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Sample records for mitral valve calcification

  1. Mitral valve repair without mitral annuloplasty with extensive mitral annular calcification.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Akimasa; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yosuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2014-12-01

    In mitral valve repair, removal of mitral annular calcification (MAC) is necessary to secure the artificial ring but may cause rupture of the left ventricle or injury to the circumflex coronary artery. We experienced 3 cases of mitral valve regurgitation with extensive MAC. Patient 1, an 83-year old woman, had P1-P2 prolapse due to tendon rupture. We performed mitral valve repair with triangular resection of P2 and patch reconstruction, artificial-chordal reconstruction to P2 and anterolateral commissural edge-to-edge suturing. Patient 2 was a 76-year old man with P3 prolapse due to tendon rupture. We performed A3-P3 edge-to-edge suturing and small annular plication of the posteromedial commissure. Patient 3, an 84-year old woman with a non-specific coaptation defect in the anterolateral commissure and tenting of the anterior mitral leaflet due to a secondary chorda, underwent cutting of the secondary chorda of the anterior mitral leaflet and A1-P1 edge-to-edge suturing. We performed tricuspid annuloplasty in Patient 1 and aortic valve replacement in Patients 2 and 3. Postoperative echocardiography showed good control of mitral valve regurgitation, which we were able to regulate by repairing the leaflets and chordae without decalcification of the mitral annulus or implantation of an artificial ring. PMID:25205783

  2. Using a double-plicated posterior leaflet as an anchor for mitral valve replacement: a case of mitral annular calcification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We present a 62-year-old man with mitral regurgitation whose posterior annulus had severe calcification. Mitral valve replacement was performed by anchoring the cuff on a double-plicated posterior leaflet, and reinforcing with an equine pericardium. The patient is doing well 13 years after surgery with echocardiography showing no problems. PMID:23547886

  3. Mitral and aortic valve sclerosis/calcification and carotid atherosclerosis: results from 1065 patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Faggiano, Pompilio; Amado, Alexandra E; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Bonapace, Stefano; Franceschini, Lorenzo; Dini, Frank L; Ghio, Stefano; Agricola, Eustachio; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2014-11-01

    This study assesses whether aortic valve sclerosis (AVS) and mitral annulus calcification (MAC) are associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1065 patients underwent both echocardiography and carotid artery ultrasound scanning. AVS and MAC were defined as focal areas of increased echogenicity and thickening of the aortic leaflets or mitral valve annulus. Carotid artery atherosclerosis was defined as presence/absence of any atherosclerotic plaque or presence/absence of plaque >50 %. Of 1065 patients (65 ± 9 years; 38 % female) who comprised the study population, 642 (60 %) had at least one atherosclerotic plaque. AVS, but not mitral valve sclerosis; was associated with the presence of carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.9; P = 0.005) and the degree of carotid atherosclerosis (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.9; P = 0.01) in a multivariate model including age, gender, previous ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes, family cardiovascular history, left ventricular size, mass, and ejection fraction, and left atrial size. AVS is a significant predictor of carotid atherosclerosis, independently of other cardiovascular clinical and echocardiographic risk factors. PMID:24196525

  4. Heme oxygenase derived carbon monoxide and iron mediated plasmatic hypercoagulability in a patient with calcific mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jess L; Nielsen, Vance G; Castro, Allison R; Chen, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    We present a case of a patient with calcific mitral valve stenosis and plasmatic hypercoagulability. Using thrombelastography, the patient was determined to have an abnormally large velocity of plasma thrombus growth and strength with reduced vulnerability to lysis. Critically, increased carboxyhemoglobin concentration (2.4 %) was present, likely secondary to hemolysis from mitral stenosis and engagement of systemic heme oxygenase. It was determined that the patient's plasmatic hypercoagulability was in part due to carboxyhemefibrinogen formation and iron-enhancement of coagulation via two thrombelastographic methods. In conclusion, future investigation of the involvement of both carbon monoxide and iron mediated hypercoagulability in the setting of stenotic valve disease is warranted. PMID:25169134

  5. Low Magnesium Levels and FGF-23 Dysregulation Predict Mitral Valve Calcification as well as Intima Media Thickness in Predialysis Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jerónimo, Teresa; Fragoso, André; Silva, Claudia; Guilherme, Patrícia; Santos, Nélio; Faísca, Marília; Neves, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mitral valve calcification and intima media thickness (IMT) are common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) implicated with high cardiovascular mortality. Objective. To investigate the implication of magnesium and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) levels with mitral valve calcification and IMT in CKD diabetic patients. Methods. Observational, prospective study involving 150 diabetic patients with mild to moderate CKD, divided according to Wilkins Score. Carotid-echodoppler and transthoracic echocardiography were used to assess calcification. Statistical tests used to establish comparisons between groups, to identify risk factors, and to establish cut-off points for prediction of mitral valve calcification. Results. FGF-23 values continually increased with higher values for both IMT and calcification whereas the opposite trend was observed for magnesium. FGF-23 and magnesium were found to independently predict mitral valve calcification and IMT (P < 0.05). Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, the number of deaths was higher in patients with lower magnesium levels and poorer Wilkins score. The mean cut-off value for FGF-23 was 117?RU/mL and for magnesium 1.7?mg/dL. Conclusions. Hypomagnesemia and high FGF-23 levels are independent predictors of mitral valve calcification and IMT and are risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in this population. They might be used as diagnostic/therapeutic targets in order to better manage the high cardiovascular risk in CKD patients. PMID:26089881

  6. Mitral Valve Repair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Thoracic Surgeon? Adult Cardiac Surgery What is Pediatric Heart Disease? What is Risk Adjustment? Valve Repair/Replacement Surgery Mitral Valve Replacement Aortic Valve Mitral Valve Repair Esophageal Surgery Lung/Thoracic Surgery Aneurysm Surgery Arrhythmia Surgery Other Types of Surgery Clinical ...

  7. Surgical Management of Caseous Calcification of the Mitral Annulus.

    PubMed

    Wehman, Brody; Dawood, Murtaza; Ghoreishi, Mehrdad; Cheema, Faisal; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gammie, James S

    2015-06-01

    Caseous calcification of the mitral annulus is a rare variant of mitral annular calcification where liquefaction and caseation result in formation of a mass at the border of the calcified annulus. Limited reports of operative therapy for caseous calcification of the mitral annulus describe wide excision and gross débridement of the mass, a technique that can cause perioperative stroke. We present a strategy of limited incision and drainage of the liquid material, closure of the incision, and subsequent suture obliteration of the cavity and mitral valve repair or replacement. In our experience, this technique is safe and has not been associated with perioperative stroke. PMID:26046892

  8. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is due to small, usually harmless, tumor-like growths of collagen on the valve leaflets (called myxomatous changes). Mitral valve prolapse occurs in 2 percent to 3 percent of the population. A person can be born with the genetic ...

  9. Severe mitral regurgitation and heart failure due to caseous calcification of the mitral annulus.

    PubMed

    Pozsonyi, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila; Vágó, Hajnalka; Adám, Zsófia; Apor, Astrid; Alotti, Nasri; Sármán, Pál; Merkely, Béla; Karádi, István

    2011-01-01

    Caseous calcification is a rare form of mitral annular calcification. Echocardiography reveals an echodense mass in the inferior mitral annulus with smooth borders and an echolucent inner core. We present a case where caseous calcification of the mitral annulus caused severe mitral regurgitation, atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography were performed and ensured the diagnosis. The mass was surgically removed and a prosthetic valve was implanted. We conclude that caseous calcification of the mitral annulus should be considered not only in the differential diagnosis of cardiac masses but also in the background of mitral regurgitation, atrial fibrillation and heart failure. This case also represents the usefulness of multimodal imaging in identifying cardiac masses. PMID:21508639

  10. Mitral Valve Repair Surgery

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... end, where the valve doesn’t leak, the stress is taken off the chordal structure. But as ... on and as patients are put under increased stress and strain. Another question: “I will have mitral ...

  11. Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergy, Gordon G.

    1980-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is the most common heart disease seen in college and university health services. It underlies most arrhythmia and many chest complaints. Activity and exercise restrictions are usually unnecessary. (Author/CJ)

  12. Lipomatous hamartoma of mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Seetharama Ps; Gowda Sl, Girish; Chikkatur, Raghavendra; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2016-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are very rare, and tumors arising from cardiac valves are extremely rare. We present a case of lipomatous hamartoma of the mitral valve in a young female. This is the 6th case of lipomatous hamartoma of the mitral valve to be reported. We discuss the operative and histopathological findings. PMID:24821963

  13. Mitral Valve Prolapse (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Atrial Septal Defect Congenital Heart Defects Heart and Circulatory System Arrhythmias Getting an EKG (Video) Heart Murmurs Marfan Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Your Heart & Circulatory System EKG (Video) Ventricular Septal Defect Marfan Syndrome Arrhythmias ...

  14. Minimally invasive robotic mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Atluri, Pavan; Woo, Y Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, significant advances have been made in mitral valve surgery. Cardiac surgeons have successfully repaired degenerative and ischemic regurgitant mitral valves via a traditional midline sternotomy. In recent years, alternate incisions have yielded minimally invasive approaches to the mitral valve. Technological advances have made robotically assisted minimally invasive mitral valve surgery feasible. Decreased pain, more rapid return to work, diminished blood loss and reduced length of hospitalization have been witnessed following robotic mitral valve surgery when compared with a traditional sternotomy. Equivalent long-term mortality and freedom from recurrent mitral regurgitation are evident between mitral valve repair performed via a traditional sternotomy and minimally invasive and robotic techniques. As a result, an increasing number of patients and referring cardiologists are seeking minimally invasive approaches to mitral valve surgery. PMID:21158546

  15. Current challenges in interventional mitral valve treatment.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Maurizio; Candreva, Alessandro; Pozzoli, Alberto; Guidotti, Andrea; Gaemperli, Oliver; Nietlispach, Fabian; Barthelmes, Jens; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Weber, Alberto; Benussi, Stefano; Alfieri, Ottavio; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve therapies have emerged as an alternative option in high surgical risk or inoperable patients with severe and symptomatic mitral regurgitation (MR). As multiple technologies and different approaches will become available in the field of mitral valve interventions, different challenges are emerging, both patient- (clinical challenges) and procedure-related (technical challenges). This review will briefly explore the current open challenges in the evolving fields of interventional mitral valve treatment. PMID:26543599

  16. Current challenges in interventional mitral valve treatment

    PubMed Central

    Candreva, Alessandro; Pozzoli, Alberto; Guidotti, Andrea; Gaemperli, Oliver; Nietlispach, Fabian; Barthelmes, Jens; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Weber, Alberto; Benussi, Stefano; Alfieri, Ottavio; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve therapies have emerged as an alternative option in high surgical risk or inoperable patients with severe and symptomatic mitral regurgitation (MR). As multiple technologies and different approaches will become available in the field of mitral valve interventions, different challenges are emerging, both patient- (clinical challenges) and procedure-related (technical challenges). This review will briefly explore the current open challenges in the evolving fields of interventional mitral valve treatment. PMID:26543599

  17. [Cardiac valves calcifications in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Klari?, Dragan; Klari?, Vera; Kristi?, Ivica

    2011-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, especially those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), are at much higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than the general population. High serum phosphorus (P) level play important role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular calcifications and is a frequent and important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with CKD. We aimed to investigate the association of serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), parathyroid hormon (PTH). calcium phosphorus product (CaxP) with cardiac valves calcifications (VC) in patients on hemodialysis (HD). We investigated for VC using colour Doppler echocardiography. VC were considered present if mitral annular calcifications and/or aortic annular calcifications were visualized. We divided patients in two groups. VC negative group (VC-) were patients with absence of VC. Patients with presence of VC were VC positive (VC+). CRP mean levels in two samples were higher in VC+ group than in VC- group (17.0 vs 3.4mg/L) and (17.1 vs 4.0 mg/L) p<0.0001. CaxP mean level in both samples was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 4.8 vs 4.2 (p=0.0219) and 5.0 vs 4.3 (p=0.0078). We also made analysis of absolute highest levels of three samples of CRP (CRPmax) between groups. CRPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 19.5 vs 9.7 mg/L, (p=0.0045). We made analysis of absolute higher levels of two samples of Ca x P (CaxPmax) between groups. CaxPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 5.2 vs 4.4 (p=0.0014). We found cardiac valve calcifications in 40 percent of patients on hemodialysis. We found that patients with correlation between PTH level, CRP level, CaxP product and cardiac valve calcifications have higher serum levels of PTH and CRP. We also found that CaxP product is higher in patients with cardiac valve calcifications. We didn't find correlation between age, dialysis duration, BMI and cardiac valve calcifications. These findings support careful monitoring of calcium metabolisum in end stage renal disease to reduce valvular cacifications and the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23120808

  18. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may not close tightly. These flaps normally help seal or open the valve. Much of the time, ... and tricuspid valves close. They form a tight seal that prevents blood from flowing back into the ...

  19. Mitral valve surgery - open

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the rest of your life. Biological, made of human or animal tissue. These valves last 10 to 12 years. ... occur, but this is rare. Valves made from human or animal tissue fail over time, but have a lower ...

  20. Bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction due to native valve preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yukihiro; Mori, Yoshio; Umeda, Yukio; Takiya, Hiroshi

    2014-11-12

    Mitral valve replacement with preservation of the mitral leaflets and subvalvular apparatus is considered to maintain left ventricular geometry and function and reduce the risk of myocardial rupture. However, the routine use of this technique may lead to early complications such as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and even mitral inflow obstruction, requiring reoperation. We describe a rare case of bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction caused by a native valve preserving procedure. PMID:25392048

  1. Alternative approaches for mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Unique situations arise in which alternative exposures for mitral valve surgery offer distinct advantages over traditional approaches. Each exposure facilitates both mitral valve repair and replacement, although the standard repair procedures must be modified to accommodate these non-traditional exposures. Here, we detail the technical considerations required to perform transventricular and transaortic mitral valve repair as well as discuss the advantages for employing these less conventional approaches. PMID:26539353

  2. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... back through the valve also may have a heart murmur . A heart murmur is the sound caused by the leaking blood. ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC The Heart Heart Murmurs Atrial Septal Defect Quiz: Heart & Circulatory System Getting ...

  3. Leakage test during mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Taiju; Arai, Hirokuni

    2014-11-01

    Mitral valve repair is the preferred surgical treatment for mitral regurgitation. Cardiac surgeons must increasingly pursue high-quality mitral valve repair, which ensures excellent long-term outcomes. Intraoperative assessment of a competency of the repaired mitral valve before closure of the atrium is an important step in accomplishing successful mitral valve repair. Saline test is the most simple and popular method to evaluate the repaired valve. In addition, an "Ink test" can provide confirmation of the surface of coaptation, which is often insufficient in the assessment of saline test. There are sometimes differences between the findings of the leakage test in an arrested heart and the echocardiographic findings after surgery. Assessment of the mitral valve in an arrested heart may not accurately reflect its function in a contractile heart. Assessment of the valve on the beating heart induced by antegrade or retrograde coronary artery perfusion can provide a more physiological assessment of the repaired valve. Perfusion techniques during beating heart surgery mainly include antegrade coronary artery perfusion without aortic cross-clamping, and retrograde coronary artery perfusion via the coronary sinus with aortic cross-clamping. It is the most important point for the former approach to avoid air embolism with such precaution as CO2 insufflation, left ventricular venting, and transesophageal echocardiography, and for the latter approach to maintain high perfusion flow rate of coronary sinus and adequate venting. Leakage test during mitral valve repair increasingly takes an important role in successful mitral valve reconstruction. PMID:25156036

  4. Postoperative Outcomes of Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Restenosis after Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvotomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok; Song, Myong Gun; Park, Jae Bum; Shin, Je Kyoun

    2015-01-01

    Background There have been a number of studies on mitral valve replacement and repeated percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy for mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. However, studies on mitral valve repair for these patients are rare. In this study, we analyzed postoperative outcomes of mitral valve repair for mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. Methods In this study, we assessed 15 patients (mean age, 47.7±9.7 years; 11 female and 4 male) who underwent mitral valve repair between August 2008 and March 2013 for symptomatic mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy. The mean interval between the initial percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy and the mitral valve repair was 13.5±7 years. The mean preoperative Wilkins score was 9.4±2.6. Results The mean mitral valve area obtained using planimetry increased from 1.16±0.16 cm2 to 1.62±0.34 cm2 (p=0.0001). The mean pressure half time obtained using Doppler ultrasound decreased from 202.4±58.6 ms to 152±50.2 ms (p=0.0001). The mean pressure gradient obtained using Doppler ultrasound decreased from 9.4±4.0 mmHg to 5.8±1.5 mmHg (p=0.0021). There were no early or late deaths. Thromboembolic events or infective endocarditis did not occur. Reoperations such as mitral valve repair or mitral valve replacement were not performed during the follow-up period (39±16 months). The 5-year event-free survival was 56.16% (95% confidence interval, 47.467–64.866). Conclusion On the basis of these results, we could not conclude that mitral valve repair could be an alternative for patients with mitral valve restenosis after percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy. However, some patients presented with results similar to those of mitral valve replacement. Further studies including more patients with long-term follow-up are necessary to determine the possibility of this application of mitral valve repair. PMID:26509126

  5. Mitral valve disease-morphology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert A; Hagége, Albert A; Judge, Daniel P; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N; Dietz, Harry C; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D; Jensen, Morten O; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P; Marec, Hervé Le; Tourneau, Thierry Le; Markwald, Roger R; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-12-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but-even in adult life-remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular-ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  6. Quantitative mitral valve anatomy and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis is an important part of the morphological assessment of the diseased mitral valve. It can be used to describe valve anatomy, pathology, function and the mechanisms of disease. Echocardiography is the main source of indirect quantitative data that is comparable with direct anatomic or surgical measurements. Furthermore, it can relate morphology with function. This review provides an account of current mitral valve quantification techniques and clinical applications.

  7. Mitral Valve Area During Exercise After Restrictive Mitral Valve Annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Philippe B.; Verbrugge, Frederik H.; Verhaert, David; Smeets, Christophe J.P.; Grieten, Lars; Mullens, Wilfried; Gutermann, Herbert; Dion, Robert A.; Levine, Robert A.; Vandervoort, Pieter M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Restrictive mitral valve annuloplasty (RMA) for secondary mitral regurgitation might cause functional mitral stenosis, yet its clinical impact and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain debated. OBJECTIVES The purpose of our study was to assess the hemodynamic and clinical impact of effective orifice area (EOA) after RMA and its relationship with diastolic anterior leaflet (AL) tethering at rest and during exercise. METHODS Consecutive RMA patients (n = 39) underwent a symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise test with Doppler echocardiography and respiratory gas analysis. EOA, transmitral flow rate, mean transmitral gradient, and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure were assessed at different stages of exercise. AL opening angles were measured at rest and peak exercise. Mortality and heart failure readmission data were collected for at least 20 months after surgery. RESULTS EOA and AL opening angle were 1.5 ± 0.4 cm2 and 68 ± 10°, respectively, at rest (r = 0.4; p = 0.014). EOA increased significantly to 2.0 ± 0.5 cm2 at peak exercise (p < 0.001), showing an improved correlation with AL opening angle (r = 0.6; p < 0.001). Indexed EOA (EOAi) at peak exercise was an independent predictor of exercise capacity (maximal oxygen uptake, p = 0.004) and was independently associated with freedom from all-cause mortality or hospital admission for heart failure (p = 0.034). Patients with exercise EOAi <0.9 cm2/m2 (n = 14) compared with ?0.9 cm2/m2 (n = 25) had a significantly worse outcome (p = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, AL opening angle at peak exercise (p = 0.037) was the strongest predictor of exercise EOAi. CONCLUSIONS In RMA patients, EOA increases during exercise despite fixed annular size. Diastolic AL tethering plays a key role in this dynamic process, with increasing AL opening during exercise being associated with higher exercise EOA. EOAi at peak exercise is a strong and independent predictor of exercise capacity and is associated with clinical outcome. Our findings stress the importance of maximizing AL opening by targeting the subvalvular apparatus in future repair algorithms for secondary mitral regurgitation. PMID:25660923

  8. Durability of mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation due to degenerative mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative diseases of the mitral valve (MV) are the most common cause of mitral regurgitation in the Western world and the most suitable pathology for MV repair. Several studies have shown excellent long-term durability of MV repair for degenerative diseases. The best follow-up results are obtained with isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet, however even with isolated prolapse of the anterior leaflet or prolapse of both leaflets the results are gratifying, particularly in young patients. The freedom from reoperation on the MV at 15 years exceeds 90% for isolated prolapse of the posterior leaflet and it is around 70-85% for prolapse of the anterior leaflet or both leaflets. The degree of degenerative change in the MV also plays a role in durability of MV repair. Most studies have used freedom from reoperation to assess durability of the repair but some studies that examined valve function late after surgery suggest that recurrent mitral regurgitation is higher than estimated by freedom from reoperation. We can conclude that MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation is associated with low probability of reoperation for up to two decades after surgery. However, almost one-third of the patients develop recurrent moderate or severe mitral regurgitation suggesting that surgery does not arrest the degenerative process. PMID:26539345

  9. Acute Renal Infarction Secondary to Calcific Embolus from Mitral Annular Calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Bande, Dinesh; Abbara, Suhny; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2011-06-15

    We report a case of a 62-year-old man who presented with right groin pain who subsequently was found to have a renal infarct secondary to calcific embolus from mitral annular calcification on CT and angiography. We briefly review the literature and discuss the importance of this entity in clinical practice.

  10. Material properties of aged human mitral valve leaflets.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thuy; Sun, Wei

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of aged human anterior mitral leaflets (AML) and posterior mitral leaflets (PML). The AML and PML samples from explanted human hearts (n = 21, mean age of 82.62 ± 8.77-years-old) were subjected to planar biaxial mechanical tests. The material stiffness, extensibility, and degree of anisotropy of the leaflet samples were quantified. The microstructure of the samples was assessed through histology. Both the AML and PML samples exhibited a nonlinear and anisotropic behavior with the circumferential direction being stiffer than the radial direction. The AML samples were significantly stiffer than the PML samples in both directions, suggesting that they should be modeled with separate sets of material properties in computational studies. Histological analysis indicated the changes in the tissue elastic constituents, including the fragmented and disorganized elastin network, the presence of fibrosis and proteoglycan/glycosaminoglycan infiltration and calcification, suggesting possible valvular degenerative characteristics in the aged human leaflet samples. Overall, stiffness increased and areal strain decreased with calcification severity. In addition, leaflet tissues from hypertensive individuals also exhibited a higher stiffness and low areal strain than normotensive individuals. There are significant differences in the mechanical properties of the two human mitral valve leaflets from this advanced age group. The morphologic changes in the tissue composition and structure also infer the structural and functional difference between aged human valves and those of animals. PMID:24039052

  11. Study of collagen structure in canine myxomatous mitral valve disease 

    E-print Network

    Hadian, Mojtaba

    2009-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the single most common acquired cardiac disease of dogs, and is a disease of significant veterinary importance. It also bears close similarities to mitral valve prolapse in humans ...

  12. Unusual redo mitral valve replacement for bleeding in Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villarreal, Ovidio A; Fernández-Ceseña, Ernesto; Solano-Ricardi, Mercedes; Aguilar-García, Alma L; Vega-Hernández, Raquel; Angel-Soto, Gustavo Del

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 23-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation and Glanzmann thrombasthenia, who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement. Warfarin therapy was devastating, causing bilateral hemothorax, pericardial effusion, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hematuria. Redo mitral valve replacement with a biological prosthesis was required to resolve this critical situation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mitral valve replacement in Glanzmann thrombasthenia, highlighting the danger of oral anticoagulation in this pathology. PMID:24904176

  13. Mitral Valve Prolapse in Persons with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; Werner, John Christian

    1994-01-01

    Examination of 36 home-reared young adults with Down's syndrome found that 20 had abnormal echocardiographic findings. Thirteen had mitral valve prolapse, three had mitral valve prolapse and aortic insufficiency, two had only aortic insufficiency, and two had other mitral valve disorders. Theories of pathogenesis and relationship to exercise and…

  14. Recommended transoesophageal echocardiographic evaluation of mitral valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hokken, R.B.; ten Cate, F.J.; van Herwerden, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Valve replacement in patients with mitral valve regurgitation is indicated when symptoms occur or left ventricular function becomes impaired. Using different surgical techniques, mitral valve reconstruction has lead to earlier interventions with good clinical results. In order to determine the possibility of a mitral valve reconstruction, echocardiographic parameters are necessary. With transoesophageal echocardiography a segmental analysis of the entire mitral valve can be performed; mitral valve motion abnormalities and severity and direction of the regurgitation jet can be judged. From this analysis clues for underlying pathology can be derived as well as the eligibility of a successful mitral valve reconstruction. This article focuses on transoesophageal examination with segmental analysis in patients with mitral valve regurgitation. PMID:25696623

  15. Mitral valve plasty for a hammock mitral valve in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiaki; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Jyunji

    2015-09-01

    A 50-year old woman presented with arterial thrombosis in the right leg. Echocardiography revealed a mobile left atrial thrombus and severe mitral stenosis. She underwent a left atrial thrombectomy, the maze procedure and mitral valve plasty. Anterior and posterior mitral leaflets arose directly from the anterior papillary muscle, and from the posterior papillary muscle intervened by short chordae. This suggested a hammock mitral valve. A posterior papillary muscle division and commissurotomy were performed. The anterior leaflet was divided off the anterior papillary muscle, then extended by a triangular-shaped autologous pericardial patch and apically reattached. The postoperative mean pressure gradient of the mitral valve was 2.2 mmHg, and there was no regurgitation. The patient was in NYHA Class 1 and in sinus rhythm, 14 months after the operation. PMID:26034223

  16. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  17. Mitral Valve Prolapse in Young Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFaul, Richard C.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research regarding mitral valve prolapse in young children indicates that up to five percent of this population have the condition, with the majority being asymptomatic and requiring reassurance that the condition usually remains mild. Beta-blocking drugs are prescribed for patients with disabling chest pain, dizziness, palpitation, or…

  18. Mitral valve repair over five decades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that mitral valve (MV) repair is the preferable treatment for the majority of patients presenting with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). This success clearly testifies that the surgical procedure is accessible, reproducible and is carrying excellent long-lasting results. From the pre-extracorporeal circulation’s era to the last percutaneous approaches, a large variety of techniques have been proposed to address the different features of MV diseases. This article aimed at reviewing chronologically the development of these dedicated techniques through their origins and the debates that they generated in the literature. PMID:26309841

  19. Mitral valve-in-valve with the lotus mechanically expanding platform.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Reardon, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Disadvantages of existing balloon expandable or self-expanding transcatheter platforms for mitral valve-in-valve include the potential for malposition during deployment and for LV outflow tract obstruction Controlled mechanical valve expansion, the option to reposition, and stable hemodynamics throughout the procedure make the LOTUS valve an attractive option for mitral valve-in-valve Correct sizing remains a critical aspect of all trancatheter valve implant procedures, including valve-in-valve implants. PMID:26582326

  20. [Left Ventricular Rupture following Mitral Valve Replacement].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Left ventricular rupture is a rare but lethal complication after mitral valve replacement (MVR). Between 1989 and 2014, of 850 patients who underwent MVR, 6 developed left ventricular rupture in Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University. Treasure type I rupture occurred in 5 patients and Miller type III in 1. Four cases developed ventricular rupture right after declamping of the ascending aorta, and the remaining 2 after the transfer to the intensive care unit( ICU). Prompt surgical therapy was achieved for the instant closure of the muscular wall defect under the cardiopulmonary bypass and cardiac arrest, however, leading to the disappointing result of 66.7% of hospital death. It is the most important to relieving the stress of the posterior wall of the left ventricle during mitral surgery by using the modification techniques with the preservation of posterior mitral leaflet and avoiding pre and afterload of the left ventricle right after the MVR. PMID:26197900

  1. Evolution of the concept and practice of mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Rajab, Taufiek K.

    2015-01-01

    The first successful mitral valve repair was performed by Elliot Cutler at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1923. Subsequent evolution in the surgical techniques as well as multi-disciplinary cooperation between cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and cardiac anesthesiologists has resulted in excellent outcomes. In spite of this, the etiology of mitral valve pathology ultimately determines the outcome of mitral valve repair. PMID:26309840

  2. [Robot-assisted Mitral Valve Plasty].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Gou

    2015-01-01

    In April 2014, Team Watanabe have completed 249 robot-assisted cardiac surgeries. Wide range of procedures include internal thoracic artery harvesting, totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting(CABG), atrial septal defect closure, mitral valve plasty, cardiac tumor resection. The major benefit of robot-assisted cardiac surgery, which differentiates it from minimally invasive cardiac surgery, is that it only requires a few ports instead of small thoracotomy. Mitral valve plasty for regurgitation is one of the most suitable indication, which represents the advantage of robot-assisted cardiac surgery. The da Vinci surgical system completely changed the modality of cardiac surgeries from median sternotomy to endoscopic approach. Endoscopic surgery is expected not only to provide superior cosmesis but also to reduce complications and improve post-operative quality of life. In addition, we consider that sharing the same surgical view on the screen monitor is another great benefit from the educational point of view for the next-generation. PMID:25595158

  3. Robotically assisted minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kaushik; Alwair, Hazaim; Nifong, Wiley L; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-11-01

    Increased recognition of advantages, over the last decade, of minimizing surgical trauma by operating through smaller incisions and its direct impact on reduced postoperative pain, quicker recovery, improved cosmesis and earlier return to work has spurred the minimally invasive cardiac surgical revolution. This transition began in the early 1990s with advancements in endoscopic instruments, video & fiberoptic technology and improvements in perfusion systems for establishing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) via peripheral cannulation. Society of Thoracic Surgeons data documents that 20% of all mitral valve surgeries are performed using minimally invasive techniques, with half being robotically assisted. This article reviews the current status of robotically assisted mitral valve surgery, its advantages and technical modifications for optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:24251030

  4. Rare Mycotic Aneurysm of the Mitral Valve without Aortic Valve Involvement.

    PubMed

    Zarrini, Parham; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Luthringer, Daniel; Siegel, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Mycotic aneurysms can be a rare, but serious complication of infectious endocarditis. We report the case of a 20-year-old woman who presented with fever and malaise from streptococcal bacteremia and found to have vegetation on the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. On follow-up visit, the patient was noted to have a mycotic aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve without aortic involvement. Her clinical course was complicated by mitral valve chordal rupture, severe mitral regurgitation, and dyspnea from severe mitral regurgitation for which she underwent successful surgical repair of the mitral valve. PMID:25881967

  5. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Lardo, Albert C.

    2014-12-15

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or “looped”) flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  6. Anatomy of the Mitral Valve Apparatus – Role of 2D and 3D Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Levine, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The mitral valve apparatus is a complex three–dimensional functional unit that is critical to unidirectional heart pump function. This review details the normal anatomy, histology and function of the main mitral valve apparatus components 1) mitral annulus, 2) mitral valve leaflets, 3) chordae tendineae and 4) papillary muscles. 2 and 3 dimensional Echocardiography is ideally suited to examine the mitral valve apparatus and has provided insights into the mechanism of mitral valve disease. An overview of standardized image acquisition and interpretation is provided. Understanding normal mitral valve apparatus function is essential to comprehend alterations in mitral valve disease and the rationale for repair strategies. PMID:23743068

  7. Trans-catheter mitral valve implantation for mitral regurgitation: clinical case description and literature review.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Francesco; Cammalleri, Valeria; Ruvolo, Giovanni; Quadri, Arshad; De Vico, Pasquale; Muscoli, Saverio; Marchei, Massimo; Meloni, Sabrina; Conti, Fabio; Ussia, Gian Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Trans-catheter mitral valve implantation (TMVI) is actually the most attractive technique for treating patients with severe mitral regurgitation, who are denied surgical therapy. Recently, trans-catheter implantation of aortic biological prosthesis in mitral position has been done in compassionate cases, and very few experiences of TMVI in native non-calcified valves have been recently reported in very-high-risk patients, mainly with functional mitral regurgitation.Here, we report our case of TMVI using the second-generation CardiAQ prostheisis (CardiAQ Valve Technologies, Irvine, California, USA), reviewing the current state of the art. PMID:26556446

  8. Finite element analysis to model complex mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, Michel; Mesana, Thierry; Baxter, Ian; Chan, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Although finite element analysis has been used to model simple mitral repair, it has not been used to model complex repair. A virtual mitral valve model was successful in simulating normal and abnormal valve function. Models were then developed to simulate an edge-to-edge repair and repair employing quadrangular resection. Stress contour plots demonstrated increased stresses along the mitral annulus, corresponding to the annuloplasty. The role of finite element analysis in guiding clinical practice remains undetermined. PMID:24904177

  9. Intermittent premature mitral valve closure in combined acute severe aortic and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Dianzumba, S B; Montello, N J; Joyner, C R

    1984-11-01

    We have described the clinical, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic features of torn aortic cusps with mitral valve fenestration in a patient with infective endocarditis. Hemodynamic studies showed left atrial pressure intermittently exceeding left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. This phenomenon corresponded with intermittent premature mitral valve closure, which may serve as a marker for M-mode echocardiographic diagnosis in combined severe acute aortic and mitral regurgitation. PMID:6494970

  10. Review of the endovascular approach to mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Bergsland, Jacob; Mirtaheri, Peyman; Hiorth, Nikolai; Fosse, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The first interventional attempts at relieving mitral valve disease were in a sense minimally invasive, using relatively small incisions and introduction of instruments or a finger to open stenotic valves on the beating heart. The development of reliable cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) made exact anatomic repair of mitral pathology possible with improved results. Mitral valve surgery on an arrested heart has been the mainstay of treatment for decades. Modifications and minimalization of the surgical approach using videoscopic or robotic instruments have made less invasive procedures possible. Such procedures demand excellent technical skills and are still not widely adopted. More recently, attempts have been made to repair mitral valves using endovascular access on the beating heart, guiding the repair process with real-time imaging. We are presenting a review of available and developing techniques for endovascular repair of the mitral valve. A device developed by our group will be briefly described. PMID:26201541

  11. Minimally invasive surgery of mitral valve (MIS-MV).

    PubMed

    Kudo, Mikihiko; Yozu, Ryohei

    2014-06-01

    Following the revision of the therapeutic guideline of ACC/AHA in (Circulation 114:450-527, 2006), the incidence of mitral valve repair in asymptomatic patients with moderate or severe mitral valve regurgitation has increased. For mitral valve repair, the quality and outcomes as well as lower invasive procedure are important to obtain the confidence of cardiologists and ensure request of early phase operation from cardiologists. With recent innovations of technologies and the development of revolutionary techniques, minimally invasive surgery of the mitral valve (MIS-MV) has become a widespread surgical option of mitral valve repair. It is vital, however, that careful preoperative assessment, and planning of the approach and perfusion strategy are put in place to perform MIS-MV safely. PMID:24722958

  12. Lifting posterior mitral annuloplasty for enhancing leaflet coaptation in mitral valve repair: midterm outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Meong Gun; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok; Yang, Hyun Suk

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the midterm outcomes of lifting posterior mitral annuloplasty for enhancing leaflet coaptation in mitral valve repair. Methods Between October 2007 and December 2012, 341 consecutive patients with significant mitral regurgitation underwent lifting posterior mitral annuloplasty using a specially designed fabric annuloplasty strip that lifts the middle portion of the posterior annulus. Associated procedures for mitral valve repairs, such as patch valvuloplasty for posterior leaflet prolapse (n=80), new chord placement for anterior leaflet prolapse (n=33), commissurotomy (n=29), and posterior leaflet extension (n=23), were performed in 141 patients (41.3%). Results Thirty-day mortality was 0.9%. Nine late deaths (2.6%) occurred. Mean overall survival at 5 years was 96.0%±1.1%. During the mean follow-up period of 38±17 months, six patients (1.8%) underwent valve-related reoperation (5-year freedom from valve-related reoperation, 98.1%±0.8%). At 5 years, mean freedom from recurrence of mitral regurgitation grade 3+ to 4+ (moderate to severe) was 95.1%±1.6%. The mean valve pressure gradient (PG) was 3.2±1.5 mmHg across all strip sizes at the time of follow-up. Conclusions Lifting posterior mitral annuloplasty using an innovative annuloplasty strip in mitral valve repair has a low rate of recurrent regurgitation or valve-related reoperation with rare relevant complications. PMID:26309826

  13. Mitral Valve Prolapse and the Association with Cutaneous Mucin Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Uzma; McLeod, Michael P.; Torchia, Daniele; Romanelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is the most common disorder of the cardiac valves in people in the United States. It can present as both primary and secondary disorders, and when associated with myxomatous changes in the skin, the term cardiocutaneous mucinosis can be used to describe this entity. Patients with mitral valve prolapse may have cutaneous findings on histological analysis that may indicate its severity and complication rate. PMID:23710268

  14. TexMi: development of tissue-engineered textile-reinforced mitral valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ricardo; Gesche, Valentine N; Hurtado-Aguilar, Luis G; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Frese, Julia; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Mela, Petra

    2014-09-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation together with aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in Europe and North America. Mechanical and biological prostheses available for mitral valve replacement have significant limitations such as the need of a long-term anticoagulation therapy and failure by calcifications. Both types are unable to remodel, self-repair, and adapt to the changing hemodynamic conditions. Moreover, they are mostly designed for the aortic position and do not reproduce the native annular-ventricular continuity, resulting in suboptimal hemodynamics, limited durability, and gradually decreasing ventricular pumping efficiency. A tissue-engineered heart valve specifically designed for the mitral position has the potential to overcome the limitations of the commercially available substitutes. For this purpose, we developed the TexMi, a living textile-reinforced mitral valve, which recapitulates the key elements of the native one: annulus, asymmetric leaflets (anterior and posterior), and chordae tendineae to maintain the native annular-ventricular continuity. The tissue-engineered valve is based on a composite scaffold consisting of the fibrin gel as a cell carrier and a textile tubular structure with the twofold task of defining the gross three-dimensional (3D) geometry of the valve and conferring mechanical stability. The TexMi valves were molded with ovine umbilical vein cells and stimulated under dynamic conditions for 21 days in a custom-made bioreactor. Histological and immunohistological stainings showed remarkable tissue development with abundant aligned collagen fibers and elastin deposition. No cell-mediated tissue contraction occurred. This study presents the proof-of-principle for the realization of a tissue-engineered mitral valve with a simple and reliable injection molding process readily adaptable to the patient's anatomy and pathological situation by producing a patient-specific rapid prototyped mold. PMID:24665896

  15. Mitral Valve Clip for Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed T.; Ahmadzai, Nadera; Coyle, Kathryn; Coyle, Doug; Moher, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of the 500,000 North American patients with chronic mitral regurgitation may be poor candidates for mitral valve surgery. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous mitral valve repair using mitral valve clips in candidates at prohibitive risk for surgery. Data Sources We searched articles in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library published from 1994 to February 2014 for evidence of effectiveness and harms; for economic literature we also searched NHS EED and Tufts CEA registry. Grey literature was also searched. Review Methods Primary studies were sought from existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screening methods. Newer studies were sought by searching the period subsequent to the last search date of the review. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. We used the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized, generic assessment for non-randomized studies, and the Phillips checklist for economic studies. Results Ten studies including 1 randomized trial were included. The majority of the direct comparative evidence compared the mitral valve clip repair with surgery in patients not particularly at prohibitive surgical risk. Irrespective of degenerative or functional chronic mitral regurgitation etiology, evidence of effectiveness and harms is inconclusive and of very low quality. Very-low-quality evidence indicates that percutaneous mitral valve clip repair may provide a survival advantage, at least during the first 1 to 2 years, particularly in medically managed chronic functional mitral regurgitation. Because of limitations in the design of studies, the cost-effectiveness of mitral valve clips in patients at prohibitive risk for surgery also could not be established. Limitations Because of serious concerns of risk of bias, indirectness, and imprecision, evidence is of very low quality. Conclusions No meaningful conclusions can be drawn about the comparative effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness of mitral valve clips in the population with chronic mitral regurgitation who are at prohibitive risk for surgery. PMID:26379810

  16. Reoperative minimally invasive mitral valve replacement for bovine pericardial valve thrombosis secondary to idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W A; Adams, Corey; Yared, Kibar; Ball, Warren; Dhingra, Sanjay; Rosenbloom, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Bioprosthetic mitral valves rarely obstruct. We present an older woman who presented with rapidly progressive dyspnea 4 years after bovine mitral replacement. Investigations demonstrated severe mitral stenosis with large, obstructive masses within the previous mitral prosthesis and an elevated eosinophil count. She underwent urgent reoperative mitral replacement and tricuspid valve repair through a 4-cm right minithoracotomy under hypothermic, fibrillatory arrest. Pathologic analysis revealed eosinophilic infiltrates in the obstructive masses and normal endomyocardial biopsies. She made an uneventful recovery and was discharged on steroids to suppress the eosinophilia. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated a well-functioning porcine valve without leaflet restriction or obstruction. PMID:21664795

  17. Association of Serum Phosphate Levels with Aortic Valve Sclerosis and Annular Calcification: the Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Linefsky, Jason P.; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Katz, Ronit; de Boer, Ian H.; Barasch, Eddy; Jenny, Nancy S.; Siscovick, David S.; Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate mineral metabolism markers as potential risk factors for calcific aortic valve disease. Background Mineral metabolism disturbances are common among older people and may contribute to cardiac valvular calcification. Associations of serum mineral metabolism markers with cardiac valvular calcification have not been evaluated in a well-characterized general population of older adults. Methods We measured serum levels of phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 1,938 Cardiovascular Health Study participants who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease and who underwent echocardiography measurements of aortic valve sclerosis (AVS), mitral annular calcification (MAC), and aortic annular calcification (AAC). We used logistic regression models to estimate associations of mineral metabolism markers with AVS, MAC, and AAC after adjustment for relevant confounding variables, including kidney function. Results The respective prevalences of AVS, MAC, and AAC were 54%, 39%, and 44%. Each 0.5 mg/dl higher serum phosphate concentration was associated with a greater adjusted odds of AVS (odds ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.31, p = 0.01), MAC (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.26, p =0.05), and AAC (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 0.99 to 1.25, p = 0.05). In contrast, serum calcium, parathyroid hormone, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were not associated with aortic or mitral calcification. Conclusions Higher serum phosphate levels within the normal range are associated with valvular and annular calcification in a community-based cohort of older adults. Phosphate may be a novel risk factor for calcific aortic valve disease and warrants further study. PMID:21737022

  18. Transcatheter Aortic and Mitral Valve Implantation (TAMVI) in Native Rheumatic Valves.

    PubMed

    Akujuo, Adanna C; Dellis, Sophia L; Britton, Lewis W; Bennett, Edward V

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old female with moderate to severe aortic stenosis and severe mitral stenosis, deemed too high risk for surgery (STS mortality risk?=?12.3%) with a porcelain aorta, was successfully treated with a transcatheter aortic and mitral valve implantation (TAMVI) via a transapical approach. A 23?mm Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was placed in the aortic position and a 29?mm inverted Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences) in the mitral position. PMID:26347492

  19. Mass attached to mechanical mitral valve mimicking a thrombus.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Taracido, Manuel; Bustamante, Sergio; Adasme, Óscar; Kara, Sergio; Merino, Jaime; Pivetta, Rodolfo; Macedo, Matías; Marrero, Roberto; Fernández, Ricardo; Puccio, José Miguel

    2015-12-15

    Mitral valve replacement with preservation of chordae tendineae and papillary muscles is a well-known technique which has proved beneficial by reducing postoperative left ventricular remodeling and preserving left ventricular function. This advantage has been demonstrated in functional mitral valve regurgitation as well as mitral valve regurgitation due to rheumatic disease. Regarding complications of this technique, several of them have been reported, papillary muscle rupture being one of them. We describe a clinical case of this weird but possible kind of complication. PMID:26298382

  20. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after mitral valve replacement: Review of pseudoaneurysms late after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    ?ahan, Ekrem; ?ahan, Suzan; Karamanl?o?lu, Murat; Gül, Murat; Tüfekçio?lu, Omac

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm (LVPA) due to incomplete or late rupture after mitral valve replacement is a rare condition but can be life threatening if it develops into perdicardial tamponade. LVPA may develop de novo after the surgical procedure or may be a sequela of an earlier rupture. Clinical presentation includes shortness of breath, heart failure, chest pain, endocarditis, and pericardial tamponade. However, it can also have an asymptomatic course. The recommended treatment for LVPA is surgical repair. Conservative follow-up is an alternative for patients who refuse surgical treatment or are considered high risk for re-operation. We conducted a review of all the available literature on cases of LVPA after mitral valve replacement and present the findings here. PMID:25939434

  1. Dissecting intramyocardial hematoma after robotic mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Tory; Ushukumari, Deepu; Canale, Leonardo; Gillinov, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the first case of a dissecting intramyocardial hematoma discovered intraoperatively after robotic mitral valve repair, potential etiologies relevant to robotic surgery, and its successful management. PMID:25742825

  2. [Intracardiac mass: Why not a liquefaction necrosis of a mitral annulus calcification?].

    PubMed

    Leddet, P; Couppié, P; De Poli, F; Uhry, S; Hanssen, M

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic 70-year-old woman with a liquefaction necrosis of mitral annulus calcification. This mass was discovered incidentally during an echocardiographic examination. Additional treatment was not performed because liquefaction necrosis of mitral calcification usually has a benign prognosic. A scheduled clinical review with an echocardiographic examination and cardiac MRI was planified. The patient is actually healthy without any complication. PMID:26482628

  3. Iatrogenic mitral valve chordal rupture during placement of an inflatable and repositionable percutaneous aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Ince, Hüseyin; Ortak, Jasmin; Stoeckicht, Yannik; Kische, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    A case is reported of iatrogenic mitral valve chordal rupture occurring during transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with an inflatable and repositionable valve (Direct Flow; Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, CA, USA). The specific implantation technique requires initial valve advancement into the left ventricular cavity, valve inflation within the ventricular cavity, and a final finely tuned valve upward pulling through the left ventricular outflow tract until contact with the aortic annulus is achieved. During this phase of the procedure, entangling with the mitral subvalvular apparatus should be excluded, to avoid inadvertent tissue tearing and consequent mitral valve malfunction. The present patient underwent TAVI but then developed symptomatic severe mitral valve regurgitation resulting from chordal rupture. The condition was successfully treated percutaneously by implanting a Mitra-Clip. PMID:26204679

  4. How to start a minimal access mitral valve program.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Steven

    2013-11-01

    The seven pillars of governance established by the National Health Service in the United Kingdom provide a useful framework for the process of introducing new procedures to a hospital. Drawing from local experience, the author present guidance for institutions considering establishing a minimal access mitral valve program. The seven pillars of governance apply to the practice of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery, based on the principle of patient-centred practice. The author delineate the benefits of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery in terms of: "clinical effectiveness", including reduced length of hospital stay, "risk management effectiveness", including conversion to sternotomy and aortic dissection, "patient experience" including improved cosmesis and quicker recovery, and the effectiveness of communication, resources and strategies in the implementation of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery. Finally, the author have identified seven learning curves experienced by surgeons involved in introducing a minimal access mitral valve program. The learning curves are defined as: techniques of mitral valve repair, Transoesophageal Echocardiography-guided cannulation, incisions, instruments, visualization, aortic occlusion and cardiopulmonary bypass strategies. From local experience, the author provide advice on how to reduce the learning curves, such as practising with the specialised instruments and visualization techniques during sternotomy cases. Underpinning the NHS pillars are the principles of systems awareness, teamwork, communication, ownership and leadership, all of which are paramount to performing any surgery but more so with minimal access surgery, as will be highlighted throughout this paper. PMID:24349981

  5. Past, present, and future of minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Schmitto, Jan D; Mokashi, Suyog A; Cohn, Lawrence H

    2011-09-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (mini-MVS) has evolved into a safe and efficient surgical option for many patients. The overall complication rate is reduced, patient satisfaction increased, and hospital costs are lower with this approach, while providing safe and durable surgery. The repair/replacement of mitral valves via a minimally invasive technique represents a significant recent paradigm shift in cardiac surgery. The rapid development and refinement of minimally invasive valve surgery has enabled the repair of complex valves and, most importantly, has yielded similar results to those provided by standard surgical approaches. PMID:22066352

  6. Tissue-engineered canine mitral valve constructs as In vitro research models for myxomatous mitral valve disease 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Mengmeng

    2014-11-28

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is one of the most common degenerative cardiac diseases affecting humans and dogs; however, its pathogenesis is not completely understood. This study focussed on developing ...

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone predict extent of aortic valve calcifications in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Luca; Gorini, Antonio; Bellasi, Antonio; Morrone, Luigi F.; Rivera, Rodolfo; Russo, Luigi; Santoboni, Alberto; Russo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac valve calcifications are present in dialysis patients and regarded as dependent on a deranged mineral metabolism. Few data are available for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not on dialysis. This study evaluates the potential association between the extent of cardiac valve calcification and levels of intact parathyroid hormone (i-PTH), phosphorus, calcium, 25-OH vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), Klotho and C-reactive protein (CRP) simultaneously measured in patients with mild to moderate CKD. Methods Consecutive non-hospitalized patients referring to five nephrology units were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were age >18 years, CKD Stages 3–4, and the presence of aortic and/or mitral valve calcification assessed by echocardiography as routinely clinical evaluation. Patients underwent clinical examination and routine biochemistry. Baseline i-PTH, phosphorus, calcium, 25-OH vitamin D, FGF-23, Klotho and CRP were simultaneously ascertained. Results Extent of aortic valve calcification (n = 100 patients) was moderate in 68 patients and mild in the remaining patients. Mitral valve calcification (n = 96 patients) score was 1, 2 and 3 in 61, 34 and 1 patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, no association was found between extent of mitral valve calcification and markers of mineral metabolism and CRP; aortic valve extent of calcification was positively associated with i-PTH (r2 = 0.212; P = 0.03) and FGF-23 (r2 = 0.272; P = 0.01), and negatively with Klotho (r2 = ?0.208; P = 0.04). In multivariable analysis, extent of aortic valve calcification was associated with FGF-23 (P = 0.01) and PTH (P = 0.01) levels. Conclusions Extent of aortic valve calcification is associated to FGF-23 and PTH in naïve CKD patients with mild to moderate CKD. Further studies should examine whether FGF-23 assay should be included in routine clinical evaluation of CKD as part of cardiovascular risk stratification. PMID:26613033

  8. Open-Heart Surgery for Mitral Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerein, Alfred N.; Gourlay, Robert H.; Kavanagh-Gray, Doris

    1965-01-01

    The findings in and experiences with 19 consecutive patients subjected to open mitral valve surgery are described. All patients underwent a right-heart catheterization. In order to exclude multivalvular heart disease, a left-heart catheterization was performed in 10 patients and angiographic studies of the aortic valve area in 12. Pulmonary function studies were performed on 11 patients. The FEV (0.75 sec.) and the MMFR were found to correlate well with existing pulmonary reserves. Fourteen of the 19 patients subjected to open mitral valve surgery survived the operation and have been followed up for three months to 2½ years. Four patients had a mitral valvuloplasty. Three of these four have deteriorated and will require a valvular replacement. Ten of 15 patients subjected to a mitral valve replacement are alive; five of these 10 have had signs and symptoms indicating peripheral embolization. Mitral valvuloplasty is preferable to a valvular replacement as far as embolic complications are concerned, while valvular replacements result in a more perfect and lasting hemodynamic repair. The high incidence of peripheral embolization following valvular replacements focuses attention on the need for improved mitral valve prostheses. PMID:14346463

  9. [A simplified method for estimating mitral valve area by Doppler].

    PubMed

    Cobos Gil, M A; Rada, I; Gili, M; Camacho, I; Asín, E; Yuste, P

    1991-01-01

    Based upon geometrical considerations we have developed a new method for estimation of valve area in patients with mitral stenosis. A special ruler enables us to read the valve area from the Doppler record. We prove that our new method is more precise and rapid than original Hatle's procedure. In 35 patients, we found a good correlation between the result of our method and the valve area obtained by 2D-Echo. Thus the new method is very useful for Doppler evaluation of mitral stenosis patients. PMID:1953210

  10. Morphological, cellular and proteomic features of canine myxomatous mitral valve disease 

    E-print Network

    Han, Richard I-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve degeneration (MMVD) is the single most common cardiac disease of the dog, and is analogous to Mitral Valve Prolapse in humans. Very little is known about the aetiopathogenesis of this disease or ...

  11. [Left Ventricular Rupture during Both Mitral and Aortic Valve Replacements].

    PubMed

    Kurumisawa, Soki; Aizawa, Kei; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Ohki, Shinnichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-05-01

    A 73-year-old woman on hemodialysis was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment of heart valve disease. She required both mitral and aortic valve replacement with mechanical valves, associated with tricuspid annuloplasty. After aortic de-clamping, a massive hemorrhage from the posterior atrioventricular groove was observed. Under repeated cardiac arrest, the left atrium was reopened, the implanted mitral prosthetic valve was removed and a type I left ventricular rupture (Treasure classification) was diagnosed. The lesion was directly repaired with mattress stitches and running sutures, using reinforcement materials such as a glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium. To avoid mechanical stress by the prosthetic valve on the repaired site, a mechanical valve was implanted using a translocation method. The patient suffered from aspiration pneumonia and disuse atrophy for 3 months. However, she was doing well at 1 year post-operation. PMID:25963782

  12. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lo, Su Hao; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bruneval, Patrick; Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Milan, David J; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A; Mvp-France; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown etiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance. We performed a meta-analysis of 2 genome-wide association studies in 1,412 MVP cases and 2,439 controls. We identified 6 loci, which we replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls, and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 (LIM and cysteine-rich domains 1), which encodes a transcription factor and for which morpholino knockdown of the ortholog in zebrafish resulted in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained with knockdown of the ortholog of TNS1, which encodes tensin 1, a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also showed expression of tensin 1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1(-/-) mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair. PMID:26301497

  13. Acute massive mitral regurgitation from prosthetic valve dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D K; Sturridge, M F

    1976-01-01

    Two cases of prosthetic valve dysfunction resulting in acute massive mitral regurgitation are reported; emergency operation was successful in both cases. Survival following complete dislodgement of the occluder of a disc valve, as occurred in one case, does not appear to have been reported before. The diffculty in diagnosis of sudden cardiac decompensation in patients with prosthetic valves is stressed, as is the need for urgent operation. Images PMID:973894

  14. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation in severe aortic stenosis patients with prior mitral valve prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sar?, Cenk; Ba?tu?, Serdal; Kasapkara, Hac? Ahmet; Durmaz, Tahir; Kele?, Telat; Akçay, Murat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bozkurt, Engin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in patients with a previous mitral valve prosthesis is technically challenging, and pre-procedural comprehensive assessment of these patients before transcatheter aortic valve implantation is vital for an uncomplicated and successful procedure. Aim We want to share our experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with a preexisting functional mitral valve prosthesis and describe a series of important technical and pre-procedural details. Material and methods At our center, 135 patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Six of them with a preexisting mitral valve prosthesis received an Edwards SAPIEN XT valve through the transfemoral route. Results Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed successfully in all 6 patients without any deformation of the cobalt-chromium/steel stents of the aortic valve bioprosthesis. Also no distortion or malfunction in the mitral valve prosthesis was observed after the procedure. There were no complications during the hospitalization period. Post-procedural echocardiography revealed no or mild aortic paravalvular regurgitation and normal valve function in all the patients. In addition, serial echocardiographic examination demonstrated that both the stability and function of the aortic and mitral prosthetic valves were normal without any deterioration in the gradients and the degree of the regurgitation at long-term follow-ups. Conclusions Our experience confirms that transcatheter aortic valve implantation is technically feasible in patients with previous mitral valve replacement but comprehensive evaluation of patients by multimodal imaging techniques such as transesophageal echocardiography and multislice computed tomography is mandatory for a successful and safe procedure. PMID:26677380

  15. En bloc aortic and mitral valve replacement and left ventricular outflow tract enlargement using a combined transaortic and trans-septal atrial approach.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed; Windsor, Jimmy; Ricci, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Aortic and mitral valve replacement with division and reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body has been described in clinical situations involving infective endocarditis, extensive annular calcifications and diminutive valve annuli. Herein, we describe a combined transaortic and trans-septal approach with division of the inter-valvular fibrosa for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. The reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body, atrial walls and aortic root was carried out using a 'three-patch' technique with bovine pericardium. PMID:26409564

  16. Septic Cerebral Embolisation in Fulminant Mitral Valve Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doolub, Gemina

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old male with known intravenous drug use was admitted with an acute onset of worsening confusion and speech impairment. His vitals and biochemical profile demonstrated severe sepsis, with a brain CT showing several lesions suspicious for cerebral emboli. He then went on to have a bedside transthoracic echocardiogram that was positive for vegetation on the mitral valve, with associated severe mitral regurgitation. Unfortunately, before he was stable enough to be transferred for valve surgery, he suffered an episode of acute pulmonary oedema requiring intubation and ventilation on intensive care unit. PMID:26120312

  17. Rate of repair in minimally invasive mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hohenberger, Wolfgang; Lakew, Fitsum; Batz, Gerhard; Diegeler, Anno

    2013-01-01

    Background Valve repair has been shown to be the method of choice in the treatment of patients with severe mitral valve regurgitation. Minimally invasive surgery has raised skepticism regarding the rate of repair especially for supposedly complex lesions, when anterior leaflet involvement or bileaflet prolapse is present. We sought to review our experience of all our patients presenting with degenerative mitral valve regurgitation and operated on minimally invasively. Method From September 2006 to December 2012, 842 patients (mean age 56.12±11.62 years old) with degenerative mitral valve regurgitation and anterior leaflet (n=82, 9.7%), posterior leaflet (n=688, 81.7%) and bileaflet (n=72, 8.6%) prolapses were operated on using a minimally invasive approach. Results 836 patients had a valve repair (99.3%) and received a concomitant ring annuloplasty (mean size, 33.7; range, 28-40). Six patients (0.7%) underwent valve replacement. Two patients had a re-repair due to MR progression or infective endocarditis. Thirty-day mortality was 0.2% (two patients). There were 60 major adverse events (MAE) (7.1%). Conclusions A minimally invasive approach allows repair of almost all degenerative valves with good short-term outcomes in a tertiary referral center, when using proven and efficient surgical techniques. PMID:24349977

  18. Unravelling the proteome of degenerative human mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Richards, Arthur Mark; Kofidis, Theodoros; Teoh, Kristine Leok-Kheng; Ling, Lieng H; Chung, Maxey C M

    2015-09-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD), which includes the syndromes of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and flail leaflet, is a common valvular condition which can be complicated by mitral regurgitation and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Although several genetic and other studies of MVP in dog models have provided some information regarding the underlying disease mechanisms, the proteins and molecular events mediating human MVP pathogenesis have not been unraveled. In this study, we report the first large-scale proteome profiling of mitral valve tissue resected from patients with MVP. A total of 1134 proteins were identified, some of which were validated using SWATH-MS and western blotting. GO annotation of these proteins confirmed the validity of this proteome database in various cardiovascular processes. Among the list of proteins, we found several structural and extracellular matrix proteins, such as asporin, biglycan, decorin, lumican, mimecan, prolargin, versican, and vinculin, that have putative roles in the pathophysiology of MVP. These proteins could also be involved in the cardiac remodeling associated with mitral regurgitation. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000774 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000774). PMID:25914152

  19. State of the mitral valve in rabbits with hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkovska, V. Y.

    1979-01-01

    In hypokinesia, edema of all the layers of the mitral value was observed, which resulted in morphological changes of the cellular and noncellular components. An increase in ratio of elastic and collagenic fibers in the value was also observed along with and changes in their structural and staining properties. The observed changes can limit valve mobility and can result in manifestations of cardiac valve insufficiency, which is found clinically.

