a lower level of polymorphism in the VNITIP and Moscow Zoo populations, which only had the ORL-1 and ORL-3 haplotypes belonging to Haplogroup E, respectively. Our data suggested that the studied Spangled Orloff chicken populations differed in the composition and frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups and haplotypes. PMID:26606802

  6. BDE-154 induces mitochondrial permeability transition and impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lílian Cristina; Miranda, Luiz Felippe Cabral; de Souza, Alecsandra Oliveira; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants are used in various consumer goods to make these materials difficult to burn. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which are representative of this class of retardants, consist of two benzene rings linked by an oxygen atom, and contain between 1 and 10 bromine atoms in their chemical structure, with the possibility of up to 209 different congeners. Among these congeners, BDE-154 (hexa-BDE) is persistent in the environment and easy to detect in the biota, but no apparent information regarding the mechanism underlying action and toxicity is available. Mitochondria, as the main energy-producing organelles, play an important role in the maintenance of various cellular functions. Therefore, mitochondria were used in the present study as an experimental model to determine the effects of BDE-154 congener at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 50 μM. Our results demonstrated that BDE-154 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane, preferably by inserting into the hydrophobic core of the mitochondrial membrane, which partially inhibits respiration, dissipates Δψ, and permeabilizes the inner mitochondrial membrane to deplete ATP. These effects are more pronounced at concentrations equal to or higher than 10 μM. Results also showed that BDE-154 did not induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation within the mitochondria, indicating the absence of oxidative stress. Therefore, BDE-154 impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics and permeabilizes the mitochondrial membrane, potentially leading to cell death but not via mechanisms involving oxidative stress. PMID:24555644

  7. Oxidative DNA damage stalls the human mitochondrial replisome

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Makarova, Alena V.; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Forslund, Josefin; Burgers, Peter M.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is capable of causing damage to various cellular constituents, including DNA. There is however limited knowledge on how oxidative stress influences mitochondrial DNA and its replication. Here, we have used purified mtDNA replication proteins, i.e. DNA polymerase γ holoenzyme, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein mtSSB, the replicative helicase Twinkle and the proposed mitochondrial translesion synthesis polymerase PrimPol to study lesion bypass synthesis on oxidative damage-containing DNA templates. Our studies were carried out at dNTP levels representative of those prevailing either in cycling or in non-dividing cells. At dNTP concentrations that mimic those in cycling cells, the replication machinery showed substantial stalling at sites of damage, and these problems were further exacerbated at the lower dNTP concentrations present in resting cells. PrimPol, the translesion synthesis polymerase identified inside mammalian mitochondria, did not promote mtDNA replication fork bypass of the damage. This argues against a conventional role for PrimPol as a mitochondrial translesion synthesis DNA polymerase for oxidative DNA damage; however, we show that Twinkle, the mtDNA replicative helicase, is able to stimulate PrimPol DNA synthesis in vitro, suggestive of an as yet unidentified role of PrimPol in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:27364318

  8. Uniparental Inheritance and Replacement of Mitochondrial DNA in Neurospora Tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. B.; Taylor, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    This study tested mechanisms proposed for maternal uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in Neurospora: (1) exclusion of conidial mitochondria by the specialized female reproductive structure, trichogyne, due to mating locus heterokaryon incompatibility and (2) mitochondrial input bias favoring the larger trichogyne over the smaller conidium. These mechanisms were tested by determining the modes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance and transmission in the absence of mating locus heterokaryon incompatibility following crosses of uninucleate strains of Neurospora tetrasperma with trichogyne (trichogyne inoculated by conidia) and without trichogyne (hyphal fusion). Maternal uniparental mitochondrial inheritance was observed in 136 single ascospore progeny following both mating with and without trichogyne using mtDNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms to distinguish parental types. This suggests that maternal mitochondrial inheritance following hyphal fusions is due to some mechanism other than those that implicate the trichogyne. Following hyphal fusion, mututally exclusive nuclear migration permitted investigation of reciprocal interactions. Regardless of which strain accepted nuclei following seven replicate hyphal fusion matings, acceptor mtDNA was the only type detected in 34 hyphal plug and tip samples taken from the contact and acceptor zones. No intracellular mtDNA mixtures were detected. Surprisingly, 3 days following hyphal fusion, acceptor mtDNA replaced donor mtDNA throughout the entire colony. To our knowledge, this is the first report of complete mitochondrial replacement during mating in a filamentous fungus. PMID:8104158

  9. Microangiopathy in the cerebellum of patients with mitochondrial DNA disease

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Pienaar, Ilse S.; Reeve, Amy K.; Hepplewhite, Philippa D.; Jaros, Evelyn; Taylor, Robert W.; Kalaria, Raj N.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathological findings in mitochondrial DNA disease vary and are often dependent on the type of mitochondrial DNA defect. Many reports document neuronal cell loss, demyelination, gliosis and necrotic lesions in post-mortem material. However, previous studies highlight vascular abnormalities in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA defects, particularly in those with the m.3243A>G mutation in whom stroke-like events are part of the mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome. We investigated microangiopathic changes in the cerebellum of 16 genetically and clinically well-defined patients. Respiratory chain deficiency, high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA and increased mitochondrial mass were present within the smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells comprising the vessel wall in patients. These changes were not limited to those harbouring the m.3243A>G mutation frequently associated with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, but were documented in patients harbouring m.8344A>G and autosomal recessive polymerase (DNA directed), gamma (POLG) mutations. In 8 of the 16 patients, multiple ischaemic-like lesions occurred in the cerebellar cortex suggestive of vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction. Indeed, changes in vascular smooth muscle and endothelium distribution and cell size are indicative of vascular cell loss. We found evidence of blood–brain barrier breakdown characterized by plasma protein extravasation following fibrinogen and IgG immunohistochemistry. Reduced immunofluorescence was also observed using markers for endothelial tight junctions providing further evidence in support of blood–brain barrier breakdown. Understanding the structural and functional changes occurring in central nervous system microvessels in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA defects will provide an important insight into mechanisms of neurodegeneration in mitochondrial DNA disease. Since therapeutic

  10. Prevalence of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations related to adult mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Andrew M.; Ng, Yi; Gomez, Nicholas; Blakely, Emma L.; Alston, Charlotte L.; Feeney, Catherine; Horvath, Rita; Yu‐Wai‐Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; McFarland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of mitochondrial disease has proven difficult to establish, predominantly as a result of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. The phenotypic spectrum of mitochondrial disease has expanded significantly since the original reports that associated classic clinical syndromes with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements and point mutations. The revolution in genetic technologies has allowed interrogation of the nuclear genome in a manner that has dramatically improved the diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. We comprehensively assessed the prevalence of all forms of adult mitochondrial disease to include pathogenic mutations in both nuclear and mtDNA. Methods Adults with suspected mitochondrial disease in the North East of England were referred to a single neurology center from 1990 to 2014. For the midyear period of 2011, we evaluated the minimum prevalence of symptomatic nuclear DNA mutations and symptomatic and asymptomatic mtDNA mutations causing mitochondrial diseases. Results The minimum prevalence rate for mtDNA mutations was 1 in 5,000 (20 per 100,000), comparable with our previously published prevalence rates. In this population, nuclear mutations were responsible for clinically overt adult mitochondrial disease in 2.9 per 100,000 adults. Interpretation Combined, our data confirm that the total prevalence of adult mitochondrial disease, including pathogenic mutations of both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes (≈1 in 4,300), is among the commonest adult forms of inherited neurological disorders. These figures hold important implications for the evaluation of interventions, provision of evidence‐based health policies, and planning of future services. Ann Neurol 2015 Ann Neurol 2015;77:753–759 PMID:25652200

  11. Validation of Mitochondrial Gene Delivery in Liver and Skeletal Muscle via Hydrodynamic Injection Using an Artificial Mitochondrial Reporter DNA Vector.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Ishikawa, Takuya; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-12-01

    For successful mitochondrial transgene expression, two independent processes, i.e., developing a mitochondrial gene delivery system and construction of DNA vector to achieve mitochondrial gene expression, are required. To date, very few studies dealing with mitochondrial gene delivery have been reported and, in most cases, transgene expression was not validated, because the construction of a reporter DNA vector for mitochondrial gene expression is the bottleneck. In this study, mitochondrial transgene expression by the in vivo mitochondrial gene delivery of an artificial mitochondrial reporter DNA vector via hydrodynamic injection is demonstrated. In the procedure, a large volume of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA) is rapidly injected. We designed and constructed pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) as a mitochondrial reporter DNA vector that possesses a mitochondrial heavy strand promoter (HSP) and an artificial mitochondrial genome with the reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase gene that records adjustments to the mitochondrial codon system. We delivered the pDNA into mouse liver mitochondria by hydrodynamic injection, and detected exogenous mRNA in the liver using reverse transcription PCR analysis. The hydrodynamic injection of pHSP-mtLuc (CGG) resulted in the expression of the Nluc luciferase protein in liver and skeletal muscle. Our mitochondrial transgene expression reporter system would contribute to mitochondrial gene therapy and further studies directed at mitochondrial molecular biology. PMID:26567847

  12. [Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  13. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching shapes metabolism and healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana Victoria; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Calvo, Enrique; Aix, Esther; González-Guerra, Andrés; Logan, Angela; Bernad-Miana, María Luisa; Romanos, Eduardo; Cruz, Raquel; Cogliati, Sara; Sobrino, Beatriz; Carracedo, Ángel; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Ruíz-Cabello, Jesús; Murphy, Michael P; Flores, Ignacio; Vázquez, Jesús; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-07-28

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) shows extensive within population sequence variability. Many studies suggest that mtDNA variants may be associated with ageing or diseases, although mechanistic evidence at the molecular level is lacking. Mitochondrial replacement has the potential to prevent transmission of disease-causing oocyte mtDNA. However, extension of this technology requires a comprehensive understanding of the physiological relevance of mtDNA sequence variability and its match with the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Studies in conplastic animals allow comparison of individuals with the same nuclear genome but different mtDNA variants, and have provided both supporting and refuting evidence that mtDNA variation influences organismal physiology. However, most of these studies did not confirm the conplastic status, focused on younger animals, and did not investigate the full range of physiological and phenotypic variability likely to be influenced by mitochondria. Here we systematically characterized conplastic mice throughout their lifespan using transcriptomic, proteomic,metabolomic, biochemical, physiological and phenotyping studies. We show that mtDNA haplotype profoundly influences mitochondrial proteostasis and reactive oxygen species generation,insulin signalling, obesity, and ageing parameters including telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in profound differences in health longevity between conplastic strains. PMID:27383793

  14. CpG methylation patterns of human mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baojing; Du, Qingqing; Chen, Lu; Fu, Guangping; Li, Shujin; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Chunling; Bin, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic modification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is still in controversy. To clarify this point, we applied the gold standard method for DNA methylation, bisulfite pyrosequencing, to examine human mtDNA methylation status. Before bisulfite conversion, BamHI was used to digest DNA to open the loop of mtDNA. The results demonstrated that the linear mtDNA had significantly higher bisulfite conversion efficiency compared with circular mtDNA. Furthermore, the methylation values obtained from linear mtDNA were significantly lower than that of circular mtDNA, which was verified by SEQUENOM MassARRAY. The above impacts of circular structure were also observed in lung DNA samples but not in saliva DNA samples. Mitochondrial genome methylation of blood samples and saliva samples from 14 unrelated individuals was detected. The detected regions covered 83 CpG sites across mtDNA including D-loop, 12 S rRNA, 16 S rRNA, ND1, COXI, ND3, ND4, ND5, CYTB. We found that the average methylation levels of nine regions were all less than 2% for both sample types. In conclusion, our findings firstly show that the circular structure of mtDNA affects bisulfite conversion efficiency, which leads to overestimation of mtDNA methylation values. CpG methylation in human mtDNA is a very rare event at most DNA regions. PMID:26996456

  15. CpG methylation patterns of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baojing; Du, Qingqing; Chen, Lu; Fu, Guangping; Li, Shujin; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Chunling; Bin, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic modification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is still in controversy. To clarify this point, we applied the gold standard method for DNA methylation, bisulfite pyrosequencing, to examine human mtDNA methylation status. Before bisulfite conversion, BamHI was used to digest DNA to open the loop of mtDNA. The results demonstrated that the linear mtDNA had significantly higher bisulfite conversion efficiency compared with circular mtDNA. Furthermore, the methylation values obtained from linear mtDNA were significantly lower than that of circular mtDNA, which was verified by SEQUENOM MassARRAY. The above impacts of circular structure were also observed in lung DNA samples but not in saliva DNA samples. Mitochondrial genome methylation of blood samples and saliva samples from 14 unrelated individuals was detected. The detected regions covered 83 CpG sites across mtDNA including D-loop, 12 S rRNA, 16 S rRNA, ND1, COXI, ND3, ND4, ND5, CYTB. We found that the average methylation levels of nine regions were all less than 2% for both sample types. In conclusion, our findings firstly show that the circular structure of mtDNA affects bisulfite conversion efficiency, which leads to overestimation of mtDNA methylation values. CpG methylation in human mtDNA is a very rare event at most DNA regions. PMID:26996456

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in the Arctoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1993-01-01

    Some taxa in the superfamily Arctoidea, such as the giant panda and the lesser panda, have presented puzzles to taxonomists. In the present study, approximately 397 bases of the cytochrome b gene, 364 bases of the 12S rRNA gene, and 74 bases of the tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro) genes from the giant panda, lesser panda, kinkajou, raccoon, coatimundi, and all species of the Ursidae were sequenced. The high transition/transversion ratios in cytochrome b and RNA genes prior to saturation suggest that the presumed transition bias may represent a trend for some mammalian lineages rather than strictly a primate phenomenon. Transversions in the 12S rRNA gene accumulate in arctoids at about half the rate reported for artiodactyls. Different arctoid lineages evolve at different rates: the kinkajou, a procyonid, evolves the fastest, 1.7-1.9 times faster than the slowest lineage that comprises the spectacled and polar bears. Generation-time effect can only partially explain the different rates of nucleotide substitution in arctoids. Our results based on parsimony analysis show that the giant panda is more closely related to bears than to the lesser panda; the lesser panda is neither closely related to bears nor to the New World procyonids. The kinkajou, raccoon, and coatimundi diverged from each other very early, even though they group together. The polar bear is closely related to the spectacled bear, and they began to diverge from a common mitochondrial ancestor approximately 2 million years ago. Relationships of the remaining five bear species are derived. PMID:8415740

  17. Interaction of mitochondrial presequences with DnaK and mitochondrial hsp70.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X P; Elofsson, A; Andreu, D; Glaser, E

    1999-04-23

    Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mt-hsp70) functions as a molecular chaperone in mitochondrial biogenesis. The chaperone in co-operation with its co-proteins acts as a translocation motor pulling the mitochondrial precursor into the matrix. Mt-hsp70s are highly conserved when compared to the bacterial hsp70 homologue, DnaK. Here we have used DnaK as a model to study the interaction of mitochondrial presequences with mt-hsp70 applying a DnaK-binding algorithm, computer modeling and biochemical investigations. DnaK-binding motifs have been analysed on all available, statistically relevant mitochondrial presequences found in the OWL database by running the algorithm. A total of 87 % of mammalian, 97 % of plant, 71 % of yeast and 100 % of Neurospora crassa presequences had at least one DnaK binding site. Based on the prediction, five 13-mer presequence peptides have been synthesized and their inhibitory effect on the molecular chaperone (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE) assisted refolding of luciferase has been analysed. The peptide with the highest predicted binding likelihood showed the strongest inhibitory effect, whereas the peptide with no predicted binding capacity showed no inhibitory effect. A 3D structure of the pea mt-hsp70 has been constructed using homology modeling. The binding affinities of the 13-mer presequence peptides and additional control peptides to DnaK and pea mt-hsp70 have been theoretically estimated by calculating the buried hydrophobic surface area of the peptides docked to DnaK and to the mt-hsp70 structural model. These results suggest that mitochondrial presequences interact with the mt-hsp70 during or after mitochondrial protein import. PMID:10329135

  18. Mitofusins and the mitochondrial permeability transition: the potential downside of mitochondrial fusion

    PubMed Central

    Papanicolaou, Kyriakos N.; Phillippo, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitofusins (Mfn-1 and Mfn-2) are transmembrane proteins that bind and hydrolyze guanosine 5′-triphosphate to bring about the merging of adjacent mitochondrial membranes. This event is necessary for mitochondrial fusion, a biological process that is critical for organelle function. The broad effects of mitochondrial fusion on cell bioenergetics have been extensively studied, whereas the local effects of mitofusin activity on the structure and integrity of the fusing mitochondrial membranes have received relatively little attention. From the study of fusogenic proteins, theoretical models, and simulations, it has been noted that the fusion of biological membranes is associated with local perturbations on the integrity of the membrane that present in the form of lipidic holes which open on the opposing bilayers. These lipidic holes represent obligate intermediates that make the fusion process thermodynamically more favorable and at the same time induce leakage to the fusing membranes. In this perspectives article we present the relevant evidence selected from a spectrum of membrane fusion/leakage models and attempt to couple this information with observations conducted with cardiac myocytes or mitochondria deficient in Mfn-1 and Mfn-2. More specifically, we argue in favor of a situation whereby mitochondrial fusion in cardiac myocytes is coupled with outer mitochondrial membrane destabilization that is opportunistically employed during the process of mitochondrial permeability transition. We hope that these insights will initiate research on this new hypothesis of mitochondrial permeability transition regulation, a poorly understood mitochondrial function with significant consequences on myocyte survival. PMID:22636681

  19. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A is required for the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-15

    The segregation and transmission of the mitochondrial genome in humans are complicated processes but are particularly important for understanding the inheritance and clinical abnormalities of mitochondrial disorders. However, the molecular mechanism of the segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for the segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TFAM in HeLa cells resulted in the enlarged mtDNA, as indicated by the assembly of fluorescent signals stained with PicoGreen. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the enlarged mtDNA and further showed the existence of increased numbers of mitochondria lacking mtDNA signals in TFAM knockdown cells. By complementation analysis, the C-terminal tail of TFAM, which enhances its affinity with DNA, was found to be required for the appropriate distribution of mtDNA. Furthermore, we found that TFAM knockdown induced asymmetric segregation of mtDNA between dividing daughter cells. These results suggest an essential role for human TFAM in symmetric segregation of mtDNA. PMID:20955698

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Human Radiation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental adaptation, predisposition to common diseases, and, potentially, speciation may all be linked through the adaptive potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations of bioenergetics. This Perspective synthesizes evidence that human mtDNA variants may be adaptive or deleterious depending on environmental context and proposes that the accrual of mtDNA variation could contribute to animal speciation via adaptation to marginal environments. PMID:26406369

  1. Genetics Home Reference: TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form Enable Javascript to view ... Open All Close All Description TK2 -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form ( TK2 -MDS) is an ...

