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Sample records for mixed culture sulphate-reducing

  1. Effect of uranium (VI) on two sulphate-reducing bacteria cultures from a uranium mine site.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogério; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-05-15

    This work was conducted to assess the impact of uranium (VI) on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) communities obtained from environmental samples collected on the Portuguese uranium mining area of Urgeiriça. Culture U was obtained from a sediment, while culture W was obtained from sludge from the wetland of that mine. Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) was used to monitor community changes under uranium stress conditions. TGGE profiles of dsrB gene fragment demonstrated that the initial cultures were composed of SRB species affiliated with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfomicrobium spp. (sample U), and by species related to D. desulfuricans (sample W). A drastic change in SRB communities was observed as a result of uranium (VI) exposure. Surprisingly, SRB were not detected in the uranium removal communities. Such findings emphasize the need of monitoring the dominant populations during bio-removal studies. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed that the uranium removal consortia are composed by strains affiliated to Clostridium genus, Caulobacteraceae and Rhodocyclaceae families. Therefore, these communities can be attractive candidates for environmental biotechnological applications associated to uranium removal. PMID:20334901

  2. Anaerobic sulphate-reducing microbial process using UASB reactor for heavy metals decontamination.

    PubMed

    de Lima, A C; Gonçalves, M M; Granato, M; Leite, S G

    2001-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using sewage as an organic substrate for the growth of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and to acclimatise anaerobic sludge to produce sulphide from sulphate reduction, with a view to metal precipitation. The experiments were carried out in a continuous bench-scale bioreactor (13 1 UASB reactor) operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 11 and 19 hours. The feed solution used was composed of the liquid part of the sewage (organic matter) supplemented with nickel sulphate and sodium sulphate. The results showed that it was possible to acclimatise anaerobic sludge for production of sulphide by sulphate reduction. A relation between the available COD and the concentration of sulphate reduced by SRB was observed. High nickel removal efficiency (96%) was obtained during the whole operation (320 days). However, the process required very strict control of the organic load available (sewage) in the solution and, if necessary, the addition of a complementary organic carbon source, in order to maintain a constant level of metal removal. The SRB were not affected by the HRT values studied and were installed and maintained in the system; however, granular sludge was not observed. The micrographs confirmed the presence of iron and nickel sulphides and also a mixed bacterial culture in the anaerobic sludge. The EDS spectrum of the sludge showed that nickel was retained in the sludge predominantly as a nickel sulphide. PMID:11346283

  3. Influence of headspace composition on product diversity by sulphate reducing bacteria biocathode.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohita; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Jain, Pratiksha; Dureja, Prem; Lal, Banwari; Dominguez-Benetton, Xochitl; Pant, Deepak; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2014-08-01

    Mixed culture of sulphate reducing bacteria named TERI-MS-003 was used for development of biocathode on activated carbon fabric fastened to stainless steel mesh for conversion of volatile fatty acids to reduced organic compounds under chronoamperometric conditions of -0.85V vs. Ag/AgCl (3.5M KCl). A range of chemicals were bioelectrosynthesized, however the gases present in headspace environment of the bioelectrochemical reactor governed the product profile. Succinate, ethanol, hydrogen, glycerol and propionate were observed to be the predominant products when the reactor was hermetically sealed. On the other hand, acetone, propionate, isopropanol, propanol, isobutyrate, isovalerate and heptanoate were the predominant products when the reactor was continuously sparged with nitrogen. This study highlights the importance of head space composition in order to manoeuvre the final product profile desired during a microbial electro-synthesis operation and the need for simultaneously developing effective separation and recovery strategies from an economical and practical standpoint. PMID:24726774

  4. The ecology and biotechnology of sulphate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Muyzer, Gerard; Stams, Alfons J M

    2008-06-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are anaerobic microorganisms that use sulphate as a terminal electron acceptor in, for example, the degradation of organic compounds. They are ubiquitous in anoxic habitats, where they have an important role in both the sulphur and carbon cycles. SRB can cause a serious problem for industries, such as the offshore oil industry, because of the production of sulphide, which is highly reactive, corrosive and toxic. However, these organisms can also be beneficial by removing sulphate and heavy metals from waste streams. Although SRB have been studied for more than a century, it is only with the recent emergence of new molecular biological and genomic techniques that we have begun to obtain detailed information on their way of life. PMID:18461075

  5. Metal precipitation in an ethanol-fed, fixed-bed sulphate-reducing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kousi, Pavlina; Remoundaki, Emmanouela; Hatzikioseyian, Artin; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Joulian, Catherine; Kousteni, Vassiliki; Tsezos, Marios

    2011-05-30

    A batch upflow fixed-bed sulphate-reducing bioreactor has been set up and monitored for the treatment of synthetic solutions containing divalent iron (100mg/L and 200mg/L), zinc (100mg/L and 200mg/L), copper (100mg/L and 200mg/L), nickel (100mg/L and 200mg/L) and sulphate (1700 mg/L and 2130 mg/L) at initial pH 3-3.5, using ethanol as the sole electron donor. The reactor has been operated at the theoretical stoichiometric ethanol/sulphate ratio. Complete oxidation of ethanol has been achieved through complete oxidation of the intermediately, microbially produced acetate. This is mainly attributed to the presence of Desulfobacter postgatei species which dominated the sulphate-reducing community in the reactor. The reduction of sulphate was limited to about 85%. Quantitative precipitation of the soluble metal ions has been achieved. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses performed on samples of the produced sludge showed poorly crystalline phases of marcasite, covellite and wurtzite as well as several mixed metal sulphides. PMID:21316850

  6. Influence of EPS isolated from thermophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria on carbon steel corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ze Hua; Liu, Tao; Liu, Hong Fang

    2011-05-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were isolated by centrifugation of thermophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grown in API-RP38 culture medium. The protein and polysaccharide fractions were quantified and the highest concentrations were extracted from a 14-day old culture. The effect of EPS on carbon steel corrosion was investigated by electrochemical techniques. At 30°C, a small amount of EPS in 3% NaCl solution inhibited corrosion, whilst excessive amounts of EPS facilitated corrosion. In addition, the inhibition efficiency of EPS decreased with temperature due to thermal desorption of the EPS. The results suggest that adsorbed EPS layers could be beneficial to anti-corrosion by hindering the reduction of oxygen. However, the accumulation of an EPS film could stimulate the anodic dissolution of the underlying steel by chelation of Fe2+ ions. PMID:21604218

  7. Microbial fouling community analysis of the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor with emphasis on sulphate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, P; Joshi, M Hiren; Rao, T S

    2011-10-01

    Culture and molecular-based techniques were used to characterize bacterial diversity in the cooling water system of a fast breeder test reactor (FBTR). Techniques were selected for special emphasis on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Water samples from different locations of the FBTR cooling water system, in addition to biofilm scrapings from carbon steel coupons and a control SRB sample were characterized. Whole genome extraction of the water samples and SRB diversity by group specific primers were analysed using nested PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of the bacterial assay in the cooling water showed that the total culturable bacteria (TCB) ranged from 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron-reducing bacteria, 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron oxidizing bacteria, 10(2) to 10(3) cfu ml(-1) and SRB, 2-29 cfu ml(-1). However, the counts of the various bacterial types in the biofilm sample were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher. SRB diversity by the nested PCR-DGGE approach showed the presence of groups 1, 5 and 6 in the FBTR cooling water system; however, groups 2, 3 and 4 were not detected. The study demonstrated that the PCR protocol influenced the results of the diversity analysis. The paper further discusses the microbiota of the cooling water system and its relevance in biofouling. PMID:21929472

  8. Biogenic sulphide plays a major role on the riboflavin-mediated decolourisation of azo dyes under sulphate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; Enríquez, Javier E; Galindo-Petatán, Eden; Arvayo, Héctor; Razo-Flores, Elías; Field, Jim A

    2007-06-01

    The effect of high concentrations of sulphate on the reductive decolourisation of different azo dyes by anaerobic sludge was studied in batch cultures. Sludge cultures were pre-incubated under sulphate-reducing conditions prior addition of dyes. Little or no effects of sulphate (5-10 g sulphate l(-1)) on the rate of decolourisation of Reactive Orange 14 (RO14), Direct Blue 53 (DB53) and Direct Blue 71 (DB71) were observed when no external redox mediator was provided. However, an increase in sulphate concentration, in the presence of riboflavin (20 microM), enhanced the decolourisation of all dyes. The first-rate constant of decolourisation (k) was increased up to 2-, 3.6- and 2-fold for RO14, DB53 and DB71, respectively, by supplying high sulphate concentrations, compared to the controls lacking sulphate, in the presence of the redox mediator. Sulphate reduction did not take place during the course of azo reductions, but was only evident before dye addition and after complete decolourisation, suggesting azo dyes reduction out-competed sulphate reduction for the available reducing equivalents. The experimental data suggest that reduction of azo dyes by riboflavin, which had been reduced by biogenic sulphide, was the major mechanism implicated during decolourisations, which was corroborated by abiotic incubations. Riboflavin greatly accelerated the abiotic reduction of RO14, so that the k value was increased up to 44-fold compared to the control lacking riboflavin. PMID:17350080

  9. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  10. Optimization study for Pb(II) and COD sequestration by consortium of sulphate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Anamika; Bishnoi, Narsi R.; Gupta, Asha

    2016-04-01

    In this study, initial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pb(II) ions was analysed to check optimum concentration of Pb(II) ions at which the growth of sulphate-reducing consortium (SRC) was found to be maximum. 80 ppm of Pb(II) ions was investigated as minimum inhibitory concentration for SRC. Influence of electron donors such as lactose, sucrose, glucose and sodium lactate was examined to investigate best carbon source for growth and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Sodium lactate was found to be the prime carbon source for SRC. Later optimization of various parameters was executed using Box-Behnken design model of response surface methodology to explore the effectiveness of three independent operating variables, namely, pH (5.0-9.0), temperature (32-42 °C) and time (5.0-9.0 days), on dependent variables, i.e. protein content, precipitation of Pb(II) ions, and removal of COD by SRC biomass. Maximum removal of COD and Pb(II) was observed to be 91 and 98 %, respectively, at pH 7.0 and temperature 37 °C and incubation time 7 days. According to response surface analysis and analysis of variance, the experimental data were perfectly fitted to the quadratic model, and the interactive influence of pH, temperature and time on Pb(II) and COD removal was highly significant. A high regression coefficient between the variables and response (r 2 = 0.9974) corroborate eminent evaluation of experimental data by second-order polynomial regression model. SEM and Fourier transform infrared analysis was performed to investigate morphology of PbS precipitates, sorption mechanism and involved functional groups in metal-free and metal-loaded biomass of SRC for Pb(II) binding.

  11. The effect of substrate and operational parameters on the abundance of sulphate-reducing bacteria in industrial anaerobic biogas digesters.

    PubMed

    Moestedt, Jan; Nilsson Påledal, Sören; Schnürer, Anna

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of operational parameters and type of substrate on the abundance of sulphate-reducing bacteria in 25 industrial biogas digesters using qPCR targeting the functional dissimilatory sulphite reductase gene. The aim was to find clues for operational strategies minimizing the production of H2S. The results showed that the operation, considering strategies evaluated, only had scarce effect on the abundance, varying between 10(5) and 10(7) gene copies per ml. However, high ammonia levels and increasing concentration of sulphate resulted in significantly lower and higher levels of sulphate-reducing bacteria, respectively. PMID:23416620

  12. Monitoring structural transformation of hydroxy-sulphate green rust in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, M.; Zegeye, A.; Jorand, F.; Carteret, C.

    2006-01-01

    The activities of bacterial consortia enable organisms to maximize their metabolic capabilities. This article assesses the synergetic relationship between iron reducing bacteria (IRB), Shewanella putrefaciens and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Thus, the aim of this study was first to form a biogenic hydroxy-sulpahte green rust GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) through the bioreduction of lepidocrocite by S. putrefaciens and secondly to investigate if sulfate anions intercalated in the biogenic GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) could serve as final electron acceptor for a sulfate reducing bacterium, D. alaskensis. The results indicate that the IRB lead to the formation of GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) and this mineral serve as an electron acceptor for SRB. GR2( {text{SO}}_{{text{4}}} ^{{2 - }} ) precipitation and its transformation was demonstrated by using X-ray diffraction (DRX), Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). These observations point out the possible acceleration of steel corrosion in marine environment in presence of IRB/SRB consortia.

  13. Monitoring structural transformation of hydroxy-sulphate green rust in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, M.; Zegeye, A.; Jorand, F.; Carteret, C.

    The activities of bacterial consortia enable organisms to maximize their metabolic capabilities. This article assesses the synergetic relationship between iron reducing bacteria (IRB), Shewanella putrefaciens and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Thus, the aim of this study was first to form a biogenic hydroxysulpahte green rust GR2(SO{4/2-}) through the bioreduction of lepidocrocite by S. putrefaciens and secondly to investigate if sulfate anions intercalated in the biogenic GR2(SO{4/2-}) could serve as final electron acceptor for a sulfate reducing bacterium, D. alaskensis. The results indicate that the IRB lead to the formation of GR2(SO{4/2-}) and this mineral serve as an electron acceptor for SRB. GR2(SO{4/2-}) precipitation and its transformation was demonstrated by using X-ray diffraction (DRX), Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). These observations point out the possible acceleration of steel corrosion in marine environment in presence of IRB/SRB consortia.

  14. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    PubMed

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion. PMID:24238897

  15. Biotreatment of Cr(VI) contaminated waters by sulphate reducing bacteria fed with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Pagnanelli, F; Viggi, C Cruz; Cibati, A; Uccelletti, D; Toro, L; Palleschi, C

    2012-01-15

    Biological treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated waters was performed in fixed bed reactors inoculated with SRB (sulphate-reducing bacteria) growing on ethanol. Treatment efficiency was evaluated by checking chemical abatement of Cr(VI) and by ecotoxicological tests using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A preliminary comparison between ethanol and lactate was performed, denoting that using ethanol, the same values of final sulphate abatement were obtained. In addition ethanol showed to be a substrate more competitive than lactate in kinetic terms. Fixed bed column reactors were continuously fed with a solution containing sulphates (3 g L(-1)), ethanol (1.5 g L(-1)) and Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)). At steady state the column inoculated with SRB removed 65 ± 5% of sulphate and 95 ± 5% of chromium. Bioactive removal mechanisms predominated over biosorption. Diminution of Cr(VI) toxicity was assessed by using the nematode C. elegans as a test organism showing that the survival of nematodes was 20% in the presence of the untreated influent and raised up to 53% when the nematodes were exposed to the treated effluent. PMID:22104763

  16. [USAGE OF FUMARATE BY SULPHATE-REDUCING BACTERIA DESULFOMICROBIUM SP. CrR3 AND DESULFOTOMACULUM SP].

    PubMed

    Sholiak, K V; Peretyatko, T B; Gudz, S P; Hnatush, S O; Verkholyak, N S; Halushka, A A

    2015-01-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria Desulfomicrobium sp. CrR3 and Desulfotomaculum. sp. are able to use fumarate as electron donor and acceptor. When they use fumarate as an electron acceptor succinate accumulates in the medium. If fumarate serves as electron donor, minor amounts of citrate, isocitrate and acetate are detected except succinate. In the case of simultaneous introduction of fumarate, SO4(2-) and Cr2O7(2-), the last inhibits usage of fumarate and SO4(2-). PMID:26638481

  17. Cometabolism of trihalomethanes by mixed culture nitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Henry, Andrea E; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2006-10-01

    Three mixed-culture nitrifier sources degraded low concentrations (25-450 microg/L) of four trihalomethanes (THMs) (trichloromethane (TCM) or chloroform, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM) or bromoform) commonly found in treated drinking water. Individual THM rate constants (k1THM) increased with increasing THM bromine-substitution with TBM>DBCM>BDCM>TCM and were comparable to previous studies with the pure culture nitrifier, Nitrosomonas europaea. A decrease in temperature resulted in a decrease in both ammonia and THM degradation rates with ammonia rates affected to a greater extent than THM degradation rates. The significant effect of temperature indicates that seasonal variations in water temperature should be a consideration for technology implementation. Product toxicity, measured by transformation capacity (T(c)), was similar to that observed with N. europaea. Because both rate constants and product toxicities increase with increasing THM bromine-substitution, a water's THM speciation is an important consideration for process implementation during drinking water treatment. Even though a given water is kinetically favored, the resulting THM product toxicity may not allow stable treatment process performance. PMID:16970971

  18. Intelligent control of mixed-culture bioprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, D.L.; Larsen, E.D.; Miller, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    A hierarchical control system is being developed and applied to a mixed culture bioprocess in a continuous stirred tank reactor. A bioreactor, with its inherent complexity and non-linear behavior was an interesting, yet, difficult application for control theory. The bottom level of the hierarchy was implemented as a number of integrated set point controls and data acquisition modules. Within the second level was a diagnostic system that used expert knowledge to determine the operational status of the sensors, actuators, and control modules. A diagnostic program was successfully implemented for the detection of stirrer malfunctions, and to monitor liquid delivery rates and recalibrate the pumps when deviations from desired flow rates occurred. The highest control level was a supervisory shell that was developed using expert knowledge and the history of the reactor operation to determine the set points required to meet a set of production criteria. At this stage the supervisory shell analyzed the data to determine the state of the system. In future implementations, this shell will determine the set points required to optimize a cost function using expert knowledge and adaptive learning techniques.

  19. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO[sub 2]-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  20. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse. PMID:25189842

  1. The contribution of sulphate reducing bacteria and 5-aminosalicylic acid to faecal sulphide in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, M; Beatty, E; Cummings, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Butyrate oxidation within the colonocyte is selectively inhibited by hydrogen sulphide, reproducing the metabolic lesion observed in active ulcerative colitis.
AIMS—To study generation of hydrogen sulphide by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and the effects of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in patients with ulcerative colitis in order to identify a role of this noxious agent in pathogenesis.
PATIENTS—Fresh faeces were obtained from 37 patients with ulcerative colitis (23 with active disease) and 16 healthy controls.
METHODS—SRB were enumerated from fresh faecal slurries and measurements made of sulphate reducing activity, and sulphate and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. The effect of 5-ASA on hydrogen sulphide production was studied in vitro.
RESULTS—All controls and patients with active ulcerative colitis carried SRB and total viable counts were significantly related to the clinical severity grade. SRB were of two distinct types: rapidly growing strains (desulfovibrios) which showed high sulphate reduction rates, present in 30% of patients with ulcerative colitis and 44% of controls; and slow growing strains which had little activity. In vitro, 5-ASA inhibited sulphide production in a dose dependent manner; in patients with ulcerative colitis not on these drugs faecal sulphide was significantly higher than in controls (0.55 versus 0.25 mM, p=0.027).
CONCLUSIONS—Counts and carriage rates of SRB in faeces of patients with ulcerative colitis are not significantly different from those in controls. SRB metabolism is not uniform between strains and alternative sources of hydrogen sulphide production exist in the colonic lumen which may be similarly inhibited by 5-ASA. The evidence for hydrogen sulphide as a metabolic toxin in ulcerative colitis remains circumstantial.


Keywords: colitis; sulphate; sulphide; bacteria; fermentation; salicylate PMID:10601057

  2. Polyhydroxybutyrate production from lactate using a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Marang, Leonie; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Muyzer, Gerard; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-09-01

    In this study we investigated the use of lactate and a lactate/acetate mixture for enrichment of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) producing mixed cultures. The mixed cultures were enriched in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) that established a feast-famine regime. The SBRs were operated under conditions that were previously shown to enable enrichment of a superior PHB producing strain on acetate (i.e., 12 h cycle length, 1 day SRT and 30°C). Two new mixed cultures were eventually enriched from activated sludge. The mixed culture enriched on lactate was dominated by a novel gammaproteobacterium. This enrichment can accumulate over 90 wt% PHB within 6 h, which is currently the best result reported for a bacterial culture in terms of the final PHB content and the biomass specific PHB production rate. The second mixed culture enriched on a mixture of acetate and lactate can produce up to 84 wt% PHB in just over 8 h. The predominant bacterial species in this culture were Plasticicumulans acidivorans and Thauera selenatis, which have both been reported to accumulate large amounts of PHB. The data suggest that P. acidivorans is a specialist on acetate conversion, whereas Thauera sp. is a specialist on lactate conversion. The main conclusion of this work is that the use of different substrates has a direct impact on microbial composition, but has no significant effect on the functionality of PHB production process. PMID:21455932

  3. Characterization of Mono- and Mixed-Culture Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ica, Tuba; Caner, Vildan; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Ahmed, Bulbul; Call, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis, is a thermophilic and microaerophilic bacterium. These characteristics make it a fastidious organism, which limits its ability to survive outside animal hosts. Nevertheless, C. jejuni can be transmitted to both humans and animals via environmental pathways, especially through contaminated water. Biofilms may play a crucial role in the survival of the bacterium under unfavorable environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to investigate survival strategies of C. jejuni in mono- and mixed-culture biofilms. We grew monoculture biofilms of C. jejuni and mixed-culture biofilms of C. jejuni with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that mono- and mixed-culture biofilms had significantly different structures and activities. Monoculture C. jejuni biofilms did not consume a measurable quantity of oxygen. Using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), we found that cells from monoculture biofilms were alive according to live/dead staining but that these cells were not culturable. In contrast, in mixed-culture biofilms, C. jejuni remained in a culturable physiological state. Monoculture C. jejuni biofilms could persist under lower flow rates (0.75 ml/min) but were unable to persist at higher flow rates (1 to 2.5 ml/min). In sharp contrast, mixed-culture biofilms were more robust and were unaffected by higher flow rates (2.5 ml/min). Our results indicate that biofilms provide an environmental refuge that is conducive to the survival of C. jejuni. PMID:22179238

  4. A Post-Genomic View of the Ecophysiology, Catabolism and Biotechnological Relevance of Sulphate-Reducing Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Venceslau, Sofia S; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction is the unifying and defining trait of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). In their predominant habitats, sulphate-rich marine sediments, SRP have long been recognized to be major players in the carbon and sulphur cycles. Other, more recently appreciated, ecophysiological roles include activity in the deep biosphere, symbiotic relations, syntrophic associations, human microbiome/health and long-distance electron transfer. SRP include a high diversity of organisms, with large nutritional versatility and broad metabolic capacities, including anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons. Elucidation of novel catabolic capacities as well as progress in the understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks, energy metabolism, evolutionary processes and adaptation to changing environmental conditions has greatly benefited from genomics, functional OMICS approaches and advances in genetic accessibility and biochemical studies. Important biotechnological roles of SRP range from (i) wastewater and off gas treatment, (ii) bioremediation of metals and hydrocarbons and (iii) bioelectrochemistry, to undesired impacts such as (iv) souring in oil reservoirs and other environments, and (v) corrosion of iron and concrete. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of SRPs focusing mainly on works published after 2000. The wealth of publications in this period, covering many diverse areas, is a testimony to the large environmental, biogeochemical and technological relevance of these organisms and how much the field has progressed in these years, although many important questions and applications remain to be explored. PMID:26210106

  5. dsrAB-based analysis of sulphate-reducing bacteria in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important members of the sulphur cycle in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigate the diversity and activity of SRB within the developing and established biofilm of two moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater in New Zealand. The larger of the two WWTPs (Moa Point) generates high levels of sulphide relative to the smaller Karori plant. Clone libraries of the dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase (dsrAB) genes and quantitative real-time PCR targeting dsrA transcripts were used to compare SRB communities between the two WWTPs. Desulfobulbus (35-53 % of total SRB sequences) and genera belonging to the family Desulfobacteraceae (27-41 %) dominated the SRB fraction of the developing biofilm on deployed plastic carriers at both sites, whereas Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium were exclusively found at Moa Point. In contrast, the established biofilms from resident MBBR carriers were largely dominated by Desulfomonile tiedjei-like organisms (58-100 % of SRB sequences). The relative transcript abundance of dsrA genes (signifying active SRBs) increased with biofilm weight yet remained low overall, even in the mature biofilm stage. Our results indicate that although SRB are both present and active in the microbial community at both MBBR study sites, differences in the availability of sulphate may be contributing to the observed differences in sulphide production at these two plants. PMID:24788329

  6. Comparison of Sulphate-reducing Bacterial Communities in Japanese Fish Farm Sediments with Different Levels of Organic Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ryuji; Mori, Yumi; Sakami, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Fish farm sediments receive a large amount of organic matter from uneaten food and fecal material. This nutrient enrichment, or organic pollution, causes the accumulation of sulphide in the sediment from the action of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We investigated the effect of organic enrichment around coastal fish farms comparing the SRB community structure in these sediments. Sediment samples with different levels of organic pollution classified based upon the contents of acid-volatile sulphide and chemical oxygen demand were collected at three stations on the coast of western Japan. The SRB community composition was assessed using PCR amplification, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the dissimilatory sulphite reductase β-subunit gene (dsrB) fragments using directly extracted sediment DNA. Sequencing of the cloned PCR products of dsrB showed the existence of different SRB groups in the sediments. The majority of dsrB sequences were associated with the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae. Clones related to the phylum Firmicutes were also detected from all sediment samples. Statistical comparison of sequences revealed that community compositions of SRB from polluted sediments significantly differed from those of moderately polluted sediments and unpolluted sediments (LIBSHUFF, p<0.05), showing a different distribution of SRB in the fish farm sediments. There is evidence showing that the organic enrichment of sediments influences the composition of SRB communities in sediments at marine fish farms. PMID:22791053

  7. Changes in iso- and n-alkane distribution during biodegradation of crude oil under nitrate and sulphate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasinger, Marion; Scherr, Kerstin E; Lundaa, Tserennyam; Bräuer, Leopold; Zach, Clemens; Loibner, Andreas Paul

    2012-02-20

    Crude oil consists of a large number of hydrocarbons with different susceptibility to microbial degradation. The influence of hydrocarbon structure and molecular weight on hydrocarbon biodegradation under anaerobic conditions is not fully explored. In this study oxygen, nitrate and sulphate served as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for the microbial degradation of a paraffin-rich crude oil in a freshly contaminated soil. During 185 days of incubation, alkanes from n-C11 to n-C39, three n- to iso-alkane ratios commonly used as weathering indicators and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) were quantified and statistically analyzed. The use of different TEAs for hydrocarbon degradation resulted in dissimilar degradative patterns for n- and iso-alkanes. While n-alkane biodegradation followed well-established patterns under aerobic conditions, lower molecular weight alkanes were found to be more recalcitrant than mid- to high-molecular weight alkanes under nitrate-reducing conditions. Biodegradation with sulphate as the TEA was most pronounced for long-chain (n-C32 to n-C39) alkanes. The observation of increasing ratios of n-C17 to pristane and of n-C18 to phytane provides first evidence of the preferential degradation of branched over normal alkanes under sulphate reducing conditions. The formation of distinctly different n- and iso-alkane biodegradation fingerprints under different electron accepting conditions may be used to assess the occurrence of specific degradation processes at a contaminated site. The use of n- to iso-alkane ratios for this purpose may require adjustment if applied for anaerobic sites. PMID:22001845

  8. Single-cell growth analysis in a mixed cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Bato, Mary Grace P.; Daria, Vincent Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    We perform single cell analysis of cell growth in a mixed cell culture. Two species of yeast cells: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, are optically trapped using focused continuous-wave near infrared laser. Cell growth for both cells is inhibited only when the two species of cells are in contact with each other. This indicates cell-cell interaction mediated cell growth inhibition mechanism. Single cell level analysis of cell growth studied here contributes to the further understanding of yeast growth arrest in a mixed yeast culture.