  20. Calcific aortic valve disease: Is it another face of atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, I; Alex, Shaji

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. As life expectancy increases, prevalence of CAVD is expected to rise. CAVD is characterized by progressive dystrophic calcification of aortic cusps. In the initial stages, the pathogenesis is similar to atherosclerosis, characterized by basement membrane disruption, inflammation, cell infiltration, lipid deposition, and calcification. Presence of osteopontin in calcified aortic valves suggests pathological calcification and bone formation in these calcified valves. Historical, experimental, genetic, and clinical evidences suggest that CAVD and atherosclerosis share the same pathological sequences with common risk factors. Understanding the two faces of atherosclerosis, the vascular and valvular, will help us to prevent progression of aortic sclerosis to aortic stenosis, by controlling modifiable risk factors and by initiating statin therapy in them. However, the knowledge about these preventive measures and drugs is scanty. In this review article, an attempt is made to unfurl the relation between atherosclerosis and CAVD. PMID:26432749

  1. Controversy in mitral valve repair, resection or chordal replacement?

    PubMed

    Sawazaki, Masaru; Tomari, Shiro; Zaikokuji, Kenta; Imaeda, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    Mitral valve plasty has superseded valve replacement as the standard technique for treating degenerative mitral valve prolapse. Quadrangular resection is considered the gold standard for posterior leaflet prolapse. Chordal replacement was first developed to treat the anterior leaflet and subsequently became widely used for the posterior leaflet, after which a new version of posterior leaflet resection was developed that did not involve local annular plication. In the era of the mini-thoracotomy, the premeasured loop technique is simple to adopt and is as durable as quadrangular resection. However, there is controversy surrounding whether resection or chordal replacement is the optimal technique. The resection technique is curative because it removes the main pathologic lesion. The disadvantage of the resection is that it can be complicated and often requires advanced surgical skills. In contrast, chordal replacement is not pathologically curative because it leaves behind a redundant leaflet. However, the long-term results appear to be equivalent in many reports. Functionally, chordal replacement retains greater posterior leaflet motion with a lower trans-mitral pressure gradient than quadrangular resection. Moreover, chordal replacement is simple and yields uniform results. The optimal technique depends on whether the anterior leaflet or posterior leaflet is involved, the Barlow or non-Barlow disease state, and whether a mini-thoracotomy or standard sternotomy approach is used. For mitral valve repair, the most superior and reliable technique for the posterior leaflet is resection using the newer resection technique with a sternotomy approach, which requires a skilled surgeon. PMID:25112793

  2. [Necrotising endocarditis of mitral valve due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis].

    PubMed

    Celebi, Güven; Büyükate?, Mustafa; Do?an, Sait Mesut; Pi?kin, Nihal; Aydemir, Hande; Oztoprak, Nefise; Akta?, Elif; Bekta?, Sibel; Keskin, Ay?egül; Akduman, Deniz

    2009-04-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is an infrequent cause of infective endocarditis (IE) and usually involves native valves of the heart. It causes life-threatening events such as rupture of cardiac valve or cerebral or pulmonary embolism due to necrosis on the endocardial tissue involved by the bacteria. Antibiotic therapy without cardiac surgery or delayed cardiac surgery usually follows a fatal course in S. lugdunensis endocarditis. In this report the first case of S. lugdunensis endocarditis from Turkey was presented. A 37-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with a 2-weeks history of fever chills and accompanying intermittent pain on the left side of the thorax. Other than recurrent folliculitis continuing for 20 years, his history was unremarkable. Echocardiography revealed vegetation on the mitral valve of the patient and vancomycin plus gentamicin were initiated with the diagnosis of IE. All blood cultures (5 sets) taken on admission and within the initial 48 hours of the antibiotic therapy yielded S. lugdunensis. According to the susceptibility test results, the antibiotic therapy was switched to ampicillin-sulbactam plus rifampin. Blood cultures became negative after the third day of therapy, however, cardiac failure was emerged due to rupture of mitral valve and chorda tendiniea on the 12th day of the therapy. Cardiac surgery revealed that mitral valve and surrounding tissue of the valve were evidently necrotic and fragile, anterior leaflet of the mitral valve was covered with vegetation, posterior leaflet and chorda tendiniea were ruptured. Vegetation was removed and the destructed mitral valve was replaced with a mechanical valve. Vegetation culture remained sterile, however, antibiotics were switched to vancomycin plus rifampin due to persistent fever on the 21st day of the therapy (9th day of operation). Fever resolved four days after the antibiotic switch. Antibiotics were stopped on the 9th weeks of admission and the patient was discharged. He had no problem in follow-up controls for one year. In conclusion, proper antibiotic therapy combined with early cardiac surgery seems to be the optimal therapeutic approach in IE caused by S. lugdunensis. PMID:19621620

  3. Transapical aortic valve and mitral valve in ring prosthesis implantation - a new advance in transcatheter procedures.

    PubMed

    Neves, Paulo C; Paulo, Nelson Santos; Gama, Vasco; Vouga, Luís

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation offers a new treatment modality to those patients whose general condition makes conventional surgery very risky. However, the transcatheter option has only been available for the aortic valve. We describe a case of a successful implantation of two Edwards SAPIEN(®) 26 and 29 mm transapical valves, respectively, in aortic and mitral positions, on a 74-year-old patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis. The procedure progressed uneventfully. Predischarge echocardiogram showed a peak aortic gradient of 20 mmHg, mild periprosthetic regurgitation, peak and mean mitral gradients of 12 and 4, respectively, and moderate (II/IV) periprosthetic regurgitation. Indications for transapical valve implantation will rapidly increase in the near future. It is essential to individualize the treatment be applied for each patient, in order to optimize the success of the procedure. PMID:24786177

  4. Occurrence of mitral valve insufficiency in clinically healthy Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Károly; Szilvási, Viktória; Manczur, Ferenc; Máthé, Ákos; Reiczigel, Jen?; Nolte, Ingo; Hungerbühler, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic degenerative valve disease (CDVD) is the most common cardiac disease in dogs, usually resulting in mitral valve insufficiency (MVI). The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of MVI in clinically healthy Beagle populations. A total of 79 adult healthy Beagles (41 females and 38 males; age: 5.6 ± 2.7 years, range 1.4 to 11.7 years) were examined. The diagnosis of MVI was based on the detection of a systolic murmur heard above the mitral valve, and was confirmed by colour flow Doppler (CFD) echocardiography. Systolic mitral valve murmurs were detected in 20/79 dogs (25.3%), of them 11 males and 9 females with no statistically significant gender difference (P = 0.6059). The strength of the murmur on the semi-quantitative 0/6 scale yielded intensity grade 1/6 in 10 dogs, grade 2/6 in 4 dogs, and grade 3/6 in 6 dogs. Mild to moderate MVI was detected by CFD in all these 20 dogs with systolic murmurs. Of them, 17 dogs had mild and 3 demonstrated moderate MVI, showing 10-30% and 30-50% regurgitant jets compared to the size of the left atrium, respectively. The age of dogs with MVI was 7.1 ± 2.3 years, which was significantly different from that of dogs without MVI (5.1 ± 2.7 years, P = 0.0029). No significant differences in body weight (P = 0.1724) were found between dogs with MVI (13.8 ± 2.8 kg) and those without MVI (12.8 ± 3.0 kg). Mitral valve disease causing MVI is relatively common in Beagle dogs, just like in other small breed dogs reported in the literature. PMID:26599093

  5. Review of mitral valve insufficiency: repair or replacement

    PubMed Central

    Madesis, Athanasios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Kesisis, George; Tsiouda, Theodora; Beleveslis, Thomas; Koletas, Alexander; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve (MV) dysfunction is the second-most common clinically significant form of valvular defect in adults. MV regurgitation occurs with the increasing frequency of degenerative changes of the aging process. Moreover, other causes of clinically significant MV regurgitation include cardiac ischemia, infective endocarditis and rhematic disease more frequently in less developed countries. Recent evidence suggests that the best outcomes after repair of severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR) are achieved in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients, who are selected for surgery soon after diagnosis on the basis of echocardiography. This review will focus on the surgical management of mitral insufficiency according to its aetiology today and will give insight to some of the perspectives that lay in the future. PMID:24672698

  6. [Catheter based mitral valve repair for severe mitral regurgitation: patient selection].

    PubMed

    Naegeli, Barbara; Franzen, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    The catheter-based mitral valve repair is a novel technology for the treatment of severe mitral regurgitation (MR). This technique is suitable for elderly patients with pronounced co-morbidities who are deemed to be high risk for conventional heart surgery. A meaningful reduction of mitral regurgitation leads to improvement of symptoms and quality of life. Studies also demonstrate reverse remodeling of the left ventricle. In heart failure patients with severe MR percutaneous repair reduces re-hospitalization rates>50% in comparison to optimal medical treatment. For degenerative MR conventional surgery is the gold standard, whereas for high surgical risk patients and for severe functional MR percutaneous repair is an alternative. PMID:26331203

  7. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Aortic stenosis Congenital heart valve disease Mitral regurgitation - acute Mitral regurgitation - chronic Mitral stenosis Mitral valve prolapse Pulmonary valve stenosis Tricuspid regurgitation Tricuspid valve stenosis

  8. Robotic tissue tracking for beating heart mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-01

    The rapid motion of the heart presents a significant challenge to the surgeon during intracardiac beating heart procedures. We present a 3D ultrasound-guided motion compensation system that assists the surgeon by synchronizing instrument motion with the heart. The system utilizes the fact that certain intracardiac structures, like the mitral valve annulus, have trajectories that are largely constrained to translation along one axis. This allows the development of a real-time 3D ultrasound tissue tracker that we integrate with a 1 degree-of-freedom (DOF) actuated surgical instrument and predictive filter to devise a motion tracking system adapted to mitral valve annuloplasty. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the system provides highly accurate tracking (1.0 mm error) with 70% less error than manual tracking attempts. PMID:23973122

  9. Maze permutations during minimally invasive mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation is most frequently done in the concomitant setting, and most commonly with mitral valve surgery. Minimally invasive surgical techniques for the treatment of atrial fibrillation have developed contemporaneously with techniques for minimally invasive mitral valve surgery. As in traditional surgery for atrial fibrillation, there are many different permutations of ablations for the less invasive approaches. Lesion sets can vary from simple pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) to full bi-atrial lesions that completely reproduce the traditional cut-and-sew Cox Maze III procedure with variable efficacy in restoring sinus rhythm. Additionally, treatment of the atrial appendage can be done through minimally invasive approaches without any ablation at all in an attempt to mitigate the risk of stroke. Finally, hybrid procedures combining minimally invasive surgery and catheter-based ablation are being developed that might augment surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation at the time of minimally invasive mitral valve repair. These various permutations and their results are reviewed. PMID:26539352

  10. Caseous Necrosis of Mitral Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Sinan; Akkaya, Selcuk; Ardali, Selin; Hazirolan, Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    Masses or mass-like lesions located in proximity to mitral valve encompass a wide range of differential diagnoses including neoplasias, abscesses, thrombi, and rarely caseous calcification of mitral annulus. Due to asymptomatic presentation, its diagnosis is usually incidental. Echocardiography is the first choice of imaging in evaluation. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is helpful in establishing diagnosis by showing dense calcifications while cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used primarily as a problem solving tool. Imaging in evaluation of mitral annulus caseous calcification is essential in order to prevent unnecessary operations. PMID:26355421

  11. Developing a Training Tool for Intraoperative Mitral Valve Analysis Neil A. Tenenholtz, Robert D. Howe

    E-print Network

    @seas.harvard.edu INTRODUCTION The mitral valve is one of the four valves of the human heart. Serving as a passive check valve the native valve tissue through a series of tissue resections and suturing. While the goal is to restore as the heart is arrested during the operation. As a result, rather than being directly observed, closed valve

  12. Robotic Tissue Tracking for Beating Heart Mitral Valve Surgery Shelten G. Yuena

    E-print Network

    Robotic Tissue Tracking for Beating Heart Mitral Valve Surgery Shelten G. Yuena , Nikolay V. Keywords: 3D ultrasound, real-time tissue tracking, motion compensation, medical robotics, beating heart-pump animal trials indicate that beating heart modification of the mitral valve can- not be performed reliably

  13. Placement of Neochords in Mitral Valve Repair: Enhanced Exposure of the Papillary Muscles Using a Standard Valve Sizer.

    PubMed

    Erlebach, Magdalena; Lange, Ruediger; Mazzitelli, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve repair with placement of artificial chordae for mitral valve regurgitation has become the standard of care. In some cases, such as Barlow's disease or bileaflet prolapse, papillary muscle exposure may be difficult. By using a valve sizer to retract both leaflets, visualization can be optimized, thus simplifying suture placement and thereby minimizing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times. This technique is simple, is cost effective, and can be applied quickly. PMID:26694289

  14. FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION MODELS OF THE MITRAL VALVE: FUNCTION IN NORMAL AND PATHOLOGIC STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzelman, K. S.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Cochran, R. P.

    2007-08-29

    Successful mitral valve repair is dependent upon a full understanding of normal and abnormal mitral valve anatomy and function. Computational analysis is one such method that can be applied to simulate mitral valve function in order to analyze the roles of individual components, and evaluate proposed surgical repair. We developed the first three-dimensional, finite element (FE) computer model of the mitral valve including leaflets and chordae tendineae, however, one critical aspect that has been missing until the last few years was the evaluation of fluid flow, as coupled to the function of the mitral valve structure. We present here our latest results for normal function and specific pathologic changes using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Normal valve function was first assessed, followed by pathologic material changes in collagen fiber volume fraction, fiber stiffness, fiber splay, and isotropic stiffness. Leaflet and chordal stress and strain, and papillary muscle force was determined. In addition, transmitral flow, time to leaflet closure, and heart valve sound were assessed. Model predictions in the normal state agreed well with a wide range of available in-vivo and in-vitro data. Further, pathologic material changes that preserved the anisotropy of the valve leaflets were found to preserve valve function. By contrast, material changes that altered the anisotropy of the valve were found to profoundly alter valve function. The addition of blood flow and an experimentally driven microstructural description of mitral tissue represent significant advances in computational studies of the mitral valve, which allow further insight to be gained. This work is another building block in the foundation of a computational framework to aid in the refinement and development of a truly noninvasive diagnostic evaluation of the mitral valve. Ultimately, it represents the basis for simulation of surgical repair of pathologic valves in a clinical and educational setting.

  15. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation during Mitral-Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Parides, Michael K.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Voisine, Pierre; Ailawadi, Gorav; Bouchard, Denis; Smith, Peter K.; Mack, Michael J.; Acker, Michael A.; Mullen, John C.; Rose, Eric A.; Chang, Helena L.; Puskas, John D.; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Gardner, Timothy J.; Varghese, Robin; Horvath, Keith A.; Bolling, Steven F.; Michler, Robert E.; Geller, Nancy L.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Miller, Marissa A.; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G.; Williams, Paula; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Among patients undergoing mitral-valve surgery, 30 to 50% present with atrial fibrillation, which is associated with reduced survival and increased risk of stroke. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation has been widely adopted, but evidence regarding its safety and effectiveness is limited. Methods We randomly assigned 260 patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation who required mitral-valve surgery to undergo either surgical ablation (ablation group) or no ablation (control group) during the mitral-valve operation. Patients in the ablation group underwent further randomization to pulmonary-vein isolation or a biatrial maze procedure. All patients underwent closure of the left atrial appendage. The primary end point was freedom from atrial fibrillation at both 6 months and 12 months (as assessed by means of 3-day Holter monitoring). Results More patients in the ablation group than in the control group were free from atrial fibrillation at both 6 and 12 months (63.2% vs. 29.4%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation between patients who underwent pulmonary-vein isolation and those who underwent the biatrial maze procedure (61.0% and 66.0%, respectively; P = 0.60). One-year mortality was 6.8% in the ablation group and 8.7% in the control group (hazard ratio with ablation, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.84; P = 0.55). Ablation was associated with more implantations of a permanent pacemaker than was no ablation (21.5 vs. 8.1 per 100 patient-years, P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in major cardiac or cerebrovascular adverse events, overall serious adverse events, or hospital readmissions. Conclusions The addition of atrial fibrillation ablation to mitral-valve surgery significantly increased the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation at 1 year among patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but the risk of implantation of a permanent pacemaker was also increased. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00903370.) PMID:25853744

  16. Repair for mitral valve aneurysm using autologous pericardium: a case of our experience.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongqiang; Chen, Hao; Sun, Xiaoning; Yang, Shouguo; Wang, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Mitral Valve Aneurysm (MVA) is rarely reported and occurs most in association with infective endocarditis of the aortic valve. In our case, the 46-yr-old Chinese man was referred to our hospital with dyspnea and orthopnea. Transesophageal echocardiography during operation revealed a localized, thin-walled saccular structure in the anterior leaflet that bulged into the left atrium, and severe mitral and aortic regurgitation. Aortic valve was replaced with mechanical prostheses and mitral valve was repaired with autologous pericardium. Transesophageal echocardiography during operation and transthoracic echocardiography 3 months later showed mild regurgitation. PMID:25230935

  17. Perinatal Changes in Mitral and Aortic Valve Structure and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Post, Allison D.; Laucirica, Daniel R.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    At birth, the mechanical environment of valves changes radically as fetal shunts close and pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances change. Given that valves are reported to be mechanosensitive, we investigated remodeling induced by perinatal changes by examining compositional and structural differences of aortic and mitral valves (AVs, MVs) between 2-day-old and 3rd fetal trimester porcine valves using immunohistochemistry and Movat pentachrome staining. Aortic valve composition changed more with birth than the MV, consistent with a greater change in AV hemodynamics. At 2 days, AV demonstrated a trend of greater versican and elastin (P = 0.055), as well as greater hyaluronan turnover (hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis, P = 0.049) compared with the 3rd-trimester samples. The AVs also demonstrated decreases in proteins related to collagen synthesis and fibrillogenesis with birth, including procollagen I, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, biglycan (all P ? 0.005), and decorin (P = 0.059, trend). Both AVs and MVs demonstrated greater delineation between the leaflet layers in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples, and AVs demonstrated greater saffron-staining collagen intensity, suggesting more mature collagen in 2-day-old compared with 3rd-trimester samples (each P < 0.05). The proportion of saffron-staining collagen also increased in AV with birth (P < 0.05). The compositional and structural changes that occur with birth, as noted in this study, likely are important to proper neonatal valve function. Furthermore, normal perinatal changes in hemodynamics often do not occur in congenital valve disease; the corresponding perinatal matrix maturation may also be lacking and could contribute to poor function of congenitally malformed valves. PMID:20536360

  18. In vitro Models of Aortic Valve Calcification: Solidifying a System

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Meghan A.; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone [1]. As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  19. Morphological and Chemical Study of Pathological Deposits in Human Aortic and Mitral Valve Stenosis: A Biomineralogical Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Salvador, Loris; Valfré, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate heart valve calcification process by different biomineralogical techniques to provide morphological and chemical features of the ectopic deposit extracted from patients with severe mitral and aortic valve stenosis, to better evaluate this pathological process. Polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses brought to light the presence of nodular and massive mineralization forms characterized by different levels of calcification, as well as the presence of submicrometric calcified globular cluster, micrometric cavities containing disorganized tissue structures, and submillimeter pockets formed by organic fibers very similar to amyloid formations. Electron microprobe analyses showed variable concentrations of Ca and P within each deposit and the highest content of Ca and P within calcified tricuspid aortic valves, while powder X-ray diffraction analyses indicated in the nanometer range the dimension of the pathological bioapatite crystals. These findings indicated the presence of highly heterogeneous deposits within heart valve tissues and suggested a progressive maturation process with continuous changes in the composition of the valvular tissue, similar to the multistep formation process of bone tissue. Moreover the micrometric cavities represent structural stages of the valve tissue that immediately precedes the formation of heavily mineralized deposits such as bone-like nodules. PMID:25685595

  20. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  1. Personalized Computational Modeling of Mitral Valve Prolapse: Virtual Leaflet Resection.

    PubMed

    Rim, Yonghoon; Choi, Ahnryul; McPherson, David D; Kim, Hyunggun

    2015-01-01

    Posterior leaflet prolapse following chordal elongation or rupture is one of the primary valvular diseases in patients with degenerative mitral valves (MVs). Quadrangular resection followed by ring annuloplasty is a reliable and reproducible surgical repair technique for treatment of posterior leaflet prolapse. Virtual MV repair simulation of leaflet resection in association with patient-specific 3D echocardiographic data can provide quantitative biomechanical and physiologic characteristics of pre- and post-resection MV function. We have developed a solid personalized computational simulation protocol to perform virtual MV repair using standard clinical guidelines of posterior leaflet resection with annuloplasty ring implantation. A virtual MV model was created using 3D echocardiographic data of a patient with posterior chordal rupture and severe mitral regurgitation. A quadrangle-shaped leaflet portion in the prolapsed posterior leaflet was removed, and virtual plication and suturing were performed. An annuloplasty ring of proper size was reconstructed and virtual ring annuloplasty was performed by superimposing the ring and the mitral annulus. Following the quadrangular resection and ring annuloplasty simulations, patient-specific annular motion and physiologic transvalvular pressure gradient were implemented and dynamic finite element simulation of MV function was performed. The pre-resection MV demonstrated a substantial lack of leaflet coaptation which directly correlated with the severe mitral regurgitation. Excessive stress concentration was found along the free marginal edge of the posterior leaflet involving the chordal rupture. Following the virtual resection and ring annuloplasty, the severity of the posterior leaflet prolapse markedly decreased. Excessive stress concentration disappeared over both anterior and posterior leaflets, and complete leaflet coaptation was effectively restored. This novel personalized virtual MV repair strategy has great potential to help with preoperative selection of the patient-specific optimal MV repair techniques, allow innovative surgical planning to expect improved efficacy of MV repair with more predictable outcomes, and ultimately provide more effective medical care for the patient. PMID:26103002

  2. Elevated transaortic valvular gradients after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement: an intraoperative dilemma.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Michael; Portillo, Juan; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Otey, Andrew; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2015-03-01

    High transaortic valvular gradients, after combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement, require prompt intraoperative diagnosis and appropriate management. The presence of high transaortic valvular gradients after cardiopulmonary bypass, in this setting, can be secondary to the following conditions: prosthesis dysfunction, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, supravalvular obstruction, prosthesis-patient mismatch, hyperkinetic left ventricle from administration of inotropes, left ventricular intracavitary gradients, pressure recovery phenomenon, and increased transvalvular blood flow resulting from hyperdynamic circulation or anemia. Transesophageal echocardiography is an extremely useful tool for timely diagnosis and treatment of this complication. We describe a case of a critically ill patient with endocarditis and acute lung injury, who presented for combined aortic valve and mitral valve replacement. Transesophageal echocardiographic assessment, post-cardiopulmonary bypass, revealed high transaortic valvular gradients due to encroachment of the mitral prosthesis strut on the left ventricular outflow tract, which was compounded by a small, hypertrophied, and hyperkinetic left ventricle. Discontinuation of inotropic support, administration of fluids, phenylephrine, and esmolol led to resolution of the high gradients and prevented further surgery. PMID:25549635

  3. Accurate assessment of mitral valve area in patients with mitral stenosis by three-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Nosir, Y F; Vletter, W B; Kint, P P; Salustri, A; Roelandt, J R

    1997-03-01

    The accuracy of measurements of mitral valve orifice area (MVA) from three-dimensional echocardiographic (3DE) image data sets obtained by a transthoracic or transesophageal rotational imaging probe was studied in 15 patients with native mitral stenosis. The smallest MVA was identified from a set of eight parallel short-axis cut planes of the mitral valve between the anulus and the tips of leaflets (paraplane echocardiography) and measured by planimetry. In addition, MVA was measured from the two-dimensional short-axis view (2DE). Values of MVA measured by 3DE and 2DE were compared with those calculated from Doppler pressure half-time (PHT) as a gold standard. Observer variabilities were studied for 3DE. MVA measured from PHT ranged between 0.55 and 3.19 cm2 (mean +/- SD 1.57 +/- 0.73 cm2), from 3DE between 0.83 and 3.23 cm2 (mean +/- SD 1.55 +/- 0.67 cm2), and from 2DE between 1.27 and 4.08 cm2 (mean +/- SD 1.9 +/- 0.7 cm2). The variability of intraobserver and interobserver measurements for 3DE measurements was not significantly different (p = 0.79 and p = 0.68, respectively); for interobserver variability, standard error of the estimate = 0.25. There was excellent correlation, close limits of agreement (mean difference +/- 2 SD), and nonsignificant differences between 3DE and PHT for MVA measurements (r = 0.98 [0.02 +/- 0.3] and p = 0.6), respectively. There was moderate correlation, wider limits of agreement, and significant difference between 2DE and PHT for MVA measurements (r = 0.89 [0.32 +/- 0.66] and p = 0.002), respectively. This may be related to the difficulties in visualization of the smallest orifice in precordial short-axis views. This study suggests that three-dimensional image data sets, by providing the possibility of "computer slicing" to generate equidistant parallel cross sections of the mitral valve independently from physically dictated ultrasonic windows, allow accurate and reproducible measurement of the MVA. PMID:9083968

  4. Forty-year durability of a Smeloff-Cutter ball valve prosthesis in the mitral position.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masato; Tsuchiya, Koji; Ichihara, Yuki; Amenomori, Shunsuke; Koshiyama, Hiroshi; Kaku, Yuji

    2011-12-01

    A rare case requiring replacement of an intact Smeloff-Cutter ball prosthesis in the mitral position 40 years after implantation is presented. The Smeloff-Cutter ball valve prosthesis was designed to have two open cages. It has two potential advantages: a relatively large, effective orifice area and its self-washing effect that prevents thrombus formation. There have been only a few reports of survivors with ball valve prostheses in place for more than three decades especially in the mitral position. This is a valuable report describing the long-term durability of a Smeloff-Cutter ball valve prosthesis in the mitral position. PMID:22173679

  5. A novel mathematical technique to assess of the mitral valve dynamics based on echocardiography

    E-print Network

    Karvandi, Mersedeh; Hassantash, Seyed Ahmad; Foroughi, Mahnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The mechanics of the mitral valve leaflet as a nonlinear, inelastic and anisotropic soft tissue results from an integrated response of many mathematical/physical indexes' that illustrate the tissue. In the past decade, finite element modeling of complete heart valves has greatly aided evaluation of heart valve surgery, design of bioprosthetic valve replacements, and general understanding of healthy and abnormal cardiac function. Such a model must be based on an accurate description of the mechanical behavior of the valve material. It is essential to calculate velocity/displacement and strain rate/strain at a component level that is to work at the cellular level. In this study we developed the first three-dimensional displacement vectors field in the characterization of mitral valve leaflets in continuum equations of inelasticity framework based on echocardiography. Method: Much of our knowledge of abnormal mitral valve function is based on surgical and post-mortem studies while these studies are quan...

  6. The prevalence of vascular calcification in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: a cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Philip A.; Hunter, John; Menoyo, José; Stankus, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Background: This multicenter international cross-sectional observational study characterized vascular and valvular calcification burden and correlations with pulse pressure, diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases in prevalent hemodialysis patients. Methods: We enrolled 275 consecutive adults with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis for ?3 months. Coprimary endpoints were prevalences of: (1) echocardiographic calcification in mitral valve, aortic valve or mitral annulus; (2) aortoiliac tree vascular calcifications by plain lateral lumbar X-ray. Correlations among calcification sites and with demographics and comorbidities were determined. Pulse pressures were determined. Results: Subjects’ mean?±?standard deviation (SD) age was 56?±?15.9 years; mean (SD) dialysis duration was 4.5?±?4.3 years. Overall, 100% of echocardiographically imaged patients (n?=?243) had calcification in aortic valve, mitral valve, or mitral annulus; 77.8% of X-rayed patients (n?=?248) had abdominal aortic calcification. Radiographic abdominal aortic calcification score correlated significantly with calcification of aortic valve (p?mitral annulus (p?=?0.0001) but not mitral valve. Aortic valve, mitral valve, and mitral annulus calcification correlated significantly among themselves (p?valve calcification was significantly more prevalent in patients aged ?65 years than <65 years, men than women, and Whites than African Americans. Pulse pressure correlated significantly with vascular calcification score (p?=?0.0049) but not with valvular calcification at any site. Conclusions: Vascular and valvular calcification are highly prevalent in the hemodialysis population. Peripheral vascular calcification correlates significantly with elevated pulse pressure and can be assessed easily using lateral lumbar X-ray. Further studies investigating the interaction between pulse pressure and development or progression of vascular calcification are of interest. PMID:25984289

  7. Review of Congenital Mitral Valve Stenosis: Analysis, Repair Techniques and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baird, Christopher W; Marx, Gerald R; Borisuk, Michele; Emani, Sitram; Del Nido, Pedro J

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of congenital mitral valve stenosis (MS) consists of a complex of defects that result in obstruction to left ventricular inflow. This spectrum includes patients with underdeveloped left heart structures (Fig. 1) to those with isolated congenital MS. The specific mitral valve defects can further be divided into categories based on the relationship to the mitral valve annulus including valvar, supravalvar and subvalvar components. Clinically, these patients present based on the degree of obstruction, associated mitral regurgitation, secondary pulmonary hypertension, associated lung disease and/or associated cardiac lesions. There are a number of factors that contribute to the successful outcomes in these patients including pre-operative imaging, aggressive surgical techniques and peri-operative management. Figure 1 (a) Image representing a parachute mitral valve with a small left ventricular cavity. Supra-mitral ring with a fibrous rim of tissue attaches to the mitral annulus and extends on the surfaces of the mitral leaflets. Stenosing mitral membranes or the thickened fribrotic rim of tissue grows on to the atrial aspects of the mitral leaflets restricting the effective orifice area. This thickened fibrous anterior leaflet tissue can extend down onto the chordae tendenae towards the papillary muscle creating an "arcade" like structure. Additional valvar components include commissural fusion and thickened fibrous leaflets that can lead to restricted leaflet motion. Note the sub-valvar or papillary muscle components of congenital MS including the shortened chordae tendenae, reduced inter-chordal space and tethering of the papillary muscles to the ventricle. (b) Pathologic specimen of a parachute mitral valve with a single papillary muscle. PMID:26577233

  8. [Fever, malaise and new onset mitral valve insufficiency. Subacute Streptococcus bovis mitral valve endocarditis ].

    PubMed

    Burri, E; Laffer, R; Steuerwald, M; Cathomas, G; Zimmerli, W

    2004-05-01

    A 62-year-old patient with low grade fever, fatigue, arthralgia and newly discovered mitral regurgitation was diagnosed with subacute endocarditis. Streptococcus bovis grew from all six blood culture bottles. Streptococcus bovis is known to be associated with gastrointestinal neoplasias. Therefore a colonoscopy was performed and two polyps were removed. Histological analysis revealed a tubulovillous adenoma and a serrated adenoma. Colonoscopy is mandatory for all patients with Streptococcus bovis endocarditis even without any symptoms for colorectal neoplasia. The significance of Streptococcus bovis for the carcinogenesis of colorectal neoplasias and the possible alternative pathway for colorectal carcinomas through serrated adenomas will be discussed. PMID:15185488

  9. Simultaneous transapical aortic and mitral valve-in-valve implantation for double prostheses dysfunction: case report and technical insights.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Augusto; Zucchetta, Fabio; Gerosa, Gino

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter "Valve-in-Valve" implantation (ViV) has shown promising results in high-risk patients suffering from structural valve deterioration (SVD) of a previously implanted heart valve bioprosthesis. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with a history of three previous cardiac operations on the aortic and mitral valve. At the time of admission she was severely symptomatic due to a simultaneous SVD of a 23 mm aortic and of a 29 mm mitral St. Jude Biocor bioprosthesis. Because of the history of several cardiac operations and to her comorbidities, the patient was considered with an extremely high surgical risk profile and was therefore scheduled for double concomitant mitral and aortic ViV. Through a trans-apical approach, the patient underwent 23 and 29 mm Edwards Sapien XT implantation in the aortic and mitral bioprosthesis, respectively. The procedure was uneventful as well as the following hospital stay. At 6-months follow-up the patient is in NYHA class I. Echocardiography shows that the aortic bioprosthesis has no leak and the mean gradient is 20 mm Hg while the mitral valve has mild leak and maximum and mean gradients are 21 and 10 mm Hg, respectively. The three main technical aspects that should be carefully considered in double concomitant ViV are: sequence of valve deployment (whether to implant the mitral or the aortic valve first), choice of access and valve sizing. In conclusion, double simultaneous trans-apical mitral and aortic ViV is technically feasible. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24677811

  10. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sauls, Kimberly; Koenig, Sara N.; Anstine, Lindsey J.; Garg, Vidu; Norris, Russell A.; Lincoln, Joy

    2015-01-01

    The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC) population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM) structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle ?-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states. PMID:26527432

  11. Adult women with mitral valve prolapse are more flexible

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, C; Chaves, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is common in women. Other clinical features such as flexibility and hyperlaxity are often associated with MVP, as there is a common biochemical and histological basis for collagen tissue characteristics, range of joint motion, and mitral leaflet excursion. Objective: To confirm whether adult women with MVP are more flexible and hypermobile than those without. Methods: Data from 125 women (mean age 50 years), 31 of them with MVP, were retrospectively analysed with regard to clinical and kinanthropometric aspects. Passive joint motion was evaluated in 20 body movements using Flexitest and three laxity tests. Flexitest individual movements (0 to 4) and overall Flexindex scores were obtained in all subjects by the same investigator. Results: Women with MVP were lighter, less endomorphic and mesomorphic, and more linear. The Flexindex was significantly higher in the women with MVP, both absolute (48 (1.6) v 41 (1.3); p<0.01) and centile for age (67 v 42; p<0.01) values. In 13 out of 20 movements, the Flexitest scores were significantly higher for the women with MVP. Signs of hyperlaxity were about five times more common in these women: 74% v 16% (p<0.01). Scores of 0 and 1 in elbow extension, absence of hyperlaxity, and a Flexindex centile below 65 were almost never found in women with MVP. Conclusion: Flexitest, alone or combined with hyperlaxity tests, may be useful in the assessment of adult women with MVP. PMID:16183767

  12. Left ventricular rupture after embolic myocardial infarction due to mitral valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Caspar, Thibault; Delabranche, Xavier; Mazzucotelli, Jean-Philippe; Samet, Hafida; Morel, Olivier; Ohlmann, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    We report a very rare case of a 43-year-old patient with fatal left ventricular subepicardial aneurysm rupture complicating embolic myocardial infarction due to mitral valve infective endocarditis. PMID:24447262

  13. The future of transcatheter mitral valve interventions: competitive or complementary role of repair vs. replacement?

    PubMed

    Maisano, Francesco; Alfieri, Ottavio; Banai, Shmuel; Buchbinder, Maurice; Colombo, Antonio; Falk, Volkmar; Feldman, Ted; Franzen, Olaf; Herrmann, Howard; Kar, Saibal; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lutter, Georg; Mack, Michael; Nickenig, Georg; Piazza, Nicolo; Reisman, Mark; Ruiz, Carlos E; Schofer, Joachim; Søndergaard, Lars; Stone, Gregg W; Taramasso, Maurizio; Thomas, Martyn; Vahanian, Alec; Webb, John; Windecker, Stephan; Leon, Martin B

    2015-07-01

    Transcatheter mitral interventions has been developed to address an unmet clinical need and may be an alternative therapeutic option to surgery with the intent to provide symptomatic and prognostic benefit. Beyond MitraClip therapy, alternative repair technologies are being developed to expand the transcatheter intervention armamentarium. Recently, the feasibility of transcatheter mitral valve implantation in native non-calcified valves has been reported in very high-risk patients. Acknowledging the lack of scientific evidence to date, it is difficult to predict what the ultimate future role of transcatheter mitral valve interventions will be. The purpose of the present report is to review the current state-of-the-art of mitral valve intervention, and to identify the potential future scenarios, which might benefit most from the transcatheter repair and replacement devices under development. PMID:25870204

  14. Designing innovative retractors and devices to facilitate mitral valve repair surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yozu, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Various devices have been developed to facilitate mitral valve surgery, including those that improve mitral valve exposure and assist surgeons with associated procedures. Choosing appropriate supporting devices when performing minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) through a minithoracotomy with endoscopic assistance is critical. Depending on the surgeon’s preference, trans-thoracic or trans-working-port left atrial retractors can be utilized. Although the trans-thoracic retractors provide a simple and orderly working space around the minithoracotomy working port, the positioning of the shaft is difficult and there is an implicit risk of chest wall bleeding. On the other hand, the trans-working-port type provides excellent exposure, is easily handled and manipulated, and facilitates surgeries involving various anatomical structures without special training. A great deal of understanding and knowledge about retractors is necessary to achieve the optimal exposure required to facilitate surgical techniques, and to maintain a reproducible and safe surgical system during mitral valve surgery. PMID:26309847

  15. Dynamic simulation of heart mitral valve with transversely isotropic material model

    E-print Network

    Weinberg, Eli, 1979-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis develops two methods for simulating, in the finite element setting, the material behavior of heart mitral valve leaflet tissue. First, a mixed pressure-displacement formulation is used to implement the constitutive ...

  16. Myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs: Does size matter?

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.; Kilroy-Glynn, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most commonly diagnosed cardiovascular disease in the dog accounting for more than 70% of all cardiovascular disease in dogs. As are most canine diseases with genetic underpinnings, risk of MMVD is greatly increased in a subset of breeds. What is uncommon is that the vast majority of the breeds at elevated risk for MMVD are small or toy breeds with average adult weights under 9 kg. These breeds appear to have little in common other than their diminutive size. In the following review we propose a number of mechanisms by which relatively unrelated small breeds may have developed a predisposition for chronic valvular disorders. Although factors such as age are key in the expression of MMVD, taking a comprehensive look at the commonalities, as well as the differences, between the susceptible breeds may assist in finding the causal variants responsible for MMVD and translating them to improved treatments for both dogs and humans. PMID:22356836

  17. Repeat Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Replacement for Recurrent Mitral Stenosis after OMC in Patients Who Decline Blood Product Transfusion for Religious Reasons

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yujiro; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Tagusari, Osamu; Yoshida, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac surgery for Jehovah's Witness (JW) patients is considered to be high risk because of patients' refusal to receive blood transfusion. We report a successful mitral valve replacement for recurrent mitral stenosis after OMC with minimally invasive right thoracotomy, without any transfusion of allogeneic blood or blood products. This minimally invasive mitral valve replacement through right thoracotomy was an excellent approach for JW patients. PMID:26618021

  18. Simultaneous in- and out-of-plane Mitral Valve Annular Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Skov, Søren N; Røpcke, Diana M; Telling, Kristine; Ilkjær, Christine; Tjørnild, Marcell J; Nygaard, Hans; Nielsen, Sten L; Jensen, Morten O

    2015-06-01

    Mitral valve repair with annuloplasty is often favoured over total valve replacement. In order to develop and optimize new annuloplasty ring designs, it is important to study the complex biomechanical behaviour of the valve annulus and the subvalvular apparatus with simultaneous in- and out-of-plane restraining force measurements. A new flat D-shaped mitral valve annular force transducer was developed. The transducer was mounted with strain gauges to measure strain and calibrated to provide simultaneous restraining forces in- and out of the mitral annular plane. The force transducer was implanted and evaluated in an 80 kg porcine experimental model. Accumulation of out-of-plane restraining forces, creating strain in the anterior segment were 0.7 ± 0.0 N (towards apex) and an average force accumulation of 1.5 ± 0.3 N, creating strain in the commissural segments (away from apex). The accumulations of in-plane restraining forces, creating strain on the inner side of the ring were 1.7 ± 0.2 N (away from ring center). A new mitral annular force transducer was successfully developed and evaluated in vivo. The transducer was able to measure forces simultaneously in different planes. Initial indications point towards overall agreement with previous individual force measurements in- and out-of the mitral annular plane. This can provide more detailed insight into the annular force distribution, and could potentially improve the level of evidence based mitral valve repair and support the development of future mitral annuloplasty devices. PMID:26577234

  19. Anomalous chord of the left atrium without involvement of the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Arya, Bhawna; Challenger, Margaret; Lai, Wyman W

    2012-08-01

    An anomalous chord from the left side of the atrial septum to the left atrial free wall was incidentally noted on transthoracic echocardiography in a 14-year-old boy with vasovagal syncope. Previously reported cases of anomalous chords in the left atrium were associated with the mitral valve leaflets in all but two cases. This is the first reported case of an echocardiographic diagnosis of anomalous left atrial chord without insertion of the chord into the mitral valve. PMID:22404153

  20. Replacement of the mitral valve in an infant with group B streptococcal endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Walker, T A; Aru, G M; Ebeid, M R

    2001-01-01

    Endocarditis due to group B streptococcus is very rare in infants, and may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Review of the literature reveals only a single reported case of an infant with this type of streptococcal endocarditis involving the mitral valve. This infant had underlying congenital heart disease, and died shortly after catheterization. We now report group B streptococcal endocarditis occurring in an infant with a structurally normal heart who was treated successfully by replacement of the mitral valve. PMID:11233405

  1. Warfarin Causes Rapid Calcification of the Elastic Lamellae in Rat Arteries and Heart Valves

    E-print Network

    Price, Paul A.

    Warfarin Causes Rapid Calcification of the Elastic Lamellae in Rat Arteries and Heart Valves Paul A of the elastic lamellae in the media of major arteries and in aortic heart valves in the rat. Aortic, and 5 weeks of treatment. By 5 weeks, the highly focal calcification of major arteries could be seen

  2. Calcific aortic valve disease: A consensus summary from the Alliance of Investigators on Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yutzey, Katherine E.; Demer, Linda L.; Body, Simon C.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Towler, Dwight A.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.; Hofmann-Bowman, Marion A.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Rogers, Melissa B.; Sadeghi, Mehran M.; Aikawa, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Calcific Aortic Valve Disease (CAVD) is increasingly prevalent worldwide with significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic options beyond surgical valve replacement are currently limited. In 2011, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute assembled a working group on aortic stenosis. This group identified CAVD as an actively regulated disease process in need of further study. As a result, the Alliance of Investigators on CAVD was formed to coordinate and promote CAVD research, with the goals of identifying individuals at risk, developing new therapeutic approaches, and improving diagnostic methods. The group is composed of cardiologists, geneticists, imaging specialists, and basic science researchers. This report reviews the current status of CAVD research and treatment strategies with identification of areas in need of additional investigation for optimal management of this patient population. PMID:25189570

  3. Large Patent Ductus Arteriosus in a 44-Year-Old Woman Leading to Calcium Deposition in the Left Atrium and Mitral and Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Carey Camille

    2015-01-01

    This report describes unusual autopsy findings in a 44-year-old woman who had a large, calcified patent ductus arteriosus that produced substantial left-to-right shunting. The patient died in 1962, 7 days after patch closure of the aortic orifice of the ductus. Numerous calcific deposits were present in the mural left atrial endocardium, the mitral valve leaflets and annulus, and the aortic valve cusps. The cause of the left-sided calcific deposits was perhaps related to the patient's several-decades-old giant aortopulmonary shunt, causing a major increase in the volume of blood passing through the left-sided cardiac chambers in comparison with the volume in the right side. To our knowledge, such findings in a patient with patent ductus arteriosus have not been reported previously. PMID:26175644

  4. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  5. Recurrent native and prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zakhama, Lilia; Slama, Iskander; Boussabah, Elhem; Harbegue, Basma; Mimouni, Majdi; Abdelaali, Nabil; Sioua, Sana; Thameur, Moez; Benyoussef, Soraya

    2014-03-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is defined as a prolonged, unexplained peripheral eosinophilia. Endomyocardial fibrosis and mural thrombus formation are common occurrences such that patients are exposed to lethal thromboembolic complications. The valvular damage described is mainly related to iterative valve thromboses that are amenable to surgery. Here, the case is reported of a 39-year-old woman suffering from HES with mitral valve thrombosis and mechanical prosthetic mitral valve replacement, in whom a new thrombosis of the inserted prosthesis occurred one month postoperatively, concomitant with severe hypereosinophilia and despite adequate anticoagulation. The patient had received a new bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement, and her eosinophil count had been normalized after treatment with corticosteroids. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin was maintained. Subsequently, no recurrent thromboembolic events were reported, and echocardiography performed at the one-year follow up showed the bioprosthesis to have a normal hemodynamic profile. PMID:25076546

  6. Large free-floating left atrial thrombus with normal mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, Sundar; Rajkumar, Arunkumar; Ganesan, Gnanavelu; Sangareddi, Venkatesan; Ramasamy, Alagesan; Dhandapani, V.E.; Ravi, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial thrombus in the presence of diseased mitral valve and atrial fibrillation is a well known entity. But it is very rare to occur in the presence of normal mitral valve apparatus. We report the case of a 36 year old female who presented with left atrial ball valve thrombus and normal mitral valve apparatus and underwent surgery. This patient with gangrene of right lower limb came for cardiac evaluation. She had infarct in left middle cerebral artery territory- ten months prior to this admission and was on treatment for infertility. She had atrial fibrillation. Emergency surgery to remove the thrombus should be considered given its potential life threatening embolic nature. PMID:23438617

  7. Three-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography in the Anatomical Assessment of Isolated Parachute Mitral Valve in an Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    López-Pardo, Francisco; Urbano-Moral, Jose Angel; González-Calle, Antonio; Laviana-Martinez, Fernando; Esteve-Ruiz, Iris; Lagos-Degrande, Oscar; López-Haldon, Jose E

    2015-11-01

    Parachute mitral valve (PMV) is a rare congenital anomaly of the mitral valve apparatus usually evidenced in infants and young children. Adult presentation is extremely rare and is generally mild in terms of mitral stenosis. A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department due to progressive dyspnea, with NYHA functional class IV symptoms on presentation. The echocardiographic examination identified a PMV with moderate mitral stenosis and a secondary smaller subvalvular mitral orifice. The report shows the usefulness of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the detection and quantification of this rare anomaly. PMID:26096823

  8. CC-chemokine receptor 7 and its ligand CCL19 promote mitral valve interstitial cell migration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaozhi; Wang, Liang; Miao, Liping; Zhao, Rong; Wu, Yanhu; Kong, Xiangqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and CC-chemokine ligand 19 (CCL19) on rheumatic mitral stenosis is unknown. This study aimed to explore the roles of CCR7 and CCL19 in rheumatic mitral stenosis by measuring the expression of CCR7 and CCL19 in human mitral valves from rheumatic mitral stenosis patients. Additionally, we examined their effects on human mitral valve interstitial cells (hMVICs) proliferation, apoptosis and wound repair. CCR7 and CCL19 expression was measured in the mitral valves from rheumatic mitral stenosis patients (n?=?10) and compared to normal mitral valves (n?=?5). CCR7 was measured in cultured hMVICs from rheumatic mitral stenosis patients and normal donors by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The cells were also treated with exogenous CCL19, and the effects on wound healing, proliferation and apoptosis were assayed. In the rheumatic mitral valves, valve interstitial cells expressed CCR7, while mononuclear cells and the endothelium expressed CCL19. Healthy mitral valves did not stain positive for CCR7 or CCL19. CCR7 was also detected in cultured rheumatic hMVICs or in normal hMVICs treated with CCL19. In a wound healing experiment, wound closure rates of both rheumatic and normal hMVICs were significantly accelerated by CCL19. These effects were abrogated by a CCR7 neutralizing antibody. The CCR7/CCL19 axis did not influence the proliferation or apoptosis of hMVICs, indicating that wound healing was due to increased migration rates rather than increased proliferation. In conclusion, CCR7 and CCL19 were expressed in rheumatic mitral valves. The CCR7/CCL19 axis may regulate remodeling of rheumatic valve injury through promoting migratory ability of hMVICs. PMID:26668580

  9. The First Finite Element Model of the Left Ventricle with Mitral Valve: Insights into Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Wenk, Jonathan F.; Zhang, Zhihong; Cheng, Guangming; Malhotra, Deepak; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Burger, Mike; Suzuki, Takamaro; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular remodeling after postero-basal myocardial infarction can lead to ischemic mitral regurgitation. This occurs as a consequence of leaflet tethering due to posterior papillary muscle displacement. Methods A finite element model of the left ventricle, mitral apparatus, and chordae tendineae was created from magnetic resonance images from a sheep that developed moderate mitral regurgitation after postero-basal myocardial infarction. Each region of the model was characterized by a specific constitutive law that captured the material response when subjected to physiological pressure loading. Results The model simulation produced a gap between the posterior and anterior leaflets, just above the infarcted posterior papillary muscle, which is indicative of mitral regurgitation. When the stiffness of the infarct region was reduced, this caused the wall to distend and the gap area between the leaflets to increase by 33%. Additionally, the stress in the leaflets increased around the chordal connection points near the gap. Conclusions The methodology outlined in this work will allow a finite element model of both the left ventricle and mitral valve to be generated using non-invasive techniques. PMID:20417775

  10. Live 3D TEE demonstrates and guides the management of prosthetic mitral valve obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Mangeet; Pandya, Utpal; Adlakha, Satjit; Khouri, Samer J

    2011-08-01

    A 43-year-old woman, with a remote history of rheumatic mitral stenosis and a St. Jude prosthetic mitral valve replacement, presented with shortness of breath and palpitations, shortly after a long flight. On admission, atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response was noted in the setting of a long history of noncompliance with her anticoagulation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated multiple laminated thrombi in the left atrial appendage. Live three-dimensional (3D) TEE confirmed this diagnosis and demonstrated an immobile posterior leaflet of the mitral prosthesis, which had direct implications in her management. She successfully underwent surgery for mitral valve replacement, left atrial appendage ligation, and a Maze procedure on the following day. The multiple thrombi within the atrial appendage were confirmed intraoperatively and pannus formation was determined to be the etiology of the leaflet immobility. PMID:21752090

  11. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Extracellular matrix tenascin-X in calcific aortic valves].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-01

    We previously disclosed a novel extracellular matrix tenascin-X (TNX) , the largest member of the tenascin family. So far, we have made efforts to elucidate the roles of TNX. TNX is involved in collagen deposition, collagen fibrillogenesis, and modulation of collagen stiffness. Homozygous mutations in TNXB, the gene encoding TNX, cause a classic-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) , a heritable connective tissue disorder, whereas haploinsufficiency of TNXB and heterozygous mutations in TNXB are associated with hypermobility-type EDS. Recently, we performed proteomic analyses of calcific aortic valves (CAVs) compared with relatively adjacent normal tissues to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of dystrophic valvular calcification. Interestingly, we found that TNX was the protein with the greatest decrease in expression among the differentially expressed proteins and that expression levels of proteins modulating collagen structure and function, such as type I collagen and decorin, were also decreased in CAVs. In this review, I will discuss about the decreased level of collagen due to the reduction of expression levels of proteins that play regulatory roles in collagen functions such as fibril organization and fibrillogenesis in CAVs. PMID:25926574

  12. Application of color Doppler flow mapping to calculate orifice area of St Jude mitral valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, D. Y.; Wong, J.; Rodriguez, L.; Pu, M.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effective orifice area (EOA) of a prosthetic valve is superior to transvalvular gradients as a measure of valve function, but measurement of mitral prosthesis EOA has not been reliable. METHODS AND RESULTS: In vitro flow across St Jude valves was calculated by hemispheric proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) and segment-of-spheroid (SOS) methods. For steady and pulsatile conditions, PISA and SOS flows correlated with true flow, but SOS and not PISA underestimated flow. These principles were then used intraoperatively to calculate cardiac output and EOA of newly implanted St Jude mitral valves in 36 patients. Cardiac output by PISA agreed closely with thermodilution (r=0.91, Delta=-0.05+/-0.55 L/min), but SOS underestimated it (r=0.82, Delta=-1.33+/-0.73 L/min). Doppler EOAs correlated with Gorlin equation estimates (r=0.75 for PISA and r=0.68 for SOS, P<0.001) but were smaller than corresponding in vitro EOA estimates. CONCLUSIONS: Proximal flow convergence methods can calculate forward flow and estimate EOA of St Jude mitral valves, which may improve noninvasive assessment of prosthetic mitral valve obstruction.

  13. Asymptotic Model of Fluid-Tissue Interaction for Mitral Valve Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Domenichini, Federico; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2015-06-01

    The vortex formation process inside the left ventricle is intrinsically connected to the dynamics of the mitral leaflets while they interact with the flow crossing the valve during diastole. The description of the dynamics of a natural mitral valve still represents a challenging issue, especially because its material properties are not measurable in vivo. Medical imaging can provide some indications about the geometry of the valve, but not about its mechanical properties. In this work, we introduce a parametric model of the mitral valve geometry, whose motion is described in the asymptotic limit under the assumption that it moves with the flow, without any additional resistance other than that given by its shape, and without the need to specify its material properties. The mitral valve model is coupled with a simple description of the left ventricle geometry, and their dynamics is solved numerically together with the equations ruling the blood flow. The intra-ventricular flow is analyzed in its relationship with the valvular motion. It is found that the initial valve opening anticipates the peak velocity of the Early filling wave with little influence of the specific geometry; while subsequent closure and re-opening are more dependent on the intraventricular vortex dynamics and thus on the leaflets' geometry itself. The limitations and potential applications of the proposed model are discussed. PMID:26577230

  14. Idiopathic mitral valve chordae rupture in an infant: importance of rapid diagnosis and surgery.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuki; Inoue, Nobuaki; Fukushima, Naoya; Yoshikawa, Tadahiro; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Matsubara, Shigeki; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    Mitral valve chordae rupture in infancy is a rare, but life-threatening disease. The progression of acute cardiac failure has been reported, with emergency surgery being required in most cases. Mitral valve chordae rupture typically occurs at the age of 4-6 months. Echocardiography is needed to diagnose this disease, and accurate diagnosis is difficult for general pediatricians. We herein describe the case of an acutely ill 4-month-old infant, who was saved and discharged without neurological sequelae due to the early diagnosis of mitral valve chordae rupture, life support, and surgery. We confirm the importance of acute pre-surgery treatment and immediate surgery for the survival and good outcome of infants. PMID:25712749

  15. Spontaneous closure of a large left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Yoshimasa; Nagahori, Ryuichi; Yoshitake, Michio; Matsumura, Yoko; Takagi, Tomomitsu; Kinami, Hiroo

    2014-09-16

    Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is a rare, but potentially fatal, condition that generally occurs as a complication of myocardial infarction, infective endocarditis, or cardiac surgery. Surgical repair is the treatment of first choice because of the marked risk of rupture, but deteriorated hemodynamics and complicated procedures to treat the pseudoaneurysm may lead to a high mortality rate. We report a 62-year-old woman with a large left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after mitral valve replacement for rheumatic mitral valve stenosis. Surgical repair was not performed due to the patient's refusal, but her pseudoaneurysm resolved spontaneously by 2 years after mitral valve replacement. Spontaneous obliteration of a large left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is very rare in a patient on warfarin therapy. This case suggests that a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm with a narrow neck may resolve spontaneously in rare settings. PMID:25224154

  16. Distribution of Mitral Annular and Aortic Valve Calcium as Assessed by Unenhanced Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Codolosa, Jose N; Goykhman, Igor; Romero-Corral, Abel; Pressman, Gregg S

    2015-12-15

    Aging is associated with calcium deposits in various cardiovascular structures, but patterns of calcium deposition, if any, are unknown. In search of such patterns, we performed quantitative assessment of mitral annular calcium (MAC) and aortic valve calcium (AVC) in a broad clinical sample. Templates were created from gated computed tomography (CT) scans depicting the aortic valve cusps and mitral annular segments in relation to surrounding structures. These were then applied to CT reconstructions from ungated, clinically indicated CT scans of 318 subjects, aged ?65 years. Calcium location was assigned using the templates and quantified by the Agatston method. Mean age was 76 ± 7.3 years; 48% were men and 58% were white. Whites had higher prevalence (p = 0.03) and density of AVC than blacks (p = 0.02), and a trend toward increased MAC (p = 0.06). Prevalence of AVC was similar between men and women, but AVC scores were higher in men (p = 0.008); this difference was entirely accounted for by whites. Within the aortic valve, the left cusp was more frequently calcified than the others. MAC was most common in the posterior mitral annulus, especially its middle (P2) segment. For the anterior mitral annulus, the medial (A3) segment calcified most often. In conclusion, AVC is more common in whites than blacks, and more intense in men, but only in whites. Furthermore, calcium deposits in the mitral annulus and aortic valve favor certain locations. PMID:26517948

  17. Side-Specific Endothelial-Dependent Regulation of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Chen, Si; Sarang, Zubair; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Chester, Adrian H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial endothelial cells maintain vascular homeostasis and vessel tone in part through the secretion of nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we determined how aortic valve endothelial cells (VEC) regulate aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) phenotype and matrix calcification through NO. Using an anchored in vitro collagen hydrogel culture system, we demonstrate that three-dimensionally cultured porcine VIC do not calcify in osteogenic medium unless under mechanical stress. Co-culture with porcine VEC, however, significantly attenuated VIC calcification through inhibition of myofibroblastic activation, osteogenic differentiation, and calcium deposition. Incubation with the NO donor DETA-NO inhibited VIC osteogenic differentiation and matrix calcification, whereas incubation with the NO blocker l-NAME augmented calcification even in 3D VIC–VEC co-culture. Aortic VEC, but not VIC, expressed endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in both porcine and human valves, which was reduced in osteogenic medium. eNOS expression was reduced in calcified human aortic valves in a side-specific manner. Porcine leaflets exposed to the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ increased osteocalcin and ?-smooth muscle actin expression. Finally, side-specific shear stress applied to porcine aortic valve leaflet endothelial surfaces increased cGMP production in VEC. Valve endothelial-derived NO is a natural inhibitor of the early phases of valve calcification and therefore may be an important regulator of valve homeostasis and pathology. PMID:23499458

  18. Transesophageal echocardiographic imaging of multiple complications following mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Brassard, Charles L; Viens, Claudia; Denault, André

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a case of mitral valve (MV) replacement that resulted in multiple complications, as diagnosed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), including left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, aortic dissection and left ventricular rupture. We also describe that identification of bleeding originating from the posterior aspect of the heart by the surgical team should trigger a complete TEE evaluation for adequate diagnosis. An 84-year-old woman underwent a MV replacement. Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) revealed a late-peaking gradient of 44 mmHg over the left ventricular outflow tract caused by obstruction from a bioprosthetic strut. After proper surgical correction, TEE evaluation showed a type A aortic dissection that was subsequently repaired. After separation from CPB, the surgical team identified a major bleed that originated from the posterior aspect of the heart. Although the initial suspicion was injury to the atrioventricular groove, a complete TEE evaluation confirmed a left ventricular free wall rupture by showing the dissecting jet using colour-flow Doppler. TEE is an essential component in cardiac surgery for assessment of surgical repair and potential complications. Posterior bleeding should trigger a complete TEE examination with assessment of nearby structures to rule out a life-threatening pathology. Left ventricular free wall rupture can be identified using colour-flow Doppler. Learning points Multiple complications may occur after MVR.TEE is an essential component in the evaluation of surgical repair and its potential associated complications, including LVOT obstruction, aortic dissection and LV rupture.Posterior bleeding, from the region of AV groove, should trigger a complete TEE examination with assessment of nearby structures such as the atria, coronary sinus and myocardium to rule out a life threatening pathology.The diagnosis of a LV rupture can be confirmed with 2-D imaging and colour-flow Doppler demonstrating a dissecting jet through the myocardium.