  2. Evaluating mitochondrial DNA variation in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    HADJIXENOFONTOS, ATHENA; SCHMIDT, MICHAEL A.; WHITEHEAD, PATRICE L.; KONIDARI, IOANNA; HEDGES, DALE J.; WRIGHT, HARRY H.; ABRAMSON, RUTH K.; MENON, RAMKUMAR; WILLIAMS, SCOTT M.; CUCCARO, MICHAEL L.; HAINES, JONATHAN L.; GILBERT, JOHN R.; PERICAK-VANCE, MARGARET A.; MARTIN, EDEN R.; MCCAULEY, JACOB L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite the increasing speculation that oxidative stress and abnormal energy metabolism may play a role in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and the observation that patients with mitochondrial defects have symptoms consistent with ASD, there are no comprehensive published studies examining the role of mitochondrial variation in autism. Therefore, we have sought to comprehensively examine the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation with regard to ASD risk, employing a multi-phase approach. In phase 1 of our experiment, we examined 132 mtDNA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped as part of our genome-wide association studies of ASD. In phase 2 we genotyped the major European mitochondrial haplogroup-defining variants within an expanded set of autism probands and controls. Finally in phase 3, we resequenced the entire mtDNA in a subset of our Caucasian samples (~400 proband-father pairs). In each phase we tested whether mitochondrial variation showed evidence of association to ASD. Despite a thorough interrogation of mtDNA variation, we found no evidence to suggest a major role for mtDNA variation in ASD susceptibility. Accordingly, while there may be attractive biological hints suggesting the role of mitochondria in ASD our data indicate that mtDNA variation is not a major contributing factor to the development of ASD. PMID:23130936

  3. Mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in young onset parkinsonism: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M; Ceravolo, R; Lombardi, V; Iudice, A; Bonuccelli, U

    2001-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a nosological entity of unknown origin for which, in some cases, a possible pathogenetic role for mitochondrial dysfunction has been postulated. Two young onset parkinsonian patients with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in skeletal muscle are reported on. Patient 1 also presented with increased blood creatine kinase and lactate concentrations and a family history which included a wide range of phenotypes affecting multiple systems. Patient 2 presented with multiple symmetric lipomatosis. Histopathological investigation showed ragged red fibres and COX negative fibres in muscle biopsies from both patients. The data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial DNA mutations may occur in some cases of parkinsonism, suggesting that a diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder should be considered in the presence of consistent family history and clinical symptoms. PMID:11606686

  4. DNA Compaction by Yeast Mitochondrial Protein ABF2p

    SciTech Connect

    Friddle, R W; Klare, J E; Noy, A; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R; Baskin, R J; Martin, S S; Baldwin, E P

    2003-05-09

    We used high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image compaction of linear and circular DNA by the yeast mitochondrial protein ABF2p , which plays a major role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA. AFM images show that protein binding induces drastic bends in the DNA backbone for both linear and circular DNA. At high concentration of ABF2p DNA collapses into a tight globular structure. We quantified the compaction of linear DNA by measuring the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule at increasing concentrations of ABF2p. We also derived a polymer statistical mechanics model that gives quantitative description of compaction observed in our experiments. This model shows that a number of sharp bends in the DNA backbone is often sufficient to cause DNA compaction. Comparison of our model with the experimental data showed excellent quantitative correlation and allowed us to determine binding characteristics for ABF2. Our studies indicate that ABF2 compacts DNA through a novel mechanism that involves bending of DNA backbone. We discuss the implications of such a mechanism for mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

  5. Respiratory-deficient human fibroblasts exhibiting defective mitochondrial DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, A G; Cooper, J M; Leonard, J V; Schapira, A H

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized cultured skin fibroblasts from two siblings affected with a fatal mitochondrial disease caused by a nuclear genetic defect. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain function was severely decreased in these cells. Southern-blot analysis showed that the fibroblasts had reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mtDNA was unstable and was eliminated from the cultured cells over many generations, generating the rho0 genotype. As the mtDNA level decreased, the cells became more dependent upon pyruvate and uridine for growth. Nuclear-encoded subunits of respiratory-chain complexes were synthesized and imported into the mitochondria of the mtDNA-depleted cells, albeit at reduced levels compared with the controls. Mitochondrial protein synthesis directed by the residual mtDNA indicated that the mtDNA was expressed and that the defect specifically involves the replication or maintenance of mtDNA. This is a unique example of a respiratory-deficient human cell line exhibiting defective mtDNA replication. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7848281

  6. Isolation of Circular DNA from a Mitochondrial Fraction from Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Walker, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Breakage and fractionation of respiratory competent yeast in the presence of ethidium bromide, and subsequent centrifugation of a detergent lysate of the mitochondrial fraction by the dye-buoyant-density technique, results in the isolation of closed-circular DNA. After removal of bound dye, this DNA has two components when analyzed by equilibrium buoyant density in the analytical ultracentrifuge. A minor component has a buoyant density of 1.684 g/cm3, which is characteristic of mitochondrial DNA, but the major component has a buoyant density of 1.701 g/cm3. This species of DNA is also present in yeast that have been mutagenized to respiratory deficiency in the presence of the highest concentration of ethidium bromide compatible with cell growth. The closed-circular DNA of buoyant density 1.701 g/cm3, and free of linear DNA, is associated with the sole particulate band obtained on sucrose gradient centrifugation of a mitochondrial preparation from respiratory-deficient cells. Two particulate bands are obtained on sucrose gradient centrifugation of a mitochondrial preparation from respiratory-competent cells, the upper band containing DNA of buoyant density 1.701 g/cm3 and the lower band DNA of buoyant density 1.684 g/cm3. The suggestion is advanced, in view of the reputed sedimentation behaviour of yeast peroxisomes, that the closed-circular DNA of buoyant density 1.701 g/cm3 may be located in peroxisomes. Images PMID:4551142

  7. Mitochondrial DNA repairs double-strand breaks in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, M; Fairhead, C; Dujon, B

    1999-11-01

    The endosymbiotic theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells proposes that genetic information can be transferred from mitochondria to the nucleus of a cell, and genes that are probably of mitochondrial origin have been found in nuclear chromosomes. Occasionally, short or rearranged sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA are seen in the chromosomes of different organisms including yeast, plants and humans. Here we report a mechanism by which fragments of mitochondrial DNA, in single or tandem array, are transferred to yeast chromosomes under natural conditions during the repair of double-strand breaks in haploid mitotic cells. These repair insertions originate from noncontiguous regions of the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome indicates that the yeast nuclear genome does indeed contain several short sequences of mitochondrial origin which are similar in size and composition to those that repair double-strand breaks. These sequences are located predominantly in non-coding regions of the chromosomes, frequently in the vicinity of retrotransposon long terminal repeats, and appear as recent integration events. Thus, colonization of the yeast genome by mitochondrial DNA is an ongoing process. PMID:10573425

  8. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  9. Dynamic Localization of Trypanosoma brucei Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase ID

    PubMed Central

    Concepción-Acevedo, Jeniffer; Luo, Juemin

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomes contain a unique form of mitochondrial DNA called kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) that is a catenated network composed of minicircles and maxicircles. Several proteins are essential for network replication, and most of these localize to the antipodal sites or the kinetoflagellar zone. Essential components for kDNA synthesis include three mitochondrial DNA polymerases TbPOLIB, TbPOLIC, and TbPOLID). In contrast to other kDNA replication proteins, TbPOLID was previously reported to localize throughout the mitochondrial matrix. This spatial distribution suggests that TbPOLID requires redistribution to engage in kDNA replication. Here, we characterize the subcellular distribution of TbPOLID with respect to the Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our analyses demonstrate that in addition to the previously reported matrix localization, TbPOLID was detected as discrete foci near the kDNA. TbPOLID foci colocalized with replicating minicircles at antipodal sites in a specific subset of the cells during stages II and III of kDNA replication. Additionally, the TbPOLID foci were stable following the inhibition of protein synthesis, detergent extraction, and DNase treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TbPOLID has a dynamic localization that allows it to be spatially and temporally available to perform its role in kDNA replication. PMID:22286095

  10. Detection of Heteroplasmic Mitochondrial DNA in Single Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Joseph E.; Kishore, Rani B.; Levin, Barbara C.; Albanetti, Thomas; Boire, Nicholas; Knipe, Ashley; Helmerson, Kristian; Deckman, Koren Holland

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome mutations can lead to energy and respiratory-related disorders like myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fiber disease (MERRF), mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke (MELAS) syndrome, and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). It is not well understood what effect the distribution of mutated mtDNA throughout the mitochondrial matrix has on the development of mitochondrial-based disorders. Insight into this complex sub-cellular heterogeneity may further our understanding of the development of mitochondria-related diseases. Methodology This work describes a method for isolating individual mitochondria from single cells and performing molecular analysis on that single mitochondrion's DNA. An optical tweezer extracts a single mitochondrion from a lysed human HL-60 cell. Then a micron-sized femtopipette tip captures the mitochondrion for subsequent analysis. Multiple rounds of conventional DNA amplification and standard sequencing methods enable the detection of a heteroplasmic mixture in the mtDNA from a single mitochondrion. Significance Molecular analysis of mtDNA from the individually extracted mitochondrion demonstrates that a heteroplasmy is present in single mitochondria at various ratios consistent with the 50/50 heteroplasmy ratio found in single cells that contain multiple mitochondria. PMID:21179558

  11. Mitochondrial DNA D-loop hypervariable regions: Czech population data.

    PubMed

    Vanecek, T; Vorel, F; Sip, M

    2004-02-01

    In order to identify polymorphic sites and to find out their frequencies and the frequency of haplotypes, the complete D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 93 unrelated Czech Caucasians was sequenced. Sequence comparison showed that 85 haplotypes were found and of these 78 were unique, 6 were observed twice and 1 was observed three times. Genetic diversity (GD) was estimated at 0.999 and the probability of two randomly selected sequences matching (random match probability, RMP) at 1.2%. Additionally these calculations were carried out for hypervariable regions 1, 2 (HV1, HV2), for the area between HV1 and HV2 and for the area of the hypervariable region HV3. The average number of nucleotide differences (ANND) was established to be 10.2 for the complete D-loop. The majority of sequence variations were substitutions, particularly transitions. Deletions were found only in the region where HV3 is situated and insertions in the same place and in poly-C tracts between positions 303 and 315 in HV2. A high degree of length heteroplasmy was found especially in the regions of poly-C tracts between positions 16184 and 16193 in HV1 and between positions 303 and 315 in HV2. Position heteroplasmies were found in two cases. PMID:14593483

  12. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy dynamics in a kindred harboring a novel pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA glutamate gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, C.T.; Hao, H.; Bonilla, E.; DiMauro, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in a 32-year-old male with a myopathy (without progressive external ophthalmoplegia) and mild pyramidal involvement. This A{yields}G transition at mtDNA position 14709 alters an evolutionary conserved nucleotide in a region coding for the anticodon loop of the mitcohondrial tRNA{sup Glu}. The 14709 mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic but present at very high levels in the patient`s muscle (95%), white blood cells (81%) and hair follicles (90%). The same mutant mtDNA population was observed in white blood cells and hair follicles of all maternal relatives, but a lesser percentage (25-80%). The patient`s muscle showed many ragged-red fibers and a severe focal defect in cytochrome c oxidase activity, accompanied by the absence of cross-reacting material for mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides (ND 1 and COX II). The percentage of mutant mtDNA was not preferentially increased over two generations. Rather, the percentage of mutant mtDNA observed in siblings seemed to follow a normal distribution around the percentage observed in their mothers. Single hair PCR/RFLP analysis showed that the intercellular fluctuation in the percentage of mutant mtDNA differs among family members. Younger generations tend to have a more homogeneous distribution of mutant mtDNA in different hair follicles. The highest degree of variability between individual hair follicles was observed in the patient`s grandmother. These results suggest that the intercellular distribution of the mutant and wild-type mtDNA populations may drift towards homogeneity in subsequent generations.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Barron, Martin J.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Gospel, Amy; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Samuels, David C.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Plusa, Stefan M.; Needham, Stephanie J.; Greaves, Laura C.; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2003-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of the respiratory chain and has remarkable genetics based on uniparental inheritance. Within human populations, the mitochondrial genome has a high rate of sequence divergence with multiple polymorphic variants and thus has played a major role in examining the evolutionary history of our species. In recent years it has also become apparent that pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations play an important role in neurological and other diseases. Patients harbor many different mtDNA mutations, some of which are mtDNA mutations, some of which are inherited, but others that seem to be sporadic. It has also been suggested that mtDNA mutations play a role in aging and cancer, but the evidence for a causative role in these conditions is less clear. The accumulated data would suggest, however, that mtDNA mutations occur on a frequent basis. In this article we describe a new phenomenon: the accumulation of mtDNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells that result in a significant biochemical defect in their progeny. These studies have important consequences not only for understanding of the finding of mtDNA mutations in aging tissues and tumors, but also for determining the frequency of mtDNA mutations within a cell. PMID:14597761

  14. Mitochondrial DNA disease and developmental implications for reproductive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Joerg Patrick; Johnston, Iain G.; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are potentially severe, incurable diseases resulting from dysfunctional mitochondria. Several important mitochondrial diseases are caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the genetic material contained within mitochondria, which is maternally inherited. Classical and modern therapeutic approaches exist to address the inheritance of mtDNA disease, but are potentially complicated by the fact that cellular mtDNA populations evolve according to poorly-understood dynamics during development and organismal lifetimes. We review these therapeutic approaches and models of mtDNA dynamics during development, and discuss the implications of recent results from these models for modern mtDNA therapies. We particularly highlight mtDNA segregation—differences in proliferative rates between different mtDNA haplotypes—as a potential and underexplored issue in such therapies. However, straightforward strategies exist to combat this and other potential therapeutic problems. In particular, we describe haplotype matching as an approach with the power to potentially ameliorate any expected issues from mtDNA incompatibility. PMID:25425607

  15. Somatic hypermutation of human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, a pathway for DNA catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Aynaud, Marie-Ming; Guétard, Denise; Henry, Michel; Eckhoff, Grace; Marchio, Agnès; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 (A3A–A3H) locus encodes six cytidine deaminases that edit single-stranded DNA, the result being DNA peppered with uridine. Although several cytidine deaminases are clearly restriction factors for retroviruses and hepadnaviruses, it is not known if APOBEC3 enzymes have roles outside of these settings. It is shown here that both human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are vulnerable to somatic hypermutation by A3 deaminases, with APOBEC3A standing out among them. The degree of editing is much greater in patients lacking the uracil DNA-glycolyase gene, indicating that the observed levels of editing reflect a dynamic composed of A3 editing and DNA catabolism involving uracil DNA-glycolyase. Nonetheless, hyper- and lightly mutated sequences went hand in hand, raising the hypothesis that recurrent low-level mutation by APOBEC3A could catalyze the transition from a healthy to a cancer genome. PMID:21368204

  16. Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70, a molecular chaperone for proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mt-Hsp70) has been shown to play an important role in facilitating import into, as well as folding and assembly of nuclear-encoded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Here, we describe a role for mt-Hsp70 in chaperoning proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA and synthesized within mitochondria. The availability of mt-Hsp70 function influences the pattern of proteins synthesized in mitochondria of yeast both in vivo and in vitro. In particular, we show that mt-Hsp70 acts in maintaining the var1 protein, the only mitochondrially encoded subunit of mitochondrial ribosomes, in an assembly competent state, especially under heat stress conditions. Furthermore, mt-Hsp70 helps to facilitate assembly of mitochondrially encoded subunits of the ATP synthase complex. By interacting with the ATP-ase 9 oligomer, mt-Hsp70 promotes assembly of ATP-ase 6, and thereby protects the latter protein from proteolytic degradation. Thus mt-Hsp70 by acting as a chaperone for proteins encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, has a critical role in the assembly of supra- molecular complexes. PMID:7962074

  17. Thymidine phosphorylase mutations cause instability of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Michio; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Valentino, Maria L; Martí, Ramon; Nishigaki, Yutaka

    2005-07-18

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ptosis and progressive external ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia and leukoencephalopathy. Muscle biopsies of MNGIE patients have revealed morphologically abnormal mitochondria and defects of respiratory chain enzymes. In addition, patients harbor depletion, multiple deletions, and point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). This disorder is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP) a cytosolic enzyme. In MNGIE patients, TP activity is very low or absent resulting in dramatically elevated levels of plasma thymidine and deoxyuridine. We have hypothesized that the increased levels of thymidine and deoxyuridine cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances that, in turn, generate mtDNA alterations. PMID:15975738

  18. Structure and evolution of the Phasianidae mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuhao; Ke, Dianhua

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control region is an area of the mitochondrial genome which is non-coding DNA. To infer the structural and evolutionary characteristics of Phasianidae mitochondrial DNA control region, the entire control region sequences of 34 species were analyzed. The length of the control region sequences ranged from 1144 bp (Phasianus colchicus) to 1555 bp (Coturnix japonica) and can be separated into three domains. The average genetic distances among the species within the genera varied from 1.96% (Chrysolophus) to 12.05% (Coturnix). The average genetic distances showed significantly negative correlation with ts/tv. In most genera (except Coturnix), domain I is the most variable among the three domains. However, the first 150 nucleotides apparently evolved at unusually low rates. Four conserved sequence boxes in the domain II of Phasianidae sequences were identified. The alignment of the Phasianidae four boxes and CSB-1 sequences showed considerable sequence variation. PMID:24617466

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  20. Mitochondrial DNA stress primes the antiviral innate immune response.

    PubMed

    West, A Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C; Pineda, Cristiana M; Lang, Sabine M; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A; Kaech, Susan M; Smiley, James R; Means, Robert E; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S

    2015-04-23

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance and segregation. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation, triggering calcium-dependent stress signalling and adaptive metabolic responses. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and ageing, remain poorly defined. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signalling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes. Mechanistically, we find that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS (also known as MB21D1) and promotes STING (also known as TMEM173)-IRF3-dependent signalling to elevate interferon-stimulated gene expression, potentiate type I interferon responses and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which enhances antiviral signalling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signalling and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully engage antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  1. Oxidative Stress Is Not a Major Contributor to Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Itsara, Leslie S.; Kennedy, Scott R.; Fox, Edward J.; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10−5), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  2. Oxidative stress is not a major contributor to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Itsara, Leslie S; Kennedy, Scott R; Fox, Edward J; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10(-5)), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  3. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F.; Brown, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions. We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  5. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  6. Methods for Efficient Elimination of Mitochondrial DNA from Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Nataliya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Kousoulas, Konstantin G.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we document that persistent mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) damage due to mitochondrial overexpression of the Y147A mutant uracil-N-glycosylase as well as mitochondrial overexpression of bacterial Exonuclease III or Herpes Simplex Virus protein UL12.5M185 can induce a complete loss of mtDNA (ρ0 phenotype) without compromising the viability of cells cultured in media supplemented with uridine and pyruvate. Furthermore, we use these observations to develop rapid, sequence-independent methods for the elimination of mtDNA, and demonstrate utility of these methods for generating ρ0 cells of human, mouse and rat origin. We also demonstrate that ρ0 cells generated by each of these three methods can serve as recipients of mtDNA in fusions with enucleated cells. PMID:27136098

  7. A modified procedure for isolation of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Nedeva, Trayana; Petrova, Ventzislava; Hristozova, Tsonka; Kujumdzieva, Anna

    2002-01-01

    A modified, rapid and inexpensive method for preparation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), suitable for molecular analysis is proposed. It comprises batch cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NBIMCC 583 on a simple nutrient medium at 28 degrees C; permeabialization of cells from late exponential growth phase with cetyltrimethylamonnium bromide, mechanical disintegration of the cell wall; preparation of a mitochondrial fraction and subsequent isolation and purification of mtDNA. The amount and the purity of the obtained mtDNA have been checked and its application for molecular analysis proven. The main advantages of the proposed procedure for isolation of mtDNA are introduction of simple nutrient medium, replacement of the enzymatic lysis of the cell wall by the cheaper mechanical one, avoidance of ultracentrifugation steps and use of harmful chemical substances. PMID:12440743

  8. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an intermediate lag to tumor growth, while cells from lung metastases exhibited full restoration of respiratory function and no lag in tumor growth. Stepwise assembly of mitochondrial respiratory (super)complexes was correlated with acquisition of respiratory function. Our findings indicate horizontal transfer of mtDNA from host cells in the tumor microenvironment to tumor cells with compromised respiratory function to re-establish respiration and tumor-initiating efficacy. These results suggest pathophysiological processes for overcoming mtDNA damage and support the notion of high plasticity of malignant cells. PMID:25565207