  9. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  10. Characterization and activity studies of highly heavy metal resistant sulphate-reducing bacteria to be used in acid mine drainage decontamination.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, M Leonor; Barros, Raúl J; Veríssimo, A Raquel; Barreiros, M Alexandra; Costa, M Clara

    2009-07-30

    Biological treatment with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been considered as the most promising alternative for acid mine drainage (AMD) decontamination. Normally, these wastewaters contain high concentrations of sulphate and heavy metals, so the search for SRB highly resistant to metals is extremely important for the development of a bioremediation technology. A SRB consortium resistant to high concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Cu and Zn), similar to those typically present in AMD, was obtained among several environmental samples, from a wastewater treatment plant. The phylogenetic analysis of the dsr gene sequence revealed that this consortium contains species of SRB affiliated to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfobulbus rhabdoformis. The results show that the presence of usually lethal concentrations of Fe (400mg/L), Zn (150 mg/L) and Cu (80 mg/L) is not toxic for the sulphate-reducing bacteria present in this sample. As a consequence, a very good efficiency in terms of sulphate reduction and metals removal was obtained. Both ethanol and lactate can be used by this inoculum as carbon source. With the other samples tested sulphate reduction was inhibited by the presence of copper and zinc. This highly metal resistant consortium will be used to inoculate a bioreactor to carry out AMD decontamination. PMID:19135795

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, G.; Koenig, J.; Ringpfeil, M.

    1995-12-31

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are a complex mixture of organic compounds, was demonstrated using a bacterial mixed culture selected from a contaminated site by the BIOPRACT GmbH. The investigations were carried out in a laboratory fermenter using emulsified tar oil as the substrate to determine the following: (1) concentration of the single PAH and of the sum of PAHs relative to fermentation time, (2) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) content in the outflowing air during fermentation, (3) chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the broth, and (4) toxicity of the broth before and after fermentation according to the bioluminescence test (DIN 38412, part 34/1). The results of this model experiment indicated that the investigated mixed culture is able to effectively metabolize the PAHs contained in tar oil, including the higher condensed compounds such as benzo(a)pyrene. In the first 8 days of fermentation, the PAH sum decreased to below 5% of the starting concentration connected with a five-fold reduction of the toxic effect on Vibrio fischeri. The PAH degradation rate correlated with the rate of COD decrease, the rate of evolving CO{sub 2}, and the consumption of O{sub 2}.

  12. Comparison of mixed-acid fermentations inoculated with six different mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Andrea K; Hollister, Emily B; Gentry, Terry J; Wilkinson, Heather H; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2012-08-01

    The MixAlco™ process biologically converts biomass to carboxylate salts that may be converted to a variety of chemicals and fuels. This study examines the fermentation performance of six different mixed cultures, and how the performance was affected by the bacterial composition of each community. All six countercurrent fermentations had very similar performance, but were dissimilar in microbial community composition. The acid concentrations varied by only 12% between fermentation trains and the conversions varied only by 6%. The microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA tag-pyrosequencing, which revealed the presence of dynamic communities that were dominated by bacteria resembling Clostridia, but they shared few taxa in common. Yue-Clayton similarity calculations of the communities revealed that they were extremely different. The presence of different but functionally similar microbial communities in this study suggests that it is the operating parameters that determine the fermentation end-products. PMID:22705541

  13. Effects of storage on mixed-culture biological electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte; Modin, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    Storage methods are important to preserve the viability and biochemical characteristics of microbial cultures between experiments or during periods when bioreactors are inactive. Most of the research on storage has focused on isolates; however, there is an increasing interest in methods for mixed cultures, which are of relevance in environmental biotechnology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different storage methods on electrochemically active enrichment cultures. Acetate-oxidizing bioanodes generating a current density of about 5 A m−2 were enriched in a microbial electrolysis cell. The effect of five weeks of storage was evaluated using electrochemical techniques and microbial community analysis. Storage by refrigeration resulted in quicker re-activation than freezing in 10% glycerol, while the bioelectrochemical activity was entirely lost after storage using dehydration. The results showed that the bioelectrochemical activity of bioanodes stored at low temperature could be retained. However, during the re-activation period the bioanodes only recovered 75% of the current density generated before storage and the bacterial communities were different in composition and more diverse after storage than before. PMID:26678949

  14. Biopolymers production from mixed cultures and pyrolysis by-products.

    PubMed

    Moita, R; Lemos, P C

    2012-02-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from low value substrates and/or byproducts represents an economical and environmental promising alternative to established industrial manufacture methods. Bio-oil resulting from the fast-pyrolysis of chicken beds was used as substrate to select a mixed microbial culture (MMC) able to produce PHA under feast/famine conditions. In this study a maximum PHA content of 9.2% (g/g cell dry weight) was achieved in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operated for culture selection. The PHA obtained with bio-oil as a carbon source was a copolymer composed by 70% of hydroxybutyrate (HB) and 30% of hydroxyvalerate (HV) monomers. Similar results have been reported by other studies that use real complex substrates for culture selection indicating that bio-oil can be a promising feedstock to produce PHAs using MMC. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrated the use of bio-oil resulting from fast pyrolysis as a possibly feedstock to produce short chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates. PMID:21983233

  15. Competition of Invertebrates Mixed Culture in the Closed Aquatic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The study considers the experimental model of interactions between invertebrates (the cilates Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium bursaria and the rotifers Brachionis plicatilis) in the closed aquatic system. The infusoria P.caudatum can feed on yeast, bacteria and chlorella; in this experiment growth and reproduction were maintained by bacteria only. The P.bursaria - zoochlorella endosymbiosis is a natural model of a simple biotic cycle. P.bursaria consumes glucose and oxygen released by zoochlorella in the process of biosynthesis and releases nitrogenous compounds and carbon dioxide necessary for algal photosynthesis. The rotifers Br. plicatilis can consume algae, bacteria and detritus. Thus in experiment with the mixed culture of invertebrates they can use different food sources. However with any initial percentage of the invertebrates the end portion of P.bursaria reaches 90-99

  16. Biological carbon monoxide conversion to acetate production by mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chul Woo; Jung, Kyung A; Park, Jong Moon

    2016-07-01

    To utilize waste CO for mixed culture gas fermentation, carbon sources (CO, CO2) and pH were optimized in the batch system to find out the center point and boundary of response surface method (RSM) for higher acetate (HAc) production (center points: 25% CO, 40% CO2, and pH 8). The concentrations of CO and CO2, and pH had significant effects on acetate production, but the pH was the most significant on the HAc production. The optimum condition for HAc production in the gas fermentation was 20.81% CO, 41.38% CO2, 37.81% N2, and pH 7.18. The continuous gas fermentation under the optimum condition obtained 1.66g/L of cell DW, 23.6g/L HAc, 3.11g/L propionate, and 3.42g/L ethanol. PMID:27035481

  17. A Mixed-Culture Biofilm Model with Cross-Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kazi A; Sudarsan, Rangarajan; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-11-01

    We propose a deterministic continuum model for mixed-culture biofilms. A crucial aspect is that movement of one species is affected by the presence of the other. This leads to a degenerate cross-diffusion system that generalizes an earlier single-species biofilm model. Two derivations of this new model are given. One, like cellular automata biofilm models, starts from a discrete in space lattice differential equation where the spatial interaction is described by microscopic rules. The other one starts from the same continuous mass balances that are the basis of other deterministic biofilm models, but it gives up a simplifying assumption of these models that has recently been criticized as being too restrictive in terms of ecological structure. We show that both model derivations lead to the same PDE model, if corresponding closure assumptions are introduced. To investigate the role of cross-diffusion, we conduct numerical simulations of three biofilm systems: competition, allelopathy and a mixed system formed by an aerobic and an anaerobic species. In all cases, we find that accounting for cross-diffusion affects local distribution of biomass, but it does not affect overall lumped quantities such as the total amount of biomass in the system. PMID:26582360

  18. Dimethylamine biodegradation by mixed culture enriched from drinking water biofilter.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaobin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Jingxu; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojian; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylamine (DMA) is one of the important precursors of drinking water disinfection by-product N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Reduction of DMA to minimize the formation of carcinogenic NDMA in drinking water is of practical importance. Biodegradation plays a major role in elimination of DMA pollution in the environment, yet information on DMA removal by drinking water biofilter is still lacking. In this study, microcosms with different treatments were constructed to investigate the potential of DMA removal by a mixed culture enriched from a drinking water biofilter and the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources. DMA could be quickly mineralized by the enrichment culture. Amendment of a carbon source, instead of a nitrogen source, had a profound impact on DMA removal. A shift in bacterial community structure was observed with DMA biodegradation, affected by carbon and nitrogen sources. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum group in DMA-degrading microcosms. Microorganisms from a variety of bacterial genera might be responsible for the rapid DMA mineralization. PMID:25280176

  19. Biotransformation of trichloroethylene by a phenol-induced mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, M.M.; Parkin, G.F.; Gibson, D.T.; Weathers, L.J.

    1996-07-01

    Biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using a mixed culture of aerobic, phenol-induced organisms. Abiotic experiments showed that sorption of TCE to biomass was negligible in the systems studied. The effects of influent phenol and TCE concentration on the TCE degradation capacity of the culture were studied using chemostats. A relationship exists between the influent phenol/TCE ratio and TCE biodegradation. TCE transformation yields ranged from 0.052 to 0.222 mg TCE removed/mg phenol removed. Monod kinetic coefficients for phenol degradation were determined. Monod kinetic coefficients were also determined for TCE biotransformation by resting cells. The concept of transformation capacity was used to model the decrease in active biomass concentration caused by TCE transformation. In mineralization studies using {sup 14}C-labeled TCE, 22% of the degraded mass of TCE was transformed to carbon dioxide, 8.8% was incorporated into biomass, 42% was transformed to nonvolatile products, with the remaining, unrecovered 27% most likely transformed into volatile or semivolatile products.

  20. Lindane removal by pure and mixed cultures of immobilized actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saez, Juliana M; Benimeli, Claudia S; Amoroso, María J

    2012-11-01

    Lindane (γ-HCH) is an organochlorine insecticide that has been widely used in developing countries. It is known to persist in the environment and can cause serious health problems. One of the strategies adopted to remove lindane from the environment is bioremediation using microorganisms. Immobilized cells present advantages over free suspended cells, like their high degradation efficiency and protection against toxins. The aims of this work were: (1) To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces strains immobilized in four different matrices to remove lindane, (2) To select the support with optimum lindane removal by pure cultures, (3) To assay the selected support with consortia and (4) To evaluate the reusability of the immobilized cells. Four Streptomyces sp. strains had previously shown their ability to grow in the presence of lindane. Lindane removal by microorganisms immobilized was significantly higher than in free cells. Specifically immobilized cells in cloth sachets showed an improvement of around 25% in lindane removal compared to the abiotic control. Three strains showed significantly higher microbial growth when they were entrapped in silicone tubes. Strains immobilized in PVA-alginate demonstrated lowest growth. Mixed cultures immobilized inside cloth sachets showed no significant enhancement compared to pure cultures, reaching a maximum removal of 81% after 96 h for consortium I, consisting of the four immobilized strains together. Nevertheless, the cells could be reused for two additional cycles of 96 h each, obtaining a maximum removal efficiency of 71.5% when each of the four strains was immobilized in a separate bag (consortium III). PMID:22840534

  1. Transformation of toluene and benzene by mixed methanogenic cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Grbić-Galić, D; Vogel, T M

    1987-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and benzene were anaerobically transformed by mixed methanogenic cultures derived from ferulic acid-degrading sewage sludge enrichments. In most experiments, toluene or benzene was the only semicontinuously supplied carbon and energy source in the defined mineral medium. No exogenous electron acceptors other than CO2 were present. The cultures were fed 1.5 to 30 mM unlabeled or 14C-labeled aromatic substrates (ring-labeled toluene and benzene or methyl-labeled toluene). Gas production from unlabeled substrates and 14C activity distribution in products from the labeled substrates were monitored over a period of 60 days. At least 50% of the substrates were converted to CO2 and methane (greater than 60%). A high percentage of 14CO2 was recovered from the methyl group-labeled toluene, suggesting nearly complete conversion of the methyl group to CO2 and not to methane. However, a low percentage of 14CO2 was produced from ring-labeled toluene or from benzene, indicating incomplete conversion of the ring carbon to CO2. Anaerobic transformation pathways for unlabeled toluene and benzene were studied with the help of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The intermediates detected are consistent with both toluene and benzene degradation via initial oxidation by ring hydroxylation or methyl oxidation (toluene), which would result in the production of phenol, cresols, or aromatic alcohol. Additional reactions, such as demethylation and ring reduction, are also possible. Tentative transformation sequences based upon the intermediates detected are discussed. PMID:3105454

  2. KINETICS OF CHROMATE REDUCTION DURING NAPHTHALENE DEGRADATION IN A MIXED CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mixed culture of Bacillus sp. K1 and Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA 505 was exposed to chromate and naphthalene. Batch experiments showed that chromate was reduced and naphthalene was degraded by the mixed culture. Chromate reduction occurred initially at a high rate followed by...

  3. Kinetics of chromate reduction during naphthalene degradation in a mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.; Sewell, G.W.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1996-11-05

    A mixed culture of Bacillus sp. K1 and Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA 505 was exposed to chromate and naphthalene. Batch experiments showed that chromate was reduced and naphthalene was degraded by the mixed culture. Chromate reduction occurred initially at a high rate followed by a decrease in rate until chromate reduction ceased. Chromate reduction decreased in the mixed culture when a lower ratio of S. paucimobilis EPA 505 to Bacillus sp. K1 was utilized. A kinetic model incorporating a term for the cell density ratio is proposed to describe chromate reduction in the mixed culture under both chromate limited and electron donor limited conditions. The validity of the model, and its parameter values, was verified by experimental data generated under a variety of initial population compositions and a broad range of chromate concentrations. The consistent result of experimental data with model predictions implies that the model is useful for evaluating the interactions and the use of mixed culture for chromate removal.

  4. A Review of International Cross-Cultural Mixed Messages and Their Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on the concept of international cross-cultural mixed messages. Although there is limited literature on this topic, the review suggests that messages from one's home culture and a second culture can result in conflicting expectations for one's own behavior and for the behavior of others. Double bind theory is…

  5. A Mixed Methodological Analysis of the Role of Culture in the Clinical Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; McLeod, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    Even though literature indicates that particular cultural groups receive more severe diagnoses at disproportionate rates, there has been minimal research that addresses how culture interfaces specifically with clinical decision making. This mixed methodological study of 41 counselors indicated that cultural characteristics of both counselors and…

  6. Effects of transgenic soybean on growth and phosphorus acquisition in mixed culture system.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianna; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Xiurong; Liao, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Transgenic soybean plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis purple acid phosphatase gene AtPAP15 (OXp) or the soybean expansin gene GmEXPB2 (OXe) can improve phosphorous (P) efficiency in pure culture by increasing Apase secretion or changing root morphology. In this study, soybean-soybean mixed cultures were employed to illuminate P acquisition among plants in mixed stands of transgenic and wild-type soybean. Our results showed that transgenic soybean plants were much more competitive, and had greater growth and P uptake than wild-type soybean in mixed culture in both low P calcareous and acid soils. Furthermore, OXe plants had an advantage in calcareous soils when mixed with OXp, whereas the latter performed much better in acid soils. In soybean-maize mixed culture, transgenic soybean had no impact on maize growth compared to controls in both acid and calcareous soils with different P conditions. As for soybean in mixed culture, OXp plants had no significant advantages regardless of P availability or soil type, while P efficiency improved in OXe in calcareous soils compared to controls. These results imply that physiological traits could be easily affected by the mixed maize. Transgenic soybean plants with enhanced root traits had more competitive advantages than those with improved root physiology in mixed culture. PMID:25048220

  7. Sequential Mixed Cultures: From Syngas to Malic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Florian; Dörsam, Stefan; Veith, Nicolas; Zwick, Michaela; Neumann, Anke; Ochsenreither, Katrin; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation using acetogenic bacteria is an approach for production of bulk chemicals like acetate, ethanol, butanol, or 2,3-butandiol avoiding the fuel vs. food debate by using carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen from gasification of biomass or industrial waste gases. Suffering from energetic limitations, yields of C4-molecules produced by syngas fermentation are quite low compared with ABE fermentation using sugars as a substrate. On the other hand, fungal production of malic acid has high yields of product per gram metabolized substrate but is currently limited to sugar containing substrates. In this study, it was possible to show that Aspergilus oryzae is able to produce malic acid using acetate as sole carbon source which is a main product of acetogenic syngas fermentation. Bioreactor cultivations were conducted in 2.5 L stirred tank reactors. During the syngas fermentation part of the sequential mixed culture, Clostridium ljungdahlii was grown in modified Tanner medium and sparged with 20 mL/min of artificial syngas mimicking a composition of clean syngas from entrained bed gasification of straw (32.5 vol-% CO, 32.5 vol-% H2, 16 vol-% CO2, and 19 vol-% N2) using a microsparger. Syngas consumption was monitored via automated gas chromatographic measurement of the off-gas. For the fungal fermentation part gas sparging was switched to 0.6 L/min of air and a standard sparger. Ammonia content of medium for syngas fermentation was reduced to 0.33 g/L NH4Cl to meet the requirements for fungal production of dicarboxylic acids. Malic acid production performance of A. oryzae in organic acid production medium and syngas medium with acetate as sole carbon source was verified and gave YP∕S values of 0.28 g/g and 0.37 g/g respectively. Growth and acetate formation of C. ljungdahlii during syngas fermentation were not affected by the reduced ammonia content and 66 % of the consumed syngas was converted to acetate. The overall conversion

  8. Sequential Mixed Cultures: From Syngas to Malic Acid.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Florian; Dörsam, Stefan; Veith, Nicolas; Zwick, Michaela; Neumann, Anke; Ochsenreither, Katrin; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation using acetogenic bacteria is an approach for production of bulk chemicals like acetate, ethanol, butanol, or 2,3-butandiol avoiding the fuel vs. food debate by using carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen from gasification of biomass or industrial waste gases. Suffering from energetic limitations, yields of C4-molecules produced by syngas fermentation are quite low compared with ABE fermentation using sugars as a substrate. On the other hand, fungal production of malic acid has high yields of product per gram metabolized substrate but is currently limited to sugar containing substrates. In this study, it was possible to show that Aspergilus oryzae is able to produce malic acid using acetate as sole carbon source which is a main product of acetogenic syngas fermentation. Bioreactor cultivations were conducted in 2.5 L stirred tank reactors. During the syngas fermentation part of the sequential mixed culture, Clostridium ljungdahlii was grown in modified Tanner medium and sparged with 20 mL/min of artificial syngas mimicking a composition of clean syngas from entrained bed gasification of straw (32.5 vol-% CO, 32.5 vol-% H2, 16 vol-% CO2, and 19 vol-% N2) using a microsparger. Syngas consumption was monitored via automated gas chromatographic measurement of the off-gas. For the fungal fermentation part gas sparging was switched to 0.6 L/min of air and a standard sparger. Ammonia content of medium for syngas fermentation was reduced to 0.33 g/L NH4Cl to meet the requirements for fungal production of dicarboxylic acids. Malic acid production performance of A. oryzae in organic acid production medium and syngas medium with acetate as sole carbon source was verified and gave YP∕S values of 0.28 g/g and 0.37 g/g respectively. Growth and acetate formation of C. ljungdahlii during syngas fermentation were not affected by the reduced ammonia content and 66 % of the consumed syngas was converted to acetate. The overall conversion

  9. Lactic Acid Production in a Mixed-Culture Biofilm Reactor †

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Ali; Pometto, Anthony L.; Johnson, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    Novel solid supports, consisting of polypropylene blended with various agricultural materials (pp composite), were evaluated as supports for pure- and mixed-culture continuous lactic acid fermentations in biofilm reactors. Streptomyces viridosporus T7A (ATCC 39115) was used to form a biofilm, and Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus (ATCC 11443) was used for lactic acid production. For mixed-culture fermentations, a 15-day continuous fermentation of S. viridosporus was performed initially to establish the biofilm. The culture medium was then inoculated with L. casei subsp. rhamnosus. For pure-culture fermentation, L. casei subsp. rhamnosus was inoculated directly into the reactors containing sterile pp composite chips. The biofilm reactors containing various pp composite chips were compared with a biofilm reactor containing pure polypropylene chips and with a reactor containing a suspension culture. Continuous fermentation was started, and each flow rate (0.06 to 1.92 ml/min) was held constant for 24 h; steady state was achieved after 10 h. Lactic acid production was determined throughout the 24-h period by high-performance liquid chromatography. Production rates that were two to five times faster than those of the suspension culture (control) were observed for the pure- and mixed-culture bioreactors. Both lactic acid production rates and lactic acid concentrations in the culture medium were consistently higher in mixed-culture than in pure-culture fermentations. Biofilm formation on the chips was detected at harvest by chip clumping and Gram staining. PMID:16348843

  10. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  11. COMPARISON OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE AND STANDARDIZED LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS FOR TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two microecosystem protocols, the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) method (1982) and the Mixed Flask Culture (MFC) method (1981), were compared on the basis of their response to copper sulfate. These protocols differed in microcosm structure, age, and the variables monitored....