  19. A Computational Model of Aging and Calcification in the Aortic Heart Valve

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Eli J.; Schoen, Frederick J.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2009-01-01

    The aortic heart valve undergoes geometric and mechanical changes over time. The cusps of a normal, healthy valve thicken and become less extensible over time. In the disease calcific aortic stenosis (CAS), calcified nodules progressively stiffen the cusps. The local mechanical changes in the cusps, due to either normal aging or pathological processes, affect overall function of the valve. In this paper, we propose a computational model for the aging aortic valve that connects local changes to overall valve function. We extend a previous model for the healthy valve to describe aging. To model normal/uncomplicated aging, leaflet thickness and extensibility are varied versus age according to experimental data. To model calcification, initial sites are defined and a simple growth law is assumed. The nodules then grow over time, so that the area of calcification increases from one model to the next model representing greater age. Overall valve function is recorded for each individual model to yield a single simulation of valve function over time. This simulation is the first theoretical tool to describe the temporal behavior of aortic valve calcification. The ability to better understand and predict disease progression will aid in design and timing of patient treatments for CAS. PMID:19536285

  20. On the bending properties of porcine mitral, tricuspid, aortic, and pulmonary valve leaflets.

    PubMed

    Brazile, Bryn; Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; Bertucci, Robbin; Prabhu, Raj; Patnaik, Sourav S; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; Brinkman-Ferguson, Erin; Williams, Lakiesha N; Liao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The atrioventricular valve leaflets (mitral and tricuspid) are different from the semilunar valve leaflets (aortic and pulmonary) in layered structure, ultrastructural constitution and organization, and leaflet thickness. These differences warrant a comparative look at the bending properties of the four types of leaflets. We found that the moment-curvature relationships in atrioventricular valves were stiffer than in semilunar valves, and the moment-curvature relationships of the left-side valve leaflets were stiffer than their morphological analog of the right side. These trends were supported by the moment-curvature curves and the flexural rigidity analysis (EI value decreased from mitral, tricuspid, aortic, to pulmonary leaflets). However, after taking away the geometric effect (moment of inertia I), the instantaneous effective bending modulus E showed a reversed trend. The overall trend of flexural rigidity (EI: mitral > tricuspid > aortic > pulmonary) might be correlated with the thickness variations among the four types of leaflets (thickness: mitral > tricuspid > aortic > pulmonary). The overall trend of the instantaneous effective bending modulus (E: mitral < tricuspid < aortic < pulmonary) might be correlated to the layered fibrous ultrastructures of the four types of leaflets, of which the fibers in mitral and tricuspid leaflets were less aligned, and the fibers in aortic and pulmonary leaflets were highly aligned. We also found that, for all types of leaflets, moment-curvature relationships are stiffer in against-curvature (AC) bending than in with-curvature bending (WC), which implies that leaflets tend to flex toward their natural curvature and comply with blood flow. Lastly, we observed that the leaflets were stiffer in circumferential bending compared with radial bending, likely reflecting the physiological motion of the leaflets, i.e., more bending moment and movement were experienced in radial direction than circumferential direction. PMID:25955006

  1. A meta-analysis of robotic vs. conventional mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenden, Hugh; Liou, Kevin; Pathan, Faraz; Gupta, Sunil; Nienaber, Thomas A.; Chandrakumar, David; Indraratna, Praveen; Yan, Tristan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study is the first meta-analysis to compare the surgical outcomes of robotic vs. conventional mitral valve surgery in patients with degenerative mitral valve disease. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify all relevant studies with comparative data on robotic vs. conventional mitral valve surgery. Predefined primary endpoints included mortality, stroke and reoperation for bleeding. Secondary endpoints included cross-clamp time, cardiopulmonary bypass time, length of hospitalization and duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Echocardiographic outcomes were assessed when possible. Results Six relevant retrospective studies with comparative data for robotic vs. conventional mitral valve surgery were identified from the existing literature. Meta-analysis demonstrated a superior perioperative survival outcome for patients who underwent robotic surgery. Incidences of stroke and reoperation were not statistically different between the two treatment arms. Patients who underwent robotic surgery required a significantly longer period of cardiopulmonary bypass time and cross-clamp time. However, the lengths of hospitalization and ICU stay were not significantly different. Both surgical techniques appeared to achieve satisfactory echocardiographic outcomes in the majority of patients. Conclusions Current evidence on comparative outcomes of robotic vs. conventional mitral surgery is limited, and results of the present meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due to differing patient characteristics. However, it has been demonstrated that robotic mitral valve surgery can be safely performed by expert surgeons for selected patients. A successful robotic program is dependent on a specially trained team and a sufficient volume of referrals to attain and maintain safety. PMID:26309839

  2. A comparative study of the morphology of mammalian chordae tendineae of the mitral and tricuspid valves

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Jennifer; Rea, Paul

    2015-01-01

    It is assumed that the human heart is almost identical to domestic mammalian species, but with limited literature to support this. One such area that has been underinvestigated is that of the subvalvular apparatus level. The authors set out to examine the morphology of the subvalvular apparatus of the mammalian atrioventricular valves through gross dissection and microscopic analysis in a small-scale pilot study. The authors examined the chordae tendineae of the mitral and tricuspid valves in sheep, pig and bovine hearts, comparing the numbers of each of these structures within and between species. It was found that the number of chordae was up to twice as many for the tricuspid valve compared with the mitral valve. The counts for the chordae on the three valve leaflets of the tricuspid valve, as well as the two mitral valve leaflets, were almost identical between species. However, the chordae attaching onto the posterior papillary muscle were almost double compared with the septal and anterior papillary muscles. Histological analysis demonstrated an abrupt transitional zone. In conclusion, the authors have shown that there is no gross morphological difference between, or within, these species at the subvalvular apparatus level. PMID:26644912

  3. Mitral Annular and Coronary Artery Calcification Are Associated with Mortality in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lange, David C.; Glidden, David; Secemsky, Eric A.; Ordovas, Karen; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Bolger, Ann F.; Hsue, Priscilla Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV infection increases cardiovascular risk. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) and mitral annular calcification (MAC) identify patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between MAC, CAC and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Methods and Results We studied 152 asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and computed tomography (CT). MAC was identified on TTE using standardized criteria. Presence of CAC, CAC score and CAC percentiles were determined using the modified Agatston criteria. Mortality data was obtained from the Social Security and National Death Indices (SSDI/NDI). The median age was 49 years; 87% were male. The median duration of HIV was 16 years; 84% took antiretroviral therapy; 64% had an undetectable viral load. CVD risk factors included hypertension (35%), smoking (62%) and dyslipidemia (35%). Twenty-five percent of individuals had MAC, and 42% had CAC. Over a median follow-up of 8 years, 11 subjects died. Subjects with CAC had significantly higher mortality compared to those with MAC only or no MAC. The Harrell’s C-statistic of CAC was 0.66 and increased to 0.75 when MAC was added (p = 0.05). MAC, prior CVD, age and HIV viral load were independently associated with higher age- and gender-adjusted CAC percentiles in an adjusted model (p < 0.05 for all). Conclusion In HIV patients, the presence of MAC, traditional risk factors and HIV viral load were independently associated with CAC. Presence of CAC and MAC may be useful in identifying HIV-infected individuals at higher risk for death. PMID:26132465

  4. Phasic disappearance of left circumflex coronary artery from an early complication of mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Devabhaktuni, Subodh; Sunkara, Nirmal; Ahsan, Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message LV pseudoaneurysm can be a late complication of mitral valve replacement. In our case, it was an early postoperative complication. This pseudoaneurysm was causing compression of LCX artery during systole, leading to presentation of NSTEMI two weeks after the surgery. PMID:26576286

  5. Using Real-Time Three-Dimensional Ultrasound to Characterize Mitral Valve Motion

    E-print Network

    Ayache, Nicholas

    for the visualization, characterization, and tracking of heart tissue, whether from an imaging or mechanical pointUsing Real-Time Three-Dimensional Ultrasound to Characterize Mitral Valve Motion Paul M. Novotnya of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, USA b Department of Cardiology, Children

  6. 3D Ultrasound-Guided Motion Compensation System for Beating Heart Mitral Valve Repair

    E-print Network

    3D Ultrasound-Guided Motion Compensation System for Beating Heart Mitral Valve Repair Shelten G with the tissue for longer periods. 1 Introduction Beating heart intracardiac repairs are now feasible clear benefits, heart motion can make the safe manipulation of its tissues extremely challenging

  7. In vitro measurement of the coaptation force distribution in normal and functional regurgitant porcine mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Adams, John; O'Rourke, Malachy J

    2015-07-01

    Closure of the left atrioventricular orifice is achieved when the anterior and posterior leaflets of the mitral valve press together to form a coaptation zone along the free edge of the leaflets. This coaptation zone is critical to valve competency and is maintained by the support of the mitral annulus, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Myocardial ischemia can lead to an altered performance of this mitral complex generating suboptimal mitral leaflet coaptation and a resultant regurgitant orifice. This paper reports on a two-part experiment undertaken to measure the dependence of coaptation force distribution on papillary muscle position in normal and functional regurgitant porcine mitral heart valves. Using a novel load sensor, the local coaptation force was measured in vitro at three locations (A1-P1, A2-P2, and A3-P3) along the coaptation zone. In part 1, the coaptation force was measured under static conditions in ten whole hearts. In part 2, the coaptation force was measured in four explanted mitral valves operating in a flow loop under physiological flow conditions. Here, two series of tests were undertaken corresponding to the normal and functional regurgitant state as determined by the position of the papillary muscles relative to the mitral valve annulus. The functional regurgitant state corresponded to grade 1. The static tests in part 1 revealed that the local force was directly proportional to the transmitral pressure and was nonuniformly distributed across the coaptation zone, been strongest at A1-P1. In part 2, tests of the valve in a normal state showed that the local force was again directly proportional to the transmitral pressure and was again nonuniform across the coaptation zone, been strongest at A1-P1 and weakest at A2-P2. Further tests performed on the same valves in a functional regurgitant state showed that the local force measured in the coaptation zone was directly proportional to the transmitral pressure. However, the force was now observed to be weakest at A1-P1 and strongest at A2-P2. Movement of the anterolateral papillary muscle (APM) away from both the annular and anterior-posterior (AP) planes was seen to contribute significantly to the altered force distribution in the coaptation zone. It was concluded that papillary muscle displacement typical of myocardial ischemia changes the coaptation force locally within the coaptation zone. PMID:25661678

  8. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26170468

  9. Clinical Trial Design Principles and Endpoint Definitions for Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement: Part 2: Endpoint Definitions: A Consensus Document From the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-07-21

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodeling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26184623

  10. Simulation Based Design and Evaluation of a Transcatheter Mitral Heart Valve Frame

    PubMed Central

    Young, Melissa; Erdemir, Ahmet; Stucke, Samantha; Klatte, Ryan; Davis, Brian; Navia, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    In certain populations, open heart surgery to replace a diseased mitral valve is not an option, leaving percutaneous delivery a viable alternative. However, a surgical transcatheter based delivery of a metallic support frame incorporating a tissue derived valve puts considerable constraints on device specifications. Expansion to a large diameter from the catheter diameter without mechanical fracture involves advanced device design and appropriate material processing and selection. In this study, a new frame concept is presented with a desirable feature that incorporates wings that protrude during expansion to establish adequate fixation. Expansion characteristics of the design in relation to annulus fixation were quantified through finite element analysis predictions of the frame wing span and angles. Computational modeling and simulation was used to identify many favorable design features for the transcatheter mitral valve frame and obtain desired expansion diameters (35–45mm), acceptable radial stiffness (2.7N/mm), and ensure limited risk of failure based on predicted plastic deformations. PMID:23372624

  11. A Case of Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Causing Mitral Valve Papillary Muscle Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Tamse, Tiffany; Rampersad, Avind; Jordan-Villegas, Alejandro; Ireland, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (IHES) is a rare disease that can be difficult to diagnose as the differential is broad. This disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Our patient is a 17-year-old adolescent female who presented with nonspecific symptoms of abdominal pain and malaise. She was incidentally found to have hypereosinophilia of 16,000 on complete blood count and nonspecific colitis and pulmonary edema on computed tomography. She went into cardiogenic shock due to papillary rupture of her mitral valve requiring extreme life support measures including intubation and extracorporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as well as mitral valve replacement. Pathology of the valve showed eosinophilic infiltration as the underlying etiology. The patient was diagnosed with IHES after the exclusion of infectious, rheumatologic, and oncologic causes. She was treated with steroids with improvement of her symptoms and scheduled for close follow-up. In general patients with IHES that have cardiac involvement have poorer prognoses. PMID:26640733

  12. A Case of Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Causing Mitral Valve Papillary Muscle Rupture.

    PubMed

    Tamse, Tiffany; Rampersad, Avind; Jordan-Villegas, Alejandro; Ireland, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (IHES) is a rare disease that can be difficult to diagnose as the differential is broad. This disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Our patient is a 17-year-old adolescent female who presented with nonspecific symptoms of abdominal pain and malaise. She was incidentally found to have hypereosinophilia of 16,000 on complete blood count and nonspecific colitis and pulmonary edema on computed tomography. She went into cardiogenic shock due to papillary rupture of her mitral valve requiring extreme life support measures including intubation and extracorporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as well as mitral valve replacement. Pathology of the valve showed eosinophilic infiltration as the underlying etiology. The patient was diagnosed with IHES after the exclusion of infectious, rheumatologic, and oncologic causes. She was treated with steroids with improvement of her symptoms and scheduled for close follow-up. In general patients with IHES that have cardiac involvement have poorer prognoses. PMID:26640733

  13. Papillary fibroelastoma of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Prifti, Edvin; Ademaj, Fadil; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Demiraj, Aurel

    2015-01-01

    The papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is a rare and benign primary cardiac tumor, and the most frequently found tumor occurring in the cardiac valves. With the introduction of echocardiography, the diagnosis of these tumors in living patients has been reported sporadically. The PFEs have been found most often on valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and both ventricles. We describe an interesting case of the PFE originating from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation. The patient underwent successful surgical removal of the PFE. PMID:26187170

  14. Papillary fibroelastoma of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Ademaj, Fadil; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Demiraj, Aurel

    2015-01-01

    The papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is a rare and benign primary cardiac tumor, and the most frequently found tumor occurring in the cardiac valves. With the introduction of echocardiography, the diagnosis of these tumors in living patients has been reported sporadically. The PFEs have been found most often on valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and both ventricles. We describe an interesting case of the PFE originating from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation. The patient underwent successful surgical removal of the PFE. PMID:26187170

  15. Macrophage involvement in mitral valve pathology in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome).

    PubMed

    Brands, Marion; Roelants, Jorine; de Krijger, Ronald; Bogers, Ad; Reuser, Arnold; van der Ploeg, Ans; Helbing, Wim

    2013-10-01

    Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type VI) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder in which the pathologic storage of glycosaminoglycans in various tissues can lead to severe symptoms, including cardiomyopathy. We report on a child with Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome whose cardiac condition deteriorated and eventually led to cardiac failure at the age of 7 years due to severe mitral regurgitation. She received a mitral valve replacement and tricuspid repair with successful outcome. Histologic examination of the mitral valve showed abundant "clear" cells in both the leaflets and chordae tendineae. In Hurler disease (MPS I), similar cells have been identified as activated valvular interstitial cells (VICs, a myofibroblast like cell type). Here we report that the "clear" cells are CD68 positive, a frequently used marker of macrophage lineage. The "clear" cells remained unstained with the more specific macrophage marker CD14 while persistent staining of other cells demonstrated macrophage infiltration. From these observations, we infer that macrophages are involved in mitral valve pathology in MPS VI. PMID:23949968

  16. Short-term hemodynamic performance of the mitral Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve. Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Morehead, A. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Smedira, N. G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Marchand, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although long-term durability data exist, little data are available concerning the hemodynamic performance of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve in the mitral position. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients who were implanted with mitral PERIMOUNT valves at seven international centers between January 1996 and February 1997 consented to participate in a short-term echocardiography follow-up. Echocardiographs were collected at a mean of 600+/-133 days after implantation (range, 110 to 889 days); all underwent blinded core lab analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, peak gradients were 9.09+/-3.43 mm Hg (mean, 4.36+/-1.79 mm Hg) and varied inversely with valve size (p < 0.05). The effective orifice areas were 2.5+/-0.6 cm2 and tended to increase with valve size (p = 0.08). Trace mitral regurgitation (MR) was common (n = 48), 9 patients had mild MR, 1 had moderate MR, none had severe MR. All MR was central (n = 55) or indeterminate (n = 3). No paravalvular leaks were observed. Mitral regurgitation flow areas were 3.4+/-2.8 cm2 and were without significant volumes. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study, these mitral valves are associated with trace, although physiologically insignificant, central MR. Despite known echocardiographic limitations, the PERIMOUNT mitral valves exhibit similar hemodynamics to other prosthetic valves.

  17. [Experience of Mitral Valve Replacement Using a Pulmonary Autograft (Ross II Operation) in an Infant;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Tomohisa; Egawa, Yoshiyasu; Yoshida, Homare; Shimoe, Yasushi; Onishi, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Yuhichi; Terada, Kazuya; Ohta, Akira

    2015-07-01

    A 24-day-old boy suddenly developed progressive heart failure and was transported to our hospital. Echocardiography showed massive mitral regurgitation due to chordal rupture. Mitral valve repair was performed at 28 days of life, but postoperative valvular function was not satisfactory. A mechanical valve was implanted in the supra-annular position at 37 days of life. Two months after valve replacement, the mechanical valve was suddenly stuck. Emergent redo valve replacement was performed, but the prosthetic valve became stuck again 2 months after the 3rd operation, despite sufficient anti-coagulation therapy. At the 4th operation (6 months after birth), we implanted a pulmonary autograft in the mitral position instead of another mechanical valve in an emergent operation. The right ventricular outflow tract was reconstructed with a valved conduit. A postoperative catheter examination, which was performed 1 year after the Ross II operation, showed mild mitral stenosis with no regurgitation. Previous reports of Ross II operations in infants are rare and long-term results are unknown. However, we advocate that this procedure should be a rescue operation for mitral valve dysfunction in the early period of infants. PMID:26197828

  18. Robotic resection of dual accessory mitral valve tissue in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shojiro; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Tomita, Shigeyuki; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Kiuchi, Ryuta; Nishida, Yuji; Muramatsu, Kenichi; Watanabe, Go

    2014-09-01

    The presence of isolated accessory mitral valve tissue (AMVT) is extremely rare in adults. We successfully performed robot-assisted resection of dual AMVT that was attached to the papillary muscle and anterior mitral leaflet. Echocardiography was invaluable for identifying the most suitable approach. The short-axis view on echocardiography revealed the precise location where the AMVT was attached. The robotic operation enabled fine visualization; we clearly observed the AMVT and removed its entire extra structure. The patient recovered well and was discharged 3 days after the operation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful robotic AMVT resection. PMID:25193197

  19. Transcatheter valve-in-ring implantation after a failed surgical mitral repair using a transseptal approach and a veno-arterial loop for valve placement.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Nina C; Kische, Stephan; Ince, Hüseyin; Bozda?-Turan, Ilkay

    2014-12-01

    A failure of a mitral valve repair, which includes the implantation of a mitral annuloplasty ring in the majority of cases, is associated with relevant mortality. Surgery is considered as the standard treatment for these patients. For patients who have an unacceptable high peri-surgical risk a transcatheter valve-in-ring (TVIR) procedure might be an option. Isolated case reports and small case series report on the feasibility of a TVIR implantation in mitral position. We present a case where a 29-mm Edwards Sapien valve was placed in a 32-mm Carpentier Edwards ring. To our knowledge no valve has been implanted so far in this ring size and this is the first case where a veno-arterial loop was used as guide rail for valve implantation and helped considerably to position the valve properly. PMID:24307006

  20. Transcatheter ACURATE-TA Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient With a Previous Mechanical Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Bagur, Rodrigo; Kiaii, Bob; Teefy, Patrick J; Diamantouros, Pantelis; Harle, Christopher; Goela, Aashish; Chan, Ian; Chu, Michael W A

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in the presence of a mechanical mitral valve (MMV) prosthesis is still challenging because of the rigid mitral frame within the aortomitral curtain. Moreover, low-lying coronary ostia represent a hazardous problem of coronary obstruction, especially in narrow or porcelain aortic roots. The present case demonstrates the successful management of 2 challenging anatomical issues, the rigid cage of the MMV and the low-lying left main coronary ostium (LMCO), with the implantation of the ACURATE-TA bioprosthesis (Symetis SA, Ecublens, Switzerland). It also highlights the importance of having multiple TAVI devices in order to choose the ideal transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis to fit the unique anatomical presentation of the patient. PMID:26522576

  1. New recessive truncating mutation in LTBP3 in a family with oligodontia, short stature, and mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sarah L; Temme, Renee T; Olson, Rebecca A; Mikhailov, Anna; Law, Rosalind; Mahmood, Huda; Noor, Abdul; Vincent, John B

    2015-06-01

    Latent TGFB-binding protein 3 (LTBP3) is known to increase bio-availability of TGFB. A homozygous mutation in this gene has previously been associated with oligodontia and short stature in a single family. We report on two sisters with homozygous truncating mutations in LTBP3. In addition to oligodontia and short stature, both sisters have mitral valve prolapse, suggesting a link between truncating LTBP3 mutations and mitral valve disease mediated through the TGFB pathway. PMID:25899461

  2. Image-based mass-spring model of mitral valve closure for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Peter E.; Perrin, Douglas P.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2008-03-01

    Surgical repair of the mitral valve is preferred in most cases over valve replacement, but replacement is often performed instead due to the technical difficulty of repair. A surgical planning system based on patient-specific medical images that allows surgeons to simulate and compare potential repair strategies could greatly improve surgical outcomes. In such a surgical simulator, the mathematical model of mechanics used to close the valve must be able to compute the closed state quickly and to handle the complex boundary conditions imposed by the chords that tether the valve leaflets. We have developed a system for generating a triangulated mesh of the valve surface from volumetric image data of the opened valve. We then compute the closed position of the mesh using a mass-spring model of dynamics. The triangulated mesh is produced by fitting an isosurface to the volumetric image data, and boundary conditions, including the valve annulus and chord endpoints, are identified in the image data using a graphical user interface. In the mass-spring model, triangle sides are treated as linear springs, and sides shared by two triangles are treated as bending springs. Chords are treated as nonlinear springs, and self-collisions are detected and resolved. Equations of motion are solved using implicit numerical integration. Accuracy was assessed by comparison of model results with an image of the same valve taken in the closed state. The model exhibited rapid valve closure and was able to reproduce important features of the closed valve.

  3. Left atrial high-grade undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma protruding through the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Bégué, Celine; Barreda, Eleodoro; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Fouret, Pierre; Toledano, Dan; Isnard, Richard; Leprince, Pascal; Montalescot, Gilles; Barthélémy, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are uncommon. Malignant neoplasms account for 25%, including 75% of cardiac sarcomas. A 53-year-old female complained of exertional dyspnea and orthopnea. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass within the left atrium. Echocardiography confirmed a bilobed left atrial mass protruding through the mitral valve orifice. The tumor was completely resected and was histologically diagnosed as a high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma. A 13-month follow-up was achieved without any recurrence on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25468101

  4. Early and Mid-Term Outcome of Pediatric Congenital Mitral Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Ramin; Tabib, Avisa; Jalili, Farshad; Totonchi, Ziae; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Ghadrdoost, Behshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital lesions of the mitral valve are relatively rare and are associated with a wide spectrum of cardiac malformations. The surgical management of congenital mitral valve malformations has been a great challenge. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and intermediate-term outcome of congenital mitral valve (MV) surgery in children and to identify the predictors for poor postoperative outcomes and death. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, 100 consecutive patients with congenital MV disease undergoing mitral valve surgery were reviewed in 60-month follow-up (mean, 42.4 ± 16.4 months) during 2008 - 2013. Twenty-six patients (26%) were under one-year old. The mean age and weight of the patients were 41.63 ± 38.18 months and 11.92 ± 6.12 kg, respectively. The predominant lesion of the mitral valve was MV stenosis (MS group) seen in 21% and MR (MR group) seen in 79% of the patients. All patients underwent preoperative two-dimensional echocardiography and then every six months after surgery Results: Significant improvement in degree of MR was noted in all patients with MR during postoperative and follow-up period in both patients with or without atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) (P = 0.045 in patients with AVSD and P = 0.008 in patients without AVSD). Decreasing trend of mean gradient (MG) in MS group was statistically significant (P = 0.005). In patients with MR, the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) had improved postoperatively (P < 0.001). Although PAP in patients with MV stenosis was reduced, this reduction was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). In-hospital mortality was 7%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that age (P < 0.001), weight (P < 0.001), and pulmonary stenosis (P = 0.03) are strong predictors for mortality. Based on the echocardiography report at the day of discharge from hospital, surgical results were optimal (up to moderate degree for MR group and up to mild degree for MS group) in 85.7% of patients with MS and in 76.6% of patients with MR. Age (P = 0.002) and weight (P = 0.003) of patients are strong predictors for surgical success in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Surgical repair of the congenital MV disease yields acceptable early and intermediate-term satisfactory valve function and good survival at intermediate-term follow-up. Strong predictors for poor surgical outcome and death were age smaller than 1 year, weight smaller or equal than 6 kg, and associated cardiac anomalies such as pulmonary stenosis. PMID:26446282

  5. Premeasured neochordae loop maker: a new technology in mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Ghavidel, Alireza Alizadeh; Samiei, Niloofar; Javadikasgari, Hoda; Bashirpour, Kamiar

    2013-01-01

    The exact length of neochordae loops plays the major role in the success of mitral valve repair. The Neochordae Loop Maker is a novel device that models the left ventricular structure in an individual patient. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography is used to identify the geometry of each papillary muscle and set up the device for the patient. All required neochordae loops are made in the operating room before initiating the cardiopulmonary bypass. In the calibration phase, seven consecutive patients who were candidates for mitral valve replacement underwent transthoracic echocardiography. The device was set up for each patient, and the length of their normal chordae and their respective neochordae was compared by the Bland-Altman analysis. From seven excised mitral valves, 21 chordae were considered normal (gold standard). The length of these gold standards (1.92 ± 0.67 cm) and their respective neochordae (1.93 ± 0.69 cm) showed agreement by the Bland-Altman analysis. The proposed technology showed satisfactory preliminary results in creating the premeasured neochorda loops inasmuch as it reduced the complexity of minimally invasive surgeries. PMID:24356435

  6. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Mitral Valve Prolapse?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inner lining of your heart chambers and valves. Arrhythmias Arrhythmias are problems with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. The most common types of arrhythmias are harmless. Other arrhythmias can be serious or ...

  7. Automated auscultation : using acoustic features to diagnose mitral valve prolapse

    E-print Network

    Jung, Marcia Yeojin, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    During annual physical examinations, a primary-care physician listens to the heart using a stethoscope to assess the condition of the heart muscle and valves. This process, termed cardiac auscultation, is the primary means ...

  8. Supplement material Calcification by valve interstitial cells is regulated by the stiffness of the

    E-print Network

    Simmons, Craig A.

    1 of 9 Supplement material Calcification by valve interstitial cells is regulated by the stiffness subsequently seeded on constrained collagen matrices at 10,000 cells/cm2 and were incubated for eight to ten with 10 mM - glycerophosphate, 10 g/mL ascorbic acid and 10 nM dexamathesone. Preparation of collagen

  9. Elevated Cyclic Stretch Induces Aortic Valve Calcification in a Bone Morphogenic Protein-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Kartik; Sucosky, Philippe; Jo, Hanjoong; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-01-01

    Calcified aortic valve (AV) cusps have increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1). Elevated stretch loading on the AV is known to increase expression of matrix remodeling enzymes and pro-inflammatory proteins. Little, however, is known about the mechanism by which elevated stretch might induce AV calcification. We investigated the hypothesis that elevated stretch may cause valve calcification via a BMP-dependent mechanism. Porcine AV cusps were cultured in a stretch bioreactor, at 10% (physiological) or 15% (pathological) stretch and 70 beats per minute for 3, 7, and 14 days, in osteogenic media supplemented with or without high phosphate (3.8 mmol/L), TGF-?1 (1 ng/ml), as well as the BMP inhibitor noggin (1, 10, and 100 ng/ml). Fresh cusps served as controls. Alizarin red and von Kossa staining demonstrated that 15% stretch elicited a stronger calcification response compared with 10% stretch in a fully osteogenic medium containing high phosphate and TGF-?1. BMP-2, -4, and Runx2 expression was observed after 3 days on the fibrosa surface of the valve cusp and was stretch magnitude-dependent. Cellular apoptosis was highest at 15% stretch. Tissue calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity were similarly stretch-dependent and were significantly reduced by noggin in a dose dependent manner. These results underline the potential role of BMPs in valve calcification due to altered stretch. PMID:20489151

  10. Percutaenous mitral valve: A non-stented coronary sinus device for the treatment of functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Sack, Stefan; Kahlert, Philipp; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure limits survival in a severity-graded fashion. Even mild mitral regurgitation doubles mortality risk. We report the use of a non-stented coronary sinus device to reduce mitral annulus dimension in order to re-establish mitral valve competence. The device (PTMA, Viacor, Inc., Wilmington, MA, USA) consists of a multi-lumen PTFE (Teflon) PTMA catheter in which Nitinol (nickel-titanium alloy) treatment rods are advanced. For individual use up to three rods of different length and stiffness can be used. Therefore dimension reduction can be performed in an incremental fashion. Fluoroscopy and 3 D echocardiography are performed throughout the procedure to visiualize the positioning and confirm maximum treatment effect. The case describes the use and the effect of PTMA treatment. Safety and efficacy of the PTMA device will be investigated in the upcoming PTOLEMY 2 trial. PMID:19431068

  11. Increased systolic load causes adverse remodeling of fetal aortic and mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Tibayan, Frederick A; Louey, Samantha; Jonker, Sonnet; Espinoza, Herbert; Chattergoon, Natasha; You, Fanglei; Thornburg, Kent L; Giraud, George

    2015-12-15

    While abnormal hemodynamic forces alter fetal myocardial growth, little is known about whether such insults affect fetal cardiac valve development. We hypothesized that chronically elevated systolic load would detrimentally alter fetal valve growth. Chronically instrumented fetal sheep received either a continuous infusion of adult sheep plasma to increase fetal blood pressure, or a lactated Ringer's infusion as a volume control beginning on day 126 ± 4 of gestation. After 8 days, mean arterial pressure was higher in the plasma infusion group (63.0 mmHg vs. 41.8 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mitral annular septal-lateral diameter (11.9 mm vs. 9.1 mm, P < 0.05), anterior leaflet length (7.7 mm vs. 6.4 mm, P < 0.05), and posterior leaflet length (P2; 4.0 mm vs. 3.0 mm, P < 0.05) were greater in the elevated load group. mRNA levels of Notch-1, TGF-?2, Wnt-2b, BMP-1, and versican were suppressed in aortic and mitral valve leaflets; elastin and ?1 type I collagen mRNA levels were suppressed in the aortic valves only. We conclude that sustained elevated arterial pressure load on the fetal heart valve leads to anatomic remodeling and, surprisingly, suppression of signaling and extracellular matrix genes that are important to valve development. These novel findings have important implications on the developmental origins of valve disease and may have long-term consequences on valve function and durability. PMID:26354842

  12. Multi-Scale Biomechanical Remodeling in Aging and Genetic Mutant Murine Mitral Valve Leaflets: Insights into Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Russell A.; Sinha, Ravi; Aziz, Hamza; Rouf, Rosanne; Dietz, Harry C.; Judge, Daniel P.; Butcher, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Mitral valve degeneration is a key component of the pathophysiology of Marfan syndrome. The biomechanical consequences of aging and genetic mutation in mitral valves are poorly understood because of limited tools to study this in mouse models. Our aim was to determine the global biomechanical and local cell-matrix deformation relationships in the aging and Marfan related Fbn1 mutated murine mitral valve. To conduct this investigation, a novel stretching apparatus and gripping method was implemented to directly quantify both global tissue biomechanics and local cellular deformation and matrix fiber realignment in murine mitral valves. Excised mitral valve leaflets from wild-type and Fbn1 mutant mice from 2 weeks to 10 months in age were tested in circumferential orientation under continuous laser optical imaging. Mouse mitral valves stiffen with age, correlating with increases in collagen fraction and matrix fiber alignment. Fbn1 mutation resulted in significantly more compliant valves (modulus 1.34±0.12 vs. 2.51±0.31 MPa, respectively, P<.01) at 4 months, corresponding with an increase in proportion of GAGs and decrease in elastin fraction. Local cellular deformation and fiber alignment change linearly with global tissue stretch, and these slopes become more extreme with aging. In comparison, Fbn1 mutated valves have decoupled cellular deformation and fiber alignment with tissue stretch. Taken together, quantitative understanding of multi-scale murine planar tissue biomechanics is essential for establishing consequences of aging and genetic mutations. Decoupling of local cell-matrix deformation kinematics with global tissue stretch may be an important mechanism of normal and pathological biomechanical remodeling in valves. PMID:22984535

  13. A simplified D-shaped model of the mitral annulus to facilitate CT-based sizing before transcatheter mitral valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Philipp; Dvir, Danny; Cheung, Anson; Ye, Jian; Levine, Robert A.; Precious, Bruce; Berger, Adam; Stub, Dion; Hague, Cameron; Murphy, Darra; Thompson, Christopher; Munt, Brad; Moss, Robert; Boone, Robert; Wood, David; Pache, Gregor; Webb, John; Leipsic, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Background The nonplanar, saddle-shaped structure of the mitral annulus has been well established through decades of anatomic and echocardiographic study. Its relevance for mitral annular assessment for transcatheter mitral valve implantation is uncertain. Objective Our objectives are to define the methodology for CT-based simplified “D-shaped” mitral annular assessment for transcatheter mitral valve implantation and compare these measurements to traditional “saddle-shaped” mitral annular assessment. Methods The annular contour was manually segmented, and fibrous trigones were identified using electrocardiogram-gated diastolic CT data sets of 28 patients with severe functional mitral regurgitation, yielding annular perimeter, projected area, trigone-to-trigone (TT) distance, and septal-lateral distance. In contrast to the traditional saddle-shaped annulus, the D-shaped annulus was defined as being limited anteriorly by the TT distance, excluding the aortomitral continuity. Hypothetical left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) clearance was assessed. Results Projected area, perimeter, and septal-lateral distance were found to be significantly smaller for the D-shaped annulus (11.2 ± 2.7 vs 13.0 ± 3.0 cm2; 124.1 ± 15.1 vs 136.0 ± 15.5 mm; and 32.1 ± 4.0 vs 40.1 ± 4.9 mm, respectively; P < .001). TT distances were identical (32.7 ± 4.1 mm). Hypothetical LVOT clearance was significantly lower for the saddle-shaped annulus than for the D-shaped annulus (10.7 ± 2.2 vs 17.5 ± 3.0 mm; P < .001). Conclusion By truncating the anterior horn of the saddle-shaped annular contour at the TT distance, the resulting more planar and smaller D-shaped annulus projects less onto the LVOT, yielding a significantly larger hypothetical LVOT clearance than the saddle-shaped approach. CT-based mitral annular assessment may aid preprocedural sizing, ensuring appropriate patient and device selection. PMID:25467833

  14. Current state of transcatheter mitral valve repair with the MitraClip

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Emily A.; Lim, D. Scott; Saji, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients affected with mitral valve regurgitation suffer from multiple comorbidities. The MitraClip device provides a safe means of transcatheter valve repair in patients with suitable mitral valve anatomy who are at prohibitive risk for surgery. We describe our early procedural outcomes and present a summary of the current state of MitraClip technology in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of initial high-risk or inoperable patients who underwent MitraClip placement at our institution after completion of the EVEREST II study. We examined the primary outcome of 30-day mortality, and secondary outcomes included extent of reduction of mitral regurgitation (MR), New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class improvement, length of stay, and major complications. Results A total of 115 high-risk patients (mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality 9.4%±6.1%) underwent the MitraClip procedure at our institution between March 2009 and April 2014. Co-morbidities including coronary artery disease (67.8%), pulmonary disease (39.1%) and previous cardiac surgery (44.3%) were common. The device was placed successfully in all patients with a 30-day mortality of 2.6%. All patients demonstrated 3+ or 4+ MR on preoperative imaging, and 80.7% of patients had trace or 1+ MR at hospital discharge. NYHA class improved substantially, with 79% of patients exhibiting class III or IV symptoms pre-procedure and 81% reporting class I or II symptoms at one month follow-up. Conclusions The MitraClip procedure provides a safe alternative to surgical or medical management for high-risk patients with MR and suitable valve anatomy. A comprehensive heart team approach is essential, with surgeons providing critical assessment of patient suitability for surgery versus percutaneous therapy as well as performance of the valve procedure. PMID:26309842

  15. Culture and characterisation of canine mitral valve interstitial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, M-M; Flanagan, T C; Lu, C-C; French, A T; Argyle, D J; Corcoran, B M

    2015-04-01

    Valve interstitial cells (VICs) have an important role in the aetiopathogenesis of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in the dog. Furthermore, there is evidence that valve endothelial cells (VECs) also contribute to disease development. In addition to examining native valve tissue to understand MMVD, another strategy is to separately examine VIC and VEC biology under in vitro culture conditions. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterise canine mitral VICs and VECs from normal dog valves using a combination of morphology, immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Canine mitral VECs and VICs were isolated and cultured in vitro. The two cell populations exhibited different morphologies and growth patterns. VECs, but not VICs, expressed the endothelial markers, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1 or CD31) and acetylated low density lipoprotein (Dil-Ac-LDL). Both VECs and VICs expressed vimentin and embryonic non-smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMemb), an activated mesenchymal cell marker. The myofibroblast marker, alpha smooth muscle actin (?-SMA), was detected at the mRNA level in both VEC and VIC cultures, but only at the protein level in VIC cultures. The morphological heterogeneity and expression of non-endothelial phenotypic markers in VEC cultures suggested that a mixture of cell types was present, which might be due to cell contamination and/or endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT). The use of a specific endothelial culture medium for primary VEC cultures enhanced the endothelial properties of the cells and reduced ?-SMA and SMemb expression. PMID:25747697

  16. Concomitant Repair of Mitral Valve Papillary Muscle Rupture and Tricuspid Valve Avulsion in a Pediatric Patient after a Motor Vehicle Collision

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Ashley; Forbus, Geoff; Hsia, Tain Yen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: We report the case of an 8-year-old patient with severe acute mitral regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation after a motor vehicle collision caused by traumatic injuries of the supporting structures of both valves. An echocardiogram showed avulsion of the posteromedial papillary muscle of the mitral valve and a severely prolapsed anterior tricuspid valve leaflet. In addition, there was a near-complete defect in the left ventricular side of the interventricular septum, with diffuse hematoma of the akinetic septal muscle. After emergency mitral and tricuspid valve repairs, consisting of re-implantation of the posteromedial papillary muscle and anterior tricuspid leaflet chordal support, the patient completely recovered with no residual valvular pathology. PMID:19806802

  17. Increased frequency of mitral valve prolapse in patients with deviated nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hasan Huseyin; Aparci, Mustafa; Arslan, Zekeriya; Ozturk, Cengiz; Isilak, Zafer; Balta, Sevket; Celik, Turgay; Iyisoy, Atila

    2015-07-01

    Any abnormality of collagen may affect the tissues with higher collagen content, e.g., joints, heart valves, and great arteries. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a characteristic of generalized collagen abnormality. Nasal septum (NS) is constituted by osseous and cartilaginous septums that are highly rich in collagen. We evaluated the co-existence of deviation of NS (DNS) in patients with MVP. We retrospectively evaluated the recordings of echocardiographic and nasal examinations of subjects with MVP and DNS. We analyzed the features of MVP and anatomical classification of DNS among subjects. Totally, 74 patients with DNS and 38 subjects with normal nasal passage were enrolled to the study. Presence of MVP was significantly higher in patients with DNS compared to normal subjects (63 vs 26%, p < 0.001). Prolapse of anterior, posterior and both leaflets was higher in patients with DNS. Thickness of anterior mitral leaflet was significantly increased in patients with DNS (3.57 ± 0.68 vs 4.59 ± 1.1 mm, p < 0.001) compared to normal subjects. Type I, II, and III, IV DNS were higher in frequency in patients with MVP while type V and VI were higher in normal subjects. DNS is highly co-existent with MVP and increased thickness of mitral anterior leaflet. Generalized abnormality of collagen which is the main component of mitral valves and nasal septum may be accounted for co-existence of MVP and DNS. Also co-existence of them may exaggerate the symptoms of patients with MVP due to limited airflow through the nasal passage. PMID:25129374

  18. Papillary fibroelastoma of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Prifti, Edvin; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Veshti, Altin; Demiraj, Aurel; Xhaxho, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The papillary fibroelastoma (PFE) is a rare and benign primary cardiac tumor, and the mostly frequently found tumor occurring in cardiac valves. Case presentation We describe a 52 year old female presenting a history of 2 weeks of fever due to wound infection after breast’s surgery. A preoperative echocardiography demonstrated a mass >1 cm2 originating from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve mimicking vegetation. The patient underwent successful surgical removal of the PFE. The histologic evaluation demonstrated a PFE. Discussion With the introduction of echocardiography, the diagnosis of these tumors in living patients has been reported sporadically. PFE have been found most often on valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and both ventricles. The differential diagnosis of PFE includes other cardiac tumors, thrombus, vegetation, and Lambl’s excrescences. Conclusion To summarize, we report a PFE of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination after surgical removal. Finally, careful echocardiographic analyses during evaluation of valvular masses are strongly recommended for differential diagnosis. PMID:26209756

  19. Differentiating the aging of the mitral valve from human and canine myxomatous degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Patrick S.; Han, Richard I.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2012-01-01

    During the course of both canine and human aging, the mitral valve remodels in generally predictable ways. The connection between these aging changes and the morbidity and mortality that accompany pathologic conditions has not been made clear. By exploring work that has investigated the specific valvular changes in both age and disease, with respect to the cells and the extracellular matrix found within the mitral valve, heretofore unexplored connections between age and myxomatous valve disease can be found. This review addresses several studies that have been conducted to explore such age and disease related changes in extracellular matrix, valvular endothelial and interstitial cells, and valve innervation, and also reviews attempts to correlate aging and myxomatous disease. Such connections can highlight avenues for future research and help provide insight as to when an individual diverts from an aging pattern into a diseased pathway. Recognizing these patterns and opportunities could result in earlier intervention and the hope of reduced morbidity and mortality for patients. PMID:22364720

  20. A novel left heart simulator for the multi-modality characterization of native mitral valve geometry and fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2013-02-01

    Numerical models of the mitral valve have been used to elucidate mitral valve function and mechanics. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional fully coupled fluid structure interaction models. However, to date these models lack direct one-to-one experimental validation. As computational solvers vary considerably, experimental benchmark data are critically important to ensure model accuracy. In this study, a novel left heart simulator was designed specifically for the validation of numerical mitral valve models. Several distinct experimental techniques were collectively performed to resolve mitral valve geometry and hemodynamics. In particular, micro-computed tomography was used to obtain accurate and high-resolution (39 ?m voxel) native valvular anatomy, which included the mitral leaflets, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Three-dimensional echocardiography was used to obtain systolic leaflet geometry. Stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry provided all three components of fluid velocity through the mitral valve, resolved every 25 ms in the cardiac cycle. A strong central filling jet (V ~ 0.6 m/s) was observed during peak systole with minimal out-of-plane velocities. In addition, physiologic hemodynamic boundary conditions were defined and all data were synchronously acquired through a central trigger. Finally, the simulator is a precisely controlled environment, in which flow conditions and geometry can be systematically prescribed and resultant valvular function and hemodynamics assessed. Thus, this work represents the first comprehensive database of high fidelity experimental data, critical for extensive validation of mitral valve fluid structure interaction simulations. PMID:22965640

  1. Canine model for long-term evaluation of prosthetic mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Bianco, R W; St Cyr, J A; Schneider, J R; Rasmussen, T M; Clack, R M; Shim, H S; Sandstad, J; Rysavy, J; Foker, J E

    1986-08-01

    The evaluation of mechanical prosthetic heart valves would be aided by a more satisfactory animal model. For acute assessment, a variety of animals have been used, but for chronic studies, only larger animals (pigs, calves, baboons) have been employed, creating an expensive model with laboratory management difficulties. Previously, the use of dogs for chronic evaluation has been unsatisfactory because of the frequent occurrence of early sepsis and valve-related thrombotic deaths. We have modified our existing acute dog protocol to produce a successful chronic model. Our model employs perioperative systemic antibiotics, short cardiopulmonary bypass period (range 35-60 min), a minimum of perioperative intravenous lines, postoperative anticoagulation therapy, and strict postoperative antiseptic technique for blood sampling. To evaluate this model, 11 consecutive mongrel dogs underwent mitral valve replacement with either a standard Dacron sewing skirt or a newly devised carbon-coated Teflon sewing skirt No. 23 mm Bjork-Shiley Convexo Concave (CC) prosthetic valve. Nine animals (82%) survived and were evaluated after a predetermined observation interval of either 3 or 6 months for valve function, pannus formation, and possible carbon particle migration. At sacrifice, all animals had good hemodynamics and valve function, minimal pannus formation and no carbon washout. Consequently, this model provides a relatively inexpensive, reproducible method of chronic in vivo evaluation of prosthetic valve modifications. PMID:3762124

  2. The evolution from surgery to percutaneous mitral valve interventions: the role of the edge-to-edge technique.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Francesco; La Canna, Giovanni; Colombo, Antonio; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2011-11-15

    The edge-to-edge technique is a versatile procedure for mitral valve repair. Its technical simplicity has been the prerequisite for the development of a number of transcatheter technologies to perform percutaneous mitral valve repair. The evolution from a standard open heart surgical to percutaneous procedure involved the application of the technique in minimally invasive robotic surgery and direct access (transatrial) off-pump suture-based repair and finally in the fully percutaneous approach with either suture-based or device (clip)-based approach. The MitraClip (Abbott Vascular, Menlo Park, California) is currently available for clinical use in Europe, and it is mainly applied to treat high-risk patients with functional mitral regurgitation. A critical review of the surgical as well as the early percutaneous repair data is necessary to elucidate the clinical role and the potential for future developments of the edge-to-edge repair in the treatment of mitral regurgitation. PMID:22078423

  3. Primary Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma Originating From the Mitral Valve Causing Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Veshti, Altin; Ikonomi, Majlinda; Demiraj, Aurel

    2015-10-01

    An 11-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of syncope and convulsion. Echocardiogram revealed a mass measuring 2 × 4 cm related to the mitral subvalvular apparatus. The mass, which appeared to be attached to the anterolateral papillary muscle, protruded into the left ventricular outflow tract causing intermittent obstruction. The patient underwent surgical excision of the mass. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of primary synovial sarcoma. At six months following the operation, a small mass measuring 1 × 1 cm was detected in the left ventricle. The patient underwent reoperation consisting of radical resection of the subvalvular apparatus and mitral valve replacement. Histology confirmed that the mass was cardiac synovial sarcoma. One year after surgery, the patient is doing well. PMID:26467881

  4. Staphylococcus lugdunensis Endocarditis Complicated by Embolism in an 18-Year-Old Woman with Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Pecoraro, Rosaria; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Parrinello, Gaspare; Pinto, Antonio; Licata, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS). It is a major cause of prosthetic valve endocarditis; mitral valve prolapse (MVP) has emerged as a prominent predisposing structural cardiac abnormality. We describe a case of Staphylococcus lugdunensis endocarditis in an 18-year-old woman with preexisting mitral valve prolapse complaining of fever, a one-month history of continuous-remittent fever (Tmax 38.6°C). The transthoracic echocardiogram revealed large vegetation on the anterior mitral valve leaflet flopping from the atrial side to the ventricular side. Five sets of blood cultures were positive for coagulase-negative staphylococci. During hospitalization, after two weeks of antibiotic therapy, the patient complained of sudden pain in her right leg associated with numbness. Lower limb arterial Doppler ultrasound showed an arterial thrombosis of right common iliac artery. Transfemoral iliac embolectomy was promptly performed and on septic embolus S. lugdunensis with the same antibiotic sensitivity and the same MIC values was again isolated. Our patient underwent cardiac surgery: triangular resection of the A2 with removal of infected tissue including vegetation. Our case is an example of infective endocarditis by S. lugdunensis on native mitral valve in a young woman of 18 with anamnesis valve prolapse. PMID:23424690

  5. Effects of Bileaflet Mechanical Mitral Valve Rotational Orientation on Left Ventricular Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Westerdale, John C; Adrian, Ronald; Squires, Kyle; Chaliki, Hari; Belohlavek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We studied left ventricular flow patterns for a range of rotational orientations of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV) implanted in the mitral position of an elastic model of a beating left ventricle (LV). The valve was rotated through 3 angular positions (0, 45, and 90 degrees) about the LV long axis. Ultrasound scans of the elastic LV were obtained in four apical 2-dimensional (2D) imaging projections, each with 45 degrees of separation. Particle imaging velocimetry was performed during the diastolic period to quantify the in-plane velocity field obtained by computer tracking of diluted microbubbles in the acquired ultrasound projections. The resulting velocity field, vorticity, and shear stresses were statistically significantly altered by angular positioning of the mechanical valve, although the results did not show any specific trend with the valve angular position and were highly dependent on the orientation of the imaging plane with respect to the valve. We conclude that bileaflet MHV orientation influences hemodynamics of LV filling. However, determination of ‘optimal’ valve orientation cannot be made without measurement techniques that account for the highly 3-dimensional (3D) intraventricular flow. PMID:26312080

  6. When what appears to be mitral stenosis is not: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Inês; Caetano, Francisca; Trigo, Joana; Mota, Paula; Cachulo, Maria do Carmo; Antunes, Manuel; Leitão Marques, António

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 53-year-old man, with a long-standing history of mild mitral stenosis, admitted for worsening fatigue. Transthoracic echocardiography (limited by poor image quality) showed mitral annular calcification, leaflets that were difficult to visualize and an estimated mitral valve area of 1.8 cm(2) by the pressure half-time method. However, elevated mean transmitral and right ventricle/right atrium gradients were identified (39 and 117 mmHg, respectively). This puzzling discrepancy in the echocardiographic findings prompted investigation by transesophageal echocardiography, which revealed an echogenic structure adjacent to the mitral annulus, causing severe obstruction (effective orifice area 0.7 cm(2)). The suspicion of supravalvular mitral ring was confirmed during surgery. Following ring resection and mitral valve replacement there was significant improvement in the patient's clinical condition and normalization of the left atrium/left ventricle gradient. Supravalvular mitral ring is an unusual cause of congenital mitral stenosis, characterized by an abnormal ridge of connective tissue on the atrial side of the mitral valve, which often obstructs mitral valve inflow. Few cases have been reported, most of them in children with concomitant congenital abnormalities. Diagnosis of a supravalvular mitral ring is challenging, since it is very difficult to visualize in most diagnostic tests. It was the combination of clinical and various echocardiographic findings that led us to suspect this very rare condition, enabling appropriate treatment, with excellent long-term results. PMID:25108561

  7. Total percutaneous femoral vessels cannulation for minimally invasive mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Matteo; Henaine, Roland; Grinberg, Daniel; Robin, Jacques; Saroul, Christine; Delannoy, Bertrand; Desebbe, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) has experienced several technological changes in the last two decades. Our aim was to describe one of the most recent improvements, the utilization of a total percutaneous femoral vessels cannulation technique during MIMVS. Methods We performed a retrospective observational analysis of this technique among 300 consecutive MIMVS patients, with particular focus on cannulation aspects of MIMVS, its success rate and potential complications. Results From October 2008 to December 2012, 300 patients (60% males) were operated on. Mean age was 62.9±16.4 years. Indications for operation included mitral valve repair (93%) and mitral valve replacement (7%). Two femoral arterial catheterizations failed and required conversion to sternotomy. The complications on the arterial side were: 5 (1.6%) cases of bleeding during the introduction of Prostar leading to a preoperative surgical hemostasis; 2 (0.6%) retroperitoneal bleeds during cardiopulmonary bypass requiring difficult surgical control but with an uneventful follow-up; 6 (2%) bleeding episodes after removal of the arterial cannula easily controlled by direct surgical revision; 1 (0.3%) arterio-venous fistula requiring a surgical correction on postoperative day 32; 1 (0.3%) patient had a transitory claudication due to a superficial femoral artery thrombosis progressively compensated by the collateral circulation. There were no postoperative bleeding complications. There were no other complications linked to the femoral cannulations or to the groin occurred during the follow-up. The percentage of uneventful arterial cannulations was 80% among the first 50 patients (N=10 out of 50) and 98.8% thereafter (N=3 out of 250). Conclusions Total percutaneous femoral vessels cannulation technique is particularly suitable for MIMVS with a high success rate and few complications after a short learning curve. With the advent of the percutaneous approach, the traditional complications of the groin incision have completely disappeared in modern operations with no groin infection, hematoma or lymphocele. PMID:24349975

  8. Prediction of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing operations for mitral valve degeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. S.; Lauer, M. S.; Asher, C. R.; Cosgrove, D. M.; Blackstone, E.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to develop and validate a model that estimates the risk of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients undergoing operations for mitral valve degeneration and to demonstrate its potential clinical utility. METHODS: A total of 722 patients (67% men; age, 61 +/- 12 years) without a history of myocardial infarction, ischemic electrocardiographic changes, or angina who underwent routine coronary angiography before mitral valve prolapse operations between 1989 and 1996 were analyzed. A bootstrap-validated logistic regression model on the basis of clinical risk factors was developed to identify low-risk (< or =5%) patients. Obstructive coronary atherosclerosis was defined as 50% or more luminal narrowing in one or more major epicardial vessels, as determined by means of coronary angiography. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-nine (19%) patients had obstructive coronary atherosclerosis. Independent predictors of coronary artery disease include age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus,and hyperlipidemia. Two hundred twenty patients were designated as low risk according to the logistic model. Of these patients, only 3 (1.3%) had single-vessel disease, and none had multivessel disease. The model showed good discrimination, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.84. Cost analysis indicated that application of this model could safely eliminate 30% of coronary angiograms, corresponding to cost savings of $430,000 per 1000 patients without missing any case of high-risk coronary artery disease. CONCLUSION: A model with standard clinical predictors can reliably estimate the prevalence of obstructive coronary atherosclerosis in patients undergoing mitral valve prolapse operations. This model can identify low-risk patients in whom routine preoperative angiography may be safely avoided.

  9. Late pericardial tamponade after aortic and mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Huwer, H; Volkmer, I; Dyckmans, J

    1988-02-01

    A report is presented on a patient who developed a pericardial tamponade on the 11th postoperative day after double valve replacement. Instead of classical signs of tamponade, however, the signs of posterior wall infarction were most prominent. The administration of nitrate resulted in deterioration of the circulatory situation, but the ST elevation in supraventricular tachycardia occurring from time to time regressed. As before the operation, coronary angiography showed normal conditions, and valve function was normal. The contrast-medium imaging of the right ventricle suggested a compression from ventral, and the right ventricular and right atrial pressures corresponded to a tamponade situation: in rethoracotomy, a blood coagulum roughly the size of a fist was found ventral to the right ventricle. After clearing the hematoma, there was an immediate improvement of the circulatory situation, and the ECG alterations regressed. Enzyme alterations in terms of myocardial infarction did not occur. We explained the symptoms as follows: The coagulum compressed the outflow tract of the right ventricle and thus caused on the one hand the hemodynamic situation of tamponade and on the other hand an extreme vagotonia with consecutive bradycardia and ST elevation. PMID:3376091

  10. Inhibition of bioprosthetic heart valve calcification with aminodiphosphonate covalently bound to residual aldehyde groups

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, C.L.; Benedict, J.J.; Schoen, F.J.; Linden, J.A.; Levy, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    Calcification is the principal mode of failure of bioprosthetic heart valves (BPHV) fabricated from glutaraldehyde-pretreated porcine aortic valves or bovine pericardium. Covalent binding of aminopropanehydroxy-diphosphonate (APDP) to residual glutaraldehyde in pericardial BPHV tissue was studied as an approach for the inhibition of calcification. BPHV tissue was preincubated in 0.14 M APDP at pH 7.4, 9.0, and 11.0 for various durations (1 hour to 8 days). The need for NaBH4 stabilization of the tissue-bound APDP was also examined in vitro. The bound APDP was determined using 14C-labeled APDP. APDP uptake was dependent on incubation duration and pH. Calcification of APDP-pretreated BPHV was studied using 21-day rat subdermal implants. Calcification inhibition was directly related to the amount of tissue APDP incorporation. Inhibition of calcification to less than 15% of control was achieved with a concentration of bound APDP of greater than or equal to 30 nM/mg dry tissue with more than 1 hour of incubation at pH 11.0 (bound APDP, 33.55 nM/mg; BPHV calcium content = 3.1 +/- 0.9 micrograms/mg). No adverse effects such as rat growth inhibition or disruption of bone architecture were observed after any treatment. Additionally, in vitro, NaBH4 stabilized tissue-bound APDP. In conclusion, APDP covalently bound to residual aldehyde functions markedly inhibited calcification of BPHV tissue. This inhibition was dependent on the amount of APDP incorporated. NaBH4 stabilized APDP-glutaraldehyde covalent bonds.

  11. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  12. Ventricular fibrillation during general anaesthesia in a seven-year-old patient with mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Casthely, P A; Dluzneski, J; Resurreccion, M A; Kleopoulos, N; Redko, V

    1986-11-01

    A case report is presented of a seven-year-old boy who developed ventricular fibrillation during general anaesthesia with atracurium, O2, N2O and halothane, following tracheal intubation for hypospadias revision. He spontaneously defibrillated and the surgery was cancelled. Echocardiography done two days later was normal. The patient returned two weeks later for the same procedure. He developed nodal tachycardia, and premature ventricular contractions, which responded to lidocaine. A second echocardiographic examination done postoperatively while the child was crying showed mitral valve prolapse. PMID:3779501

  13. A note on the critical flow to initiate closure of pivoting disc mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Reif, T H; Huffstutler, M C

    1985-01-01

    Newton's second law of motion for rotating bodies and potential flow theory is used to mathematically model the closing process of a pivoting disc prosthetic heart valve in mitral position. The model predicts closure to be dependent upon disc curvature, eccentricity, mass, diameter, density, opening angle and fluid properties. Experiments using two commercially available prostheses are shown to give good correlation with the theory for large opening angles. Divergence between theory and experiment occur at small opening angles because of the limitation of the potential flow assumption. PMID:3988784

  14. [Left ventricular rupture of mitral valve prosthesis implantation treated using an intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation].