  9. Role of polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase in mitochondrial DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Tahbaz, Nasser; Subedi, Sudip; Weinfeld, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are implicated in a broad range of human diseases and in aging. Compared to nuclear DNA, mtDNA is more highly exposed to oxidative damage due to its proximity to the respiratory chain and the lack of protection afforded by chromatin-associated proteins. While repair of oxidative damage to the bases in mtDNA through the base excision repair pathway has been well studied, the repair of oxidatively induced strand breaks in mtDNA has been less thoroughly examined. Polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) processes strand-break termini to render them chemically compatible for the subsequent action of DNA polymerases and ligases. Here, we demonstrate that functionally active full-length PNKP is present in mitochondria as well as nuclei. Downregulation of PNKP results in an accumulation of strand breaks in mtDNA of hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. Full restoration of repair of the H2O2-induced strand breaks in mitochondria requires both the kinase and phosphatase activities of PNKP. We also demonstrate that PNKP contains a mitochondrial-targeting signal close to the C-terminus of the protein. We further show that PNKP associates with the mitochondrial protein mitofilin. Interaction with mitofilin may serve to translocate PNKP into mitochondria. PMID:22210862

  10. Mitochondrial DNA repair: a novel therapeutic target for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marín-García, José

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular, cancer, premature aging and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF). Mitochondria contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, called "mitochondrial nucleoids," along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription and repair. Although the mammalian organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to various types of mtDNA damage. These include accumulation of mtDNA point mutations and/or deletions and decreased mtDNA copy number, which will impair mitochondrial function and finally, may lead to CVD including HF. PMID:26940911

  11. Mitochondrial DNA evidence of southward migration of Manchus in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Bin; Sun, Wen-Yi; Zhan, Yang; Di, Wang; Yu, Chang-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The Northeast area of China is a cross region between East Asia and Siberia. Although five populations from this area have been studied in maternal lineage, little is known about the genetics of other populations. In this study, forty-seven Manchu individuals were analyzed using a mitochondrial DNA marker, and fourteen mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, the representative haplogroups of east Eurasian, were identified. All analyses showed that Manchu were close to the neighboring populations such as Mongolian, Korean and northern Han Chinese, and were far from the other populations who lived in the cradle of Manchu, suggesting that the Manchu integrated gradually with natives following its southward migration. PMID:22393778

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  13. Mutations in FBXL4 Cause Mitochondrial Encephalopathy and a Disorder of Mitochondrial DNA Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bonnen, Penelope E.; Yarham, John W.; Besse, Arnaud; Wu, Ping; Faqeih, Eissa A.; Al-Asmari, Ali Mohammad; Saleh, Mohammad A.M.; Eyaid, Wafaa; Hadeel, Alrukban; He, Langping; Smith, Frances; Yau, Shu; Simcox, Eve M.; Miwa, Satomi; Donti, Taraka; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Wong, Lee-Jun; Craigen, William J.; Graham, Brett H.; Scott, Kenneth L.; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear genetic disorders causing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and the molecular etiology remains undiagnosed in the majority of cases. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified recessive nonsense and splicing mutations in FBXL4 segregating in three unrelated consanguineous kindreds in which affected children present with a fatal encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and severe mtDNA depletion in muscle. We show that FBXL4 is an F-box protein that colocalizes with mitochondria and that loss-of-function and splice mutations in this protein result in a severe respiratory chain deficiency, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and a disturbance of the dynamic mitochondrial network and nucleoid distribution in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Expression of the wild-type FBXL4 transcript in cell lines from two subjects fully rescued the levels of mtDNA copy number, leading to a correction of the mitochondrial biochemical deficit. Together our data demonstrate that mutations in FBXL4 are disease causing and establish FBXL4 as a mitochondrial protein with a possible role in maintaining mtDNA integrity and stability. PMID:23993193

  14. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Alessandra; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Caporali, Leonardo; Carelli, Valerio; Zanna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia-deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E) are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however, mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is regulated and

  15. More evidence for non-maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA?

    PubMed Central

    Bandelt, H; Kong, Q; Parson, W; Salas, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: A single case of paternal co-transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in humans has been reported so far. Objective: To find potential instances of non-maternal inheritance of mtDNA. Methods: Published medical case studies (of single patients) were searched for irregular mtDNA patterns by comparing the given haplotype information for different clones or tissues with the worldwide mtDNA database as known to date—a method that has proved robust and reliable for the detection of flawed mtDNA sequence data. Results: More than 20 studies were found reporting clear cut instances with mtDNAs of different ancestries in single individuals. As examples, cases are reviewed from recent published reports which, at face value, may be taken as evidence for paternal inheritance of mtDNA or recombination. Conclusions: Multiple types (or recombinant types) of quite dissimilar mitochondrial DNA from different parts of the known mtDNA phylogeny are often reported in single individuals. From re-analyses and corrigenda of forensic mtDNA data, it is apparent that the phenomenon of mixed or mosaic mtDNA can be ascribed solely to contamination and sample mix up. PMID:15923271

  16. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition and generates breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guha, M; Srinivasan, S; Ruthel, G; Kashina, AK; Carstens, RP; Mendoza, A; Khanna, C; Van Winkle, T; Avadhani, NG

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast tumors undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which renders them resistant to therapies targeted to the primary cancers. The mechanistic link between mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) reduction, often seen in breast cancer patients, and EMT is unknown. We demonstrate that reducing mtDNA content in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) activates Calcineurin (Cn)-dependent mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway, which induces EMT-like reprogramming to fibroblastic morphology, loss of cell polarity, contact inhibition and acquired migratory and invasive phenotype. Notably, mtDNA reduction generates breast cancer stem cells. In addition to retrograde signaling markers, there is an induction of mesenchymal genes but loss of epithelial markers in these cells. The changes are reversed by either restoring the mtDNA content or knockdown of CnAα mRNA, indicating the causal role of retrograde signaling in EMT. Our results point to a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancers targeted to the mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway for abrogating EMT and attenuating cancer stem cells, which evade conventional therapies. We report a novel regulatory mechanism by which low mtDNA content generates EMT and cancer stem cells in hMECs. PMID:24186204

  17. Ubisol-Q10 Prevents Glutamate-Induced Cell Death by Blocking Mitochondrial Fragmentation and Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Santosh; Mehta, Suresh L; Milledge, Gaolin Z.; Huang, Xinyu; Li, Haining; Li, P. Andy

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major events that lead to the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) during glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has widely been used for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Comparing to traditional lipid-soluble CoQ10, water soluble CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10) has high intracellular and intra-mitochondrial distribution. The aims of the present study are to determine the neuroprotective effects of Ubisol-Q10 on glutamate-induced cell death and to explore its functional mechanisms. HT22 neuronal cells were exposed to glutamate. Cell viability was measured and mitochondrial fragmentation was assessed by mitochondrial imaging. The mPTP opening was determined by mitochondrial membrane potential and calcium retention capacity. The results revealed that the anti-glutamate toxicity effects of Ubisol-Q10 was associated with its ability to block mitochondrial fragmentation, to maintain calcium retention capacity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and to prevent mPTP formation, AIF release, and DNA fragmentation. We concluded that Ubisol-Q10 protects cells from glutamate toxicity by preserving the integrity of mitochondrial structure and function. Therefore, adequate CoQ10 supplementation may be beneficial in preventing cerebral stroke and other disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27194946

  18. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p < 0.01). Long time chronic suppurative otitis media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media. PMID:26620342

  19. Shot-gun proteomic analysis of mitochondrial D-loop DNA binding proteins: identification of mitochondrial histones.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yon-Sik; Hoon Jeong, Jae; Min, Hye-Ki; Jung, Hee-Jung; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim Pak, Youngmi

    2011-05-01

    Transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are regulated by nuclear DNA-encoded proteins that are targeted into mitochondria. A decrease in mtDNA copy number results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which may lead to insulin resistance and metabolic syndromes. We analyzed mitochondrial proteins that physically bind to human mitochondrial D-loop DNA using a shot-gun proteomics approach following protein enrichment by D-loop DNA-linked affinity chromatography. A total of 152 D-loop DNA binding proteins were identified by peptide sequencing using ultra high pressure capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Bioinformatic analysis showed that 68 were mitochondrial proteins, 96 were DNA/RNA/protein binding proteins and 114 proteins might form a complex via protein-protein interactions. Histone family members of H1, H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, were detected in abundance among them. In particular, histones H2A and H2B were present in the mitochondrial membrane as integral membrane proteins and not bound directly to mtDNA inside the organelle. Histones H1.2, H3 and H4 were associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Silencing of H2AX expression inhibited mitochondrial protein transport. Our data suggests that many mitochondrial proteins may reside in multiple subcellular compartments like H2AX and exert multiple functions. PMID:21359316

  20. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with 3460 mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Chang, Bong Leen; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Sup

    2002-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease causing acute or subacute, bilateral optic atrophy mainly in young men. It is found to be a mitochondrial disorder with the primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations at 11,778, 3460, and 14,484. The incidence of each mutation is reported to be race-dependent. Point mutations at mtDNA nucleotide position 11,778 and 14,484 have been reported in Korean patients with LHON, however there has been no report of mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 3460. Molecular genetic analyses at four primary sites (11,778, 14,484, 15,257, and 3460) of mitochondrial DNA using the polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, and direct sequencing were performed in a 35-yr-old man with severe visual loss. A point mutation in the mtDNA at nucleotide position 3460 was identified and a conversion of a single alanine to a threonine was confirmed. To our knowledge, this is the first report confirming mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 3460 in Korean patients with LHON. Detailed molecular analyses would be very helpful for the correct diagnosis of optic neuropathy of unknown etiology and for genetic counseling. PMID:11961321

  1. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA quantification of various forensic materials.

    PubMed

    Andréasson, H; Nilsson, M; Budowle, B; Lundberg, H; Allen, M

    2006-12-01

    Due to the different types and quality of forensic evidence materials, their DNA content can vary substantially, and particularly low quantities can impact the results in an identification analysis. In this study, the quantity of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA was determined in a variety of materials using a previously described real-time PCR method. DNA quantification in the roots and distal sections of plucked and shed head hairs revealed large variations in DNA content particularly between the root and the shaft of plucked hairs. Also large intra- and inter-individual variations were found among hairs. In addition, DNA content was estimated in samples collected from fingerprints and accessories. The quantification of DNA on various items also displayed large variations, with some materials containing large amounts of nuclear DNA while no detectable nuclear DNA and only limited amounts of mitochondrial DNA were seen in others. Using this sensitive real-time PCR quantification assay, a better understanding was obtained regarding DNA content and variation in commonly analysed forensic evidence materials and this may guide the forensic scientist as to the best molecular biology approach for analysing various forensic evidence materials. PMID:16427750

  2. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C.; Hirano, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5′-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  3. Site-specific somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with thymidine phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Martí, Ramon; Copeland, William C; Hirano, Michio

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). This deficiency of TP leads to increased circulating levels of thymidine (deoxythymidine, dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd) and has been associated with multiple deletions and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Here we describe 36 point mutations in mtDNA of tissues and cultured cells from MNGIE patients. Thirty-one mtDNA point mutations (86%) were T-to-C transitions, and of these, 25 were preceded by 5'-AA sequences. In addition, we identified a single base-pair mtDNA deletion and a TT-to-AA mutation. Next-nucleotide effects and dislocation mutagenesis may contribute to the formation of these mutations. These results provide the first demonstration that alterations of nucleoside metabolism can induce multiple sequence-specific point mutations in humans. We hypothesize that, in patients with TP deficiency, increased levels of dThd and dUrd cause mitochondrial nucleotide pool imbalances, which, in turn, lead to mtDNA abnormalities including site-specific point mutations. PMID:12813027

  4. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    STEFANO, GEORGE B.; KREAM, RICHARD M.

    2016-01-01

    The biomedical literature has extensively documented the functional roles of genetic polymorphisms in concert with well-characterized somatic mutations in the etiology and progression of major metastatic diseases afflicting human populations. Mitochondrial heteroplasmy exists as a dynamically determined co-expression of inherited polymorphisms and somatic mutations in varying ratios within individual mitochondrial DNA genomes with repetitive patterns of tissue specificity. Mechanistically, carcinogenic cellular processes include profound alterations of normative mitochondrial function, notably dependence on aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, and aberrant production and release of lactate, according to a classic theory. Within the translational context of human health and disease, the present review discusses the necessity of establishing critical foci designed to probe multiple biological roles of mitochondrial heteroplasmy in cancer biology. PMID:26998260

  5. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Edith E.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Feichtinger, Rene G.; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined OXPHOS and citrate synthase enzyme activities in HEK293 cells devoid of mtDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes partially encoded by mtDNA show reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also the entirely nuclear encoded complex II and citrate synthase exhibit reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of mtDNA induces a feedback mechanism that downregulates complex II and citrate synthase. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 {rho}{sup 0} cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in {rho}{sup 0} cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  6. Evidence for recombination in scorpion mitochondrial DNA (Scorpiones: Buthidae)

    PubMed Central

    Gantenbein, Benjamin; Fet, Victor; Gantenbein-Ritter, Iris A; Balloux, François

    2005-01-01

    There has been very little undisputed evidence for recombination in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) provided so far. Previous unpublished results suggestive of mtDNA recombination in the scorpion family Buthidae, together with cytological evidence for a unique mechanism of mitochondrial fusion in that family, prompted us to investigate this group in more details. First, we sequenced the complete mtDNA genome of Mesobuthus gibbosus, and chose two genes opposing each other (16S and coxI). We then sequenced 150 individuals from the natural populations of four species of Buthidae (Old World genera Buthus and Mesobuthus). We observed strong evidence for widespread recombination through highly significant negative correlations between linkage disequilibrium and physical distance in three out of four species. The evidence is further confirmed when using five other tests for recombination and by the presence of a high amount of homoplasy in phylogenetic trees. PMID:15870032

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in etiopathogenesis of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Monis Bilal; Kumar, Rakesh; Bhatt, Audesh; Bamezai, R. N. K.; Kumar, Rajeev; Gupta, Narmada P.; Das, T. K.; Dada, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Objective To understand role of mitochondrial (mt) mutations in genes regulating oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in pathogenesis of male infertility. Infertility affects approximately 15% of couples trying to conceive. Infertility is frequently attributed to defects of sperm motility and number. Mitochondrion and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) play an important role in variety of physiological process. They control the oxidative energy supply and thus are central to growth, development and differentiation. Mitochondrial function is controlled by a fine-tuned crosstalk between mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA). As mitochondria supply energy by OXPHOS, any mutation in mtDNA disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and thus result in an impaired spermatogenesis and impaired flagellar movement. As sperm midpiece has few mtDNA copies, thus enhanced number of mutant mtDNA results in early phenotypic defect which manifest as spermatogenic arrest or asthenozoospermia. Oxidative stress and mtDNA mutations are positively correlated and mutations in mitochondrial genome (mt genome) are implicated in the lowered fertilising capacity of the sperm and affects the reproductive potential of an individual. Materials and Methods A thorough review of articles in the last 15 years was cited with reference to the below-mentioned keywords. The articles considered discuss the role of mt genome in the normal functioning of sperm and the factors associated with mt mutations and impact of these mutations on the reproductive potential. Results Sperm motility is a very important factor for the fertilisation of ova. The energy requirements of sperm are therefore very critical for sperm. Mutations in the mitochondrial genes as COX II, ATPase 6 and 8 play an important role and disrupts ATP production affecting the spermatogenesis and sperm motility. Therefore, the aberrations in mt genome are an important etiopatholgy of male infertility. Conclusion In the context of male infertility, mt

  8. Deoxyribonucleotide pool imbalance stimulates deletions in HeLa cell mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiwei; Wheeler, Linda J; Mathews, Christopher K

    2003-11-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with multiple mutations in mitochondrial DNA, both deletions and point mutations, and mutations in the nuclear gene for thymidine phosphorylase. Spinazzola et al. (Spinazzola, A., Marti, R., Nishino, I., Andreu, A., Naini, A., Tadesse, S., Pela, I., Zammarchi, E., Donati, M., Oliver, J., and Hirano, M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 4128-4133) showed that MNGIE patients have elevated circulating thymidine levels and they hypothesized that this generates imbalanced mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools, which in turn are responsible for mitochondrial (mt) DNA mutagenesis. We tested this hypothesis by culturing HeLa cells in medium supplemented with 50 microM thymidine. After 8-month growth, mtDNA in the thymidine-treated culture, but not the control, showed multiple deletions, as detected both by Southern blotting and by long extension polymerase chain reaction. After 4-h growth in thymidine-supplemented medium, we found the mitochondrial dTTP and dGTP pools to expand significantly, the dCTP pool to drop significantly, and the dATP pool to drop slightly. In whole-cell extracts, dTTP and dGTP pools also expanded, but somewhat less than in mitochondria. The dCTP pool shrank by about 50%, and the dATP pool was essentially unchanged. These results are discussed in terms of the recent report by Nishigaki et al. (Nishigaki, Y., Marti, R., Copeland, W. C., and Hirano, M. (2003) J. Clin. Invest. 111, 1913-1921) that most mitochondrial point mutations in MNGIE patients involve T --> C transitions in sequences containing two As to the 5' side of a T residue. Our finding of dTTP and dGTP elevations and dATP depletion in mitochondrial dNTP pools are consistent with a mutagenic mechanism involving T-G mispairing followed by a next-nucleotide effect involving T insertion opposite A. PMID:13679382

  9. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups may influence Fabry disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, C; Chico, L; Concolino, D; Sestito, S; Fancellu, L; Boadu, W; Sechi, G P; Feliciani, C; Gnarra, M; Zampetti, A; Salviati, A; Scarpelli, M; Orsucci, D; Bonuccelli, U; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2016-08-26

    While the genetic origin of Fabry disease (FD) is well known, it is still unclear why the disease presents a wide heterogeneity of clinical presentation and progression, even within the same family. Emerging observations reveal that mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of FD. To investigate if specific genetic polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) could act as susceptibility factors and contribute to the clinical expression of FD, we have genotyped European mtDNA haplogroups in 77 Italian FD patients and 151 healthy controls. Haplogroups H and I, and haplogroup cluster HV were significantly more frequent in patients than controls. However, no correlation with gender, age of onset, organ involvement was observed. Our study seems to provide some evidence of a contribution of mitochondrial variation in FD pathogenesis, at least in Italy. PMID:27365132

  10. Mitochondrial DNA sequences in the nuclear genome of a locust.

    PubMed

    Gellissen, G; Bradfield, J Y; White, B N; Wyatt, G R

    The endosymbiotic theory of the origin of mitochondria is widely accepted, and implies that loss of genes from the mitochondria to the nucleus of eukaryotic cells has occurred over evolutionary time. However, evidence at the DNA sequence level for gene transfer between these organelles has so far been limited to a single example, the demonstration that a mitochondrial ATPase subunit gene of Neurospora crassa has an homologous partner in the nuclear genome. From a gene library of the insect, Locusta migratoria, we have now isolated two clones, representing separate fragments of nuclear DNA, which contain sequences homologous to the mitochondrial genes for ribosomal RNA, as well as regions of homology with highly repeated nuclear sequences. The results suggest the transfer of sequences between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, followed by evolutionary divergence. PMID:6298629

  11. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher B; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, André

    2012-07-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA (λnDNA) and mtDNA (λmtDNA) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in degraded samples in the future. To our knowledge this is the first time different degradation impact of the two genomes is demonstrated and which evaluates systematically the impact of DNA degradation on quantification of mtDNA copy number. PMID:22683632

  12. Heterogeneous base distribution in mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, P; Holtrop, M; Kroon, A

    1977-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa has a heterogeneous intramolecular base distribution. A contiguous piece, representing at least 30% of the total genome, has a G+C content that is 6% lower than the overall G+C content of the DNA. The genes for both ribosomal RNAs are contained in the remaining, relatively G+C rich, part of the genome. PMID:141040

  13. Fly Diversity Revealed by PCR-RFLP of Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asraoui, Jimmy F.; Sayar, Nancy P.; Knio, Khouzama M.; Smith, Colin A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe an inexpensive, two-session undergraduate laboratory activity that introduces important molecular biology methods in the context of biodiversity. In the first session, students bring tentatively identified flies (order Diptera, true flies) to the laboratory, extract DNA, and amplify a region of the mitochondrial gene…

  14. A Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Associated with IQ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skuder, Patricia; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Of 100 DNA markers examined in an allelic association study, only 1 showed a replicated association with IQ in samples totaling 107 children. How the gene marked by the particular restriction fragment length polymorphism was tracked and its mitochondrial origin identified is described. (SLD)

  15. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore in AD 2016: An update.