  12. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials. PMID:24975413

  13. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  14. Preparation of Rodent Primary Cultures for Neuron–Glia, Mixed Glia, Enriched Microglia, and Reconstituted Cultures with Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Heng; Oyarzabal, Esteban A.; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, neurons, and macroglia (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) are the major cell types in the central nervous system. In the past decades, primary microglia-enriched cultures have been widely used to study the biological functions of microglia in vitro. In order to study the interactions between microglia and other brain cells, neuron–glia, neuron–microglia, and mixed glia cultures were developed. The aim of this chapter is to provide basic and adaptable protocols for the preparation of these microglia-containing primary cultures from rodent. Meanwhile, we also want to provide a collection of tips from our collective experiences doing primary brain cell cultures. PMID:23813383

  15. FT-IR microspectroscopy in rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontoura, Inglid; Belo, Ricardo; Sakane, Kumiko; Cardoso, Maria Angélica Gargione; Khouri, Sônia; Uehara, Mituo; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2010-02-01

    In recent years FT-IR microspectroscopy has been developed for microbiology analysis and applied successfully in pure cultures of microorganisms to rapidly identify strains of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The investigation and characterization of microorganism mixed cultures is also of growing importance, especially in hospitals where it is common to poly-microbial infections. In this work, the rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed cultures was studied. The bacteria were obtained from the Institute Oswaldo Cruz culture collection at Brazil. Escherichia coli ATCC 10799 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 14456 were analyzed, 3 inoculations were examined in triplicate: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and a mixed culture of them. The inoculations were prepared according to McFarland 0.5, incubated at 37 ° C for 6 hours, diluted in saline, placed in the CaF2 window and store for one hour at 50°C to obtain thin film. The measurement was performed by Spectrum Spotlight 400 (Perkin-Elmer) equipment in the range of 4000-900 cm-1, with 32 scans using a transmittance technique with point and image modes. The data were processed (baseline, normalization, calculation of first derivate followed by smoothing with 9 point using a Savitzky-Golay algorithm) and a cluster analysis were done by Ward's algorithm and an excellent discrimination between pure and mixed culture was obtained. Our preliminary results indicate that the FT-IR microspectroscopy associated with cluster analysis can be used to discriminate between pure and mixed culture.

  16. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Annual progress report, June 1992--May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO{sub 2}-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  17. Assessing Resilience across Cultures Using Mixed Methods: Construction of the Child and Youth Resilience Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Michael; Liebenberg, Linda

    2011-01-01

    An international team of investigators in 11 countries have worked collaboratively to develop a culturally and contextually relevant measure of youth resilience, the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM-28). The team used a mixed methods design that facilitated understanding of both common and unique aspects of resilience across cultures.…

  18. Perceptions of Organizational Culture of a Multi-Campus Community College District: Mixed Methods in Concert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuster Dale, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This concurrent, mixed-methods case study analyzed perceptions of current and preferred organizational culture within a rural, multi-campus community college district. This phenomenon was examined by analyzing and comparing data collected by surveying all full-time employees utilizing the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and…

  19. Spatial distributions of sulphur species and sulphate-reducing bacteria provide insights into sulphur redox cycling and biodegradation hot-spots in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Pilloni, Giovanni; Ruth-Anneser, Bettina; Lueders, Tillman; Griebler, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) has been proven to be one of the most relevant redox reactions in the biodegradation of contaminants in groundwater. However, the possible role of sulphur species of intermediate oxidation state, as well as the role of potential re-oxidative sulphur cycling in biodegradation particularly at the groundwater table are still poorly understood. Here we used a combination of stable isotope measurements of SO42-, H2S, and S0 as well as geochemical profiling of sulphur intermediates with special emphasis on SO32-, S2O32-, and S0 to unravel possible sulphur cycling in the biodegradation of aromatics in a hydrocarbon-contaminated porous aquifer. By linking these results to the quantification of total bacterial rRNA genes and respiratory genes of sulphate reducers, as well as pyrotag sequencing of bacterial communities over depth, light is shed on possible key-organisms involved. Our results substantiate the role of DSR in biodegradation of hydrocarbons (mainly toluene) in the highly active plume fringes above and beneath the plume core. In both zones the concentration of sulphur intermediates (S0, SO32- and S2O32-) was almost twice that of other sampling-depths, indicating intense sulphur redox cycling. The dual isotopic fingerprint of oxygen and sulphur in dissolved sulphate suggested a re-oxidation of reduced sulphur compounds to sulphate especially at the upper fringe zone. An isotopic shift in δ34S of S0 of nearly +4‰ compared to the δ34S values of H2S from the same depth linked to a high abundance (∼10%) of sequence reads related to Sulphuricurvum spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) in the same depth were indicative of intensive oxidation of S0 to sulphate in this zone. At the lower plume fringe S0 constituted the main inorganic sulphur species, possibly formed by abiotic re-oxidation of H2S with Fe(III)oxides subsequent to sulphate reduction. These results provide first insights into intense sulphur redox cycling in a hydrocarbon

  20. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X. Frank; Gregory, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro. PMID:25970462

  1. Cultural Consensus and Cultural Diversity: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Human Service Providers' Models of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses mixed methods and theory from cognitive anthropology to examine the cultural models of domestic violence among domestic violence agency workers, welfare workers, nurses, and a general population comparison group. Data collection and analysis uses quantitative and qualitative techniques, and the findings are integrated for…

  2. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were <0.5 log at most points, being 83.3% and 84.2% for the two-species mixture and the three-species mixture, respectively. The present study showed that the model could be applied to the competitive growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns. PMID:25252643

  3. Batch fermentative hydrogen production by enriched mixed culture: Combination strategy and their microbial composition.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Sen, Biswarup; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2014-02-01

    The effect of individual and combined mixed culture on dark fermentative hydrogen production performance was investigated. Mixed cultures from cow dung (C1), sewage sludge (C2), and pig slurry (C3) were enriched under strict anaerobic conditions at 37°C with glucose as the sole carbon source. Biochemical hydrogen production test in peptone-yeast-glucose (PYG) and basal medium was performed for individual mixed cultures (C1, C2 and C3) and their combinations (C1-C2, C2-C3, C1-C3 and C1-C2-C3) at a glucose concentration of 10 g/L, 37°C and initial pH 7. Maximum hydrogen yields (HY) of 2.0 and 1.86 [Formula: see text] by C2, and 1.98 and 1.95 mol(H2)/mol(glucose) by C2-C3 were obtained in PYG and basal medium, respectively. Butyrate and acetate were the major soluble metabolites produced by all the cultures, and the ratio of butyrate to acetate was ∼2 fold higher in basal medium than PYG medium, indicating strong influence of media formulation on glucose catabolism. The major hydrogen-producing bacterial strains, observed in all mixed cultures, belonged to Clostridium butyricum, C. saccharobutylicum, C. tertium and C. perfringens. The hydrogen production performance of the combined mixed culture (C2-C3) was further evaluated on beverage wastewater (10 g/L) at pH 7 and 37°C. The results showed an HY of 1.92 mol(H2)/mol(glucose-equivalent). Experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen fermentation by mixed culture combination could be a novel strategy to improve the HY from industrial wastewater. PMID:24095211

  4. Effect of culture phasing and mannanase on production of cellulase and hemicellulase by mixed culture of Trichoderma reesei D 1-6 and Aspergillus wentii Pt 2804

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, T.K.; Panda, T.; Bisaria, V.S.

    1985-09-01

    Significant increase in extracellular cellulase and hemicellulase activities was observed in the biosynthesis of cellulase enzyme in mixed culture fermentation of Trichoderma reesei D 1-6 and Aspergillus wentii Pt 2804 when the A. wentii inoculation was phased by 15 hours. The optimal conditions of fermentation by the mixed culture have been established. Presence of mannanase has been found to affect the release as well as activity of cellulase enzyme produced in mixed culture.

  5. Culturally Mixed Groups on International Campuses: An Opportunity for Inter-Cultural Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volet, S. E.; Ang, G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major educational goals of the internationalisation of higher education is to prepare students to function in an international and inter-cultural context. Cultural diversity on university campuses creates ideal social forums for inter-cultural learning, yet, one of the most disturbing aspects of the internationalisation of higher…

  6. Methodological issues in life cycle assessment of mixed-culture polyhydroxyalkanoate production utilising waste as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Heimersson, Sara; Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Peters, Gregory M; Werker, Alan; Svanström, Magdalena

    2014-06-25

    Assessing the environmental performance of emerging technologies using life cycle assessment (LCA) can be challenging due to a lack of data in relation to technologies, application areas or other life cycle considerations, or a lack of LCA methodology that address the specific concerns. Nevertheless, LCA can be a valuable tool in the environmental optimisation in the technology development phase. One emerging technology is the mixed-culture production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHA production by pure microbial cultures has been developed and assessed in several LCAs during the previous decade. Recent developments within mixed-culture PHA production call for environmental assessment to guide in technology development. Mixed-culture PHA production can use the organic content in wastewater as a feedstock; the production may then be integrated with wastewater treatment (WWT) processes. This means that mixed-culture PHA is produced as a by-product from services in the WWT. This article explores different methodological challenges for LCA of mixed-culture PHA production using organic material in wastewater as feedstock. LCAs of both pure- and mixed-culture PHA production were reviewed. Challenges, similarities and differences when assessing PHA production by mixed- or pure-cultures were identified and the resulting implications for methodological choices in LCA were evaluated and illustrated, using a case study with mixed- and pure-culture PHA model production systems, based on literature data. Environmental impacts of processes producing multiple products or services need to be allocated between the different products or services. Such situations occur both in feedstock production and when the studied system is providing multiple functions. The selection of allocation method is shown to determine the LCA results. The type of data used, for electricity in the energy system, is shown to be important for the results, which indicates, a strong regional dependency of

  7. Effect of emulsan on biodegradation of crude oil by pure and mixed bacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Foght, J.M.; Westlake, D.W.S. ); Gutnick, D.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Crude oil was treated with purified emulsan, the heteropolysaccharide bioemulsifier produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1. A mixed bacterial population as well as nine different pure cultures isolated from various sources was tested for biodegradation of emulsan-treated and untreated crude oil. Biodegradation was measured both quantitatively and qualitatively. Recovery of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from mineralized {sup 14}C-labeled substrates yielded quantitative data on degradation of specific compounds, and capillary gas chromatography of residual unlabeled oil yielded qualitative data on a broad spectrum of crude oil components. Biodegradation of linear alkanes and other saturated hydrocarbons, both by pure cultures and by the mixed population, was reduced some 50 to 90% after emulsan pretreatment. In addition, degradation of aromatic compounds by the mixed population was reduced some 90% in emulsan-treated oil. In sharp contrast, aromatic biodegradation by pure cultures was either unaffected or slightly stimulated by emulsification of the oil.

  8. Metabolites from the Fungal Endophyte Aspergillus austroafricanus in Axenic Culture and in Fungal-Bacterial Mixed Cultures.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Weaam; El-Neketi, Mona; Lewald, Laura-Isabell; Orfali, Raha S; Lin, Wenhan; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Daletos, Georgios; Proksch, Peter

    2016-04-22

    The endophytic fungus Aspergillus austroafricanus isolated from leaves of the aquatic plant Eichhornia crassipes was fermented axenically on solid rice medium as well as in mixed cultures with Bacillus subtilis or with Streptomyces lividans. Chromatographic analysis of EtOAc extract of axenic cultures afforded two new metabolites, namely, the xanthone dimer austradixanthone (1) and the sesquiterpene (+)-austrosene (2), along with five known compounds (3-7). Austradixanthone (1) represents the first highly oxygenated heterodimeric xanthone derivative. When A. austroafricanus was grown in mixed cultures with B. subtilis or with S. lividans, several diphenyl ethers (8-11) including the new austramide (8) were induced up to 29-fold. The structures of new compounds were unambiguously elucidated using 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy, HRESIMS, and chemical derivatization. Compound 7 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against the murine lymphoma L5178Y cell line (EC50 is 12.6 μM). In addition, compounds 9 and 10, which were enhanced in mixed fungal/bacterial cultures, proved to be active against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 700699) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 25 μM each (6.6 μg/mL), whereas compound 11 revealed moderate antibacterial activity against B. subtilis 168 trpC2 with an MIC value of 34.8 μM (8 μg/mL). PMID:27070198

  9. Mixing against culture vs mixing against nature: ontologization of prohibited interethnic relationships.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, Alessandra; Pérez, Juan A; Ravenna, Marcella; Navarro-Pertusa, Esperanza

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we develop the theory of ontologization: Social representations that prevent members of minority and majority groups who are living in contact with each other to mingle. The process of ontologization consists of separating some humans from their own species, and anchoring them in another environment, that of an animal, for example. We propose that underlying the famous slogan "equal but separate" is the social representation of interracial mixing as a "counter-nature" phenomenon. It is predicted that a sexual relationship between people of different "races" leads to a greater degree of ontologization, and, as such, this miscegenation will be explained in terms of biologistic thinking, like an instinctive nature or atavistic animal impulse. An experiment (N = 360) features the case of a woman who, though already in a stable relationship, is unfaithful to her partner. In a 2×3 factor design, the ethnic-national identity of this woman (in-group: Spanish/Italian vs out-group: Senegalese) and the ethnic-national identity of her lovers (in-group: Spanish/Italian vs out-group: Rumanian vs out-group: Senegalese) were manipulated. In general, results fit the hypothesis of ontologization in interracial conditions better, rather than the customary in-group favouritism and/or out-group discrimination bias. We then go on to discuss the way in which a biologistic way of thinking enables a differentiation at the human level, in terms of culture groups and nature groups, in "races," so that an interracial sexual relationship is seen as evidence of a wild and irrepressible impulse, which stigmatizes the people involved in these relationships. This research was supported by the Italian/Spanish Integrated Action Program HI2004_0241 and the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología BSO2003-00476/PSCE. Dans cet article, nous développons la théorie de l'ontologisation: des représentations sociales qui empêchent les membres des groupes minoritaire et majoritaire

  10. Evaluation of mono or mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria in type II sourdough system.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Şimşek, Ömer; Küçükçuban, Ayca; Nas, Sebahattin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mono and mixed lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures to determine suitable LAB combinations for a type II sourdough system. In this context, previously isolated sourdough LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, which included Lactobacillus plantarum PFC22, Lactobacillus brevis PFC31, Pediococcus acidilactici PFC38, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis PFC80, were used as mono or mixed culture combinations in a fermentation system to produce type II sourdough, and subsequently in bread dough production. Compared to the monoculture fermentation of dough, the use of mixed cultures shortened the adaptation period by half. In addition, the use of mixed cultures ensured higher microbial viability, and enhanced the fruity flavor during bread dough production. It was determined that the combination of L. plantarum PFC22 + P. acidilactici PFC38 + L. sanfranciscensis PFC80 is a promising culture mixture that can be used in the production of type II sourdough systems, and that may also contribute to an increase in metabolic activity during bread production process. PMID:25807196

  11. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  12. Expression Profiles of Cloned Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) Lymphoid Cell Lines and Mixed Lymphocyte Cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clonal channel catfish lymphoid cell lines and mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) have proven extremely useful in examining immune responses at the cellular and molecular levels. To date clonal catfish cell lines and MLC have been biologically and phenotypically characterized using a variety of techniq...

  13. Quantification of Dehalospirillum multivorans in Mixed-Culture Biofilms with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Kreisel, P.; Eisenbeis, M.; Scholz-Muramatsu, H.

    1996-01-01

    A fast, highly selective and sensitive method to quantify specific biomasses in mixed-culture biofilms is described. It consists of detachment of a biofilm from its support material, resolution of the detached biofilm flocs in order to separate the enclosed cells and antigens, and quantification of specific biomass by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:16535389

  14. Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy-Forming Experiences: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga

    2011-01-01

    The author used an explanatory mixed methods research design. The first phase involved the collection of quantitative data to examine the nature of preservice teachers' (N = 192) culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy beliefs. Follow-up face-to-face interviews were carried out with a subsample selected from Phase 1 participants. These…

  15. COMPARISON OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE AND STANDARDIZED LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS FOR TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two microecosystem protocols, the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) method developed by Dr. Frieda Taub and associates (1982) and the Mixed Flask Culture (MFC) method of Dr. John Leffler (1981), were compared on the basis of their response to copper sulfate. These protocols di...

  16. Quantification of Dehalospirillum multivorans in Mixed-Culture Biofilms with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Kreisel, P; Eisenbeis, M; Scholz-Muramatsu, H

    1996-08-01

    A fast, highly selective and sensitive method to quantify specific biomasses in mixed-culture biofilms is described. It consists of detachment of a biofilm from its support material, resolution of the detached biofilm flocs in order to separate the enclosed cells and antigens, and quantification of specific biomass by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:16535389

  17. Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Munakata, Kanako; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition. PMID:24975409

  18. Illustrating a Mixed-Method Approach for Validating Culturally Specific Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, J.H.; Nastasi, B.K.; Dai, D.Y.; Newman, J.; Jayasena, A.; Bernstein-Moore, R.; Sarkar, S.; Varjas, K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate a mixed-method approach (i.e., combining qualitative and quantitative methods) for advancing the study of construct validation in cross-cultural research. The article offers a detailed illustration of the approach using the responses 612 Sri Lankan adolescents provided to an ethnographic survey. Such…

  19. Molecular and kinetic characterization of mixed cultures degrading natural and synthetic estrogens.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mathieu; Patureau, Dominique; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina

    2010-01-01

    The biodegradation of estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and ethinylestradiol (EE2) was investigated using mixed bacterial cultures enriched from activated sludge. Enrichments were carried out on E2 or EE2 in batch conditions with acetonitrile as additional carbon source. Degradation experiments were performed both using hormones as sole carbon source or with an additional source. The hormones were completely degraded by these cultures. Estradiol was rapidly converted to E1 within 24 h. Thereafter, E1 degradation began, displaying a lag phase ranging from 3 to 4 days. Estrone depletion took from 48 h to more than 6 days, depending on the culture conditions. For EE2 degradation, when it was the sole carbon source, the lag phase and the time required for its complete removal (7 and 15 days, respectively) were shorter that in cultures with a supplementary carbon source. The specific degradation rates observed for E2 both with and without an additional carbon source were similar. By contrast, the specific degradation rates for E1 and EE2 were, respectively, seven and 20 times faster when these hormones were supplied as the sole carbon source. The bacterial community structure of each culture was characterized by molecular and cultural methods. The mixed cultures were made up of species belonging to Alcaligenes faecalis, Pusillimonas sp., Denitrobacter sp., and Brevundimonas diminuta or related to uncultured Bacteroidetes. The isolated strain B. diminuta achieved the conversion of E2 to E1. PMID:19685239

  20. Comparative evaluation of the hydrogen production by mixed consortium, synthetic co-culture and pure culture using distillery effluent.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Preeti; Roy, Shantonu; Das, Debabrata

    2015-12-01

    Wastewater comprises of various carbon sources. So, the use of microbial consortium may improve the hydrogen production and organic reduction. The present study deals with biohydrogen production by acidogenic mixed consortia (AMC), synthetic co-culture (Klebsiella pneumoniae IIT-BT 08 and Citrobacter freundii IIT-BT L139) and pure culture using distillery effluent (DE). Higher hydrogen yield was observed in case of AMC (9.17 mol/kg CODreduced) as compared to the synthetic co-culture and pure culture. PCR-DGGE analysis indicated that the consortium was predominated by species closely affiliated to Clostridium sp. The average hydrogen production rate was 267 mL/Lh. The maximum hydrogen production rate (Rm), hydrogen production potential (P) and lag time (λ) by AMC using DE were 507.2 mL/Lh, 3729 m/L and 2.04 h, respectively. Maximum gaseous energy recovery by AMC was found to be higher by 21.9% and 45.4% than that of using co-culture and pure culture respectively. PMID:26433784

  1. Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures.

    PubMed

    Timpka, T; Eriksson, H; Holm, E; Strömgren, M; Ekberg, J; Spreco, A; Dahlström, Ö

    2016-07-01

    Workplaces are one of the most important regular meeting places in society. The aim of this study was to use simulation experiments to examine the impact of different workplace cultures on influenza dissemination during pandemics. The impact is investigated by experiments with defined social-mixing patterns at workplaces using semi-virtual models based on authentic sociodemographic and geographical data from a North European community (population 136 000). A simulated pandemic outbreak was found to affect 33% of the total population in the community with the reference academic-creative workplace culture; virus transmission at the workplace accounted for 10·6% of the cases. A model with a prevailing industrial-administrative workplace culture generated 11% lower incidence than the reference model, while the model with a self-employed workplace culture (also corresponding to a hypothetical scenario with all workplaces closed) produced 20% fewer cases. The model representing an academic-creative workplace culture with restricted workplace interaction generated 12% lower cumulative incidence compared to the reference model. The results display important theoretical associations between workplace social-mixing cultures and community-level incidence rates during influenza pandemics. Social interaction patterns at workplaces should be taken into consideration when analysing virus transmission patterns during influenza pandemics. PMID:26847017

  2. The Cultural Politics of Mixed-Income Schools and Housing: A Racialized Discourse of Displacement, Exclusion, and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I examine the contested and racially coded cultural politics of creating mixed-income schools in mixed-income communities. Policymakers claim deconcentrating low-income people will reduce poverty and improve education. However, based on activist research in Chicago, I argue these policies are grounded in "culture of poverty"…

  3. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites. PMID:24555327

  4. Denitrification by the mix-culturing of fungi and bacteria with shell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deli; Zhang, Shan; Zheng, Yongliang; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2006-01-01

    Denitrification by pure and mixed culture of Fusarium oxysporum and Pseudomonas stutzeri in different mineral medium and in synthetic wastewater were examined. The results obtained revealed that a rapid N2 evolution by F. oxysporum and P. stutzeri in mineral medium and synthetic wastewater was observed. In co-cultures of F. oxysporum and P. stutzeri, N2O produced by F. oxysporum was rapidly consumed by P. stutzeri. This indicated that mixed culture of F. oxysporum and P. stutzeri could be used for efficient nitrate and nitrite removal. Using synthetic wastewater, about 87% of nitrate was reduced by co-denitrification of F. oxysporum and P. stutzeri after incubation for 6 days. In the further denitrification tests, the interaction of shell and mixed culture of F. oxysporum and P. stutzeri was investigated. The dinitrogen was rapidly evolved (442.48 micromol N2 produced from 1.0 mmol of NO3(-) in 36 h). These results clearly showed that shell provide a suitable microenvironment for P. stutzeri, which is beneficial to the denitrification. PMID:16427516

  5. Biopolymers Production by Mixed Culture and Their Applications in Water and Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    More, Tanaji T; Yan, Song; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal; Surampalli, Rao Y

    2015-06-01

    Thirteen extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains were cultivated (as pure/mixed culture) in sterilized sludge (suspended solids: 25 g/L). The mixed culture produced higher concentrations of EPS (4.9 g/L) as compared to that of the pure culture (2.7-3.7 g/L). The harvested EPS were examined for their flocculation performance (turbidity removal and dewatering) in jar tests using kaolin suspensions with Ca2+. Broth (B-EPS) revealed high kaolin flocculating activity (91.2%) at very low concentrations (0.8 mg B-EPS/g kaolin) and it was comparable to the chemical polymer, Magnafloc-155 (90.4% at 0.2 mg/g kaolin). B-EPS also exhibited very good flocculation performance (turbidity removal %) in river water (93.5%), municipal wastewater (91.7%) and brewery wastewater (81.8%). The study revealed that the mixed culture consortium could be used for the production of highly efficient flocculants. PMID:26459822

  6. How-to-Do-It. Isolation of Pure Cultures from Mixed Cultures: A Modern Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an alternative method of culture isolation that uses streaking on specialized media. An activity in which different media are tested for selectivity is presented including a list of materials and procedures. A chart of colony morphology is given. (CW)