    PubMed

    García-Villarreal, Ovidio Alberto; Ramírez-González, Bertín; Saldaña-Becerra, Martín A

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular rupture is an infrequent but potentially fatal complication of mitral valve replacement. In spite of the fact that several methods of repair have previously been described, the mortality rate remains nearly 85%. The use of the intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation may increase the possibilities of success in the repair of this dreaded complication. We present here three cases of left ventricular rupture associated to mitral valve prosthesis implantation successfully treated with the aid of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation. PMID:26581539

  15. How has robotic repair changed the landscape of mitral valve surgery?

    PubMed

    Taggarse, Amit K; Suri, Rakesh M; Daly, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    The introduction of robotic technology has revolutionized the performance of certain cardiac surgical procedures such as mitral valve (MV) repair. The foundation of modern MV repair was laid by Dr. Dwight C. McGoon in 1958. The operation was first performed with robotic assistance by Carpentier in 1998 using rudimentary motion-assisted equipment. Today, four generations later, telemanipulation technology enables surgeons to carry out all known methods of MV repair traditionally performed by conventional sternotomy; utilizing tiny port access incisions to safely and reliably eliminate mitral regurgitation. Extubation in the operating room following robotic MV repair is now routine and its benefits are well-documented, including transfer to the step-down from the intensive care unit several hours after surgery. This, in turn, translates into diminished usage of blood products, decreased need for pain medication, earlier dismissal from hospital, more rapid return to work and improved patient satisfaction. In addition, smaller, more cosmetically appealing scars and comparable short and mid-term outcomes of robotic and open MV repair have made the robotic approach a preferred option for many patients who meet appropriate safety criteria. As these procedures become more commonplace in large structural heart practices, it is important to reflect upon how the robotic approach has changed the landscape of MV surgery. We discuss the evolution and current status of robotic MV repair founded upon the principles of safe and effective open mitral valvuloplasty techniques. We will explore the potential of the robotic platform to improve both early referral and patient acceptance of interventions to eliminate severe degenerative mitral regurgitation. PMID:26309846

  16. How has robotic repair changed the landscape of mitral valve surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Taggarse, Amit K.; Daly, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of robotic technology has revolutionized the performance of certain cardiac surgical procedures such as mitral valve (MV) repair. The foundation of modern MV repair was laid by Dr. Dwight C. McGoon in 1958. The operation was first performed with robotic assistance by Carpentier in 1998 using rudimentary motion-assisted equipment. Today, four generations later, telemanipulation technology enables surgeons to carry out all known methods of MV repair traditionally performed by conventional sternotomy; utilizing tiny port access incisions to safely and reliably eliminate mitral regurgitation. Extubation in the operating room following robotic MV repair is now routine and its benefits are well-documented, including transfer to the step-down from the intensive care unit several hours after surgery. This, in turn, translates into diminished usage of blood products, decreased need for pain medication, earlier dismissal from hospital, more rapid return to work and improved patient satisfaction. In addition, smaller, more cosmetically appealing scars and comparable short and mid-term outcomes of robotic and open MV repair have made the robotic approach a preferred option for many patients who meet appropriate safety criteria. As these procedures become more commonplace in large structural heart practices, it is important to reflect upon how the robotic approach has changed the landscape of MV surgery. We discuss the evolution and current status of robotic MV repair founded upon the principles of safe and effective open mitral valvuloplasty techniques. We will explore the potential of the robotic platform to improve both early referral and patient acceptance of interventions to eliminate severe degenerative mitral regurgitation. PMID:26309846

  17. A case report of papillary fibroelastoma attached to chorda tendineae of mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaomi; Yagi, Kentaro; Ikeya, Eriko; Fujimura, Takabumi; Taguchi, Junichi; Shibuya, Makoto; Inamura, Shunichi; Kanabuchi, Kazuo

    2006-07-01

    The case was a Japanese man of 62 years old. A bulbar mass attached to mitral valve anterior leaflet was discovered in an echocardiography within detailed examination of ischemic heart disease accidentally. We diagnosed him as ischemic heart disease and doubt of heart tumor. We thought about the danger of future embolism, surgical treatment was decided. We dissected the tumor together with one chorda tendineae of mitral valve, and a performed aorta - coronary bypass surgery. We diagnosed the tumor as papillary fibroelastoma by pathological diagnosis. Papillary fibroelastoma is extremely rare with 7-9% of benign tumor of heart primary. Most of the papillary fibroelastoma is incidentally discovered by echocardiography or autopsy. Or it is discovered for systemic embolism. The tumor is benign, but there is a problem to cause embolism. Therefore, when we discovered papillary fibroelastoma, surgical resection of the tumor is the first-line therapy. A problem on surgical therapy is the range of resection area. Papillary fibroelastoma is benign tumor, but the pathological characteristic is still unidentified. Further epidemiological and pathological studies are necessary to determine the extent of surgical excision in associated with characteristics of papillary fibroelastoma. PMID:21302223

  18. Aspergillus Flavus Endocarditis of the Native Mitral Valve in a Bone Marrow Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Tolga; Ergenoglu, Mehmet Umit; Ekinci, Abdurrahman; Tanrikulu, Nursen; Sahin, Mazlum; Demirsoy, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 36 Final Diagnosis: Aspergillus flavus endocarditis Symptoms: Malaise • fatigue and dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Mitral vale replacemnet Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Infective endocarditis due to Aspergillus species is an uncommon infection with a high mortality rate. It mostly occurs after the implantation of prosthetic heart valves. Parenteral nutrition, immunosuppression, broad-spectrum antibiotic regimens, and illegal intravenous drug use are the risk factors for developing infection. Case Report: We report a case of Aspergillus flavus native mitral valve endocarditis in a patient who had allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the past due to myelodysplastic syndrome. Conclusions: Although it is rare and there is limited experience available with the diagnosis and treatment, early recognition and therapeutic intervention with systemic antifungal therapy and aggressive surgical intervention are critical to prevent further complications that may eventually lead to death. In addition, better novel diagnostic tools are needed to facilitate more accurate identification of patients with invasive Aspergillus and to permit earlier initiation of antifungal treatment. PMID:25603977

  19. Effect of the Mitral Valve's Anterior Leaflet on Axisymmetry of Transmitral Vortex Ring.

    PubMed

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Pahlevan, Niema M; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-10-01

    The shape and formation of transmitral vortex ring are shown to be associated with diastolic function of the left ventricle (LV). Transmitral vortex ring is a flow feature that is observed to be non-axisymmetric in a healthy heart and its inherent asymmetry in the LV assists in efficient ejection of the blood during systole. This study is a first step towards understanding the effects of the mitral valve's anterior leaflet on transmitral flow. We experimentally study a single-leaflet model of the mitral valve to investigate the effect of the anterior leaflet on the axisymmetry of the generated vortex ring based on the three-dimensional data acquired using defocusing digital particle image velocimetry. Vortex rings form downstream of a D-shaped orifice in presence or absence of the anterior leaflet in various physiological stroke ratios. The results of the statistical analysis indicate that the formed vortex ring downstream of a D-shaped orifice is markedly non-axisymmetric, and presence of the anterior leaflet improves the ring's axisymmetry. This study suggests that the improvement of axisymmetry in presence of the anterior leaflet might be due to coupled dynamic interaction between rolling-up of the shear layer at the edges of the D-shaped orifice and the borders of the anterior leaflet. This interaction can reduce the non-uniformity in vorticity generation, which results in more axisymmetric behavior compared to the D-shaped orifice without the anterior leaflet. PMID:25821111

  20. Left atrial rupture secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease in 11 dogs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Reid K; Tompkins, Emily; Russell, Nicholas J; Zimmerman, Sarah A; Yuhas, Danielle L; Morrison, Thomas J; Lesser, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term outcome in dogs with left atrial rupture secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease. Eleven client-owned dogs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Median age was 11.6 yr (range, 8.3-17.8 yr), and median weight was 5.8 kg (range, 3.8-15.2 kg). Of the 11 dogs, 10 survived the initial 24 hr after diagnosis and 5 of the dogs were still alive at the conclusion of data collection. The median survival of all dogs was 203 days. Dogs with no previous history of congestive heart failure (CHF) at the time of diagnosis had a significantly longer median survival time (345 days) compared with dogs with a previous history of CHF (160 days, P = 0.0038). Outcome of dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease presenting with left atria rupture was more favorable than previously reported, and dogs without previous CHF survived the longest. PMID:25251426

  1. A finite strain nonlinear human mitral valve model with fluid-structure interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Ma, Xingshuang; Qi, Nan; Berry, Colin; Griffith, Boyce E; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    A computational human mitral valve (MV) model under physiological pressure loading is developed using a hybrid finite element immersed boundary method, which incorporates experimentally-based constitutive laws in a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction framework. A transversely isotropic material constitutive model is used to characterize the mechanical behaviour of the MV tissue based on recent mechanical tests of healthy human mitral leaflets. Our results show good agreement, in terms of the flow rate and the closing and opening configurations, with measurements from in vivo magnetic resonance images. The stresses in the anterior leaflet are found to be higher than those in the posterior leaflet and are concentrated around the annulus trigons and the belly of the leaflet. The results also show that the chordae play an important role in providing a secondary orifice for the flow when the valve opens. Although there are some discrepancies to be overcome in future work, our simulations show that the developed computational model is promising in mimicking the in vivo MV dynamics and providing important information that are not obtainable by in vivo measurements. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25319496

  2. Iatrogenic aortic insufficiency following mitral valve replacement: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kolakalapudi, Pavani; Chaudhry, Sadaf; Omar, Bassam

    2015-06-01

    We report a 28-year-old white female who suffered significant aortic insufficiency (AI) following mitral valve (MV) replacement for endocarditis. The patient had history of rheumatoid arthritis and presented to our emergency department with a 3-month history of dyspnea, orthopnea, fevers and weight loss, worsening over 2 weeks, for which she took intermittent acetaminophen. On admission, vital signs revealed blood pressure of 99/70 mm Hg, heart rate of 120 beats/minute, and temperature of 98.8 °F; her weight was 100 lbs. Physical exam revealed a thin and pale female. Cardiac auscultation revealed regular tachycardic rhythm with a third heart sound, and a short early systolic murmur at the left lower sternal border without radiation. Lungs revealed right lower lobe rhonchi. Initial pertinent laboratory evaluation revealed hemoglobin 9.6 g/dL and white blood cell count 17,500/?L. Renal function was normal, and hepatic enzymes were mildly elevated. Chest radiogram revealed right lower lobe infiltrate. Blood cultures revealed Enterococcus faecalis. Two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed large multilobed vegetation attached to the anterior MV leaflet with severe mitral regurgitation (MR), otherwise normal left ventricular systolic function. She was started on appropriate antibiotics and underwent MV replacement with 25-mm On-X prosthesis. She was noted post-operatively to have prominent systolic and diastolic murmurs. Repeat echocardiogram revealed normal mitral prosthesis function, with new moderately severe AI. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed AI originating from a tethered non-coronary cusp, due to a suture preventing proper cusp mobility. The patient declined further surgery. She recovered slowly and was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation 4 weeks later. This case highlights the importance of vigilance to this potential serious complication of valve surgery with regard to diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term adverse consequences. PMID:25883714

  3. Iatrogenic Aortic Insufficiency Following Mitral Valve Replacement: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kolakalapudi, Pavani; Chaudhry, Sadaf; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    We report a 28-year-old white female who suffered significant aortic insufficiency (AI) following mitral valve (MV) replacement for endocarditis. The patient had history of rheumatoid arthritis and presented to our emergency department with a 3-month history of dyspnea, orthopnea, fevers and weight loss, worsening over 2 weeks, for which she took intermittent acetaminophen. On admission, vital signs revealed blood pressure of 99/70 mm Hg, heart rate of 120 beats/minute, and temperature of 98.8 °F; her weight was 100 lbs. Physical exam revealed a thin and pale female. Cardiac auscultation revealed regular tachycardic rhythm with a third heart sound, and a short early systolic murmur at the left lower sternal border without radiation. Lungs revealed right lower lobe rhonchi. Initial pertinent laboratory evaluation revealed hemoglobin 9.6 g/dL and white blood cell count 17,500/?L. Renal function was normal, and hepatic enzymes were mildly elevated. Chest radiogram revealed right lower lobe infiltrate. Blood cultures revealed Enterococcus faecalis. Two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed large multilobed vegetation attached to the anterior MV leaflet with severe mitral regurgitation (MR), otherwise normal left ventricular systolic function. She was started on appropriate antibiotics and underwent MV replacement with 25-mm On-X prosthesis. She was noted post-operatively to have prominent systolic and diastolic murmurs. Repeat echocardiogram revealed normal mitral prosthesis function, with new moderately severe AI. Transesophageal echocardiogram revealed AI originating from a tethered non-coronary cusp, due to a suture preventing proper cusp mobility. The patient declined further surgery. She recovered slowly and was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation 4 weeks later. This case highlights the importance of vigilance to this potential serious complication of valve surgery with regard to diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term adverse consequences. PMID:25883714

  4. Mitral valve dynamics in structural and fluid–structure interaction models

    PubMed Central

    Lau, K.D.; Diaz, V.; Scambler, P.; Burriesci, G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling and simulation of heart valves is a challenging biomechanical problem due to anatomical variability, pulsatile physiological pressure loads and 3D anisotropic material behaviour. Current valvular models based on the finite element method can be divided into: those that do model the interaction between the blood and the valve (fluid–structure interaction or ‘wet’ models) and those that do not (structural models or ‘dry’ models). Here an anatomically sized model of the mitral valve has been used to compare the difference between structural and fluid–structure interaction techniques in two separately simulated scenarios: valve closure and a cardiac cycle. Using fluid–structure interaction, the valve has been modelled separately in a straight tubular volume and in a U-shaped ventricular volume, in order to analyse the difference in the coupled fluid and structural dynamics between the two geometries. The results of the structural and fluid–structure interaction models have shown that the stress distribution in the closure simulation is similar in all the models, but the magnitude and closed configuration differ. In the cardiac cycle simulation significant differences in the valvular dynamics were found between the structural and fluid–structure interaction models due to difference in applied pressure loads. Comparison of the fluid domains of the fluid–structure interaction models have shown that the ventricular geometry generates slower fluid velocity with increased vorticity compared to the tubular geometry. In conclusion, structural heart valve models are suitable for simulation of static configurations (opened or closed valves), but in order to simulate full dynamic behaviour fluid–structure interaction models are required. PMID:20702128

  5. Transcatheter Valve-in-Valve and Valve-in-Ring for Treating Aortic and Mitral Surgical Prosthetic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Jean-Michel; Del Trigo, Maria; Puri, Rishi; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2015-11-01

    Bioprosthetic valve use has increased significantly. Considering their limited durability, there will remain an ongoing clinical need for repairing or replacing these prostheses in the future. The current standard of care for treating bioprosthetic valve degeneration involves redo open-heart surgery. However, repeat cardiac surgery may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. With the rapid evolution of transcatheter heart valve therapies, the feasibility and safety of implanting a transcatheter heart valve within a failed tissue valve has been established. We review the historical perspective of transcatheter valve-in-valve therapy, as well as the main procedural challenges and clinical outcomes associated with this new less invasive treatment option. PMID:26516006

  6. Short-Term and Long-Term Survival After Revascularization with or without Mitral Valve Surgery of Patients with Ischemic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Yili; Qiu, Shaodong; Liang, Weixiang; Jiang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is no consensus on whether mitral valve repair or replacement (MVRR) must be performed to treat ischemic mitral regurgitation (MVR) after myocardial infarction. Our objective in this study was to investigate the efficacy of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) combined with or without MVRR for the ischemic MVR. MATERIAL AND METHODS An article search was performed in OvidSP, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase. In these articles, researchers compared the efficacy of CABG with or without MVRR in treating patients with ischemic MVR after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We performed a meta-analysis to compare the differences in the short-term and long-term survival rates of patients treated with CABG only and those treated with both CABG and MVRR. Secondary outcomes were compared with the preoperative and postoperative degree of MVR, left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. RESULTS Out of the 1183 studies, we selected only 5 articles. A total of 3120 patients were enrolled; the CABG and MVRR group included 575 patients, while the CABG only group included 2545 patients. Long-term survival was higher in the CABG only group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15-1.58, P=0.003). Hospital mortality was similar in both the groups (odds ratio [OR], 2.54; 95% CI, 0.65-9.95; P=0.18). No differences were found in the degree of residual MVR, the mean of LVESV, LVEF, or NYHA class. CONCLUSIONS In patients with ischemic MVR, the short-term survival rate was similar in both groups. Moreover, there was no significant improvement in the long-term survival rates of patients treated with both CAG and MVRR. PMID:26635041

  7. Short-Term and Long-Term Survival After Revascularization with or without Mitral Valve Surgery of Patients with Ischemic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Yili; Qiu, Shaodong; Liang, Weixiang; Jiang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on whether mitral valve repair or replacement (MVRR) must be performed to treat ischemic mitral regurgitation (MVR) after myocardial infarction. Our objective in this study was to investigate the efficacy of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) combined with or without MVRR for the ischemic MVR. Material/Methods An article search was performed in OvidSP, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase. In these articles, researchers compared the efficacy of CABG with or without MVRR in treating patients with ischemic MVR after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We performed a meta-analysis to compare the differences in the short-term and long-term survival rates of patients treated with CABG only and those treated with both CABG and MVRR. Secondary outcomes were compared with the preoperative and postoperative degree of MVR, left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. Results Out of the 1183 studies, we selected only 5 articles. A total of 3120 patients were enrolled; the CABG and MVRR group included 575 patients, while the CABG only group included 2545 patients. Long-term survival was higher in the CABG only group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.58, P=0.003). Hospital mortality was similar in both the groups (odds ratio [OR], 2.54; 95% CI, 0.65–9.95; P=0.18). No differences were found in the degree of residual MVR, the mean of LVESV, LVEF, or NYHA class. Conclusions In patients with ischemic MVR, the short-term survival rate was similar in both groups. Moreover, there was no significant improvement in the long-term survival rates of patients treated with both CAG and MVRR. PMID:26635041

  8. Endothelial-Derived Oxidative Stress Drives Myofibroblastic Activation and Calcification of the Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Emily J.; Huntley, Geoffrey D.; Butcher, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Oxidative stress is present in and contributes to calcification of the aortic valve, but the driving factors behind the initiation of valve oxidative stress are not well understood. We tested whether the valve endothelium acts as an initiator and propagator of oxidative stress in aortic valve disease. Methods and Results Calcified human aortic valves showed side-specific elevation of superoxide in the endothelium, co-localized with high VCAM1 expression, linking oxidative stress, inflammation, and valve degeneration. Treatment with inflammatory cytokine TNF? increased superoxide and oxidative stress and decreased eNOS and VE-cadherin acutely over 48 hours in aortic valve endothelial cells (VEC) and chronically over 21 days in ex vivo AV leaflets. Co-treatment of VEC with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) but not apocynin mitigated TNF?-driven VEC oxidative stress. Co-treatment of ex vivo AV leaflets with TNF?+BH4 or TNF?+peg-SOD rescued endothelial function and mitigated inflammatory responses. Both BH4 and peg-SOD rescued valve leaflets from the pro-osteogenic effects of TNF? treatment, but only peg-SOD was able to mitigate the fibrogenic effects, including increased collagen and ?SMA expression. Conclusions Aortic valve endothelial cells are a novel source of oxidative stress in aortic valve disease. TNF?-driven VEC oxidative stress causes loss of endothelial protective function, chronic inflammation, and fibrogenic and osteogenic activation, mitigated differentially by BH4 and peg-SOD. These mechanisms identify new targets for tailored antioxidant therapy focused on mitigation of oxidative stress and restoration of endothelial protection. PMID:25874717

  9. Scanning electron microscopy methodology for study of the pathophysiology of calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.C.; Schoen, F.J.; Levy, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) morphologic analysis combined with energy dispersive characteristic X-ray (EDX) microprobe analysis provides insight into the mechanisms associated with disease-related crystal formation in biological materials. SEM and EDX were employed in analyzing specimens which were embedded in standard fashion in glycolmethacrylate. The specimen surfaces under electron microscope investigation resulted from microtomy used in the preparation of reference light microscope histological sections; thus histology served as a direct reference for the SEM and EDX analyses. The particular application of these methods was in the study of bioprosthetic heart valve calcification, largely responsible for clinical failure of these heart valve substitutes. To simulate the clinically observed mineralization processes, glutaraldehyde-pretreated porcine heart valve leaflets were implanted subcutaneously in rats and subsequently removed at various time intervals from 1 to 56 days. Also, to address the hypothesis that the calcification process generates crystalline materials analogous to those in bone, EDX data obtained from pure hydroxyapatite were compared with the embedded tissue results. Further, EDX results were compared with data obtained by chemical analysis of the bulk specimens to assess the validity of the electron microscope technique.

  10. Velocity of closure of Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave mitral valves: effect of mitral annulus orientation and rate of left ventricular pressure rise.

    PubMed

    Blick, E F; Wieting, D W; Inderbitzen, R; Schreck, S; Stein, P D

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine analytically the hemodynamic factors that affect the closing velocity of the disc of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) prosthetic mitral valves. The motion of the BSCC disk was modelled by Newton's second law written in the form of a second order differential equation which expressed the instantaneous angle of the disc with respect to the valve ring as a function of the instantaneous pressure drop across the mitral valve, delta P(t), and the angle of the pressure gradient vector acting upon the disc during closure. The disc closes in response to the negative pressure drop created by the crossover of left atrial and left ventricular (LV) pressures. The rate of closure depends on the rate of development of the pressure drop across the valve, d delta P/dt, which is largely dependent upon the rate of change of left ventricular pressure during isovolumic contraction, LV dP/dt. The closure rate is also strongly dependent on the initial angle of the pressure drop vector with respect to the disc. The disc was predicted to reach its highest velocity at the moment of impact, based on the Runge-Kutta solution. Modelling suggests that a high LV dP/dt during valve closure or distorted LV geometry, causing the angle between the fully open disc and the pressure drop vector to shift, will cause the valve to have a high velocity at the moment of impact and may produce high impact loads. PMID:8581208

  11. Prolonged recovery and respiratory depression after fentanyl infusion in a sheep undergoing mitral valve reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kronen, P W; Levionnois, O L; Eckstein, F S; Moens, Y P S

    2005-10-01

    A sheep was anaesthetized for implantation of a novel device (MitroFast) to replace the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Anaesthetic management included a balanced anaesthetic protocol and consisted of propofol or isoflurane combined with fentanyl infusion (0.15-0.4 microg/kg/min). Deliberate hypothermia during cardiopulmonary bypass was set at 34.5-35.5 degrees C. Surgery proceeded uneventfully. Total time of aortic cross-clamping was 35 min and total time on extracorporeal circulation was 60 min. Visual inspection, intracardiac pressure testing and transesophageal echocardiography indicated proper functioning of the device. The anaesthetic period was uneventful, but recovery was prolonged with central nervous and respiratory depression and marked hypoxaemia. Administration of naloxone (1.5 microg/kg, repeated twice at 15-20 min intervals) reversed the central nervous and attenuated the respiratory depressions. An initially low rate of urine production normalized after rewarming and a single intravenous administration of furosemide. PMID:16197710

  12. [Mitral valve prolapse in residents of different altitudes in the Tien Shan and Pamirs].

    PubMed

    Aldasheva, N M; Moldotashev, I K

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) in 1197 Kirghiz mountain-dwellers aged 16 to 22 living constantly at different altitudes of the Tien Shan and the Pamirs. MVP was detected in 24 persons (10.9%) living at an altitude of 3600-4200 m above sea level using the method of echocardiography. At middle altitudes (2020 m) it was detected in 23 persons (3.1%) and at foothills (760 m) in 4 persons (1.7%). It was shown that MVP in inhabitants at high altitudes was accompanied by more pronounced subjective symptomatology, frequently with various rhythm disorders, hypertrophy of the right ventricle and interventricular septum. It was found appropriate that mountain-dwellers with MVP should be attributed to a risk group with adequate prophylactic medical examination. PMID:2938294

  13. Aortic regurgitation and mitral valve prolapse with Down's syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Goldhaber, S Z; Brown, W D; Robertson, N; Rubin, I L; Sutton, M G

    1988-08-01

    This case-control study was designed to determine whether aortic regurgitation (AR) and mitral valve prolapse (MVP) are specifically associated with Down's syndrome, or occur in a comparably retarded population without Down's syndrome. The 92 control subjects resided at the same institution as the 131 cases, and had mental retardation attributable to low birth weight or perinatal asphyxia. Mean (+/- SD) ages of the cases and the control group were 41 +/- 11 years compared with 40 +/- 13 years, respectively. The relative risk of AR among the cases (those with Down's syndrome) was 2.9 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-13.2; P = 0.16) and that of MVP was 3.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-10.2; P = 0.02). The results showed that these two valvular abnormalities are specifically associated with Down's syndrome in adults. PMID:2975337

  14. Is robotic mitral valve surgery more expensive than its conventional counterpart?

    PubMed

    Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano

    2015-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Is robotic mitral valve surgery more expensive than its conventional counterpart?' Altogether 19 papers were found using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There is a general impression in the surgical community that robotic operations might incur prohibitive additional costs. There is a paucity of data in the literature regarding cost analysis in cardiac robotic surgery. From the five studies, four were single institution experiences and one was a database inquiry study. These four studies showed that operational costs are higher for robotic cases but this was partially (one study) or completely (three studies) offset by lower postoperative costs. Overall hospital costs were similar between the two approaches in three studies and one study showed higher costs in the robotic group. Higher operating theatre (OT) costs were driven mainly by use of robotic instruments (approximately US$1500 per case) and longer OT times. Savings in postoperative care were driven by shorter length of hospital stay (on average 2 days fewer in robotic cases) and lower morbidity. If amortization cost, that is, the value of the initial capital investment on the robotic system divided by all operations performed, is included in this analysis, robotic approach becomes significantly more expensive by approximately US$3400 per case. The fifth study was a large national database inquiry in which robotic approach was found to be more expensive by US$600 per case excluding amortization cost and by US$3700 if amortization is included. We conclude that the total hospital cost of robotic mitral valve surgery is slightly higher than conventional sternotomy surgery. If amortization is taken into consideration, robotic cases are considerably more expensive. PMID:25757475

  15. Wide range force feedback for catheter insertion mechanism for use in minimally invasive mitral valve repair surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Roozbeh; Sokhanvar, Saeed; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Dargahi, Javad

    2009-02-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is a condition in which heart's mitral valve does not close tightly, which allows blood to leak back into the left atrium. Restoring the dimension of the mitral-valve annulus by percutaneous intervention surgery is a common choice to treat MR. Currently, this kind of open heart annuloplasty surgery is being performed through sternotomy with cardiomyopathy bypass. In order to reduce trauma to the patient and also to eliminate bypass surgery, robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure, which requires small keyhole incisions, has a great potential. To perform this surgery through MIS procedure, an accurate computer controlled catheter with wide-range force feedback capabilities is required. There are three types of tissues at the site of operation: mitral leaflet, mitral annulus and left atrium. The maximum allowable applied force to these three types of tissue is totally different. For instance, leaflet tissue is the most sensitive one with the lowest allowable force capacity. For this application, therefore, a wide-range force sensing is highly required. Most of the sensors that have been developed for use in MIS applications have a limited range of sensing. Therefore, they need to be calibrated for different types of tissue. The present work, reports on the design, modeling and simulation of a novel wide-range optical force sensor for measurement of contact pressure between catheter tip and heart tissue. The proposed sensor offers a wide input range with a high resolution and sensitivity over this range. Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology, this sensor can be microfabricated and integrated with commercially available catheters.

  16. [Knack and pitfall in valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Takano, T; Amano, J

    2010-07-01

    We choose prosthetic or bioprosthetic valves according to AHA/ACC guidelines in valve replacement. It is important to remove only the calcification and avoid over-resection to preserve the valve annulus during aortic valve replacement. We leave posterior leaflet as well as basal chordae in mitral valve replacement in case of large mitral annulus. Sutures should be tied-down after those on both adjacent sides are pulled up and the sawing cuff and annulus are firmly attached. Intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography is useful for detecting a stack valve, perivalvular leakage and remnant air in the cardiac chambers. We performed 53 cases of valve replacement in 2009. One patient (1.9%) died because of ventricular arrhythmia during hospital stay. Re-operation was required in 2 cases (3.8%) of infective endocarditis due to prosthetic valve endocarditis. No other major complication was observed. PMID:20715438

  17. Comparison of the accuracy of cardiac computed tomography angiography and transthoracic echocardiography in the diagnosis of mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Maryam; Nazari, Masoud; Khajouei, Amir Sajjadieh; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been mainly applied in the diagnosis of valvular heart morphology and function along with the assessment of coronary artery disease. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of coronary MDCT angiography for the diagnosis of mitral valve prolapse (MVP), as compared to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients who had undergone both TTE and MDCT within a three-month period were included in the study. Two parameters of mitral valve leaflet thickness and leaflet billowing were measured using both techniques. The MDCT results were compared with those of TTE, which was the reference standard. Results: Implementing the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) test on the data for MDCT-measured leaflet billowing received from MDCT angiography suggests that the area under the ROC curve is 96% for a declared variable, which is absolutely significant (P < 0.001), and MDCT-measured leaflet billowing is an appropriate index for the diagnosis of mitral valve prolapse. On the basis of the achieved cut-off point from the ROC analysis (which equals 2.5 mm leaftlet billowing) the MDCT-measured leaflet billowing takes a sensitivity and specificity of 68.4 and 95.2%. The false positive and false negative results are 4.8 and 31.6%. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of the revealed test indicate 92.9 and 76.9%, respectively. Finally, the consistency of the MDCT measured leaflet billowing for diagnosing the mitral valve prolapse is 82.5%. Based on the mentioned test, the consistency of the MDCT-measured leaflet thickness test is 47.5%. Conclusion: Along with the assessment of coronary arteries, the presence or absence of MVP can be reliably evaluated by MDCT angiography. PMID:26623397

  18. Biology of mitral valve prolapse: the harvest is big, but the workers are few.

    PubMed

    Loardi, Claudia; Alamanni, Francesco; Trezzi, Matteo; Kassem, Samer; Cavallotti, Laura; Tremoli, Elena; Pacini, Davide; Parolari, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) represents a common degenerative disease, often requiring surgery. If untreated, MVP with considerable valve incompetence can lead to cardiovascular and systemic complications causing substantial morbidity and mortality. In contrast with the wide knowledge concerning clinical and physiological features, currently available data regarding its molecular bases are very limited. We review current knowledge concerning MVP biological mechanisms, focusing on specific aspects of haemostasis, platelet function, oxidative stress, extracellular matrix remodeling and genomics. In particular, available evidence supports the role played by tissue remodeling processes in determining MVP onset and progression. Moreover, even if a consistent although controversial perturbation of haemostatic system and alterations of the oxidative stress equilibrium have been proposed to influence disease development, it is unknown whether these changes precede or follow MVP occurrence. Consequently, the complete knowledge of all the biochemical pathways involved are far from complete. In addition, changes in the regulation pattern of adrenergic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems have been described in MVP syndrome, a condition characterized by the association of MVP with other peculiar neurological and general symptoms, but it is unknown whether these abnormalities are shared by "traditional" MVP. In conclusion, MVP is probably a multi-factorial process, and many aspects still need to be clarified. As surgery can only correct the damaged valve but not the underlying mechanisms, a more complete knowledge of the involved molecular pathways is necessary, as it may allow the discovery of targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying or slackening MVP natural course in the early phases. PMID:21168228

  19. On the presence of affine fibril and fiber kinematics in the mitral valve anterior leaflet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Zhang, Will; Liao, Jun; Carruthers, Christopher A; Sacks, Jacob I; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-04-21

    In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that the constituent fibers follow an affine deformation kinematic model for planar collagenous tissues. Results from two experimental datasets were utilized, taken at two scales (nanometer and micrometer), using mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) tissues as the representative tissue. We simulated MVAL collagen fiber network as an ensemble of undulated fibers under a generalized two-dimensional deformation state, by representing the collagen fibrils based on a planar sinusoidally shaped geometric model. The proposed approach accounted for collagen fibril amplitude, crimp period, and rotation with applied macroscopic tissue-level deformation. When compared to the small angle x-ray scattering measurements, the model fit the data well, with an r(2) = 0.976. This important finding suggests that, at the homogenized tissue-level scale of ?1 mm, the collagen fiber network in the MVAL deforms according to an affine kinematics model. Moreover, with respect to understanding its function, affine kinematics suggests that the constituent fibers are largely noninteracting and deform in accordance with the bulk tissue. It also suggests that the collagen fibrils are tightly bounded and deform as a single fiber-level unit. This greatly simplifies the modeling efforts at the tissue and organ levels, because affine kinematics allows a straightforward connection between the macroscopic and local fiber strains. It also suggests that the collagen and elastin fiber networks act independently of each other, with the collagen and elastin forming long fiber networks that allow for free rotations. Such freedom of rotation can greatly facilitate the observed high degree of mechanical anisotropy in the MVAL and other heart valves, which is essential to heart valve function. These apparently novel findings support modeling efforts directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of tissue biomechanics in healthy and diseased conditions. PMID:25902446

  20. Integration of a biomechanical simulation for mitral valve reconstruction into a knowledge-based surgery assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Nicolai; Engelhardt, Sandy; Zimmermann, Norbert; Speidel, Stefanie; De Simone, Raffaele; Wolf, Ivo; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    A mitral valve reconstruction (MVR) is a complex operation in which the functionality of incompetent mitral valves is re-established by applying surgical techniques. This work deals with predictive biomechanical simulations of operation scenarios for an MVR, and the simulation's integration into a knowledge-based surgery assistance system. We present a framework for the definition of the corresponding surgical workflow, which combines semantically enriched surgical expert knowledge with a biomechanical simulation. Using an ontology, 'surgical rules' which describe decision and assessment criteria for surgical decision-making are represented in a knowledge base. Through reasoning these 'rules' can then be applied on patient-specific data in order to be converted into boundary conditions for the biomechanical soft tissue simulation, which is based on the Finite Elements Method (FEM). The simulation, which is implemented in the open-source C++ FEM software HiFlow3, is controlled via the Medical Simulation Markup Language (MSML), and makes use of High Performance Computing (HPC) methods to cope with real-time requirements in surgery. The simulation results are presented to surgeons to assess the quality of the virtual reconstruction and the consequential remedial effects on the mitral valve and its functionality. The whole setup has the potential to support the intraoperative decision-making process during MVR where the surgeon usually has to make fundamental decision under time pressure.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair Using the MitraClip® System in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Jan; van Hall, Silke; Rammos, Christos; Wagstaff, Rabea; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes mellitus show a negative outcome in percutaneous coronary intervention, aortic valve replacement and cardiac surgery. The impact of diabetes on patients undergoing treatment of severe mitral regurgitation (MR) using the MitraClip system is not known. We therefore sought to assess whether percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip system is safe and effective in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results We included 58 patients with severe and moderate-to-severe MR in an open-label observational single-center study. Ninteen patients were under oral medication or insulin therapy for type II diabetes mellitus. MitraClip devices were successfully implanted in all patients with diabetes and in 97.4% (n?=?38) of patients without diabetes (p?=?0.672). Periprocedural major cardiac adverse and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) occurred in 5.1% (n?=?2) of patients without diabetes whereas patients with diabetes did not show any MACCE (p?=?0.448). 30-day mortality was 1.7% (n?=?1) with no case of death in the diabetes group. Short-term follow up of three months showed a significant improvement of NYHA class and quality of life evaluated by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire in both groups, with no changes in the 6-minute walk test. Conclusions Mitral valve repair with the MitraClip system is safe and effective in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Trial Registration MitraClip Registry NCT02033811 PMID:25375257

  2. Left ventricular outflow track obstruction and mitral valve regurgitation in a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Fan, WuQiang; Chachula, Laura; Costacurta, Gary; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Elmi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) can be complicated by left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction and severe acute mitral regurgitation (MR), leading to hemodynamic instability in an otherwise benign disorder. Despite the severity of these complications, there is a paucity of literature on the matter. Because up to 20–25% of TCM patients develop LVOT obstruction and/or MR, it is important to recognize the clinical manifestations of these complications and to adhere to specific management in order to reduce patient morbidity and mortality. We report the clinical history, imaging, treatment strategy, and clinical outcome of a patient with TCM that was complicated with severe MR and LVOT obstruction. We then discuss the pathophysiology, characteristic imaging, key clinical features, and current treatment strategy for this unique patient population. Case report A postmenopausal woman with no clear risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) presented to the emergency department with chest pain after an episode of mental/physical stress. Physical examination revealed MR, mild hypotension, and pulmonary vascular congestion. Her troponins were mildly elevated. Cardiac catheterization excluded obstructive CAD, but revealed severe apical hypokinesia and ballooning. Notably, multiple diagnostic tests revealed the presence of severe acute MR and LVOT obstruction. The patient was diagnosed with TCM complicated by underlying MR and LVOT obstruction, and mild hemodynamic instability. The mechanism of her LVOT and MR was attributed to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM), which the transesophageal echocardiogram clearly showed during workup. She was treated with beta-blocker, aspirin, and ACE-I with good outcome. Nitroglycerin and inotropes were discontinued and further avoided. Conclusions Our case illustrated LVOT obstruction and MR associated with underlying SAM in a patient with TCM. LVOT obstruction and MR are severe complications of TCM and may result in heart failure and/or pulmonary edema. Timely and accurate identification of these complications is critical to achieve optimal clinical outcomes in patients with TCM. PMID:26653691

  3. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 1: clinical trial design principles: A consensus document from the mitral valve academic research consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Vahanian, Alec S; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Borer, Jeffrey S; Bax, Jeroen J; Schofer, Joachim; Cutlip, Donald E; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Blackstone, Eugene H; Généreux, Philippe; Mack, Michael J; Siegel, Robert J; Grayburn, Paul A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Kappetein, Arie Pieter

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26170467

  4. Clinical Trial Design Principles and Endpoint Definitions for Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement: Part 1: Clinical Trial Design Principles: A Consensus Document From the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Vahanian, Alec S; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Borer, Jeffrey S; Bax, Jeroen J; Schofer, Joachim; Cutlip, Donald E; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Blackstone, Eugene H; Généreux, Philippe; Mack, Michael J; Siegel, Robert J; Grayburn, Paul A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Kappetein, Arie Pieter

    2015-07-21

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodeling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26184622

  5. Horseshoe thrombus in a patient with mechanical prosthetic mitral valve: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Sanjay; Movahed, Assad; Espinoza, Carlos; Marcu, Constantin B

    2015-09-16

    Patients with prosthetic cardiac valves are at high risk for thromboembolic complications and need life long anticoagulation with warfarin, which can be associated with variable dose requirements and fluctuating level of systemic anticoagulation and may predispose to thromboembolic and or hemorrhagic complications. Prosthetic cardiac valve thrombosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography, and if required transesophageal echocardiography are the main diagnostic imaging modalities. Medically stable patients can be managed with thrombolytic therapy and anticoagulation, while some patients may require surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. We present a case report of a patient with prosthetic mitral valve and an unusually large left atrial thrombus with both thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. PMID:26380832

  6. Horseshoe thrombus in a patient with mechanical prosthetic mitral valve: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sanjay; Movahed, Assad; Espinoza, Carlos; Marcu, Constantin B

    2015-01-01

    Patients with prosthetic cardiac valves are at high risk for thromboembolic complications and need life long anticoagulation with warfarin, which can be associated with variable dose requirements and fluctuating level of systemic anticoagulation and may predispose to thromboembolic and or hemorrhagic complications. Prosthetic cardiac valve thrombosis is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography, and if required transesophageal echocardiography are the main diagnostic imaging modalities. Medically stable patients can be managed with thrombolytic therapy and anticoagulation, while some patients may require surgical thrombectomy or valve replacement. We present a case report of a patient with prosthetic mitral valve and an unusually large left atrial thrombus with both thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. PMID:26380832

  7. Relationship between Urinary Level of Phytate and Valvular Calcification in an Elderly Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Palomeque, Carlos; Grau, Andres; Perelló, Joan; Sanchis, Pilar; Isern, Bernat; Prieto, Rafel M.; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Caldés, Onofre J.; Bonnin, Oriol; Garcia-Raja, Ana; Bethencourt, Armando; Grases, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Pathological calcification generally consists of the formation of solid deposits of hydroxyapatite (calcium phosphate) in soft tissues. Supersaturation is the thermodynamic driving force for crystallization, so it is believed that higher blood levels of calcium and phosphate increase the risk of cardiovascular calcification. However several factors can promote or inhibit the natural process of pathological calcification. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationship between physiological levels of urinary phytate and heart valve calcification in a population of elderly out subjects. A population of 188 elderly subjects (mean age: 68 years) was studied. Valve calcification was measured by echocardiography. Phytate determination was performed from a urine sample and data on blood chemistry, end-systolic volume, concomitant diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, medication usage and food were obtained. The study population was classified in three tertiles according to level of urinary phytate: low (<0.610 ?M), intermediate (0.61–1.21 ?M), and high (>1.21 ?M). Subjects with higher levels of urinary phytate had less mitral annulus calcification and were less likely to have diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. In the multivariate analysis, age, serum phosphorous, leukocytes total count and urinary phytate excretion appeared as independent factors predictive of presence of mitral annulus calcification. There was an inverse correlation between urinary phytate content and mitral annulus calcification in our population of elderly out subjects. These results suggest that consumption of phytate-rich foods may help to prevent cardiovascular calcification evolution. PMID:26322979

  8. Correlation between conjunctival and corneal calcification and cardiovascular calcification in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenxue; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Yi; Lin, Xiaomin; Zhao, Sisi; Ma, Lulu

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of conjunctival and corneal calcification (CCC) with cardiovascular calcification in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). A total of 122 patients undergoing MHD in our hospital were included in this study. Conjunctival and corneal calcification was examined by slit lamp and graded. Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), aortic valve calcification (AVC), and mitral valve calcification (MVC) were determined by X-ray or ultrasound. The correlation of CCC with AAC, AVC, and MVC was analyzed. Biochemical, hematological, and cardiovascular data were compared between patients with different severity of CCC or AAC. Mitral valve calcification was significantly associated with AAC in our patients. Conjunctival and corneal calcification positively correlated with AAC. We also found that patients with severe CCC exhibited significantly higher levels of serum calcium, phosphate, product of calcium and phosphate, serum copper, cystatin, intact parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D than patients with mild CCC. In addition to significantly increased levels of serum calcium, product of calcium and phosphate, serum copper, and cystatin, patients with severe AAC also had higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level and greater left ventricular posterior wall thickness and left ventricular end-diastolic interventricular septum thickness than patients with mild AAC. Our results suggest that patients undergoing MHD with severe CCC or AAC have high degree of mineral metabolism disorder, inflammation, and cardiovascular function disorder. The strong correlation between CCC and AAC indicates that CCC score might be used as an indirect indicator to predict cardiovascular risks in patients undergoing MHD. PMID:25377787

  9. Meta-analysis of the impact of mitral regurgitation on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Van Belle, Eric; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Noheria, Amit; Testa, Luca; Bedogni, Francesco; Rück, Andreas; Barbanti, Marco; Toggweiler, Stefan; Thomas, Martyn; Khawaja, Muhammed Zeeshan; Hutter, Andrea; Abramowitz, Yigal; Siegel, Robert J; Cheng, Wen; Webb, John; Leon, Martin B; Makkar, Raj R

    2015-04-01

    Significant mitral regurgitation (MR) constitutes an important co-existing valvular heart disease burden in the setting of aortic valve stenosis. There are conflicting reports on the impact of significant MR on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We evaluated the impact of MR on outcomes after TAVI by performing a meta-analysis of 8 studies involving 8,927 patients reporting TAVI outcomes based on the presence or absence of moderate-severe MR. Risk ratios (RRs) were calculated using the inverse variance random-effects model. None-mild MR was present in 77.8% and moderate-severe MR in 22.2% of the patients. The presence of moderate-severe MR at baseline was associated with increased mortality at 30 days (RR 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14 to 1.59, p = 0.003) and 1 year (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.37, p <0.0001). The increased mortality associated with moderate-severe MR was not influenced by the cause of MR (functional or degenerative MR; RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.30, p = 0.56). The severity of MR improved in 61 ± 6.0% of patients after TAVI. Moderate-severe residual MR, compared with none-mild residual MR after TAVI, was associated with significantly increased 1-year mortality (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.31 to 1.68, p <0.00001). In conclusion, baseline moderate-severe MR and significant residual MR after TAVI are associated with an increase in mortality after TAVI and represent an important group to target with medical or transcatheter therapies in the future. PMID:25779617

  10. Fluid-Structure Interactions of the Mitral Valve and Left Heart: Comprehensive Strategies, Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Del Pin, Facundo; Jiao, Xiangmin; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The remodeling that occurs after a posterolateral myocardial infarction can alter mitral valve function by creating conformational abnormalities in the mitral annulus and in the posteromedial papillary muscle, leading to mitral regurgitation (MR). It is generally assumed that this remodeling is caused by a volume load and is mediated by an increase in diastolic wall stress. Thus, mitral regurgitation can be both the cause and effect of an abnormal cardiac stress environment. Computational modeling of ischemic MR and its surgical correction is attractive because it enables an examination of whether a given intervention addresses the correction of regurgitation (fluid-flow) at the cost of abnormal tissue stress. This is significant because the negative effects of an increased wall stress due to the intervention will only be evident over time. However, a meaningful fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart is not trivial; it requires a careful characterization of the in-vivo cardiac geometry, tissue parameterization though inverse analysis, a robust coupled solver that handles collapsing Lagrangian interfaces, automatic grid-generation algorithms that are capable of accurately discretizing the cardiac geometry, innovations in image analysis, competent and efficient constitutive models and an understanding of the spatial organization of tissue microstructure. In this manuscript, we profile our work toward a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart by reviewing our early work, presenting our current work and laying out our future work in four broad categories: data collection, geometry, fluid-structure interaction and validation. PMID:20454531

  11. Triglycidylamine Crosslinking of Porcine Aortic Valve Cusps or Bovine Pericardium Results in Improved Biocompatibility, Biomechanics, and Calcification Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Jeanne M.; Alferiev, Ivan; Clark-Gruel, Jocelyn N.; Eidelman, Naomi; Sacks, Michael; Palmatory, Elizabeth; Kronsteiner, Allyson; DeFelice, Suzanne; Xu, Jie; Ohri, Rachit; Narula, Navneet; Vyavahare, Narendra; Levy, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated a novel polyepoxide crosslinker that was hypothesized to confer both material stabilization and calcification resistance when used to prepare bioprosthetic heart valves. Triglycidylamine (TGA) was synthesized via reacting epichlorhydrin and NH3. TGA was used to crosslink porcine aortic cusps, bovine pericardium, and type I collagen. Control materials were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (Glut). TGA-pretreated materials had shrink temperatures comparable to Glut fixation. However, TGA crosslinking conferred significantly greater collagenase resistance than Glut pretreatment, and significantly improved biomechanical compliance. Sheep aortic valve interstitial cells grown on TGA-pretreated collagen did not calcify, whereas sheep aortic valve interstitial cells grown on control substrates calcified extensively. Rat subdermal implants (porcine aortic cusps/bovine pericardium) pretreated with TGA demonstrated significantly less calcification than Glut pretreated implants. Investigations of extracellular matrix proteins associated with calcification, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, tenascin-C, and osteopontin, revealed that MMP-9 and tenascin-C demonstrated reduced expression both in vitro and in vivo with TGA crosslinking compared to controls, whereas osteopontin and MMP-2 expression were not affected. TGA pretreatment of heterograft biomaterials results in improved stability compared to Glut, confers biomechanical properties superior to Glut crosslinking, and demonstrates significant calcification resistance. PMID:15631995

  12. Mitral valve prolapse associated with celiac artery stenosis: a new ultrasonographic syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, Luciano

    2004-01-01

    Background Celiac artery stenosis (CAS) may be caused by atherosclerotic degeneration or compression exerted by the arched ligament of the diaphragm. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common valvular disorder. There are no reports on an association between CAS and MVP. Methods 1560 (41%) out of 3780 consecutive patients undergoing echocardiographic assessment of MVP, had Doppler sonography of the celiac tract to detect CAS. Results CAS was found in 57 (3.7%) subjects (23 males and 34 females) none of whom complained of symptoms related to visceral ischemia. MVP was observed in 47 (82.4%) subjects with and 118 (7.9%) without CAS (p < 0.001). The agreement between MVP and CAS was 39% (95% CI 32–49%). PSV (Peak Systolic Velocity) was the only predictor of CAS in MPV patients (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.08–0.69) as selected in a multivariate logistic model. Conclusion CAS and MVP seem to be significantly associated in patients undergoing consecutive ultrasonographic screening. PMID:15588321

  13. Mitral valve prolapse in the ventriculogram: scintigraphic, electrocardiographic, and hemodynamic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Tebbe, U.; Schicha, H.; Neumann, P.; Voth, E.; Emrich, D.; Neuhaus, K.L.; Kreuzer, H.

    1985-06-01

    Patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) frequently have chest pain, which may be difficult to differentiate from angina pectoris in coronary artery disease (CAD). The authors performed resting and exercise ECGs, pulmonary arterial pressure measurements, radionuclide ventriculography (/sup 99m/technetium), and perfusion scintigrams (/sup 201/thallium) in 56 patients with angiographically proven MVP and no CAD. Pathological results were obtained in 31% of exercise ECGs, 33% of pulmonary arterial pressure measurements during exercise, 22% of radionuclide ventriculographies, and in 75% of thallium perfusion scintigrams. A significant correlation in pathological results was found only between exercise ECG and both radionuclide ventriculography and pulmonary arterial pressure measurements. Because of the high prevalence of false-positive perfusion scintigrams in patients with typical or atypical chest pain, the use of exercise /sup 201/Tl imaging as a screening method to separate patients with MVP from those with CAD will not be appropriate. The variability of cardiac abnormalities in our patients with MVP and angiographically normal coronary arteries suggests that the MVP syndrome may represent a variable combination of metabolic, ischemic, or myopathic disorders.

  14. Conditional long-term survival following minimally invasive robotic mitral valve repair: a health services perspective

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, William F.; Gudimella, Preeti; O’Neal, Wesley T.; Davies, Stephen W.; Crane, Patricia B.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Kindell, Linda C.; Landrine, Hope; O’Neal, Jason B.; Alwair, Hazaim; Kypson, Alan P.; Nifong, Wiley L.; Chitwood, W. Randolph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conditional survival is defined as the probability of surviving an additional number of years beyond that already survived. The aim of this study was to compute conditional survival in patients who received a robotically assisted, minimally invasive mitral valve repair procedure (RMVP). Methods Patients who received RMVP with annuloplasty band from May 2000 through April 2011 were included. A 5- and 10-year conditional survival model was computed using a multivariable product-limit method. Results Non-smoking men (?65 years) who presented in sinus rhythm had a 96% probability of surviving at least 10 years if they survived their first year following surgery. In contrast, recent female smokers (>65 years) with preoperative atrial fibrillation only had an 11% probability of surviving beyond 10 years if alive after one year post-surgery. Conclusions In the context of an increasingly managed healthcare environment, conditional survival provides useful information for patients needing to make important treatment decisions, physicians seeking to select patients most likely to benefit long-term following RMVP, and hospital administrators needing to comparatively assess the life-course economic value of high-tech surgical procedures. PMID:26539348

  15. Predictive model for the detection of pulmonary hypertension in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    MIKAWA, Shoma; MIYAGAWA, Yuichi; TODA, Noriko; TOMINAGA, Yoshinori; TAKEMURA, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) often occurs due to a left heart disease, such as myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD), in dogs and is diagnosed using Doppler echocardiography and estimated pulmonary arterial pressure. Diagnosis of PH in dogs requires expertise in echocardiography: however, the examination for PH is difficult to perform in a clinical setting. Thus, simple and reliable methods are required for the diagnosis of PH in dogs. The purpose of this study was to develop models using multiple logistic regression analysis to detect PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. The medical records of dogs with MMVD were retrospectively reviewed, and 81 dogs were included in this study and classified into PH and non-PH groups. Bivariate analysis was performed to compare all parameters between the groups, and variables with P values of <0.25 in bivariate analysis were included in multiple logistic regression analysis to develop models for the detection of PH. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the model included a vertebral heart scale short axis of >5.2 v, and a length of sternal contact of >3.3 v was considered suitable for the detection of PH. The predictive accuracy of this model (85.9%) was judged statistically adequate, and therefore, this model may be useful to screen for PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. PMID:25319513

  16. Mass-spring systems for simulating mitral valve repair using 3D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Skornitzke, Stephan; Schummers, Georg; Schreckenberg, Marcus; Ender, Jörg; Eibel, Sarah; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Stiller, Wolfram

    2015-10-01

    Mitral valve (MV) diseases are among the most common types of heart diseases, while heart diseases are the most common cause of death worldwide. MV repair surgery is connected to higher survival rates and fewer complications than the total replacement of the MV, but MV repair requires extensive patient-specific therapy planning. The simulation of MV repair with a patient-specific model could help to optimize surgery results and make MV repair available to more patients. However, current patient-specific simulations are difficult to transfer to clinical application because of time-constraints or prohibitive requirements on the resolution of the image data. As one possible solution to the problem of patient-specific MV modeling, we present a mass-spring MV model based on 3D transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) images already routinely acquired for MV repair therapy planning. Our novel approach to the rest-length estimation of springs allows us to model the global support of the MV leaflets through the chordae tendinae without the need for high-resolution image data. The model is used to simulate MV annuloplasty for five patients undergoing MV repair, and the simulated results are compared to post-surgical TEE images. The comparison shows that our model is able to provide a qualitative estimate of annuloplasty surgery. In addition, the data suggests that the model might also be applied to simulating the implantation of artificial chordae. PMID:26241162

  17. Assessment of transmitral flow after mitral valve edge-to-edge repair using High-speed particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyhani, Morteza; Shahriari, Shahrokh; Labrosse, Michel; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 500,000 people in North America suffer from mitral valve regurgitation (MR). MR is a disorder of the heart in which the mitral valve (MV) leaflets do not close securely during systole. Edge-to-edge repair (EtER) technique can be used to surgically treat MR. This technique produces a double-orifice configuration for the MV. Under these un-physiological conditions, flow downstream of the MV forms a double jet structure that may disturb the intraventricular hemodynamics. Abnormal flow patterns following EtER are mainly characterized by high-shear stress and stagnation zones in the left ventricle (LV), which increase the potential of blood component damage. In this study, a custom-made prosthetic bicuspid MV was used to analyze the LV flow patterns after EtER by means of digital particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although the repair of a MV using EtER technique is an effective approach, this study confirms that EtER leads to changes in the LV flow field, including the generation of a double mitral jet flow and high shear stress regions.

  18. The role of glutaraldehyde-induced cross-links in calcification of bovine pericardium used in cardiac valve bioprostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, G.; Schoen, F. J.; Smith, M. S.; Linden, J.; Dixon, M.; Levy, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Calcification is the principal cause of failure of tissue-derived cardiac valve replacements pretreated with glutaraldehyde (GLUT). The objective of this study was to determine the role of GLUT-induced cross-links in bovine pericardial tissue calcification. Various levels of 3H-GLUT incorporation were obtained by varying incubation pH, and protein modification was determined by amino acid analysis and resistance to collagenase digestion. Calcification of cross-linked tissue was studied using subdermal implants in rats. Low GLUT uptake (less than 150 nm/mg) resulted in minimal calcification (Ca2+, 12.8 micrograms/mg) and stability (4% residual weight following digestion) due to a limited crosslinking (lysine + hydroxylysine = 26.1 residues/1000 amino acids [AA]). In contrast, higher GLUT uptake induced more cross-links (Lys + Hyl = 8.2 residues/1000 AA) and consequent higher stability (95% residual wt); such tissues calcified severely (Ca2+, 93.5 micrograms/mg). Incorporation of GLUT two to three times beyond a critical level did not further enhance calcification. It is concluded that the amount of GLUT incorporated controls the extent of cross-links, which in turn directly determines tissue stability and calcification. Images Figure 4 PMID:3105321

  19. Biologic determinants of dystrophic calcification and osteocalcin deposition in glutaraldehyde-preserved porcine aortic valve leaflets implanted subcutaneously in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, R. J.; Schoen, F. J.; Levy, J. T.; Nelson, A. C.; Howard, S. L.; Oshry, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Bioprosthetic cardiac valve calcification is a frequent complication after long-term valve replacement. In this study the authors sought to examine the biologic determinants of this type of dystrophic calcification using subcutaneous implants of glutaraldehyde-preserved porcine aortic valve leaflets (GPVs) in rats. GPVs and clinical valvular bioprostheses were prepared identically. Retrieved implants were examined for calcification and the deposition of osteocalcin (OC), a vitamin K-dependent, bone-derived protein, that is found in other dystrophic and ectopic calcifications. GPVs implanted in 3-week-old rats calcified progressively (GPV Ca2+, 122.9 +/- 6.0 micrograms/mg) after 21 days, with mineral deposition occurring in a morphologic pattern comparable to that noted in clinical retrievals. Calcified GPVs accumulated osteocalcin (OC, 183.4 +/- 19.4 ng/mg); Nonpreserved porcine aortic leaflet implants did not calcify (Ca2+ + 5.6 +/- 1.0 micrograms/mg). Millipore diffusion chamber (0.45-mu pore size enclosed GPV implants accumulated calcium and adsorbed osteocalcin despite the absence of attached host cells. GPVs implanted for 21 days in 8-month-old rats calcified less (GPV Ca2+, 22.4 +/- 5.0 micrograms/mg) than did GPVs implanted in 3-week-old rats (see above). High-dose warfarin therapy (80 mg/kg) did not alter GPV calcification (GPV Ca2+, 39.6 +/- 2.9 micrograms/mg) in 72-hour subcutaneous implants in 3-week-old male rats, compared with control rats (GPV Ca2+, 40.8 +/- 4.8 micrograms/mg). Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6605687

  20. Noninvasive radioisotopic technique for detection of platelet deposition in mitral valve prostheses and quantitation of visceral microembolism in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Fuster, V.; Rao, S.A.; Forshaw, P.L.; Kaye, M.P.

    1983-05-01

    A noninvasive technique has been developed in the dog model for imaging, with a gamma camera, the platelet deposition on Bjoerk-Shiley mitral valve prostheses early postoperatively. At 25 hours after implantation of the prosthesis and 24 hours after intravenous administration of 400 to 500 microCi of platelets labeled with indium-111, the platelet deposition in the sewing ring and perivalvular cardiac tissue can be clearly delineated in a scintiphotograph. An in vitro technique was also developed for quantitation of visceral microemboli in brain, lungs, kidneys, and other tissues. Biodistribution of the labeled platelets was quantitated, and the tissue/blood radioactivity ratio was determined in 22 dogs in four groups: unoperated normal dogs, sham-operated dogs, prosthesis-implanted dogs, and prosthesis-implanted dogs treated with dipyridamole before and aspirin and dipyridamole immediately after operation. Fifteen to 20% of total platelets were consumed as a consequence of the surgical procedure. On quantitation, we found that platelet deposition on the components of the prostheses was significantly reduced in prosthesis-implanted animals treated with dipyridamole and aspirin when compared with prosthesis-implanted, untreated dogs. All prosthesis-implanted animals considered together had a twofold to fourfold increase in tissue/blood radioactivity ratio in comparison with unoperated and sham-operated animals, an indication that the viscera work as filters and trap platelet microemboli that are presumably produced in the region of the mitral valve prostheses. In the dog model, indium-111-labeled platelets thus provide a sensitive marker for noninvasive imaging of platelet deposition on mechanical mitral valve prostheses, in vitro evaluation of platelet microembolism in viscera, in vitro quantitation of surgical consumption of platelets, and evaluation of platelet-inhibitor drugs.

  1. Calcification resistance, biostability, and low immunogenic potential of porcine heart valves modified by dye-mediated photooxidation.

    PubMed

    Moore, M A; Adams, A K

    2001-07-01

    The calcification potential, biostability, and immunogenic response of materials intended for long-term in vivo use, such as in heart-valve bioprostheses, are essential components of device performance. Here we explore these properties in photooxidized porcine heart valves. To study immunological sensitization, we injected tissue extracts intradermally into guinea pigs. Test and control animals received a challenge patch of the appropriate extract and were scored for dermal reactions. Neither cottonseed oil nor sodium chloride extracts of photooxidized heart-valve tissues caused any dermal inflammatory response. After implantation in the rat subcutaneous model for 90 days, the calcium content of 48-h-treated photooxidized cusp tissue [0.04 +/- 0.00 mg/g wet weight (gww)] was comparable to that of unimplanted control tissues (usually <1 mg/gww) and much lower than that of glutaraldehyde-treated controls (71 +/- 15 mg/gww). The porcine aortic wall calcium content (49 +/- 31 mg/gww) was comparable to that of glutaraldehyde-treated controls (59 +/- 8 mg/gww). Histologically, a time-dependent decrease in inflammation and vascularization with increasing photooxidation time was noted in the rat model along with an increase in the stability and organization of collagen bundles. In summary, porcine valve tissues treated by dye-mediated photooxidation were resistant to calcification, were biostable, and demonstrated a low immunogenic response, indicating potential for use in heart-valve bioprostheses. PMID:11309787

  2. Severity of Mitral Valve Degeneration Is Associated with Chromosome 15 Loci in Whippet Dogs.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua A; Hsue, Weihow; Song, Kun-Ho; Ontiveros, Eric S; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Mitral valve degeneration (MVD) is the most common form of heart disease in dogs, frequently leading to left-sided congestive heart failure and cardiac mortality. Although breed-specific disease characteristics and overrepresentation point towards a genetic origin for MVD, a causative mutation and complete molecular pathogenesis are unknown. Whippet dogs are overrepresented in incidence of MVD, suggesting an inherited component in this breed. Expressivity of this condition is variable with some dogs showing evidence of more severe disease at earlier ages than other dogs. This phenomenon makes a traditional case versus control genetic study prone to phenotyping error. This study sought to avoid these common pitfalls by identifying genetic loci associated with severity of MVD in Whippets through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). 138 Whippet dogs were characterized for MVD by echocardiographic examination and a novel disease severity score was developed and adjusted for age in each subject. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data (170k Illumina CanineHD SnpChip) was obtained for DNA isolated from blood of each study subject. Continuous variable genome wide association was performed after correction for population stratification by efficient mixed model association expedited (EMMAX) in 130 dogs. A genome wide significant association was identified on chromosome 15 (peak locus 57,770,326; Padj = 0.049) and secondary loci of suggestive association were identified on chromosome 2 (peak locus 37,628,875; Padj = 0.079). Positional candidate genes were identified within the primary and secondary loci including follistatin-related protein 5 precursor (FSTL5) and Rho GTPase-activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26). These results support the hypothesis that severity of MVD in whippets has a genetic basis and warrants further study by either candidate gene sequencing or next-generation techniques. PMID:26509595

  3. Severity of Mitral Valve Degeneration Is Associated with Chromosome 15 Loci in Whippet Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Joshua A.; Hsue, Weihow; Song, Kun-Ho; Ontiveros, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Mitral valve degeneration (MVD) is the most common form of heart disease in dogs, frequently leading to left-sided congestive heart failure and cardiac mortality. Although breed-specific disease characteristics and overrepresentation point towards a genetic origin for MVD, a causative mutation and complete molecular pathogenesis are unknown. Whippet dogs are overrepresented in incidence of MVD, suggesting an inherited component in this breed. Expressivity of this condition is variable with some dogs showing evidence of more severe disease at earlier ages than other dogs. This phenomenon makes a traditional case versus control genetic study prone to phenotyping error. This study sought to avoid these common pitfalls by identifying genetic loci associated with severity of MVD in Whippets through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). 138 Whippet dogs were characterized for MVD by echocardiographic examination and a novel disease severity score was developed and adjusted for age in each subject. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data (170k Illumina CanineHD SnpChip) was obtained for DNA isolated from blood of each study subject. Continuous variable genome wide association was performed after correction for population stratification by efficient mixed model association expedited (EMMAX) in 130 dogs. A genome wide significant association was identified on chromosome 15 (peak locus 57,770,326; Padj = 0.049) and secondary loci of suggestive association were identified on chromosome 2 (peak locus 37,628,875; Padj = 0.079). Positional candidate genes were identified within the primary and secondary loci including follistatin-related protein 5 precursor (FSTL5) and Rho GTPase-activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26). These results support the hypothesis that severity of MVD in whippets has a genetic basis and warrants further study by either candidate gene sequencing or next-generation techniques. PMID:26509595

  4. Elucidating the Molecular-Level Events in Valvular Interstitial Cell Calcification to Improve the Design of Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaoxiao

    Calcification is the leading cause of native and bioprosthetic heart valve failure, yet its etiology and progression remain poorly understood. Total valve replacement, which is both invasive and accompanied by numerous shortcomings, is commonly performed to replace stenotic valves, but there are currently no medical agents that are FDA-approved for the prevention of aortic valve disease progression. Tissue engineering offers an attractive alternative to current valve replacement options. Thus, there is a pressing need to: (1) better understand the progression of valve calcification, (2) develop more options for prevention and treatment of valve calcification, and (3) define the properties of appropriate scaffold environments that will support the growth of engineered valve tissue. In this thesis, we describe our plan to bring together these goals in cardiovascular medicine: we aim to identify differences between calcifying and non-calcifying valve cultures and then use this information to discover potential calcification inhibitors and define biomaterial environments that can be used to support either healthy or diseased valvular interstitial cell function.