    PubMed

    Biasutto, Lucia; Azzolini, Michele; Szabò, Ildikò; Zoratti, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 30years the mitochondrial permeability transition - the permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane due to the opening of a wide pore - has progressed from being considered a curious artifact induced in isolated mitochondria by Ca(2+) and phosphate to a key cell-death-inducing process in several major pathologies. Its relevance is by now universally acknowledged and a pharmacology targeting the phenomenon is being developed. The molecular nature of the pore remains to this day uncertain, but progress has recently been made with the identification of the FOF1 ATP synthase as the probable proteic substrate. Researchers sharing this conviction are however divided into two camps: these believing that only the ATP synthase dimers or oligomers can form the pore, presumably in the contact region between monomers, and those who consider that the ring-forming c subunits in the FO sector actually constitute the walls of the pore. The latest development is the emergence of a new candidate: Spastic Paraplegia 7 (SPG7), a mitochondrial AAA-type membrane protease which forms a 6-stave barrel. This review summarizes recent developments of research on the pathophysiological relevance and on the molecular nature of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26902508

  16. Association of DNA sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA polymerase with mitochondrial DNA synthesis and risk of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sayantan; Ray, Anindita; Roy, Roshni; Roy, Bidyut

    2016-01-10

    Enzymes responsible for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis and transcription are encoded by nuclear genome and inherited mutations in these genes may play important roles in enhancing risk of precancer and cancer. Here, genetic variations in 23 functionally relevant tagSNPs in 6 genes responsible for mtDNA synthesis and transcription were studied in 522 cancer and 241 precancer (i.e. leukoplakia) patients and 525 healthy controls using Illumina Golden Gate assay to explore association with risk of oral precancer and cancer. Two SNPs, rs41553913 at POLRMT and rs9905016 at POLG2, significantly increased risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer, respectively, at both genotypic and allelic levels. Gene-environment interaction models also revealed that tobacco habits and SNPs at POLG2 and TFAM may modulate risk of both leukoplakia and cancer. In silico analysis of published data-set also revealed that variant heterozygote (TC) significantly increased transcription of POLG2 compared to wild genotype (p=0.03). Cancer tissues having variant allele genotypes (TC+CC) at POLG2 contained 1.6 times (p<0.01) more mtDNA compared to cancer tissues having wild genotype (TT). In conclusion, polymorphisms at POLG2 and POLRMT increased risk of oral cancer and leukoplakia, respectively, probably modulating synthesis and activity of the enzymes. Enhanced synthesis of mtDNA in cancer tissues may have implication in carcinogenesis, but the mechanism is yet to be explored. PMID:26403317

  17. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christian M.; Aidt, Frederik H.; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446 variants. After elimination of 312 (69.9%) non-coding and synonymous variants, a further 109 (24.4%) with a global prevalence > 0.1%, three (0.7%) haplogroup associated and 19 (2.0%) variants with a low predicted in silico likelihood of pathogenicity, three variants: MT-TC: m.5772G>A, MT-TF: m.644A>G, and MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM. PMID:25923817

  18. The Molecular Composition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell death is a fundamental cause of organ disease in humans. However, despite the need for us to delineate the molecular machinery that underlies cardiomyocyte death, our knowledge of these lethal cellular processes is still limited. The discovery that mitochondrial dysfunction, and in particular the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore, is often a common cause of the cardiac cell mortality that underlies numerous cardiac diseases has been a first crucial step. This purpose of this review is to outline our current understanding of the molecular identity of the MPT pore and the many questions that still need to be answered. PMID:19233198

  19. Indirubin-3'-oxime impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and prevents mitochondrial permeability transition induction

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Ana T.; Gomes, Ana P.; Simoes, Anabela M.; Teodoro, Joao S.; Duarte, Filipe V.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.

    2008-12-01

    Indirubin, a red colored 3,2'-bisindole isomer, is a component of Indigo naturalis and is an active ingredient used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases. The family of indirubin derivatives, such as indirubin-3'-oxime, has been suggested for various therapeutic indications. However, potential toxic interactions such as indirubin effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics are still unknown. This study evaluated the action of indirubin-3'-oxime on the function of isolated rat liver mitochondria contributing to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the multiple effects of indirubin. Indirubin-3'-oxime incubated with isolated rat liver mitochondria, at concentrations above 10{mu}M, significantly depresses the phosphorylation efficiency of mitochondria as inferred from the decrease in the respiratory control and ADP/O ratios, the perturbations in mitochondrial membrane potential and in the phosphorylative cycle induced by ADP. Furthermore, indirubin-3'-oxime at up to 25{mu}M stimulates the rate of state 4 respiration and inhibits state 3 respiration. The increased lag phase of repolarization was associated with a direct inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase. Indirubin-3'-oxime significantly inhibited the activity of complex II and IV thus explaining the decreased FCCP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria pre-incubated with indirubin-3'-oxime exhibits decreased susceptibility to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. This work shows for the first time multiple effects of indirubin-3'-oxime on mitochondrial bioenergetics thus indicating a potential mechanism for indirubin-3'-oxime effects on cell function.

  20. Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions within dopaminergic neurons triggers neuroprotective mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Perier, Celine; Bender, Andreas; García-Arumí, Elena; Melià, Ma Jesus; Bové, Jordi; Laub, Christoph; Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Mounsey, Ross B; Teismann, Peter; Prolla, Tomas; Andreu, Antoni L; Vila, Miquel

    2013-08-01

    Acquired alterations in mitochondrial DNA are believed to play a pathogenic role in Parkinson's disease. In particular, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions has been observed in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Also, mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma result in multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions that can be associated with levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and severe substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, whether mitochondrial DNA deletions play a causative role in the demise of dopaminergic neurons remains unknown. Here we assessed the potential pathogenic effects of mitochondrial DNA deletions on the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system by using mutant mice possessing a proofreading-deficient form of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLGD257A), which results in a time-dependent accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in several tissues, including the brain. In these animals, we assessed the occurrence of mitochondrial DNA deletions within individual substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons, by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and determined the potential deleterious effects of such mitochondrial DNA alterations on mitochondrial function and dopaminergic neuronal integrity, by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry and quantitative morphology. Nigral dopaminergic neurons from POLGD257A mice accumulate mitochondrial DNA deletions to a similar extent (∼40-60%) as patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Despite such high levels of mitochondrial DNA deletions, the majority of substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from these animals did not exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction or degeneration. Only a few individual substantia nigra pars compacta neurons appeared as cytochrome c oxidase-negative, which exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial DNA

  1. Lamivudine/telbivudine-associated neuromyopathy: neurogenic damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zheng, Lemin; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Jin, Suqin; Yuan, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Aims Myopathy or neuropathy has been associated with lamivudine/telbivudine therapy in hepatitis B patients. We aim to describe the pathological changes of lamivudine/telbivudine-associated neuromyopathy. Methods We retrospectively recruited six patients who were diagnosed with nucleotide analogues-associated myopathy or neuropathy. Muscle and nerve biopsy were performed, and the specimens were prepared for the light microscopy and electron microscopy. Genomic DNA was extracted from frozen muscle specimens, and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content was quantified by real-time PCR. Results Recovery of the myopathy can be achieved after the discontinuation or changing the drugs to entecavir. Muscle and nerve biopsy revealed similar changes under either the light or electronic microscopy in all the subjects. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed decrease of mtDNA content in the affected muscle. Conclusions MtDNA depletion results in mitochondrial dysfunction in the lamivudine/telbivudine-associated neuromyopathy. Myopathy was characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied with neurogenic damage due to axonal neuropathy. Ultrastructure changes of mitochondria included vacuolisation, simplification of the cristae and homogenised matrix. PMID:25190818

  2. Impaired coronary metabolic dilation in the metabolic syndrome is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Guarini, Giacinta; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Pung, Yuh Fen; Marzilli, Mario; Chen, Yeong Renn; Chen, Chwen Lih; Kang, Patrick T; Hardwick, James P; Kolz, Christopher L; Yin, Liya; Wilson, Glenn L; Shokolenko, Inna; Dobson, James G; Fenton, Richard; Chilian, William M

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes can be caused by excessive production of free radicals, which can damage mitochondrial DNA. Because mitochondrial DNA plays a key role in the production of ATP necessary for cardiac work, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, induced by mitochondrial DNA damage, uncouples coronary blood flow from cardiac work. Myocardial blood flow (contrast echocardiography) was measured in Zucker lean (ZLN) and obese fatty (ZOF) rats during increased cardiac metabolism (product of heart rate and arterial pressure, i.v. norepinephrine). In ZLN increased metabolism augmented coronary blood flow, but in ZOF metabolic hyperemia was attenuated. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired and ROS production was greater in ZOF than ZLN. These were associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ZOF. To determine if coronary metabolic dilation, the hyperemic response induced by heightened cardiac metabolism, is linked to mitochondrial function we introduced recombinant proteins (intravenously or intraperitoneally) in ZLN and ZOF to fragment or repair mtDNA, respectively. Repair of mtDNA damage restored mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation, and reduced ROS production in ZOF; whereas induction of mtDNA damage in ZLN reduced mitochondrial function, increased ROS production, and attenuated metabolic dilation. Adequate metabolic dilation was also associated with the extracellular release of ADP, ATP, and H2O2 by cardiac myocytes; whereas myocytes from rats with impaired dilation released only H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial function plays a seminal role in connecting myocardial blood flow to metabolism, and integrity of mtDNA is central to this process. PMID:27040114

  3. Developmental genetics of deleted mtDNA in mitochondrial oculomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Marzuki, S; Berkovic, S F; Saifuddin Noer, A; Kapsa, R M; Kalnins, R M; Byrne, E; Sasmono, T; Sudoyo, H

    1997-02-12

    Heteroplasmic populations of mtDNA, consisting of normal mtDNA and mtDNA with large deletions, are found in the skeletal muscle and other tissues of certain patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies, particularly in those with the CPEO (chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia) phenotype. To study the developmental genetics of this mitochondrial disorder, the distribution of the deleted mtDNA in a wide range of tissues of different embryonic origins (total 34 samples from 27 tissues obtained at autopsy) was investigated in a patient with the CPEO syndrome. Three species of partially deleted mtDNA were observed, with deletions of 2.3 kb, 5.0 kb and 6.4 kb. Their tissue distribution suggests that the mtDNA deletions have occurred very early during embryonic development, prior to the differentiation events that lead to the formation of the three primary embryonic germ layers, and that the partially deleted mtDNA species were segregated during development mainly to the skeletal muscle and to tissues of the central nervous system. PMID:9094043

  4. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in the African American population.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek C; Shrestha, Sadeep; Wiener, Howard W; Makowsky, Robert; Kurundkar, Ashish; Wilson, Craig M; Aissani, Brahim

    2015-06-01

    Genetic polymorphism along mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defines population-specific signatures called mtDNA haplogroups. Estimation of mtDNA haplogroup distribution may be prone to errors, notably if the study sample is not drawn from a multicenter cohort. Here, we report on mtDNA diversity in a sample of African American individuals (n = 343) enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Sequencing of the hypervariable regions I and II of the D-loop control region showed that the most common mitochondrial variants are 73G, 146C, 150T, 152C, 189G, 16278T, and 16311C. In agreement with the published data, we observed 17 common mtDNA haplogroups: L0, L1, L1b, L1c, L2, L2a, L2b, L2c, L2e, L3, L3b, L3d, L3e, L3f, L3h, L3x, and L4. The most commonly observed haplogroup is L2a (19.8%), followed by L1b (10.2%). Overall, the observed mtDNA haplogroup distribution in our study is similar to those published for the African American and the African populations. PMID:24102597

  5. Mutational spectrometry without phenotypic selection: human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Khrapko, K; Coller, H; André, P; Li, X C; Foret, F; Belenky, A; Karger, B L; Thilly, W G

    1997-01-01

    By first separating mutant from nonmutant DNA sequences on the basis of their melting temperatures and then increasing the number of copies by high-fidelity DNA amplification, we have developed a method that allows observation of point mutations in biological samples at fractions at or above 10-6. Using this method, we have observed the hotspot point mutations that lie in 100 base pairs of the mitochondrial genome in samples of cultured cells and human tissues. To date, 19 mutants have been isolated, their fractions ranging from 4x10-4 down to the limit of detection. We performed specific tests to determine if the observed signals were artefacts arising from contamination, polymerase errors during PCR or DNA adducts created during the procedure. We also tested the possibilities that DNA replication mismatch intermediates, or endogenous DNA adducts that were originally present in the cells, were included with true mutants in our separation steps and converted to mutants during PCR. We show that while most of the mutants behave as double-stranded point mutants in the cells, some appear to arise at least in part from mismatch intermediates or cellular DNA adducts. This technology is therefore sufficient for the observation of the spectrum of point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA and is a tool for discovering the primary causes of these mutations. PMID:9016616

  6. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in the African American population

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Derek C.; Shrestha, Sadeep; Wiener, Howard W.; Makowsky, Robert; Kurundkar, Ashish; Wilson, Craig M.; Aissani, Brahim

    2014-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism along mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defines population-specific signatures called mtDNA haplogroups. Estimation of mtDNA haplogroup distribution may be prone to errors, notably if the study sample is not drawn from a multicenter cohort. Here, we report on mtDNA diversity in a sample of African American individuals (n = 343) enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Sequencing of the hypervariable regions I and II of the D-loop control region showed that the most common mitochondrial variants are 73G, 146C, 150T, 152C, 189G, 16278T, and 16311C. In agreement with the published data, we observed 17 common mtDNA haplogroups: L0, L1, L1b, L1c, L2, L2a, L2b, L2c, L2e, L3, L3b, L3d, L3e, L3f, L3h, L3x, and L4. The most commonly observed haplogroup is L2a (19.8%), followed by L1b (10.2%). Overall, the observed mtDNA haplogroup distribution in our study is similar to those published for the African American and the African populations. PMID:24102597

  7. Mitochondrial DNA in the regulation of innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chunju; Wei, Xiawei; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrion is known as the energy factory of the cell, which is also a unique mammalian organelle and considered to be evolved from aerobic prokaryotes more than a billion years ago. Mitochondrial DNA, similar to that of its bacterial ancestor’s, consists of a circular loop and contains significant number of unmethylated DNA as CpG islands. The innate immune system plays an important role in the mammalian immune response. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) activates several innate immune pathways involving TLR9, NLRP3 and STING signaling, which contributes to the signaling platforms and results in effector responses. In addition to facilitating antibacterial immunity and regulating antiviral signaling, mounting evidence suggests that mtDNA contributes to inflammatory diseases following cellular damage and stress. Therefore, in addition to its well-appreciated roles in cellular metabolism and energy production,mtDNA appears to function as a key member in the innate immune system. Here, we highlight the emerging roles of mtDNA in innate immunity. PMID:26498951

  8. Mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA from normal rat liver have a common sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, H I; Dimitrijevic, B; Mahalingam, R

    1983-01-01

    Although Pst I does not cut the circular mitochondrial genome of the rat, BamHI generates from this genome two unequal fragments of DNA. Each of these fragments was cloned in pBR322. Nuclear DNA was digested from rat liver singly or doubly with Pst I and BamHI, and it was demonstrated that nuclear DNA shared a common sequence with the larger mitochondrial DNA BamHI fragment. The cloned larger mitochondrial DNA fragment was further subdivided with HindIII into four pieces that were labeled and then used to probe the double-digested nuclear DNA. The hybridization data showed that the common sequence is less than 3 kilobase pairs long and lies within the part of the mitochondrial genome containing the D-loop and a portion of the rRNA genes. It therefore appears that, as in lower eukaryotes, there are shared sequences between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in mammals. Images PMID:6579536

  9. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA in leucocytes harbouring the 3243A→G mtDNA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Taylor, Robert W; Durham, Steve E; Deschauer, Marcus; Schaefer, Andrew M; Samuels, David C; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2007-01-01

    Background The 3243A→G MTTL1 mutation is the most common heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with disease. Previous studies have shown that the percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases in blood as patients get older, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Objectives and method To understand the dynamics of the process and the underlying mechanisms, an accurate fluorescent assay was established for 3243A→G heteroplasmy and the amount of mtDNA in blood with real‐time polymerase chain reaction was determined. The amount of mutated and wild‐type mtDNA was measured at two time points in 11 subjects. Results The percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases exponentially during life, and peripheral blood leucocytes in patients harbouring 3243A→G are profoundly depleted of mtDNA. Conclusions A similar decrease in mtDNA has been seen in other mitochondrial disorders, and in 3243A→G cell lines in culture, indicating that depletion of mtDNA may be a common secondary phenomenon in several mitochondrial diseases. Depletion of mtDNA is not always due to mutation of a nuclear gene involved in mtDNA maintenance. PMID:16950816

  10. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE.

    PubMed

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S

    2016-05-19

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE-a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  11. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  12. Polymorphic Sites and the Mechanism of Evolution in Human Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cann, Rebecca L.; Brown, Wesley M.; Wilson, Allan C.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve restriction enzymes were used to screen for the presence or absence of cleavage sites at 441 locations in the mitochondrial DNA of 112 humans from four continents. Cleavage maps were constructed by comparison of DNA fragment sizes with those expected from the published sequence for one human mtDNA. One hundred and sixty-three of the sites were polymorphic, i.e., present in some individuals but absent from others, 278 sites being invariant. These polymorphisms probably result from single base substitutions and occur in all functional regions of the genome.—In 77 cases, it was possible to specify the exact nature and location (within a restriction site) of the mutation responsible for the absence of a restriction site in a known human mtDNA sequence and its presence in another human mtDNA. Fifty-two of these 77 gain mutations occur in genes coding for proteins, 34 being silent and 18 causing amino acid replacements; moreover, nine of the replacements are radical.—Notable also is the anomalous ratio of transitions to transversions required to account for these 77 restriction site differences between the known human mtDNA sequences and other human mtDNAs. This ratio is lower for most groups of restriction sites than has been reported from sequence comparisons of limited parts of the mtDNA genome in closely related mammals, perhaps indicating a special functional role or sensitivity to mutagenesis for palindromic regions containing high levels of guanine and cytosine.—From the genomic distribution of the 163 polymorphic sites, it is inferred that the level of point mutational variability in tRNA and rRNA genes is nearly as high as in protein-coding genes but lower than in noncoding mtDNA. Thus, the functional constraints operating on components of the protein-synthetic apparatus may be lower for mitochondria than for other systems. Furthermore, the mitochondrial genes for tRNAs that recognize four codons are more variable than those recognizing only two

  13. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification. PMID:26149767

  14. Effect of nitroso-chloramphenicol on mitochondrial DNA polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.O.; Abou-Khalil, W.H.; Yunis, A.A.; Abou-Khalil, S.

    1984-08-01

    A study was made of the effects of nitroso-chloramphenicol, chloramphenicol, amino-chloramphenicol, and thiamphenicol on the activity of mitochondrial DNA polymerase of rat liver. /sup 3/H-thymidine triphosphate incorporation into DNA was used to measure the DNA polymerase activity in the mitochondrial matrix fraction. This fraction was in the supernatant of sonicated mitochondria obtained by ultracentrifugation. Under standard experimental conditions, thymidine triphosphate incorporation was time dependent up to 10 minutes. This activity was enhanced by ..beta..-mercaptoethanol and was blocked by the known polymerase inhibitors ethidium bromide and 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate. Chloramphenicol and its analogues, amino-chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, did not have a significant effect on the polymerase activity, whereas nitroso-chloramphenicol was inhibitory. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the experimental conditions. Thus, in the absence of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol, nitroso-chloramphenicol was inhibitory. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the experimental conditions. Under similar conditions, the addition of dithiothreitol also provided partial protection. On the other hand, the inhibition by nitroso-chloramphenicol was significantly enhanced with its preincubation in the mitochondrial matrix fraction before the addition of nucleotides and DNA; thus after 40 minutes of preincubation, nitroso-chloramphenicol at a concentration of 200 ..mu..mol/L gave 53% inhibition, and produced total inhibition at 600 ..mu..mol/L. The addition of NADH or NADPH to the preincubation medium produced substantial protection against nitroso-chloramphenicol, whereas nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide had no effect. These results suggest that mitochondrial DNA polymerase may be a target for nitroso-chloramphenicol action.