  7. A Moderately Thermophilic Mixed Microbial Culture for Bioleaching of Chalcopyrite Concentrate at High Pulp Density

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuguang; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Chen, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of samples (acid mine drainage, coal mine wastewater, and thermal spring) derived from different sites were collected in China. Thereafter, these samples were combined and then inoculated into a basal salts solution in which different substrates (ferrous sulfate, elemental sulfur, and chalcopyrite) served as energy sources. After that, the mixed cultures growing on different substrates were pooled equally, resulting in a final mixed culture. After being adapted to gradually increasing pulp densities of chalcopyrite concentrate by serial subculturing for more than 2 years, the final culture was able to efficiently leach the chalcopyrite at a pulp density of 20% (wt/vol). At that pulp density, the culture extracted 60.4% of copper from the chalcopyrite in 25 days. The bacterial and archaeal diversities during adaptation were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and constructing clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. The results show that the culture consisted mainly of four species, including Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus caldus, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Ferroplasma thermophilum, before adapting to a pulp density of 4%. However, L. ferriphilum could not be detected when the pulp density was greater than 4%. Real-time quantitative PCR was employed to monitor the microbial dynamics during bioleaching at a pulp density of 20%. The results show that A. caldus was the predominant species in the initial stage, while S. acidophilus rather than A. caldus became the predominant species in the middle stage. F. thermophilum accounted for the greatest proportion in the final stage. PMID:24242252

  8. Biocatalytic Desulfurization Capabilities of a Mixed Culture during Non-Destructive Utilization of Recalcitrant Organosulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Wael; El-Sayed, Wael S.; Abdul Raheem, Abdul Salam; Mohamed, Magdy E.; El Nayal, Ashraf M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the biodesulfurization potential of a mixed culture AK6 enriched from petroleum hydrocarbons-polluted soil with dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a sulfur source. In addition to DBT, AK6 utilized the following compounds as sulfur sources: 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT), benzothiophene (BT), and 4,6- dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DM-DBT). None of these compounds supported the growth of AK6 as the sole carbon and sulfur source. AK6 could not grow on dibenzylsulfide (DBS) as a sulfur source. The AK6 community structure changed according to the provided sulfur source. The major DGGE bands represented members of the genera Sphingobacterium, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Arthrobacter, Mycobacterium, and Rhodococcus. Sphingobacterium sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were abundant across all cultures utilizing any of the tested thiophenic S-compounds. Mycobacterium/Rhodococcus spp. were restricted to the 4-MDBT culture. The 4-MDBT culture had the highest species richness and diversity. Biodesulfurization of DBT by resting cells of AK6 produced 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) in addition to trace amounts of phenylacetate. AK6 transformed DBT to 2-hydroxybiphenyl with a specific activity of 9 ± 0.6 μM 2-HBP g dry cell weight−1 h−1. PCR confirmed the presence in the AK6 community of the sulfur-specific (4S) pathway genes dszB and dszC. Mixed cultures hold a better potential than axenic ones for the development of a biodesulfurization technology. PMID:26973637

  9. Biocatalytic Desulfurization Capabilities of a Mixed Culture during Non-Destructive Utilization of Recalcitrant Organosulfur Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wael; El-Sayed, Wael S; Abdul Raheem, Abdul Salam; Mohamed, Magdy E; El Nayal, Ashraf M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the biodesulfurization potential of a mixed culture AK6 enriched from petroleum hydrocarbons-polluted soil with dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a sulfur source. In addition to DBT, AK6 utilized the following compounds as sulfur sources: 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT), benzothiophene (BT), and 4,6- dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DM-DBT). None of these compounds supported the growth of AK6 as the sole carbon and sulfur source. AK6 could not grow on dibenzylsulfide (DBS) as a sulfur source. The AK6 community structure changed according to the provided sulfur source. The major DGGE bands represented members of the genera Sphingobacterium, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Arthrobacter, Mycobacterium, and Rhodococcus. Sphingobacterium sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were abundant across all cultures utilizing any of the tested thiophenic S-compounds. Mycobacterium/Rhodococcus spp. were restricted to the 4-MDBT culture. The 4-MDBT culture had the highest species richness and diversity. Biodesulfurization of DBT by resting cells of AK6 produced 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) in addition to trace amounts of phenylacetate. AK6 transformed DBT to 2-hydroxybiphenyl with a specific activity of 9 ± 0.6 μM 2-HBP g dry cell weight(-1) h(-1). PCR confirmed the presence in the AK6 community of the sulfur-specific (4S) pathway genes dszB and dszC. Mixed cultures hold a better potential than axenic ones for the development of a biodesulfurization technology. PMID:26973637

  10. Detection of Specific Strains and Variants of Streptococcus cremoris in Mixed Cultures by Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Veldkamp, Hans; Konings, Wil N.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera against four different strains of Streptococcus cremoris were raised by injecting rabbits with washed suspensions of whole cells. These antisera interacted specifically with the corresponding strain in a mixture of up to nine different S. cremoris strains. The antisera could be used for analyzing the composition of mixed cultures containing these strains by immunofluorescence. Competition experiments were performed in batch and continuous cultures under amino acid limitation. A bacteriophage-sensitive variant of S. cremoris SK11 (SK1128) could be distinguished from a bacteriophage-resistant variant (SK1143) by the same immunofluorescence technique. The competition between the two variants and the stability of both variants in pure cultures were followed with the specific antibodies. Antibodies against the purified proteolytic system of S. cremoris Wg2 were used to determine the presence of proteases by immunofluorescence in several S. cremoris strains under different culture conditions. The described immunofluorescence methods can be used to analyze complex mixed starter cultures common in the dairy industry as the strains and variants present in these mixtures can be recognized microscopically. Images PMID:16347256

  11. Effects of space flight and mixing on bacterial growth in low volume cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Manfredi, B.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that liquid suspension bacterial cultures grow to higher cell concentrations in spaceflight than on Earth. None of these studies included ground-control experiments designed to evaluate the fluid effects potentially responsible for the reported increases. Therefore, the emphasis of this research was to both confirm differences in final cell concentration between 1g and microgravity cultures, and to examine the effects of mixing as a partial explanation for this difference. Flight experiments were performed in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA), aboard Space Shuttle Missions STS-63 and STS-69, with simultaneous 1g static and agitated controls. Additional static 1g, agitated, and clino-rotated controls were performed in 9-ml culture tubes. This research revealed that both E. coli and B. subtilis samples cultured in space flight grew to higher final cell densities (120-345% increase) than simultaneous static 1g controls. The final cell concentration of E. coli cells cultured under agitation was 43% higher than in static 1g cultures and was 102% higher with clino-rotation. However, for B. subtilis cultures grown while being agitated on a shaker or clino-rotated, the final cell concentrations were nearly identical to those of the simultaneous static 1g controls. Therefore, these data suggest that the unique fluid quiescence in the microgravity environment (lack of sedimentation, creating unique transfer of nutrients and waste products), was responsible for the enhanced bacterial proliferation reported in this and other studies.

  12. Comparative analysis of microbial community of novel lactic acid fermentation inoculated with different undefined mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Settles, Matthew L; Forney, Larry J; Coats, Erik R; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-03-01

    Three undefined mixed cultures (activated sludge) from different municipal wastewater treatment plants were used as seeds in a novel lactic acid fermentation process fed with potato peel waste (PPW). Anaerobic sequencing batch fermenters were run under identical conditions to produce predominantly lactic acid. Illumina sequencing was used to examine the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in the three seeds and fermenters. Results showed that the structure of microbial communities of three seeds were different. All three fermentation products had unique community structures that were dominated (>96%) by species of the genus Lactobacillus, while members of this genus constituted <0.1% in seeds. The species of Lactobacillus sp. differed among the three fermentations. Results of this study suggest the structure of microbial communities in lactic acid fermentation of PPW with undefined mixed cultures were robust and resilient, which provided engineering prospects for the microbial utilization of carbohydrate wastes to produce lactic acid. PMID:25545096

  13. Some nutritional requirements of a mixed culture transforming Reichstein's compound S into prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, K M; Yusef, H H

    1992-08-01

    Reichstein's compound S was successfully converted to prednisolone in a single-step fermentation using a mixed culture of Curvularia lunata and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Introducing additional medium at the time of bacterial inoculation and increasing the M. smegmatis inoculum to 8% were necessary for maximal dehydrogenation of cortisol to prednisolone (86%). However, beef extract, corn-steep solids, and malt extract were inhibitory to the dehydrogenase activity and stimulatory to hydroxylase. Of the vitamins tested, nicotinic acid and riboflavin at 0.2 and 1.13 mg/L, respectively, resulted in maximum transformation of Reichstein's compound S (100%) and optimized prednisolone yields (92%) in the mixed culture. The trace elements present in the medium were sufficient for maximal transformation, and there was no need for an exogenous supply. Addition of ATP, sodium acetate, and NAD inhibited the dehydrogenation reaction. PMID:1458367

  14. Carboxylic acid production from brewer's spent grain via mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Wan, Caixia

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating carboxylic acid production from brewer's spent grain (BSG) via mixed culture fermentation. The results showed that the distribution of fermentation products was significantly affected by pH conditions and the addition of electron donors. Lactic acid was the dominant component under acidic and alkaline conditions while volatile fatty acids (VFAs) became dominant under the neutral condition. Furthermore, the neutral condition favored the chain elongation of carboxylic acids, especially with ethanol as the electron donor. Ethanol addition enhanced valeric acid and caproic acid production by 44% and 167%, respectively. Lactic acid addition also had positive effects on VFAs production under the neutral condition but limited to C2-C4 products. As a result, propionic acid and butyric acid production was increased by 109% and 152%, respectively. These findings provide substantial evidence for regulating carboxylic acid production during mixed culture fermentation of BSG by controlling pH and adding electron donors. PMID:25698409

  15. Analysis of mixed cell cultures with quantitative digital holographic phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Wibbeling, Jana; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2014-05-01

    In order to study, for example, the influence of pharmaceuticals or pathogens on different cell types under identical measurement conditions and to analyze interactions between different cellular specimens a minimally-invasive quantitative observation of mixed cell cultures is of particular interest. Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) provides high resolution detection of optical path length changes that is suitable for stain-free minimally-invasive live cell analysis. Due to low light intensities for object illumination, QPM minimizes the interaction with the sample and is in particular suitable for long term time-lapse investigations, e.g., for the detection of cell morphology alterations due to drugs and toxins. Furthermore, QPM has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for the quantification of cellular growth, the extraction morphological parameters and cell motility. We studied the feasibility of QPM for the analysis of mixed cell cultures. It was explored if quantitative phase images provide sufficient information to distinguish between different cell types and to extract cell specific parameters. For the experiments quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) was utilized. Mixed cell cultures with different types of human pancreatic tumor cells were observed with quantitative DHM phase contrast up to 35 h. The obtained series of quantitative phase images were evaluated by adapted algorithms for image segmentation. From the segmented images the cellular dry mass and the mean cell thickness were calculated and used in the further analysis as parameters to quantify the reliability the measurement principle. The obtained results demonstrate that it is possible to characterize the growth of cell types with different morphologies in a mixed cell culture separately by consideration of specimen size and cell thickness in the evaluation of quantitative DHM phase images.

  16. Characterization of the liver-macrophages isolated from a mixed primary culture of neonatal swine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently developed a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages in sufficient number and purity using a mixed primary culture of rat and bovine hepatocytes. In this study, we aim to apply this method to the neonatal swine liver. Swine parenchymal hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T75 culture flasks. Similar to the rat and bovine cells, the swine hepatocytes retained an epithelial cell morphology for only a few days and progressively changed into fibroblastic cells. After 5-13 days of culture, macrophage-like cells actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. Gentle shaking of the culture flask followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells to a plastic dish surface. After rinsing dishes with saline, the attached macrophage-like cells were collected at a yield of 10(6) cells per T75 culture flask at 2-3 day intervals for more than 3 weeks. The isolated cells displayed a typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for macrophage markers, such as CD172a, Iba-1 and KT022, but negative for cytokeratin, desmin and α-smooth muscle actin, indicating a highly purified macrophage population. The isolated cells exhibited phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and a release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. This shaking and attachment method is applicable to the swine liver and provides a sufficient number of macrophages without any need of complex laboratory equipments. PMID:24707456

  17. Enzymatic activities produced by mixed Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces cultures: relationship with wine volatile composition.

    PubMed

    Maturano, Yolanda Paola; Assof, Mariela; Fabani, María Paula; Nally, María Cristina; Jofré, Viviana; Rodríguez Assaf, Leticia Anahí; Toro, María Eugenia; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía Inés; Vazquez, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    During certain wine fermentation processes, yeasts, and mainly non-Saccharomyces strains, produce and secrete enzymes such as β-glucosidases, proteases, pectinases, xylanases and amylases. The effects of enzyme activity on the aromatic quality of wines during grape juice fermentation, using different co-inoculation strategies of non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, were assessed in the current study. Three strains with appropriate enological performance and high enzymatic activities, BSc562 (S. cerevisiae), BDv566 (Debaryomyces vanrijiae) and BCs403 (Candida sake), were assayed in pure and mixed Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces cultures. β-Glucosidase, pectinase, protease, xylanase and amylase activities were quantified during fermentations. The aromatic profile of pure and mixed cultures was determined at the end of each fermentation. In mixed cultures, non-Saccharomyces species were detected until day 4-5 of the fermentation process, and highest populations were observed in MSD2 (10% S. cerevisiae/90% D. vanrijiae) and MSC1 (1% S. cerevisiae/99% C. sake). According to correlation and multivariate analysis, MSD2 presented the highest concentrations of terpenes and higher alcohols which were associated with pectinase, amylase and xylanase activities. On the other hand, MSC1 high levels of β-glucosidase, proteolytic and xylanolytic activities were correlated to esters and fatty acids. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the effect of enzymatic activities by yeasts on compound transformations that occur during wine fermentation. PMID:26386703

  18. Total Degradation of EDTA by Mixed Cultures and a Bacterial Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Nörtemann, Bernd

    1992-01-01

    A bacterial mixed culture, which was obtained from sewage by a special enrichment procedure, utilized EDTA as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth. High concentrations of mineral salts, particularly CaCl2, or the use of a mineral base without nitrogen protected the cells from inactivation after transfer into fresh medium containing 200-mg/liter (0.67 mM) EDTA. The chemical speciation did not influence the biodegradability of EDTA. However, when resting cells of the mixed culture were incubated with EDTA in the presence of an equivalent molar amount of FeCl3, the reaction came to a halt before the complete consumption of the substrate. A gram-negative isolate from the mixed population, BNC1, also metabolized EDTA in monoculture. Growth of the pure culture was promoted by biotin or folic acid but was always accompanied by the accumulation of unidentified metabolites and was slow (μmax, 0.024 h-1) compared with that of the original community (μmax, 0.036 h-1). Images PMID:16348653

  19. Stoichiometric model and flux balance analysis for a mixed culture of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum.

    PubMed

    Merino, M P; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation process of sulfide minerals in natural environments is achieved by microbial communities from the Archaea and Bacteria domains. A metabolic reconstruction of two dominant species, Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum, which are always found together as a mixed culture in this natural environments, was made. The metabolic model, composed of 152 internal reactions and 29 transport reactions, describes the main interactions between these species, assuming that both use ferrous iron as energy source, and F. acidiphilum takes advantage of the organic compounds secreted by L. ferriphilum for chemomixotrophic growth. A first metabolic model for a mixed culture used in bacterial leaching is proposed in this article, which pretends to represent the characteristics of the mixed culture in a simplified manner. It was evaluated with experimental data through flux balance analysis (FBA) using as objective function the maximization of biomass. The growth yields on ferrous iron obtained for each microorganism are consistent with experimental data, and the flux distribution obtained allows understanding of the metabolic capabilities of both microorganisms growing together in a bioleaching process. The model was used to simulate the growth of F. acidiphilum on different substrates, to determine in silico which compounds maximize cell growth, and which are essential. Knockout simulations were carried out for L. ferriphilum and F. acidiphilum metabolic models, predicting key enzymes of central metabolism. The results of this analysis are consistent with experimental data from literature, showing a robust behavior of the metabolic model. PMID:25504621

  20. Metabolism of dibenzofuran by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 and the mixed culture HH27

    SciTech Connect

    Fortnagel, P.; Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Krohn, S.; Meyer, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Wilkes, H.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain, HH69, and a mixed culture, designated HH27, were isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples. The pure strain and the mixed culture grew aerobically on dibenzofuran as the sole source of carbon and energy. Degradation proceeded via salicylic acid which was branched into the gentisic acid and the catechol pathway. Both salicylic acid and gentisic acid accumulated in the culture medium of strain HH69. The acids were slowly metabolized after growth ceased. The enzymes responsible for their metabolism showed relatively low activities. Besides the above-mentioned acids, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, benzopyran-4-one (chrome), several 2-substituted chroman-4-ones, and traces of the four isomeric monohydroxydibenzofurans were identified in the culture medium. 2,2{prime},3-Trihydroxybiphenyl was isolated from the medium of a dibenzofuran-converting mutant derived from parent strain HH69, which can no longer grow on dibenzofuran. This gives evidence for a novel type of dioxygenases responsible for the attack on the biarylether structure of the dibenzofuran molecule. A meta-fission mechanism for cleavage of the dihydroxylated aromatic nucleus of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl is suggested as the next enzymatic step in the degradative pathway.

  1. Reduction of bromate to bromide coupled to acetate oxidation by anaerobic mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, C G; van Haperen, A M; van der Togt, B

    2005-01-01

    Bromate, a weakly mutagenic oxidizing agent, exists in surface waters. The biodegradation of bromate was investigated by assessing the ability of mixed cultures of micro-organisms for utilization of bromate as electron acceptor and acetate as electron donor. Reduction of bromate was only observed at relatively low concentrations (<3.0 mM) in the absence of molecular oxygen. Under these conditions bromate was reduced stoichiometrically to bromide. Unadapted sludge from an activated sludge treatment plant and a digester reduced bromate without lag period at a constant rate. Using an enrichment culture adapted to bromate, it was demonstrated that bromate was a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Approximately 50% of the acetate was utilized for growth with bromate by the enrichment culture. A doubling of 20 h was estimated from a logarithmic growth curve. Other electron acceptors, like perchlorate, chlorate and nitrate, were not reduced or at negligible rates by bromate-utilizing microorganisms. PMID:15607164

  2. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Final report: June 1992--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1994-12-01

    The microorganisms capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were identified as Pseudomonas acidovorans, Flavobacterium indoltheticum and Phyllobacterium rubiaceum. The bacterial cells of mix cultures were immobilized in calcium-alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with different amounts of CO{sub 2}-free air. The normal saline saturated with BTXs was circulated in the bioreactors at the rate of 2--4 ml/min. The biodegradation of BTXs by the immobilized beads of mix culture was monitored by determining the concentrations of the BTXs and the metabolites formed during their degradation in the samples at regular intervals using GC. The peaks obtained through the degradation of BTXs were not identified and quantified in this study.

  3. Use of whey lactose from dairy industry for economical kefiran production by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens in mixed cultures with yeasts.

    PubMed

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Radchabut, Sirilaor

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of producing kefiran industrially, whey lactose, a by-product from dairy industry, was used as a low cost carbon source. Because the accumulation of lactic acid as a by-product of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens inhibited cell growth and kefiran production, the kefir grain derived and non-derived yeasts were screened for their abilities to reduce lactic acid and promote kefiran production in a mixed culture. Six species of yeasts were examined: Torulaspora delbrueckii IFO 1626; Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 0216; Debaryomyces hansenii TISTR 5155; Saccharomyces exiguus TISTR 5081; Zygosaccharomyces rouxii TISTR 5044; and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis TISTR 5018. The mixed culture of L. kefiranofaciens with S. cerevisiae IFO 0216 enhanced the kefiran production best from 568 mg/L in the pure culture up to 807 and 938 mg/L in the mixed cultures under anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, respectively. The optimal conditions for kefiran production by the mixed culture were: whey lactose 4%; yeast extract 4%; initial pH of 5.5; and initial amounts of L. kefiranofaciens and S. cerevisiae IFO 0216 of 2.1×10(7) and 4.0×10(6)CFU/mL, respectively. Scaling up the mixed culture in a 2L bioreactor with dissolved oxygen control at 5% and pH control at 5.5 gave the maximum kefiran production of 2,580 mg/L in batch culture and 3,250 mg/L in fed-batch culture. PMID:21315193

  4. Culturing oil sands microbes as mixed species communities enhances ex situ model naphthenic acid degradation

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joseph A.; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Oil sands surface mining for bitumen results in the formation of oil sands process water (OSPW), containing acutely toxic naphthenic acids (NAs). Potential exists for OSPW toxicity to be mitigated by aerobic degradation of the NAs by microorganisms indigenous to the oil sands tailings ponds, the success of which is dependent on the methods used to exploit the metabolisms of the environmental microbial community. Having hypothesized that the xenobiotic tolerant biofilm mode-of-life may represent a feasible way to harness environmental microbes for ex situ treatment of OSPW NAs, we aerobically grew OSPW microbes as single and mixed species biofilm and planktonic cultures under various conditions for the purpose of assaying their ability to tolerate and degrade NAs. The NAs evaluated were a diverse mixture of eight commercially available model compounds. Confocal microscopy confirmed the ability of mixed and single species OSPW cultures to grow as biofilms in the presence of the NAs evaluated. qPCR enumeration demonstrated that the addition of supplemental nutrients at concentrations of 1 g L-1 resulted in a more numerous population than 0.001 g L-1 supplementation by approximately 1 order of magnitude. GC-FID analysis revealed that mixed species cultures (regardless of the mode of growth) are the most effective at degrading the NAs tested. All constituent NAs evaluated were degraded below detectable limits with the exception of 1-adamantane carboxylic acid (ACA); subsequent experimentation with ACA as the sole NA also failed to exhibit degradation of this compound. Single species cultures degraded select few NA compounds. The degradation trends highlighted many structure-persistence relationships among the eight NAs tested, demonstrating the effect of side chain configuration and alkyl branching on compound recalcitrance. Of all the isolates, the Rhodococcus spp. degraded the greatest number of NA compounds, although still less than the mixed species cultures

  5. Children's activities and their meanings for parents: a mixed-methods study in six Western cultures.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Sara; Zylicz, Piotr Olaf; Super, Charles M; Welles-Nyström, Barbara; Bermúdez, Moisés Ríos; Bonichini, Sabrina; Moscardino, Ughetta; Mavridis, Caroline Johnston

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical perspectives and research in sociology, anthropology, sociolinguistics, and cultural psychology converge in recognizing the significance of children's time spent in various activities, especially in the family context. Knowing how children's time is deployed, however, only gives us a partial answer to how children acquire competence; the other part must take into account the culturally constructed meanings of activities, from the perspective of those who organize and direct children's daily lives. In this article, we report on a study of children's routine daily activities and on the meanings that parents attribute to them in six Western middle-class cultural communities located in Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States (N = 183). Using week-long time diaries kept by parents, we first demonstrate similarities as well as significant differences in children's daily routines across the cultural samples. We then present brief vignettes--"a day in the life" --of children from each sample. Parent interviews were coded for themes in the meanings attributed to various activities. Excerpts from parent interviews, focusing on four major activities (meals, family time, play, school- or developmentally related activities), are presented to illustrate how cultural meanings and themes are woven into parents' organization and understanding of their children's daily lives. The results of this mixed-method approach provide a more reliable and nuanced picture of children's and families' daily lives than could be derived from either method alone. PMID:22149041

  6. Hydrogen as an electron donor for dechlorination of tetrachloroethene by an anaerobic mixed culture.

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, T D; Gossett, J M; Zinder, S H

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen served as an electron donor in the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to vinyl chloride and ethene over periods of 14 to 40 days in anaerobic enrichment cultures; however, sustained dechlorination for more extended periods required the addition of filtered supernatant from a methanol-fed culture. This result suggests a nutritional dependency of hydrogen-utilizing dechlorinators on the metabolic products of other organisms in the more diverse, methanol-fed system. Vancomycin, an inhibitor of cell wall synthesis in eubacteria, was found to inhibit acetogenesis when added at 100 mg/liter to both methanol-fed and hydrogen-fed cultures. The effect of vancomycin on dechlorination was more complex. Methanol could not sustain dechlorination when vancomycin inhibited acetogenesis, while hydrogen could. These results are consistent with a model in which hydrogen is the electron donor directly used for dechlorination by organisms resistant to vancomycin and with the hypothesis that the role of acetogens in methanol-fed cultures is to metabolize a portion of the methanol to hydrogen. Methanol and other substrates shown to support dechlorination in pure and mixed cultures may merely serve as precursors for the formation of an intermediate hydrogen pool. This hypothesis suggests that, for bioremediation of high levels of tetrachloroethene, electron donors that cause the production of a large hydrogen pool should be selected or methods that directly use H2 should be devised. PMID:1482184

  7. Bioleaching of electronic scrap by mixed culture of moderately thermophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivǎnuş, D.; ǎnuş, R. C., IV; Cǎlmuc, F.