  5. Mineral metabolism disturbances are associated with the presence and severity of calcific aortic valve disease*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen-kun; Ying, Chen; Zhao, Hong-yan; Fang, Yue-hua; Chen, Ying; Shen, Wei-feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether disturbance of calcium and phosphate metabolism is associated with the presence and severity of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) in patients with normal or mildly impaired renal function. Methods: We measured serum levels of calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (AKP), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), and biomarkers of bone turnover in 260 consecutive patients with normal or mildly impaired renal function and aortic valve sclerosis (AVSc) (n=164) or stenosis (AVS) (n=96) and in 164 age- and gender-matched controls. Logistic regression models were used to determine the association of mineral metabolism parameters with the presence and severity of CAVD. Results: Stepwise increases were observed in serum levels of calcium, phosphate, AKP, and iPTH from the control group to patients with AVS, and with reverse changes for 25-OHD levels (all P<0.001). Similarly, osteocalcin, procollagen I N-terminal peptide, and ?-isomerized type I collagen C-telopeptide breakdown products were significantly increased stepwise from the control group to patients with AVS (all P<0.001). In patients with AVS, serum levels of iPTH were positively, in contrast 25-OHD levels were negatively, related to trans-aortic peak flow velocity and mean pressure gradient. After adjusting for relevant confounding variables, increased serum levels of calcium, phosphate, AKP, and iPTH and reduced serum levels of 25-OHD were independently associated with the presence and severity of CAVD. Conclusions: This study suggests an association between mineral metabolism disturbance and the presence and severity of CAVD in patients with normal or mildly impaired renal function. Abnormal bone turnover may be a potential mechanism. PMID:25990053

  6. Patterns of systolic stress distribution on mitral valve anterior leaflet chordal apparatus. A structural mechanical theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazari, S; Carli, F; Salvi, S; Banfi, C; Aluffi, A; Mourad, Z; Buniva, P; Rescigno, G

    2000-04-01

    Increasing diffusion and complexity of mitral valve repair procedures may prompt an interest in the evaluation of the patterns of stress distribution on the chords, which are, from the structural mechanical point of view, the weakest element of valve apparatus. This theoretical analysis concentrates in particular on the mitral valve anterior leaflet. As is known, the vast majority of the chordae are attached to the anterior leaflet within the coaptation area; during systole they are then necessarily parallel, aligned along the same plane as that of the leaflets' coaptation surface, to which they are attached; moreover the thickness of the chordae increases significantly from the marginal chordae to the more central ones. In normal conditions during systole the progressively wider coaptation surface causes the increasing stress to be supported by an increasing number of progressively thicker chords, which are substantially parallel and aligned on the coaptation surface plane in such a way that they can share the stress between them, according to their thickness; in other words chords form a multifilament functional unit which enrolls elements of increasing thickness in response to the mounting stress. The geometrical modifications of the valve apparatus architecture (annulus dilatation, leaflet retraction, chordal elongation or retraction) often associated with valve insufficiency due to chordal rupture, have the common result of causing, during systole, a radial disarrangement of the direction of most of the secondary chordae which are no longer parallel, aligned on the coaptation surface plane. Due to the negligible elastic module of the valve leaflet, in this new arrangement the various chordae cannot share the stress between themselves as they do in a normal physiological situation; on the contrary the thinner chordae nearer to the free margin are also loaded with the peak systolic stress, thus generating conditions favoring their rupture. It can, therefore, be hypothesized that the anatomopathological picture of valve insufficiency due to chordal rupture may be the final event of a series of geometrical modifications of valve apparatus architecture, the common consequence of which is to load thinner marginal chords with peak systolic stress from which they are normally spared, thus favoring their rupture. PMID:10901521

  7. An inverse modeling approach for stress estimation in mitral valve anterior leaflet valvuloplasty for in-vivo valvular biomaterial assessment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Amini, Rouzbeh; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Sacks, Michael S

    2014-06-27

    Estimation of regional tissue stresses in the functioning heart valve remains an important goal in our understanding of normal valve function and in developing novel engineered tissue strategies for valvular repair and replacement. Methods to accurately estimate regional tissue stresses are thus needed for this purpose, and in particular to develop accurate, statistically informed means to validate computational models of valve function. Moreover, there exists no currently accepted method to evaluate engineered heart valve tissues and replacement heart valve biomaterials undergoing valvular stresses in blood contact. While we have utilized mitral valve anterior leaflet valvuloplasty as an experimental approach to address this limitation, robust computational techniques to estimate implant stresses are required. In the present study, we developed a novel numerical analysis approach for estimation of the in-vivo stresses of the central region of the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) delimited by a sonocrystal transducer array. The in-vivo material properties of the MVAL were simulated using an inverse FE modeling approach based on three pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive models: the neo-Hookean, exponential-type isotropic, and full collagen-fiber mapped transversely isotropic models. A series of numerical replications with varying structural configurations were developed by incorporating measured statistical variations in MVAL local preferred fiber directions and fiber splay. These model replications were then used to investigate how known variations in the valve tissue microstructure influence the estimated ROI stresses and its variation at each time point during a cardiac cycle. Simulations were also able to include estimates of the variation in tissue stresses for an individual specimen dataset over the cardiac cycle. Of the three material models, the transversely anisotropic model produced the most accurate results, with ROI averaged stresses at the fully-loaded state of 432.6±46.5 kPa and 241.4±40.5 kPa in the radial and circumferential directions, respectively. We conclude that the present approach can provide robust instantaneous mean and variation estimates of tissue stresses of the central regions of the MVAL. PMID:24275434

  8. Alpha-smooth muscle actin and serotonin receptors 2A and 2B in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Cremer, S E; Moesgaard, S G; Rasmussen, C E; Zois, N E; Falk, T; Reimann, M J; Cirera, S; Aupperle, H; Oyama, M A; Olsen, L H

    2015-06-01

    Canine Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is an age-related disease. Serotonin (5-HT) is implicated in the pathogenesis as locally-produced or platelet-derived. Involvement of the 5-HT2A receptor (R) and 5-HT2BR in the induction of myxomatous-mediating valvular myofibroblasts (MF) has been suggested. In an age-matched population of dogs with non-clinical and clinical MMVD, the objectives were to investigate (1) gene expression of 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2BR, (2) protein expression and spatial relationship of 5-HT2AR, 5-HT2BR and MF in the mitral valve (MV) and the cardiac anterior papillary muscle (AP) and (3) serum 5-HT concentrations. Gene expression of 5-HT2BR was significantly higher in MV and AP among dogs with clinical MMVD. This was not found for 5-HT2BR protein expression, though association of 5-HT2BR with myxomatous pathology and co-localization of 5-HT2BR and MF in MV and AP support a functional relationship, perhaps perpetuation of clinical MMVD. 5-HT2AR-expression and serum 5-HT showed no differences between groups. PMID:25843893

  9. [State of the cardiovascular system in patients with decompensated mitral valve defect under conditions of high altitude].

    PubMed

    Iusupova, N Ia; Kuda?berdiev, E M; Narbekov, O N

    1976-06-01

    A clinical study was conducted in 236 patients with decompensated mitral valve disease--permanent residents of the areas located at various altitudes in the Pamirs and Tien Shan (760 to 4,200 m above the sea level). The main parameters of haemodynamics were studied by means of the dye dilution method in 158 of them, as well as the indices of cardiodynamics by way of polycardiography. The data obtained in 120 normal individuals living in foothills (760 m) served as control. It was demonstrated that with the same stages of cardiac insufficiency, the most striking changes in the haemo- and cardiodynamics were noted among the residents of the high altitude areas. Among those living at medium altitudes (1,650 to 2,020 m), the cardiac output and the left ventricular function appeared to be reduced most distinctly. These patients also exhibited a clear relationship between the main variables of the cardiovascular functions and the severity of cardiac insufficiency. The revealed clinical and functional peculiarities of the decompensated mitral valve disease in mountaneers are atrributable to the effect of hypoxic hyposy upon the regulation of the respiration and the pulmonary circulation. PMID:139491

  10. Assessment of Mitral Valve Adaptation with Gated Cardiac Computed Tomography: Validation with Three-Dimensional Echocardiography and Mechanistic Insight to Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Jonathan; Thai, Wai-Ee; Wai, Bryan; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Truong, Quynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitral valve (MV) enlargement is a compensatory mechanism capable of preventing functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) in dilated ventricles. Total leaflet area and its relation with closure area measured by 3D-echocardiography have been related to FMR. Whether these parameters can be assessed with other imaging modalities is not known. Our objectives are to compare cardiac CT-based measurements of MV leaflets with 3D-echocardiography and determine the relationship of these metrics to the presence of FMR. Methods and Results We used two cohorts of patients who had cardiac CT to measure MV total leaflet, closure and annulus areas. In cohort 1 (26 patients), we validated these CT metrics to 3D-echocardiography. In cohort 2 (66 patients), we assessed the relation of MV size with the presence of FMR in three populations: heart failure with FMR, heart failure without FMR, and normal controls. Cardiac CT and 3D-echocardiography produced similar results for total leaflet (R2=0.97), closure (R2=0.89) and annulus areas (R2=0.84). MV size was largest in heart failure without FMR compared with controls and FMR patients (9.1±1.7 vs 7.5±1.0 vs 8.1±0.9 cm2/m2, p<0.01). FMR patients had reduced ratios of total leaflet:closure areas and total leaflet:annulus areas when compared to patients without FMR (p<0.01). Conclusions MV size measured by CT is comparable to 3D-echocardiography. MV enlargement in cardiomyopathy suggests leaflet adaptation. Patients with FMR have inadequate adaptation as reflected by decreased ratios of leaflet area and areas determined by ventricle size (annulus and closure areas). These measurements provide additional insight into the mechanism of FMR. PMID:23873402

  11. Traumatic disruption of the fibrous skeleton of the heart, with injury of the tricuspid and mitral valves, aortic annulus, and ventricular septum

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, John M.; Sade, Robert M.; Usher, Bruce W.; Gaddy, Joe E.

    1980-01-01

    In an automobile accident, a young man sustained blunt trauma to the chest that caused injury to the fibrous skeleton of the heart. The mitral and tricuspid valves and their annuli were lacerated, the aortic annulus was separated from the ventricular septum, and the ventricular septum was disrupted; however, with surgical management, the patient survived. PMID:15216256

  12. Degenerative mitral valve disease: Survival of dogs attending primary-care practice in England.

    PubMed

    Mattin, M J; Boswood, A; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; O'Neill, D G; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate survival of dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD). A retrospective cohort study of dogs with DMVD attending primary-care practices in England was undertaken. Cases of DMVD were identified within the electronic patient records (EPRs) of practices sharing data with VetCompass. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to explore survival and Cox regression models identified factors associated with hazard of death. The EPRs from 111,967 dogs, attending 93 veterinary practices between January 2010 and December 2011 identified 405 cases diagnosed with DMVD giving a prevalence of diagnosed DMVD of 0.36% (95% CI: 0.29-0.45%). A further 3557 dogs were classified as possible cases (heart murmurs consistent with DMVD). Overall, a total of 3962 dogs were classified as heart murmur cases (possible and diagnosed DMVD), giving a prevalence of 3.54% (95% CI: 3.26-3.84%). One hundred and sixteen (28.6%) of the diagnosed DMVD cases were incident, newly diagnosed with DMVD. The mean age at diagnosis was 9.52 years (95% CI: 8.98-10.14 years). Fifty-eight (50.0%) of the incident cases died during the study period. The median survival time (MST) for all-cause mortality was 25.4 months (95% CI: 20.4-34.4 months) after disease detection for DMVD cases. For possible cases, 121 (29.7%) from a random sample of 407 possible DMVD cases were incident cases (newly detected heart murmur consistent with DMVD during the study period). The mean age at which a heart murmur was first recorded in possible cases was 9.73 years (95% CI: 9.02-10.44 years). Forty-nine (40.5%) possible cases died during the study period. The MST for all-cause mortality was 33.8 months (95% CI: 23.7-43.1 months) after a heart murmur was initially detected. In the multivariable survival analysis for possible and diagnosed cases, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and other purebreds had higher hazards of death than crossbreds. Dogs weighing ?20.0kg and older dogs had an increased hazard of death compared with those <20.0kg and younger dogs, respectively. The study highlights poorer survival for all-cause mortality in CKCSs and larger dogs. The reported survival characteristics could aid veterinary surgeons' advice on the prognosis for dogs with DMVD and help the assessment of the impact of the condition at a population level. PMID:26058819

  13. Comparison of the novel Medtentia double helix mitral annuloplasty system with the Carpentier-Edwards Physio annuloplasty ring: morphological and functional long-term outcome in a mitral valve insufficiency sheep model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of mitral regurgitation in cardiac diseases requires annuloplasty systems that can be implanted without excessive patient burden. This study was designed to examine the morphological and functional outcome of a new double helix mitral annuloplasty ring in an ovine model in comparison to the classical Carpentier-Edwards (CE) annuloplasty ring as measured by reduction of mitral regurgitation and tissue integration. The Medtentia annuloplasty ring (MAR) is a helical device that is rotated into the annulus self-restoring the valve geometry, enabling a faster fixation without the need of elaborate repair of the valve geometry. The ventricular part of the helical ring encircles the valve chords. Methods Twenty adult sheep were overpaced until 2+ level mitral valve regurgitation was achieved. Seven animals per group received either the MAR or the CE ring. Implantation was performed on-pump in a beating heart through the left atrial appendix. The animals were sacrificed 3.6?±?0.3 months after surgery following an echocardiography for assessing mitral regurgitation as primary endpoint. The annuloplasty rings with surrounding tissue were harvested for histological analyses as secondary endpoints. The remaining six sheep received the MAR system and were sampled seven, nine or 12 months after surgery. Results Implantation time (p?valve function repair in nearly all animals with a normalization of the ventricle diameters in both groups (group difference: p?=?0.147). The weights of the hearts did not differ significantly. Histology revealed adequately covered atrial annuloplasty rings with functional endothelium and lack of excessive granulation tissue or fibrosis in all specimens. The ventricular projections of the MAR systems encircling the chordae tendineae were not completely covered with neointimal tissue, although in no case were microthrombi detected and no thromboembolic events were recorded. Conclusions The new MAR system is an easy to use annuloplasty system with a functional outcome comparable to that of the well–proven CE ring. Mitral valve regurgitation is effectively stopped both by restricting the pathological expansion of the annulus and by gathering the chords without thrombus formation. PMID:23566678

  14. Impact of Duration of Mitral Regurgitation on Outcomes in Asymptomatic Patients With Myxomatous Mitral Valve Undergoing Exercise Stress Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Peyman; Asfahan, Fadi; Barr, Tyler; Rodriguez, L. Leonardo; Grimm, Richard A.; Agarwal, Shikhar; Thomas, James D.; Gillinov, A. Marc; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Griffin, Brian P.; Desai, Milind Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant mitral regurgitation (MR) typically occurs as holosystolic (HS) or mid?late systolic (MLS), with differences in volumetric impact on the left ventricle (LV). We sought to assess outcomes of degenerative MR patients undergoing exercise echocardiography, separated based on MR duration (MLS versus HS). Methods and Results We included 609 consecutive patients with ?III+myxomatous MR undergoing exercise echocardiography: HS (n=487) and MLS (n=122). MLS MR was defined as delayed appearance of MR signal during mid?late systole on continuous?wave Doppler while HS MR occurred throughout systole. Composite events of death and congestive heart failure were recorded. Compared to MLS MR, HS MR patients were older (60±14 versus 53±14 years), more were males (72% versus 53%), and had greater prevalence of atrial fibrillation (16% versus 7%; all P<0.01). HS MR patients had higher right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) at rest (33±11 versus 27±9 mm Hg), more flail leaflets (36% versus 6%), and a lower number of metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved (9.5±3 versus 10.5±3), compared to the MLS MR group (all P<0.05). There were 54 events during 7.1±3 years of follow?up. On step?wise multivariable analysis, HS versus MLS MR (HR 4.99 [1.21 to 20.14]), higher LV ejection fraction (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94 [0.89 to 0.98]), atrial fibrillation (HR, 2.59 [1.33 to 5.11]), higher RVSP (HR, 1.05 [1.03 to 1.09]), and higher percentage of age? and gender?predicted METs (HR, 0.98 [0.97 to 0.99]) were independently associated with adverse outcomes (all P<0.05). Conclusion In patients with ?III+myxomatous MR undergoing exercise echocardiography, holosystolic MR is associated with adverse outcomes, independent of other predictors. PMID:25672368

  15. Aortic Valve

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arteries . WHAT OPTIONS EXIST FOR THE REPLACEMENT OF ARTIFICIAL VALVES? Unlike the mitral valve which can often ... proceed with surgery, choices regarding the type of artificial valve ( prosthesis ) used should be considered. In broad ...

  16. Impact of Aortic Valve Calcification, as Measured by MDCT, on Survival in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A.; Michelena, Hector I.; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D.; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. METHODS In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. RESULTS During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ? 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. CONCLUSIONS This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of quantitative Doppler echocardiographic and MDCT assessment of AS shows that measuring AVC load provides incremental prognostic value for survival beyond clinical and Doppler echocardiographic assessment. Severe AVC independently predicts excess mortality after AS diagnosis, which is greatly alleviated by AVI. Thus, measurement of AVC by MDCT should be considered for not only diagnostic but also risk-stratification purposes in patients with AS. PMID:25236511

  17. Primary Left Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Mitral Valve Involvement Accompanying Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Cagdas; Durdu, Serkan; Eryilmaz, Sadik; Sirlak, Mustafa; Akar, A. Ruchan

    2015-01-01

    We report here on a 43-year-old female patient presenting with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, severe mitral regurgitation, and mild mitral stenosis secondary to encroachment of the related structures by a primary cardiac angiosarcoma. A coronary angiography revealed significant stenosis in the left main and left circumflex arteries and at exploration, the tumour was arising from posterior left atrial free wall, invading the posterior mitral leaflet, and extending into all of the pulmonary veins and pericardium. Therefore, no further intervention was performed, except for left internal mammarian artery to left anterior descending artery anastomosis and biopsy. As far as we know, this case is unique with respect to its presentation. PMID:26649221

  18. Video-assisted Port-Access mitral valve surgery: from debut to routine surgery. Will Trocar-Port-Access cardiac surgery ultimately lead to robotic cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Vanermen, H; Wellens, F; De Geest, R; Degrieck, I; Van Praet, F

    1999-07-01

    A right thoracotomy is a well-known alternative for midsternotomy to have access to the left atrium. The Port-Access (Heartport, Inc, Redwood City, CA) approach is an invaluable option to avoid cracking of ribs and cartilage. EndoCPB (Heartport, Inc) and Endo-Aortic Clamp (Heartport, Inc) allows installation of the extracorporeal circulation and cardiac arrest from the groin. Videoassistance and shafted instruments help the surgeon to perform the surgery through a 5 x 2-cm port and fulfill the main goals of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, comfort, cosmesis, and fast rehabilitation. From February 1997 to November 1998, 75 patients (40 men/35 women) had either Port-Access mitral valve repair (n = 41) or replacement (n = 33) for a variety of reasons: myxoid degeneration (n = 45), rheumatic disease (n = 21), chronic endocarditis (n = 4), annular dilatation (n = 2), and sclerotic disease (n = 2). One valve was replaced because of an ingrowing myxoma. There was one closure of a paravalvular leak. The mean age was 59.3 years of age (range, 32 to 83 years). Most patients had normal ejection fractions but different grades of mitral valve insufficiency and were in NYHA class II. One 71-year-old patient died after reoperation on postoperative day 1 for failed repair. Two patients had conversion to sternotomy and conventional ECC for repair of a dissected aorta. One patient died, one patient suffered a minor cerebrovascular deficit. Three patients had prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stays for respiratory insufficiency, 5 patients underwent revision for bleeding. Mean ICU stay was 2.5 days; and mean hospital stay, 9 days (range, 4 to 36). A significant difference between the first 30 and last 38 patients in terms of length of stay in the ICU and the hospital was noticed. Two late mitral valve replacements for chronic endocarditis after repair occurred. One patient had medical therapy for endocarditis after mitral valve replacement. The debut of Port-Access mitral valve surgery may be nerve-racking; the routine is a smooth and sure surgery with maximum comfort, a very discrete scar, and a fast rehabilitation. There were no paravalvular leakages nor myocardial infarctions. Cerebrovascular accidents owing to thromboembolic phenomena, vascular lower limb or wound complications were not seen. Port-Access mitral valve surgery is a very important investment in the future of cardiac surgery. Some learning curve pitfalls were associated with the process of starting this revolutionary technique. PMID:10451253

  19. The Relation Between Collagen Fibril Kinematics and Mechanical Properties in the Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet

    SciTech Connect

    Liao,J.; Yang, L.; Grashow, J.; Sacks, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain ({epsilon}{sub D}) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, {epsilon}{sub D} increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using {epsilon}{sub D}, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5{+-}25.5 MPa, which was {approx}27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58{+-}1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and D remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min {epsilon}{sub D} was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen fibril strain was 8.3 min, which was smaller than the tissue-level stress relaxation time constants of 22.0 and 16.9 min in the circumferential and radial directions, respectively. Moreover, there was no change in the fibril angular distribution under both creep and stress relaxation over the test period. Our results suggest that (1) the MVAL collagen fibrils do not exhibit intrinsic viscoelastic behavior, (2) tissue relaxation results from the removal of stress from the fibrils, possibly by a slipping mechanism modulated by noncollagenous components (e.g. proteoglycans), and (3) the lack of creep but the occurrence of stress relaxation suggests a 'load-locking' behavior under maintained loading conditions. These unique mechanical characteristics are likely necessary for normal valvular function.

  20. [Acute Mitral Regurgitation in Infant].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yasutaka

    2015-07-01

    The acute mitral regurgitation of the infants are believed to be very rare until recently. However, there have been increasing number of reports of acute massive mitral regurgitation attributable to rupture of the chordae tendaniae escecially in Japan. If undiagnosed or the optimal treatment including surgery is delayed, it may cause cardiogenic shock and death in infants. Thus pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists and pediatric caridiac surgeons should consider this diagnosis when previously healthy infant suddenly develop cardiorespiratory collapse. It is very important to diagnose early and if there is over moderate mitral regurgitation, the 1st choice will be the mitral valve repair if possible. Pediatric cardiac suregon should be skilled at the mitral valve repair and mitral valve replacement. There are several techniques which are different from the adult operation, so pediatric cardiac surgeon also has to be prepared for these techniques including supraannular mitral valve replacement. PMID:26197907

  1. Calcification of bovine pericardium used in cardiac valve bioprostheses. Implications for the mechanisms of bioprosthetic tissue mineralization.

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, F. J.; Tsao, J. W.; Levy, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Calcification of bioprosthetic heart valves fabricated from glutaraldehyde-pretreated bovine pericardium has not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to characterize pericardium before and after glutaraldehyde pretreatment and to study the pathophysiology of mineralization of glutaraldehyde-preserved pericardium. Pericardial protein was approximately 90% collagen, predominantly Type I. Glutaraldehyde incorporation was complete following 24 hours' incubation (151 X 10(-9) mol/mg). Bovine pericardium pretreated in buffered 0.6% glutaraldehyde, implanted subcutaneously in young rats for 24 hours to 112 days, was analyzed chemically (calcium and phosphorus) and morphologically. Mineralization, detected at 48 hours' implantation, was initially associated with pericardial connective tissue cells and later also collagen. Mean calcium content was 114 micrograms/mg at 21 days and 199 micrograms/mg at 112 days. The morphologic features and the kinetics and degree of mineral accumulation in glutaraldehyde-pretreated bovine pericardium were strikingly similar to those previously determined for porcine aortic valve. These results predict that calcification will critically limit the late durability of clinical pericardial bioprostheses and suggest generalized mechanisms of bioprosthetic tissue mineralization which are probably dependent on modification of implant microstructure by glutaraldehyde pretreatment. Images Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2421577

  2. Usefulness of intraoperative real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography for pre-procedural evaluation of mitral valve cleft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ju; Yu, Ga-Yon; Seok, Jung-Ho; Oh, Chungsik; Kim, Seong-Hyop; Yoon, Tae-Gyoon; Kim, Tae-Yop

    2014-01-01

    A precise pre-procedural evaluation of mitral valve (MV) pathology is essential for planning the surgical strategy for severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and preparing for the intraoperative procedure. In the present case, a 38-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo MV replacement due to severe MR. She had a history of undergoing percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty due to rheumatic mitral stenosis during a previous pregnancy. A preoperative transthoracic echocardiography suggested a tear in the mid tip of the anterior mitral leaflet. However, the "en face" view of the MV in the left atrial perspective using intraoperative real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT 3D-TEE) provided a different diagnosis: a torn cleft in the P2-scallop of the posterior mitral leaflet (PML) with rupture of the chordae. Thus, surgical planning was changed intraoperatively to MV repair (MVRep) consisting of patch closure of the PML, commissurotomy, and lifting annuloplasty. The present case shows that intraoperative RT 3D-TEE provides more precise and reliable spatial information of MV for MVRep and facilitates critical surgical decision-making. PMID:24567819

  3. On the in-vivo deformation of the mitral valve anterior leaflet: Effects of annular geometry and referential configuration

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Eckert, Chad E.; Koomalsingh, Kevin; McGarvey, Jeremy; Minakawa, Mashito; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of the native mitral valve (MV) shape has been hypothesized to have a profound effect on the local tissue stress distribution, and is potentially linked to limitations in repair durability. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the relation between MV annular shape and central mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) strain history, using flat annuloplasty in an ovine model. In addition, we report for the first time the presence of residual in-vivo leaflet strains. In-vivo leaflet deformations were measured using sonocrystal transducers sutured to the MVAL (n=10), with the 3D positions acquired over the full cardiac cycle. In six animals a flat ring was sutured to the annulus and the transducer positions recorded, while in the remaining four the MV was excised from the exsanguinated heart and the stress-free transducer positions obtained. In the central region of the MVAL the peak stretch values, referenced to the minimum left ventricular pressure (LVP), were 1.10 ± 0.01 and 1.31 ± 0.03 (mean ± standard error) in the circumferential and radial directions, respectively. Following flat ring annuloplasty, the central MVAL contracted 28% circumferentially and elongated 16% radially at minimum LVP, and the circumferential direction was under a negative strain state during the entire cardiac cycle. After valve excision from the exsanguinated heart, the MVAL contracted significantly (18% and 30% in the circumferential and radial directions, respectively), indicating the presence of substantial in-vivo residual strains. While the physiological function of the residual strains (and their associated stresses) are at present unknown, accounting for their presence is clearly necessary for accurate computational simulations of MV function. Moreover, we demonstrated that changes in annular geometry dramatically alter valvular functional strains in-vivo. As levels of homeostatic strains are related to tissue remodeling and homeostasis, our results suggest that surgically-introduced alterations in MV shape could lead to the long term MV mechanobiological and microstructural alterations that could ultimately affect MV repair durability. PMID:22327292

  4. On the effects of leaflet microstructure and constitutive model on the closing behavior of the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Recent long-term studies showed an unsatisfactory recurrence rate of severe mitral regurgitation 3-5 years after surgical repair, suggesting that excessive tissue stresses and the resulting strain-induced tissue failure are potential etiological factors controlling the success of surgical repair for treating mitral valve (MV) diseases. We hypothesized that restoring normal MV tissue stresses in MV repair techniques would ultimately lead to improved repair durability through the restoration of MV normal homeostatic state. Therefore, we developed a micro- and macro- anatomically accurate MV finite element model by incorporating actual fiber microstructural architecture and a realistic structure-based constitutive model. We investigated MV closing behaviors, with extensive in vitro data used for validating the proposed model. Comparative and parametric studies were conducted to identify essential model fidelity and information for achieving desirable accuracy. More importantly, for the first time, the interrelationship between the local fiber ensemble behavior and the organ-level MV closing behavior was investigated using a computational simulation. These novel results indicated not only the appropriate parameter ranges, but also the importance of the microstructural tuning (i.e., straightening and re-orientation) of the collagen/elastin fiber networks at the macroscopic tissue level for facilitating the proper coaptation and natural functioning of the MV apparatus under physiological loading at the organ level. The proposed computational model would serve as a logical first step toward our long-term modeling goal-facilitating simulation-guided design of optimal surgical repair strategies for treating diseased MVs with significantly enhanced durability. PMID:25947879

  5. Fast Interactive Simulations of Mitral Valve Repair Neil A. Tenenholtz, Peter E. Hammer, Robert D. Howe

    E-print Network

    simulation error from geometric modeling error due to low ultrasound image quality, we use valve models are treated as linear-elastic cylindrical rods with a 1 mm diameter supporting only uniaxial tension. Finally

  6. The effects of cross-link density and chemistry on the calcification potential of diamine-extended glutaraldehyde-fixed bioprosthetic heart-valve materials.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Deon; Oosthuysen, Anel; Human, Paul; Weissenstein, Christoph; Zilla, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Despite indications that GA (glutaraldehyde)-crosslinked tissues remain prone to long-term degradation and calcification, it is still the reagent of choice in the fixation of bioprosthetic heart valves. We have shown previously that increased GA concentrations and diamine extension of cross-links with lysine incorporation lead to mitigated in vivo calcification, mainly of porcine aortic-wall tissue. The present study was performed to assess the correlation between the cross-link density of all three commonly used tissue types [PW (porcine aortic wall), PL (porcine aortic leaflet) and BP (bovine pericardium)] and tissue calcification in the subcutaneous rat model after GA treatment with or without lysine. The effect of lysine enhancement, and increased GA concentration in the presence of lysine, resulted in significant increases in tissue cross-linking in all three tissue types. Although increased GA concentration on its own resulted in decreased calcification without an increase in cross-link density, overall positive correlations were found between denaturation temperature and RPD (resistance towards protease degradation) [correlation coefficient (rho) values: rhoPW =0.922, rhoPL =0.783 and rhoBP =0.955], whereas negative correlations existed between RPD and calcification (rhoPW=-0.836, rhoPL=-0.929 and rhoBP=-0.579). The combination of lysine enhancement and an increase in GA concentration from 0.2 to 3% resulted in 79, 44 and 56% decreases in calcification in PW, PL and BP. In the case of BP, a decrease in calcification of 81% could be achieved merely by adding lysine extension to low-concentration (0.2 %) GA cross-linking. Thus it is concluded that the increase in cross-link density achieved by lysine incorporation, and by increased GA concentration in the presence of lysine, results in significant and marked decreases in calcification of all three types of tissues commonly used in bioprosthetic heart valves. PMID:19882764

  7. Characterisation of the fatigue life, dynamic creep and modes of damage accumulation within mitral valve chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Gillian M; Murphy, Bruce P

    2015-09-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is often caused by either elongated or ruptured chordae tendineae (CT). In many cases, rupture is spontaneous, meaning there is no underlying cause. We hypothesised that spontaneous rupture may be due to mechanical fatigue. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested porcine marginal CT: in uniaxial tension, and in fatigue at a range of peak stresses (n=12 at 15, 10 and 7.5MPa respectively, n=6 at 5MPa). The rupture surfaces of failed CT were observed histologically, under polarised light microscopy, and SEM. The cycles to failure for 15, 10, 7.5 and 5 MPa peak stresses were: (average±SD): 5077±4366, 49513±56414, 99927±108908, 197099±69103. A Weibull plot was constructed and from this, the number of cycles at 50% probability of failure was established in order to approximate the fatigue life, which was found to be 2.43MPa at 10 million cycles. The rate of creep increases exponentially with increasing peak stress. Under histological examination it was observed that CT which have been fatigued at low stress partially lose their organised collagen structure and can sustain micro-cracks that can be linked to increases in the creep rate. Furthermore our SEM images closely matched descriptions from the literature of spontaneous in vivo rupture. In conclusion, we believe that the mechanical test results we present strongly suggest that spontaneous chordal rupture and chordal elongation in vivo can be caused by mechanical fatigue. PMID:26087111

  8. A Spiral in the Heart: Mitral Valve Endocarditis with Unusual Vegetation Shape Potentially Affecting Effectiveness of Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fibbi, Veronica; Ballo, Piercarlo; Abbondanti, Alessandro; Nannini, Marco; Fazi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report an unusual case of infective endocarditis (IE) in an 88-year-old woman, occurring on a prolapsing mitral valve and characterized by an atypical vegetation shape resembling a spiral-like appearance. After the patient refused surgical correction, persistent IE despite prolonged antibiotic therapy was observed, resulting in an ischemic stroke probably secondary to septic embolus. The importance of vegetation shape in the management of patients with IE was classically related to the increased risk of embolization associated with pedunculated, irregular, and multilobed masses. We hypothesize that the unusual spiral-like vegetation shape in our patient may have favored IE persistence by two mechanisms, namely, a decrease of the exposed vegetation surface with creation of an internal core where the penetration of antimicrobial agents was obstacled and the creation of blood turbulence within the vegetation preventing a prolonged contact with circulating antibiotics. These considerations suggest that vegetation shape might be considered of importance in patients with IE not only because of its classical association with embolization risk, but also because of its potential effect on the efficacy of antibiotic therapy. PMID:26583074

  9. Association of Aortic Valve Calcification to the Presence, Extent, and Composition of Coronary Artery Plaque Burden: ROMICAT Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahabadi, Amir A.; Bamberg, Fabian; Toepker, Michael; Schlett, Christopher L.; Rogers, Ian S.; Nagurney, John T.; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo; Truong, Quynh A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery calcification. We sought to determine whether AVC is associated with the presence and extent of overall plaque burden, as well as to plaque composition (calcified, mixed, and non-calcified). Methods We examined 357 subjects (mean age: 53 ± 12 years, 61% male) who underwent contrast-enhanced ECG-gated 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography from the ROMICAT trial for the assessment of presence and extent of coronary plaque burden according to the 17-coronary segment model and presence of AVC. Results Patients with AVC (n=37, 10%) were more likely than those without AVC (n=320, 90%) to have coexisting presence of any coronary plaque (89% vs. 46%, p<0.001) and had a greater extent of coronary plaque burden (6.4 segments vs. 1.8 segments, p<0.001). Those with AVC had over 3-fold increase odds of having any plaque (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.6, p=0.047) and an increase of 2.5 segments of plaque (p<0.001) as compared to those without AVC. When stratified by plaque composition, AVC was associated most with calcified plaque (OR 5.2, p=0.004), then mixed plaque (OR 3.2, p=0.02), but not with non-calcified plaque (p=0.96). Conclusion AVC is associated with the presence and greater extent of coronary artery plaque burden and may be part of the later stages of the atherosclerosis process, as its relation is strongest with calcified plaque, less with mixed plaque, and nonsignificant with non-calcified plaque. If AVC is present, consideration for aggressive medical therapy may be warranted. PMID:19781415

  10. Aortic dilatation and calcification in asymptomatic patients with bicuspid aortic valve: analysis in a Korean health screening population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mirae; Sung, Jidong; Cho, Soo Jin; Choi, Soo Hee; Cho, Sung Won; Oh, Jae K; Park, Sung-Ji; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Entire anatomic area involved in the bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease has not been studied well, especially in Asian populations. We investigated prevalence and vascular characteristics of the BAV disease in a Korean population. In a health screening program from 2005 through 2010, 38 BAV patients (BAV group, 0.16 %, 35 males) were isolated among a total of 23,291 persons based on echocardiography. Each BAV patient was matched with three TAV patients (TAV group, n = 114) of the same age, gender, BSA, and hypertension. Using echocardiography and low-dose chest CT scan, diameters of the aortic root to proximal descending aorta (pDA) and pulmonary artery (PA), morphologic types of BAV, and calcification in the aortic root were evaluated in both groups. Diameters of the sinotubular junction and ascending aorta in BAV group were larger than in TAV group (29 ± 7 vs. 27 ± 3 mm, p = 0.046; 42 ± 7 vs. 34 ± 4 mm, p < 0.001, respectively). Diameters of the annulus, sinus of Valsalva, aortic arch, pDA, and PA were not different between two groups. Calcification in the aortic root was approximately seven times more common in BAV group (p < 0.001). Diameters of the aortic root were larger in the R-L type (n = 24) than in the R-N type (n = 11). Prevalence of BAV in a Korean population appears lower than in Western populations. Within the entire anatomic boundaries of BAV, the ascending aorta was predominantly dilated in BAV patients. The R-L type showed more dilatation than the R-N type, not in the ascending aorta but in the aortic root. PMID:22923281

  11. Does preservation of the sub-valvular apparatus during mitral valve replacement affect long-term survival and quality of life? A Microsimulation Study

    E-print Network

    Rao, Christopher; Hart, Jonathan; Chow, Andre; Siannis, Fotios; Tsalafouta, Polyxeni; Murtuza, Bari; Darzi, Ara; Wells, Frank C.; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2008-04-23

    :295-296. 49. Lewis EF, Johnson PA, Johnson W, Collins C, Griffin L, Stevenson LW: Preferences for quality of life or survival expressed by patients with heart failure. J Heart Lung Transplant 2001, 20:1016-1024. 50. Szende A, Williams A: Measuring self... with and without preserva- tion of the chordae tendineae. Surg Forum 1966, 17:178-179. 60. Rastelli GC, Tsakiris AG, Frye RL, Kirklin JW: Exercise tolerance and hemodynamic studies after replacement of canine mitral valve with and without preservation of chordae...

  12. Impact of preprocedural mitral regurgitation upon mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, M Z; Williams, R; Hung, J; Arri, S; Asrress, K N; Bolter, K; Wilson, K; Young, C P; Bapat, V; Hancock, J; Thomas, M; Redwood, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the effects of preprocedural significant mitral regurgitation (MR) and change in MR severity upon mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using the Edwards SAPIEN system. Methods A retrospective analysis of 316 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI for aortic stenosis at a single centre in the UK between March 2008 and January 2013. Patients were stratified into two groups according to severity of MR: ?grade 3 were classed as significant and ?grade 2 were non-significant. Change in MR severity was assessed by comparison of baseline and 30-day echocardiograms. Results 60 patients had significant MR prior to TAVI (19.0%). These patients were of higher perioperative risk (logistic EuroScore 28.7±16.6% vs 20.3±10.7%, p=0.004) and were more dyspnoeic (New York Heart Association class IV 20.0% vs 7.4%, p=0.014). Patients with significant preprocedural MR displayed greater 12-month and cumulative mortality (28.3% vs 20.2%, log-rank p=0.024). Significant MR was independently associated with mortality (HR 4.94 (95% CI 2.07 to 11.8), p<0.001). Of the 60 patients with significant MR only 47.1% had grade 3–4 MR at 30?days (p<0.001). Patients in whom MR improved had lower mortality than those in whom it deteriorated (log-rank p=0.05). Conclusions Significant MR is frequently seen in patients undergoing TAVI and is independently associated with increased all-cause mortality. Yet almost half also exhibit significant improvements in MR severity. Those who improve have better outcomes, and future work could focus upon identifying factors independently associated with such an improvement. PMID:25155800

  13. Transthoracic two-dimensional xPlane and three-dimensional echocardiographic analysis of the site of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    McGhie, Jackie S; de Groot-de Laat, Lotte; Ren, Ben; Vletter, Wim; Frowijn, René; Oei, Frans; Geleijnse, Marcel L

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to assess the value of two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), 2D xPlane imaging and three-dimensional (3D) TTE for the definition of the site and the extent of mitral valve (MV) prolapse. Fifty patients underwent transthoracic 2D, 2D xPlane and 3D echocardiography. With 2D xPlane a segmental analysis of the MV was performed, by making a lateral sweep across the MV coaptation line as seen in the parasternal short-axis view. Inter-observer agreement for specific scallop prolapse was for 2D xPlane excellent (97 %, kappa = 0.94) and for 3D TTE moderate (85 %, kappa = 0.67). The respective sensitivities of standard 2D TTE, 2D xPlane, and 3D TTE for the identification of the precise posterior scallop prolapse were for P1 92, 85, and 92 %, for P2 96, 96, and 82 %, and for P3 86, 81, and 71 %. In total, 5 (8 %) prolapsing MV scallops were missed by 2D TTE, 7 (12 %) by 2D xPlane, and 12 (20 %) by 3D TTE. The sensitivity of 3D TTE was significantly lower than standard 2D imaging (80 % versus 93 %, P < 0.05). The extent of P2 prolapse was under or overestimated in 5 patients with 2D xPlane and in 9 patients with 3D TTE. 2D xPlane imaging is an accurate, easy to use (compared to 3D TTE) and easy to interpret (compared to 2D and 3D TTE) imaging modality to study the site and the extent of MV prolapse. PMID:26276508

  14. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wypasek, Ewa; Potaczek, Daniel P.; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96) vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90) mg/L, p < 0.001) and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01) compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression. PMID:26473826

  15. LV mechanics in mitral and aortic valve diseases: value of functional assessment beyond ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Galli, Elena; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Sengupta, Partho P; Donal, Erwan

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of myocardial function in the context of valvular heart disease remains highly challenging. The myocardium deforms simultaneously in 3 dimensions, and global left ventricular (LV) function parameters such as volume and ejection fraction may remain compensated despite the changes in myocardial deformation properties. Current guidelines recommend valve replacement/repair in the presence of symptoms or reduced LV ejection fraction, but the resolution of symptoms or recovery of LV function post-surgery may not be reliably predicted. A wealth of evidence currently suggests that LV dysfunction is frequently subclinical despite normal ejection fraction. It may precede the onset of symptoms and portend a poor outcome due to progressive myocardial remodeling and dysfunction during the post-operative period. The advent of novel tissue-tracking echocardiography techniques has unleashed new opportunities for the clinical identification of early abnormalities in LV function. This review gathers and summarizes current evidence regarding the use of these techniques to assess myocardial deformation in patients with valvular heart disease. PMID:25459597

  16. The anti-calcification potential of a silsesquioxane nanocomposite polymer under in vitro conditions: potential material for synthetic leaflet heart valve.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Hossein; Kidane, Asmeret G; Burriesci, Gaetano; Ramesh, Bala; Darbyshire, Arnold; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2010-11-01

    Calcification currently represents a major cause of failure of biological tissue heart valves. It is a complex phenomenon influenced by a number of biochemical and mechanical factors. Recent advances in material science offer new polymers with improved properties, potentially suitable for synthetic leaflets heart valves manufacturing. In this study, the calcification-resistance efficacy and mechanical and surface properties of a new nanocomposite polymeric material (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-poly(carbonate-urea)urethane; POSS-PCU) which has been developed by our group are assessed by means of in vitro testing. In particular, thin sheets of nanocomposite, glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium (BP) and polyurethane (PU) were exposed to a calcium solution into a specially designed in vitro accelerated physiological pulsatile pressure system for a period of 31days and a total of 4×10(7) cycles. The samples were investigated for signs of calcification after exposure to calcium solution by means of X-ray, microscopic and chemical inspections. Mechanical and surface properties were also studied using stress-strain behaviour and surface morphology and hydrophobicity. Comparison shows that, in the experimental conditions, the level of calcification for the nanocomposite is considerably lower than for the fixed BP (p=0.008) and PU samples (p=0.015). Also, mechanical properties were unchanged in POSS-PCU, while there was a significant deterioration in PU samples (p<0.05). Hydrophobicity was significantly reduced in both the POSS-PCU and PU samples (p<0.0001). However, the POSS-PCU nanocomposite remained more hydrophobic than the PU sample (p<0.0001). Less platelet adhered to the POSS-PCU compared to the PU (p<0.0001). These results indicate that the use of this nanocomposite in synthetic leaflets heart valves may lead to potential advantages in terms of long-term performances and durability. PMID:20601232

  17. [A case of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, mitral regurgitation and congestive heart failure successfully treated by Batista operation, coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve replacement; usefulness of myocardial scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Okoshi, T; Ueda, K; Neya, K; Suzuki, Y; Nakajima, H; Akasaka, T; Kaminaga, T

    2002-01-01

    A 75-year-old man diagnosed as having ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure and mitral regurgitation underwent left ventricle volume reduction operation (Batista), coronary bypass grafting and mitral valve replacement because myocardial infarction had developed at lateral, inferior and small area of apex wall, not at interventricular septum. Left ventricular endodiastolic volume index and left ventricular endosystolic volume index decreased from pre-operative values of 155, and 128 ml/m2 to post-operative values of 113, and 82 ml/m2, respectively. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased from a pre-operative value of 17% to a post-operative value of 27%. This evaluation was performed by myocardial scintigraphy (quantitative gated spect: QGS). This method was bloodless and useful for determination of indication of left ventricle volume reduction surgery including Batista operation and pre- and post-operative evaluation of this type of surgery. Today, Batista operation is, generally speaking, performed for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. In this case, however, Batista operation was applied to ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and was very effective. PMID:11797415

  18. National Trends in Hospital Readmission Rates among Medicare Fee-for-Service Survivors of Mitral Valve Surgery, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, John A.; Wang, Yun; Murugiah, Karthik; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Cooper, Zack; Hashim, Sabet; Nuti, Sudhakar V.; Spatz, Erica; Desai, Nihar; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older patients who undergo mitral valve surgery (MVS) have high 1-year survival rates, but little is known about the experience of survivors. Our objective was to determine trends in 1-year hospital readmission rates and length of stay (LOS) in these individuals. Methods We included 100% of Medicare Fee-for-Service patients ?65 years of age who underwent MVS between 1999–2010 and survived to 1 year (N = 146,877). We used proportional hazards regression to analyze the post-MVS 1-year readmission rate in each year, mean hospital LOS (after index admission), and readmission rates by subgroups (age, sex, race). Results The 1-year survival rate among patients undergoing MVS was 81.3%. Among survivors, 49.1% experienced a hospital readmission within 1 year. The post-MVS 1-year readmission rate declined from 1999–2010 (49.5% to 46.9%, P<0.01), and mean hospital LOS decreased from 6.2 to 5.3 (P<0.01). Readmission rates were highest in oldest patients, but declined in all age subgroups (65–74: 47.4% to 44.4%; 75–84: 51.4% to 49.2%, ?85: 56.4% to 50.0%, all P<0.01). There were declines in women and men (women: 51.7% to 50.8%, P<0.01; men: 46.9% to 43.0%, P<0.01), and in whites and patients of other race, but not in blacks (whites: 49.0% to 46.2%, P<0.01; other: 55.0% to 48.9%, P<0.01; blacks: 58.1% to 59.0%, P = 0.18). Conclusions Among older adults surviving MVS to 1 year, slightly fewer than half experience a hospital readmission. There has been a modest decline in both the readmission rate and LOS over time, with worse outcomes in women and blacks. PMID:26147225

  19. Standard transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography views of mitral pathology that every surgeon should know

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The mitral valve is the most commonly diseased heart valve and the prevalence of mitral valve disease increases proportionally with age. Echocardiography is the primary diagnostic imaging modality used in the assessment of patients with mitral valve disease. It is a noninvasive method which provides accurate anatomic and functional information regarding the mitral valve and can identify the mechanism of mitral valve pathology. This is especially useful as it may guide surgical repair. This is increasingly relevant given the growing trend of patients undergoing mitral valve repair. Collaboration between cardiac surgeons and echocardiographers is critical in the evaluation of mitral valve disease and for identification of complex valvular lesions that require advanced surgical skill to repair. This article will provide an overview of transthoracic and transesophageal assessment of common mitral valve pathology that aims to aid surgical decision making. PMID:26539350

  20. Midregional-proAtrial Natriuretic Peptide and High Sensitive Troponin T Strongly Predict Adverse Outcome in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Repair of Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Trepte, Ulrike; Seeger, Julia; Gonska, Birgid; Koenig, Wolfgang; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is not known whether biomarkers of hemodynamic stress, myocardial necrosis, and renal function might predict adverse outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous repair of severe mitral valve insufficiency. Thus, we aimed to assess the predictive value of various established and emerging biomarkers for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in these patients. Methods Thirty-four patients with symptomatic severe mitral valve insufficiency with a mean STS-Score for mortality of 12.6% and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 19.7% undergoing MitraClip therapy were prospectively included in this study. Plasma concentrations of mid regional-proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), Cystatin C, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), high-sensitive troponin T (hsTnT), N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), galectin-3, and soluble ST-2 (interleukin 1 receptor-like 1) were measured directly before procedure. MACE was defined as cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure (HF). Results During a median follow-up of 211 days (interquartile range 133 to 333 days), 9 patients (26.5%) experienced MACE (death: 7 patients, rehospitalization for HF: 2 patients). Thirty day MACE-rate was 5.9% (death: 2 patients, no rehospitalization for HF). Baseline concentrations of hsTnT (Median 92.6 vs 25.2 ng/L), NT-proBNP (Median 11251 vs 1974 pg/mL) and MR-proANP (Median 755.6 vs 318.3 pmol/L, all p<0.001) were clearly higher in those experiencing an event vs event-free patients, while other clinical variables including STS-Score and logistic EuroSCORE did not differ significantly. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, NT-proBNP and in particular hsTnT and MR-proANP above the median discriminated between those experiencing an event vs event-free patients. This was further corroborated by C-statistics where areas under the ROC curve for prediction of MACE using the respective median values were 0.960 for MR-proANP, 0.907 for NT-proBNP, and 0.822 for hsTnT. Conclusions MR-proANP and hsTnT strongly predict cardiovascular death and rehospitalization for HF in patients undergoing percutaneous repair of mitral valve insufficiency. Both markers might be useful components in new scoring systems to better predict short- and potentially long-term mortality and morbidity after MitraClip procedure. PMID:26368980

  1. Mitral Annulus Segmentation From 3D Ultrasound Using Graph Cuts

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Robert J.

    The shape of the mitral valve annulus is used in diagnostic and modeling applications, yet methods to accurately and reproducibly delineate the annulus are limited. This paper presents a mitral annulus segmentation algorithm ...

  2. Mitral Valve Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... amount of blood forward. This is called volume overload. The heart can compensate for this overload for many months or years, provided that the ... if any, restrictions on your activity. (For more information about your recovery, refer to What to Expect ...

  3. Mitral valve regurgitation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or dexfenfluramine. The drug was removed from the market by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ... ultrasound examination of the heart) - transthoracic or transesophageal Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Cardiac catheterization may be done if heart ...

  4. Surgical treatment for double-valve destruction after balloon aortic valvuloplasty in a patient with porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Fukui, Toshihiro; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of surgical treatment for double-valve destruction after balloon aortic valvuloplasty in a 90-year old female with severe aortic calcification. The patient underwent aortic balloon valvuloplasty for symptomatic aortic stenosis, resulting in severe aortic regurgitation because of injury to the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve and severe mitral regurgitation because of rupture of the chordae tendineae. She became haemodynamically unstable and required treatment with mechanical ventilation and assisted circulation. Urgent surgical treatment was planned. The patient's porcelain aorta increased the difficulty of surgery, but the procedure was carefully planned, and aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair were performed successfully without major complications. The patient had a satisfactory postoperative course and was transferred to another hospital for rehabilitation on the 8th postoperative day. PMID:25187531

  5. Mitral Perivalvular Leak after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Cause of Severe Subacute Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Vigna, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a very rare cause of valve disorder. Moreover, mitral valve involvement is less frequent than is aortic or tricuspid valve involvement, and the clinical course is usually acute. In the present report, we describe the case of a 49-year-old man with a perivalvular mitral injury that became clinically manifest one year after a violent, nonpenetrating chest injury. This case is atypical in regard to the valve involved (isolated mitral damage), the injury type (perivalvular leak in the absence of subvalvular abnormalities), and the clinical course (interval of one year between trauma and symptoms). PMID:26664317

  6. Importance of mitral valve repair associated with left ventricular reconstruction for patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy: a real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jian Xin; Shiota, Takahiro; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Asher, Craig R.; Hail, Melanie; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Greenberg, Neil L.; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Starling, Randall C.; Young, James B.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV) reconstruction surgery leads to early improvement in LV function in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) patients. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of mitral valve (MV) repair associated with LV reconstruction on LV function 1-year after surgery in ICM patients assessed by real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty ICM patients who underwent the combination surgery (LV reconstruction in 60, MV repair in 30, and revascularization in 52 patients) were studied. Real-time 3DE was performed and LV volumes were obtained at baseline, discharge, 6-month and >or=12-month follow-up. Reduction in end-diastolic volumes (EDV) by 29% and in end-systolic volumes by 38% were demonstrated immediately after surgery and remained at subsequent follow-up (P<0.0001). The LV ejection fraction significantly increased by about 10% at discharge and was maintained >or=12-month (P<0.0001). Although the LV volumes were significantly larger in patients with MV repair before surgery (EDV, 235+/-87 mL versus 193+/-67 mL, P<0.05), they were similar to LV volumes of the patients without MV repair at subsequent follow-ups. However, the EDV increased from 139+/-24 mL to 227+/-79 mL (P<0.01) in 7 patients with recurrent mitral regurgitation (MR). Improvement in New York Heart Association functional class occurred in 81% patients during late follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time 3DE demonstrates that LV reconstruction provides significant reduction in LV volumes and improvement in LV function which is sustained throughout the 1-year follow-up with 84% cardiac event free survival. If successful, MV repair may prevent LV redilation, while recurrent MR is associated with increased LV volumes.

  7. Acute aortic insufficiency due to rupture of an aortic valve commissure.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Samer; Polvani, Gianluca; Al Jaber, Emad; Gennari, Marco

    2014-07-01

    Myxomatous degeneration generally involves the atrioventricular valves (mitral and tricuspid). Rarely, it may affect the aortic or pulmonary valve. We report a case of an acute severe aortic insufficiency due to a rupture of a commissure of the aortic valve in a patient who had previously undergone mitral valve surgery for myxomatous mitral valve prolapse. PMID:24417221

  8. Noninvasive radioisotopic technique for detection of platelet deposition in mitral valve prosthesis and renal microembolism in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Kaye, M.P.; Fuster, V.; Rao, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    At 24 hrs after implantation of Bjoerk-Shiley mitral prosthesis in 5 dogs, in vivo images were obtained with a gamma camera after intravenous administration (0.5-0.6 mCi) one hour postoperatively of autologous Indium-111-labeled platelets. The site of platelet deposition in the teflon ring and perivascular damaged cardiac tissue is clearly delineated in the scintiphoto. In vitro biodistribution (mean % +/- SD of injected dose) at 24 hrs after injection of the 5 implanted and 7 normal dogs performed with a gamma counter demonstrated that (45.1 +/- 10.6)% and (0.7 +/- 0.4)% were in blood and kidneys in normal dogs and (28.5 +/- 6.8)%, (1.6 +/- 0.6)%, (0.3 +/- 0.1)%, and (0.2 +/- 0.1)% were in blood, kidneys, teflon rings, and perivascular damaged cardiac tissue, respectively. The strut and pyrolytic carbon-coated disc retained only (0.0033 +/- 0.0004)% and (0.0031 +/- 0.0003)%, respectively. There was a 2.3-fold increase of labeled platelets in kidneys of implanted dogs due to renal trapping of microembolism. Also, three- to fivefold increase in ratios of lung, brain, cardiac, and skeletal muscle to blood indicates that internal organs and whole body work as filter for microembolism generated by cardiovascular surgery and mitral prosthesis. Twenty percent of the administered platelets are consumed in surgical repair of damaged tissue. Indium-111-labeled platelets thus provide a sensitive marker for noninvasive imaging of Bjoerk-Shiley mitral prosthesis, thromboembolism after implantation of prosthetic device, and in vitro quantitation of surgical consumption.