  15. Reconstructing phylogeny from the multifractal spectrum of mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazier, James A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Berthelsen, Cheryl L.; Skolnick, Mark H.

    1995-03-01

    Conventional methods of phylogenetic reconstruction from DNA sequences require simplified models of evolutionary dynamics. We present a method based on fractal analysis to reconstruct the evolutionary history of organisms from mitochondrial DNA sequences. We map animal mtDNA into four-dimensional random walks and estimate their long range correlations using multifractal spectra. We see systematic changes in correlations in mtDNA sequences across taxonomic lines, which translate into changes in the scaling of the random walks. We use cluster analysis to group the multifractal spectra and obtain the phylogeny of the organisms. Though our method uses no a priori assumptions and is independent of gene order, it yields phylogenetic relationships broadly consistent with established results. Several recent papers have analyzed DNA using fractal analysis and have found long range correlations. However, no one has succeeded in using them to deduce biologically significant relationships.

  16. Functional recovery of human cells harbouring the mitochondrial DNA mutation MERRF A8344G via peptide-mediated mitochondrial delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Liu, Ko-Hung; Li, Yu-Chi; Kou, Shou-Jen; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Hsieh, Mingli; Liu, Chin-San

    2013-01-01

    We explored the feasibility of mitochondrial therapy using the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 to transfer mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) between cells and rescue a cybrid cell model of the mitochondrial disease myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF) syndrome. Pep-1-conjugated wild-type mitochondria isolated from parent cybrid cells incorporating a mitochondria-specific tag were used as donors for mitochondrial delivery into MERRF cybrid cells (MitoB2) and mtDNA-depleted Rho-zero cells (Mitoρ°). Forty-eight hours later, translocation of Pep-1-labelled mitochondria into the mitochondrial regions of MitoB2 and Mitoρ° host cells was observed (delivery efficiencies of 77.48 and 82.96%, respectively). These internalized mitochondria were maintained for at least 15 days in both cell types and were accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery and cell survival by preventing mitochondria-dependent cell death. Mitochondrial homeostasis analyses showed that peptide-mediated mitochondrial delivery (PMD) also increased mitochondrial biogenesis in both cell types, but through distinct regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial dynamics. Dramatic decreases in mitofusin-2 (MFN2) and dynamin-related protein 1/fission 1 were observed in MitoB2 cells, while Mitoρ° cells showed a significant increase in optic atrophy 1 and MFN2. These findings suggest that PMD can be used as a potential therapeutic intervention for mitochondrial disorders. PMID:23006856

  17. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  18. Mitochondrial nucleoid clusters protect newly synthesized mtDNA during Doxorubicin- and Ethidium Bromide-induced mitochondrial stress.

    PubMed

    Alán, Lukáš; Špaček, Tomáš; Pajuelo Reguera, David; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is compacted in ribonucleoprotein complexes called nucleoids, which can divide or move within the mitochondrial network. Mitochondrial nucleoids are able to aggregate into clusters upon reaction with intercalators such as the mtDNA depletion agent Ethidium Bromide (EB) or anticancer drug Doxorobicin (DXR). However, the exact mechanism of nucleoid clusters formation remains unknown. Resolving these processes may help to elucidate the mechanisms of DXR-induced cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we addressed the role of two key nucleoid proteins; mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB); in the formation of mitochondrial nucleoid clusters during the action of intercalators. We found that both intercalators cause numerous aberrations due to perturbing their native status. By blocking mtDNA replication, both agents also prevented mtDNA association with TFAM, consequently causing nucleoid aggregation into large nucleoid clusters enriched with TFAM, co-existing with the normal nucleoid population. In the later stages of intercalation (>48h), TFAM levels were reduced to 25%. In contrast, mtSSB was released from mtDNA and freely distributed within the mitochondrial network. Nucleoid clusters mostly contained nucleoids with newly replicated mtDNA, however the nucleoid population which was not in replication mode remained outside the clusters. Moreover, the nucleoid clusters were enriched with p53, an anti-oncogenic gatekeeper. We suggest that mitochondrial nucleoid clustering is a mechanism for protecting nucleoids with newly replicated DNA against intercalators mediating genotoxic stress. These results provide new insight into the common mitochondrial response to mtDNA stress and can be implied also on DXR-induced mitochondrial cytotoxicity. PMID:27102948

  19. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore: a mystery solved?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The permeability transition (PT) denotes an increase of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability to solutes with molecular masses up to about 1500 Da. It is presumed to be mediated by opening of a channel, the permeability transition pore (PTP), whose molecular nature remains a mystery. Here I briefly review the history of the PTP, discuss existing models, and present our new results indicating that reconstituted dimers of the FOF1 ATP synthase form a channel with properties identical to those of the mitochondrial megachannel (MMC), the electrophysiological equivalent of the PTP. Open questions remain, but there is now promise that the PTP can be studied by genetic methods to solve the large number of outstanding problems. PMID:23675351

  20. Mitochondrial Permeability Transition: New Findings and Persisting Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Valentina; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Sica, Valentina; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Several insults cause the inner mitochondrial membrane to abruptly lose osmotic homeostasis, hence initiating a regulated variant of cell death known as 'mitochondrial permeability transition' (MPT)-driven necrosis. MPT provides an etiological contribution to several human disorders characterized by the acute loss of post-mitotic cells, including cardiac and cerebral ischemia. Nevertheless, the precise molecular determinants of MPT remain elusive, which considerably hampers the development of clinically implementable cardio- or neuroprotective strategies targeting this process. We summarize recent findings shedding new light on the supramolecular entity that mediates MPT, the so-called 'permeability transition pore complex' (PTPC). Moreover, we discuss hitherto unresolved controversies on MPT and analyze the major obstacles that still preclude the complete understanding and therapeutic targeting of this process. PMID:27161573

  1. Selfish Mitochondrial DNA Proliferates and Diversifies in Small, but not Large, Experimental Populations of Caenorhabditis briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Wendy S.; Coleman-Hulbert, Anna L.; Weiss, Emily S.; Howe, Dana K.; Ping, Sita; Wernick, Riana I.; Estes, Suzanne; Denver, Dee R.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary interactions across levels of biological organization contribute to a variety of fundamental processes including genome evolution, reproductive mode transitions, species diversification, and extinction. Evolutionary theory predicts that so-called “selfish” genetic elements will proliferate when the host effective population size (Ne) is small, but direct tests of this prediction remain few. We analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of deletion-containing mitochondrial DNA (ΔmtDNA) molecules, previously characterized as selfish elements, in six different natural strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae allowed to undergo experimental evolution in a range of population sizes (N = 1, 10, 100, and 1,000) for a maximum of 50 generations. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was analyzed for replicate lineages at each five-generation time point. Ten different ΔmtDNA molecule types were observed and characterized across generations in the experimental populations. Consistent with predictions from evolutionary theory, lab lines evolved in small-population sizes (e.g., nematode N = 1) were more susceptible to accumulation of high levels of preexisting ΔmtDNA compared with those evolved in larger populations. New ΔmtDNA elements were observed to increase in frequency and persist across time points, but almost exclusively at small population sizes. In some cases, ΔmtDNA levels decreased across generations when population size was large (nematode N = 1,000). Different natural strains of C. briggsae varied in their susceptibilities to ΔmtDNA accumulation, owing in part to preexisting compensatory mtDNA alleles in some strains that prevent deletion formation. This analysis directly demonstrates that the evolutionary trajectories of ΔmtDNA elements depend upon the population-genetic environments and molecular-genetic features of their hosts. PMID:26108490

  2. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Polytremis nascens (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weibin; Zhu, Jianqing; Yang, Qichang; Zhao, Huidong; Chen, Minghan; He, Haiyan; Yu, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Polytremis nascens (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) was determined. The 15,392 bp mitogenome with GenBank accession number KM981865 contained 13 protein genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, and a non-coding control region (D-loop). All the 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes were found. The overall base composition was 39.7% A, 40.7% T, 7.7% G and 11.9% C, with a high A + T content (80.4%). This complete mitogenome of P. nascens provides a basic data for studies on species identification, molecular systematics and conservation genetics. PMID:25690054

  3. Mitochondrial DNA replication and disease: insights from DNA polymerase γ mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerase γ (pol γ), encoded by POLG, is responsible for replicating human mitochondrial DNA. About 150 mutations in the human POLG have been identified in patients with mitochondrial diseases such as Alpers syndrome, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia-neuropathy syndromes. Because many of the mutations are described in single citations with no genotypic family history, it is important to ascertain which mutations cause or contribute to mitochondrial disease. The vast majority of data about POLG mutations has been generated from biochemical characterizations of recombinant pol γ. However, recently, the study of mitochondrial dysfunction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mouse models provides important in vivo evidence for the role of POLG mutations in disease. Also, the published 3D-structure of the human pol γ assists in explaining some of the biochemical and genetic properties of the mutants. This review summarizes the current evidence that identifies and explains disease-causing POLG mutations. PMID:20927567

  4. Neutral and Non-Neutral Evolution of Drosophila Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. M.; Dorfsman, M.; Kann, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    To test hypotheses of neutral evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), nucleotide sequences were determined for 1515 base pairs of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene in the mitochondrial DNA of 29 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and 9 lines of its sibling species Drosophila simulans. In contrast to the patterns for nuclear genes, where D. melanogaster generally exhibits much less nucleotide polymorphism, the number of segregating sites was slightly higher in a global sample of nine ND5 sequences in D. melanogaster (s = 8) than in the nine lines of D. simulans (s = 6). When compared to variation at nuclear loci, the mtDNA variation in D. melanogaster does not depart from neutral expectations. The ND5 sequences in D. simulans, however, show fewer than half the number of variable sites expected under neutrality when compared to sequences from the period locus. While this reduction in variation is not significant at the 5% level, HKA tests with published restriction data for mtDNA in D. simulans do show a significant reduction of variation suggesting a selective sweep of variation in the mtDNA in this species. Tests of neutral evolution based on the ratios of synonymous and replacement polymorphism and divergence are generally consistent with neutral expectations, although a significant excess of amino acid polymorphism within both species is localized in one region of the protein. The rate of mtDNA evolution has been faster in D. melanogaster than in D. simulans and the population structure of mtDNA is distinct in these species. The data reveal how different rates of mtDNA evolution between species and different histories of neutral and adaptive evolution within species can compromise historical inferences in population and evolutionary biology. PMID:7851771

  5. Geographic variation of human mitochondrial DNA from Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.; Wilson, A.C. ); Jorde, L.B. ); Bhatia, K. )

    1990-03-01

    High resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction maps, consisting of an average of 370 sites per mtDNA map, were constructed for 119 people from 25 localities in Papua, New Guinea (PNG). Comparison of these PNG restriction maps to published maps from Australian, Caucasian, Asian and African mtDNAs reveals that PNG has the lowest amount of mtDNA variation, and that PNG mtDNA lineages originated from Southeast Asia. The statistical significance of geographic structuring of populations with respect to mtDNA was assessed by comparing observed G{sub ST} values to a distribution of G{sub ST} values generated by random resampling of the data. These analyses show that there is significant structuring of mtDNA variation among worldwide populations, between highland and coastal PNG populations, and even between two highland PNG populations located approximately 200 km apart. However, coastal PNG populations are essentially panmictic, despite being spread over several hundred kilometers. The high resolution technique for examining mtDNA variation, coupled with extensive geographic sampling within a single defined area, leads to an enhanced understanding of the influence of geography on mtDNA variation in human populations.

  6. Functional Consequences of Mitochondrial DNA Deletions in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Majora, Marc; Wittkampf, Tanja; Schuermann, Bianca; Schneider, Maren; Franke, Susanne; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Bernerd, Françoise; Schroeder, Peter; Krutmann, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Deletions within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are thought to contribute to extrinsic skin aging. To study the translation of mtDNA deletions into functional and structural changes in the skin, we seeded human skin fibroblasts into collagen gels to generate dermal equivalents. These cells were either derived from Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) patients, who constitutively carry large amounts of the UV-inducible mitochondrial common deletion, or normal human volunteers. We found that KSS fibroblasts, in comparison with normal human fibroblasts, contracted the gels faster and more strongly, an effect that was dependent on reactive oxygen species. Gene expression and Western blot analysis revealed significant upregulation of lysyl oxidase (LOX) in KSS fibroblasts. Treatment with the specific LOX inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile decreased the contraction difference between KSS and normal human fibroblast equivalents. Also, addition of the antioxidant N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone reduced the contraction difference by inhibiting collagen gel contraction in KSS fibroblasts, and both β-aminopropionitrile and N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone diminished LOX activity. These data suggest a causal relationship between mtDNA deletions, reactive oxygen species production, and increased LOX activity that leads to increased contraction of collagen gels. Accordingly, increased LOX expression was also observed in vivo in photoaged human and mouse skin. Therefore, mtDNA deletions in human fibroblasts may lead to functional and structural alterations of the skin. PMID:19661442

  7. Quantitative and qualitative profiling of mitochondrial DNA length heteroplasmy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Chung, Ukhee; Yoo, Ji-Eun; Park, Myung Jin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analysis of mitochondrial DNA length heteroplasmy for the first hypervariable segment (HV1) and second hypervariable segment (HV2) regions were performed using size-based separation of fluorescently-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products by capillary electrophoresis. In this report, the relative proportions of length heteroplasmies in individuals were determined, and each length variant in the heteroplasmic mtDNA mixture was identified. The study demonstrated that 36% and 69% of Koreans show length heteroplasmy in the HV1 and HV2 regions, respectively. Electropherograms revealed that length heteroplasmy in the HV1 region resulted in over 5 length variants in an individual. The peak patterns of length heteroplasmy in the HV1 region were classified into five major types. In the HV2 region, length heteroplasmy resulted in 3-6 length variants in an individual, and showed seven variant peak patterns. The increased knowledge concerning mtDNA length heteroplasmy is believed to not only offer a useful means of determining genetic identity due to increased mitochondrial DNA haplotype diversity by allowing mtDNAs to be classified into several peak patterns, but also represent a promising tool for the diagnosis of several common diseases which are etiologically or prognostically associated with mtDNA polymorphisms. PMID:14730565

  8. Mitochondrial DNA sequences from a 7000-year old brain.

    PubMed Central

    Pääbo, S; Gifford, J A; Wilson, A C

    1988-01-01

    Pieces of mitochondrial DNA from a 7000-year-old human brain were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Albumin and high concentrations of polymerase were required to overcome a factor in the brain extract that inhibits amplification. For this and other sources of ancient DNA, we find an extreme inverse dependence of the amplification efficiency on the length of the sequence to be amplified. This property of ancient DNA distinguishes it from modern DNA and thus provides a new criterion of authenticity for use in research on ancient DNA. The brain is from an individual recently excavated from Little Salt Spring in southwestern Florida and the anthropologically informative sequences it yielded are the first obtained from archaeologically retrieved remains. The sequences show that this ancient individual belonged to a mitochondrial lineage that is rare in the Old World and not previously known to exist among Native Americans. Our finding brings to three the number of maternal lineages known to have been involved in the prehistoric colonization of the New World. Images PMID:3186445

  9. Infantile Encephalopathy and Defective Mitochondrial DNA Translation in Patients with Mutations of Mitochondrial Elongation Factors EFG1 and EFTu

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Lucia; Tiranti, Valeria; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Malfatti, Edoardo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Donnini, Claudia; Mereghetti, Paolo; De Gioia, Luca; Burlina, Alberto; Castellan, Claudio; Comi, Giacomo P.; Savasta, Salvatore; Ferrero, Iliana; Zeviani, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translation is a complex process performed within mitochondria by an apparatus composed of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)–encoded RNAs and nuclear DNA–encoded proteins. Although the latter by far outnumber the former, the vast majority of mitochondrial translation defects in humans have been associated with mutations in RNA-encoding mtDNA genes, whereas mutations in protein-encoding nuclear genes have been identified in a handful of cases. Genetic investigation involving patients with defective mitochondrial translation led us to the discovery of novel mutations in the mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EFG1) in one affected baby and, for the first time, in the mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EFTu) in another one. Both patients were affected by severe lactic acidosis and rapidly progressive, fatal encephalopathy. The EFG1-mutant patient had early-onset Leigh syndrome, whereas the EFTu-mutant patient had severe infantile macrocystic leukodystrophy with micropolygyria. Structural modeling enabled us to make predictions about the effects of the mutations at the molecular level. Yeast and mammalian cell systems proved the pathogenic role of the mutant alleles by functional complementation in vivo. Nuclear-gene abnormalities causing mitochondrial translation defects represent a new, potentially broad field of mitochondrial medicine. Investigation of these defects is important to expand the molecular characterization of mitochondrial disorders and also may contribute to the elucidation of the complex control mechanisms, which regulate this fundamental pathway of mtDNA homeostasis. PMID:17160893

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves. PMID:26774058

  11. The mitochondrial permeability transition from yeast to mammals.

    PubMed

    Azzolin, Luca; von Stockum, Sophia; Basso, Emy; Petronilli, Valeria; Forte, Michael A; Bernardi, Paolo

    2010-06-18

    Regulated permeability changes have been detected in mitochondria across species. We review here their key features, with the goal of assessing whether a "permeability transition" similar to that observed in higher eukaryotes is present in other species. The recent discoveries (i) that treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) unmasks an inhibitory site for inorganic phosphate (Pi) [Basso, E., Petronilli, V., Forte, M.A. and Bernardi, P. (2008) Phosphate is essential for inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by cyclosporin A and by cyclophilin D ablation. J. Biol. Chem. 283, 26307-26311], the classical inhibitor of the permeability transition of yeast and (ii) that under proper experimental conditions a matrix Ca(2+)-dependence can be demonstrated in yeast as well [Yamada, A., Yamamoto, T., Yoshimura, Y., Gouda, S., Kawashima, S., Yamazaki, N., Yamashita, K., Kataoka, M., Nagata, T., Terada, H., Pfeiffer, D.R. and Shinohara Y. (2009) Ca(2+)-induced permeability transition can be observed even in yeast mitochondria under optimized experimental conditions. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1787, 1486-1491] suggest that the mitochondrial permeability transition has been conserved during evolution. PMID:20398660

  12. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  13. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  14. Mitochondrial transmission during mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by mitochondrial fusion and fission and the intramitochondrial segregation of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nunnari, J; Marshall, W F; Straight, A; Murray, A; Sedat, J W; Walter, P

    1997-01-01

    To gain insight into the process of mitochondrial transmission in yeast, we directly labeled mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and observed their fate after the fusion of two cells. To this end, mitochondrial proteins in haploid cells of opposite mating type were labeled with different fluorescent dyes and observed by fluorescence microscopy after mating of the cells. Parental mitochondrial protein markers rapidly redistributed and colocalized throughout zygotes, indicating that during mating, parental mitochondria fuse and their protein contents intermix, consistent with results previously obtained with a single parentally derived protein marker. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of mitochondria in living cells with wide-field fluorescence microscopy indicated that mitochondria form a single dynamic network, whose continuity is maintained by a balanced frequency of fission and fusion events. Thus, the complete mixing of mitochondrial proteins can be explained by the formation of one continuous mitochondrial compartment after mating. In marked contrast to the mixing of parental mitochondrial proteins after fusion, mtDNA (labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromodeoxyuridine) remained distinctly localized to one half of the zygotic cell. This observation provides a direct explanation for the genetically observed nonrandom patterns of mtDNA transmission. We propose that anchoring of mtDNA within the organelle is linked to an active segregation mechanism that ensures accurate inheritance of mtDNA along with the organelle. Images PMID:9243504