    2010-06-01

    A process for the metal recovery from electronic scrap using bacterial leaching was investigated. A mixed culture of moderately thermophilic microorganisms was enriched from acid mine drainages (AMDs) samples collected from several sulphide mines in Romania, and the bioleaching of electronic scrap was conducted both in shake flask and bioreactor. The results show that in the shake flask, the mixture can tolerate 50 g/L scrap after being acclimated to gradually increased concentrations of scrap. The copper extraction increases obviously in bioleaching of scrap with moderately thermophilic microorganisms supplemented with 0.4 g/L yeast extract at 180 r/min, 74% copper can be extracted in the pulp of 50 g/L scrap after 20 d. Compared with copper extractions of mesophilic culture, unacclimated culture and acclimated culture without addition of yeast extract, that of accliniated culture with addition of yeast extract is increased by 53%, 44% and 16%, respectively. In a completely stirred tank reactor, the mass fraction of copper and total iron extraction reach up to 81% and 56%, respectively. The results also indicate that it is necessary to add a large amount of acid to the pulp to extract copper from electronic scrap effectively.

  8. Experimental and mathematical model of the interactions in the mixed culture of links in the "producer-consumer" cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Galayda, Ya. V.

    The paper presents experimental and mathematical model of interactions between invertebrates the ciliates Paramecium caudatum and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and algae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus quadricauda in the producer -- consumer aquatic biotic cycle with spatially separated components The model describes the dynamics of the mixed culture of ciliates and rotifers in the consumer component feeding on the mixed algal culture of the producer component It has been found that metabolites of the algae Scenedesmus produce an adverse effect on the reproduction of the ciliates P caudatum Taking into account this effect the results of investigation of the mathematical model were in qualitative agreement with the experimental results In the producer -- consumer biotic cycle it was shown that coexistence is impossible in the mixed algal culture of the producer component and in the mixed culture of invertebrates of the consumer component The ciliates P caudatum are driven out by the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis

  9. Protozoal ciliate promotes bacterial autoinducer-2 accumulation in mixed culture with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Satoshi; Hanawa, Tomoko; Matsuo, Junji; Ishida, Kasumi; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shinji; Okubo, Torahiko; Fukumoto, Tatsuya; Akizawa, Kouzi; Shimizu, Chikara; Kamiya, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated conjugation of Escherichia coli into vacuoles of the protozoal ciliate (Tetrahymena thermophila). This indicated a possible role of ciliates in evoking bacterial quorum sensing, directly connecting bacterial survival via accumulation in the ciliate vacuoles. We therefore assessed if ciliates promoted bacterial autoinducer (AI)-2 accumulation with vacuole formation, which controls quorum sensing. E. coli AI-2 accumulation was significantly enhanced in the supernatants of a mixed culture of ciliates and bacteria, likely depending on ciliate density rather than bacterial concentration. As expected, AI-2 production was significantly correlated with vacuole formation. The experiment with E. coli luxS mutants showed that ciliates failed to enhance bacterial AI-2 accumulation, denying a nonspecific phenomenon. Fluorescence microscopy revealed accumulation of fragmented bacteria in ciliate vacuoles, and, more importantly, expulsion of the vacuoles containing disrupted bacteria into the culture supernatant. There was no increase in the expression of luxS (encoding AI-2) or ydgG (a transporter for controlling bacterial export of AI-2). We conclude that ciliates promote bacterial AI-2 accumulation in a mixed culture, via accumulation of disrupted bacteria in ciliate vacuoles followed by expulsion of the vacuoles, independently of luxS or ydgG gene induction. This is believed to be the first demonstration of a relationship between E. coli AI-2 dynamics and ciliates. In the natural environment, ciliate biotopes may provide a survival advantage to bacteria inhabiting such biotopes, via evoking quorum sensing. PMID:26582290

  10. Degradation and total mineralization of monohalogenated biphenyls in natural sediment and mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, H L; Sayler, G S

    1983-01-01

    Mixed bacterial cultures obtained from polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated river sediments are capable of degrading monohalogenated biphenyls under simulated natural conditions. Culture conditions include river water as supportive medium and mixed bacterial cultures obtained from river sediments. Degradation occurs when the substrates are supplied as the sole carbon source or when added together with glucose. The degradation rates of 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorobiphenyl, at 30 micrograms ml-1, were 1.1, 1.6, and 2.0 micrograms ml-1 day-1, respectively. Monobrominated biphenyls, including 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobiphenyl, were degraded at rates of 2.3, 4.2, and 1.4 micrograms ml-1 day-1, respectively. Metabolites, including halogenated benzoates, were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. By using chlorophenyl ring-labeled monochlorobiphenyls as substrates, total mineralization (defined as CO2 production from the chlorophenyl ring) was observed for 4-chlorobiphenyl but not for 2-chlorobiphenyl. Rates of total mineralization of 4-chlorobiphenyl (at 39 to 385 micrograms ml-1 levels) were dependent on substrate concentration, whereas variation of cell number in the range of 10(5) to 10(7) cells ml-1 had no significant effects. Simulated sunlight enhanced the rate of mineralization by ca. 400%. PMID:6639021

  11. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27196729

  12. Interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in predominant biofilm or planktonic forms of existence in mixed culture with Escherichia coli in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Marina V; Maslennikova, Irina L; Karpunina, Tamara I; Nesterova, Larisa Yu; Demakov, Vitaly A

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are known to be involved in mixed communities in diverse niches. In this study we examined the influence of the predominant form of cell existence of and the exometabolite production by P. aeruginosa strains on interspecies interactions, in vitro. Bacterial numbers of P. aeruginosa and E. coli in mixed plankton cultures and biofilms compared with their numbers in single plankton cultures and biofilms changed in a different way, but were in accordance with the form of P. aeruginosa cell existence. The mass of a mixed-species biofilm was greater than the mass of a single-species biofilm. Among the mixed biofilms, the one with the "planktonic" P. aeruginosa strain had the least biomass. The total pyocyanin and pyoverdin levels were found to be lower in all mixed plankton cultures. Despite this, clinical P. aeruginosa strains irrespective of the predominant form of existence ("biofilm" or "planktonic") had a higher total concentration of exometabolites than did the reference strain in 12-24 h mixed cultures. The metabolism of E. coli, according to its bioluminescence, was reduced in mixed cultures, and the decrease was by 20- to 100-fold greater with the clinical Pseudomonas strains than the reference Pseudomonas strain. Thus, both the predominant form of existence of and the exometabolite production by distinct P. aeruginosa strains should be considered to fully understand the interspecies relationship and bacteria survival in natural communities. PMID:24011343

  13. Slow conduction in mixed cultured strands of primary ventricular cells and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Jan P.; Prudat, Yann; Marcu, Irene C.; Azzarito, Michela; Ullrich, Nina D.

    2015-01-01

    Modern concepts for the treatment of myocardial diseases focus on novel cell therapeutic strategies involving stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SCMs). However, functional integration of SCMs requires similar electrophysiological properties as primary cardiomyocytes (PCMs) and the ability to establish intercellular connections with host myocytes in order to contribute to the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The aim of this project was to investigate the properties of cardiac conduction in a co-culture approach using SCMs and PCMs in cultured cell strands. Murine embryonic SCMs were pooled with fetal ventricular cells and seeded in predefined proportions on microelectrode arrays to form patterned strands of mixed cells. Conduction velocity (CV) was measured during steady state pacing. SCM excitability was estimated from action potentials measured in single cells using the patch clamp technique. Experiments were complemented with computer simulations of conduction using a detailed model of cellular architecture in mixed cell strands. CV was significantly lower in strands composed purely of SCMs (5.5 ± 1.5 cm/s, n = 11) as compared to PCMs (34.9 ± 2.9 cm/s, n = 21) at similar refractoriness (100% SCMs: 122 ± 25 ms, n = 9; 100% PCMs: 139 ± 67 ms, n = 14). In mixed strands combining both cell types, CV was higher than in pure SCMs strands, but always lower than in 100% PCM strands. Computer simulations demonstrated that both intercellular coupling and electrical excitability limit CV. These data provide evidence that in cultures of murine ventricular cardiomyocytes, SCMs cannot restore CV to control levels resulting in slow conduction, which may lead to reentry circuits and arrhythmias. PMID:26442264

  14. Enhanced xylitol production: Expression of xylitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans and mixed culture of resting cell.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiang-Hui; Zhu, Jing-Fei; Yun, Jun-Hua; Lin, Jing; Qi, Yi-Lin; Guo, Qi; Xu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Xylitol has numerous applications in food and pharmaceutical industry, and it can be biosynthesized by microorganisms. In the present study, xdh gene, encoding xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), was cloned from the genome of Gluconobacter oxydans CGMCC 1.49 and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21. Sequence analysis revealed that XDH has a TGXXGXXG NAD(H)-binding motif and a YXXXK active site motif, and belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. And then, the enzymatic properties and kinetic parameter of purified recombinant XDH were investigated. Subsequently, transformations of xylitol from d-xylulose and d-arabitol, respectively, were studied through mixed culture of resting cells of G. oxydans wild-type strain and recombinant strain BL21-xdh. We obtained 28.80 g/L xylitol by mixed culture from 30 g/L d-xylulose in 28 h. The production was increased by more than three times as compared with that of wild-type strain. Furthermore, 25.10 g/L xylitol was produced by the mixed culture from 30 g/L d-arabitol in 30 h with a yield of 0.837 g/g, and the max volumetric productivity of 0.990 g/L h was obtained at 22 h. These contrast to the fact that wild-type strain G. oxydans only produced 8.10 g/L xylitol in 30 h with a yield of 0.270 g/g. To our knowledge, these values are the highest among the reported yields and productivity efficiencies of xylitol from d-arabitol with engineering strains. PMID:26975753

  15. Selection of an actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation. Pesticide effects on microbial morphology and bioemulsifier production.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María S; Colin, Verónica L; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2016-02-01

    Chlordane bioremediation using actinobacteria mixed culture is an attractive clean-up technique. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers could increase the bioavailability of this pesticide. In order to select a defined actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation, compatibility assays were performed among six Streptomyces strains. The strains did not show growth inhibition, and they were assayed for chlordane removal, either as pure or as mixed cultures. In pure cultures, all of the strains showed specific dechlorination activity (1.42-24.20 EU mg(-1)) and chlordane removal abilities (91.3-95.5%). The specific dechlorination activity was mainly improved with cultures of three or four microorganisms. The mixed culture consisting of Streptomyces sp. A2-A5-A13 was selected. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers in the presence of glucose or chlordane was tested, but no significant differences were observed (p > 0.05). However, the stability of the emulsions formed was linked to the carbon source used. Only in chlordane presence the emulsions retained 100% of their initial height. Finally, the selected consortium showed a high degree of sporulation in the pesticide presence. This is the first study on the effects that chlordane exerts on microbe morphology and emulsifier production for a defined mixed culture of Streptomyces with ability to remediate the pesticide. PMID:26554742

  16. Starter Culture Selection for Making Chinese Sesame-Flavored Liquor Based on Microbial Metabolic Activity in Mixed-Culture Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Ling, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a starter culture with excellent viability and metabolic activity is important for inoculated fermentation of traditional food. To obtain a suitable starter culture for making Chinese sesame-flavored liquor, the yeast and bacterium community structures were investigated during spontaneous and solid-state fermentations of this type of liquor. Five dominant species in spontaneous fermentation were identified: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranaefaciens, Issatchenkia orientalis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The metabolic activity of each species in mixed and inoculated fermentations of liquor was investigated in 14 different cocultures that used different combinations of these species. The relationships between the microbial species and volatile metabolites were analyzed by partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. We found that S. cerevisiae was positively correlated to nonanal, and B. licheniformis was positively associated with 2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, guaiacol, and 4-vinyl guaiacol, while I. orientalis was positively correlated to butyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, and 2,3-butanediol. These three species are excellent flavor producers for Chinese liquor. Although P. membranaefaciens and B. amyloliquefaciens were not efficient flavor producers, the addition of them alleviated competition among the other three species and altered their growth rates and flavor production. As a result, the coculture of all five dominant species produced the largest amount of flavor compounds. The result indicates that flavor producers and microbial interaction regulators are important for inoculated fermentation of Chinese sesame-flavored liquor. PMID:24814798

  17. Methanol suppression of trichloroethylene degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b) and methane-oxidizing mixed cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, W.; Palumbo, A.V.; Strandberg, G.W.; Sriharan, S.

    1991-12-31

    The effect of methanol on trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by mixed and pure methylotrophic cultures was examined in batch culture experiments. Methanol was found to relieve growth inhibition of Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b) at high (14 mg/L) TCE concentrations. Degradation of TCE was determined by both radiolabeling and gas chromatography techniques. When cultures were grown on methanol over 10 to 14 d with 0.3 mg/L TCE, OB3b degraded 16.89 {+-} 0.82% (mean {+-} SD) of the TCE, and a mixed culture (DT type II) degraded 4.55 {+-} 0.11%. Mixed culture (JS type I) degraded 4.34 {+-} 0.06% of the TCE. When grown on methane with 0.3 mg/L TCE, 32.93 {+-} 2.01% of the TCE was degraded by OB3b, whereas the JS culture degraded 24.3 {+-} 1.38% of the TCE, and the DT culture degraded 34.3 {+-} 2.97% of the TCE. The addition of methanol to cultures grown on methane reduced TCE degradation to 16.21 {+-} 1.17% for OB3b and to 5.08 {+-} 0.56% for JS. Although methanol reduces the toxicity of TCE to the cultures, biodegradation of TCE cannot be sustained in methanol-grown cultures. Since high TCE concentrations appear to inhibit methane uptake and growth, we suggest the primary toxicity of TCE is directed towards the methane monooxygenase.

  18. Modelling the interactions between Lactobacillus curvatus and Enterobacter cloacae. II. Mixed cultures and shelf life predictions.

    PubMed

    Malakar, P K; Martens, D E; Zwietering, M H; Béal, C; van 't Riet, K

    1999-10-01

    The modelling approach presented in this study can be used to predict when interactions between microorganisms in homogenous systems occur. It was tested for the interaction between Lactobacillus curvatus and Enterobacter cloacae. In this binary system, L. curvatus produces lactic acid which decreases the pH in the system. The pH decrease was found to be the main limiting factor of growth of both E. cloacae and L. curvatus. This resulted in E. cloacae reaching its final concentration earlier when compared to its growth in pure culture. The models consisted of a set of first order ordinary differential equations describing the growth, consumption and production rates of both microorganisms. The parameters for these equations were obtained from pure culture studies and from literature. These equations were solved using a combination of analytical and numerical methods. The prediction of growth in mixed culture using parameters from pure culture experiments and literature were close to the experimental data. Both model predictions and experimental validation indicated that interaction occurs when the concentration of L. curvatus reaches 10(8) cfu/ml. At that moment in time, the pH had decreased to inhibiting levels. These concentrations of microorganisms (10(8) cfu/ml) do occur in fermented products where interactions obviously are important. In nonfermented foods however, this level of microorganisms indicate that spoilage has occurred or is about to start. Microbial interactions can therefore be neglected when predicting shelf life or safety of food products in most cases. PMID:10563464

  19. Influence of the pH on (open) mixed culture fermentation of glucose: a chemostat study.

    PubMed

    Temudo, Margarida F; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark

    2007-09-01

    Catabolic products from anaerobic fermentation processes are potentially of industrial interest. The volatile fatty acids and alcohols produced can be used as building blocks in chemical processes or applied directly as substrates in a mixed culture process to produce bioplastics. Development of such applications requires a predictable and controllable product spectrum of the fermentation process. The aim of the research described in this paper was (i) to investigate the product spectrum of an open mixed culture fermentation (MCF) process as a function of the pH, using glucose as substrate, and (ii) to relate the product spectrum obtained to generalized biochemical and thermodynamic considerations. A chemostat was operated under carbon and energy limitation in order to investigate the pH effect on the product spectrum in a MCF process. A transition from CO(2)/H(2) production at lower pH values to formate production at higher pH values was observed. The ratio of CO(2)/H(2) versus formate production was found to be related to the thermodynamics of formate dehydrogenation to CO(2)/H(2). This transition was associated with a shift in the catabolic products, from butyrate and acetate to ethanol and acetate, likely due to a decrease in the oxidation state of the electron carriers in the cell. The product spectrum of the MCF process as a function of the pH could largely be explained using general biochemical considerations. PMID:17657773

  20. The highest inhibition coefficient of phenol biodegradation using an acclimated mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Mojtaba; Sharifi Abdar, Payman; Borghei, S Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study a membrane biological reactor (MBR) was operated at 25 ± 1 °C and pH = 7.5 ± 0.5 to treat synthetic wastewater containing high phenol concentrations. Removal efficiencies of phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were evaluated at four various hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 24, 12, 8, and 4 hours. The removal rate of phenol (5.51 kg-Phenol kg-VSS(-1) d(-1)), observed at HRT of 4 h, was the highest phenol degradation rate in the literature. According to COD tests, there were no significant organic matter in the effluent, and phenol was degraded completely by mixed culture. Substrate inhibition was calculated from experimental growth parameters using the Haldane, Yano, and Edward equations. The results show that the Haldane equation is fitted to the experimental data in an excellent manner. Kinetic parameters were derived by nonlinear regression with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.974. The values for Haldane constants μmax, Ks, and Ki were 0.3085 h(-1), 416 mg L(-1) and 1,886 mg L(-1), respectively. The Ki value is the highest value obtained for mixed cultures degrading phenol under batch conditions. PMID:26942524

  1. Kinetics and thermodynamics of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process using Brocadia spp. dominated mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Puyol, D; Carvajal-Arroyo, J M; Garcia, B; Sierra-Alvarez, R; Field, J A

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial process commonly applied to treat ammonium pollution in effluents with low organic carbon content. Modeling anammox processes is important for simulating and controlling full-scale plants. In this study, the anammox process was simulated using three models, and substrate and growth parameters obtained by different research groups. Two Brocadia spp.-dominated mixed cultures, one granular and the other flocculent, were used for this purpose. A very good correlation between experimental data using both sludges and model predictions was achieved by one of the models, obtaining correlation coefficients higher than 0.997. Other models and stoichiometric equations tested were unable to predict the anammox kinetics and stoichiometry. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behavior of the two mixed cultures was compared through the determination of the energy of activation of the anammox conversion at temperatures ranging from 9 to 40 °C. Optimum temperature for anammox activity was established at 30-35 °C in both cases. The energy of activation values calculated for granular sludge and flocculent sludge were 64 and 124 kJ mol(-1), respectively. PMID:24759529

  2. Metabolic Energy-Based Modelling Explains Product Yielding in Anaerobic Mixed Culture Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Lema, Juan M.; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The fermentation of glucose using microbial mixed cultures is of great interest given its potential to convert wastes into valuable products at low cost, however, the difficulties associated with the control of the process still pose important challenges for its industrial implementation. A deeper understanding of the fermentation process involving metabolic and biochemical principles is very necessary to overcome these difficulties. In this work a novel metabolic energy based model is presented that accurately predicts for the first time the experimentally observed changes in product spectrum with pH. The model predicts the observed shift towards formate production at high pH, accompanied with ethanol and acetate production. Acetate (accompanied with a more reduced product) and butyrate are predicted main products at low pH. The production of propionate between pH 6 and 8 is also predicted. These results are mechanistically explained for the first time considering the impact that variable proton motive potential and active transport energy costs have in terms of energy harvest over different products yielding. The model results, in line with numerous reported experiments, validate the mechanistic and bioenergetics hypotheses that fermentative mixed cultures products yielding appears to be controlled by the principle of maximum energy harvest and the necessity of balancing the redox equivalents in absence of external electron acceptors. PMID:25992959

  3. The impact of oxygen on the final alcohol content of wine fermented by a mixed starter culture.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pilar; Rojas, Virginia; Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a wine fermentation procedure that takes advantage of the metabolic features of a previously characterized Metschnikowia pulcherrima strain in order to reduce ethanol production. It involves the use of M. pulcherrima/Saccharomyces cerevisiae mixed cultures, controlled oxygenation conditions during the first 48 h of fermentation, and anaerobic conditions thereafter. The influence of different oxygenation regimes and initial inoculum composition on yeast physiology and final ethanol content was studied. The impact of oxygenation on yeast physiology goes beyond the first aerated step and influences yields and survival rates during the anaerobic stage. The activity of M. pulcherrima in mixed oxygenated cultures resulted in a clear reduction in ethanol yield, as compared to S. cerevisiae. Despite relatively low initial cell numbers, S. cerevisiae always predominated in mixed cultures by the end of the fermentation process. Strain replacement was faster under low oxygenation levels. M. pulcherrima confers an additional advantage in terms of dissolved oxygen, which drops to zero after a few hours of culture, even under highly aerated conditions, and this holds true for mixed cultures. Alcohol reduction values about 3.7 % (v/v) were obtained for mixed cultures under high aeration, but they were associated to unacceptable volatile acidity levels. In contrast, under optimized conditions, only 0.35 g/L acetic acid was produced, for an alcohol reduction of 2.2 % (v/v), and almost null dissolved oxygen during the process. PMID:25582558

  4. Bio-oil upgrading strategies to improve PHA production from selected aerobic mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Moita Fidalgo, Rita; Ortigueira, Joana; Freches, André; Pelica, João; Gonçalves, Magarida; Mendes, Benilde; Lemos, Paulo C

    2014-06-25

    Recent research on polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) has focused on developing cost-effective production processes using low-value or industrial waste/surplus as substrate. One of such substrates is the liquid fraction resulting from pyrolysis processes, bio-oil. In this study, valorisation of bio-oil through PHA production was investigated. The impact of the complex bio-oil matrix on PHA production by an enriched mixed culture was examined. The performance of the direct utilization of pure bio-oil was compared with the utilization of three defined substrates contained in this bio-oil: acetate, glucose and xylose. When compared with acetate, bio-oil revealed lower capacity for polymer production as a result of a lower polymer yield on substrate and a lower PHA cell content. Two strategies for bio-oil upgrade were performed, anaerobic fermentation and vacuum distillation, and the resulting liquid streams were tested for polymer production. The first one was enriched in volatile fatty acids and the second one mainly on phenolic and long-chain fatty acids. PHA accumulation assays using the upgraded bio-oils attained polymer yields on substrate similar or higher than the one achieved with acetate, although with a lower PHA content. The capacity to use the enriched fractions for polymer production has yet to be optimized. The anaerobic digestion of bio-oil could also open-up the possibility to use the fermented bio-oil directly in the enrichment process of the mixed culture. This would increase the selective pressure toward an optimized PHA accumulating culture selection. PMID:24189432

  5. Degradation of estradiol and ethinyl estradiol by activated sludge and by a defined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefanie; Leuschner, Prisca; Kämpfer, Peter; Dott, Wolfgang; Hollender, Juliane

    2005-04-01

    The aerobic degradation of the natural hormone 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic hormone 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) was investigated in batch experiments with activated sludge from a conventional and a membrane sewage treatment plant. E2 was converted to estrone (E1), the well known metabolite, and further completely transformed within 3 days. The turnover rates of E2 did not differ greatly between conventional and membrane activated sludge. EE2 was persistent in both sludges. By several transfers into fresh E2-medium an enrichment culture could be selected that used E2 as growth substrate. Further enrichment and isolation led to a defined mixed culture consisting of two strains, which were identified by a polyphasic approach as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ralstonia sp., respectively. The culture used E2 and E1 as growth substrates and transformed estriol (E3) and 16-alpha-hydroxyestrone but not the xenoestrogens bisphenol A, alpha-zearalenol, mestranol or EE2. The turnover rates of E2 were 0.025-0.1 microg h(-1) cfu(-1) and did not depend on the steroid concentration. PMID:15290133

  6. Development and composition of a mixed culture for bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, E.J.P.; Voytek, M.A.; Lorah, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial organisms capable of dechlorinating 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane (TeCA) and its chlorinated ethane and ethylene daughter products were enriched in surface sediments collected from the West Branch Canal Creek wetland area, leading to the formation of two mixed cultures using slightly different enrichment methods. Both WBC-1 and WBC-2 were capable of rapid and complete reductive dechlorination of TeCA and its daughter products (1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride) to ethylene, and addition of either culture to wetland sediment and to engineered peat/compost mixtures resulted in significant enhancement of dechlorination. However, the WBC-2 culture supported better sustained activity and was more readily scaled up for application in bioaugmentation treatments, whereas dechlorination activity was gradually lost in WBC-1. The microbial composition of WBC-1 and WBC-2 were determined by cloning and sequencing 500 base pairs of the 16S rDNA gene and the methyl co-reductase. Methanogens identified in the consortia were members of the Order Methanomicrobiales, which includes acetoclastic methanogens. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  7. Decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 recalcitrant auto-oxidation coloured by-products using an acclimatised mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Bay, Hui Han; Lim, Chi Kim; Kee, Thuan Chien; Ware, Ismail; Chan, Giek Far; Shahir, Shafinaz; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2014-03-01

    This study focuses on the biodegradation of recalcitrant, coloured compounds resulting from auto-oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in a sequential facultative anaerobic-aerobic treatment system. A novel mixed bacterial culture, BAC-ZS, consisting of Brevibacillus panacihumi strain ZB1, Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain ZB2, and Enterococcus faecalis strain ZL bacteria were isolated from environmental samples. The acclimatisation of the mixed culture was carried out in an AO7 decolourised solution. The acclimatised mixed culture showed 98 % decolourisation within 2 h of facultative anaerobic treatment using yeast extract and glucose as co-substrate. Subsequent aerobic post treatment caused auto-oxidation reaction forming dark coloured compounds that reduced the percentage decolourisation to 73 %. Interestingly, further agitations of the mixed culture in the solution over a period of 48 h significantly decolourise the coloured compounds and increased the decolourisation percentage to 90 %. Analyses of the degradation compounds using UV-visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed complete degradation of recalcitrant AO7 by the novel BAC-ZS. Phytotoxicity tests using Cucumis sativus confirmed the dye solution after post aerobic treatment were less toxic compared to the parent dye. The quantitative real-time PCR revealed that E. faecalis strain ZL was the dominant strain in the acclimatised mix culture. PMID:24293297

  8. Use of a mixed algal culture to characterize industrial waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Claesson, A.