  9. Potential Inherited Causes of Recurrent Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis in a Pregnant Patient Suffering from Recurrent Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy, M. Ozan; Karakoyun, Suleyman; Yesin, Mahmut; Astarcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    An effective anticoagulation is critical in pregnant patients with prosthetic heart valves. Inherited disorders may interfere with the coagulation cascade and may be associated with obstetrical complications as well as with prosthetic valve-derived complications. The patient in the present case had a history of recurrent prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PHVT) despite an effective anticoagulation. She underwent a thrombolysis with low-dose prolonged infusion of tissue-type plasminogen activator for the management of her recurrrent prosthetic valve thrombosis. The genetic testing showed homozygous mutations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) A 1298 C and heterozygous mutations of ?-fibrinogen 455 G-A. Inherited disorders such as MTHFR A 1298 C and fibrinogen 455G/A polymorphisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent PHVT and/or pregnancy loss. PMID:25089140

  10. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Severe Acute Respiratory Failure in Postpartum Woman With Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease: Benefit, Factors Furthering the Success of This Procedure, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Georges; Larrue, Benoît; Modine, Thomas; Azzaoui, Richard; Regnault, Alexi; Koussa, Mohammad; Gourlay, Terry; Fourrier, François; Decoene, Christophe; Warembourg, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Pregnancy is a common decompensation factor for women with post-rheumatic mitral disease. However, valvular heart diseases causing severe acute respiratory distress are rare. Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) early in the event of cardiorespiratory failure after cardiac surgery may be of benefit. Indeed, ECMO cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support could help pulmonary recovery if the mitral pathology is involved. A 31-year-old female patient at 30 weeks of amenorrhea was admitted to the obstetrics department with 40°C hyperthermia and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class 4 dyspnea. The patient’s medical history included a post-rheumatic mitral stenosis. Blood gases showed severe hypoxemia associated with hypocapnia. The patient needed to be rapidly intubated and was placed on ventilatory support because of acute respiratory failure. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a severe mitral stenosis, mild mitral insufficiency, and diminished left ventricular function, hypokinetic, dilated right ventricle, and a severe tricuspid regurgitation. An urgent cesarean section was performed. Because of the persistent hemodynamic instability, a mitral valvular replacement and tricuspid valve annuloplasty were performed. In view of the preoperative acute respiratory distress, we decided, at the beginning of the operation, to carry on circulatory support with oxygenation through an ECMO-type CPB at the end of the operation. This decision was totally justified by the unfeasible CPB weaning off. ECMO use led to an efficient hemodynamic state without inotropic drug support. The surgical post-operative course was uneventful. Early use of cardiorespiratory support with veno-arterial ECMO allows pulmonary and right heart recovery after cardiac surgery, thus avoiding the use of inotropic drugs and complex ventilatory support. PMID:17672195

  11. Basic mechanisms of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Handschumacher, Mark D; Levine, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Any structural or functional impairment of the mitral valve (MV) apparatus that exhausts MV tissue redundancy available for leaflet coaptation will result in mitral regurgitation (MR). The mechanism responsible for MV malcoaptation and MR can be dysfunction or structural change of the left ventricle, the papillary muscles, the chordae tendineae, the mitral annulus, and the MV leaflets. The rationale for MV treatment depends on the MR mechanism and therefore it is essential to identify and understand normal and abnormal MV and MV apparatus function. PMID:25151282

  12. Basic Mechanisms of Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Beaudoin, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Any structural or functional impairment of the mitral valve (MV) apparatus that exhausts MV tissue redundancy available for leaflet coaptation will result in mitral regurgitation (MR). The mechanism responsible for MV malcoaptation and MR can be dysfunction or structural change of the left ventricle, the papillary muscles, the chordae tendineae, the mitral annulus and the MV leaflets. The rationale for MV treatment depends on the MR mechanism and therefore it is essential to identify and understand normal and abnormal MV and MV apparatus function. PMID:25151282

  13. Massive hemothorax due to subclavian vein tear during internal jugular vein cannulation in a 15-year-old boy scheduled for mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Paulose, Deepak; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2015-01-01

    We present an unusual case of life-threatening hemothorax in a 15-year-old boy following subclavian vein tear during internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation prior to initiation of surgery (mitral valve replacement). Successful IJV cannulation was done in the third attempt. However, we missed the subclavian tear which occurred during the first two initial attempts as there was no clinical evidence suggestive of it at that point of time. This undiagnosed hemothorax led to hemodynamic decompensation requiring high volume and inotropic support to wean the patient off cardiopulmonary bypass. This unusually high requirement of fluid and inotropes required the surgeon to look for noncardiac causes for the hemodynamic disturbance and he noticed a bulge in the right pleura, which on exploration had approximately 1.5 L of collected blood. It was then retrospectively analyzed that the cause of this hemothorax could have been the undue lateral orientation of the needle during IJV cannulation and the advancement of the dilator to its entire length could have injured the subclavian vein. Here, we also would like to discuss the safety precautions to be taken during the cannulation, like the needle orientation and the length to which the dilator must be advanced for safe central venous cannulation. PMID:26712992

  14. Noninvasive radioisotopic technique for detection of platelet deposition on bovine pericardial mitral-valve prosthesis and in vitro quantification of visceral microembolism in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Trastek, V.F.; Tago, M.; Torianni, M.; Kaye, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Platelet deposition on bovine pericardial-tissue mitral-valve prostheses in dogs was observed noninvasively by use of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and quantified after sacrifice at one, 14 and 30 days postimplantation (300-400 microCi of labeled platelets having been injected 24 hrs previously). Thrombosis on the sewing ring and pericardial leaflets at one and 14 days and on the leaflets at 30 days was delineated in scintiphotos. In vitro quantification (% injected dose) indicated that the sewing ring and perivalvular tissue retained 0.75% of labeled platelets at one day postimplantation, 0.084% at 14 days, and 0.0042% at 30 days. Platelet survival was reduced to 38 hrs at 21 days postimplantation but returned toward the normal (50 hrs) with endothelial covering of the sewing ring. Microemboli in lung and kidney, as measured by tissue/blood radioactivity ratio, decreased significantly at 30 days. /sup 111/In-labeled platelets thus provide a sensitive marker for noninvasive imaging and in vitro quantification of platelet deposition on valvular prostheses and microemboli trapped in viscera.

  15. Dynamic obstruction induced by systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve in a volume-depleted left ventricle: an unexpected cause of acute heart failure in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suji; Kim, So Jeong; Kim, Jina; Yoon, Phillhoon; Park, Jeongwoong

    2015-01-01

    Systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve (MV) and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dynamic obstruction (DO) typically occur in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, they can appear in an apparently normal heart in association with changes in cardiac loading conditions and/or hyperdynamic left ventricular (LV) performance. Meanwhile, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can impair LV filling by elevating pulmonary vascular resistance. The authors report a case of transient acute heart failure caused by LVOT DO resulting from SAM of the MV in a severely volume-depleted LV in a patient with acute COPD exacerbation.

  16. Short-term follow-up of exercise training program and beta-blocker treatment on quality of life in dogs with naturally acquired chronic mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes-Santos, M.; Mansur, A.P.; Fragata, F.S.; Strunz, C.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of carvedilol treatment and a regimen of supervised aerobic exercise training on quality of life and other clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical variables in a group of client-owned dogs with chronic mitral valve disease (CMVD). Ten healthy dogs (control) and 36 CMVD dogs were studied, with the latter group divided into 3 subgroups. In addition to conventional treatment (benazepril, 0.3-0.5 mg/kg once a day, and digoxin, 0.0055 mg/kg twice daily), 13 dogs received exercise training (subgroup I; 10.3±2.1 years), 10 dogs received carvedilol (0.3 mg/kg twice daily) and exercise training (subgroup II; 10.8±1.7 years), and 13 dogs received only carvedilol (subgroup III; 10.9±2.1 years). All drugs were administered orally. Clinical, laboratory, and Doppler echocardiographic variables were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Exercise training was conducted from months 3-6. The mean speed rate during training increased for both subgroups I and II (ANOVA, P>0.001), indicating improvement in physical conditioning at the end of the exercise period. Quality of life and functional class was improved for all subgroups at the end of the study. The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level increased in subgroup I from baseline to 3 months, but remained stable after training introduction (from 3 to 6 months). For subgroups II and III, NT-proBNP levels remained stable during the entire study. No difference was observed for the other variables between the three evaluation periods. The combination of carvedilol or exercise training with conventional treatment in CMVD dogs led to improvements in quality of life and functional class. Therefore, light walking in CMVD dogs must be encouraged. PMID:26445331

  17. Short-term follow-up of exercise training program and beta-blocker treatment on quality of life in dogs with naturally acquired chronic mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Marcondes-Santos, M; Mansur, A P; Fragata, F S; Strunz, C M C

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of carvedilol treatment and a regimen of supervised aerobic exercise training on quality of life and other clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical variables in a group of client-owned dogs with chronic mitral valve disease (CMVD). Ten healthy dogs (control) and 36 CMVD dogs were studied, with the latter group divided into 3 subgroups. In addition to conventional treatment (benazepril, 0.3-0.5 mg/kg once a day, and digoxin, 0.0055 mg/kg twice daily), 13 dogs received exercise training (subgroup I; 10.3±2.1 years), 10 dogs received carvedilol (0.3 mg/kg twice daily) and exercise training (subgroup II; 10.8±1.7 years), and 13 dogs received only carvedilol (subgroup III; 10.9±2.1 years). All drugs were administered orally. Clinical, laboratory, and Doppler echocardiographic variables were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Exercise training was conducted from months 3-6. The mean speed rate during training increased for both subgroups I and II (ANOVA, P>0.001), indicating improvement in physical conditioning at the end of the exercise period. Quality of life and functional class was improved for all subgroups at the end of the study. The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level increased in subgroup I from baseline to 3 months, but remained stable after training introduction (from 3 to 6 months). For subgroups II and III, NT-proBNP levels remained stable during the entire study. No difference was observed for the other variables between the three evaluation periods. The combination of carvedilol or exercise training with conventional treatment in CMVD dogs led to improvements in quality of life and functional class. Therefore, light walking in CMVD dogs must be encouraged. PMID:26445331

  18. Asymptomatic chronic severe organic mitral regurgitation: contemporary management strategies.

    PubMed

    Chaliki, Hari P; Tajik, A Jamil

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Chronic organic mitral regurgitation resulting from mitral valve prolapse is increasing in prevalence due to aging of the population. Although "watchful waiting" has been the conventional standard for many years in patients with minimal or no symptoms and chronic severe organic mitral regurgitation, several factors including changing etiology, better understanding of the natural history, improved diagnosis and advances in surgical techniques are now paving the way for earlier mitral valve surgery. The ability to successfully repair the myxomatous mitral valve with low operative risk (< 1%) and advances in imaging in the recent years have led to a major change in the treatment paradigm for organic mitral regurgitation. It is clear from the preponderance of evidence that mitral valve repair in asymptomatic patients with preserved ejection fraction and severe organic mitral regurgitation leads to "cure" or "suppression" of the disease, underscoring the need for early surgery. Whether further advances in imaging, robotic surgery, and percutaneous mitral valve repair lead to even better outcomes remains to be seen. PMID:22734359

  19. Pharmacodynamic and Efficacy Profile of TGN 255, a Novel Direct Thrombin Inhibitor, in Canine Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Simulated Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David A.; Nelson, Katherine T.; Miller, Matthew W.; Dupe, Robert; Chahwala, Suresh B.; Kennedy, Anthony; Chander, Chaman; Fossum, Theresa W.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia can be a life-threatening sequel to conventional use of unfractionated heparin in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study evaluated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) and efficacy profile of a novel direct thrombin inhibitor, TGN 255, during cardiac surgery in dogs. Point-of-care coagulation monitoring was also compared against the plasma concentrations of TRI 50c, the active metabolite of TGN 255. The study was conducted in three phases using 10 animals: phase 1 was a dose-ranging study in conscious animals (n = 6), phase 2 was a similar but terminal dose-ranging study in dogs undergoing CPB (n = 6), and phase 3 was with animals undergoing simulated mitral valve repair (terminal) using optimal TGN 255 dose regimens derived from phases I and II (n = 4). During the study, PD markers and drug plasma levels were determined. In addition, determinations of hematologic markers and blood loss were undertaken. Phase 1 studies showed that a high-dose regimen of a 5-mg/kg bolus and infusion of 20 mg/kg/h elevated PD markers in conscious animals, at which time there were no measured effects on platelet or red blood cell counts, and the mean plasma concentration of TRI 50C was 20.6 fg/mL. In the phase 2 CPB dose-ranging study, this dosing regimen significantly elevated all the PD markers and produced hemorrhagic and paradoxical thrombogenic effects. In the phase 3 surgical study, a lower TGN 255 dose regimen of a 2.5-mg/kg bolus plus 10 mg/kg/h produced anticoagulation, elevated PD markers, and produced minimal post-operative blood loss in the animals. Plasma levels of TRI 50C trended well with the conventional point-of-care coagulation monitoring. TGN 255 provided effective anticoagulation in a canine CPB procedure, enabling successful completion with minimal blood loss. These findings support further evaluation of TGN 255 as an anticoagulant for CPB. PMID:18705547

  20. Visualizing novel concepts of cardiovascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hjortnaes, Jesper; New, Sophie E.P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is currently viewed as an active disease process similar to embryonic bone formation. Cardiovascular calcification mainly affects the aortic valve and arteries and is associated with increased mortality risk. Aortic valve and arterial calcification share similar risk factors, including age, gender, diabetes, chronic renal disease, and smoking. However, the exact cellular and molecular mechanism of cardiovascular calcification is unknown. Late-stage cardiovascular calcification can be visualized with conventional imaging modalities such as echocardiography and computed tomography. However, these modalities are limited in their ability to detect the development of early calcification and the progression of calcification until advanced tissue mineralization is apparent. Due to the subsequent late diagnosis of cardiovascular calcification, treatment is usually comprised of invasive interventions such as surgery. The need to understand the process of calcification is therefore warranted and requires new imaging modalities which are able to visualize early cardiovascular calcification. This review focuses on the use of new imaging techniques to visualize novel concepts of cardiovascular calcification. PMID:23290463

  1. QCT Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Vascular and Valvular Calcification: The Framingham Study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jimmy J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Kiel, Douglas P; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Hoffmann, Udo; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that bone and vascular calcification share common pathogenesis. Little is known about potential links between bone and valvular calcification. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between spine bone mineral density (BMD) and vascular and valvular calcification. Participants included 1317 participants (689 women, 628 men) in the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age 60 years). Integral, trabecular, and cortical volumetric bone density (vBMD) and arterial and valvular calcification were measured from computed tomography (CT) scans and categorized by sex-specific quartiles (Q4?=?high vBMD). Calcification of the coronary arteries (CAC), abdominal aorta (AAC), aortic valve (AVC), and mitral valve (MVC) were quantified using the Agatston Score (AS). Prevalence of any calcium (AS >0) was 69% for CAC, 81% for AAC, 39% for AVC, and 20% for MVC. In women, CAC increased with decreasing quartile of trabecular vBMD: adjusted mean CAC?=?2.1 (Q4), 2.2 (Q3), 2.5 (Q2), 2.6 (Q1); trend p?=?0.04. However, there was no inverse trend between CAC and trabecular vBMD in men: CAC?=?4.3 (Q4), 4.3 (Q3), 4.2 (Q2), 4.3 (Q1); trend p?=?0.92. AAC increased with decreasing quartile of trabecular vBMD in both women (AAC?=?4.5 [Q4], 4.8 [Q3], 5.4 [Q2], 5.1 [Q1]; trend p?=?0.01) and men (AAC?=?5.5 [Q4], 5.8 [Q3], 5.9 [Q2], 6.2 [Q1]; trend p?=?0.01). We observed no association between trabecular vBMD and AVC or MVC in women or men. Finally, cortical vBMD was unrelated to vascular calcification and valvular calcification in women and men. Women and men with low spine vBMD have greater severity of vascular calcification, particularly at the abdominal aorta. The inverse relation between AAC and spine vBMD in women and men may be attributable to shared etiology and may be an important link on which to focus treatment efforts that can target individuals at high risk of both fracture and cardiovascular events. PMID:25871790

  2. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve Prolapse Send ... Diagnosed? Your primary care doctor may detect a heart murmur or other signs of heart valve disease. However, ...

  3. Transapical implantation of an Edwards SAPIEN XT in a degenerated mitral bioprosthesis without fluoroscopic landmarks.

    PubMed

    Salizzoni, Stefano; Barbero, Cristina; Grosso Marra, Walter; Moretti, Claudio; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2014-09-01

    An 84-year-old male with degeneration of a radiolucent mitral bioprosthesis was successfully treated with transapical valve-in-valve implantation exclusively guided by transesophageal echocardiography. The techniques involved in performing this procedure are reviewed. PMID:24641319

  4. Living with Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, and trout, about twice a week Fruits, ... canola, peanut, safflower, and sesame oils Peanut butter Salmon and trout Tofu Sodium You should try to ...

  5. Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePLUS

    ... RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ... heart disease in adults. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's ...

  6. Postoperative mitral leaflet rupture in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Koichi; Tamura, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Sachiko; Sugita, Ryo; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Noriki, Sakon; Morisaki, Hiroko

    2014-12-01

    This report describes an infantile case of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) with spontaneous mitral leaflet rupture. The patient was diagnosed with a type B interruption of the aortic arch. Bilateral pulmonary artery banding was performed 5?days after birth. On the 53rd day, intra-cardiac repair was performed without valvuloplasty. Although the operation was successful, mitral regurgitation deteriorated at 4?weeks after operation. On the 88th day, a mitral valvuloplasty was performed and a severely ruptured anterior leaflet was observed. Seven?days after valvuloplasty, the mitral valve insufficiency again worsened and a fourth operation was performed. Two tears were observed in the anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflets, and a mitral valve replacement was required. Subsequently, the patient was diagnosed with LDS according to gene mutational status. LDS is known to have a poor prognosis with cardiovascular complications, but valve rupture has not been previously reported in other cases. PMID:25521989

  7. Ecocardiografía tridimensional. Nuevas perspectivas sobre la caracterización de la válvula mitral

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Jorge; Sitges, Marta; Levine, Robert A.; Hung, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in three-dimensional echocardiography have made it possible to obtain images in real time, without the need for off-line reconstruction. These developments have enabled the technique to become an important tool for both research and daily clinical practice. A substantial proportion of the studies carried out using three-dimensional echocardiography have focused on the mitral valve, the pathophysiology of mitral valve disease and, in particular, functional mitral regurgitation. The aims of this article were to review the contribution of three-dimensional echocardiography to understanding of the functional anatomy of the mitral valve and to summarize the resulting clinical applications and therapeutic implications. PMID:19232192

  8. A new technique for quantification of platelet thrombosis on bovine pericardial valve prostheses (Ionescu-Shiley) in calves with indium-111 labeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Solis, E.E.; Mackey, S.; Chesebro, J.H.; Didisheim, P.; Edwards, W.D.; Zollman, P.E.; Kaye, M.P.

    1985-05-01

    Platelet thrombosis on components of tissue valve prosthesis explanted from Holstein calves was quantified with In-111-labeled autologous platelets. Twenty-eight calves were implanted with 25 mm bovine pericardial valve prostheses in mitral annulus and killed 1, 14, 30 and 90 days post-implantation. Twenty-four hours before killing 350-450 ..mu..Ci of autologous In-111 platelets were administered intravenously. Components of the explanted valve were imaged with a gamma camera. Mean (+- SD) value of platelet deposition (PlX10/sup 5//mm/sup 2/) on four sections of each leaflet (free edge: FE, central zone: CZ, flexion zone: FZ, attachment zone: AZ) was calculated from platelet count, radioactivity in blood, leaflet sections and area of leaflet sections. With fibrous ingrowth in sewing ring the tissue valve becomes less thrombogenic at 30 days post-implantation; with increase in calcification platelet thrombosis also increases in central zone of leaflet at 30 and 90 days.

  9. Restoration of normal left ventricular geometry after percutaneous mitral annuloplasty: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Muhammad Adil; Alsamadi, Faisal

    2015-08-01

    Surgical mitral valve intervention is not considered suitable in patients with severe functional mitral regurgitation due to severe dilated cardiomyopathy and severe systolic dysfunction. In such patients percutaneous mitral valve intervention is the next best alternative. We are presenting case report of a patient who presented with severe dyspnea progressing to orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. He was found to have severe functional mitral regurgitation and severe left ventricle systolic dysfunction. Surgical mitral intervention was not considered suitable and percutaneous mitral annuloplasty was done. At one month follow-up significant improvement in symptoms were noted with improvement in severity of mitral regurgitation severity. At 6 months follow-up further improvement in symptoms were noted along with significant improvement in the severity of mitral regurgitation and normalization of left ventricle geometry. At 1 year follow-up his symptoms further improved, left ventricle geometry remained normal and mitral regurgitation severity remained mild to moderate. Our case demonstrate that in patient with severe LV systolic dysfunction, severe mitral regurgitation and left bundle branch block percutaneous mitral annuloplasty can obviate the need for CRT-D due to significant improvement in LV function and geometry along with regression in severity of mitral regurgitation. Improvement in mitral regurgitation severity and LV geometry started early and kept improving with excellent result at 6 and 12 months. PMID:25258184

  10. Mitral stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease that can develop after an illness with strep throat that was not properly treated. The valve ... is becoming rare in the United States because strep infections are most often treated. This has made ...

  11. [Mitral Valvuloplasty of Infective Endocarditis During Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Yasuko; Higami, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Natsuya; Takagi, Nobuyuki; Tachibana, Kazutoshi; Hagiwara, Takayuki

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case in which we treated a patient who developed infective endocarditis in the mitral valve at 28 weeks' gestation. The condition was resolved by performing mitral valvuloplasty 2 days after an emergency cesarean section. Although the patient was in a relatively stable period at 32 weeks' gestation, the mother had an extremely high risk of embolism;thus, emergency surgery was required. We believe that an accurate diagnosis in a timely manner and a valvuloplasty shortly after cesarean section saved the life of the mother and child. PMID:26555912

  12. A novel approach to ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR)

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a complicated medical condition with varying degrees of coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation (MR). The traditional surgical treatment option for those with indications for intervention is coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) plus or minus mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR). Percutaneous coronary intervention, hybrid coronary revascularization (HCR), and conventional CABG are three techniques available to address coronary artery disease (CAD). Percutaneous edge-to-edge repair, minimally invasive, and traditional sternotomy are accepted approaches for the treatment of MR. When taken in combination, there are nine methods available to revascularize the myocardium and restore competency to the mitral valve. While most of these treatment options have not been studied in detail, they may offer novel solutions to a widely variable and complex IMR patient population. Thus, a comparative analysis including an examination of potential benefits and risks will be helpful and potentially allow for more patient-specific treatment strategies. PMID:26539349

  13. Relationship between pulmonary hypertension, peripheral vascular calcification, and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Chul; Chang, Hyo Jung; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is a recently recognized complication of chronic kidney disease. In this study, we investigated the association between PHT, peripheral vascular calcifications (VCs), and major cardiovascular events. Methods In this retrospective study, we included 172 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing dialysis [hemodialysis (HD)=84, peritoneal dialysis=88]. PHT was defined as an estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure>37 mmHg using echocardiography. The Simple Vascular Calcification Score (SVCS) was measured using plain radiographic films of the hands and pelvis. Results The prevalence of PHT was significantly higher in HD patients (51.2% vs. 22.7%). Dialysis patients with PHT had a significantly higher prevalence of severe VCs (SVCS?3). In multivariate analysis, the presence of severe VCs [odds ratio (OR), 2.68], mitral valve disease (OR, 7.79), HD (OR, 3.35), and larger left atrial diameter (OR, 11.39) were independent risk factors for PHT. In addition to the presence of anemia, severe VCs, or older age, the presence of PHT was an independent predictor of major cardiovascular events in ESRD patients. Conclusion The prevalence of PHT was higher in HD patients and was associated with higher rates of major cardiovascular events. Severe VCs are thought to be an independent risk factor for predicting PHT in ESRD patients. Therefore, in dialysis patients with PHT, careful attention should be paid to the presence of VCs and the occurrence of major cardiovascular events. PMID:26484016

  14. Surgical Management of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Marfan Syndrome during Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Re; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Eun Seok; Cho, Sungkyu; Jang, Woo Sung; Kim, Yong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitral regurgitation is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to contribute to determining the appropriate surgical strategy for these patients. Methods From January 1992 to May 2013, six patients with Marfan syndrome underwent surgery for mitral regurgitation in infancy or early childhood. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 47 months (range, 3 to 140 months) and the median follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 1.3 to 15.5 years). Mitral valve repair was performed in two patients and four patients underwent mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. There was one reoperation requiring valve replacement for aggravated mitral regurgitation two months after repair. The four patients who underwent mitral valve replacement did not experience any complications related to the prosthetic valve. One late death occurred due to progressive emphysema and tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusion Although repair can be an option for some patients, it may not be durable in infantile-onset Marfan syndrome patients who require surgical management during infancy or childhood. Mitral valve replacement is a feasible treatment option for these patients. PMID:25705592

  15. Insights into the Mechanism of Severe Mitral Regurgitation: RT-3D TEE Guided Management with Pathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Senthil; Hamoud, Naktal; Thompson, Jess; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Mitral valve perforation is an uncommon but important complication of infective endocarditis. We report a case of a 65-year-old man who was diagnosed to have infective endocarditis of his mitral valve. Through the course of his admission he had a rapid development of hemodynamic instability and pulmonary edema secondary to acutely worsening mitral regurgitation. While the TEE demonstrated an increase in the size of his bacterial vegetation, Real Time 3D TEE was ultimately the imaging modality through which the valve perforation was identified. Through this case report we discuss the advantages that RT-3D TEE has over traditional 2D TEE in the management of valve perforation.

  16. Safety and feasibility of a novel adjustable mitral annuloplasty ring: a multicentre European experience†

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Martin; Doll, Nicolas; Livesey, Steve; Castella, Manuel; Kocher, Alfred; Casselman, Filip; Voth, Vladimir; Bannister, Christina; Encalada Palacios, Juan F.; Pereda, Daniel; Laufer, Guenther; Czesla, Markus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recurrent mitral regurgitation is a significant problem after mitral valve repair in patients with functional valve disease. We report the safety and feasibility of a novel adjustable mitral annuloplasty device that permits downsizing of the anterior–posterior diameter late after initial surgery. METHODS In this multicentre, non-randomized, observational register, patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation undergoing surgical mitral valve repair with the MiCardia EnCorSQ™ Mitral Valve Repair system were evaluated. Patient characteristics, operative specifications and results as well as postoperative follow-up were collected for all five centres. RESULTS Ninety-four patients with a median age of 71 (64–75) years (EuroSCORE II 6.7 ± 6.3; 66% male, 48% ischaemic MR, 37% dilated cardiomyopathy and 15% degenerative disease) were included. Operative mortality was 1% and the 1-year survival was 93%. Ring adjustment was attempted in 12 patients at a mean interval of 9 ± 6 months after surgery. In three of these attempts, a technical failure occurred. In 1 patient, mitral regurgitation was reduced two grades, in 2 patients mitral regurgitation was reduced one grade and in 6 patients, mitral regurgitation did not change significantly. The mean grade of mitral regurgitation changed from 2.9 ± 0.9 to 2.1 ± 0.7 (P = 0.02). Five patients were reoperated after 11 ± 9 months (Ring dehiscence: 2; failed adjustment: 3). CONCLUSION We conclude that this device may provide an additional treatment option in patients with functional mitral regurgitation, who are at risk for reoperation due to recurrent mitral regurgitation. Clinical results in this complex disease were ambiguous and patient selection seems to be a crucial step for this device. Further trials are required to estimate the clinical value of this therapeutic concept. PMID:25694471

  17. The effect of mitral annuloplasty shape in ischemic mitral regurgitation: a finite element simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vincent M.; Wenk, Jonathan F.; Zhang, Zhihong; Cheng, Guangming; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Burger, Mike; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Ge, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Undersized mitral annuloplasty (MA) is the preferred surgical treatment for chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR). However, the preferred shape of undersized MA is unclear. Methods A previously described finite element (FE) model of the LV with mitral valve based on magnetic resonance images of a sheep with CIMR after postero-lateral MI was used. Saddle shape (Edwards Physio II) and asymmetric (IMR ETlogix) MA rings were digitized and meshed. Virtual annuloplasty was performed using virtual sutures to attach the MA ring. LV diastole and systole were performed before and after virtual MA of each type. Results Both types of MA reduced the septo-lateral dimension of the mitral annulus and abolished mitral regurgitation. The asymmetric MA was associated with lower virtual suture force in the P2 region but higher force in P1 and P3 regions. Although both types of MA reduced fiber stress at the LV base, fiber stress reduction after asymmetric MA was slightly greater. Neither type of MA affected fiber stress at the LV equator or apex. Although both types of MA increased leaflet curvature and reduced leaflet stress, stress reduction with saddle shape MA was slightly greater. Both MA types reduced stress on the mitral chordae. Conclusions The effects of saddle shaped and asymmetric MA rings are similar. FE simulations are a powerful tool that may reduce the need for animal and clinical trials. PMID:22245588

  18. Chordal Rupture Following MitraClip Implantation Resulting in Massive Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Benito-González, Tomás; Estévez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Gualis, Javier

    2015-10-01

    MitraClip (Abbott Vascular) therapy has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment for mitral regurgitation, even when the commissures are targeted. However, complications during the procedure may occur. We present a 44-year-old patient who underwent MitraClip implantation complicated by chordal rupture, resulting in emergent mitral valve replacement. PMID:26429855

  19. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Jeon, Seok Chol; Jang, Hyo-Jun; Chung, Won-Sang; Kim, Young Hak; Kim, Hyuck

    2015-02-01

    We present a case of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm, which is a very rare and fatal complication of cardiac procedures such as mitral valve replacement. A 55-year-old woman presented to the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Hanyang University Seoul Hospital with chest pain. Ten years prior, the patient had undergone double valve replacement due to aortic regurgitation and mitral steno-insufficiency. Surgical repair was successfully performed using a prosthetic pericardial patch via a left lateral thoracotomy. PMID:25705601

  20. Clinical characteristics and outcomes with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation but underlying native mitral and aortic valve disease participating in the ROCKET AF trial

    PubMed Central

    Breithardt, Günter; Baumgartner, Helmut; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) in the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) trial. Methods and results ROCKET AF excluded patients with mitral stenosis or artificial valve prostheses. We used Cox regression to adjust comparisons for potential confounders. Among 14 171 patients, 2003 (14.1%) had SVD; they were older and had more comorbidities than patients without SVD. The rate of stroke or systemic embolism with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin was consistent among patients with SVD [2.01 vs. 2.43%; hazard ratio (HR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55–1.27] and without SVD (1.96 vs. 2.22%; HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.75–1.07; interaction P = 0.76). However, rates of major and non-major clinically relevant bleeding with rivaroxaban vs. warfarin were higher in patients with SVD (19.8% rivaroxaban vs. 16.8% warfarin; HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.05–1.49) vs. those without (14.2% rivaroxaban vs. 14.1% warfarin; HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.94–1.10; interaction P = 0.034), even when controlling for risk factors and potential confounders. In intracranial haemorrhage, there was no interaction between patients with and without SVD where the overall rate was lower among those randomized to rivaroxaban. Conclusions Many patients with ‘non-valvular atrial fibrillation’ have significant valve lesions. Their risk of stroke is similar to that of patients without SVD after controlling for stroke risk factors. Efficacy of rivaroxaban vs. warfarin was similar in patients with and without SVD; however, the observed risk of bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban in patients with SVD but was the same among those without SVD. Atrial fibrillation patients with and without SVD experience the same stroke-preventive benefit of oral anticoagulants. PMID:25148838

  1. Unusual cause of acute mitral regurgitation: idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madhwal, Surabhi; Goldberg, Jonathan; Barcena, Julio; Guha, Avirup; Gogate, Prema; Cmolik, Brian; Elgudin, Yakov

    2012-03-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a rare multisystem condition characterized by dysregulated overproduction of eosinophils. Cardiac involvement in HES is characterized by necrosis from infiltration of eosinophils and thrombus formation and, in the late stage, by fibrosis and chronic valvular regurgitation. We report a very unusual presentation of idiopathic HES with acute mitral regurgitation due to papillary muscle rupture. The transesophageal echocardiogram was suggestive of a flail posterior leaflet and suspicious for endocarditis. Intraoperatively, papillary muscle rupture was seen and the patient underwent mitral valve replacement. The pathologic examination of the valve revealed eosinophilic infiltration of the papillary muscle. The patient was treated with steroids and responded well clinically. PMID:22364989

  2. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  3. Resistance to secondary thrombosis of the On-X mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiritano, Federica; Serraino, Giuseppe F; Rossi, Michele; Pisano, Giuseppe; Renzulli, Attilio

    2013-09-01

    A 60-year-old man underwent aortic and mitral valve replacement with mechanical On-X prostheses, plus tricuspid annuloplasty ring and maze radiofrequency ablation. Two years later, he was admitted to hospital with severe orthopnea and hemolysis. Echocardiography revealed a blocked prosthetic mitral leaflet due to interference of the preserved subvalvular apparatus. Intraoperatively, one leaflet was found to be blocked by the native mitral apparatus, but no thrombus and/or pannus was present. Although, despite an abnormal blood flow, the On-X prosthesis is resistant to secondary thrombosis, even under adverse hemodynamic conditions, interference of the valve with cardiac structures remains a possibility. PMID:24383391

  4. Mitral valvuloplasty with the Inoue balloon tracked over an arteriovenous wire.

    PubMed

    Tandar, Anwar; Badger, Rodney; Whisenant, Brian K

    2012-11-15

    Mitral stenosis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty is a standard treatment option for severe mitral stenosis, and in some patients may be the only feasible option. In patients with suitable valve anatomy and morphology, and with requisite physician expertise the procedure has a high success rate and good long-term outcomes. Nonetheless, even in appropriately selected patients the procedure can pose significant technical challenges. The transeptal antegrade approach using the Inoue Balloon system may be associated with difficulty and rarely with failure to cross the stenotic mitral valve. We report a case of initial Inoue balloon failure to cross followed by successful Inoue mitral valvuloplasty tracked over an arteriovenous wire loop. PMID:22109970

  5. Use of barbed suture in robot-assisted mitral valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Go; Ishikawa, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Robot-assisted annuloplasty using a mitral band has a major issue: suturing is time consuming because knot tying is performed mechanically under endoscopic view. We suture the mitral band to the native valve by running sutures using the V-Loc barbed suture nonabsorbable wound closure device (Covidien, Mansfield, MA) with 3-0 monofilament. This technique allows rapid suturing of the band to the valve. Although conventional interrupted sutures leave multiple knots protruding on the band, using the V-Loc eliminates the need to tie surgical knots and leaves a clean surface, which may potentially reduce the risk of thrombogenesis. This method is highly useful for robotic mitral annuloplasty. PMID:25555967

  6. Biological Niches within Human Calcified Aortic Valves: Towards Understanding of the Pathological Biomineralization Process

    PubMed Central

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Relucenti, Michela; Agrosì, Giovanna; Cavarretta, Elena; Familiari, Giuseppe; Salvador, Loris; Maras, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances, mineralization site, its microarchitecture, and composition in calcific heart valve remain poorly understood. A multiscale investigation, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), from micrometre up to nanometre, was conducted on human severely calcified aortic and mitral valves, to provide new insights into calcification process. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial relationship existing between bioapatite crystals, their local growing microenvironment, and the presence of a hierarchical architecture. Here we detected the presence of bioapatite crystals in two different mineralization sites that suggest the action of two different growth processes: a pathological crystallization process that occurs in biological niches and is ascribed to a purely physicochemical process and a matrix-mediated mineralized process in which the extracellular matrix acts as the template for a site-directed nanocrystals nucleation. Different shapes of bioapatite crystallization were observed at micrometer scale in each microenvironment but at the nanoscale level crystals appear to be made up by the same subunits. PMID:26509159

  7. Biological Niches within Human Calcified Aortic Valves: Towards Understanding of the Pathological Biomineralization Process.

    PubMed

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Relucenti, Michela; Agrosì, Giovanna; Cavarretta, Elena; Familiari, Giuseppe; Salvador, Loris; Maras, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances, mineralization site, its microarchitecture, and composition in calcific heart valve remain poorly understood. A multiscale investigation, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), from micrometre up to nanometre, was conducted on human severely calcified aortic and mitral valves, to provide new insights into calcification process. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial relationship existing between bioapatite crystals, their local growing microenvironment, and the presence of a hierarchical architecture. Here we detected the presence of bioapatite crystals in two different mineralization sites that suggest the action of two different growth processes: a pathological crystallization process that occurs in biological niches and is ascribed to a purely physicochemical process and a matrix-mediated mineralized process in which the extracellular matrix acts as the template for a site-directed nanocrystals nucleation. Different shapes of bioapatite crystallization were observed at micrometer scale in each microenvironment but at the nanoscale level crystals appear to be made up by the same subunits. PMID:26509159

  8. [Surgery for mitral regurgitation in children].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, N; Otake, S; Sawa, Y; Ichikawa, H; Yoshiryu, M; Matsuda, H

    1999-04-01

    In pediatric patients, mitral valve (MV) repair is preferable than MV replacement because of no need for anticoagulation and its feasibility in small children. However, long-term outcome of MV repair is still unclear. In the present study, fifty-two pediatric patients who underwent MV repair (n = 46) and MV replacement (n = 6) against mitral regurgitation (MR) between January 1970 and December 1996 were evaluated. 46 patients had associated diseases. Mitral annuloplasty was applied in 20 patients (by Kay method (n = 14) and Paneth-Burr method (n = 6) before and after 1991, respectively). Freedom from reoperation rate in patients with partial endocardial cushion defect (ECD) was significantly lower than that in other patients after MV repair, which was significantly higher than that in patients with MV replacement. Diameter of mitral annulus grew within normal range after MV repair. In conclusion, MV repair may provide better outcomes with respect to reoperation and growth of MV in pediatric patients except with partial ECD. PMID:10226421

  9. Intraoperative measurements on the mitral apparatus using optical tracking: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Sandy; De Simone, Raffaele; Wald, Diana; Zimmermann, Norbert; Al Maisary, Sameer; Beller, Carsten J.; Karck, Matthias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2014-03-01

    Mitral valve reconstruction is a widespread surgical method to repair incompetent mitral valves. During reconstructive surgery the judgement of mitral valve geometry and subvalvular apparatus is mandatory in order to choose for the appropriate repair strategy. To date, intraoperative analysis of mitral valve is merely based on visual assessment and inaccurate sizer devices, which do not allow for any accurate and standardized measurement of the complex three-dimensional anatomy. We propose a new intraoperative computer-assisted method for mitral valve measurements using a pointing instrument together with an optical tracking system. Sixteen anatomical points were defined on the mitral apparatus. The feasibility and the reproducibility of the measurements have been tested on a rapid prototyping (RP) heart model and a freshly exercised porcine heart. Four heart surgeons repeated the measurements three times on each heart. Morphologically important distances between the measured points are calculated. We achieved an interexpert variability mean of 2.28 +/- 1:13 mm for the 3D-printed heart and 2.45 +/- 0:75 mm for the porcine heart. The overall time to perform a complete measurement is 1-2 minutes, which makes the method viable for virtual annuloplasty during an intervention.

  10. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  11. Pathophysiology of Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Neal X; Moe, Sharon M

    2015-12-01

    Vascular calcification can lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The initiating factors and clinical consequences depend on the underlying disease state and location of the calcification. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is complex and involves a transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to an osteo/chondrocytic cell that expresses RUNX2 and produces matrix vesicles. The imbalance of promoters (such as hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia) and inhibitors (e.g., fetuin-A) is critical in the development of vascular calcification. The altered mineral metabolism and deficiency in inhibitors are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is one reason why vascular calcification is so prevalent in that population. PMID:26409849

  12. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve Prolapse Send ... disease is an unusual heartbeat sound called a heart murmur . Your doctor can hear a heart murmur with ...

  13. The role of protein solubilization in antigen removal from xenogeneic tissue for heart valve tissue engineering

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    in chronic immune- mediated degeneration and subsequent calcification, thus limiting prosthesis lifetime [2 matrix (ECM), selection of an appropriate tissue-engineered heart valve scaffold material is crucial

  14. Giant Thrombus Formation Immediately After Mitral Valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshihiro; Nakai, Toshiko; Kurosawa, Takafumi; Saito, Yuki; Monno, Koyuru; Hatta, Takumi; Hiro, Takafumi; Arimoto, Munehito; Osaka, Shunji; Hata, Hiroaki; Shiono, Motomi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at risk of cardioembolism.(1,2)) Atrial thrombus formation associated with AF typically occurs in the left atrial appendage (LAA);(3)) therefore, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is important for detection of such a thrombus and measurement of LAA flow velocity.(4,5)) LAA closure is routinely performed during mitral valve surgery in patients with AF to prevent cardiogenic stroke.(6)) We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) and AF in whom a giant thrombus formed almost immediately after mitral and tricuspid valvuloplasty and concurrent LAA resection. No atrial thrombus or spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) was detected by TEE before the surgery. However, a giant intramural thrombus was detected in the left atrium 7 days after surgery. It was thought that the atrial dysfunction as well as the change in morphology of the left atrium resulting from the severe MR complicated by AF and congestive heart failure produced a thrombotic substrate. This case suggests that careful surveillance for thrombus formation and careful maintenance of anticoagulation therapy are needed throughout the perioperative period even if no SEC or thrombus is detected before surgery. PMID:26549289

  15. Heart valve replacement during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Claúdio Ribeiro da; Santos, Paulo Cesar; Castineira, Caroline Pastorin; Pereira, Flávia Souza Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    We describe a woman with gestational age of 20 weeks, who was submitted to a complex procedure. She underwent replacement of the biological mitral and aortic valve, both by biological prosthesis, valvuloplasty of the tricuspid valve, as well as thrombectomy of the left atrium. Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was used during 105 minutes. The patient was discharged from hospital in good health conditions and the newborn remained in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in a stable state. This is a complex procedure with a high maternal and fetal mortality. Therefore, this is an important case regarding valve abnormalities treatment during pregnancy. PMID:18488120

  16. Immediate Clinical and Echocardiographic Outcome of Percutaneous Transvenous Mitral Commissurotomy for Patients of Mitral Stenosis with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M T; Rahman, M M; Islam, M M; Khan, M R; Haque, S A; Chowdhury, A W; Majumder, A S; Rahman, A; Islam, Q I

    2015-07-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to be the major health problem in all developing countries including Bangladesh. Rheumatic mitral stenosis is a very common problem in our population having an incidence of 54 percent among rheumatic heart disease with a female preponderance of 2:1. Percutaneous balloon mitral commissurotomy is appealing because the mechanism of valve dilation closely parallels the mechanism of surgical mitral commissurotomy. The technique of balloon mitral commissurotomy has evolved rapidly, with improvements in balloons, guide wires, and the application of double-balloon techniques. There is controversy that whether the presence of AF has a direct negative effect on the immediate or long-term outcome after PTMC in mitral stenosis patients. The purpose of this study was to see the effect of atrial fibrillation (AF) on the immediate clinical and echocardiographic outcome of patients undergoing Percutaneous Transvenous Mitral Commissurotomy (PTMC). The immediate procedural and in-hospital clinical outcome after PTMC of 264 patients with AF were prospectively collected and compared with those of 288 patients in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) with mitral stenosis admitted in National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Dhaka and Al-Helal Heart Institute, Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Patients with AF were older than patients with normal sinus rhythm (53 ± 11 vs. 33 ± 12 years; p<0.0001) and presented more frequently with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III-IV (78.3% vs. 58.5%; p<0.0001), echocardiographic score >8 (38.9% vs. 22.7%; p<0.0001), calcified valves under fluoroscopy (22.2% vs.12.4%, p<0.0001) and with history of previous surgical commissurotomy (21.7% vs. 10.5%; p<0.0001). In patients with AF, PTMC resulted in worse outcomes, as reflected in a smaller post-PTMC mitral valve area (1.6±0.4 vs. 2.1 ± 0.8 cm²; p<0.0001). Patients with atrial fibrillation have a worse immediate clinical and echocardiographic outcome after PTMC. PMID:26329959

  17. Valve repair in rheumatic heart disease in pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod K; Dharmapuram, Anil K; Swain, Sunil K; Ramdoss, Nagarajan; Raghavan, Sreekanth S; Murthy, Kona S

    2008-04-01

    Valve repair in children is technically demanding but more desirable than valve replacement. From April 2004 to September 2005, 1 boy and 8 girls with rheumatic heart disease, aged 2-13 years (median, 9 years), underwent valve repair for isolated mitral regurgitation in 5, combined mitral and aortic regurgitation in 2, mitral stenosis in 1, and mitral regurgitation associated with atrial septal defect in 1. Chordal shortening in 7, annular plication in 6, commissurotomy in 1, reconstruction of commissural leaflets in 7 were performed for mitral valve disease. Plication and reattachment of the aortic cusps was carried out in 2 patients. Annuloplasty rings were not used. All patients survived the operation, 8 had trivial or mild residual mitral regurgitation, and 1 had trivial aortic regurgitation. Mean left atrial pressure decreased from 14 to 7 mm Hg postoperatively. During follow-up of 3-18 months, all children were asymptomatic and enjoyed normal activity. None required reoperation. In addition to chordal shortening and annular plication, reconstruction of the commissural leaflets is considered the most important aspect of valve repair. It can be achieved without annuloplasty rings, giving good early and midterm results. PMID:18381871

  18. Fungal Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis by Candida parapsilosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shokohi, Tahereh; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Najafi, Narges; Mehdipour, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is rare but serious complication of valve replacement surgery. Candida species, particularly Candida albicans is the most common isolated pathogen in fungal PVE (1–6%of cases). Case Presentation: We describe a 35-year-old woman who underwent mechanical mitral valve replacement about 3 years ago. She was admitted with neurological symptoms and later with dyspnea and hypotension. Transesophageal echocardiography showed large and mobile prosthetic valve vegetation. She underwent mitral valve surgery. The explanted valve and vegetation revealed lots of budding yeasts and the isolated yeast was identified as C. parapsilosis. Amphotericin B and broad spectrum antibiotic were started immediately. Unfortunately, the patient died two days after surgery, due to sepsis probably related to the candidemia. Conclusions: Fungal endocarditis is uncommon infection, but it is a serious problem in patients with prosthetic valve. Fungal PVE can occur years after the surgery, thus long-term follow-up is essential. PMID:25147692

  19. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient’s presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26500737

  20. Anticoagulant Therapy-Induced Gallbladder Hemorrhage after Cardiac Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Ho; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential after cardiac valve surgery. However, spontaneous bleeding remains a major concern during anticoagulation therapy. Spontaneous gallbladder (GB) hemorrhage (hemobilia) is a rare occurrence during standard anticoagulation therapy. This report presents a case of GB hemorrhage that occurred shortly after initiating oral anticoagulant therapy in a patient who had undergone mitral valve replacement surgery. PMID:26665115

  1. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Marmelo, Filipe Carvalho; Mateus, Sónia Matilde Fonseca; Pereira, Alexandre José Marques

    2014-01-01

    Background Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS) is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%), and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%). The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1%) and AVS (36.7%). There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001), myocardial infarction (p = 0.007), diabetes (p = 0.006) and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. PMID:25229357

  2. Surgical experience for prolapse of both atrioventricular valves in a patient with filamin A mutation.

    PubMed

    Hoashi, Takaya; Shiraishi, Isao; Ichikawa, Hajime

    2015-02-01

    A 21-year-old man underwent mitral valve replacement and tricuspid annuloplasty for severe mitral regurgitation and moderate tricuspid regurgitation. Until the operation, he had been treated for hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Gene examination revealed a mutation in filamin A gene, which is the gene responsible for X-linked myxomatous valvular dystrophy. PMID:24521555

  3. Clinical assessment of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Paolo; Bellasi, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification poses an increased risk for cardiovascular events in advanced phases of chronic kidney disease. This evidence has brought many investigators to focus their attention on the importance of detection of calcification and avoidance of further development of it with appropriate therapeutic choices. Physicians can use a variety of noninvasive imaging tools to identify cardiovascular calcification, some with merely qualitative and others with both qualitative and quantitative capabilities. Plain x-rays and ultrasonography can be used to identify macroscopic calcification of aorta and peripheral arteries, echocardiography is helpful for assessment of valvular calcification, and computed tomography technologies constitute the gold standard for quantification of cardiovascular calcification. The latter is also useful to monitor calcification progression and to assess the effect of different therapeutic strategies directed at modifying calcification progression. In this article, we review the clinical significance of vascular calcification and some of the evidence surrounding the most commonly employed noninvasive imaging techniques. PMID:17200042

  4. Long term outcome of percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy in patients aged 70 and over

    PubMed Central

    Sutaria, N; Elder, A; Shaw, T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the immediate haemodynamic improvement and long term symptomatic benefit of percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy in patients aged over 70 years.?DESIGN—Pre- and postprocedure haemodynamic data and follow up for 1 to 10 years by clinic visit or telephone contact.?SETTING—Tertiary referral centre in Scotland.?SUBJECTS—80 patients age 70 and over who had mitral balloon dilatation: 55 were considered unsuitable for surgical treatment because of frailty or associated disease. In an additional four patients mitral dilatation was not achieved.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Increase in valve area after balloon dilatation and survival, freedom from valve replacement, and symptom class at follow up.?RESULTS—Mean (SD) valve area increased by 89% from 0.84 (0.28) to 1.59 (0.67) cm2. There was a low rate of serious complications, with only two patients having long term major sequelae. Of 55 patients unsuitable for surgical treatment, 28 (51%) were alive without valve replacement and with improvement by at least one symptom class at one year, and 14 (25%) at five years. In the 25 patients considered suitable for surgical treatment, 16 (64%) achieved this outcome at one year and nine (36%) at five years.?CONCLUSIONS—Percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy is a safe and useful palliative procedure in elderly patients who are unsuitable for surgery. Balloon dilatation should also be used for elderly patients whose valve appears suitable for improvement by commissurotomy, but echo score is an imperfect predictor of haemodynamic improvement.???Keywords: mitral valve stenosis; balloon valvotomy; elderly patients PMID:10722546

  5. Sizing for mitral annuloplasty: where does science stop and voodoo begin?

    PubMed

    Bothe, Wolfgang; Miller, D Craig; Doenst, Torsten

    2013-04-01

    The implantation of an improperly sized annuloplasty ring may result in an incompetent valve after surgical mitral valve repair. Consequently, the procedure of ring size selection is considered critical. Although a plethora of sizing strategies are described, the opinions on how to select the appropriate ring size differ widely and often appear arbitrary (ie, without scientific justification). These inconsistencies raise the question where, with respect to ring sizing, science stops and voodoo begins. PMID:23481703

  6. Transapical off-pump Neochord implantation on bileaflet prolapse to treat severe mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Bellu, Roberto; Pittarello, Demetrio; Gerosa, Gino

    2015-10-01

    A 74-year old lady was admitted for the presence of a symptomatic severe mitral regurgitation (MR) due to bileaflet prolapse. The patient refused any surgical conventional procedure because of severe arthrosis and osteoporosis documented by previous fractures requiring knee and hip replacements, and was sent directly to us for transapical off-pump mitral valve repair with Neochord implantation (TOP-MINI procedure). The TOP-MINI procedure was performed under general anaesthesia and transoesophageal echocardiographic guidance. Four Neochordae were implanted on the posterior leaflet and two on the anterior leaflet in order to correct a residual anterior prolapse that was not seen at preoperative screening. After 11 months of follow-up, the patient presented with recurrence of symptomatic moderate MR due to rupture of one of two neochordae implanted on the anterior leaflet and new onset of atrial fibrillation. The patient underwent uneventful mitral valve replacement. PMID:26180097

  7. Pathological calcifications studied with micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Brooks, Ellen R.; Langman, Craig B.; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2004-10-01

    The microstructure of pathological biomineral deposits has received relatively little attention, perhaps, in part because of the difficulty preparing samples for microscopy. MicroCT avoids these difficulties, and laboratory microCT results are reviewed for aortic valve calcification (human as well as a rabbit model), for human renal calculi (stones) and for calcinoses formed in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). In calcified aortic valves of rabbits, numerical analysis of the data shows statistically significant correlation with diet. In a large kidney stone the pattern of mineralization is clearly revealed and may provide a temporal blueprint for stone growth. In JDM calcified deposits, very different microstructures are observed and may be related to processes unique to this disease.

  8. Impact of recipient-related factors on structural dysfunction of xenoaortic bioprosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Barbarash, Olga; Rutkovskaya, Natalya; Hryachkova, Oksana; Gruzdeva, Olga; Uchasova, Evgenya; Ponasenko, Anastasia; Kondyukova, Natalya; Odarenko, Yuri; Barbarash, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the influence of recipient-related metabolic factors on the rate of structural dysfunction caused by the calcification of xenoaortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical status, calcium–phosphorus metabolism, and nonspecific markers of inflammatory response in bioprosthetic mitral valve recipients with calcific degeneration confirmed by histological and electron microscopic studies (group 1, n=22), and in those without degeneration (group 2, n=48). Results Patients with confirmed calcification of bioprostheses were more likely to have a severe clinical state (functional class IV in 36% in group 1 versus 15% in group 2, P=0.03) and a longer cardiopulmonary bypass period (112.8±18.8 minutes in group 1 versus 97.2±23.6 minutes in group 2, P=0.02) during primary surgery. Patients in group 1 demonstrated moderate hypovitaminosis D (median 34.0, interquartile range [21.0; 49.4] vs 40 [27.2; 54.0] pmol/L, P>0.05), osteoprotegerin deficiency (82.5 [44.2; 115.4] vs 113.5 [65.7; 191.3] pg/mL, P>0.05) and osteopontin deficiency (4.5 [3.3; 7.7] vs 5.2 [4.1; 7.2] ng/mL, P>0.05), and significantly reduced bone-specific alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme (17.1 [12.2; 21.4] vs 22.3 [15.5; 30.5] U/L, P=0.01) and interleukin-8 levels (9.74 [9.19; 10.09] pg/mL vs 13.17 [9.72; 23.1] pg/mL, P=0.045) compared with group 2, with an overall increase in serum levels of proinflammatory markers. Conclusion Possible predictors of the rate of calcific degeneration of bioprostheses include the degree of decompensated heart failure, the duration and invasiveness of surgery, and the characteristics of calcium–phosphorus homeostasis in the recipient, defined by bone resorption and local and systemic inflammation. The results confirm the hypothesis that cell-mediated regulation of pathological calcification is caused by dysregulation of metabolic processes, which are in turn controlled by proinflammatory signals. PMID:25834408

  9. Blood cyst of the anterior mitral leaflet causing severe mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprakash, K.; Jayaprasad, N.; Sathish, Gargi; George, Raju

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of blood cyst of the anterior mitral leaflet leading to severe mitral regurgitation and heart failure in a 70-year-old woman with no other factors that could explain the severe mitral regurgitation. PMID:26130890

  10. Role of Mitral Annulus Diastolic Geometry on Intraventricular Filling Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ikechukwu U; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Raghav, Vrishank S; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-12-01

    The mitral valve (MV) is a bileaflet valve positioned between the left atrium and ventricle of the heart. The annulus of the MV has been observed to undergo geometric changes during the cardiac cycle, transforming from a saddle D-shape during systole to a flat (and less eccentric) D-shape during diastole. Prosthetic MV devices, including heart valves and annuloplasty rings, are designed based on these two configurations, with the circular design of some prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) being an approximation of the less eccentric, flat D-shape. Characterizing the effects of these geometrical variations on the filling efficiency of the left ventricle (LV) is required to understand why the flat D-shaped annulus is observed in the native MV during diastole in addition to optimizing the design of prosthetic devices. We hypothesize that the D-shaped annulus reduces energy loss during ventricular filling. An experimental left heart simulator (LHS) consisting of a flexible-walled LV physical model was used to characterize the filling efficiency of the two mitral annular geometries. The strength of the dominant vortical structure formed and the energy dissipation rate (EDR) of the measured fields, during the diastolic period of the cardiac cycle, were used as metrics to quantify the filling efficiency. Our results indicated that the O-shaped annulus generates a stronger (25% relative to the D-shaped annulus) vortical structure than that of the D-shaped annulus. It was also found that the O-shaped annulus resulted in higher EDR values throughout the diastolic period of the cardiac cycle. The results support the hypothesis that a D-shaped mitral annulus reduces dissipative energy losses in ventricular filling during diastole and in turn suggests that a symmetric stent design does not provide lower filling efficiency than an equivalent asymmetric design. PMID:26502376

  11. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-10-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis(PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement( MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement(AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery. PMID:26469256

  12. Safety valve

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Ulf C. (Malmoe, SE)

    1984-01-01

    The safety valve contains a resilient gland to be held between a valve seat and a valve member and is secured to the valve member by a sleeve surrounding the end of the valve member adjacent to the valve seat. The sleeve is movable relative to the valve member through a limited axial distance and a gap exists between said valve member and said sleeve.

  13. Therapeutic decision-making for patients with fluctuating mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Fattouch, Khalil; La Canna, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common, progressive, and difficult-to-manage disease. MR is dynamic in nature, with physiological fluctuations occurring in response to various stimuli such as exercise and ischaemia, which can precipitate the development of symptoms and subsequent cardiac events. In both chronic primary and secondary MR, the dynamic behaviour of MR can be reliably examined during stress echocardiography. Dynamic fluctuation of MR can also have prognostic value; patients with a marked increase in regurgitant volume or who exhibit increased systolic pulmonary artery pressure during exercise have lower symptom-free survival than those who do not experience significant changes in MR and systolic pulmonary artery pressure during exercise. Identifying patients who have dynamic MR, and understanding the mechanisms underlying the condition, can potentially influence revascularization strategies (such as the surgical restoration of coronary blood flow) and interventional treatment (including cardiac resynchronization therapy and new approaches targeted to the mitral valve). PMID:25666403

  14. Mitral inertance in humans: critical factor in Doppler estimation of transvalvular pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The pressure-velocity relationship across the normal mitral valve is approximated by the Bernoulli equation DeltaP = 1/2 rhoDeltav(2) + M. dv/dt, where DeltaP is the atrioventricular pressure difference, rho is blood density, v is transmitral flow velocity, and M is mitral inertance. Although M is indispensable in assessing transvalvular pressure differences from transmitral flow, this term is poorly understood. We measured intraoperative high-fidelity left atrial and ventricular pressures and simultaneous transmitral flow velocities by using transesophageal echocardiography in 100 beats (8 patients). We computed mean mitral inertance (M) by M = integral((DeltaP)-(1/2 x rho v(2))dt/integral(dv/dt)dt and we assessed the effect of the inertial term on the transmitral pressure-flow relation. ranged from 1.03 to 5.96 g/cm(2) (mean = 3.82 +/- 1.22 g/cm(2)). DeltaP calculated from the simplified Bernoulli equation (DeltaP = 1/2. rhov(2)) lagged behind (44 +/- 11 ms) and underestimated the actual peak pressures (2.3 +/- 1.1 mmHg). correlated with left ventricular systolic pressure (r = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and transmitral pressure gradients (r = 0.65, P < 0.0001). Because mitral inertance causes the velocity to lag significantly behind the actual pressure gradient, it needs to be considered when assessing diastolic filling and the pressure difference across normal mitral valves.