  15. The specific mitochondrial DNA polymorphism found in Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Haruna; Tun, Zaw; Young, David R; Ozawa, Hiroyasu; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Tanaka, Einosuke; Honda, Katsuya

    2002-09-20

    Hypervariable segments of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) (HV1 and HV2) were analyzed in Klinefelter's syndrome and compared to normal population data. One pair of samples consisting of a Japanese mother and affected son with Klinefelter's syndrome (involved in a criminal case), and seven unrelated DNA samples from Caucasian Klinefelter males (two involved in criminal cases and five diagnosed) were collected in Japan and the United States. The diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome was established previously by multiplex XY-STR typing detecting two X alleles and one Y allele in the samples. Haplotype analysis of the mtDNA sequence in Klinefelter males was found to be identical, unique, and specific, as it was not found in the normal population. Astonishingly, family data exhibited that the haplotype of the mtDNA in the son was apparently different from the mother's, suggesting that the mtDNA of Klinefelter male would not be inherited from mother to son. Our data indicate that possible interaction of the sex chromosome and the mtDNA exists, and suggests that the specific mtDNA haplotype could cause the abnormal cell to fertilize and reproduce itself. PMID:12237124

  16. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10769.001 PMID:26901439

  17. Triangulating the provenance of African elephants using mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Hondo, Tomoko; Roca, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    African elephant mitochondrial (mt) DNA follows a distinctive evolutionary trajectory. As females do not migrate between elephant herds, mtDNA exhibits low geographic dispersal. We therefore examined the effectiveness of mtDNA for assigning the provenance of African elephants (or their ivory). For 653 savanna and forest elephants from 22 localities in 13 countries, 4258 bp of mtDNA was sequenced. We detected eight mtDNA subclades, of which seven had regionally restricted distributions. Among 108 unique haplotypes identified, 72% were found at only one locality and 84% were country specific, while 44% of individuals carried a haplotype detected only at their sampling locality. We combined 316 bp of our control region sequences with those generated by previous trans-national surveys of African elephants. Among 101 unique control region haplotypes detected in African elephants across 81 locations in 22 countries, 62% were present in only a single country. Applying our mtDNA results to a previous microsatellite-based assignment study would improve estimates of the provenance of elephants in 115 of 122 mis-assigned cases. Nuclear partitioning followed species boundaries and not mtDNA subclade boundaries. For taxa such as elephants in which nuclear and mtDNA markers differ in phylogeography, combining the two markers can triangulate the origins of confiscated wildlife products. PMID:23798975

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Peripheral Blood and Melanoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Fang, Shenying; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood has been suggested as risk modifier in various types of cancer. However, its influence on melanoma risk is unclear. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk in 500 melanoma cases and 500 healthy controls from an ongoing melanoma study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in cases than in controls (1.15 vs 0.99, P<0.001). Increased mtDNA copy number was associated with a 1.45-fold increased risk of melanoma (95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.97). Significant joint effects between mtDNA copy number and variables related to pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure were observed. This study supports an association between increased mtDNA copy number and melanoma risk that is independent on the known melanoma risk factors (pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure). PMID:26110424

  19. Natural interspecies transfer of mitochondrial DNA in amphibians.

    PubMed Central

    Spolsky, C; Uzzell, T

    1984-01-01

    mtDNAs of two Central European water frog species, Rana ridibunda and Rana lessonae, were examined by electrophoresis of restriction enzyme fragments. Two types of mtDNA occur in R. ridibunda. One shares with mtDNA of R. lessonae 25.8% of 132 fragments generated by 19 enzymes, corresponding to a nucleotide sequence divergence of 8.1%; the other has diverged from R. lessonae mtDNA by only 0.3%. This latter type is a variant R. lessonae mtDNA that has been transferred into R. ridibunda; the introgression may have occurred via the hybridogenetic hybrid lineages collectively known as Rana esculenta. Of 37 R. ridibunda from Poland, 59% had the typical R. ridibunda mtDNA; 41% had the modified R. lessonae mtDNA as did a single individual from Switzerland (introduced). A single R. ridibunda from Turkey, outside the present range of R. lessonae, had the typical R. ridibunda mtDNA phenotype. Discordancies between inheritance of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes point up the danger of relying on a single molecular feature in reconstructing phylogeny. In addition, studies of mtDNA provide otherwise inaccessible information on complex evolutionary histories of closely related species. A knowledge of these complexities is important to an understanding of phylogenetic relationships and of the genetic processes that underlie the evolution of clonal taxa. Images PMID:6091109

  20. Cloning of two sea urchin DNA-binding proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Megli, Fiammetta; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Roberti, Marina

    2002-03-01

    The cloning of the cDNA for two mitochondrial proteins involved in sea urchin mtDNA replication and transcription is reported here. The cDNA for the mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has been cloned by a polymerase chain reaction-based approach. The protein displays a very high similarity with the Paracentrotus lividus homologue as it contains also the two leucine zipper-like domains which are thought to be involved in intramolecular interactions needed to expose the two DNA binding domains in the correct position for contacting DNA. The cDNA for the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB) from P. lividus has been also cloned by a similar approach. The precursor protein is 146 amino acids long with a presequence of 16 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the highest homology with the Xenopus laevis protein and the lowest with the Drosophila mtSSB. The computer modeling of the tertiary structure of P. lividus mtSSB shows a structure very similar to that experimentally determined for human mtSSB, with the conservation of the main residues involved in protein tetramerization and in DNA binding. PMID:11943466

  1. Limited dCTP availability accounts for mitochondrial DNA depletion in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE).

    PubMed

    González-Vioque, Emiliano; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Andreu, Antoni L; Martí, Ramon

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a severe human disease caused by mutations in TYMP, the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). It belongs to a broader group of disorders characterized by a pronounced reduction in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in one or more tissues. In most cases, these disorders are caused by mutations in genes involved in deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) metabolism. It is generally accepted that imbalances in mitochondrial dNTP pools resulting from these mutations interfere with mtDNA replication. Nonetheless, the precise mechanistic details of this effect, in particular, how an excess of a given dNTP (e.g., imbalanced dTTP excess observed in TP deficiency) might lead to mtDNA depletion, remain largely unclear. Using an in organello replication experimental model with isolated murine liver mitochondria, we observed that overloads of dATP, dGTP, or dCTP did not reduce the mtDNA replication rate. In contrast, an excess of dTTP decreased mtDNA synthesis, but this effect was due to secondary dCTP depletion rather than to the dTTP excess in itself. This was confirmed in human cultured cells, demonstrating that our conclusions do not depend on the experimental model. Our results demonstrate that the mtDNA replication rate is unaffected by an excess of any of the 4 separate dNTPs and is limited by the availability of the dNTP present at the lowest concentration. Therefore, the availability of dNTP is the key factor that leads to mtDNA depletion rather than dNTP imbalances. These results provide the first test of the mechanism that accounts for mtDNA depletion in MNGIE and provide evidence that limited dNTP availability is the common cause of mtDNA depletion due to impaired anabolic or catabolic dNTP pathways. Thus, therapy approaches focusing on restoring the deficient substrates should be explored. PMID:21483760

  2. Unusual type of mitochondrial DNA in mice lacking a maternally transmitted antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, S D; Ritte, U; Lindahl, K F; Prager, E M; Wilson, A C

    1983-01-01

    Mice that lack a maternally transmitted antigen (Mta) on the cell surface share a distinctive type of mitochondrial DNA. This is evident from restriction analyses of mitochondrial DNAs from 25 strains of mice whose antigenic state is known. One hundred sixty-eight cleavage sites have been mapped in the mitochondrial DNA of Mta- mice. Detailed maps for the 8 other types of mitochondrial DNA detected in the survey have also been prepared. The Mta- mice are estimated to differ from those expressing the antigen by 108 to 141 base substitutions at widely scattered points in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:6304659

  3. Hybridisation, paternal leakage and mitochondrial DNA linearization in three anomalous fish (Scombridae).

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jess A T; Macbeth, Michael; Broderick, Damien; Whatmore, Paul; Street, Raewyn; Welch, David J; Ovenden, Jennifer R

    2013-11-01

    Using mitochondrial DNA for species identification and population studies assumes that the genome is maternally inherited, circular, located in the cytoplasm and lacks recombination. This study explores the mitochondrial genomes of three anomalous mackerel. Complete mitochondrial genome sequencing plus nuclear microsatellite genotyping of these fish identified them as Scomberomorus munroi (spotted mackerel). Unlike normal S. munroi, these three fish also contained different linear, mitochondrial genomes of Scomberomorus semifasciatus (grey mackerel). The results are best explained by hybridisation, paternal leakage and mitochondrial DNA linearization. This unusual observation may provide an explanation for mtDNA outliers in animal population studies. PMID:23774068

  4. Mitochondrial Calcium and the Permeability Transition in Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lemasters, John J.; Theruvath, Tom P.; Zhong, Zhi; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of Ca2+ has long been implicated to be important in cell injury. A Ca2+-linked process important in necrosis and apoptosis (or necrapoptosis) is the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). In the MPT, large conductance permeability transition (PT) pores open that make the mitochondrial inner membrane abruptly permeable to solutes up to 1500 Da. The importance of Ca2+ in MPT induction varies with circumstance. Ca2+ overload is sufficient to induce the MPT. By contrast after ischemia-reperfusion to cardiac myocytes, Ca2+ overload is the consequence of bioenergetic failure after the MPT rather than its cause. In other models, such as cytotoxicity from Reye-related agents and storage-reperfusion injury to liver grafts, Ca2+ appears to be permissive to MPT onset. Lastly in oxidative stress, increased mitochondrial Ca2+ and ROS generation act synergistically to product the MPT and cell death. Thus, the exact role of Ca2+ for inducing the MPT and cell death depends on the particular biologic setting. PMID:19576166

  5. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P.; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. PMID:25143035

  6. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-10-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. PMID:25143035

  7. Mitochondrial bax translocation accelerates DNA fragmentation and cell necrosis in a murine model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Lemasters, John J; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen and peroxynitrite and release endonucleases during acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Because mitochondrial translocation of Bax can initiate these events, we investigated the potential role of Bax in the pathophysiology of hepatic necrosis after 300 mg/kg APAP in fasted C57BL/6 mice. APAP overdose induced Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria as early as 1 h after APAP injection. At 6 h, there was extensive centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining (indicator for peroxynitrite formation) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. In addition, mitochondrial intermembrane proteins were released into the cytosol. Plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities of 5610 +/- 600 U/l indicated extensive necrotic cell death. Conversely, Bax gene knockout (Bax(-/-)) mice had 80% lower ALT activities, less DNA fragmentation, and less intermembrane protein release at 6 h. However, immunohistochemical staining for nitrotyrosine or APAP protein adducts did not show differences between wild-type and Bax(-/-) mice. In contrast to the early hepatoprotection in Bax(-/-) mice, plasma ALT activities (7605 +/- 480 U/l) and area of necrosis (53 +/- 6% hepatocytes) in wild-type animals was similar to values in Bax(-/-) mice at 12 h. In addition, there was no difference in DNA fragmentation or nitrotyrosine immunostaining. We concluded that the rapid mitochondrial Bax translocation after APAP overdose has no effect on peroxynitrite formation but that it contributes to the mitochondrial release of proteins, which cause nuclear DNA fragmentation. However, the persistent oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation in mitochondria may eventually trigger the permeability transition pore opening and release intermembrane proteins independently of Bax. PMID:17906064

  8. Distinct roles for two purified factors in transcription of Xenopus mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Antoshechkin, I.; Bogenhagen, D.F.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates transcription of mitochondrial DNA in Xenopus laevis (xl-mtDNA) by mitochondrial RNA polymerases. Details regarding the characterization of xl-mtDNA and its role in transcription in the presence of mtRNA polymerase are provided. 40 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: metabolic and antimetabolic studies of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    HeLa cells were used for the quantitation of cellular and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) and ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) pools and of changes in pools in response to treatment with the antimetabolites methotrexate (mtx) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR). Use of an enzymatic assay of dNTPs and of improved nucleotide extraction methods allowed quantitation of mitochondrial dNTP pools. All four mitochondrial dNTP pools expand following treatment with mtx or FUdR whereas cellular dTTP and dGTP pools are depleted. Mitochrondrial rNTP pools were also found to expand in response to these antimetabolites. Mouse L-cells were used to determine the relative contributions of an exogenously supplied precursor to nuclear and mitochrondrial DNA replication. Cells were labeled to near steady state specific activities with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate and subsequently labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine, a general pyrimidine precursor, in the continuing presence of /sup 32/P. Deoxyribonucleoside monophosphates derived from these DNAs were separated by HPLC and the /sup 3/H//sup 32/P ratio in each pyrimidine determined. The dCMP residues in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were found to be derived exclusively from the exogenous supplied uridine. The dTMP residues from nuclear and mtDNA and the dCMP residues from nuclear DNA were seen to be synthesized partly from exogenous sources and partly from other sources, presumably de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

  10. Modulating mitochondrial quality in disease transmission: towards enabling mitochondrial DNA disease carriers to have healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Diot, Alan; Dombi, Eszter; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Morten, Karl; Carver, Janet; Wells, Dagan; Child, Tim; Johnston, Iain G.; Williams, Suzannah; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    One in 400 people has a maternally inherited mutation in mtDNA potentially causing incurable disease. In so-called heteroplasmic disease, mutant and normal mtDNA co-exist in the cells of carrier women. Disease severity depends on the proportion of inherited abnormal mtDNA molecules. Families who have had a child die of severe, maternally inherited mtDNA disease need reliable information on the risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. However, prenatal diagnosis and even estimates of risk are fraught with uncertainty because of the complex and stochastic dynamics of heteroplasmy. These complications include an mtDNA bottleneck, whereby hard-to-predict fluctuations in the proportions of mutant and normal mtDNA may arise between generations. In ‘mitochondrial replacement therapy’ (MRT), damaged mitochondria are replaced with healthy ones in early human development, using nuclear transfer. We are developing non-invasive alternatives, notably activating autophagy, a cellular quality control mechanism, in which damaged cellular components are engulfed by autophagosomes. This approach could be used in combination with MRT or with the regular management, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Mathematical theory, supported by recent experiments, suggests that this strategy may be fruitful in controlling heteroplasmy. Using mice that are transgenic for fluorescent LC3 (the hallmark of autophagy) we quantified autophagosomes in cleavage stage embryos. We confirmed that the autophagosome count peaks in four-cell embryos and this correlates with a drop in the mtDNA content of the whole embryo. This suggests removal by mitophagy (mitochondria-specific autophagy). We suggest that modulating heteroplasmy by activating mitophagy may be a useful complement to mitochondrial replacement therapy. PMID:27528757

  11. Modulating mitochondrial quality in disease transmission: towards enabling mitochondrial DNA disease carriers to have healthy children.

    PubMed

    Diot, Alan; Dombi, Eszter; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Morten, Karl; Carver, Janet; Wells, Dagan; Child, Tim; Johnston, Iain G; Williams, Suzannah; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-08-15

    One in 400 people has a maternally inherited mutation in mtDNA potentially causing incurable disease. In so-called heteroplasmic disease, mutant and normal mtDNA co-exist in the cells of carrier women. Disease severity depends on the proportion of inherited abnormal mtDNA molecules. Families who have had a child die of severe, maternally inherited mtDNA disease need reliable information on the risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. However, prenatal diagnosis and even estimates of risk are fraught with uncertainty because of the complex and stochastic dynamics of heteroplasmy. These complications include an mtDNA bottleneck, whereby hard-to-predict fluctuations in the proportions of mutant and normal mtDNA may arise between generations. In 'mitochondrial replacement therapy' (MRT), damaged mitochondria are replaced with healthy ones in early human development, using nuclear transfer. We are developing non-invasive alternatives, notably activating autophagy, a cellular quality control mechanism, in which damaged cellular components are engulfed by autophagosomes. This approach could be used in combination with MRT or with the regular management, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Mathematical theory, supported by recent experiments, suggests that this strategy may be fruitful in controlling heteroplasmy. Using mice that are transgenic for fluorescent LC3 (the hallmark of autophagy) we quantified autophagosomes in cleavage stage embryos. We confirmed that the autophagosome count peaks in four-cell embryos and this correlates with a drop in the mtDNA content of the whole embryo. This suggests removal by mitophagy (mitochondria-specific autophagy). We suggest that modulating heteroplasmy by activating mitophagy may be a useful complement to mitochondrial replacement therapy. PMID:27528757

  12. Forensics and mitochondrial DNA: applications, debates, and foundations.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Allard, Marc W; Wilson, Mark R; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2003-01-01

    Debate on the validity and reliability of scientific methods often arises in the courtroom. When the government (i.e., the prosecution) is the proponent of evidence, the defense is obliged to challenge its admissibility. Regardless, those who seek to use DNA typing methodologies to analyze forensic biological evidence have a responsibility to understand the technology and its applications so a proper foundation(s) for its use can be laid. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), an extranuclear genome, has certain features that make it desirable for forensics, namely, high copy number, lack of recombination, and matrilineal inheritance. mtDNA typing has become routine in forensic biology and is used to analyze old bones, teeth, hair shafts, and other biological samples where nuclear DNA content is low. To evaluate results obtained by sequencing the two hypervariable regions of the control region of the human mtDNA genome, one must consider the genetically related issues of nomenclature, reference population databases, heteroplasmy, paternal leakage, recombination, and, of course, interpretation of results. We describe the approaches, the impact some issues may have on interpretation of mtDNA analyses, and some issues raised in the courtroom. PMID:14527299

  13. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Analysis - Validation and Use for Forensic Casework.