    1984-02-01

    A mixture of five freshwater algae was cultivated with additions of waste water samples from chemical, mining, polyvinylchloride, textile, paper mill, and oil refinery industries. Two water samples from chemical industries and one from an oil refinery stimulated the algal growth in a nutrient-poor medium, while growth in other samples, including a nutrient-rich medium, was inhibited in several different ways. For eight of the water samples a delayed growth of 2-4 days was noted. Decreased growth rate and lowered maximal biomass occurred in seven of the samples. The photosynthetic capacity of the algal cells was measured by using in vivo fluorescence of chlorophyll a. These quick measurements mostly agreed with those of the growth rates. When the species composition of the mixed algal culture was investigated, large differences in sensitivities between the different species were found. Stimulation or inhibition were observed in the same sample for different species but also for the same species at different concentrations.

  9. Nonspecific suppressor T cells cause decreased mixed lymphocyte culture reactivity in bone marrow transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.; Ueda, M.; Nakao, S.; Kondo, K.; Odaka, K.; Shiobara, S.; Matsue, K.; Mori, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1986-07-15

    Decreased reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was observed in patients within 1 yr after allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation. Suppressor activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from transplant patients was studied by adding these cells as modulator cells to a bidirectional MLC with cells from normal individuals. PBMC from transplant patients markedly suppressed MLC reactivity in a dose-dependent manner. Suppressor activity was present in cells forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. Treatment of modulator cells with monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens (OKT8, OKIa1) and complement completely abolished suppression of MLC. Suppressor activity was unaffected by 30 Gy irradiation. Suppressor activity declined gradually after transplantation and was inversely correlated with MLC reactivity of each patient at a significant level (p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that OKT8+ Ia+ radioresistant suppressor T cells play a role in the development of decreased MLC reactivity observed during the early post-transplant period.

  10. Production of acetate from carbon dioxide in bioelectrochemical systems based on autotrophic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Jiang, Yong; Li, Daping

    2013-08-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been suggested as a new technology for wastewater treatment while accomplishing energy and chemical generation. This study describes the performance of BESs based on mixed culture that are capable of reducing carbon dioxide to acetate. The cathode potential was a critical factor that affected the performance of the BESs. The rate of acetate production increased as the electrode potential became more negative, from 0.38 mM d(-1) (-900 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) to 2.35 mM d(-1) (-1,100 mV), while the electron recovery efficiency of carbon dioxide reduction to acetate increased from 53.6% to 89.5%. The microbial population was dominated by relatives of Acetobacterium woodii when a methanogenic inhibitor was added to the BESs initially. PMID:23727797

  11. High nitrate removal from synthetic wastewater with the mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Foglar, Lucija; Briski, Felicita; Sipos, Laszlo; Vuković, Marija

    2005-05-01

    The applicability of the mixed bacterial culture, originated from two-stage anaerobic-aerobic industrial yeasts production wastewater treatment plant for high rate denitrification processes was investigated. After acclimation to nitrate, the dominant strains were Pseudomonas and Paracoccus sp. Complete denitrification with low accumulation of nitrite-N (0.1 mg/l) was found in synthetic wastewater, obeying a zero-order reaction with respect to nitrate and a first-order reaction with respect to biomass concentration. Denitrification was then monitored in the continuous-flow stirred reactor at different hydraulic retention time, HRT (62-28 h) in order to achieve the optimal HRT. Nitrate was completely removed during following 45 days, at 25 degrees C with HRT, which we reduced from 62 to 28 h. Yet still, at 28 h HRT, high average specific denitrification rate of 142 mg NO3- -N/g VSS h was obtained. PMID:15627558

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mixed culture of blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) juice: synergism in the aroma compounds production.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Rosales, Pedro Ulises; Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ruiz-Montañez, Gabriela; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  13. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies. PMID:27110941

  14. Extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoates from mixed microbial cultures: Impact on polymer quality and recovery.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Chiara; Abbondanzi, Federica; Galletti, Paola; Giorgini, Loris; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Torri, Cristian; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) can be extracted from mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) by means of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) or combination of DMC and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). The protocol based on DMC, a green solvent never used before for the extraction of PHAs from MMC, allows an overall polymer recovery of 63%; also the purity and the molecular weight of the recovered polymers are good (98% and 1.2 MDa, respectively). The use of NaClO pretreatment before DMC extraction increases the overall PHA recovery (82%) but lowers the mean molecular weight to 0.6-0.2 MDa. A double extraction with DMC results to be the method of choice for the recovery of high quality PHAs from attractive but challenging MMCs. PMID:25889806

  15. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies. PMID:27110941

  16. Mixed culture optimization for marigold flower ensilage via experimental design and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Bolaños, José Luis; Jiménez-Islas, Hugo; Botello-Alvarez, Enrique; Rico-Martínez, Ramiro

    2003-04-01

    Endogenous microorganisms isolated from the marigold flower (Tagetes erecta) were studied to understand the events taking place during its ensilage. Studies of the cellulase enzymatic activity and the ensilage process were undertaken. In both studies, the use of approximate second-order models and multiple lineal regression, within the context of an experimental mixture design using the response surface methodology as optimization strategy, determined that the microorganisms Flavobacterium IIb, Acinetobacter anitratus, and Rhizopus nigricans are the most significant in marigold flower ensilage and exhibit high cellulase activity. A mixed culture comprised of 9.8% Flavobacterium IIb, 41% A. anitratus, and 49.2% R. nigricans used during ensilage resulted in an increased yield of total xanthophylls extracted of 24.94 g/kg of dry weight compared with 12.92 for the uninoculated control ensilage. PMID:12670157

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  18. Development and use of a quantum dot probe to track multiple yeast strains in mixed culture

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Frida S.; Whiteside, Matthew D.; Jiranek, Vladimir; Durall, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains vary in their ability to develop and enhance sensory attributes of alcoholic beverages and are often found growing in mixed strain fermentations; however, quantifying individual strains is challenging due to quantification inaccuracies, low marker longevity, and compromised kinetics. We developed a fluorescent probe, consisting of glutathione molecules conjugated to a quantum dot (QD). Two S. cerevisiae strains were incubated with different coloured probes (QD attached to glutathione molecules, QD-GSH), fermented at multiple ratios, and quantified using confocal microscopy. The QD method was compared with a culture method using microsatellite DNA analysis (MS method). Probes were taken up by an ADP1 encoded transporter, transferred from mother cell to daughter cell, detectable in strains throughout fermentation, and were non-toxic. This resulted in a new quantification method that was more accurate and efficient than the MS method. PMID:25382600

  19. Alcoholic chestnut fermentation in mixed culture. Compatibility criteria between Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Murado, Miguel Anxo; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Vázquez, José Antonio; Mirón, Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2008-10-01

    The main objective of the present work consisted in the transfer to the case of the chestnut of a rice fermentative process that carried out to the Japanese traditional way to lead to an alcoholic bagasse, the moromi, capable of obtaining distilled. This way, selection assays of amylolitic Aspergillus oryzae strains and studies of compatibility between microfungi and yeast were carried out. These mixed cultivations were performed operating in batch submerged culture. Later on, using solid state system (chestnut, microfungi, yeast), a fermentative fed-batch process (koji, moto, moromi) was defined. By means of this approach a yield of 70% was reached in the conversion of total carbohydrates in ethanol. Also, the time required by the traditional operation was reduced in half. PMID:18289846

  20. Experimental and mathematical model of the interactions in the mixed culture of links in the “producer-consumer” cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents a experimental and mathematical model of interactions between invertebrates (the ciliates Paramecium caudatum and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis) in the "producer-consumer" aquatic biotic cycle with spatially separated components. The model describes the dynamics of the mixed culture of ciliates and rotifers in the "consumer" component, feeding on the mixed algal culture of the "producer" component. It has been found that metabolites of the algae Scenedesmus produce an adverse effect on the reproduction of the ciliates P. caudatum. Taking into account this effect, the results of investigation of the mathematical model were in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In the "producer-consumer" biotic cycle it was shown that coexistence is impossible in the mixed culture of invertebrates of the "consumer" component. The ciliates P. caudatum are driven out by the rotifers B. plicatilis.

  1. Increased diazinon hydrolysis to 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol in liquid medium by a specific Streptomyces mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Briceño, G; Schalchli, H; Rubilar, O; Tortella, G R; Mutis, A; Benimeli, C S; Palma, G; Diez, M C

    2016-08-01

    Actinobacteria identified as Streptomyces spp. were evaluated for their ability to remove diazinon as the only carbon source from a liquid medium. Single cultures of Streptomyces strains were exposed to diazinon at a concentration of 50 mg L(-1). After 96 h incubation, six of the eight cultures grew and five strains showed an increase in their total protein concentrations and changes in their protein profile. Up to 32% of the diazinon was removed by the single Streptomyces cultures. A compatibility assay showed that the different Streptomyces species were not antagonistic. Twenty-six mixed cultures were then prepared. Diazinon removal was increased when mixed cultures were used, and maximum diazinon removal of 62% was observed when the Streptomyces spp. strains AC5, AC9, GA11 and ISP13 were mixed; this was defined as the selected mixed culture (SMC). Diazinon removal was positively influenced by the addition of glucose into the liquid medium. Our study showed a diazinon degradation rate of 0.025 h(-1), half-life of 28 h(-1) and 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol (IMHP) production of 0.143 mg L h(-1). Rapid diazinon hydrolysis to IMHP was associated with a decrease in the pH of the medium as a consequence of microbial glucose metabolism and organic acid exudation. Moreover, the SMC of Streptomyces was able to remove IMHP. This work constitutes a new, if not the only, report on diazinon degradation by mixed cultures of Streptomyces spp. Given the high levels of diazinon removal, the SMC formed by four Streptomyces strains has the potential to be used to treat the diazinon present in environmental matrices. PMID:27176942

  2. PHA production by mixed cultures: a way to valorize wastes from pulp industry.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Diogo; Rossetti, Simona; Serafim, Luísa S

    2014-04-01

    In this work, hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HSSL), a complex feedstock originating from the pulp industry, was tested for the first time as a substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by a mixed microbial culture (MMC) under aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) conditions. A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with HSSL was operated for 67days and the selected MMC reached a maximum PHA content of 67.6%. The MMC demonstrated a differential utilization of the carbon sources present in HSSL. Acetic acid was fully consumed, while xylose and lignosulphonates were partially consumed (30% and 14%, respectively). The selected culture was characterized by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). Bacteria belonging to the three main classes were identified: Alpha- (72.7±4.0%), Beta- (11.1±0.37%) and Gammaproteobacteria (10.3±0.3%). Within Alphaproteobacteria, a small amount of Paracoccus (4.2±0.51%) and Defluvicoccus related to Tetrad Forming Organisms (9.0±0.28%) were detected. PMID:24556373

  3. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT. PMID:25708409

  4. Impact of operating history on mixed culture fermentation microbial ecology and product mixture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Slater, F R; Mohd-Zaki, Z; Pratt, S; Batstone, D J

    2011-01-01

    Mixed culture fermentation is an alternative to pure culture fermentation for production of biofuels and valuable products. A glucose-fed, continuous reactor was operated cyclically to a central pH of 5.5 from a number of precedent pHs, from 4.5 to 7.5. At each pH, stable chemical production was reached after 2 retention times and was held for least 2 further retention times prior to the next change. Bacterial groups were identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene clones. Bacterial community dynamics were monitored by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. More ethanol was produced at high pH, and more butyrate at lower pH. At pH 5.5, the product spectrum was not measurably influenced by precedent pH but showed seemingly random changes. The impact of precedent pH on community structure was more systematic, with clear indications that when the pH was returned to 5.5, the bacterial group that was dominant at the precedent pH remained at high abundance. This result is important, since it indicates a decoupling between microbial function (as indicated by product spectrum), and community structure. More work is needed to determine the longevity of this hysteresis effect. There was evidence that groups retained their ability to re-emerge even after times of low abundance. PMID:22097058

  5. Transient concentrations of NaCl affect the PHA accumulation in mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro-Sánchez, T; Fra-Vázquez, A; Rey-Martínez, N; Campos, J L; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2016-04-01

    The present study explores the feasibility of the accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under the presence of transient concentrations of added sodium chloride, by means of a mixed microbial culture (MMC). This culture was enriched on a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) containing 0.8g Na(+)/L as NaOH. This MMC presented a maximum PHA accumulation capacity of 53wt% with 27Cmol% HV. Accumulation experiments performed with added NaCl at concentrations of 7, 13 and 20g/L shown that this salt provoked a decrease of the biomass PHA production rate, with an IC50 value close to 7gNaCl/L. The accumulated PHA was lower than the corresponding value of the assay without the addition of salt. Furthermore, the composition of the biopolymer, in terms of HB:HV ratio, changed from 2.71 to 6.37Cmol/Cmol, which means a HV decrease between 27 and 14Cmol%. Summarizing, the PHA accumulation by a MMC non-adapted to saline conditions affected the polymer composition and lead to lower production yields and rates than in absence of added NaCl. PMID:26780589

  6. Denitrification with epsilon-caprolactam by acclimated mixed culture and by pure culture of bacteria isolated from polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Wang, C C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to isolate denitrifying bacteria utilizing epsilon-caprolactam as the substrate, from a polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system. The aim is also to compare the performance of PAN (polyacrylonitrile) mixed bacteria cultures acclimated to epsilon-caprolactam and isolated pure strain for treating different initial epsilon-caprolactam concentrations from synthetic wastewater under anoxic conditions. The result showed that the PAN mixed bacteria cultures acclimated to epsilon-caprolactam could utilize 1538.5 mg/l of epsilon-caprolactam as a substrate for denitrification. Sufficient time and about 2200 mg/l of nitrate were necessary for the complete epsilon-caprolactam removal. Paracoccus thiophilus was isolated from the polyacrylonitrile fibre manufactured wastewater treatment system and it could utilize 1722.5 mg/l of epsilon-caprolactam as a substrate for denitrification. About 3500 mg/l of nitrate was necessary for the complete removal of epsilon-caprolactam. When the initial epsilon-caprolactam concentration was below 784.3 mg/l, the removal efficiency of epsilon-caprolactam by Paracoccus thiophilus was better than that for the PAN mixed bacteria cultures. The growth of Paracoccus thiophilus was better. However, when the initial epsilon-caprolactam concentration was as high as 1445.8 mg/l, both the epsilon-caprolactam removal efficiency by Paracoccus thiophilus and Paracoccus thiophilus specific growth rate were similar to the PAN mixed bacteria cultures. PMID:15137443

  7. Existence of glia mitigated ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in neuron-glia mixed cultures of neonatal rat cortex and the glia-mediated protective effect of 2-PMPA.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Chengna; Li, Zengqiang; Lin, Li; Duan, Zhenfang; Qi, Huan; Li, Lin; Sun, Feng; Wu, Yingliang

    2014-09-01

    The present study compared ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the neuron-glia mixed cultures and neuronal cultures and further explored the neuroprotective effect of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-(phosphonomethyl) pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA). Firstly, Rosenfeld's staining and immunofluorescence staining of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to address the difference of morphology in the mixed cultures and neuronal cultures. Our results showed that neurons and astrocytes grew in good conditions. The ratio of neurons and astrocytes in the mixed cultures was around 1:1, and the purity of neurons in the neuronal cultures is 91.3%. Furthermore, ketamine was used to test the hypothesis that the presence of a higher proportion of glia in the mixed cultures would be protective against ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. The results showed that ketamine-induced morphological changes, cell viability decrease and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels increase were significantly mitigated in neuron-glia mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. Furthermore, 2-PMPA was included to further explore efficient protective drug for ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. Our results showed that 2-PMPA reduced ketamine-induced decrease of cell viability and increase of LDH levels in the mixed cultures but not in the neuronal cultures. Further morphological changes of neurons and astrocytes also indicated that 2-PMPA could improve ketamine damaged neurons in the mixed cultures instead of neuronal cultures. These results indicate that glia protect neurons from ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. These data further suggest that glia mediate the neuroprotective effect of 2-PMPA and 2-PMPA has the potential to treat ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Delineating the mechanisms underlying the communication between neurons and glia and the neuroprotective effects of 2-PMPA in the mixed

  8. Transformation yields of chlorinated ethenes by a methanotrophic mixed culture expressing particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J E; McCarty, P L

    1997-01-01

    Transformation yields for the aerobic cometabolic degradation of five chlorinated ethenes were determined by using a methanotrophic mixed culture expressing particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Transformation yields (expressed as moles of chlorinated ethene degraded per mole of methane consumed) were 0.57, 0.25, 0.058, 0.0019, and 0.00022 for trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (t-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), respectively. Degradation of t-DCE and VC was observed only in the presence of formate or methane, sources of reducing energy necessary for cometabolism. The t-DCE and VC transformation yields represented 35 and 15%, respectively, of the theoretical maximum yields, based on reducing-energy availability from methane dissimilation to carbon dioxide, exclusive of all other processes that require reducing energy. The yields for t-DCE and VC were 20 times greater than the yields reported by others for cells expressing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). Transformation yields for c-DCE, TCE, and 1,1-DCE were similar to or less than those for cultures expressing sMMO. Although methanotrophic biotreatment systems have typically been designed to incorporate cultures expressing sMMO, these results suggest that pMMO expression may be highly advantageous for degradation of t-DCE or VC. It may also be much easier to maintain pMMO expression in treatment systems, because pMMO is expressed by all methanotrophs whereas sMMO is expressed only by type II methanotrophs under copper-limited conditions. PMID:9023946

  9. Evaluation of Mixed Probiotic Starter Cultures Isolated from Kimchi on Physicochemical and Functional Properties, and Volatile Compounds of Fermented Hams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joo; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Hong Chul; Yoo, Seung Seok; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mixed starter cultures isolated from kimchi on physicochemical properties, functionality and flavors of fermented ham. Physicochemical properties, microbial counts, shear force, cholesterol contents and volatile compounds of fermented ham were investigated during processing (curing and ripening time). Curing process for 7 d increased saltiness, however, decreased hunter color values (L, a, and b values). Ripening process for 21 d increased most parameters, such as saltiness, color values, weight loss, shear force and cholesterol content due to the drying process. The mixed starter culture had higher lactic acid bacteria than the commercial one. While eight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during curing process, total fiftyeight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during ripening process. The main volatile compounds were alcohols, esters and furans. However, no differences in volatile compounds were observed between two batches. Fermented hams (batch B) manufactured with probiotic starter culture (LPP) had higher sensory score in texture, color and overall acceptability than counterparts (batch A), while the opposite trend was observed in flavor. Therefore, mixed probiotic starter culture isolated from kimchi might be used as a starter culture to be able to replace with commercial starter culture (LK-30 plus) for the manufacture of fermented ham. PMID:27499673

  10. Evaluation of Mixed Probiotic Starter Cultures Isolated from Kimchi on Physicochemical and Functional Properties, and Volatile Compounds of Fermented Hams

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Seok

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mixed starter cultures isolated from kimchi on physicochemical properties, functionality and flavors of fermented ham. Physicochemical properties, microbial counts, shear force, cholesterol contents and volatile compounds of fermented ham were investigated during processing (curing and ripening time). Curing process for 7 d increased saltiness, however, decreased hunter color values (L, a, and b values). Ripening process for 21 d increased most parameters, such as saltiness, color values, weight loss, shear force and cholesterol content due to the drying process. The mixed starter culture had higher lactic acid bacteria than the commercial one. While eight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during curing process, total fiftyeight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during ripening process. The main volatile compounds were alcohols, esters and furans. However, no differences in volatile compounds were observed between two batches. Fermented hams (batch B) manufactured with probiotic starter culture (LPP) had higher sensory score in texture, color and overall acceptability than counterparts (batch A), while the opposite trend was observed in flavor. Therefore, mixed probiotic starter culture isolated from kimchi might be used as a starter culture to be able to replace with commercial starter culture (LK-30 plus) for the manufacture of fermented ham. PMID:27499673

  11. To a cultural perspective of mixed reality events: a case study of event overflow in operas and concerts in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Jean-François; Cornish, Tracy; Margolis, Todd

    2012-12-01

    Mixed reality defines the sharing of a space-time between the real and the virtual world. The definition of this concept is further extended when virtual worlds such as Second Life® (SL) are included. Through cultural events such as concerts and operas, we will see that the main goal of these kinds of projects is not simply to offer a video and audio broadcast of these events in the digital dimension. The current challenge is to create interactions between the individuals who are in different shared spaces. By studying the unfolding of these events in its various phases-before, during, and after-we examine the culture of the event. We question how the culture of the event can be transposed in a mixed reality display, and how this kind of event can affect people on both sides of the "membrane" made by the technical configuration. Beyond the alignments and adjustments that we can see between the different individuals involved in these events, we examine more broadly the changes and mutations of the culture of the event in this specific configuration.

  12. Reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder mix has better overall characteristics than reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijie; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2014-10-01

    For manufacture of commercial yogurt powder, yogurt has to go through a drying process, which substantially lowers the yogurt culture counts, so the potential health benefits of the yogurt culture bacteria are reduced. Also, upon reconstitution, commercial yogurt powder does not taste like yogurt and has an off-flavor. The objective was to study the microbial, physicochemical, and sensory characteristics of reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder (YCMP) mix and reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder (CYP). The CYP reconstituted yogurt was the control and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was the treatment. Microbial and physicochemical characteristics of the CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were analyzed daily for the first week and then weekly for a period of 8 wk. Sensory consumer testing of CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was conducted with 100 consumers. At 56 d, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had 5 log cfu/mL higher counts of Streptococcus thermophilus than the control (CYP reconstituted yogurt). Also, Lactobacillus bulgaricus counts of YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were 6.55 log cfu/mL at 28 d and were 5.35 log cfu/mL at 56 d, whereas the CYP reconstituted yogurt from 28 d onwards had a count of <10 cfu/mL. The YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt also had significantly higher apparent viscosity and sensory scores for appearance, color, aroma, taste, thickness, overall liking, consumer acceptability, and purchase intent than CYP reconstituted yogurt. Overall, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had more desirable characteristics than CYP reconstituted yogurt. PMID:25151880

  13. Workforce Education and Development Curriculum Responsiveness to Culturally and Internationally Diverse Graduate Students: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferdinand, Debra

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study used a mixed methods design and sought to examine students' perceptions on workforce education and development (WED) curriculum responsiveness to culturally and internationally diverse graduate students at a Midwestern university on four dimensions: "teaching strategies (to include delivery)," "curriculum inclusiveness,"…

  14. Effects on feeding corn, hull-less or hulled barley on fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) type or corn (Zea mays L.) as a grain source on fermentation in cultures of mixed ruminal microorganisms. Three continuous fermentors were fed 14 g of dry feed per day (divided equally between two feedings) consisting o...