  15. A reoperation of thrombosed On-X valve detected by multidetector-row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Tai, Ryuta; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    A 62-year-old female patient underwent mitral valve replacement with a 31/33-mm On-X valve for ischemic mitral valve regurgitation. Three months later, transthoracic echocardiography incidentally showed a blocked leaflet with 6 mmHg of mean pressure gradient and 2.4 cm(2) of mitral valve orifice area. Transesophageal echocardiography could not detect thrombus. Electrocardiographically gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) clearly demonstrated a blocked leaflet in the close position and thrombus (2 cm in length, 0.4 cm(2) in area) attached onto the atrial aspect of the leaflet. These findings observed by MDCT were confirmed at reoperation. MDCT was useful diagnostic method for visualizing prosthetic valve thrombosis. PMID:26105106

  16. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Functioning Prosthetic Valve.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm) reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function. PMID:26157465

  17. Prosthetic Valve Escaping During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Scholtz, Smita; Faber, Lothar; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We performed transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation on an 87-year-old woman with severe aortic valve stenosis. Because of the narrow left ventricular outflow tract, annular positioning of the prosthetic valve proved challenging. During positioning, the prosthetic valve was accidentally dislodged from the balloon catheter and dropped into the left ventricle. Attempted catheter retrieval was unsuccessful. We therefore converted to open surgery without delay. After aortotomy, to our surprise, the prosthesis could not be found, neither in the left ventricle nor in the ascending aorta. Transesophageal echocardiography failed to reveal the location of the missing prosthesis. Fluoroscopy finally displayed the prosthesis in the descending aorta at the level of the left atrium. We proceeded with aortic and mitral valve replacement and closed the sternum. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the prosthetic valve was secured to the wall of the abdominal aorta in an infrarenal position by dilatation with a balloon catheter. This case shows that we should be alert to septum hypertrophy or a narrow left ventricular outflow tract during transapical aortic valve implantation. In such anatomical situations, we recommend advancing the sheath of the application system directly below the annular plane and positioning the prosthesis from this point. PMID:26650617

  18. First reported human case of native mitral infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis.

    PubMed

    Amsallem, Myriam; Iung, Bernard; Bouleti, Claire; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence; Eme, Anne-Line; Touati, Aziza; Kirsch, Matthias; Duval, Xavier; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-11-01

    A 65 year-old woman was admitted for acute heart failure and severe sepsis revealing definite mitral infective endocarditis with severe regurgitation, complicated by multiple embolisms. Three blood cultures yielded a group G Streptococcus canis strain. Urgent surgery was performed with bioprosthetic valve replacement. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of the valve found S canis DNA. Amoxicillin and gentamicin were given for 2 weeks followed by 4 weeks of amoxicillin alone. She reported contact with a dog without bite. S canis has been reported to cause zoonotic septicemia but to our knowledge, this is the first human case of native valve infective endocarditis. PMID:25442453

  19. Management of Organic Mitral Regurgitation: Guideline Recommendations and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Gurzun, Maria-Magdalena; Popescu, Andreea C.; Ginghina, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) represents the second most frequent valvular heart disease. The appropriate management of organic MR remains unclear in many aspects, especially in several specific clinical scenarios. This review aims to discuss the current guideline recommendations regarding the management of organic MR, while highlighting the controversial aspects encountered in daily clinical practice. The role of imaging is essential in establishing the most appropriate type of surgical treatment (repair or replace), which is based on morphological mitral valve (MV) characteristics (reparability of the valve) and local surgical expertise in valve repair. The potential advantages of 3-dimensional echocardiography in assessing the MV are discussed. Other modern imaging techniques (tissue Doppler and speckle tracking) may provide additional useful information in borderline cases. Exercise echocardiography (evaluating MR severity, pulmonary pressure, or right ventricular function) may have an important role in the management of difficult cases. Finally, the moment when surgery is no longer an option and alternative solutions should be sought is also discussed. Although in everyday clinical practice the timing of surgery is not always straightforward, some newer clinical and echocardiographic indicators can guide this decision and help improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:25810729

  20. Rectus Femoris Tendon Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zini, Raul; Panascì, Manlio; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since it was developed, hip arthroscopy has become the favored treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Due to recent considerable improvements, the indications for this technique have been widely extended. Injuries of the rectus femoris tendon origin, after an acute phase, could result in a chronic tendinopathy with calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition, leading to pain and loss of function. Traditionally, this condition is addressed by local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids or, when conservative measures fail, by open excision of the calcific lesion by an anterior approach. Purpose: To assess whether arthroscopic excision of calcification of the proximal rectus is a safe and effective treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Outcomes were studied from 6 top amateur athletes (age range, 30-43 years; mean, 32.6 years) affected by calcification of the proximal rectus who underwent arthroscopic excision of the calcification. Patients were preoperatively assessed radiographically, and diagnosis was confirmed by a 3-dimensional computed tomography scan. To evaluate the outcome, standardized hip rating scores were used pre- and postoperatively (at 6 and 12 months): the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, and Modified Harris Hip Score. Moreover, visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, sport activity level (SAL), and activities of daily living (ADL) were also used. Results: One year after surgery, all patients reported satisfactory outcomes, with 3 of 6 rating their return-to-sport level as high as preinjury level, and the remaining 3 with a percentage higher than 80%. Five patients ranked their ability to carry on daily activities at 100%. Statistical analysis showed significant improvement of the Oxford Hip Score, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and all 3 VAS subscales (pain, SAL, and ADL) from pre- to latest postoperative assessment (P < .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic excision of rectus femoris tendon calcification yields satisfying results with few risks to the patient as well as rapid recovery. Clinical Relevance: The recent improvements in hip arthroscopy give the opportunity to address an increasing number of hip conditions effectively and safely, with rapid recovery for the patient. Arthroscopic excision of rectus femoris tendon calcification can be considered a feasible option, with few risks to the patient, rapid recovery, and satisfying outcomes. PMID:26535288

  1. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated remodeling of aortic and mitral valves leaflets under the volume loading and cardiac expansion of pregnancy. Those valves' leaflets enlarge with altered collagen fiber architecture, content, and cross-linking and biphasic changes (decreases, then increases) in extensibility during gestation. This study extends our analyses to right-sided valves, with additional compositional measurements for all valves. Valve leaflets were harvested from nonpregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Leaflet structure was characterized by leaflet dimensions, and ECM composition was determined using standard biochemical assays. Histological studies assessed changes in cellular and ECM components. Leaflet mechanical properties were assessed using equibiaxial mechanical testing. Collagen thermal stability and cross-linking were assessed using denaturation and hydrothermal isometric tension tests. Pulmonary and tricuspid leaflet areas increased during pregnancy by 35 and 55%, respectively. Leaflet thickness increased by 20% only in the pulmonary valve and largely in the fibrosa (30% thickening). Collagen crimp length was reduced in both the tricuspid (61%) and pulmonary (42%) valves, with loss of crimped area in the pulmonary valve. Thermomechanics showed decreased collagen thermal stability with surprisingly maintained cross-link maturity. The pulmonary leaflet exhibited the biphasic change in extensibility seen in left side valves, whereas the tricuspid leaflet mechanics remained largely unchanged throughout pregnancy. The tricuspid valve exhibits a remodeling response during pregnancy that is significantly diminished from the other three valves. All valves of the heart remodel in pregnancy in a manner distinct from cardiac pathology, with much similarity valve to valve, but with interesting valve-specific responses in the aortic and tricuspid valves. PMID:26371175

  2. [Prenatal diagnosis of fetal aortic stenosis with mitral insufficiency. Review of the ultrasound diagnosis and perinatal prognosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Román, Nuria; Alvarez, Teresa; Bravol, Coral; Pérez, Ricardo; Gámez, Francisco; De León Luis, Juan

    2014-09-01

    This is a report about a case of prenatal diagnosis of critical fetal aortic stenosis with severe mitral valve insufficiency in a 35+6 weeks fetus. Aortic stenosis represents 3% of congenital heart diseases, but its association with mitral regurgitation is quite unusual. Thanks to the latest advances in fetal ultrasonography we can now achieve a more precise diagnosis and we have been able to improve the understanding of its physiopathology. Based on this case we have reviewed the most recent literature about fetal aortic stenosis and mitral valve insufficiency, with the aim of summarizing its main physiopathological features, highlighting the clues and key points for its intrauterine diagnosis, describing its principal complications and summarizing its current treatment options. PMID:25412557

  3. Severe pulmonic valve regurgitation due to histoplasma endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Merri; Lin, Peter T; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 67-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome, disseminated histoplasmosis, and mitral valve replacement presented with dyspnea and peripheral edema. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated abnormal pulmonic valve with possible vegetation. Color flow imaging showed laminar flow from main pulmonary artery into right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) in diastole. The continuous wave Doppler signal showed dense diastolic envelope with steep deceleration slope. These findings were consistent with severe pulmonic valve regurgitation, possibly due to endocarditis. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated an echodense mass attached to the pulmonic valve. The mitral valve bioprosthesis appeared intact. Bacterial and fungal blood cultures were negative; however, serum histoplasma antigen was positive. At surgery, the valve appeared destroyed by vegetations. Gomori methenamine silver-stains showed invasive fungal hyphae and yeast consistent with a dimorphic fungus. Valve cultures grew one colony of filamentous fungus. Itraconazole was continued based on expert infectious diseases diagnosis. After surgery, dyspnea and ankle edema resolved. To the best of our knowledge, histoplasma endocarditis of pulmonic valve has not been previously reported. Isolated pulmonic valve endocarditis is rare, accounting for about 2% of infectious endocarditis (IE) cases. Fungi account for about 3% of cases of native valve endocarditis. Characterization of pulmonary valve requires thorough interrogation with 2D and Doppler echocardiography techniques. Parasternal RVOT view allowed visualization of the pulmonary valve and assessment of regurgitation severity. As an anterior structure, it may be difficult to image with transesophageal echocardiography. Mid-esophageal right ventricular inflow–outflow view clearly showed the pulmonary valve and vegetation. Learning points Identification and characterization of pulmonary valve abnormalities require thorough interrogation with 2D and Doppler echocardiography techniques.Isolated pulmonary valve IE is rare and requires high index of suspicion. Histoplasma capsulatum IE is rare and requires high index of suspicion. PMID:26693325

  4. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department – Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute

    PubMed Central

    MOLNAR, ADRIAN; MURESAN, IOAN; TRIFAN, CATALIN; POP, DANA; SACUI, DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The introduction of Duke’s criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. Methods We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. Results The patients’ age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases – 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases – 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases – 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases – 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases – 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases – 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valvemitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological examination of valve pieces excised during surgery was positive. In 3 cases it matched the germ identified in the hemocultures, and in 2 cases it evidenced another bacterium. Conclusion The overall mortality of 5% is well between the limits presented in literature, being higher (30%) in patients who required emergency surgery. For the patients who return into our clinic with prosthetic valve endocarditis, the mortality after surgery was even higher (50%).

  5. Acute congestive heart failure due to ruptured mitral chordae tendineae in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Sugiko; Nitta, Hayase; Chinen, Yukiko; Kinjo, Tadatsugu; Masamoto, Hitoshi; Sakumoto, Kaoru; Maeda, Tatsuya; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Aoki, Yoichi

    2013-03-01

    A 31-year-old woman complained of dyspnea and orthopnea at 38 weeks of gestation. A grade 3/6 pansystolic murmur was heard, and echocardiography revealed severe mitral regurgitation with a hyperechoic obstacle on the posterior mitral valve leaflet, consistent with a diagnosis of acute heart failure due to a ruptured chordae tendineae or an infectious endocarditis. An emergency cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia. A male infant was born weighing 2928?g with Apgar scores of 7 and 8 at 1 and 5?min, respectively. The patient was managed in the intensive care unit and underwent open-heart surgery for mitral valve repair on postpartum day 3. The two chordal tendineae appeared torn and frail, and a mitral annuloplasty was performed. No finding of infectious endocarditis was observed. Because it is a dramatic and life-threatening clinical situation, proper diagnosis and treatment in the intensive care unit assure a good outcome for both mother and fetus. PMID:23106781

  6. Plug valve

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, John J. (Shelley, ID)

    1989-01-01

    An improved plug valve wherein a novel shape for the valve plug and valve chamber provide mating surfaces for improved wear characteristics. The novel shape of the valve plug is a frustum of a body of revolution of a curved known as a tractrix, a solid shape otherwise known as a peudosphere.

  7. Hemodynamic Environments from Opposing Sides of Human Aortic Valve Leaflets Evoke Distinct Endothelial Phenotypes In Vitro

    E-print Network

    Weinberg, Eli J.

    The regulation of valvular endothelial phenotypes by the hemodynamic environments of the human aortic valve is poorly understood. The nodular lesions of calcific aortic stenosis (CAS) develop predominantly beneath the ...

  8. Use of aspirin as the sole antiplatelet agent following prosthetic valve replacement in rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    John, S; Bashi, V V; John, C N; Ravikumar, E; Kumar, H P; Rao, S

    1994-01-01

    Aspirin was administered as the sole antiplatelet agent in 147 patients following valve replacement, who were at low risk for thromboembolism. Of these, 67 underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR), 61 aortic valve replacement (AVR) and 19 combined aortic and mitral valve replacement (DVR). The mean follow up period was 6.63 years (range 1-14 years). The incidence of thromboembolic episodes (TEE) in patients following MVR, AVR, and DVR was 0.41, 0.80 and nil respectively. The TEE free survival at the first year follow-up was 98.4%, 99.3% and 100% in patients following MVR, AVR and DVR respectively. Fatal intracranial haemorrhage was not encountered. Valve thrombosis in this patient population was not seen. In conclusion, aspirin as the sole antiplatelet agent appears to be safe and effective following prosthetic valve replacement in selected patients. Further studies involving larger number of patients are necessary to confirm these results. PMID:7797223

  9. Check valve

    DOEpatents

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs.

  10. Check valve

    DOEpatents

    Upton, Hubert Allen (Morgan Hill, CA); Garcia, Pablo (Stanford, CA)

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion.

  11. [Calcifications in the maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Németh Bertalan; Pataky, Levente; Arpád, Joób F; Koppany, Ferenc; Barabás, József

    2015-09-01

    Among patients presenting for dental treatment we could reveal various calcifications on panoramic x-rays or on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Calcifications is more likely to occur in vessels, ligaments, glandular tissues and is usually associated with chronic inflammation or scarring. The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging characteristics of commonly observed calcifications of the maxillofacial area with presenting our own cases such as: tonsilloliths, calcified lymph nodes, elongeated styloid process (calcified stylohyoid chain), phleboliths, carotid atheromas, calcified laryngeal cartilage. PMID:26731963

  12. [Early and Mid-term Outcomes of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-10-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is associated with high mortality and reoperation rates despite diagnostic and therapeutic improvements. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 35 patients who had undergone reoperative cardiac surgery for PVE in our hospital between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2014. The mean age of the patients was 68±12 years, and 15( 42%) of those patients were women. Early PVE was defined as PVE that occurred within 1 year after the surgery;12 (34%) patients showed early PVE. The aortic valve was affected in 25;the mitral valve, in 18;and the tricuspid valve, in 2 patients. Streptococcal, staphylococcal, and other infections were observed in 4, 20, and 7 patients, respectively. Aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement, double valve replacement, and aortic root reconstruction was performed in 9, 10, 6, and 10, patients, respectively. The 30-day operative and hospital mortality occurred in 4 (11%) patients. All patients who died had developed early PVE and staphylococci infection. The overall 7-year survival and freedom from valve-related reoperation were 63% and 78%, respectively. Surgical management of PVE remains a challenge and is associated with remarkably high morbidity and mortality rates. In our series, early PVE and staphylococcal infection were associated with very poor prognosis. PMID:26469257

  13. The association of bound aldehyde content with bioprosthetic tissue calcification.

    PubMed

    Tod, Tara J; Dove, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The rapid progression of mineralization seen in glutaraldehyde-treated valves has prompted a wide variety of secondary treatments aimed at mitigating dystrophic calcification. We tested the hypothesis that aldehyde residuals bound to bioprosthetic tissue is a significant promoter of calcification. We developed a novel assay to measure residual aldehyde functional groups and assessed aldehyde content in three different groups: glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue (Glut-only), Edwards ThermaFix™ treated tissue and Edwards RESILIA™ tissue. The amount of tissue calcification in these same groups was assessed in vivo using a well-established rabbit model, in which tissue samples were implanted intramuscularly for 60 days. The aldehyde content of the Glut-only, ThermaFix™ treated and RESILIA™ tissues were 225.7 ± 31.5, 101.9 ± 79.7 and 32.5 ± 48.4 nmol/g, respectively. The differences among all three groups were highly significant (p < 0.001, Student's unpaired t test). The median (interquartile range) calcium content of the Glut-only, ThermaFix™ treated and RESILIA™ tissues were 227.4 (221.8-243.6), 101.0 (23.05-169.6), and 10.1 (0.28-51.7) ?g/mg. The differences among all three groups were highly significant (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). The results indicated that our novel assay was able to reliably measure aldehyde content in bovine pericardial tissue. Furthermore, there appeared to be a close association between aldehyde content and tissue calcium content. The processing of bioprosthetic valves to reduce their aldehyde content may offer a significant advantage in terms of reducing the potential for long-term calcification in human implants. PMID:26610931

  14. Calcific tendinitis: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Siegal, Daniel S; Wu, Jim S; Newman, Joel S; Del Cura, Jose L; Hochman, Mary G

    2009-12-01

    Calcific tendinitis is caused by the pathologic deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in tendons and is a common cause of joint pain. The disease typically affects the shoulder and hip, with characteristic imaging findings; however, any joint can be involved. Occasionally, calcific tendinitis can mimic aggressive disorders, such as infection and neoplasm, especially on magnetic resonance imaging. Radiologists should be familiar with the imaging findings to distinguish calcific tendinitis from more aggressive processes. Image-guided percutaneous needle aspiration and steroid injection of calcific tendinitis are useful techniques performed by the radiologist for the treatment of symptomatic cases. Familiarity with these procedures and their imaging appearance is an important aspect in the management of this common disease. PMID:19931132

  15. Valve Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the need for heart valve surgery. Percutaneous Interventions Balloon valvuloplasty is a procedure that may be used ... procedure works on valves in the same way balloon angioplasty does on the arteries. Like angioplasty, it ...

  16. Increased Infiltration of Extra-Cardiac Cells in Myxomatous Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sauls, Kimberly; Toomer, Katelynn; Williams, Katherine; Johnson, Amanda J.; Markwald, Roger R.; Hajdu, Zoltan; Norris, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the actin-binding gene Filamin-A have been linked to non-syndromic myxomatous valvular dystrophy and associated mitral valve prolapse. Previous studies by our group traced the adult valve defects back to developmental errors in valve interstitial cell-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling during fetal valve gestation. Mice deficient in Filamin-A exhibit enlarged mitral leaflets at E17.5, and subsequent progression to a myxomatous phenotype is observed by two months. For this study, we sought to define mechanisms that contribute to myxomatous degeneration in the adult Filamin-A-deficient mouse. In vivo experiments demonstrate increased infiltration of hematopoietic-derived cells and macrophages in adolescent Filamin-A conditional knockout mice. Concurrent with this infiltration of hematopoietic cells, we show an increase in Erk activity, which localizes to regions of MMP2 expression. Additionally, increases in cell proliferation are observed at two months, when hematopoietic cell engraftment and signaling are pronounced. Similar changes are observed in human myxomatous mitral valve tissue, suggesting that infiltration of hematopoietic-derived cells and/or increased Erk signaling may contribute to myxomatous valvular dystrophy. Consequently, immune cell targeting and/or suppression of pErk activities may represent an effective therapeutic option for mitral valve prolapse patients. PMID:26473162

  17. Vascularization of bioprosthetic valve material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughner, Derek R.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Heenatigala, Dino; Lohmann, Tara; Ellis, Chris G.

    1999-04-01

    Cell membrane remnants represent a probable nucleation site for calcium deposition in bioprosthetic heart valves. Calcification is a primary failure mode of both bovine pericardial and porcine aortic heterograft bioprosthesis but the nonuniform pattern of calcium distribution within the tissue remains unexplained. Searching for a likely cellular source, we considered the possibility of a previously overlooked small blood vessel network. Using a videomicroscopy technique, we examined 5 matched pairs of porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and 14 samples from 6 bovine pericardia. Tissue was placed on a Leitz Metallux microscope and transilluminated with a 75 watt mercury lamp. Video images were obtained using a silicon intensified target camera equipped with a 431 nm interference filter to maximize contrast of red cells trapped in a capillary microvasculature. Video images were recorded for analysis on a Silicon Graphics Image Analysis work station equipped with a video frame grabber. For porcine valves, the technique demonstrated a vascular bed in the central spongiosa at cusp bases with vessel sizes from 6-80 micrometers . Bovine pericardium differed with a more uniform distribution of 7-100 micrometers vessels residing centrally. Thus, small blood vessel endothelial cells provide a potential explanation patterns of bioprosthetic calcification.

  18. Calcification prevention tablets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Geoffrey A.; Hasting, Michael A.; Gustavson, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid tablets, which slowly release citric acid when flushed with water, are under development by the Navy for calcification prevention. The citric acid dissolves calcium carbonate deposits and chelates the calcium. For use in urinals, a dispenser is not required because the tablets are non-toxic and safe to handle. The tablets are placed in the bottom of the urinal, and are consumed in several hundred flushes (the release rate can be tailored by adjusting the formulation). All of the ingredients are environmentally biodegradable. Mass production of the tablets on commercial tableting machines was demonstrated. The tablets are inexpensive (about 75 cents apiece). Incidences of clogged pipes and urinals were greatly decreased in long term shipboard tests. The corrosion rate of sewage collection pipe (90/10 Cu/Ni) in citric acid solution in the laboratory is several mils per year at conditions typically found in traps under the urinals. The only shipboard corrosion seen to date is of the yellow brass urinal tail pieces. While this is acceptable, the search for a nontoxic corrosion inhibitor is underway. The shelf life of the tablets is at least one year if stored at 50 percent relative humidity, and longer if stored in sealed plastic buckets.

  19. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  20. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J. (Grafton, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  1. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Maryam; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Sant, Shilpa; Jung, Sungmi; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Heart valve-related disorders are among the major causes of death worldwide. Although prosthetic valves are widely used to treat this pathology, current prosthetic grafts cannot grow with the patient while maintaining normal valve mechanical and hemodynamic properties. Tissue engineering may provide a possible solution to this issue through using biodegradable scaffolds and patients' own cells. Despite their similarity to heart valve tissue, most hydrogel scaffolds are not mechanically suitable for the dynamic stresses of the heart valve microenvironment. In this study, we integrated electrospun poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) microfiber scaffolds, which possess enhanced mechanical properties for heart valve engineering, within a hybrid hydrogel made from methacrylated hyaluronic acid and methacrylated gelatin. Sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells were encapsulated in the hydrogel and evaluated in hydrogel-only, PGS-PCL scaffold-only, and composite scaffold conditions. Although the cellular viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types, the presence of the hydrogel improved the three-dimensional distribution of mitral valvular interstitial cells. As seen by similar values in both the Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength between the PGS-PCL scaffolds and the composites, microfibrous scaffolds preserved their mechanical properties in the presence of the hydrogels. Compared to electrospun or hydrogel scaffolds alone, this combined system may provide a more suitable three-dimensional structure for generating scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:24733776

  2. Intraoperative echocardiographic detection of regurgitant jets after valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, A. J.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J.; Armstrong, G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paravalvular jets, documented by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, have prompted immediate valve explantation by others, yet the significance of these jets is unknown. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients had intraoperative transesophageal two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography, performed to assess the number and area of regurgitant jets after valve replacement, before and after protamine. Patients were grouped by first time versus redo operation, valve position and type. RESULTS: Before protamine, 55 jets were identified (2.04+/-1.4 per patient) versus 29 jets after (1.07+/-1.2 per patient, p = 0.0002). Total jet area improved from 2.0+/-2.2 cm2 to 0.86+/-1.7 cm2 with protamine (p<0.0001). In all patients jet area decreased (average decrease, 70.7%+/-27.0%). First time and redo operations had similar improvements in jet number and area (both p>0.6). Furthermore, mitral and mechanical valves each had more jets and overall greater jet area when compared to aortic and tissue valves, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Following valve replacement, multiple jets are detected by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. They are more common and larger in the mitral position and with mechanical valves. Improvement occurs with reversal of anticoagulation.

  3. Geometric differences of the mitral apparatus between ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy with significant mitral regurgitation: real-time three-dimensional echocardiography study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Jun; Shiota, Takahiro; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Qin, Jian Xin; Gillinov, Marc A.; Stewart, William J.; Cosgrove, Delos M.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to elucidate the geometric differences of the mitral apparatus in patients with significant mitral regurgitation caused by ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM-MR) and by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) by use of real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six patients with ICM-MR caused by posterior infarction, 18 patients with DCM-MR, and 8 control subjects were studied. With the 3D software, commissure-commissure plane and 3 perpendicular anteroposterior (AP) planes were generated for imaging the medial, central, and lateral sides of the mitral valve (MV) during mid systole. In 3 AP planes, the angles between the annular plane and each leaflet (anterior, Aalpha; posterior, Palpha) were measured. In ICM-MR, Aalpha measured in the medial and central planes was significantly larger than that in the lateral plane (39+/-5 degrees, 34+/-6 degrees, and 27+/-5 degrees, respectively; P<0.01), whereas Palpha showed no significant difference in any of the 3 AP planes (61+/-7 degrees, 57+/-7 degrees, and 56+/-7 degrees, P>0.05). In DCM-MR, both Aalpha (38+/-8 degrees, 37+/-9 degrees, and 36+/-7 degrees, P>0.05) and Palpha (59+/-6 degrees, 58+/-5 degrees, and 57+/-6 degrees, P>0.05) revealed no significant differences in the 3 planes. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of MV deformation from the medial to the lateral side was asymmetrical in ICM-MR, whereas it was symmetrical in DCM-MR. RT3DE is a helpful tool for differentiating the geometry of the mitral apparatus between these 2 different types of functional mitral regurgitation.

  4. Percutaneous valve replacement: weird or wonderful?

    PubMed

    Thiem, A; Cremer, J; Lutter, G

    2006-02-01

    Percutaneous treatment of valve diseases has proven to be an effective alternative to open surgery since the early 1980's. For most patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis, use of percutaneous catheter-based techniques as balloon valvuloplasty for the treatment of both congenital pulmonary stenosis as well as trans-septal commissurotomy has become a good therapeutic option. Furthermore in the mid 1990's in vitro studies demonstrated the feasibility of percutaneous catheter-based valve implantation first in pulmonary and subsequently in aortic position. Afterwards initial in vivo implantations were successfully undertaken. Limitations of this new branch of transcatheter-based techniques are: risk of embolization due to pre-dilatation; difficult deployment; migration of valved stent; paravalvular leakage and limited durability of the implanted valve. Hence, many advances and improvements are necessary prior to pronouncing a new real alternative and safe therapeutic option. Up to now the gold standard for the treatment of heart valve disease is still open surgical valve repair and replacement. Percutaneous valve replacement procedures offer substantial advantages both to patients and medical care providers. From a medical point of view, they may help reduce surgical risks, offer a less invasive procedure, lower complication rates and shorten rehabilitation times in future. From an economic standpoint, shorter hospital stays result in overall cost reduction. PMID:16467739

  5. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  6. Benazepril in dogs with asymptomatic mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    2015-10-17

    BestBETs for Vets are generated by the Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nottingham to help answer specific questions and assist in clinical decision making. Although evidence is often limited, they aim to find, present and draw conclusions from the best available evidence, using a standardised framework. A more detailed description of how BestBETs for Vets are produced was published in Veterinary Record earlier this year (VR, April 4, 2015, vol 176, pp 354-356). PMID:26475899

  7. Optimal Surgical Management of Severe Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: To Repair or to Replace?

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Louis P.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Kron, Irving L.; Acker, Michael A.; Miller, Marissa A.; Horvath, Keith A.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Argenziano, Michael; D'Alessandro, David A.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Hung, Judy; Gardner, Timothy J.; Parides, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR), a complication of myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease more generally, is associated with a high mortality rate and estimated to affect 2.8 million Americans. With 1-year mortality rates as high as 40%, recent practice guidelines of professional societies recommend repair or replacement, but there remains a lack of conclusive evidence supporting either intervention. The choice between therapeutic options is characterized by the trade-off between reduced operative morbidity and mortality with repair versus a better long-term correction of mitral insufficiency with replacement. The long-term benefits of repair versus replacement remain unknown, which has led to significant variation in surgical practice. Methods and Results This paper describes the design of a prospective randomized clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of mitral valve repair and replacement in patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation. This trial is being conducted as part of the Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgical Trials Network. This paper addresses challenges in selecting a feasible primary endpoint, characterizing the target population (including the degree of MR), and analytical challenges in this high mortality disease. Conclusions The paper concludes by discussing the importance of information on functional status, survival, neurocognition, quality of life and cardiac physiology in therapeutic decision-making. PMID:22054660

  8. Transcatheter treatment of chronic mitral regurgitation with the MitraClip system: an Italian consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Francesco; Alamanni, Francesco; Alfieri, Ottavio; Bartorelli, Antonio; Bedogni, Francesco; Bovenzi, Francesco M; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Antonio; Cremonesi, Alberto; Denti, Paolo; Ettori, Federica; Klugmann, Silvio; La Canna, Giovanni; Martinelli, Luigi; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Metra, Marco; Oliva, Fabrizio; Padeletti, Luigi; Parolari, Alessandro; Santini, Francesco; Senni, Michele; Tamburino, Corrado; Ussia, Gian P; Romeo, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    New percutaneous technologies are rapidly emerging for the treatment of structural heart disease including mitral valve disease. Preliminary data suggest a potential clinical benefit of percutaneous treatment of mitral regurgitation by the MitraClip procedure in selected patients. Until final data are available from randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trials, there is an urgent need for a consensus among all the operators involved in the treatment of patients with mitral regurgitation, including clinical cardiologists, heart failure specialists, surgeons, interventional cardiologists, and imaging experts. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, the heart-team approach is the most reliable method of making proper decisions. This study is the result of multidisciplinary consensus activity, and has the aim of helping physicians in the difficult task of making decisions for the treatment of patients with mitral regurgitation. It is the result of a joint effort of the major Italian Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Societies, working together to find a proper balance between the points of view of the clinical cardiologist, the interventional cardiologist, and the cardiac surgeon. PMID:24662461

  9. Depressurization valve

    DOEpatents

    Skoda, G.I.

    1989-03-28

    A depressurization valve for use in relieving completely the pressure in a simplified boiling water reactor is disclosed. The normally closed and sealed valve is provided with a valve body defining a conduit from an outlet of a manifold from the reactor through a valve seat. A closing valve disk is configured for fitting to the valve seat to normally close the valve. The seat below the disk is provided with a radially extending annulus extending a short distance into the aperture defined by the seat. The disk is correspondingly provided with a longitudinally extending annulus that extends downwardly through the aperture defined by the seat towards the high pressure side of the valve body. A ring shaped membrane is endlessly welded to the seat annulus and to the disk annulus. The membrane is conformed over the confronted surface of the seat and disk in a C-sectioned configuration to seal the depressurization valve against the possibility of weeping. The disk is held to the closed position by an elongate stem extending away from the high pressure side of the valve body. The stem has a flange configured integrally to the stem for bias by two springs. The first spring acts from a portion of the housing overlying the disk on the stem flange adjacent the disk. This spring urges the stem and attached disk away from the seat and thus will cause the valve to open at any pressure. A second spring-preferably of the Belleville variety-acts on a latch plate surrounding and freely moving relative to the end of the stem. This second spring overcomes the bias of the first spring and any pressure acting upon the disk. This Belleville spring maintains through its spring force the valve in the closed position. At the same time, the latch plate with its freedom of movement relative to the stem allows the stem to thermally expand during valve temperature excursion.

  10. Prosthetic heart valves: catering for the few.

    PubMed

    Zilla, Peter; Brink, Johan; Human, Paul; Bezuidenhout, Deon

    2008-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves epitomize both the triumphant advance of cardiac surgery in its early days and its stagnation into a retrospective, exclusive first world discipline of late. Fifty-two years after the first diseased heart valve was replaced in a patient, prostheses largely represent the concepts of the 1960s with many of their design-inherent complications. While the sophisticated medical systems of the developed world may be able to cope with sub-optimal replacements, these valves are poorly suited to the developing world (where the overwhelming majority of potential valve recipients reside), due to differences in age profiles and socio-economic circumstances. Therefore, it is the latter group which suffered most from the sluggish pace of developments. While it previously took less than 7 years for mechanical heart valves to develop from the first commercially available ball-in-cage valve to the tilting pyrolytic-carbon disc valve, and another 10 years to arrive at the all-carbon bi-leaflet design, only small incremental improvements have been achieved since 1977. Similarly, bioprosthetic valves saw their last major break-through development in the late 1960s when formalin fixation was replaced by glutaraldehyde cross linking. Since then, poorly understood so-called 'anti-calcification' treatments were added and the homograft concept rediscovered under the catch-phrase 'stentless'. Still, tissue valves continue to degenerate fast in younger patients, making them unsuitable for developing countries. Yet, catheter-delivered prostheses almost exclusively use bioprosthetic tissue, thereby reducing one of the most promising developments for patients of the developing world into a fringe product for the few first world recipients. With tissue-engineered valves aiming at the narrow niche of congenital malformations and synthetic flexible leaflet valves being in their fifth decade of low-key development, heart valve prostheses seem to be destined to remain an unsatisfying and exclusive first world solution for a long time to come. PMID:17950840

  11. Techniques and technologies to assess vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Bellasi, Antonio; Raggi, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification (CV) is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease stage V and has been associated with an increased risk for all-cause as well as cardiovascular mortality. A number of noninvasive imaging techniques are available to screen for the presence of CV-plain x-rays of the abdomen and extremities to identify macroscopic calcifications of aorta and peripheral arteries; echocardiography for assessment of valvular calcification; two-dimensional ultrasound for calcification of carotid arteries, femoral arteries and aorta, and computed tomography technologies that constitute the gold standard for quantification of coronary artery and aorta calcification. Some of these modalities are also useful to monitor calcification progression and to assess the effect of different therapeutic strategies directed at modifying calcification progression. In this article we review the strengths and limitations of the most common noninvasive techniques employed for the imaging of vascular calcification. PMID:17374086

  12. Analysis of immunostaining and western blotting of endothelin 1 and its receptors in mitral stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Sydney Correia; Dashwood, Michael R.; de Andrade, Mateus Santana; Santos, Nicolas Nascimento; Teles, Olivia Regina Lins Leal; de Souza, Williasmin Batista; Rodrigues, Tania Maria de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic Fever represents a serious public health problem in developing countries, with thousands of new cases each year. It is an autoimmune disease, which occurs in response to infection by streptococcus A. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolabeling and protein expression for endothelin-1 and 3 (ET-1, ET-3) and its receptors (ETA, ETB) in rheumatic mitral valves. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to identify ET-1/ET-3 and ETA/ETB receptors in rheumatic and control mitral valves. Quantitative analysis of immunostaining for ET-1/ET-3 and ETA/ETB receptors was performed. In addition, western blot analysis was carried out to assess protein levels in tissue samples. Results ET-1 and ETA receptor immunostaining predominated in stenotic valves, mainly associated with fibrotic regions, inflammatory areas and neovascularization. Quantitative analysis showed that the average area with positive expression of ET-1 was 18.21±14.96%. For ETA and ETB, the mean expressed areas were respectively 15.06±13.13% and 9.20±11.09%. ET-3 did not have a significant expression. The correlation between the expression of both endothelin receptors were strongly positive (R=0.74, P=0.02), but the correlation between ET-1 and its receptor were negative for both ETA (R=-0.37, P=0.25), and ETB (R=-0.14, P=0.39). This data was supported by western blot analysis. Conclusion The strong correlation between ET-1 and its receptors suggests that both play a role in the pathophysiology of rheumatic mitral valve stenosis and may potentially act as biomarkers of this disease. PMID:26107453

  13. Chronic sustained inflammation links to left ventricular hypertrophy and aortic valve sclerosis: a new link between S100/RAGE and FGF23

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ling; Bowman, Marion A Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease including left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and ectopic valvular calcification are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both S100A12 and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) have been identified as biomarkers of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. We tested the hypothesis that human S100/calgranulin would accelerate cardiovascular disease in mice subjected to CKD. Methods This review paper focuses on S100 proteins and their receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and summarizes recent findings obtained in novel developed transgenic hBAC-S100 mice that express S100A12 and S100A8/9 proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome of the human S100/calgranulin gene cluster containing the genes and regulatory elements for S100A8, S100A9 and S100A12 was expressed in C57BL/6J mice (hBAC-S100). CKD was induced by ureteral ligation, and hBAC-S100 mice and WT mice were studied after 10 weeks of chronic uremia. Results hBAC-S100 mice with CKD showed increased FGF23 in the heart, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), diastolic dysfunction, focal cartilaginous metaplasia and calcification of the mitral and aortic valve annulus together with aortic valve sclerosis. This phenotype was not observed in WT mice with CKD or in hBAC-S100 mice lacking RAGE with CKD, suggesting that the inflammatory milieu mediated by S100/RAGE promotes pathological cardiac hypertrophy in CKD. In vitro, inflammatory stimuli including IL-6, TNF?, LPS, or serum from hBAC-S100 mice up regulated FGF23 mRNA and protein in primary murine neonatal and adult cardiac fibroblasts. Conclusions Taken together, our study shows that myeloid-derived human S100/calgranulin is associated with the development of cardiac hypertrophy and ectopic cardiac calcification in a RAGE dependent manner in a mouse model of CKD. We speculate that FGF23 produced by cardiac fibroblasts in response to cytokines may act in a paracrine manner to accelerate LVH and diastolic dysfunction in hBAC-S100 mice with CKD. We suggest that S100/RAGE-mediated chronic sustained systemic inflammation is linked to pathological cardiac remodeling via direct up regulation of FGF23 in cardiac fibroblasts, thereby providing a new mechanistic understanding for the common association between CKD, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, or hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy with diastolic dysfunction. PMID:26082935

  14. Mechanical valve obstruction: Review of diagnostic and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Jason; Munoz-Mendoza, Jerson; Liebelt, Jared J; Taub, Cynthia C

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) is a rare but feared complication of mechanical valve replacement. Diagnostic evaluation should focus on differentiating prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) from pannus formation, as their treatment options differ. History of sub-optimal anti-coagulation and post-op time course to development of PVO are useful clinical characteristics in differentiating thrombus from pannus formation. Treatment of PVT is influenced by the patient’s symptoms, valve location, degree of obstruction and thrombus size and may include thrombolysis or surgical intervention. Alternatively, pannus formation requires surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnostic approach and treatment options for aortic and mitral valve PVO.

  15. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  16. Fifteen-year experience with 1678 Hancock porcine bioprosthetic heart valve replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, L H; Collins, J J; DiSesa, V J; Couper, G S; Peigh, P S; Kowalker, W; Allred, E

    1989-01-01

    The Hancock porcine valve was the first commercially available biologic heart valve and has been in continuous use at the Brigham and Women's Hospital since January 1972. Through December 1987 we implanted 1678 valves in 1533 patients (885 male; 648 female; 17 to 95 years of age, with a mean of 60 years). There were 825 aortic valve replacements (AVR), 562 isolated mitral valve replacements (MVR), and 146 aortic mitral replacements (DVR). Ninety-four per cent of the patients were functional class III or IV. Associated coronary bypass was done in 25% of patients. Four per cent of patients were lost to follow up during a 1- to 16-year period with a mean of 6 years. Morbidity and mortality rates on a actuarial basis were calculated 10 and 15 years after operation for AVR, MVR, and DVR. The data indicates that the probability of reoperation for structural valve failure is quite reasonable as of 10 years, but from 10 to 15 years the numbers sharply fall off so that the probable effective life of the valve is 10 years. However in the elderly age group (equal to or greater than 70 years of age) the incidence of structural valve degeneration is markedly diminished, making this an ideal valve substitute for the elderly. It is also an ideal valve substitute in any patient who has a contraindication to long-term anticoagulation because of current medical or surgical problems. PMID:2802832

  17. An alternative technique for tricuspid valve repair using autologous pericardium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Debin; Zhang, Mingkui; Song, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We developed an alternative technique to integrate the replacement of tricuspid septal leaflet and chordae using a fan-shaped fresh autologous pericardial patch. Echocardiographic evaluation showed normal mobility, and no progression of tricuspid regurgitation or evidence of calcification early and late after operation. This alternative approach appears to be an easy, rapid, and effective technique for tricuspid valve repair. PMID:19740287

  18. Transapical Implantation of a 2nd-Generation JenaValve Device in Patient with Extremely High Surgical Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mieres, Juan; Menéndez, Marcelo; Fernández-Pereira, Carlos; Rubio, Miguel; Rodríguez, Alfredo E.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) is performed in patients who are poor surgical candidates. Many patients have inadequate femoral access, and alternative access sites have been used such as the transapical approach discussed in this paper. We present an elderly and fragile patient not suitable for surgery for unacceptable high risk, including poor ventricular function, previous myocardial infarction with percutaneous coronary intervention, pericardial effusion, and previous cardiac surgery with replacement of mechanical mitral valve. Transapical aortic valve replacement with a second-generation self-expanding JenaValve is performed. The JenaValve is a second-generation transapical TAVR valve consisting of a porcine root valve mounted on a low-profile nitinol stent. The valve is fully retrievable and repositionable. We discuss transapical access, implantation technique, and feasibility of valve implantation in this extremely high surgical risk patient. PMID:26346128

  19. Late embolization of a vascular plug III device after mitral paravalvular leak closure.

    PubMed

    Arzamendi, Dabit; Li, Chi Hion; Serra, Antoni

    2013-11-15

    We present a case report of an 80-year-old frail woman with hemolytic anemia and cardiac failure secondary to mitral severe paravalvular regurgitation. Her clinical history was significant for mitral valve replacement that was complicated with a paravalvular leak two months after surgery. The leak was closed percutaneously with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug III single device. A year later she is readmitted with heart failure and the transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a severe paravalvular leak beside the Vascular Plug III device that seemed to be dislodged and rocking. During a new attempt of percutaneous leak closure, while trying to lasso the old device, it embolized to the iliac bifurcation. The old device could be removed from the right femoral artery and the leak could be closed with two new Vascular Plug III devices deployed simultaneously. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a late embolization of a Vascular Plug III device. PMID:23729270

  20. An Intriguing Case Report of Functional Mitral Regurgitation Treated With MitraClip

    PubMed Central

    Duino, Vincenzo; Fiocca, Luigi; Musumeci, Giuseppe; D’Elia, Emilia; Gori, Mauro; Cerchierini, Elisa; Valsecchi, Orazio; Senni, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is frequent in patients with heart failure (HF). It develops as a consequence of left ventricle (LV) geometry alterations, causing imbalance between increased tethering forces and decreased closing forces exerted on the mitral valve apparatus during systole. FMR is known to change at rest and during effort, due to preload–afterload changes, myocardial ischemia, and/or LV dysfunction. Despite optimized medical therapy, an FMR can be responsible of shortness of breath limiting quality of life and decompensation. In this report, we present a case of dynamic FMR treated with MitraClip. MitraClip implantation is a successful and innovative opportunity for HF patients with FMR. PMID:25997036

  1. [Incidentally detected bronchial artery aneurysm with combined operation for mitral regurgitation;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hisashi; Oteki, Hitoshi; Naito, Kozo; Yunoki, Junji

    2015-02-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for heart failure with orthopnea. Echocardiography revealed massive mitral regurgitation. During preoperative cardiac catheterization, an aneurysm was indentified incidentally just below the tracheal carina. Three dimensional computed tomography showed three bronchial artery aneurysms behind the pulmonary artery and the left atrium. The proximal aneurysm was the largest and was 22 mm in diameter. It was resected by retracting the ascending aorta to the left, the superior vana cava to the right and right pulmonary artery cranially under cardiopulmonary bypass, and mitral valve plasty was performed. We believed that resection of the proximal aneurysm would cause thrombotic occlusion of the other 2 aneurysms. Bronchial artery aneurysm is a rare entity that is observed in fewer than 1% of those who undergo selective bronchial arteriography. In addition, because bronchial artery aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening lesion, it should be treated promptly when diagnosed. PMID:25743361

  2. Serotonin markers show altered transcription levels in an experimental pig model of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Cremer, S E; Zois, N E; Moesgaard, S G; Ravn, N; Cirera, S; Honge, J L; Smerup, M H; Hasenkam, J M; Sloth, E; Leifsson, P S; Falk, T; Oyama, M A; Orton, C; Martinussen, T; Olsen, L H

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) through 5-HT1B receptor (R), 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2BR-induced myxomatous pathology. Based on increased tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1) and decreased serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT) in MMVD-affected valves, increased valvular 5-HT synthesis and decreased clearance have been suggested. It remains unknown how haemodynamic changes associated with mitral regurgitation (MR) affect 5-HT markers in the mitral valve, myocardium and circulation. Twenty-eight pigs underwent surgically induced MR or sham-operation, resulting in three MR groups: control (CON, n?=?12), mild MR (mMR, n?=?10) and severe MR (sMR, n?=?6). The gene expression levels of 5-HT1BR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT2BR, SERT and TPH-1 were analysed using quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the mitral valve (MV), anterior papillary muscle (AP) and left ventricle (LV). MV 5-HT2BR was also analysed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) in relation to histological lesions and valvular myofibroblasts. All 5-HTR mRNAs were up-regulated in MV compared to AP and LV (P?<0.01). In contrast, SERT and TPH-1 were up-regulated in AP and LV compared to MV (P?<0.05). In MV, mRNA levels were increased for 5-HT2BR (P?=?0.02) and decreased for SERT (P?=?0.03) in sMR vs. CON. There were no group differences in 5-HT2BR staining (IHC) but co-localisation was found with ?-SMA-positive cells in 91% of all valves and with 33% of histological lesions. In LV, 5-HT1BR mRNA levels were increased in sMR vs. CON (P?=?0.01). In conclusion, these data suggest that MR may affect mRNA expression of valvular 5-HT2BR and SERT, and left ventricular 5-HT1BR in some pigs. PMID:25599900

  3. A calcified amorphous tumor that developed on both sides of the atrioventricular valve annulus.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Masaki; Okayama, Hideki; Kawamura, Go; Shigematsu, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Tatsunori; Miyoshi, Toru; Higaki, Akinori; Hara, Kayo; Kawata, Yoshitaka; Hiasa, Go; Yamada, Tadakatsu; Kazatani, Yukio; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of a hemodialysis patient with a calcified amorphous tumor (CAT) on both sides of the atrioventricular valve annulus. A 70-year-old female who had received hemodialysis for 23 years because of chronic glomerulonephritis presented to our hospital with acute heart failure. Echocardiography indicated the presence of mobile cardiac masses on the mitral valve and tricuspid valve annulus. We suspected the presence of a cardiac tumor or vegetation. The patient received 3 g/day sulbactam-ampicillin and 60 mg/day gentamicin. Surgery was performed on the 14th day after hospital admission. The patient underwent mitral valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty, and tumor resection. Based on the pathological findings, the cardiac tumor was diagnosed as a CAT. PMID:26585959

  4. Thrombosis of a mechanical valve prosthesis late in pregnancy. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    González-Santos, J M; Vallejo, J L; Rico, M J; González-Santos, M L; Horno, R; García-Dorado, D

    1986-10-01

    A case of acute thrombosis of a mechanical mitral valve prosthesis (Medtronic-Hall) in a 34 weeks pregnant woman is reported. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by Doppler echocardiography. Emergency surgery was performed starting with a cesarean section to save the fetus, followed by an obstetric hysterectomy. Valve thrombectomy could then be safely carried out. Both, the mother and child could be rescued by this combined intervention and were discharged from the hospital without further complications. PMID:2431509

  5. Depressurization valve

    DOEpatents

    Skoda, George I. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A depressurization valve for use in relieving completely the pressure in a simplified boiling water reactor is disclosed. The normally closed and sealed valve is provided with a valve body defining a conduit from an outlet of a manifold from the reactor through a valve seat. A closing valve disk is configured for fitting to the valve seat to normally close the valve. The seat below the disk is provided with a radially extending annulus extending a short distance into the aperture defined by the seat. The disk is correspondingly provided with a longitudinally extending annulus that extends downwardly through the aperture defined by the seat towards the high pressure side of the valve body. A ring shaped membrane is endlessly welded to the seat annulus and to the disk annulus. The membrane is conformed over the confronted surface of the seat and disk in a C-sectioned configuration to seal the depressurization valve against the possibility of weeping. The disk is held to the closed position by an elongate stem extending away from the high pressure side of the valve body. The stem has a flange configured integrally to the stem for bias by two springs. The first spring acts from a portion of the housing overlying the disk on the stem flange adjacent the disk. This spring urges the stem and attached disk away from the seat and thus will cause the valve to open at any pressure. A second spring--preferably of the Belleville variety--acts on a latch plate surrounding and freely moving relative to the end of the stem. This second spring overcomes the bias of the first spring and any pressure acting upon the disk. This Belleville spring maintains through its spring force the valve in the closed position. At the same time, the latch plate with its freedom of movement relative to the stem allows the stem to thermally expand during valve temperature excursion. The latch plate in surrounding the stem is limited in its outward movement by a boss attached to the stem at the end of the stem remote from the disk. The latch plate is held normally closed by three radial latches spaced at 120.degree. around the periphery of the plate.

  6. [An eighteen-year evaluation of the Bjork-Shiley valve prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Nakano, S; Matsuda, H; Taniguchi, K; Kawamoto, T; Mitsuno, M; Ueda, T; Kawashima, Y

    1989-09-01

    We evaluated the long-term (18 years) results of 356 patients undergoing valve replacement with Björk-Shiley valve prosthesis (aortic, 212; mitral 120; double valve, 24) between 1970 and 1988. Actuarial survival rates were 90% (18 years) for AVR, 80% 'years) for MVR and 90% (8 years) for DVR. Actuarial rates of thromboembolism were 99% (18 years) for AVR, 98% (8 years) for MVR and 94% (8 years) for DVR. Actuarial rates of freedom from events (including valve failure, thromboembolism, reoperation and prosthetic valve endocarditis) were 82% (18 years) for AVR, 95% (8 years) and 94% (8 years) for DVR. There were no differences in these results among spherical disc, convexo-concave disc and monostrut valve. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that Björk-Shiley valve showed a low incidence of postoperative events. These results endorse our choice of the Björk-Shiley. PMID:2586457

  7. Efficacy of Artificial Chordal Reconstruction for Idiopathic Severe Mitral Regurgitation Due To Chordal Rupture in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Sai, Sadahiro; Konishi, Akinobu; Sato, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Satoshi; Nitta, Megumi

    2015-01-01

    Early surgical intervention is required for sudden onset, severe mitral regurgitation (MR) due to chordal rupture in infants with normal development younger than 1 year. The condition has been recognized as idiopathic. However, the surgical options in children are limited because of their size and somatic growth. We sought to examine the efficacy of mitral valve plasty by artificial chordal reconstruction for these infants in mid-to-long term. From August 2005 through June 2012, 8 consecutive patients aged 1-7 months underwent mitral valve plasty by chordal reconstruction using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene sutures for MR, owing to leaflet prolapse. The geometric parameters of the diameter of the mitral annulus (D1), the long axis of the left ventricular (LV) chamber (D2), and the length of the papillary muscle including the reconstructed chordae (D3) were measured, as well as MR grade (0-4) and LV end-diastolic dimension, at each time point. The parameters were compared with those in the control group that included Kawasaki disease patients without cardiac lesions and healthy children (n = 51). Mean follow-up period was 5.8 (2.8-9.6) years. Freedom from reoperation was 100%. MR grades were 3.9 ± 0.4 preoperatively, 2.4 ± 0.9 at discharge, and 1.4 ± 0.6 at the latest. Postoperative MR was improved within 1 year in 5 of 6 patients who had grade 2 or higher regurgitation. LV end-diastolic dimensions were 109% (% of normal), 113%, and 107% at discharge, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Geometric configuration indicated by the D1/D2 ratio did not significantly change with time. The length of the papillary muscle including reconstructed chordae (D3) strongly correlated with body surface area (r(2) = 0.65), which seemed to be equivalent to that in the control group. In conclusion, postoperative mitral valve function and geometry was preserved. This procedure with a low morbidity should be an option for pediatric patients with acute severe MR. PMID:26708377

  8. IL-10 and ET-1 as biomarkers of rheumatic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Sydney Correia; Lima, Maria Regina Menezes; do Nascimento, Hertaline Menezes; Octacilio-Silva, Shirlei; Rodrigues, Tania Maria de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the immunological profile and gene expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in mitral valves of patients with rheumatic fever originated from a reference service in cardiovascular surgery. Methods This was a quantitative, observational and cross-sectional study. Thirty-five subjects (divided into four groups) participated in the study, 25 patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and ten control subjects. The mean age of the sample studied was 34.5 years. Seventeen of them (48.58%) were male and 18 (51.42%) were female. Inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-4 and IL-10) were measured and ten mitral valves of patients who underwent first valve replacement were collected for determination of gene expression of endothelin-1 by real time PCR. Results Among the groups studied (patients vs. controls), there was a statistically significant difference in IL-10 levels (P=0.002), and no differences in other cytokines. Expression of endothelin-1 was observed in 70% of samples. Quantitatively, average of ET-1 expression was 62.85±25.63%. Conclusion Inflammatory cytokine IL-10 participates in the maintenance of chronicity of rheumatic fever in patients who underwent valve replacement and those who are undergoing medical treatment. The expression of endothelin-1 in heart valve lesions in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement confirms its association with inflammatory activity in rheumatic fever. PMID:24896159

  9. Two cases of valve surgery through right anterior minithoracotomy in presence of severe postmastectomy irradiation sternal damage.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Andreas; Ay, Mahmut; Moritz, Anton

    2014-02-01

    High dose postmastectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer can lead to severe postirradiation sternal damage. Under these circumstances, median sternotomy may be associated with a prohibitive risk of postoperative deep sternal wound infection and alternative approaches have to be evaluated. We report herein the use of a right anterior minithoracotomy through the third intercostal space for isolated aortic valve replacement in one and combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in combination with mitral ring decalcification and coronary artery bypass grafting to the proximal right coronary artery in another patient. PMID:22535672

  10. Native valve endocarditis due to Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus oralis.

    PubMed

    Doyuk, Elif; Ormerod, Oliver J; Bowler, Ian C J W

    2002-07-01

    Viridans streptococci are the commonest cause of native valve infective endocarditis (IE). The taxonomy of this group is evolving allowing new disease associations to be made. Streptococcus vestibularis is a recently described member of the viridans group, first isolated from the vestibular mucosa of the human oral cavity. It has rarely been associated with human disease. Streptococcus oralis, another member of the viridans group resident in the human oral cavity is a well known cause of IE and bacteraemia in neutropenic patients. We report the first case of native mitral valve endocarditis due to S. vestibularis in a patient with co-existing S. oralis endocarditis. PMID:12217730

  11. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  12. Vascular calcification and fracture risk

    PubMed Central

    Szulc, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases are public health problems. Fragility fractures are associated with high risk of cardiovascular event and patients with cardiovascular diseases have higher risk of fracture. Severe abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) is associated with higher cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Severe AAC is associated with higher risk of fracture. In cross-sectional studies severe AAC was associated with greater prevalence, higher number and greater severity of vertebral fractures after adjustment for confounders including bone mineral density (BMD). Prospective studies confirm the association between baseline AAC severity and prospectively assessed fracture risk in both sexes. Data on the link between AAC and BMD are discordant. Age, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and low grade systemic inflammation are possible risk factors of severe AAC and fracture risk. However, in clinical studies, the link between AAC and fracture was significant after adjustment for these factors. Data on the association between calcification in other vascular beds and BMD are limited and discordant. PMID:26604939

  13. The role of multimodality imaging in the selection of patients for aortic valve repair.

    PubMed

    Regeer, Madelien V; Versteegh, Michel I M; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve sparing surgery for aortic regurgitation and/or aortopathy serves as an alternative to aortic valve and root replacement. One of the advantages of aortic valve sparing surgery over conventional replacement is that there is no need for life-long anticoagulation, which is particularly attractive in young patients who may receive a mechanical prosthesis otherwise. However, successful aortic valve repair requires high expertise. At present, reparability is determined intraoperatively by direct surgical inspection. Preoperative imaging techniques might improve the patient selection for aortic valve repair. The mechanism of aortic regurgitation, aortic valve morphology and calcification and aortic root dimensions are all of importance when aortic valve repair is considered. The present review focuses on the role of imaging techniques in determining aortic valve reparability. PMID:26536524

  14. Pleural calcification in northwest Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Bazas, T.; Oakes, D.; Gilson, J.C.; Bazas, B.; McDonald, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    Mass miniature radiography in 1969 detected a high prevalence of pleural calcification in three villages in northwest Greece. In 1980 a survey of a 15% sample of the population over the age of 10 was carried out with a 80% response rate. Full-size radiographs, ventilatory capacity measurements, and a detailed questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, type of work, and residence were used. Independent classification of the 408 films by two readers using the ILO/UC scheme showed very few small opacities but a very high prevalence of pleural calcification first evident in young adults and rising to 70% in the elderly. The overall prevalence was 34.7% in men and 21.5% in women. A comparison with the 1969 survey showed a progression rate of 5% per annum. In neither sex was there a significant relation of pleural calcification to smoking, ventilatory capacity, nor type of work, though those classified as field croppers had a slightly higher prevalence. There was no obvious evidence of increased lung cancer or mesothelioma in the village. The agent responsible for this apparently benign condition was not identified.

  15. [Phenomenon of calcification of the stylohyoid ligament].

    PubMed

    Fuat Iondemli; Pavlikhin, O G; Akhmed Arslan

    2004-01-01

    Patients with continuous pain in the pharynx were examined roentgenologically for calcification of the stylohyoid ligaments and the styloid process. Symptoms and surgical outcomes are described in cases with calcification of the stylohyoid process and muscle. Surgical treatment eliminated pain, noise in the ears, chronic pharyngeal inflammation. No recurrences occurred. Histological examination of the removed stylohyoid ligaments detected calcificated hyalin plaques in these ligaments. PMID:15496839

  16. Early surgical intervention or watchful waiting for the management of asymptomatic mitral regurgitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Andrew B.; Patrick, William L.; Cohen, Jeffrey E.; Aribeana, Chiaka N.; Popat, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Background Discordance between studies drives continued debate regarding the best management of asymptomatic severe mitral regurgitation (MR). The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of management plans for asymptomatic severe MR, and compare the effectiveness of a strategy of early surgery to watchful waiting. Methods A systematic review was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies were excluded if they: (I) lacked a watchful waiting cohort; (II) included symptomatic patients; or (III) included etiologies other than degenerative mitral valve disease. The primary outcome of the study was all-cause mortality at 10 years. Secondary outcomes included operative mortality, repair rate, repeat mitral valve surgery, and development of new atrial fibrillation. Results Five observational studies were eligible for review and three were included in the pooled analysis. In asymptomatic patients without class I triggers (symptoms or ventricular dysfunction), pooled analysis revealed a significant reduction in long-term mortality with an early surgery approach [hazard ratio (HR) =0.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21-0.71]. This survival benefit persisted in a sub-group analysis limited to patients without class II triggers (atrial fibrillation or pulmonary hypertension) [relative risk (RR) =0.85; 95% CI: 0.75-0.98]. Aggregate rates of operative mortality did not differ between treatment arms (0.7% vs. 0.7% for early surgery vs. watchful waiting). However, significantly higher repair rates were achieved in the early surgery cohorts (RR =1.10; 95% CI: 1.02-1.18). Conclusions Despite disagreement between individual studies, the present meta-analysis demonstrates that a strategy of early surgery may improve survival and increase the likelihood of mitral valve repair compared with watchful waiting. Early surgery may also benefit patients when instituted prior to the development of class II triggers. PMID:26309823

  17. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach—fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    Background Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Methods Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Results Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ?1.0). Conclusions Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration for further development which may bring the anti-coagulation independent mechanical valve within reach. PMID:26417581

  18. Load-dependent extracellular matrix organization in atrioventricular heart valves: differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S Hamed; Sinha, Aditi; Steward, Earl; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-07-15

    The extracellular matrix of the atrioventricular (AV) valves' leaflets has a key role in the ability of these valves to properly remodel in response to constantly varying physiological loads. While the loading on mitral and tricuspid valves is significantly different, no information is available on how collagen fibers change their orientation in response to these loads. This study delineates the effect of physiological loading on AV valves' leaflets microstructures using Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy. Fresh natural porcine tricuspid and mitral valves' leaflets (n = 12/valve type) were cut and prepared for the experiments. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to compare the microstructural differences between the valves. The specimens were imaged live during the relaxed, loading, and unloading phases using SHG microscopy. The images were analyzed with Fourier decomposition to mathematically seek changes in collagen fiber orientation. Despite the similarities in both AV valves as seen in the histology and immunohistochemistry data, the microstructural arrangement, especially the collagen fiber distribution and orientation in the stress-free condition, were found to be different. Uniaxial loading was dependent on the arrangement of the fibers in their relaxed mode, which led the fibers to reorient in-line with the load throughout the depth of the mitral leaflet but only to reorient in-line with the load in deeper layers of the tricuspid leaflet. Biaxial loading arranged the fibers in between the two principal axes of the stresses independently from their relaxed states. Unlike previous findings, this study concludes that the AV valves' three-dimensional extracellular fiber arrangement is significantly different in their stress-free and uniaxially loaded states; however, fiber rearrangement in response to the biaxial loading remains similar. PMID:26001411

  19. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow and Valve Dynamics in Hearts with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Pinheiro, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease manifested by the thickening of the ventricular wall and often leads to a partial obstruction to the blood flow out of the left ventricle. HCM is recognized as one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes. In a heart with HCM, the hypertrophy usually narrows the blood flow pathway to the aorta and produces a low pressure zone between the mitral valve and the hypertrophy during systole. This low pressure can suck the mitral valve leaflet back and completely block the blood flow into the aorta. In the current study, a sharp interface immersed boundary method flow solver is employed to study the hemodynamics and valve dynamics inside a heart with HCM. The three-dimensional motion and configuration of the left ventricle including mitral valve leaflets and aortic valves are reconstructed based on echo-cardio data sets. The mechanisms of aortic obstruction associated with HCM are investigated. The long term objective of this study is to develop a computational tool to aid in the assessment and surgical management of HCM.

  20. Standards for heart valve surgery in a ‘Heart Valve Centre of Excellence’

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John; Ray, Simon; Prendergast, Bernard; Graham, Tim; Campbell, Brian; Greenhalgh, Donna; Petrou, Mario; Tinkler, Jeremy; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Mestres, Carlos A; Rosenhek, Raphael; Pibarot, Philippe; Otto, Catherine; Sundt, Thoralf

    2015-01-01

    Surgical centres of excellence should include multidisciplinary teams with specialist expertise in imaging, clinical assessment and surgery for patients with heart valve disease. There should be structured training programmes for the staff involved in the periprocedural care of the patient and these should be overseen by national or international professional societies. Good results are usually associated with high individual and centre volumes, but this relationship is complex. Results of surgery should be published by centre and should include rates of residual regurgitation for mitral repairs and reoperation rates matched to the preoperative pathology and risk. PMID:26180639

  1. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383 Section 236.383 Transportation...383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off...every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall be tested at least once every...