    PubMed

    Holland, M M; Parsons, T J

    1999-06-01

    With the discovery of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the mid-1980's, the last in a series of critical molecular biology techniques (to include the isolation of DNA from human and non-human biological material, and primary sequence analysis of DNA) had been developed to rapidly analyze minute quantities of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). This was especially true for mtDNA isolated from challenged sources, such as ancient or aged skeletal material and hair shafts. One of the beneficiaries of this work has been the forensic community. Over the last decade, a significant amount of research has been conducted to develop PCR-based sequencing assays for the mtDNA control region (CR), which have subsequently been used to further characterize the CR. As a result, the reliability of these assays has been investigated, the limitations of the procedures have been determined, and critical aspects of the analysis process have been identified, so that careful control and monitoring will provide the basis for reliable testing. With the application of these assays to forensic identification casework, mtDNA sequence analysis has been properly validated, and is a reliable procedure for the examination of biological evidence encountered in forensic criminalistic cases. PMID:26255820

  14. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny in Eastern and Western Slavs.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, B; Grzybowski, T; Derenko, M; Perkova, M; Vanecek, T; Lazur, J; Gomolcak, P; Tsybovsky, I

    2008-08-01

    To resolve the phylogeny of certain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in eastern Europe and estimate their evolutionary age, a total of 73 samples representing mitochondrial haplogroups U4, HV*, and R1 were selected for complete mitochondrial genome sequencing from a collection of about 2,000 control region sequences sampled in eastern (Russians, Belorussians, and Ukrainians) and western (Poles, Czechs, and Slovaks) Slavs. On the basis of whole-genome resolution, we fully characterized a number of haplogroups (HV3, HV4, U4a1, U4a2, U4a3, U4b, U4c, U4d, and R1a) that were previously described only partially. Our findings demonstrate that haplogroups HV3, HV4, and U4a1 could be traced back to the pre-Neolithic times ( approximately 12,000-19,000 years before present [YBP]) in eastern Europe. In addition, an ancient connection between the Caucasus/Europe and India has been revealed by analysis of haplogroup R1 diversity, with a split between the Indian and Caucasus/European R1a lineages occurring about 16,500 years ago. Meanwhile, some mtDNA subgroups detected in Slavs (such as U4a2a, U4a2*, HV3a, and R1a1) are definitely younger being dated between 6,400 and 8,200 YBP. However, robust age estimations appear to be problematic due to the high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions found in young mtDNA subclusters. PMID:18477584

  15. Human mitochondrial DNA nucleoids are linked to protein folding machinery and metabolic enzymes at the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yousong; Bogenhagen, Daniel F

    2006-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packaged into bacterial nucleoid-like structures, each containing several mtDNA molecules. The distribution of nucleoids during mitochondrial fission and fusion events and during cytokinesis is important to the segregation of mitochondrial genomes in heteroplasmic cells bearing a mixture of wild-type and mutant mtDNA molecules. We report fractionation of HeLa cell mtDNA nucleoids into two subsets of complexes that differ in their sedimentation velocity and their association with cytoskeletal proteins. Pulse labeling studies indicated that newly replicated mtDNA molecules are evenly represented in the rapidly and slowly sedimenting fractions. Slowly sedimenting nucleoids were immunoaffinity purified using antibodies to either of two abundant mtDNA-binding proteins, TFAM or mtSSB. These two different immunoaffinity procedures yielded very similar sets of proteins, with 21 proteins in common, including most of the proteins previously shown to play roles in mtDNA replication and transcription. In addition to previously identified mitochondrial proteins, multiple peptides were observed for one novel DNA metabolic protein, the DEAH-box helicase DHX30. Antibodies raised against a recombinant fragment of this protein confirmed the mitochondrial localization of a specific isoform of DHX30. PMID:16825194

  16. Arsenic trioxide promotes mitochondrial DNA mutation and cell apoptosis in primary APL cells and NB4 cell line.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ran; Zhou, Jin; Sui, Meng; Li, ZhiYong; Feng, GuoSheng; Yang, BaoFeng

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. The NB4 cell line was treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro, and the primary APL cells were treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro and 0.16 mg kg(-1) d(-1) As(2)O(3) in vivo. The mitochondrial DNA of all the cells above was amplified by PCR, directly sequenced and analyzed by Sequence Navigatore and Factura software. The apoptosis rates were assayed by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial DNA mutation in the D-loop region was found in NB4 and APL cells before As(2)O(3) use, but the mutation spots were remarkably increased after As(2)O(3) treatment, which was positively correlated to the rates of cellular apoptosis, the correlation coefficient: r (NB4-As2O3)=0.973818, and r (APL-As2O3)=0.934703. The mutation types include transition, transversion, codon insertion or deletion, and the mutation spots in all samples were not constant and regular. It is revealed that As(2)O(3) aggravates mtDNA mutation in the D-loop region of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondrial DNA might be one of the targets of As(2)O(3) in APL treatment. PMID:20596959

  17. Mitochondrial DNA diversity and the origin of Chinese indigenous sheep.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Erhu; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Nanyang; Kong, Deying; Zhao, Yongju

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences data from previous studies were investigated to obtain genetic information which contributes to a better understanding of the genetic diversity and history of modern sheep. In this study, we analyzed mtDNA D-loop sequences of 963 individuals from 16 Chinese indigenous breeds that distributed seven geographic regions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all three previously defined haplogroups A, B, and C were found in all breeds among different regions except in Southwest China mountainous region, which had only the A and B haplogroups. The weak phylogeographic structure was observed among Chinese indigenous sheep breeds distribution regions and this could be attributable to long-term strong gene flow among regions induced by the human migration, commercial trade, and extensive transport of sheep. The estimation of demographic parameters from mismatch analyses showed that haplogroups A and B had at least one demographic expansion of indigenous sheep in China. PMID:23709123

  18. Breeding populations of northern pintails have similar mitochondrial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Grand, J.B.; Esler, Daniel; Derksen, D.V.; Scribner, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Northern pintails (Anas acuta) are highly nomadic, which may result in high levels of gene flow among nesting areas. To assess the extent of genetic differentiation among nesting areas, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in northern pintail females from three regions: Alaska, California, and midcontinent prairies and parklands. Abundant mtDNA variation was evident (20 genotypes among 289 birds), but there was no significant genetic differentiation of nesting areas within or among regions. Results indicate that pintails have had historically large breeding population sizes and a high rate of gene flow among North American nesting areas. Specific nesting areas are not independent units, but part of a larger continental population. High rates of gene flow suggest that over time, localized reductions in recruitment or survival may be compensated for by immigration.

  19. Typing single polymorphic nucleotides in mitochondrial DNA as a way to access Middle Pleistocene DNA

    PubMed Central

    Valdiosera, Cristina; García, Nuria; Dalén, Love; Smith, Colin; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Lidén, Kerstin; Angerbjörn, Anders; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Götherström, Anders

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we have used a technique designed to target short fragments containing informative mitochondrial substitutions to extend the temporal limits of DNA recovery and study the molecular phylogeny of Ursus deningeri. We present a cladistic analysis using DNA recovered from 400 kyr old U. deningeri remains, which demonstrates U. deningeri's relation to Ursus spelaeus. This study extends the limits of recovery from skeletal remains by almost 300 kyr. Plant material from permafrost environments has yielded DNA of this age in earlier studies, and our data suggest that DNA in teeth from cave environments may be equally well preserved. PMID:17148299

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of four Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Shoffner, J.M.; Wallace, D.C.

    1996-01-22

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence was determined on 3 patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD) exhibiting AD plus Parkinson`s disease (PD) neuropathologic changes and one patient with PD. Patient mtDNA sequences were compared to the standard Cambridge sequence to identify base changes. In the first AD + PD patient, 2 of the 15 nucleotide substitutions may contribute to the neuropathology, a nucleotide pair (np) 4336 transition in the tRNA{sup Gln} gene found 7.4 times more frequently in patients than in controls, and a unique np 721 transition in the 12S rRNA gene which was not found in 70 other patients or 905 controls. In the second AD + PD patient, 27 nucleotide substitutions were detected, including an np 3397 transition in the ND1 gene which converts a conserved methionine to a valine. In the third AD + PD patient, 2 polymorphic base substitutions frequently found at increased frequency in Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients were observed, an np 4216 transition in ND1 and an np 13708 transition in the ND5 gene. For the PD patient, 2 novel variants were observed among 25 base substitutions, an np 1709 substitution in the 16S rRNA gene and an np 15851 missense mutation in the cytb gene. Further studies will be required to demonstrate a casual role for these base substitutions in neurodegenerative disease. 68 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. ND5 is a hot-spot for multiple atypical mitochondrial DNA deletions in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Marti, Ramon; Hirano, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder associated with depletion, multiple deletions and site-specific point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). MNGIE is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP; endothelial cell growth factor 1). Deficiency of TP leads to dramatically elevated levels of circulating thymidine and deoxyuridine. The alterations of pyrimidine nucleoside metabolism are hypothesized to cause imbalances of mitochondrial nucleotide pools that, in turn, may cause somatic alterations of mtDNA. We have now identified five major forms of mtDNA deletions in the skeletal muscle of MNGIE patients. While direct repeats and imperfectly homologous sequences appear to mediate the formation of mtDNA deletions, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 5 gene is a hot-spot for these rearrangements. A novel aspect of the mtDNA deletions in MNGIE is the presence of microdeletions at the imperfectly homologous breakpoints. PMID:14613972

  2. PCR Based Determination of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, JP; Ryde, IT; Sanders, LH; Howlett, EH; Colton, MD; Germ, KE; Mayer, GD; Greenamyre, JT; Meyer, JN

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is a critical component of overall mitochondrial health. In this chapter we describe methods for isolation of both mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nucDNA), and measurement of their respective copy numbers using quantitative PCR. Methods differ depending on the species and cell type of the starting material, and availability of specific PCR reagents. PMID:25308485

  3. Intracellular evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the tragedy of the cytoplasmic commons.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exist in large numbers per cell. Therefore, the strength of natural selection on individual mtDNAs for their contribution to cellular fitness is weak whereas the strength of selection in favor of mtDNAs that increase their own replication without regard for cellular functions is strong. This problem has been solved for most mitochondrial genes by their transfer to the nucleus but a few critical genes remain encoded by mtDNA. Organisms manage the evolution of mtDNA to prevent mutational decay of essential services mitochondria provide to their hosts. Bottlenecks of mitochondrial numbers in female germlines increase the homogeneity of mtDNAs within cells and allow intraorganismal selection to eliminate cells with low quality mitochondria. Mechanisms of intracellular "quality control" allow direct selection on the competence of individual mtDNAs. These processes maintain the integrity of mtDNAs within the germline but are inadequate to indefinitely maintain mitochondrial function in somatic cells. PMID:27062292

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Released by Trauma Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Lee, Yen Ting; Tang, I. Tien; Isal, Burak; Adibnia, Yashar; Sandler, Nicola; Grimm, Melissa J.; Segal, Brahm H.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hauser, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are critical for anti-bacterial activity of the innate immune system. We have previously shown that mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns (mtDAMPs), including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are released into the circulation after injury. We therefore questioned whether mtDNA is involved in trauma-induced NET formation. Treatment of human polymorphoneutrophils (PMN) with mtDNA induced robust NET formation, though in contrast to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation, no NADPH-oxidase involvement was required. Moreover, formation of mtDNA-induced NETs was completely blocked by TLR9 antagonist, ODN-TTAGGG. Knowing that infective outcomes of trauma in elderly people are more severe than in young people, we measured plasma mtDNA and NET formation in elderly and young trauma patients and control subjects. MtDNA levels were significantly higher in the plasma of elderly trauma patients than young patients, despite lower injury severity scores in the elderly group. NETs were not visible in circulating PMN isolated from either young or old control subjects. NETs were however, detected in PMN isolated from young trauma patients and to a lesser extent from elderly patients. Stimulation by PMA induced widespread NET formation in PMN from both young volunteers and young trauma patients. NET response to PMA was much less pronounced in both elderly volunteers’ PMN and in trauma patients’ PMN. We conclude that mtDNA is a potent inducer of NETs that activates PMN via TLR9 without NADPH-oxidase involvement. We suggest that decreased NET formation in the elderly regardless of higher mtDNA levels in their plasma may result from decreased levels of TLR9 and/or other molecules, such as neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase that are involved in NET generation. Further study of the links between circulating mtDNA and NET formation may elucidate the mechanisms of trauma-related organ failure as well as the greater susceptibility to

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pavanello, Sofia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Fedeli, Ugo; Mielzynska-Švach, Danuta; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) is a biological response to mtDNA damage and dysfunction predictive of lung cancer risk. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are established lung carcinogens and may cause mitochondrial toxicity. Whether PAH exposure and PAH-related nuclear DNA (nDNA) genotoxic effects are linked with increased mtDNAcn has never been evaluated. Methods We investigated the effect of chronic exposure to PAHs on mtDNAcn in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of 46 Polish male non-current smoking cokeoven workers and 44 matched controls, who were part of a group of 94 study individuals examined in our previous work. Subjects PAH exposure and genetic alterations were characterized through measures of internal dose (urinary 1-pyrenol), target dose [anti-benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (anti-BPDE)-DNA adduct], genetic instability (micronuclei, MN and telomere length [TL]) and DNA methylation [p53 promoter] in PBLs. mtDNAcn (MT/S) was measured using a validated real-time PCR method. Results Workers with PAH exposure above the median value (>3 µmol 1-pyrenol/mol creatinine) showed higher mtDNAcn [geometric means (GM) of 1.06 (unadjusted) and 1.07 (age-adjusted)] compared to controls [GM 0.89 (unadjusted); 0.89 (age-adjusted)] (p=0.029 and 0.016), as well as higher levels of genetic and chromosomal [i.e. anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (p<0.001), MN (p<0.001) and TL (p=0.053)] and epigenetic [i.e., p53 gene-specific promoter methylation (p<0.001)] alterations in the nDNA. In the whole study population, unadjusted and age-adjusted mtDNAcn was positively correlated with 1-pyrenol (p=0.043 and 0.032) and anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (p=0.046 and 0.049). Conclusions PAH exposure and PAH-related nDNA genotoxicity are associated with increased mtDNAcn. Impact The present study is suggestive of potential roles of mtDNAcn in PAH-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23885040

  6. Plasma Mitochondrial DNA-a Novel DAMP in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Di Caro, Valentina; Walko, Thomas D; Bola, R Aaron; Hong, John D; Pang, Diana; Hsue, Victor; Au, Alicia K; Halstead, E Scott; Carcillo, Joseph A; Clark, Robert S B; Aneja, Rajesh K

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a novel danger-associated molecular pattern that on its release into the extracellular milieu acts via toll-like receptor-9, a pattern recognition receptor of the immune system. We hypothesized that plasma mtDNA concentrations will be elevated in septic children, and these elevations are associated with an increase in the severity of illness. In a separate set of in vitro experiments, we test the hypothesis that exposing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to mtDNA activates the immune response and induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release. Children with sepsis/systemic inflammatory response syndrome or control groups were enrolled within 24 h of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. Mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COX1) concentrations were measured by real-time quantitative PCR in the DNA extracted from plasma. PBMCs were treated with mtDNA (10 μg/mL) and supernatant TNF levels were measured. The median plasma mtDNA concentrations were significantly elevated in the septic patients as compared with the critically ill non-septic and healthy control patients [1.75E+05 (IQR 6.64E+04-3.67E+05) versus 5.73E+03 (IQR 3.90E+03-1.28E+04) and 6.64E+03 (IQR 5.22E+03-1.63E+04) copies/μL respectively]. The median concentrations of plasma mtDNA were significantly greater in patients with MOF as compared with patients without MOF (3.2E+05 (IQR 1.41E+05-1.08E+06) vs. 2.9E+04 (IQR 2.47E+04-5.43E+04) copies/μL). PBMCs treated with mtDNA demonstrated higher supernatant TNF levels as compared with control cells (6.5 ± 1.8 vs. 3.5 ± 0.5 pg/mL, P > 0.05). Our data suggest that plasma mtDNA is a novel danger-associated molecular pattern in pediatric sepsis and appears to be associated with MOF. PMID:26682947

  7. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  8. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from two Denisovan individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Susanna; Renaud, Gabriel; Viola, Bence; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoly P.; Prüfer, Kay; Pääbo, Svante

    2015-01-01

    Denisovans, a sister group of Neandertals, have been described on the basis of a nuclear genome sequence from a finger phalanx (Denisova 3) found in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains. The only other Denisovan specimen described to date is a molar (Denisova 4) found at the same site. This tooth carries a mtDNA sequence similar to that of Denisova 3. Here we present nuclear DNA sequences from Denisova 4 and a morphological description, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, from another molar (Denisova 8) found in Denisova Cave in 2010. This new molar is similar to Denisova 4 in being very large and lacking traits typical of Neandertals and modern humans. Nuclear DNA sequences from the two molars form a clade with Denisova 3. The mtDNA of Denisova 8 is more diverged and has accumulated fewer substitutions than the mtDNAs of the other two specimens, suggesting Denisovans were present in the region over an extended period. The nuclear DNA sequence diversity among the three Denisovans is comparable to that among six Neandertals, but lower than that among present-day humans. PMID:26630009

  9. HVI and HVII mitochondrial DNA data in Apaches and Navajos.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Allard, Marc W; Fisher, Constance L; Isenberg, Alice R; Monson, Keith L; Stewart, John E B; Wilson, Mark R; Miller, Kevin W P

    2002-08-01

    Most mtDNA studies on Native Americans have concentrated on hypervariable region I (HVI) sequence data. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype data from hypervariable regions I and II (HVI and HVII) have been compiled from Apaches (N=180) and Navajos (N=146). The inclusion of HVII data increases the amount of information that can be obtained from low diversity population groups. Less mtDNA variation was observed in the Apaches and Navajos than in major population groups. The majority of the mtDNA sequences were observed more than once; only 17.8% (32/180) of the Apache sequences and 25.8% of the Navajo sequences were observed once. Most of the haplotypes in Apaches and Navajos fall into the A and B haplogroups. Although a limited number of haplogroups were observed, both sample populations exhibit sufficient variation for forensic mtDNA typing. Genetic diversity was 0.930 in the Apache sample and 0.963 in the Navajo sample. The random match probability was 7.48% in the Apache sample and 4.40% in the Navajo sample. The average number of nucleotide differences between individuals in a database is 9.0 in the Navajo sample and 7.7 in the Apache sample. The data demonstrate that mtDNA sequencing can be informative in forensic cases where Native American population data are used. PMID:12185491

  10. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from two Denisovan individuals.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Susanna; Renaud, Gabriel; Viola, Bence; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Shunkov, Michael V; Derevianko, Anatoly P; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2015-12-22

    Denisovans, a sister group of Neandertals, have been described on the basis of a nuclear genome sequence from a finger phalanx (Denisova 3) found in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains. The only other Denisovan specimen described to date is a molar (Denisova 4) found at the same site. This tooth carries a mtDNA sequence similar to that of Denisova 3. Here we present nuclear DNA sequences from Denisova 4 and a morphological description, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, from another molar (Denisova 8) found in Denisova Cave in 2010. This new molar is similar to Denisova 4 in being very large and lacking traits typical of Neandertals and modern humans. Nuclear DNA sequences from the two molars form a clade with Denisova 3. The mtDNA of Denisova 8 is more diverged and has accumulated fewer substitutions than the mtDNAs of the other two specimens, suggesting Denisovans were present in the region over an extended period. The nuclear DNA sequence diversity among the three Denisovans is comparable to that among six Neandertals, but lower than that among present-day humans. PMID:26630009

  11. [Analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in yakut population].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, S A; Bermisheva, M A; Villems, R; Maksimova, N R; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2003-01-01

    To study the mitochondrial gene pool structure in Yakuts, polymorphism of mtDNA hypervariable segment I (16,024-16,390) was analyzed in 191 people sampled from the indigenous population of the Sakha Republic. In total, 67 haplotypes of 14 haplogroups were detected. Most (91.6%) haplotypes belonged to haplogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, M*, and Y, which are specific for East Eurasian ethnic groups; 8.4% haplotypes represented Caucasian haplogroups H, HV1, J, T, U, and W. A high frequency of mtDNA types belonging to Asian supercluster M was peculiar for Yakuts: mtDNA types belonging to haplogroup C, D, or G and undifferentiated mtDNA types of haplogroup M (M*) accounted for 81% of all haplotypes. The highest diversity was observed for haplogroups C and D, which comprised respectively 22 (44%) and 18 (30%) haplotypes. Yakuts showed the lowest genetic diversity (H = 0.964) among all Turkic ethnic groups. Phylogenetic analysis testified to a common genetic substrate of Yakuts, Mongols, and Central Asian (Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uigur) populations. Yakuts proved to share 21 (55.5%) mtDNA haplogroups with the Central Asian ethnic groups and Mongols. Comparisons with modern paleo-Asian populations (Chukcha, Itelmen, Koryaks) revealed three (8.9%) haplotypes common for Yakuts and Koryaks. The results of mtDNA analysis disagree with the hypothesis of an appreciable paleo-Asian contribution to the modern Yakut gene pool. PMID:12942638

  12. Historically low mitochondrial DNA diversity in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal marsupial that was historically widespread across eastern Australia until the end of the 19th century when it suffered a steep population decline. Hunting for the fur trade, habitat conversion, and disease contributed to a precipitous reduction in koala population size during the late 1800s and early 1900s. To examine the effects of these reductions in population size on koala genetic diversity, we sequenced part of the hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in koala museum specimens collected in the 19th and 20th centuries, hypothesizing that the historical samples would exhibit greater genetic diversity. Results The mtDNA haplotypes present in historical museum samples were identical to haplotypes found in modern koala populations, and no novel haplotypes were detected. Rarefaction analyses suggested that the mtDNA genetic diversity present in the museum samples was similar to that of modern koalas. Conclusions Low mtDNA diversity may have been present in koala populations prior to recent population declines. When considering management strategies, low genetic diversity of the mtDNA hypervariable region may not indicate recent inbreeding or founder events but may reflect an older historical pattern for koalas. PMID:23095716

  13. Mitochondrial DNA lineages of Italian Giara and Sarcidano horses.

    PubMed

    Morelli, L; Useli, A; Sanna, D; Barbato, M; Contu, D; Pala, M; Cancedda, M; Francalacci, P

    2014-01-01

    Giara and Sarcidano are 2 of the 15 extant native Italian horse breeds with limited dispersal capability that originated from a larger number of individuals. The 2 breeds live in two distinct isolated locations on the island of Sardinia. To determine the genetic structure and evolutionary history of these 2 Sardinian breeds, the first hypervariable segment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was sequenced and analyzed in 40 Giara and Sarcidano horses and compared with publicly available mtDNA data from 43 Old World breeds. Four different analyses, including genetic distance, analysis of molecular variance, haplotype sharing, and clustering methods, were used to study the genetic relationships between the Sardinian and other horse breeds. The analyses yielded similar results, and the FST values indicated that a high percentage of the total genetic variation was explained by between-breed differences. Consistent with their distinct phenotypes and geographic isolation, the two Sardinian breeds were shown to consist of 2 distinct gene pools that had no gene flow between them. Giara horses were clearly separated from the other breeds examined and showed traces of ancient separation from horses of other breeds that share the same mitochondrial lineage. On the other hand, the data from the Sarcidano horses fit well with variation among breeds from the Iberian Peninsula and North-West Europe: genetic relationships among Sarcidano and the other breeds are consistent with the documented history of this breed. PMID:25366719

  14. Reconstructing ancient mitochondrial DNA links between Africa and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, María; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Perego, Ugo A.; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Brisighelli, Francesca; Lancioni, Hovirag; Woodward, Scott R.; López-Soto, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Capelli, Cristian; Torroni, Antonio; Salas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages of macro-haplogroup L (excluding the derived L3 branches M and N) represent the majority of the typical sub-Saharan mtDNA variability. In Europe, these mtDNAs account for <1% of the total but, when analyzed at the level of control region, they show no signals of having evolved within the European continent, an observation that is compatible with a recent arrival from the African continent. To further evaluate this issue, we analyzed 69 mitochondrial genomes belonging to various L sublineages from a wide range of European populations. Phylogeographic analyses showed that ∼65% of the European L lineages most likely arrived in rather recent historical times, including the Romanization period, the Arab conquest of the Iberian Peninsula and Sicily, and during the period of the Atlantic slave trade. However, the remaining 35% of L mtDNAs form European-specific subclades, revealing that there was gene flow from sub-Saharan Africa toward Europe as early as 11,000 yr ago. PMID:22454235

  15. Adaptation of topoisomerase I paralogs to nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Ilaria Dalla; Goffart, Steffi; Wurm, Melanie; Wiek, Constanze; Essmann, Frank; Sobek, Stefan; Schroeder, Peter; Zhang, Hongliang; Krutmann, Jean; Hanenberg, Helmut; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Mielke, Christian; Pommier, Yves; Boege, Fritz; Christensen, Morten O.