  15. Inoculation of paperboard mill sludge versus mixed culture bacteria for hydrogen production from paperboard mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Ahmed; Tawfik, Ahmed; Danial, Amal

    2016-02-01

    A comparative evaluation of paperboard mill sludge (PMS) versus mixed culture bacteria (MCB) as inoculum for hydrogen production from paperboard mill wastewater (PMW) was investigated. The experiments were conducted at different initial cultivation pHs, inoculums to substrate ratios (ISRs gVS/gCOD), and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The peak hydrogen yield (HY) of 5.29 ± 0.16 and 1.22 ± 0.11 mmol/gCODinitial was occurred at pH = 5 for MCB and PMS, respectively. At pH of 5, the HY and COD removal achieved the highest values of 2.26 ± 0.14 mmol/gCODinitial and 86 ± 1.6% at ISR = 6 for MCB, and 2.38 ± 0.25 mmol/gCODinitial and 60.4 ± 2.5% at ISRs = 3 for PMS. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 93.75 ± 8.9 mmol/day at HRT = 9.6 h from continuous upflow anaerobic reactor inoculated with MCB. Meanwhile, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragments indicated a dominance of a novel hydrogen-producing bacterium of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia for PMS microbial community. On the other hand, Escherichia fergusonii and Enterobacter hormaechei were the predominant species for MCB. PMID:26498965

  16. Lactic acid production with undefined mixed culture fermentation of potato peel waste.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2014-11-01

    Potato peel waste (PPW) as zero value byproduct generated from food processing plant contains a large quantity of starch, non-starch polysaccharide, lignin, protein, and lipid. PPW as one promising carbon source can be managed and utilized to value added bioproducts through a simple fermentation process using undefined mixed cultures inoculated from wastewater treatment plant sludge. A series of non-pH controlled batch fermentations under different conditions such as pretreatment process, enzymatic hydrolysis, temperature, and solids loading were studied. Lactic acid (LA) was the major product, followed by acetic acid (AA) and ethanol under fermentation conditions without the presence of added hydrolytic enzymes. The maximum yields of LA, AA, and ethanol were respectively, 0.22 g g(-1), 0.06 g g(-1), and 0.05 g g(-1). The highest LA concentration of 14.7 g L(-1) was obtained from a bioreactor with initial solids loading of 60 g L(-1) at 35°C. PMID:25127412

  17. Mixed Wastewater Coupled with CO2 for Microalgae Culturing and Nutrient Removal.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lili; Shi, Jianye; Miao, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Biomass, nutrient removal capacity, lipid productivity and morphological changes of Chlorella sorokiniana and Desmodesmus communis were investigated in mixed wastewaters with different CO2 concentrations. Under optimal condition, which was 1:3 ratio of swine wastewater to second treated municipal wastewater with 5% CO2, the maximum biomass concentrations were 1.22 g L-1 and 0.84 g L-1 for C. sorokiniana and D. communis, respectively. Almost all of the ammonia and phosphorus were removed, the removal rates of total nitrogen were 88.05% for C. sorokiniana and 83.18% for D. communis. Lipid content reached 17.04% for C. sorokiniana and 20.37% for D. communis after 10 days culture. CO2 aeration increased intracellular particle numbers of both microalgae and made D. communis tend to be solitary. The research suggested the aeration of CO2 improve the tolerance of microalgae to high concentration of NH4-N, and nutrient excess stress could induce lipid accumulation of microalgae. PMID:26418261

  18. Direct 5S rRNA Assay for Monitoring Mixed-Culture Bioprocesses

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, D. L.; Browning, C. K.; Bulmer, D. K.; Ward, T. E.; MacDonell, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    This study demonstrates the efficacy of a direct 5S rRNA assay for the characterization of mixed microbial populations by using as an example the bacteria associated with acidic mining environments. The direct 5S rRNA assay described herein represents a nonselective, direct molecular method for monitoring and characterizing the predominant, metabolically active members of a microbial population. The foundation of the assay is high-resolution denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which is used to separate 5S rRNA species extracted from collected biomass. Separation is based on the unique migration behavior of each 5S rRNA species during electrophoresis in denaturing gradient gels. With mixtures of RNA extracted from laboratory cultures, the upper practical limit for detection in the current experimental system has been estimated to be greater than 15 different species. With this method, the resolution was demonstrated to be effective at least to the species level. The strength of this approach was demonstrated by the ability to discriminate between Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 19859 and Thiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 8085, two very closely related species. Migration patterns for the 5S rRNA from members of the genus Thiobacillus were readily distinguishable from those of the genera Acidiphilium and Leptospirillum. In conclusion, the 5S rRNA assay represents a powerful method by which the structure of a microbial population within acidic environments can be assessed. PMID:16535333

  19. Effects of toxicity, aeration, and reductant supply on trichloroethylene transformation by a mixed methanotrophic culture.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Cohen, L; McCarty, P L

    1991-01-01

    The trichloroethylene (TCE) transformation rate and capacity of a mixed methanotrophic culture at room temperature were measured to determine the effects of time without methane (resting), use of an alternative energy source (formate), aeration, and toxicity of TCE and its transformation products. The initial specific TCE transformation rate of resting cells was 0.6 mg of TCE per mg of cells per day, and they had a finite TCE transformation capacity of 0.036 mg of TCE per mg of cells. Formate addition resulted in increased initial specific TCE transformation rates (2.1 mg/mg of cells per day) and elevated transformation capacity (0.073 mg of TCE per mg of cells). Significant declines in methane conversion rates following exposure to TCE were observed for both resting and formate-fed cells, suggesting toxic effects caused by TCE or its transformation products. TCE transformation and methane consumption rates of resting cells decreased with time much more rapidly when cells were shaken and aerated than when they remained dormant, suggesting that the transformation ability of methanotrophs is best preserved by storage under anoxic conditions. PMID:2036009

  20. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:27317559

  1. Oxygen suppresses light-driven anodic current generation by a mixed phototrophic culture.

    PubMed

    Darus, Libertus; Ledezma, Pablo; Keller, Jürg; Freguia, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the detrimental effect of photosynthetically evolved oxygen on anodic current generation in the presence of riboflavin upon illumination of a mixed phototrophic culture enriched from a freshwater pond at +0.6 V vs standard hydrogen electrode. In the presence of riboflavin, the phototrophic biomass in the anodic compartment produced an electrical current in response to light/dark cycles (12 h/12 h) over 12 months of operation, generating a maximum current density of 17.5 mA x m(-2) during the dark phase, whereas a much lower current of approximately 2 mA x m(-2) was generated during illumination. We found that the low current generation under light exposure was caused by high rates of reoxidation of reduced riboflavin by oxygen produced during photosynthesis. Quantification of biomass by fluorescence in situ hybridization images suggested that green algae were predominant in both the anode-based biofilm (55.1%) and the anolyte suspension (87.9%) with the remaining biovolume accounted for by bacteria. Genus-level sequencing analysis revealed that bacteria were dominated by cyanobacterium Leptolyngbia (∼35%), while the prevailing algae were Dictyosphaerium, Coelastrum, and Auxenochlorella. This study offers a key comprehension of mediator sensitivity to reoxidation by dissolved oxygen for improvement of microbial solar cell performance. PMID:25364824

  2. Use of mixed culture bacteria for photofermentive hydrogen of dark fermentation effluent.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Ahmed; El-Bery, Haitham; Kumari, Sheena; Bux, Faizal

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen production (HP) from dark fermentation effluent of starch wastewater via vertical tubular photo-bioreactor was investigated. The reactor was inoculated with mixed culture of bacteria and operated at light intensity of 190 W/m(2). Hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) was varied between 0.9 to 4.0 h and 3.2 to 16 g COD/l.d., respectively. Increasing the HRT from 0.9 to 2.5 h, significantly (P<0.05) increased HP from 1±0.04 to 3.05±0.19 l/d, respectively. However, minimal increase in HP occurred when increasing the HRT up to 4.0 h. The HP remained unaffected when increasing the OLR from 3.2 to 6.4 g COD/l.d. Further increase in the OLR up to 8.2 and 16 g COD/l.d., resulted in a drop in HP i.e. 0.96 and 0.19 l/d, respectively. Microbial community analysis of the reactor samples showed the presence and dominance of hydrogen producing purple non-sulfur phototrophic (PNS) bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris in the reactor. PMID:24768414

  3. Towards industrially feasible treatment of potato starch processing waste by mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Li, Ying; Niu, Jia; Wang, Zhenyu; Yang, Qian

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed at reducing the pollution of the waste generated by the potato starch industry to the environment and transform the potato pulp and wastewater into single-cell protein (SCP) to be used as animal feed. The chemical oxygen demand of the wastewater was reduced from 26,700 to 9,100 mg/L by batch fermentation with mixed cultures in an aerated 10-L fermenter. The SCP products, with a crude protein content of 46.09 % (higher than soybean meal), were found palatable and safe for mice. During the treatment process, the microbial community was analyzed using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism for bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The results of the analysis suggested that Curacaobacter/Pseudoalteromonas and Paenibacillus/Bacillus were the main microorganisms in treating potato starch processing wastes. The 150-m(3)-scale fermentation demonstrated a potential for treatment in industrial applications. Fermentation of potato pulp and wastewater without adding an extra nitrogen source was a novel approach in treating the potato starch processing waste. PMID:23921431

  4. Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized from microbial mixed cultures and of their nanobiocomposites with bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Villano, Marianna; Oliveira, Catarina; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Majone, Mauro; Reis, Maria; Lopez-Rubio, Amparo; Lagaron, Jose M

    2014-06-25

    The present work reports on the production and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with different valerate contents, which were synthesized from microbial mixed cultures, and the subsequent development of nanocomposites incorporating bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers (BCNW) via solution casting processing. The characterization of the pure biopolyesters showed that the properties of PHAs may be strongly modified by varying the valerate ratio in the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) copolymer, as expected. Increasing the valerate content was seen to greatly decrease the melting temperature and enthalpy of the material, as well as its rigidity and stiffness, resulting in a more ductile behaviour. Additionally, the higher valerate PHA displayed higher permeability to water and oxygen and higher moisture sensitivity. Subsequently, BCNW were incorporated into both PHA grades, achieving a high level of dispersion for a 1 wt.-% loading, whereas some agglomeration took place for 3 wt.-% BCNW. As evidenced by DSC analyses, BCNW presented a nucleating effect on the PHA matrices. BCNW also increased the thermal stability of the polymeric matrices when properly dispersed due to strong matrix-filler interactions. Barrier properties were seen to depend on relative humidity and improved at low nanofiller loadings and low relative humidity. PMID:23827196

  5. Dynamic metabolic modelling of volatile fatty acids conversion to polyhydroxyalkanoates by a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Pardelha, Filipa; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Reis, Maria A M; Oliveira, Rui; Dias, João M L

    2014-06-25

    In this work, we present a dynamic metabolic model that describes the uptake of complex mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and respective conversion into PHA by mixed microbial cultures (MMC). This model builds upon a previously published flux balance analysis model [1] that identified the minimization of TCA cycle activity as the key metabolic objective to predict PHA storage fluxes and respective composition. The model was calibrated either with experimental data of PHA production from fermented sugar cane molasses or from synthetic mixtures of VFA. All PHA production experiments were performed using a MMC selected with fermented sugar cane molasses under feast and famine regimen. The model was able to capture the process dynamics denoted by an excellent fit between experimental and computed time profiles of concentrations with the regression coefficients always above 0.92. The introduced VFA uptake regulatory factor reflects the decrease of acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA available to TCA cycle in conformity with the hypothesis that the minimization of TCA cycle is a key metabolic objective for MMC subjected to feast and famine regimen for the maximization of PHA production. PMID:23933561

  6. Chemical characterization and anaerobic biodegradability of hydrothermal liquefaction aqueous products from mixed-culture wastewater algae.

    PubMed

    Tommaso, Giovana; Chen, Wan-Ting; Li, Peng; Schideman, Lance; Zhang, Yuanhui

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the chemical characteristics and the anaerobic degradability of the aqueous product from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL-ap) from the conversion of mixed-culture algal biomass grown in a wastewater treatment system. The effects of the HTL reaction times from 0 to 1.5 h, and reaction temperatures from 260 °C to 320 °C on the anaerobic degradability of the HTL-ap were quantified using biomethane potential assays. Comparing chemical oxygen demand data for HTL-ap from different operating conditions, indicated that organic matter may partition from organic phase to aqueous phase at 320 °C. Moderate lag phase and the highest cumulative methane production were observed when HTL-ap was obtained at 320 °C. The longest lag phase and the smallest production rate were observed in the process fed with HTL-ap obtained at 300 °C. Nevertheless, after overcoming adaptation issues, this HTL-ap led to the second highest accumulated specific methane production. Acetogenesis was identified as a possible rate-limiting pathway. PMID:25455086

  7. Volatile Compounds Originating from Mixed Microbial Cultures on Building Materials under Various Humidity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Korpi, Anne; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa; Pasanen, Pertti

    1998-01-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials. PMID:9687450

  8. Bioelectricity production from microbial fuel cell using mixed bacterial culture isolated from distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Samsudeen, N; Radhakrishnan, T K; Matheswaran, Manickam

    2015-11-01

    The effect of various system parameters such as wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) concentration, pH, conductivity, membrane size and thickness on efficient energy production using mixed isolated culture from the distillery wastewater in the MFC was studied. The power density increased with increase in the anolyte pH from 6 to 8. The peak power density and COD removal efficiency was observed as 63.8±0.65 mW/m(2) and 63.5±1.5% at pH 8, respectively. The MFC performance increased with increasing COD concentration (800-3200 mg/l), conductivity (1.1-9.7 mS/cm) and membrane area (8-24 cm(2)). The MFC operating with wastewater COD concentration of 3200 mg/l and its conductivity of 9.7 mS/cm produced the highest power density of 202±6 mW/m(2) with a corresponding current density of 412±12 mA/m(2). The results showed that the efficient electricity generation and simultaneous treatment of distillery wastewater can be attained in the MFC. PMID:26212679

  9. Transformation of trinitrotoluene to triaminotoluene by mixed cultures incubated under methanogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.; Chow, T.; Adrian, N.R.

    2000-04-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an explosive widely used by the military. Although it is no longer manufactured in the US, large amounts of wastewater are generated annually from load, assembly, packing, and demilitarization operations. Granular-activated carbon adsorption is the standard technology for treating wastewater containing TNT and maintaining discharges within the limits established under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. Studies evaluating biological treatment of pink water with an anaerobic fluidized-bed, granular-activated carbon bioreactor have been promising, but the fate of TNT is unknown. The authors investigated the anaerobic transformation of TNT by biofilm microorganisms obtained from a wastewater treatment plant receiving explosive manufacturing wastewater. The TNT was transformed to a mixture of 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene; 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene; 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene; and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene before culminating in the formation of triaminotoluene (TAT). Triaminotoluene was susceptible to further degradation under anaerobic conditions, but its fate was not determined. Methane formation was inhibited but resumed after the depletion of the diaminonitrotoluene isomers. These studies demonstrate near stoichiometric formation of TAT from TNT and the transformation of 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene to 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene by a mixed culture incubated under methanogenic conditions. This evidence indicates TAT is also a likely end-product of TNT biodegradation in the anaerobic fluidized fed bioreactor.

  10. High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-11-01

    High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation (MCF) induced by high ammonium concentration was investigated. Fed-batch experiments revealed that higher ammonium concentration (>2.9g/L) had simultaneous negative effects on acetate and propionate degradation. Propionate production and yield was up to 22.6g/L and 0.45g COD/g COD glycerol, respectively, with a purity of 96%. Sequential batch experiments demonstrated that the yields of propionate were 0.3±0.05, 0.32±0.01, and 0.34±0.03g COD/g COD at a glycerol concentration of 2.78, 4.38, and 5.56g/L, respectively, and the purity of propionate was 91-100%. Microbial community analysis showed that the phylum Firmicutes dominated the bacterial community at different glycerol concentrations. However, the Methanosaeta population decreased from 46% to 6% when glycerol concentration increased from 2.78 to 5.56g/L, resulting in lower acetate degradation rate. Thus, the present study might provide an alternative option for the production of propionate from glycerol via MCF. PMID:27544916

  11. A bioremediation approach using natural transformation in pure-culture and mixed-population biofilms.

    PubMed

    Perumbakkam, Sudeep; Hess, Thomas F; Crawford, Ronald L

    2006-12-01

    Bacterial transformation by naked DNA is thought to contribute to gene transfer and microbial evolution within natural environments. In nature many microbial communities exist as complex assemblages known as biofilms where genetic exchange is facilitated. It may be possible to take advantage of natural transformation processes to modify the phenotypes of biofilm communities giving them specific and desirable functions. Work described here shows that biofilms composed of either pure cultures or mixed populations can be transformed with specific catabolic genes such that the communities acquire the ability to degrade a particular xenobiotic compound. Biofilms were transformed by plasmids bearing genes encoding green fluorescent protein (mut2) and/or atrazine chlorohydrolase (atzA). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify the number of transformants expressing mut2 in the biofilms. Degradation of atrazine by expressed atzA was quantified by tandem mass spectrometry. PCR analysis was performed to confirm the presence of atzA in transformed biofilms. These results indicate that it should be possible to use natural transformation to enhance bioremediation processes performed by biofilms. PMID:16477353

  12. Selective conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen by anaerobic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yafeng; Wan, Jingjing; Han, Sheng; Zhang, Shicheng; Luo, Gang

    2016-02-01

    A new method for the conversion of CO to H2 was developed by anaerobic mixed culture in the current study. Higher CO consumption rate was obtained by anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) compared to waste activated sludge (WAS) at 55 °C and pH 7.5. However, H2 was the intermediate and CH4 was the final product. Fermentation at pH 5.5 by AGS inhibited CH4 production, while the lower CO consumption rate (50% of that at pH 7.5) and the production of acetate were found. Fermentation at pH 7.5 with the addition of chloroform achieved efficient and selective conversion of CO to H2. Stable and efficient H2 production was achieved in a continuous reactor inoculated with AGS, and gas recirculation was crucial to increase the CO conversion efficiency. Microbial community analysis showed that high abundance (44%) of unclassified sequences and low relative abundance (1%) of known CO-utilizing bacteria Desulfotomaculum were enriched in the reactor. PMID:26692523

  13. Mixed Wastewater Coupled with CO2 for Microalgae Culturing and Nutrient Removal

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lili; Shi, Jianye; Miao, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Biomass, nutrient removal capacity, lipid productivity and morphological changes of Chlorella sorokiniana and Desmodesmus communis were investigated in mixed wastewaters with different CO2 concentrations. Under optimal condition, which was 1:3 ratio of swine wastewater to second treated municipal wastewater with 5% CO2, the maximum biomass concentrations were 1.22 g L-1 and 0.84 g L-1 for C. sorokiniana and D. communis, respectively. Almost all of the ammonia and phosphorus were removed, the removal rates of total nitrogen were 88.05% for C. sorokiniana and 83.18% for D. communis. Lipid content reached 17.04% for C. sorokiniana and 20.37% for D. communis after 10 days culture. CO2 aeration increased intracellular particle numbers of both microalgae and made D. communis tend to be solitary. The research suggested the aeration of CO2 improve the tolerance of microalgae to high concentration of NH4-N, and nutrient excess stress could induce lipid accumulation of microalgae. PMID:26418261

  14. Noncytotoxic T cell clones obtained from a human mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chu, M H; Wee, S L; Bach, F H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a DQW-1 homozygous individual were cocultured with irradiated lymphoblastoid cell line from a DQW-1 homozygous unrelated donor bearing BW35-DW1 haplotype. From T cell cloning of primary and twice-stimulated mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC), 7 and 11 T cell clones were obtained respectively. None of the 18 clones showed specific cytotoxic activity against the alloantigen of the stimulator cell as well as natural killer (NK)-like activity against K562 cells. However, most T cell clones from both primary and re-stimulated MLC demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activity in lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (LDCC) assay. Screening assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) performed on growing microcultures obtained from restimulated MLC cloning confirmed the non-cytotoxic status of these T cell clones by showing that 41 out of 44 growing microcultures were not cytotoxic against the stimulator cell; the other 3 clones lyzed the target cell mildly. The cells from all 5 T cell clones detected for indirect fluorescence expressed CD3 and CD4 surface markers. Taken together, the results suggested that proliferation-regulating T cell subsets or factor(s) may be generated during the course of MLCs under the present responder-stimulator combination, and may suppress the development of alloreactive cytotoxic T cells and NK-like cells. PMID:2144231

  15. Competition for hydrogen within a chlorinated solvent dehalogenating anaerobic mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; McCarty, P.L.

    1998-11-15

    Use of an appropriate hydrogen level is necessary to favor dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents, such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), over other hydrogen using processes. This study examined the competition between dehalogenators and other microorganisms occurring in a benzoate-acclimated dehalogenating methanogenic mixed culture. Results show that the dehalogenators competed best against methanogens and homoacetogens when the hydrogen level was maintained between 2 and 11 nM. The 2 nM hydrogen concentration represents the lower threshold value found here for cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dehalogenation. The usefulness of this hydrogen range was further confirmed with both batch-fed and continuously-fed reactors. In batch studies, three times more ethene was produced from dehalogenation of cis-DCE using propionate than benzoate as electron donor, while benzoate produced three times more methane than propionate. A three times greater hydrogen utilization efficiency for dehalogenation was obtained with a CSTR than with batch reactors when benzoate was used as substrate because a constant hydrogen concentration in the appropriate range could be maintained with the CSTR. These results suggest different approaches that might be used to favor dehalogenators in competition with other microorganisms.