  2. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383 Section 236.383 Transportation...383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off...every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall be tested at least once every...

  3. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383 Section 236.383 Transportation...383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off...every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall be tested at least once every...

  4. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383 Section 236.383 Transportation...383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off...every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall be tested at least once every...

  5. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383 Section 236.383 Transportation...383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off...every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall be tested at least once every...

  6. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  7. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  8. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  9. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  10. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  11. Piezoelectric valve

    DOEpatents

    Petrenko, Serhiy Fedorovich

    2013-01-15

    A motorized valve has a housing having an inlet and an outlet to be connected to a pipeline, a saddle connected with the housing, a turn plug having a rod, the turn plug cooperating with the saddle, and a drive for turning the valve body and formed as a piezoelectric drive, the piezoelectric drive including a piezoelectric generator of radially directed standing acoustic waves, which is connected with the housing and is connectable with a pulse current source, and a rotor operatively connected with the piezoelectric generator and kinematically connected with the rod of the turn plug so as to turn the turn plug when the rotor is actuated by the piezoelectric generator.

  12. Right heart transcatheter valve therapies - a review of prostheses for the pulmonary and tricuspid positions.

    PubMed

    Kuetting, Maximilian; Pott, Desiree; Sedaghat, Alexander; Ng, Yue Ann; Egron, Sandrine; Rosefort, Christiane; Werner, Nikos; Sachweh, Joerg; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive, catheter-based treatment of valvular dysfunction has become an integral part of clinical routine. As left heart valvular disease is much more common and thus commercially of interest, transcatheter solutions for the treatment of aortic and mitral valvular defects were the first to become broadly clinically available, while even today options for the right heart valve are rare. This review looks at innovative attempts at developing effective transcatheter heart valve prostheses for the pulmonary and tricuspid heart valves, details their experience and highlights those that have made their way to application in humans. PMID:25418630

  13. Safety and efficacy of enalapril in multivalvular heart disease with significant mitral stenosis--SCOPE-MS.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Anand; Venkatesan, S; Dorairajan, Smrita; Chockalingam, V; Subramaniam, T; Jaganathan, V; Elangovan, S; Alagesan, R; Gnanavelu, G; Arul, A S

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) are often used in preventing and treating heart failure due to regurgitant valve disease. The majority of patients with symptomatic rheumatic heart disease (RHD) have significant mitral stenosis (MS) and are denied ACEI therapy, because of the fear of hypotension in the presence of fixed obstruction. The authors assessed the safety and efficacy of ACEI in 109 consecutive patients with RHD and with significant mitral stenosis (mitral valve orifice, MVO < 1.5 cm2)and with NYHA class III or IV heart failure symptoms. Mean age was 33.1+/-12 years, systolic blood pressure (BP) was 111+/-10, and diastolic BP was 73+/-8 mm Hg. MS was significant in 100 patients with mitral regurgitation in 46, aortic regurgitation in 19, and pulmonary hypertension in 60 patients. After initial stabilization, enalapril 2.5 mg bid was started in hospital and titrated up to 10 mg bid over 2 weeks. NYHA status, Borg score, and 6-minute walk test were assessed at baseline, and at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Seventy-nine of the 100 patients who completed the study had severe MS (MVO < 1.0 cm2). Enalapril was well tolerated by all study patients without hypotension or worsening of symptoms. NYHA class (3.2+/-0.5 baseline vs 2.3+/-0.5 at 4 weeks, p < 0.01) Borg Dyspnea Index (7.6+/-1.3 vs 5.6+/-1.3, p < 0.01), and 6-minute walk distance (226+/-106 vs 299+/-127 m, p < 0.01) improved significantly with enalapril. Patients with associated regurgitant lesions showed more improvement in exercise capacity (120+/-93 vs 39+/-56 m, p < 0.001). Enalapril was well tolerated in patients with RHD with moderate and severe MS. Irrespective of the valve pathology, enalapril improved functional status and exercise capacity with maximum benefit in patients with concomitant regurgitant valvular heart disease. PMID:15793604

  14. Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    DE CARLI, ANGELO; PULCINELLI, FERDINANDO; ROSE, GIACOMO DELLE; PITINO, DARIO; FERRETTI, ANDREA

    2014-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common disease that predominantly affects individuals aged between 40 and 60 years. Women seem to be more affected than men. Various factors have been suggested to play a role in this condition, such as abnormal activity of the thyroid gland, metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes), and genetic predisposition. Various etiological hypotheses have been advanced: the degenerative and multiphasic theories are the two most accredited ones. Clinically, calcific tendinitis is characterized by severe, disabling pain which occurs spontaneously, usually in the morning. There can be concomitant stiffness, giving rise to a frozen shoulder-like clinical picture. Conventional radiography of the shoulder is the most appropriate imaging approach. Most cases resolve spontaneously. Many conservative treatments have been reported in the literature, showing varying levels of evidence of efficacy. Arthroscopic surgery is the orthopedic specialist’s last option. It is to be noted that post-surgical pain can persist for many weeks after the operation. Finally, it is important not to forget the variant characterized by osteolytic involvement of the greater tuberosity, which has been associated with a worse clinical outcome, both after conservative treatment and after surgery. PMID:25606556

  15. Physiopathology of intratendinous calcific deposition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In calcific tendinopathy (CT), calcium deposits in the substance of the tendon, with chronic activity-related pain, tenderness, localized edema and various degrees of decreased range of motion. CT is particularly common in the rotator cuff, and supraspinatus, Achilles and patellar tendons. The presence of calcific deposits may worsen the clinical manifestations of tendinopathy with an increase in rupture rate, slower recovery times and a higher frequency of post-operative complications. The aetiopathogenesis of CT is still controversial, but seems to be the result of an active cell-mediated process and a localized attempt of the tendon to compensate the original decreased stiffness. Tendon healing includes many sequential processes, and disturbances at different stages of healing may lead to different combinations of histopathological changes, diverting the normal healing processes to an abnormal pathway. In this review, we discuss the theories of pathogenesis behind CT. Better understanding of the pathogenesis is essential for development of effective treatment modalities and for improvement of clinical outcomes. PMID:22917025

  16. Plasma valve

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY); Sharma, Sushil (Hinsdale, IL); Noonan, John (Naperville, IL); Rotela, Elbio (Clarendon Hills, IL); Khounsary, Ali (Hinsdale, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

  17. Calcification

    MedlinePLUS

    ... joints, and soft tissue tumors. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 26. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Cellular responses to stress and ...

  18. In vitro generation of atrioventricular heart valve neoscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Weymann, Alexander; Radovits, Tamás; Schmack, Bastian; Li, Shiliang; Korkmaz, Sevil; Soós, Pál; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gabor; Chaimow, Nicole; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-07-01

    Tissue engineering of cardiovascular structures represents a novel approach to improve clinical strategies in heart valve disease treatment. The aim of this study was to engineer decellularized atrioventricular heart valve neoscaffolds with an intact ultrastructure and to reseed them with umbilical cord-derived endothelial cells under physiological conditions in a bioreactor environment. Mitral (n=38) and tricuspid (n=36) valves were harvested from 40 hearts of German Landrace swine from a selected abattoir. Decellularization of atrioventricular heart valves was achieved by a detergent-based cell extraction protocol. Evaluation of the decellularization method was conducted with light microscopy and quantitative analysis of collagen and elastin content. The presence of residual DNA within the decellularized atrioventricular heart valves was determined with spectrophotometric quantification. The described decellularization regime produced full removal of native cells while maintaining the mechanical stability and the quantitative composition of the atrioventricular heart valve neoscaffolds. The surface of the xenogeneic matrix could be successfully reseeded with in vitro-expanded human umbilical cord-derived endothelial cells under physiological flow conditions. After complete decellularization with the detergent-based protocol described here, physiological reseeding of the xenogeneic neoscaffolds resulted in the formation of a confluent layer of human umbilical cord-derived endothelial cells. These results warrant further research toward the generation of atrioventricular heart valve neoscaffolds on the basis of decellularized xenogeneic tissue. PMID:24842040

  19. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  20. Systems Biology of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Andrew; Tintut, Yin; Garfinkel, Alan; Demer, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Vascular calcification, a prevalent and progressive disorder, involves numerous interactive, autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine regulatory mechanisms and is thus ideally suited for analysis using a systems approach. This approach focuses on creating quantitative, testable models of complex biological systems that take into consideration the time dimension. They are usually expressed as mathematical models, and because of their time dependence and complexity, they usually require computer simulation to determine predicted outcomes. Here, we provide an example of such a model used to analyze self-organization and mineralization of vascular stem cells, using partial differential equations capable of accurately predicting experimental outcomes. Such systems-based models are useful in many aspects of cardiovascular medicine. PMID:19818947

  1. 6-Month aortic valve implantation of an off-the-shelf tissue-engineered valve in sheep.

    PubMed

    Syedain, Zeeshan; Reimer, Jay; Schmidt, Jillian; Lahti, Matthew; Berry, James; Bianco, Richard; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Diseased aortic valves often require replacement, with over 30% of the current aortic valve surgeries performed in patients who will outlive a bioprosthetic valve. While many promising tissue-engineered valves have been created in the lab using the cell-seeded polymeric scaffold paradigm, none have been successfully tested long-term in the aortic position of a pre-clinical model. The high pressure gradients and dynamic flow across the aortic valve leaflets require engineering a tissue that has the strength and compliance to withstand high mechanical demand without compromising normal hemodynamics. A long-term preclinical evaluation of an off-the-shelf tissue-engineered aortic valve in the sheep model is presented here. The valves were made from a tube of decellularized cell-produced matrix mounted on a frame. The engineered matrix is primarily composed of collagen, with strength and organization comparable to native valve leaflets. In vitro testing showed excellent hemodynamic performance with low regurgitation, low systolic pressure gradient, and large orifice area. The implanted valves showed large-scale leaflet motion and maintained effective orifice area throughout the duration of the 6-month implant, with no calcification. After 24 weeks implantation (over 17 million cycles), the valves showed no change in tensile mechanical properties. In addition, histology and DNA quantitation showed repopulation of the engineered matrix with interstitial-like cells and endothelialization. New extracellular matrix deposition, including elastin, further demonstrates positive tissue remodeling in addition to recellularization and valve function. Long-term implantation in the sheep model resulted in functionality, matrix remodeling, and recellularization, unprecedented results for a tissue-engineered aortic valve. PMID:26409002

  2. Calcific aorta and coronary artery: two cases of calcific ascending aorta and descending aorta

    PubMed Central

    Idhrees, A Mohammed; Radhakrishnan, Bineesh K; Panicker, Vargheese T; Pillai, Vivek; Karunakaran, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aorta is a disease of old age and is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Here, we present two patients with calcific aorta at different levels. One with a descending porcelain aorta, and modified Bentall's procedure was done. Second is a patient who is having a calcific ascending aorta and coronary artery. Coronary artery bypass grafting from left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending was done for the patient. The calcification and its morbidity had been discussed briefly. PMID:25678909

  3. Coral calcification in a changing ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Studies (CREST) project is to examine how calcification rates in reef-building corals and encrusting coralline algae are changing in response to changes in the ocean environment.

  4. Automatic shutoff valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, S. F.; Overbey, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Cellulose-sponge disk absorbs incoming water and expands with enough force to shut valve. When water recedes, valve opens by squeezing sponge dry to its original size. This direct mechanical action is considered more reliable than solenoid valve.

  5. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have this type of valve. Biological, made of human or animal tissue. These valves may last 10 ... surgery Infection of the new valve Kidney failure Memory loss and loss of mental clarity, or "fuzzy ...

  6. Magnetically operated check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (inventor); Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  7. The relationship between pulp calcifications and salivary gland calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kaswan, Sumita; Maheshwari, Sneha; Rahman, Farzan; Khandelwal, Suneet

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Pulp stones are discrete calcified bodies found in the dental pulp. Sialolithasis is the most common salivary gland disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between the pulp stones and salivary gland stones. Material and Methods: 196 patients were randomly selected from the out patient department for the study. The periapical radiographs for all patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of dental pulp chambers and pulp canals. The intra oral occlusal radiographs were also evaluated to determine the presence or absence of salivary stones. The results were compared and analyzed using the Chi-square test (p<0.001). Results: Salivary gland calcifications were detected in 5 patients. 191 patients had pulp narrowing and 118 patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and salivary stones (p>0.001) and also between pulp stones and salivary gland stones (p>0.001). Conclusions: However, the incidental findings of salivary gland stones on intra oral occlusal radiographs can provide useful information in the early diagnosis of the condition, but in the present study no significant relationship was found between the presence of pulp stones and salivary gland stones. Key words:Pulp stone, salivary gland stone, periapical radiograph, occlusal radiograph. PMID:25674311

  8. The Role of Epigenetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shan-Shan; Lin, Xiao; Yuan, Ling-Qing; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Arterial calcification is highly prevalent and correlated with cardiovascular mortality, especially in patients with ESRD or diabetes. The pathogenesis of arterial calcification is multifactorial, with both genetic and environmental factors being implicated. In recent years, several mechanisms contributing to arterial calcification have been proposed. However, these can only explain a small proportion of the variability in arterial calcification, which is a major obstacle for its prevention and management. Epigenetics has emerged as one of the most promising areas that may fill in some of the gaps in our current knowledge of the interaction between the environmental insults with gene regulation in the development of diseases. Epigenetics refers to heritable and acquired changes in gene transcription that occur independently of the DNA sequence. Well-known components of epigenetic regulation include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs. Epigenetics research in the regulation of arterial calcification has only recently been elucidated. In this review, we will summarise recent progress in epigenetic pathways involved in arterial calcification and discuss potential therapeutic interventions based on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26221588

  9. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... valve pulmonary stenosis; Pulmonary stenosis; Stenosis - pulmonary valve; Balloon valvuloplasty - pulmonary ... water pills) Treat abnormal heartbeats and rhythms Percutaneous balloon pulmonary dilation (valvuloplasty) may be performed when no ...

  10. A case of Starr-Edwards valve thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Margot; Kiess, Marla; Rychel, Valerie; Fofonoff, Doreen; Grewal, Jasmine

    2012-11-01

    Starr-Edwards ball-in-cage prosthetic heart valves, although durable, are associated with a particularly high rate of thromboembolic complications. This valve is seldom used in North America, and is certainly not the valve of choice in a woman of childbearing age. Few reports exist from the 1970s of thrombotic complications in pregnant women with Starr-Edwards prostheses, and the optimal management strategy for such valves is unclear. Here, the case is reported of a 31-year-old woman with a Starr-Edwards prosthesis in the mitral position who was transferred to the authors' center at six weeks' gestation with pulmonary edema. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated thrombosis of the prosthetic valve, with a mean gradient of 23 mmHg. When treated initially with intravenous heparin and furosemide the patient improved significantly; however, the optimal management going forward was unclear. Here, the options for anticoagulation during pregnancy and for management in the event of valve thrombosis are reviewed. In the absence of any clear guidelines, a thorough discussion of the various risks and benefits with the patient is necessary, but ultimately any consideration of the risk to the mother is paramount. PMID:23409362

  11. Culturing Mouse Cardiac Valves in the Miniature Tissue Culture System.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Lieber, Samuel C; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Gaussin, Vincian; Goumans, Marie José

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a major burden in the Western world and no effective treatment is available. This is mainly due to a lack of knowledge of the molecular, cellular and mechanical mechanisms underlying the maintenance and/or loss of the valvular structure. Current models used to study valvular biology include in vitro cultures of valvular endothelial and interstitial cells. Although, in vitro culturing models provide both cellular and molecular mechanisms, the mechanisms involved in the 3D-organization of the valve remain unclear. While in vivo models have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying valvular development, insight into adult valvular biology is still elusive. In order to be able to study the regulation of the valvular 3D-organization on tissue, cellular and molecular levels, we have developed the Miniature Tissue Culture System. In this ex vivo flow model the mitral or the aortic valve is cultured in its natural position in the heart. The natural configuration and composition of the leaflet are maintained allowing the most natural response of the valvular cells to stimuli. The valves remain viable and are responsive to changing environmental conditions. This MTCS may provide advantages on studying questions including but not limited to, how does the 3D organization affect valvular biology, what factors affect 3D organization of the valve, and which network of signaling pathways regulates the 3D organization of the valve. PMID:26555276

  12. Age-related changes in aortic valve hemostatic protein regulation

    PubMed Central

    Balaoing, Liezl R.; Post, Allison D.; Liu, Huiwen; Minn, Kyung Taeck; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Objective While valvular endothelial cells (VECs) have unique responses compared to vascular ECs, valvular regulation of hemostasis is not well understood. Heart valves remodel throughout a person's lifetime, resulting in changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and tissue mechanical properties that may affect VEC hemostatic function. This work assessed VEC regulation of hemostasis in situ and in vitro as a function of specimen age. Approach and Results Porcine aortic valves (PAV) were assigned into one of three age groups: YNG (6 weeks), ADT (6 months), or OLD (2 years). Histology of valves showed that secreted thrombotic/anti-thrombotic proteins localize at the valve endothelium, and tissue interior. Gene expression and immunostains for von Willebrand factor (VWF), tissue factor pathway inhibitor, and tissue plasminogen activator in YNG PAVECs was higher than in OLD, while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in OLD were higher than in YNG and ADT. Histamine stimulated YNG PAVECs released higher concentrations of VWF proteins than OLD, while the fraction of cleaved VWF-140 fragments were not different between age groups. A CAVD in vitro model using valvular interstitial cells (VICs) confirmed that VWF in culture significantly increased VIC nodule formation and calcification. Conclusions Hemostatic protein regulation in AV tissues and VECs changes with age. The presence of VWF and other potential hemostatic proteins increase VIC calcification in vitro. Therefore, the increased capacity of elderly valves to sequester the hemostatic proteins, together with age-associated loss of ECM organization warrants investigation into potential roles for these proteins in the formation of calcific nodules. PMID:24177329

  13. Paravalvular leak closure for persisting aortic regurgitation after implantation of the CoreValve transcatheter valve.

    PubMed

    Poliacikova, Petra; Hildick-Smith, David

    2014-07-01

    Significant aortic regurgitation after TAVI results in lack of symptomatic and prognostic benefit from the procedure and generally requires intervention. While most of the regurgitations can be successfully targeted with standard techniques, occasional patients have restrictive calcification resistant to post-dilatation and significant regurgitation persists. We present a case of refractory aortic regurgitation successfully treated with percutaneous paravalvular leak closure. An 81-year-old man with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis underwent a transfemoral CoreValve TAVI in December 2009. He had significant aortic regurgitation refractory to medical and interventional therapy including balloon post-dilatation, valve repositioning and valve-in-valve reimplantation. Aortic regurgitation remained severe and therefore in early 2013, we proceeded with an attempted percutaneous closure of the residual paraprosthetic leak. Using 6-French femoral access and a Terumo wire, the defect was successfully crossed with a 4-French Multipurpose catheter and an 8 mm Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4 device (St. Jude Medical) was deployed through this catheter, resulting in abolition of aortic regurgitation on aortography and TOE, with associated excellent clinical response. Refractory paravalvular aortic regurgitation post CoreValve implantation can be successfully treated using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4 device. PMID:24130146

  14. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Suchá, Dominika; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, Lex A; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-09-01

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerged as new potential imaging modalities for valve prostheses. We present an overview of the possibilities and pitfalls of CT and MRI for PHV assessment based on a systematic literature review of all experimental and patient studies. For this, a comprehensive systematic search was performed in PubMed and Embase on March 24, 2015, containing CT/MRI and PHV synonyms. Our final selection yielded 82 articles on surgical valves. CT allowed adequate assessment of most modern PHVs and complemented echocardiography in detecting the obstruction cause (pannus or thrombus), bioprosthesis calcifications, and endocarditis extent (valve dehiscence and pseudoaneurysms). No clear advantage over echocardiography was found for the detection of vegetations or periprosthetic regurgitation. Whereas MRI metal artifacts may preclude direct prosthesis analysis, MRI provided information on PHV-related flow patterns and velocities. MRI demonstrated abnormal asymmetrical flow patterns in PHV obstruction and allowed prosthetic regurgitation assessment. Hence, CT shows great clinical relevance as a complementary imaging tool for the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected PHV obstruction and endocarditis. MRI shows potential for functional PHV assessment although more studies are required to provide diagnostic reference values to allow discrimination of normal from pathological conditions. PMID:26353926

  15. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . The significance of arterial calcification in unstable plaques].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Mayumi; Ueda, Makiko

    2015-05-01

    Plaque rupture or erosion with subsequent thrombus formation is the principal mechanism underlying the sudden onset of acute coronary syndromes. Plaque inflammation and increased oxidative stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of plaque destabilization. Macrophages, T lymphocytes, and neutrophils are the dominant types of inflammatory cells at human coronary unstable plaques, such as ruptured plaques or eroded plaques. Calcification is a common finding in human atherosclerotic lesions, and arterial calcification is generally classified into calcification within an atherosclerotic plaque, and Mönckeberg's medial calcific sclerosis characterized by calcific deposits within the media of small and medium-sized muscular arteries. It has been reported that a spotty pattern of calcification is associated with coronary unstable ruptured plaques in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) have a high prevalence of arterial calcification and cardiovascular events. We recently demonstrated that plasma oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels significantly increased after a single HD session. This HD session-related increase in plasma oxidized LDL levels could contribute to the progression and acceleration of atherosclerosis and arterial calcification, leading to the development of cardiovascular events in HD patients. PMID:25926571

  16. Will Catheter Interventions Replace Surgery for Valve Abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    O’Byrne, Michael L; Gillespie, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Catheter-based valve technologies have evolved rapidly over the last decade. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become a routine procedure in high-risk adult patients with calcific aortic stenosis. In patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement represents a transformative technology for right ventricular outflow tract dysfunction with the potential to expand to other indications. This review aims to summarize 1) the current state of the art for transcatheter valve replacement (TVR) in CHD, 2) the expanding indications for TVR, and 3) the technological obstacles to optimizing TVR. Recent findings Multiple case series have demonstrated that TVR with the Melody transcatheter pulmonary valve in properly selected patients is safe, effective, and durable in short-term follow-up. The Sapien transcatheter heart valve represents an alternative device with similar safety and efficacy in limited studies. Innovative use of current valves has demonstrated the flexibility of TVR, while highlighting the need for devices to address the broad range of post-operative anatomies either with a single device or strategies to prepare the outflow tract for subsequent device deployment. Summary The potential of TVR has not been fully realized, but holds promise in treatment of CHD. PMID:24281347

  17. [History, present and future of biomaterials used for artificial heart valves].

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, Benita; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Artificial heart valves can be classified into mechanical and biological. We have three types of mechanical heart valves: caged ball, tilting disc and bileaflet. Mechanical heart valves are made from various materials. They may be produced from metals, ceramics and polymers, e.g.: stainless steel, titanium, silicone, pyrolytic carbon. Biological valves are made from synthetic components (e.g.: PTFE, Dacron) and materials of biological origin (e.g.: cow pericardium, pig heart valve). We have also identified transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). TAVI may be produced from metals, ceramics and polymers (e.g.: stainless steel, titanium, Dacron) and biological material (e.g.: pig heart valve). This paper describes advantages and disadvantages of different types of artificial heart valves. The lifespan of mechanical valves is 20-30 years and they can be used for patients of any age. Mechanical valves have also disadvantages--anticoagulants are required to prevent thrombosis. Biological valves are made from natural materials, so they do not require prolonged anticoagulation. Their lifetime is 10-15 years, so they are offered to patients over 40 years. Another problem is the occurrence of calcification. PMID:24377185

  18. Inflammatory cytokines promote mesenchymal transformation in embryonic and adult valve endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Farrar, Emily J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inflammatory activation of valve endothelium is an early phase of aortic valve disease pathogenesis, but subsequent mechanisms are poorly understood. Adult valve endothelial cells retain the developmental ability to undergo endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EndMT), but a biological role has not been established. Here we test whether and how inflammatory cytokines (TNF-? and IL-6) regulate EndMT in embryonic and adult valve endothelium. Methods and Results Using in vitro 3D collagen gel culture assays with primary cells, we determined that IL-6 and TNF-? induce EndMT and cell invasion in dose dependent manners. Inflammatory-EndMT occurred through an Akt/NF?B-dependent pathway in both adult and embryonic stages. In embryonic valves, inflammatory-EndMT required canonical TGF? signaling through Alk2/5 to drive EndMT. In adult valve endothelium, however, inflammatory-induced EndMT still occurred when Alk2/5 signaling was blocked. Inflammatory receptor gene expression was significantly upregulated in vivo during embryonic valve maturation. Endothelial-derived mesenchymal cells expressing activated NF?B were found distal to calcific lesions in diseased human aortic valves. Conclusions Inflammatory cytokine induced EndMT in valve endothelium is present in both embryonic and adult stages, acting through Akt/NF?B but differently utilizing TGF? signaling. Molecular signatures of valve EndMT may be important diagnostic and therapeutic targets in early valve disease. PMID:23104848

  19. Expression of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN Genes in Mitral Valvular Interstitial Cells within Microfiber Reinforced Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Maryam; Javadi, Gholamreza; Agdami, Nasser; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of heart valve disease is increasing worldwide and the number of heart valve replacements is expected to increase in the future. By mimicking the main tissue structures and properties of heart valve, tissue engineering offers new options for the replacements. Applying an appropriate scaffold in fabricating tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is of importance since it affects the secretion of the main extracellular matrix (ECM) components, collagen 1 and elastin, which are crucial in providing the proper mechanical properties of TEHVs. Materials and Methods Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in this experi- mental study, the relative expression levels of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN were obtained for three samples of each examined sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells (MVICs)-seeded onto electrospun poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly (?-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibrous, gelatin and hyaluronic acid based hydrogel-only and composite (PGS-PCL/hydrogel) scaffolds. This composite has been shown to create a synthetic three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment with appropriate mechanical and biological properties for MVICs. Results Cell viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types. Our results showed that the level of relative expression of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN genes was higher in the encapsulated composite scaffolds compared to PGS-PCL-only and hydrogel-only scaffolds with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The encapsulated composite scaffolds are more conducive to ECM secretion over the PGS-PCL-only and hydrogel-only scaffolds. This composite scaffold can serve as a model scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:26464819

  20. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  1. Rotary pneumatic valve

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  2. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  3. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  4. Left ventricular rupture postmitral valve replacement: surviving a catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Samarjit; Mohanty, Jitendu; Mohapatra, Raghunath; Nayak, Debashish

    2015-01-01

    One of the dreaded mechanical complications of mitral valve replacement (MVR) is rupture of the left ventricle (LV). This report describes the early diagnosis and successful repair of rupture of posterior wall of LV in an elderly patient who underwent MVR. We have discussed the risk factors and perioperative issues implicated in such complication. The anesthesiologist as an intra-operative echocardiographer can aid in identifying the patient at risk. Though important surgical steps are necessary to prevent the complication; nonetheless, the anesthesiologist needs to take key measures in the perioperative period. PMID:25566717

  5. The kinetics of Dissolution of Biologically Formed Calcific Deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros

    2015-04-01

    The calcification of aortic valves results in the formation of non stoichiometric apatitic deposits which may have serious health implications because of the fact that these minerals adhere tenaciously on tissues like heart valves and arteries causing permanent damage which is partly due to their low solubility. In the present work, calcium phosphate biominerals were extracted from clinically removed tissues and were characterized with respect to their mineralogical constituents and other properties including morphology, specific surface area analyses and thermogravimetric analysis. In all cases, the biominerals may be described as non stoichiometric apatitic materials, although traces of the precursor phase of octacalcium phosphate (Ca8H2(PO4)6•5H2O, OCP) were identified on the basis of their morphological examination. The kinetics of dissolution of the biomineral deposits was investigated in solutions undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH, HAP) at conditions of constant undersaturation at pH 7.40, 37°C, 0.15M NaCl. Synthetic stoichiometric HAP was used as the control mineral. The experiments in the present work used solutions prepared from calcium chloride and sodium hydrogen phosphate and the relative undersaturation, ?, was in the range 0.38-0.74 with respect to HAP and 0.49-0.85 with respect to OCP (?=1 in water). The dissolution process started immediately upon the introduction of an accurately weighted amount of powdered biomineral in the undersaturated solutions homogenized by magnetic stirring. Inert atmosphere was ensured with the bubbling of water vapor saturated nitrogen through the demineralizing solutions. A glass/Ag/AgCl combination electrode was used as a probe to monitor the process and to control the addition of diluent solutions with the stoichiometry of the dissolving mineral. The measurements of the rates of crystal dissolution, showed a parabolic dependence on the relative solution undersaturation for HAP and higher order (ca.3) for the biominerals. This mode of dependence for both minerals studied, suggested surface diffusion controlled mechanism for their dissolution. The apparent rates of dissolution of the calcific deposits were higher in comparison to the corresponding value of the stoichiometric HAP. This finding is due to the higher apparent solubility of the carbonate and other metals containing biominerals. It should be noted that the dissolution affected the morphology of the prismatic crystallites which became thinner and shorter suggesting that the dissolution was rather uniform in the a, b and c axes of the prismatic crystallites. ACKNOWLEGMENT This research was partially funded by the European Union (European Social Fund-ESF) and Greek National Funds through the Operational program Education and Lifelong Learning' under the action Aristeia II (Code No 4420).

  6. Vacuum breaker valve assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, J.L.; Upton, H.A.

    1999-04-27

    Breaker valve assemblies for a simplified boiling water nuclear reactor are described. The breaker valve assembly, in one form, includes a valve body and a breaker valve. The valve body includes an interior chamber, and an inlet passage extends from the chamber and through an inlet opening to facilitate transporting particles from outside of the valve body to the interior chamber. The breaker valve is positioned in the chamber and is configured to substantially seal the inlet opening. Particularly, the breaker valve includes a disk which is sized to cover the inlet opening. The disk is movably coupled to the valve body and is configured to move substantially concentrically with respect to the valve opening between a first position, where the disk completely covers the inlet opening, and a second position, where the disk does not completely cover the inlet opening. 1 fig.

  7. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  8. Valve for fluid control

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  9. Effect of mitral orifice shape on intra-ventricular filling fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Angirish, Yagna; Yoganathan, Ajit; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2013-11-01

    The natural geometry of the mitral orifice is D-shaped. However, most current designs of prosthetic valves employ O-shaped orifice geometry. The goal of this study was to compare the effect of geometrical modification between the D and O orifice on the intra-ventricular fluid dynamics during diastolic filling. The different mitral orifice geometries were incorporated into an in vitro left heart simulator consisting of a flexible-walled anatomical left ventricle (LV) physical model enclosed in an acrylic housing. Physiological flow rates and pressures were obtained via tuning systemic resistance and compliance elements in the flow loop. A programmable piston pump was used to generate the LV model wall motion. 2D Particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted along multiple longitudinal planes perpendicular to the annulus plane. During peak diastole, the incoming jet width at the LV central plane was smaller for the D-orifice than that of the O-orifice. Further, the core of the vortex ring in the D-orifice was reduced in size compared to that of the O-orifice. The spatiotemporal spreading of the inflow jet as well as the propagation of the vortex ring will be discussed. This study was funded by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (RO1HL70262).

  10. Pseudoaneurysm of the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Albert; Poppas, Athena; Mansoor, Atizaz; Fernandez, Antonio B

    2015-01-01

    A pseudoaneurysm of the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa is a rare but potentially fatal complication seen primarily in the context of infective endocarditis. In this study, we discuss a case of infective endocarditis that was complicated by the rupture of a pseudoaneurysm of the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa. We review the salient echocardiographic findings of this clinical condition. PMID:25050527

  11. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Scheiber, Daniel; Veulemans, Verena; Horn, Patrick; Chatrou, Martijn L.; Potthoff, Sebastian A.; Kelm, Malte; Schurgers, Leon J.; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP) is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation (100 µg/g diet) on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05) and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05) calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01). MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression (10-fold; p < 0.05). CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures. PMID:26295257

  12. A contrast agent for MRI of calcifications in breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Marmurek, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Clinical x-ray mammography cannot delineate between hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate, the respective forms of calcification in malignant and benign breast tumors. The water-poor nature of solid calcifications makes them ...

  13. Clinical Use of Doppler Echocardiography in Organic Mitral Regurgitation: From Diagnosis to Patients' Management

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Antonio; Pasquale, Ferdinando; Biagini, Elena; Barberini, Francesco; Ferlito, Marinella; Leone, Ornella; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mitral regurgitation (MR) is essential for any care provider, and not only for those directly involved in the management of cardiovascular diseases. This happens because MR is the most frequent valvular lesion in North America and the second most common form of valve disease requiring surgery in Europe. Furthermore, due to the ageing of the general population and the reduced mortality from acute cardiovascular events, the prevalence of MR is expected to increase further. Doppler echocardiography is essential both for the diagnosis and the clinical management of MR. In the present article, we sought to provide a practical step-by-step approach to help either performing a Doppler echocardiography or interpreting its findings in light of contemporary knowledge on organic (but not only) MR. PMID:26448820

  14. Fibroblast involvement in soft connective tissue calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Ivonne; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Cianciulli, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibers and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization. PMID:23467434

  15. Cellular Changes during Renal Failure-Induced Inflammatory Aortic Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Mahmoud; Duvdevan, Nitsan; Meir, Karen; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic valve calcification (AVC) secondary to renal failure (RF) is an inflammation-regulated process, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. We sought to assess the cellular processes that are involved in the early phases of aortic valve disease using a unique animal model of RF-associated AVC. Methods Aortic valves were obtained from rats that were fed a uremia-inducing diet exclusively for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks as well as from controls. Pathological examination of the valves included histological characterization, von Kossa staining, and antigen expression analyses. Results After 2 weeks, we noted a significant increase in urea and creatinine levels, reflecting RF. RF parameters exacerbated until the Week 5 and plateaued. Whereas no histological changes or calcification was observed in the valves of any study group, macrophage accumulation became apparent as early as 2 weeks after the diet was started and rose after 3 weeks. By western blot, osteoblast markers were expressed after 2 weeks on the diet and decreased after 6 weeks. Collagen 3 was up-regulated after 3 weeks, plateauing at 4 weeks, whereas collagen 1 levels peaked at 2 and 4 weeks. Fibronectin levels increased gradually until Week 5 and decreased at 6 weeks. We observed early activation of the ERK pathway, whereas other pathways remained unchanged. Conclusions We concluded that RF induces dramatic changes at the cellular level, including macrophage accumulation, activation of cell signaling pathway and extracellular matrix modification. These changes precede valve calcification and may increase propensity for calcification, and have to be investigated further. PMID:26070132

  16. In vitro evaluation of a novel hemodynamically optimized trileaflet polymeric prosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Sheriff, Jawaad; Kuetting, Maximilian; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-02-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease is the most common and life threatening form of valvular heart disease, characterized by stenosis and regurgitation, which is currently treated at the symptomatic end-stages via open-heart surgical replacement of the diseased valve with, typically, either a xenograft tissue valve or a pyrolytic carbon mechanical heart valve. These options offer the clinician a choice between structural valve deterioration and chronic anticoagulant therapy, respectively, effectively replacing one disease with another. Polymeric prosthetic heart valves (PHV) offer the promise of reducing or eliminating these complications, and they may be better suited for the new transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure, which currently utilizes tissue valves. New evidence indicates that the latter may incur damage during implantation. Polymer PHVs may also be incorporated into pulsatile circulatory support devices such as total artificial heart and ventricular assist devices that currently employ mechanical PHVs. Development of polymer PHVs, however, has been slow due to the lack of sufficiently durable and biocompatible polymers. We have designed a new trileaflet polymer PHV for surgical implantation employing a novel polymer-xSIBS-that offers superior bio-stability and durability. The design of this polymer PHV was optimized for reduced stresses, improved hemodynamic performance, and reduced thrombogenicity using our device thrombogenicity emulation (DTE) methodology, the results of which have been published separately. Here we present our new design, prototype fabrication methods, hydrodynamics performance testing, and platelet activation measurements performed in the optimized valve prototype and compare it to the performance of a gold standard tissue valve. The hydrodynamic performance of the two valves was comparable in all measures, with a certain advantage to our valve during regurgitation. There was no significant difference between the platelet activation rates of our polymer valve and the tissue valve, indicating that similar to the latter, its recipients may not require anticoagulation. This work proves the feasibility of our optimized polymer PHV design and brings polymeric valves closer to clinical viability. PMID:23445066

  17. Unusual mechanism of myocardial infarction in prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Fernando A; Campos, Vanessa G; da Cunha, Claudio R; de Oliveira, Felipe Bezerra Martins; Otto, Maria Estefânia Bosco; Monte, Guilherme U

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve and severe calcific aortic stenosis was submitted to aortic valve replacement with a stented bioprosthesis. He developed Staphylococcus epidermidis prosthetic valve endocarditis a month later, presenting in the emergency room with acute myocardial infarction. The mechanism of myocardial ischemia was a large aortic root abscess causing left main extrinsic compression. He was urgently taken to the operating room, and an aortic root replacement with cryopreserved homograft was performed, associated with autologous pericardium patch closure of aortic to right atrium fistula and coronary artery bypass grafting of the left anterior descending. After a difficult postoperative period with multiple problems, he was eventually discharged home. At 36-month follow-up, he is asymptomatic with no recurrent infection, and the left main coronary artery is widely patent on control chest computed tomography. PMID:26045678

  18. A Rare Case of Aortic Valve Thrombosis in Patient with Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grolla, Elisabetta; Dalla Vestra, Michele; Bonanni, Luca; Cutolo, Ada; Rigo, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is characterized by persistent eosinophilia and eosinophil-mediated organ-system damage. Cardiac thrombosis and thromboembolic complications represent common causes of morbidity and mortality and usually involve cardiac ventricles or mitral and prosthetic valves, while the involvement of the aortic valve is extremely rare in HES. Here we report peculiar multimodality images of an atypical case of extended thrombosis of the aortic valve, complicated by myocardial ischemia and asymptomatic cerebral ischemia, likely due to thrombus embolization, occurring in a 48-year-old man with HES. Prompt anticoagulant and steroid therapy lead to rapid and complete resolution of the thrombotic lesions, allowing preserving the native valve and preventing further embolic events. PMID:26435854

  19. A Rare Case of Aortic Valve Thrombosis in Patient with Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grolla, Elisabetta; Dalla Vestra, Michele; Bonanni, Luca; Cutolo, Ada; Rigo, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is characterized by persistent eosinophilia and eosinophil-mediated organ-system damage. Cardiac thrombosis and thromboembolic complications represent common causes of morbidity and mortality and usually involve cardiac ventricles or mitral and prosthetic valves, while the involvement of the aortic valve is extremely rare in HES. Here we report peculiar multimodality images of an atypical case of extended thrombosis of the aortic valve, complicated by myocardial ischemia and asymptomatic cerebral ischemia, likely due to thrombus embolization, occurring in a 48-year-old man with HES. Prompt anticoagulant and steroid therapy lead to rapid and complete resolution of the thrombotic lesions, allowing preserving the native valve and preventing further embolic events. PMID:26435854

  20. Percutaneous pulmonary and tricuspid valve implantations: An update

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Daehnert, Ingo; Lurz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The field of percutaneous valvular interventions is one of the most exciting and rapidly developing within interventional cardiology. Percutaneous procedures focusing on aortic and mitral valve replacement or interventional treatment as well as techniques of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation have already reached worldwide clinical acceptance and routine interventional procedure status. Although techniques of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation have been described just a decade ago, two stent-mounted complementary devices were successfully introduced and more than 3000 of these procedures have been performed worldwide. In contrast, percutaneous treatment of tricuspid valve dysfunction is still evolving on a much earlier level and has so far not reached routine interventional procedure status. Taking into account that an “interdisciplinary challenging”, heterogeneous population of patients previously treated by corrective, semi-corrective or palliative surgical procedures is growing inexorably, there is a rapidly increasing need of treatment options besides redo-surgery. Therefore, the review intends to reflect on clinical expansion of percutaneous pulmonary and tricuspid valve procedures, to update on current devices, to discuss indications and patient selection criteria, to report on clinical results and finally to consider future directions. PMID:25914786

  1. Polymeric trileaflet prosthetic heart valves: evolution and path to clinical reality

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Hossainy, Syed; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Present prosthetic heart valves, while hemodynamically effective, remain limited by progressive structural deterioration of tissue valves or the burden of chronic anticoagulation for mechanical valves. An idealized valve prosthesis would eliminate these limitations. Polymeric heart valves (PHVs), fabricated from advanced polymeric materials, offer the potential of durability and hemocompatibility. Unfortunately, the clinical realization of PHVs to date has been hampered by findings of in vivo calcification, degradation and thrombosis. Here, the authors review the evolution of PHVs, evaluate the state of the art of this technology and propose a pathway towards clinical reality. In particular, the authors discuss the development of a novel aortic PHV that may be deployed via transcatheter implantation, as well as its optimization via device thrombogenicity emulation. PMID:23249154

  2. Quickly Removable Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, John S.

    1988-01-01

    Unit removed with minimal disturbance. Valve inlet and outlet ports adjacent to each other on same side of valve body. Ports inserted into special manifold on fluid line. Valve body attached to manifold by four bolts or, alternatively, by toggle clamps. Electromechanical actuator moves in direction parallel to fluid line to open and close valve. When necessary to clean valve, removed simply by opening bolts or toggle clamps. No need to move or separate ports of fluid line. Valve useful where disturbance of fluid line detrimental or where fast maintenance essential - in oil and chemical industries, automotive vehicles, aircraft, and powerplants.

  3. Ball valve extractor

    DOEpatents

    Herndon, Charles (Walterboro, SC); Brown, Roger A. (North Augusta, SC)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for removing a ball valve is provided. The ball valve removal tool provides a handle sliding along the length of a shaft. One end of the shaft is secured within an interior cavity of a ball valve while the opposite end of the shaft defines a stop member. By providing a manual sliding force to the handle, the handle impacts the stop member and transmits the force to the ball valve. The direction of the force is along the shaft of the removal tool and disengages the ball valve from the ball valve housing.

  4. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . The effect of phosphate binders on vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Norio

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is the abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) that directly affects the prognosis in relation with cardiovascular diseases. Phosphate binders (PB) are widely used to prevent hyperphosphatemia that can lead to vascular calcification. Two types of PB are available ; calcium (Ca) -based PB and non-Ca-based PB. Non-Ca-based PB has been shown to retard the progression of vascular calcification, while there is a great concern that Ca overload can promote calcification. Moreover, the newer non-Ca-based PBs have been developed including iron and magnesium. We must pay attention to select proper types of PB with costs, pill burdens and specific circumstances observed in Japan. PMID:25926575

  5. [Heart valve and myocardial tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Cebotari, Serghei; Tudorache, Igor; Schilling, Tobias; Haverich, Axel

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac function, including the heart muscle and valves, can be severely altered by congenital and acquired heart diseases. Several graft materials are currently used to replace diseased cardiac tissue and valvular segments. Implantable grafts are either non-vital or can trigger an immune response which leads to graft calcification and degeneration. None of the existing grafts have the ability to remodel and grow in tandem with the physiological growth of a child and therefore require re-operation. Novel approaches such as tissue engineering have emerged as possible alternatives for cardiac reconstruction. The main concept of tissue engineering includes the use of biological and artificial scaffolds that form the shape of the organ structures for subsequent tissue replacement, which will provide absolute biocompatibility, no thrombogenicity, no teratogenicity, long-term durability and growth.Heart valve tissue engineering represents an important field especially in pediatric patients with valve pathologies. In order to create an autologous valve equivalent myofibroblasts and/or endothelial cells are seeded on specially designed scaffolds. Here we describe the different types of cell sources and different types of matrices currently used in heart valve tissue engineering. Valve manufacture is carried out in specially designed bioreactors providing physiological conditions. The number of clinical studies using tissue engineered valves is still limited; however, several promising results have already demonstrated their durability and ability to grow.Myocardial tissue engineering aims to repair, replace and regenerate damaged cardiac tissue using tissue constructs created ex vivo. Conceivable indications for clinical application of tissue engineered myocardial-implant substitutes include ischemic cardiomyopathies, as well as right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction in patients with congenital heart diseases. Therapeutic application of functional (contractile) tissue engineered heart muscle appears feasible once key issues such as identification of the suitable human cell source, large scale expansion and suitable scaffolds are solved. In addition, the present article discusses the importance of vascularization as an important prerequisite for successful bio-artificial myocardial tissue.Further experimental and clinical research on cardiovascular tissue engineering is felt to be of great importance for others as well as for us in order to create an ideal heart valve/myocardial substitute and help our patients with advanced cardiac pathologies. PMID:20631970

  6. Immediate effect of balloon valvuloplasty on hemostatic changes in mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zaki, A; Salama, M; El Masry, M; Abou-Freikha, M; Abou-Ammo, D; Sweelum, M; Mashhour, E; Elhendy, A

    2000-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess right and left atrial hemostatic function in patients with mitral stenosis (MS) and to investigate the immediate effect of balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV) on hemostatic function. BMV was performed in 28 patients with MS (age 29 +/- 8 years) who had sinus rhythm and no left atrial (LA) thrombus. Right and left atrial biochemical markers of platelet activity (platelet factor 4 [PF4] and B thromboglobulin [BTG]), coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex [TAT]), and fibrinolytic activity (D-dimer) were measured before and 30 minutes after BMV. Right atrial levels of these markers were also measured in 20 control subjects. Compared with control subjects, patients with MS had higher right atrial levels of PF4 (30 +/- 15 vs 5 +/- 2 IU/ml), BTG (231 +/- 53 vs 30 +/- 8 IU/ml), TAT (7 +/- 4 vs 2 +/- 0.3 microg/L), and D-dimer (380 +/- 145 vs 160 +/- 35 ng/ml, p < 0.0001 in all). TAT levels were higher in the left atrium than in the right atrium of patients before BMV (8 +/- 4 vs 7 +/- 4 microg/L, p < 0.0001). BMV was successful (final mitral valve area > or = 1.5 cm2 and > or = 50% increase of the initial valve area) in all patients. There was a significant reduction of LA levels of PF4 (35 +/- 8 to 26 +/- 9 IU/ml, p < 0.0001), BTG (225 +/- 41 to 196 +/- 28 IU/ml, p < 0.001), and TAT (10 +/- 5 to 7 +/- 1 microg/L, p < 0.05) in the 16 patients with LA pressure < 10 mm Hg after BMV, whereas these markers were not reduced in the 12 patients with left atrial pressure > or = 10 mm Hg after BMV. These data indicate that platelet function, coagulation status, and fibrinolytic activity are increased regionally in the left atrium and in the systemic circulation in patients with MS and sinus rhythm in the absence of LA thrombus. Successful BMV induces a significant reduction of prethrombotic status in patients with low LA pressure after the procedure. Patients with high LA pressure after BMV maintain a high prethrombotic state and may be considered at an increased risk of thromboembolism after the procedure. PMID:11078309

  7. Associations between Thyroid Hormones, Calcification Inhibitor Levels and Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Christiaan Lucas; Olauson, Hannes; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Barany, Peter; Vermeer, Cees; Drummen, Nadja; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vascular calcification is a common, serious and elusive complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a pro-calcifying risk factor, non-thyroidal illness may promote vascular calcification through a systemic lowering of vascular calcification inhibitors such as matrix-gla protein (MGP) and Klotho. Methods and Material In 97 ESRD patients eligible for living donor kidney transplantation, blood levels of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4 and TSH), total uncarboxylated MGP (t-ucMGP), desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II), and soluble Klotho (sKlotho) were measured. The degree of coronary calcification and arterial stiffness were assessed by means of cardiac CT-scans and applanation tonometry, respectively. Results fT3 levels were inversely associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores and measures of arterial stiffness, and positively with dp-ucMGP and sKlotho concentrations. Subfractions of MGP, PIVKA-II and sKlotho did not associate with CAC scores and arterial stiffness. fT4 and TSH levels were both inversely associated with CAC scores, but not with arterial stiffness. Discussion The positive associations between fT3 and dp-ucMGP and sKlotho suggest that synthesis of MGP and Klotho is influenced by thyroid hormones, and supports a link between non-thyroidal illness and alterations in calcification inhibitor levels. However, the absence of an association between serum calcification inhibitor levels and coronary calcification/arterial stiffness and the fact that MGP and Klotho undergo post-translational modifications underscore the complexity of this association. Further studies, measuring total levels of MGP and membrane bound Klotho, should examine this proposed pathway in further detail. PMID:26147960

  8. Radiographic evidence of calcification in pulmonary hamartomas.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, M. S.; McElvein, R. B.; Ho, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    Eight cases of solitary intrapulmonary hamartomas are presented to show the unusually high frequency of calcification (75%, six of eight cases) in this series. Possible contributory factors were high percentage of chondromatous variant (seven of eight cases), large size of the tumors, and use of computed tomography. Images Figure PMID:1507247

  9. Pro: Cardiovascular calcifications are clinically relevant.

    PubMed

    Bover, Jordi; Evenepoel, Pieter; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Vervloet, Marc G; Brandenburg, Vincent; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Massy, Ziad A; Cozzolino, Mario

    2015-03-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that mineral and bone disorders (MBDs) contribute to the excessively high cardiovascular (CV) disease morbidity and mortality observed in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). There is ongoing debate as to whether screening for CV calcification, one of the hallmarks of CKD-MBD, should be implemented in clinical practice in patients with CKD. Issues to be considered in this controversy relate to prevalence, severity, relevance, and last but not least, modifiability and reversibility of vascular and valvular calcifications in the setting of CKD. The recent expansion of the armamentarium to treat CKD-MBD (calcium-free phosphate binders and calcimimetics) creates new opportunities. Mounting experimental and clinical evidence indicates that progression of CV calcification may indeed be attenuated. Whether this will translate into better outcomes remains to be proven. We acknowledge that hard outcome data so far are limited and, overall, yielded inconclusive results. Nevertheless, in an era in which personalized medicine has gained much popularity, we consider it reasonable, awaiting the results of additional studies, to screen for CV calcification in selected individuals. This policy may help to stratify CV risk and to guide therapy. We speculate that such an approach will ultimately improve outcomes and reduce health costs. PMID:25712934

  10. Unusual calcifications in a monkey's brain.

    PubMed

    Kulczycki, J; Kozik, M; Mossakowski, M

    1981-01-01

    Symmetrical foci of calcification were found in both putamina of a baboon's brain. The deposits were related to capillaries and small arteries walls or distributed in the ground substance of the nervous tissue. Laser spectrography analysis disclosed accumulation of calcium, phosphorus, silicium, magnesium and copper. No iron cations were found in the deposits. PMID:6939285

  11. Role of Vitamin K in Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observational studies are promising in terms of associations between vitamin K (either diet or biochemical measures) and bone health and other conditions of normal calcification in the elderly. The level of evidence from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with phylloquinone is very ...

  12. Subclinical embolism in patients undergoing cardiac valve implantation and coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Stirling, S; Cowburn, P; Kelman, A W; Faichney, A; Lees, K R

    1994-01-01

    Patients undergoing prosthetic valve insertion and coronary artery bypass surgery were examined with transcranial Doppler ultrasound, recently shown to be capable of detecting continuing subclinical emboli in patients with embolic sources. In 30 patients examined at least 1 year after valve surgery, and in whom warfarinisation was stable within defined limits, 20 of 24 patients (83%) with mechanical valves and 3 of 6 patients (50%) with porcine valves had embolic signals. In a serial preoperative and postoperative study in a further 30 patients, of whom 29 had native or bioprosthetic valves, only the one patient with a previous mechanical mitral valve prosthesis had embolic signals preoperatively. The incidence of embolic signals increased to 9 (30%) on the first postoperative day, and 20 (67%) on day 5. In a similar serial study in 25 patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery, 8 (32%) had preoperative embolic signals, which were explicable by cardiac and/or carotid disease in 6 cases. The embolus signal incidence and count did not increase postoperatively in this group. No embolic signals were found in 15 volunteer controls. The results indicate that prosthetic valves cause continuing microembolisation, detectable by transcranial Doppler; coronary artery bypass cases may have incidental embolic signals which are unaffected by cardiac surgery. This new application of Doppler ultrasound may improve the clinical assessment of embolic risk of new prosthetic valve types and deserves further examination. PMID:7909671

  13. Cells, scaffolds and bioreactors for tissue-engineered heart valves: a journey from basic concepts to contemporary developmental innovations.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Alessandro; Bagno, Andrea; Naso, Filippo; Spina, Michele; Gerosa, Gino

    2011-04-01

    The development of viable and functional tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is a challenge that, for almost two decades, the scientific community has been committed to face to create life-lasting prosthetic devices for treating heart valve diseases. One of the main drawbacks of tissue-based commercial substitutes, xenografts and homografts, is their lack of viability, and hence failure to grow, repair, and remodel. In adults, the average bioprostheses life span is around 13 years, followed by structural valve degeneration, such as calcification; in pediatric, mechanical valves are commonly used instead of biological substitutes, as in young patients, the mobilization of calcium, due to bone remodeling, accelerates the calcification process. Moreover, neither mechanical nor bioprostheses are able to follow children's body growth. Cell seeding and repopulation of acellular heart valve scaffolds, biological and polymeric, appears as a promising way to create a living valve. Biomechanical stimuli have significant impact on cell behavior including in vitro differentiation, and physiological hemodynamic conditioning has been found to promote new tissue development. These concepts have led scientists to design bioreactors to mimic the in vivo environment of heart valves. Many different types of somatic and stem cells have been tested for colonizing both the surface and the core of the valve matrix but controversial results have been achieved so far. PMID:21163670

  14. Mitral regurgitation after anthracycline treatment for childhood malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J; Thomson, J; Lewis, I; Gibbs, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the new onset of mitral regurgitation in patients with otherwise normal echocardiograms after anthracycline treatment and to assess its relation to other selected indicators of myocardial damage.?DESIGN—Prospective echocardiographic and electrocardiographic study.?SETTING—Tertiary paediatric cardiac referral centre.?PATIENTS—305 patients, aged 2-33 years (median 14 years), treated with cumulative anthracycline doses of between 150-450 mg/m2 (median 180 mg/m2) for childhood malignancy.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Colour flow Doppler detection of mitral regurgitation and its relation to changes in echocardiographic indices of left ventricular function (systolic and diastolic dimensions, fractional shortening) and to changes in the 12 lead ECG; and the prevalence of mitral regurgitation in the anthracycline treated patients in comparison with previously studied normal volunteers of similar age.?RESULTS—34 patients (11.6%) developed ultrasound detectable mitral regurgitation, which was not apparent clinically, during or after anthracycline treatment, compared with only 1.8% of a normal population of similar age (p < 0.0001). Nine of the 34 also developed non-specific T wave abnormalities. All 34 patients had normal systolic function at the time of initial detection of mitral regurgitation, but four later developed impaired left ventricular function (5, 11, 20, and 27 months after the first detection of mitral regurgitation).?CONCLUSIONS—Mitral regurgitation occurs much more often in patients treated with anthracyclines than in the normal population. Echocardiographic detection of new mitral regurgitation with or without ECG abnormalities may be an early predictor of anthracycline cardiomyopathy.???Keywords: anthracyclines; mitral regurgitation; cardiomyopathy PMID:11250971

  15. Easy method for measurement of opening angle of Björk-Shiley valve with two computers. Proof of floating phenomenon of Björk-Shiley valve.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, T; Matsuzawa, H; Eguchi, S

    1981-09-01

    A new method for measuring the opening angle of Björk-Shiley valve (B-S valve) was reported in 1977. However, this method is complicated enough to permit quick calculation of the opening angle in multiple frames of one cinefilm. We devised a new method with using two computers (NAC Cardias GP 2000, TEXAS TI-59) for calculating the opening angle of the B-S valve. We measured the opening angle of 7 cases (they were all implanted B-S valves, 5 were mitral and 2 were aortic). Results are the following: (1) The maximum opening angle ranged from 54 degrees to 65 degrees and the mean value was 58.1 degrees. (2) We showed the floating phenomenon of B-S valve with our method. (3) We showed the accuracy of our method by measuring 10 times the same photograph of B-S valve. (4) We showed that our method is very accurate by comparing the values calculated by our method with those calculated directly from the valve which was removed from a patient. (5) It takes less than 30 minutes to calculate the opening angle of 60 frames (we took 60 frames of cine-film per minutes. PMID:7300016

  16. Vascular calcification in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kosaku; Ogawa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is very common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been found to be associated with mineral and bone disorders. There are two types of vascular calcification: intimal and medial calcification. The transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells into osteoblast-like cells seems to be a key element in the pathogenesis of medial calcification in the presence of calcium and phosphate deposition. Vascular calcification causes increased arterial stiffness by medial calcification, which leads to left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased coronary artery perfusion and causes myocardial ischemia by intimal calcification. Thus, vascular calcification is thought to be associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although current treatment strategies focus on correcting abnormal calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, or vitamin D levels in ESRD patients, a better understanding of the mechanisms of vascular calcification may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies that are capable of reducing vascular calcification and improving the cardiovascular outcome of ESRD patients. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic implication of vascular calcification in ESRD patients. PMID:26023025

  17. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L. (Penn Hills, PA); Wetherill, Todd M. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  18. Valve Health Monitor (VHM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports on progress being made on developing a Valve Health Monitor (VHM) Smart Current Signature Sensor. Topics cover include: design needs, target valves, current signatures, VHM design approach and VHM status/conclusions.

  19. Fetomaternal outcome of pregnancy with Mitral stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nazia; Kausar, Hafeeza; Ali, Lubna; Rakhshinda

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the frequency of fetomaternal outcome of pregnancy with Mitral stenosis admitted in Civil Hospital Karachi. Methods: It was a two years descriptive study done in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Civil Hospital Karachi. All pregnant women with a known or newly diagnosed Mitral stenosis on echocardiography were included in the study. History was taken regarding age, parity, gestational age (calculated by ultrasound) and complaints. Mode of delivery and Maternal mortality noted. Foetal outcome was analyzed by birth weight and Apgar score. Results: A total of 101 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. The ages of the women ranged between 20-29 years (69%) and 81% were multigravidas. Vaginal delivery occurred in 67 (66.3%) women and 78.3% were term pregnancies. Preterm deliveries were 21.8% and 27.7% newborns were low birth weight. APGAR score <7 was found in 14.9% of neonates and 9 babies had intrauterine death. Low ejection fraction<55% was diagnosed in 20(13.9%) women and Maternal mortality was found in two cases. Conclusion: Heart disease in pregnancy is associated with significant morbidity, it should be carefully managed in a tertiary care hospital to obtain optimum maternal and foetal outcome. PMID:26150860

  20. Measurement of mitral leaflet and annular geometry and stress after repair of posterior leaflet prolapse: Virtual repair using a patient specific finite element simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Morrel, William G.; Ward, Alison; Mishra, Rakesh; Zhang, Zhihong; Guccione, Julius M.; Grossi, Eugene A.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent mitral regurgitation after mitral valve (MV) repair for degenerative disease occurs at a rate of 2.6% per year and re-operation rate progressively reaches 20% at 19.5 years. We believe that MV repair durability is related to initial post-operative leaflet and annular geometry with subsequent leaflet remodeling due to stress. We tested the hypothesis that MV leaflet and annular stress is increased after MV repair. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and intra-operative 3D trans-esophageal echocardiography was performed before and after repair of posterior leaflet (P2) prolapse in a single patient. The repair consisted of triangular resection and annuloplasty band placement. Images of the heart were manually co-registered. The left ventricle and MV were contoured, surfaced and a 3D finite element (FE) model was created. Elements of the P2 region were removed to model leaflet resection and virtual sutures were used to repair the leaflet defect and attach the annuloplasty ring. Results The principal findings of the current study are 1) FE simulation of MV repair is able to accurately predict changes in MV geometry including changes in annular dimensions and leaflet coaptation, 2) average posterior leaflet stress is increased, and 3) average anterior leaflet and annular stress are reduced after triangular resection and mitral annuloplasty. Conclusions We successfully conducted virtual mitral valve prolapse repair using FE modeling methods. Future studies will examine the effects of leaflet resection type as well as annuloplasty ring size and shape. PMID:24630767