    2009-01-01

    Topoisomerase I is essential for DNA metabolism in nuclei and mitochondria. In yeast, a single topoisomerase I gene provides for both organelles. In vertebrates, topoisomerase I is divided into nuclear and mitochondrial paralogs (Top1 and Top1mt). To assess the meaning of this gene duplication, we targeted Top1 to mitochondria or Top1mt to nuclei. Overexpression in the fitting organelle served as control. Targeting of Top1 to mitochondria blocked transcription and depleted mitochondrial DNA. This was also seen with catalytically inactive Top1 mutants, but not with Top1mt overexpressed in mitochondria. Targeting of Top1mt to the nucleus revealed that it was much less able to interact with mitotic chromosomes than Top1 overexpressed in the nucleus. Similar experiments with Top1/Top1mt hybrids assigned these functional differences to structural divergences in the DNA-binding core domains. We propose that adaptation of this domain to different chromatin environments in nuclei and mitochondria has driven evolutional development and conservation of organelle-restricted topoisomerase I paralogs in vertebrates. PMID:19720733

  16. Reconstructing ancient mitochondrial DNA links between Africa and Europe.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Perego, Ugo A; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Brisighelli, Francesca; Lancioni, Hovirag; Woodward, Scott R; López-Soto, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Capelli, Cristian; Torroni, Antonio; Salas, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages of macro-haplogroup L (excluding the derived L3 branches M and N) represent the majority of the typical sub-Saharan mtDNA variability. In Europe, these mtDNAs account for <1% of the total but, when analyzed at the level of control region, they show no signals of having evolved within the European continent, an observation that is compatible with a recent arrival from the African continent. To further evaluate this issue, we analyzed 69 mitochondrial genomes belonging to various L sublineages from a wide range of European populations. Phylogeographic analyses showed that ~65% of the European L lineages most likely arrived in rather recent historical times, including the Romanization period, the Arab conquest of the Iberian Peninsula and Sicily, and during the period of the Atlantic slave trade. However, the remaining 35% of L mtDNAs form European-specific subclades, revealing that there was gene flow from sub-Saharan Africa toward Europe as early as 11,000 yr ago. PMID:22454235

  17. Protection from palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA damage prevents from mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and impaired insulin signaling in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Solodushko, Viktoriya A; Wilson, Glenn L; Rachek, Lyudmila I

    2012-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/(apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase (hOGG1) to mitochondria in L6 myotubes. After palmitate exposure, we evaluated mtDNA damage, mitochondrial function, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, insulin signaling pathways, and glucose uptake. Protection of mtDNA from palmitate-induced damage by overexpression of hOGG1 targeted to mitochondria significantly diminished palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide production, restored the decline in ATP levels, reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) kinase, prevented cells from entering apoptosis, increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinase (Akt) (Ser473) and tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and thereby enhanced glucose transporter 4 translocation to plasma membrane, and restored insulin signaling. Addition of a specific inhibitor of JNK mimicked the effect of mitochondrial overexpression of hOGG1 and partially restored insulin sensitivity, thus confirming the involvement of mtDNA damage and subsequent increase of oxidative stress and JNK activation in insulin signaling in L6 myotubes. Our results are the first to report that mtDNA damage is the proximal cause in palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired insulin signaling and provide strong evidence that targeting DNA repair enzymes into mitochondria in skeletal muscles could be a potential therapeutic treatment for insulin resistance. PMID:22128025

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Spermatozoa of Fertile Stallions.

    PubMed

    Orsztynowicz, M; Pawlak, P; Podstawski, Z; Nizanski, W; Partyka, A; Gotowiecka, M; Kosiniak-Kamysz, K; Lechniak, D

    2016-06-01

    Predicting male fertility on non-invasive sperm traits is of big importance to human and animal reproduction strategies. Combining the wide range of parameters monitored by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) with some molecular traits (e.g. mtDNA content) may help to identify markers of the male fertility. The aim of this study was to characterize variation in the mtDNA copy number in equine sperm and to investigate whether mtDNA content is correlated with quality traits of stallion spermatozoa and the age of the male. Ejaculates collected from 53 fertile stallions were divided into four age groups (3-5, 6-10, 11-14 and >15 years) and were subjected to a complex investigation including conventional analysis, CASA, flow cytometry and mtDNA content (real-time PCR). The mean (±SD) number of mtDNA copies equalled 14 ± 9 and varied from 3 to 64. Considering the great number of sperm parameters monitored in this study, only few of them were correlated with the mtDNA content: ejaculate volume (a positive correlation), the amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH; a negative correlation) and the high mitochondrial activity index (a negative correlation). The stallion age was not correlated with the mtDNA copy number. This study provides the first set of data on mtDNA content in equine sperm and confirms phenomena previously described for humans and dog on associations between sperm mtDNA content and selected motility parameters monitored by the CASA. Basing our study on spermatozoa from fertile stallions could however limit the extent of detected associations. PMID:27037507

  19. In vivo rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Walker, G D

    1989-01-01

    A revertant (SPR1) from a high-frequency petite strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown by mapping and sequence analysis to have a rearranged mitochondrial genome. In vivo rearrangement has occurred through a subgenomic-recombination pathway involving the initial formation of subgenomic molecules in nascent petite mutants, recombination between these molecules to form an intermediate with direct repeats, and subsequent excision of the resident or symposed duplication to yield a molecule with three novel junctions and a changed gene order. Sequencing of the novel junctions shows that intramolecular recombination in each case occurs by means of G + C-rich short direct repeats of 40-51 base pairs. Mapping and sequence analysis also reveal that the SPR1 mitochondrial genome lacks three sectors of the wild-type molecule of 4.4, 1.7, and 0.5 kilobases. Each of these sectors occurs in nontemplate, base-biased DNA, that is over 90% A + T. Absence of these sectors together with a rearranged gene order does not appear to affect the phenotype of SPR1, as colony morphology and growth rate on a number of different substrates are not detectably different from the wild type. Lack of phenotypic change suggests that mitochondrial gene expression has not been noticeably disrupted in SPR1 despite deletion of the consensus nonomer promoter upstream from the glutamic acid tRNA gene. Dispensability of DNA sectors and the presence of recombinogenic short, direct repeats are mandatory features of the subgenomic-recombination pathway for creating rearrangements in baker's yeast mtDNA. It is proposed that, in other organisms, organelle genomes containing these elements may undergo rearrangement by the same steps. Images PMID:2682661

  20. Association between mitochondrial DNA haplogroup and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Langer, Erica; Hooten, Anthony J; Roesler, Michelle; Hirsch, Betsy; Nguyen, Phuong L; Cioc, Adina; Warlick, Erica; Ross, Julie A

    2016-09-01

    Polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are used to group individuals into haplogroups reflecting human global migration and are associated with multiple diseases, including cancer. Here, we evaluate the association between mtDNA haplogroup and risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Cases were identified by the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System. Controls were identified through the Minnesota State driver's license/identification card list. Because haplogroup frequencies vary by race and ethnicity, we restricted analyses to non-Hispanic whites. We genotyped 15 mtSNPs that capture common European mitochondrial haplogroup variation. We used SAS v.9.3 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) overall and stratified by MDS subtype and IPSS-R risk category. We were able to classify 215 cases with confirmed MDS and 522 controls into one of the 11 common European haplogroups. Due to small sample sizes in some subgroups, we combined mt haplogroups into larger bins based on the haplogroup evolutionary tree, including HV (H + V), JT (J + T), IWX (I + W + X), UK (U + K), and Z for comparisons of cases and controls. Using haplogroup HV as the reference group, we found a statistically significant association between haplogroup JT and MDS (OR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.36, 0.92, P = 0.02). No statistically significant heterogeneity was observed in subgroup analyses. In this population-based study of MDS, we observed an association between mtDNA haplogroup JT and risk of MDS. While previously published studies provide biological plausibility for the observed association, further studies of the relationship between mtDNA variation and MDS are warranted in larger sample sizes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27121678

  1. Uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by DNA gyrase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, M.; Weinberg, R.; Simpson, M.V.

    1986-05-01

    Supercoiled mtDNA and the swivel requirement for its replication suggest the existence of a mtDNA gyrase. The authors published studies on isolated mitochondria showing that novobiocin, coumermycin, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid promote relaxed DNA formation at the expense of supercoiled DNA are in accord with this view. However, their inability to directly detect the enzyme led them to ask whether these drugs act elsewhere. Their results with isolated rat liver mitochondria show that novo, nal, but not oxo, stimulate O/sub 2/ uptake as much as does 2.4-dinitrophenol (DNP). This possible uncoupling effect was confirmed by a standard (/sup 32/P) assay showing the following inhibitions of ATP synthesis: 0.2 mM novo, 95% (0.4 mM, 100%) 0.4 mM nal, 37%; oxo to at least 1.9 mM, 0%; (0.5 mM 2,4-DNP, 100%). Thus, oxo remains a useful tool for intact mitochondrial studies. Because these three drugs, especially novo, are being used to study the role of DNA superhelicity on pro- and eucaryotic (and mitochondrial) gene expression, the authors studied their effect on oxidative phosphorylation in such cells. In these cases the drugs did not affect DNP-sensitive (/sup 14/C)glutamine transport into E. coli cells (an established measure of ATP level), nor, in an S. cerevisiae mutant permeable to novo, did novo affect the steady state ATP level. Studies on cultured mammalian cells are in progress.

  2. A mechanistic view of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ: providing insight into drug toxicity and mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christopher M.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (Pol γ) is the sole polymerase responsible for replication of the mitochondrial genome. The study of human Pol γ is of key importance to clinically relevant issues such as nucleoside analog toxicity and mitochondrial disorders such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia. The development of a recombinant form of the human Pol γ holoenzyme provided an essential tool in understanding the mechanism of these clinically relevant phenomena using kinetic methodologies. This review will provide a brief history on the discovery and characterization of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ, focusing on kinetic analyses of the polymerase and mechanistic data illustrating structure-function relationships to explain drug toxicity and mitochondrial disease. PMID:20083238

  3. The impact of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functioning on the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major factors implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The maintenance of healthy mitochondria is a very complex process coordinated bi-genomically. Here, we review association studies on mitochondrial haplogroups and subhaplogroups, discussing the underlying molecular mechanisms. We also focus on variation in the nuclear genes (NDUFV2, PGC-1alpha, HSPA9, LRPPRC, MTIF3, POLG1, and TFAM encoding NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, mortalin, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein, translation initiation factor 3, mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma, and mitochondrial transcription factor A, respectively) primarily linked to regulation of mitochondrial functioning that recently have been associated with PD risk. Possible interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variants and related proteins are discussed. PMID:24532986

  4. The Impact of Mitochondrial DNA and Nuclear Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functioning on the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major factors implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathogenesis. The maintenance of healthy mitochondria is a very complex process coordinated bi-genomically. Here, we review association studies on mitochondrial haplogroups and subhaplogroups, discussing the underlying molecular mechanisms. We also focus on variation in the nuclear genes (NDUFV2, PGC-1alpha, HSPA9, LRPPRC, MTIF3, POLG1, and TFAM encoding NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, mortalin, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein, translation initiation factor 3, mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma, and mitochondrial transcription factor A, respectively) primarily linked to regulation of mitochondrial functioning that recently have been associated with PD risk. Possible interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variants and related proteins are discussed. PMID:24532986

  5. Multiple mechanisms underlying troglitazone-induced mitochondrial permeability transition

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Takuya; Norioka, Misaki; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2010-11-01

    Troglitazone, a thiazolidinedione class antidiabetic drug, was withdrawn from the market because of its severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. It causes a mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), which may in part contribute to its hepatotoxicity. In the present study, the mechanism of troglitazone mitochondrial toxicity was investigated in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was attenuated by bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}-independent phospholipase A{sub 2} (iPLA{sub 2}). In contrast, that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was exacerbated by BEL. This exacerbation was diminished by addition of 2 mM glutathione, an antioxidant. Oxygen consumption by state 3 respiration in isolated mitochondria was also decreased by troglitazone, but it was not affected by BEL. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was completely attenuated in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was not affected. Addition of 1 {mu}M cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of MPT pores, completely attenuated swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone while it only partly diminished that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone. Thus, the MPT induced by 10 and 50 {mu}M troglitazone are regulated by different mechanism; the MPT induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone is regulated by the activation of iPLA{sub 2} and caused by the opening of CsA-regulating MPT pores followed by accumulation of Ca{sup 2+} in mitochondria, while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone is partly regulated by reactive oxygen species and mainly caused by the opening of CsA-insensitive MPT pores.

  6. Cardiac involvement in mitochondrial DNA disease: clinical spectrum, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Matthew G. D.; Bourke, John P.; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogenous group of genetic disorders that result from dysfunction of the final common pathway of energy metabolism. Mitochondrial DNA mutations affect key components of the respiratory chain and account for the majority of mitochondrial disease in adults. Owing to critical dependence of the heart on oxidative metabolism, cardiac involvement in mitochondrial disease is common and may occur as the principal clinical manifestation or part of multisystem disease. Recent advances in our understanding of the clinical spectrum and genetic aetiology of cardiac involvement in mitochondrial DNA disease have important implications for cardiologists in terms of the investigation and multi-disciplinary management of patients. PMID:22936362

  7. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred. PMID:25780773

  8. Structural heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA molecules within the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Fauron, C M; Wolstenholme, D R

    1976-01-01

    We have determined by electron microscopy the molecular weight of circular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules from 39 species representing 13 groups of five subgenera of the genus Drosophila. mtDNA molecules of all species examined, other than members of the melanogaster group, had, with one exception, molecular weights in the rather narrow range 9.90 X 10(6). The one exception was D. robusta, which had a molecular weight of 10.61 X 10(6). In contrast, mtDNA molecules from species within the melanogaster group had molecular weights covering the considerably greater range 9.92 X 10(6) to 12.35 X 10(6). Applying the electron microscope denaturation mapping technique of Inman to mtDNA molecules of eight species of the melanogaster group, we found each of them to contain a region [presumably rich in adenine and thymine (A+T)] which denatured at a specific temperature (40 degrees) at which most of the remainder of the molecule remained undenatured. The size of the A+T-rich region was constant for mtDNA molecules of a species, but varied from 0.62 X 10(6) to 3.41 X 10(6) for mtDNA molecules of different species. It was demonstrated that the differences in molecular weights of the A+T-rich regions can almost completely account for the differences in total molecular weights of the mtDNA molecules from species of the melanogaster group. Images PMID:1068475

  9. Translesion synthesis past acrolein-derived DNA adducts by human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ.

    PubMed

    Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Minko, Irina G; Lloyd, R Stephen; Copeland, William C

    2013-05-17

    Acrolein, a mutagenic aldehyde, is produced endogenously by lipid peroxidation and exogenously by combustion of organic materials, including tobacco products. Acrolein reacts with DNA bases forming exocyclic DNA adducts, such as γ-hydroxy-1,N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (γ-HOPdG) and γ-hydroxy-1,N(6)-propano-2'-deoxyadenosine (γ-HOPdA). The bulky γ-HOPdG adduct blocks DNA synthesis by replicative polymerases but can be bypassed by translesion synthesis polymerases in the nucleus. Although acrolein-induced adducts are likely to be formed and persist in mitochondrial DNA, animal cell mitochondria lack specialized translesion DNA synthesis polymerases to tolerate these lesions. Thus, it is important to understand how pol γ, the sole mitochondrial DNA polymerase in human cells, acts on acrolein-adducted DNA. To address this question, we investigated the ability of pol γ to bypass the minor groove γ-HOPdG and major groove γ-HOPdA adducts using single nucleotide incorporation and primer extension analyses. The efficiency of pol γ-catalyzed bypass of γ-HOPdG was low, and surprisingly, pol γ preferred to incorporate purine nucleotides opposite the adduct. Pol γ also exhibited ∼2-fold lower rates of excision of the misincorporated purine nucleotides opposite γ-HOPdG compared with the corresponding nucleotides opposite dG. Extension of primers from the termini opposite γ-HOPdG was accomplished only following error-prone purine nucleotide incorporation. However, pol γ preferentially incorporated dT opposite the γ-HOPdA adduct and efficiently extended primers from the correctly paired terminus, indicating that γ-HOPdA is probably nonmutagenic. In summary, our data suggest that acrolein-induced exocyclic DNA lesions can be bypassed by mitochondrial DNA polymerase but, in the case of the minor groove γ-HOPdG adduct, at the cost of unprecedented high mutation rates. PMID:23543747

  10. Signatures of Climatic Change In Human Mitochondrial Dna From Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. B.; Macaulay, V. A.; Torroni, A.; Bandelt, H.-J.

    Founder analysis is an approach to analysing non-recombining DNA sequence data, such as variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which aims at identifying and dating migrations into new territory. We applied the approach to about 4,000 human mtDNA sequences from Europe and the Near East, in order to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived at various times during the continent's past. We found that the major signal dates to about 15,000 years ago, at the time of rewarming following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). There is little or no archaeological evidence for immigration into Europe at this time, and the record indicates that at least parts of southern Europe remained populated during the LGM. Therefore, we interpret this signal as the trace of a bottleneck at the time of the LGM, as a result of the retreat from northern Europe during the peak of the glaciation, followed by a re-expansion from one or more refugial zones. Immigration episodes then figure at the beginning of the Early Upper Palaeolithic, during the Middle Upper Palaeolithic, and with the Neolithic. The impact of the latter on the composition of the European mtDNA pool was evidently rather minor. This result implies that climate is likely to have been a major force shaping human demographic history in Europe.