  16. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from fermented cheese whey by using a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bianca; Pepè Sciarria, Tommy; Reis, Maria; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Two fermented cheese wheys (FCW), FCW1 composed of lactic, acetic and butyric acids in the proportion of 58/16/26 (% CODOrganic Acid (OA)) and FCW2 composed of acetic, propionic, butyric, lactic and valeric acids in the proportion of 58/19/13/6/4 (% CODOA) were used to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by using a pre-selected mixed microbial culture (MMC). PHA accumulation gave for fermented FCW1 a PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.24±0.02mgCODPHAmgCODSolubleSubstrate(SS)(-1) and a total PHA production, referred to the substrate used, of 60gPHAkgcheesewheyTotalSolids(TS)(-1). For fermented FCW2 results were: PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.42±0.03mgCODPHAmgCODSS(-1) and PHA from a substrate of 70gPHAkgcheesewheyTS(-1). Qualitatively, PHAs from FCW1 was made up exclusively of 3-hydroxybutyrate (HB), while those obtained from FCW2 were composed of 40% of 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV) and 60% of HB. PMID:27420156

  17. Oxygen Limited Bioreactors System For Nitrogen Removal Using Immobilized Mix Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B. K.; Sumino, T.; Saiki, Y.; Kazama, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recently nutrients concentrations especially nitrogen in natural water is alarming in the world wide. Most of the effort is being done on the removal of high concentration of nitrogen especially from the wastewater treatment plants. The removal efficiency is targeted in all considering the effluent discharge standard set by the national environment agency. In many cases, it does not meet the required standard and receiving water is being polluted. Eutrophication in natural water bodies has been reported even if the nitrogen concentration is low and self purification of natural systems itself is not sufficient to remove the nitrogen due to complex phenomenon. In order to recover the pristine water environment, it is very essential to explore bioreactor systems for natural water systems using immobilized mix culture. Microorganism were entrapped in Polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer gel and cut into 3mm cubic immobilized pellets. Four laboratory scale micro bio-reactors having 0.1 L volumes were packed with immobilized pellets with 50% compact ratio. RUN1, RUN2, RUN3 and RUN4 were packed with immobilized pellets from reservoirs sediments, activated sludge (AS), mixed of AS, AG and biodegradable plastic and anaerobic granules (AG) respectively. Water from Shiokawa Reservoirs was feed to all reactors with supplemental ammonia and nitrite nitrogen as specified in the results and discussions. The reactors were operated dark incubated room in continuous flow mode with hydraulic retention time of 12 hours under oxygen limiting condition. Ammonium, nitrate nitrite nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were measured as described in APWA and AWWA (1998). Laboratory scale four bioreactors containing different combination of immobilized cell were monitored for 218 days. Influent NH4+-N and NO2--N concentration were 2.27±0.43 and 2.05±0.41 mg/l respectively. Average dissolved oxygen concentration and pH in the reactors were 0.40-2.5 mg/l and pH 6

  18. [Effects of mono- and mixed culture on the grain yield and water use efficiency of two winter wheat cultivars].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Li, Feng-min; Xu, Bing-cheng; Ma, Shou-chen; Liu, Wen-zhao

    2008-01-01

    Taking two winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Changwu 135 and Pingliang 40 commonly cultivated in the semi-arid area on Loess Plateau as test materials, and by the method of ecological replacement, a 2-year field experiment was conducted to study the effects of mono- and mixed culture on the grain yield and water use efficiency of the cultivars. The results showed that under mono-culture, Pingliang 40 had a much higher unit area root biomass (367.60 g x m(-2)) than Changwu 135 (297.31 g x m(-2)), and a more uniform root distribution (i.e., a better root type for water absorption), but its grain yield and water use efficiency were lower than Changwu 135. Under mixed culture, the population root biomass of Pingliang 40 and Changwu 135 was 13.36 g * m(-2) and 8.50 g x m(-2) higher than that under mono-culture, respectively, suggesting that mixed population could absorb the water in deeper soil layers, and had higher total unit area biomass, which in turn increased the water use efficiency. Comparing with Pingliang 40, Changwu 135 allocated more dry matter to its productive organ, leading to its higher grain yield, harvest index, and water use efficiency. PMID:18419078

  19. Therapeutic effect of lung mixed culture-derived epithelial cells on lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kensuke; Fujita, Tetsuo; Umezawa, Hiroki; Namiki, Kana; Yoshioka, Kento; Hagihara, Masahiko; Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Sadao; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi

    2014-11-01

    Cell-based therapy is recognized as one of potential therapeutic options for lung fibrosis. However, preparing stem/progenitor cells is complicated and not always efficient. Here, we show easily prepared cell populations having therapeutic capacity for lung inflammatory disease that are named as 'lung mixed culture-derived epithelial cells' (LMDECs). LMDECs expressed surfactant protein (SP)-C and gave rise to type I alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) in vitro and in vivo that partly satisfied type II AEC-like characteristics. An intratracheal delivery of not HEK 293 cells but LMDECs to the lung ameliorated bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung injury. A comprehensive analysis of bronchoalveolar fluid by western blot array revealed that LMDEC engraftment could improve the microenvironment in the BLM-instilled lung in association with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 signaling axis. SDF-1 enhanced both migration activity and differentiating efficiency of LMDECs. Further classification of LMDECs by flow cytometric study showed that a major population of LMDECs (LMDEC(Maj), 84% of total LMDECs) was simultaneously SP-C(+), CD44(+), CD45(+), and hematopoietic cell lineage(+) and that LMDECs included bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) showing SP-C(+)Clara cell secretory protein(+)stem cell antigen (Sca)1(+) as a small population (1.8% of total LMDECs). CD44(+)-sorted LMDEC(Maj) and Sca1(+)-sorted LMDECs equally ameliorated fibrosis induced by BLM like LMDECs did. However, infiltrated neutrophils were observed in Sca1(+)-sorted LMDEC-treated alveoli that was not typical in LMDEC(Maj)- or LMDEC-treated alveoli. These findings suggest that the protective effect of LMDECs against BLM-induced lung injury depends greatly on that of LMDEC(Maj). Furthermore, the cells expressing both alveolar epithelial and hematopoietic cell lineage markers (SP-C(+)CD45(+)) that have characteristics corresponding to LMDEC(Maj) were observed in the alveoli of lung and

  20. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation by cultures enriched from oil sands tailings ponds involves multiple species capable of fumarate addition.

    PubMed

    Tan, BoonFei; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    A methanogenic short-chain alkane-degrading culture (SCADC) was enriched from oil sands tailings and transferred several times with a mixture of C6, C7, C8 and C10 n-alkanes as the predominant organic carbon source, plus 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane as minor components. Cultures produced ∼40% of the maximum theoretical methane during 18 months incubation while depleting the n-alkanes, 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane. Substrate depletion correlated with detection of metabolites characteristic of fumarate activation of 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane, but not n-alkane metabolites. During active methanogenesis with the mixed alkanes, reverse-transcription PCR confirmed the expression of functional genes (assA and bssA) associated with hydrocarbon addition to fumarate. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified during active alkane degradation revealed enrichment of Clostridia (particularly Peptococcaceae) and methanogenic Archaea (Methanosaetaceae and Methanomicrobiaceae). Methanogenic cultures transferred into medium containing sulphate produced sulphide, depleted n-alkanes and produced the corresponding succinylated alkane metabolites, but were slow to degrade 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane; these cultures were enriched in Deltaproteobacteria rather than Clostridia. 3-Methylpentane was not degraded by any cultures. Thus, nominally methanogenic oil sands tailings harbour dynamic and versatile hydrocarbon-degrading fermentative syntrophs and sulphate reducers capable of degrading n-, iso- and cyclo-alkanes by addition to fumarate. PMID:25873461

  1. Molecular biomarker-based biokinetic modeling of a PCE-dechlorinating and methanogenic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Heavner, Gretchen L W; Rowe, Annette R; Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M; Richardson, Ruth E

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial populations--most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA "adjustment factors" were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population's instantaneous

  2. Critical assessment of extracellular polymeric substances extraction methods from mixed culture biomass.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Domingo-Félez, Carlos; Mutlu, A Gizem; Smets, Barth F

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have a presumed determinant role in the structure, architecture, strength, filterability, and settling behaviour of microbial solids in biological wastewater treatment processes. Consequently, numerous EPS extraction protocols have recently been published that aim to optimize the trade off between high EPS recovery and low cell lysis. Despite extensive efforts, the obtained results are often contradictory, even when analysing similar biomass samples and using similar experimental conditions, which greatly complicates the selection of an extraction protocol. This study presents a rigorous and critical assessment of existing physical and chemical EPS extraction methods applied to mixed-culture biomass samples (nitrifying, nitritation-anammox, and activated sludge biomass). A novel fluorescence-based method was developed and calibrated to quantify the lysis potential of different EPS extraction protocols. We concluded that commonly used methods to assess cell lysis (DNA concentrations or G6PDH activities in EPS extracts) do not correlate with cell viability. Furthermore, we discovered that the presence of certain chemicals in EPS extracts results in severe underestimation of protein and carbohydrate concentrations by using standard analytical methods. Keeping both maximum EPS extraction yields and minimal biomass lysis as criteria, it was identified a sonication-based extraction method as the best to determine and compare tightly-bound EPS fractions in different biomass samples. Protein was consistently the main EPS component in all analysed samples. However, EPS from nitrifying enrichments was richer in DNA, the activated sludge EPS had a higher content in humic acids and carbohydrates, and the nitritation-anammox EPS, while similar in composition to the nitrifier EPS, had a lower fraction of hydrophobic biopolymers. In general, the easily-extractable EPS fraction was more abundant in carbohydrates and humic substances, while

  3. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  4. Modeling of anaerobic formate kinetics in mixed biofilm culture using dynamic membrane mass spectrometric measurement.

    PubMed

    Dornseiffer, P; Meyer, B; Heinzle, E

    1995-02-01

    The dynamics of the anaerobic conversion of formate in a microbial mixed culture taken from an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor was studied using a new stirred micro reactor equipped with a membrane mass spectrometer. The microreactor with a toroidally shaped bottom and pitched blade turbine and a cylindrical flow guide was thermostated and additionally equipped with a pH electrode and pH control. During fed-batch experiments using formate, the dissolved gases (methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide), as well as the acid consumption rates for pH control were monitored continuously. Initially and at the end of each experiment, organic acids were analyzed using ion chromatography (IC). It was found that about 50% of the formate was converted to methane via hydrogen and carbon dioxide, 40% gave methane either directly or via acetate. This was calculated from experiments using H(13)CO(3) (-) pulses and measurement of (12)CH(4) and (13)CH(4) production rates. About 10% of the formate was converted to lactate, acetate, and propionate, thereby increasing the measured CO(2)/CH(4) production ratio. The nondissociated formic acid was shown to be rate determining. From the relatively high K(s) value of 2.5 mmol m(-3), it was concluded that formate cannot play an important role in electron transfer. During dynamic feeding of formate, hydrogen concentration always increased to a maximum before decreasing again. This peak was found to be very discriminative during modeling. From the various models set up, only those with two-stage degradation and double Monod kinetics, both for CO(2) and hydrogen, were able to describe the experimental data adequately. Additional discrimination was possible with the IC measurement of organic acids. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623141

  5. Predator-Specific Enrichment of Actinobacteria from a Cosmopolitan Freshwater Clade in Mixed Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, Jakob; Posch, Thomas; S̆imek, Karel; Vrba, Jaroslav; Pernthaler, Annelie; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Nübel, Ulrich; Psenner, Roland; Amann, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether individual populations of freshwater bacteria in mixed experimental communities may exhibit specific responses to the presence of different bacterivorous protists. In two successive experiments, a two-stage continuous cultivation system was inoculated with nonaxenic batch cultures of the cryptophyte Cryptomonas sp. Algal exudates provided the sole source of organic carbon for growth of the accompanying microflora. The dynamics of several 16S rRNA-defined bacterial populations were followed in the experimental communities. Although the composition and stability of the two microbial communities differed, numerous members of the first assemblage could again be detected during the second experiment. The introduction of a size-selectively feeding mixotrophic nanoflagellate (Ochromonas sp.) always resulted in an immediate bloom of a single phylotype population of members of the class Actinobacteria (Ac1). These bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with an uncultured lineage of gram-positive bacteria that have been found in freshwater habitats only. The Ac1 cells were close to the average size of freshwater bacterioplankton and significantly smaller than any of the other experimental community members. In contrast, no increase of the Ac1 population was observed in vessels exposed to the bacterivorous ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. However, when the Ochromonas sp. was added after the establishment of C. glaucoma, the proportion of population Ac1 within the microbial community rapidly increased. Populations of a beta proteobacterial phylotype related to an Aquabacterium sp. decreased relative to the total bacterial communities following the addition of either predator, albeit to different extents. The community structure of pelagic microbial assemblages can therefore be influenced by the taxonomic composition of the predator community. PMID:11319094

  6. Short-term effects on Artemia salina of aponin and Gomphosphaeria aponina in unialgal cultures and in mixed cultures with gymnodinium breve.

    PubMed

    Eng-Wilmot, D L; Martin, D F

    1979-08-01

    Previous investigations showed that the natural marine substance aponin, produced by the blue-gree alga Gomphosphaeria sponina, was cytolytic towards Florida's red tide organism, Gymnodinium breve. As part of a study of the aponin-alga biological interactions, the effects of unialgal (G. aponina) and mixed cultures (G. aponina + G. breve) on the viability of artemia salina were investigated. Two contrasting effects were observed in mixed cultures: survival of A. salina was promoted in low G. aponina populations, while enhanced toxicity of G. breve to A. salina occurred at higher culture populations. Unialgal G. aponina cultures exerted no adverse effects on A. salina. The apparent protective effect is thought to result from the observed change in G. breve morphology (motile to sessile); toxicity was the result of enhanced toxin release by cytolyzed G. breve cells. In dose-response studies, aponin exhibited no adverse effect on A. salina at concentrations (1 unit) that were deleterious to G. breve. However, at higher applied levels (4--6 units), mortality was substantial (greater than 70%) after 48 hr of incubation. Probit analysis yielded an apparent LD50 of 2.3 units, where 1 unit was that amount required to cytolyze 50% of the G. breve cells (2000 cells/ml) after 20 hr of incubation. PMID:113525

  7. Biodegradation potential of pure and mixed bacterial cultures for removal of 4-nitroaniline from textile dye wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2009-03-01

    Environmentally toxic aromatic amines including nitroanilines are commonly generated in dye contaminated wastewater in which azo dyes undergo degradation under anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a process for biological treatment of 4-nitroaniline. Three bacteria identified as Acinetobacter sp., Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella oxytoca were isolated from enrichment cultures of activated sludge on 4-nitroaniline, after which the isolates and the mixed culture were studied to determine optimal conditions for biodegradation. HPLC analyses showed the mixed culture was capable of complete removal of 100micromol/L of 4-nitroaniline within 72h under aerobic conditions. There was an inverse linear relationship (R(2)=0.96) between the rate of degradation (V) and 4-nitraoaniline concentrations [S] over 100-1000micromol/L. The bacterial culture was also capable of decolorizing structurally different azo dyes (Acid Red-88, Reactive Black-5, Direct Red-81, and Disperse Orange-3) and also degraded nitrobenzene. Our findings show that enrichment cultures from activated sludge can be effective for the removal of dyes and their toxic intermediates, and that treatment may best be accomplished using an anaerobic-aerobic process. PMID:19114284

  8. Photometabolic production of hydrogen from organic substrates by free and immobilized mixed cultures of rhodospirillum rubrum and klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Weetall, H.H.; Sharma, B.P.; Detar, C.C.

    1981-03-01

    A culture of R. rubrum cells apparently contaminated with K. pneumoniae were immobilized by entrapment in agar. This system was used as a model for hydrogen production by photometabolic means. Observed results indicated that the contaminant exerted a major influence on the observed results. This preparation, when immobilized and used in a specifically designed reactor with glucose substrate, showed operational half-lives of approximately 1000 hr. The feasibility of using this ''mixed'' culture for producing hydrogen from acid hydrolyzed cellulose and wood sawdust was also examined. 5 refs.

  9. Improvement of vitamin B(12) fermentation by reducing the inhibitory metabolites by cell recycle system and a mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Miyano; Ye; Shimizu

    2000-12-01

    The major problem in vitamin B(12) production using Propionibacterium is the growth inhibition of the cell due to the accumulation of inhibitory metabolites such as propionic acid and acetic acid. In the present paper, we considered several approaches of controlling the propionic acid concentration at low level. Namely: (1) the periodic cultivation of Propionibacterium where dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was alternatively changed between 0 and 1ppm; (2) cell recycle system using hollow fiber module; and (3) mixed culture using Propionibacterium and Ralstonia eutropha where the latter microorganism assimilates the propionic acid produced by the former. It was found that the productivity of vitamin B(12) was the highest for the cell recycle system, while if the performance was evaluated based on the amount of vitamin B(12) produced per medium used, the mixed culture system gave the far highest value. PMID:11080651

  10. Analysis of microbial community variation during the mixed culture fermentation of agricultural peel wastes to produce lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Gerritsen, Alida T; McDonald, Armando G

    2016-05-01

    Mixed cultures fermentation can be used to convert organic wastes into various chemicals and fuels. This study examined the fermentation performance of four batch reactors fed with different agricultural (orange, banana, and potato (mechanical and steam)) peel wastes using mixed cultures, and monitored the interval variation of reactor microbial communities with 16S rRNA genes using Illumina sequencing. All four reactors produced similar chemical profile with lactic acid (LA) as dominant compound. Acetic acid and ethanol were also observed with small fractions. The Illumina sequencing results revealed the diversity of microbial community decreased during fermentation and a community of largely lactic acid producing bacteria dominated by species of Lactobacillus developed. PMID:26913642

  11. Biochemical Study of Mixed Culture Prototype in a Closed Ecological System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischer, R. G.

    1960-01-01

    Since June 1, 1960, the date of initiation of this research project, efforts have been directed toward studying cultural and fermentation patterns and the methodology of pure culture isolation of prototype microorganisms to be employed in closed ecological systems.

  12. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26109361

  13. Finding Balance in a Mix of Culture: Appreciation of Diversity through Multicultural Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nethsinghe, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the understandings of cultural diversity as enacted in multicultural music education and is located in Victoria, which is identified as the most culturally diverse state in Australia with a population that comes from various countries and speaks many languages. This cultural diversity is reflected in the schools. This…

  14. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-06-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 +/- 0.06, 1.0 +/- 0.13 and 0.4 +/- 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  15. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 ± 0.06, 1.0 ± 0.13 and 0.4 ± 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation. PMID:24920064

  16. H2 production from algal biomass by a mixed culture of Rhodobium marinum A-501 and Lactobacillus amylovorus.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, H; Hashimoto, K; Hirata, K; Miyamoto, K

    2001-01-01

    To produce hydrogen from starch accumulated in an algal biomass, we used a mixed culture of the lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus amylovorus, and the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobium marinum A-501. In this system L. amylovorus, which possesses amylase activity, utilized algal starch for lactic acid production, and R. marinum A-501 produced hydrogen in the presence of light using lactic acid as an electron donor. Algal starch accumulated in the marine green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta, and the freshwater green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was more suitable for lactic acid fermentation by L. amylovorus than an authentic starch sample. Consequently, the yields of hydrogen obtained from starch contained in D. tertiolecta and C. reinhardtii were 61% and 52%, respectively, in the mixed culture of L. amylovorus and R. marinum A-501. These values were markedly superior to those obtained using a mixed culture of Vibrio fluvialis T-522 and R. marinum A-501 described previously. The yield and production rate of hydrogen by R. marinum A-501 from the lactic acid fermentates were higher than from authentic lactic acid, suggesting that the fermentates contain a factor(s) which promotes H2 production by this bacterium. PMID:16232989

  17. Improving flavor metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by mixed culture with Bacillus licheniformis for Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Wu, Qun; Wang, Li; Wang, Diqiang; Chen, Liangqiang; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Microbial interactions could impact the metabolic behavior of microbes involved in food fermentation, and therefore they are important for improving food quality. This study investigated the effect of Bacillus licheniformis, the dominant bacteria in the fermentation process of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor, on the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results indicated that S. cerevisiae inhibited the growth of B. licheniformis in all mixed culture systems and final viable cell count was lower than 20 cfu/mL. Although growth of S. cerevisiae was barely influenced by B. licheniformis, its metabolism was changed as initial inoculation ratio varied. The maximum ethanol productions were observed in S. cerevisiae and B. licheniformis at 10(6):10(7) and 10(6):10(8) ratios and have increased by 16.8 % compared with single culture of S. cerevisiae. According to flavor compounds, the culture ratio 10(6):10(6) showed the highest level of total concentrations of all different kinds of flavor compounds. Correlation analyses showed that 12 flavor compounds, including 4 fatty acids and their 2 corresponding esters, 1 terpene, and 5 aromatic compounds, that could only be produced by S. cerevisiae were significantly correlated with the initial inoculation amount of B. licheniformis. These metabolic changes in S. cerevisiae were not only a benefit for liquor aroma, but may also be related to its inhibition effect in mixed culture. This study could help to reveal the microbial interactions in Chinese liquor fermentation and provide guidance for optimal arrangement of mixed culture fermentation systems. PMID:26323612

  18. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds. PMID:26108494

  19. Financial abuse in elderly Korean immigrants: mixed analysis of the role of culture on perception and help-seeking intention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Eaton, Charissa K

    2009-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate how elderly Korean immigrants perceive and respond to a hypothetical incident of financial abuse on the basis of their cultural background. By using a quota sampling strategy, 124 elderly Korean immigrants were recruited. A mixed-method approach was employed to explore the role of culture on elderly immigrants' view of financial abuse and the construct of independent and interdependent self-construal was adopted to theoretically guide the study. Mixed-method analysis confirmed considerable influence of culture, particularly in responding to the abusive situation. Although the vast majority of the elders (92%) perceived financial abuse as elder mistreatment, only two-thirds (64%) intended to seek help. Five major themes for not seeking help were produced. These are: (a) issues related to family problems, (b) tolerance of the abuse, (c) shame, (d) victim blame, and (e) mistrust toward third party intervention. A series of binary logistic regressions revealed (a) a lower likelihood of seeking formal types of help with those who had higher level of adherence to traditional values and (b) the profile of vulnerable elderly Koreans who are at higher risk of being financially abused: male and less educated. This article also discusses implications for social work practice and elder mistreatment policy, particularly focusing on how to work with elderly Korean immigrants who are vulnerable to this problem and who tend to use collectivistic cultural values in responding to financial abuse. PMID:19585323

  20. Three-dimensional culture of a mixed mullerian tumor of the ovary: expression of in vivo characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Prewett, T. L.; Spaulding, G. F.; Becker, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) is a novel in vitro cell culture system used to successfully culture a cell line derived from a heterologous mixed mullerian tumor cell of the ovary. Although the original tumor was comprised of both epithelial and mesodermal components, long-term culture in conventional flasks established a cell line from this tumor with homogeneous epitheliallike growth characteristics (1). Cells from Passage 36 were seeded into a Rotating-Wall Vessel containing Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads. Scanning electron micrographs of tumor cells cultured for 32 d in the RWV showed the presence of heterogeneous cell populations organized into three-dimensional tissuelike architecture. Immunocytochemical analysis confirmed the cellular heterogeneity, as demonstrated by expression of both epithelial and mesenchymal antigens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification demonstrated the presence of mRNA for cellular oncogenes HER-2/neu, H-ras, K-ras, and tumor suppressor p53. Thus, there are two advantages to propagation of tissue in the RWV culture system:(a) tissue diversification representing populations present in the original tumor, and (b) the three-dimensional freedom to organize tissues morphologically akin to those observed in vivo. These data indicate that the RWV culture system is suitable for generating large quantities of ovarian tumor cells in vitro that are amenable to immunocytochemical, oncogenic, morphologic characteristics demonstrated in vivo.

  1. Improvement of L-lactic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by mixed culture of Aspergillus niger and Lactobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Qian, He; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2009-03-01

    Aspergillus niger SL-09 and Lactobacillus sp. G-02 were used as a mixed culture in a 7-l fermentor to directly form L-lactic acid from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. The synthesis of inulinase and invertase from A. niger SL-09 was enhanced significantly by the inoculation of Lactobacillus sp. G-02 at 12h of culture, which reached 275.6 and 571.8 U/ml in 60 h, over 5-folds higher than that of the culture using single strain. In the following simultaneous saccharification and fermentation procedure, the highest L-lactic acid concentration of 120.5 g/l was obtained in 36 h of the fed-batch fermentation with high conversion efficiency of 94.5%. PMID:18990562

  2. Cellulose decomposition and associated nitrogen fixation by mixed cultures of Cellulomonas gelida and Azospirillum species or Bacillus macerans

    SciTech Connect

    Halsall, D.M.; Gibson, A.H.

    1985-10-01

    Mixed cultures of Cellulomonas gelida plus Azospirillum lipoferum or Azospirillum brasilense and C. gelida plus Bacillus macerans were shown to degrade cellulose and straw and to utilize the energy-yielding products to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This cooperative process was followed over 30 days in sand-based cultures in which the breakdown of 20% of the cellulose and 28 to 30% of the straw resulted in the fixation of 12 to 14.6 mg of N per g of cellulose and 17 to 19 mg of N per g of straw consumed. Cellulomonas species have certain advantages over aerobic cellulose-degrading fungi in being able to degrade cellulose at oxygen concentrations as low as 1% O/sub 2/ (vol/vol) which would allow a close association between cellulose-degrading and microaerobic diazotrophic microorganisms. Cultures inoculated with initially different proportions of A. brasilense and C. gelida all reached a stable ratio of approximately 1 Azospirillum/3 Cellulomonas cells.

  3. A Mixed Methods Study of Culturally Proficient Practices in an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was that leaders at an urban elementary school had not examined the implementation of culturally proficient practices, nor the challenges, barriers, or support needed for implementation. The purpose of the study was to inform instructional and leadership practices involving culturally proficient instruction.…

  4. Photosynthetic mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from individual and mixed volatile fatty acids (VFAs): substrate preferences and co-substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Fradinho, J C; Oehmen, A; Reis, M A M

    2014-09-20

    This work studied the effect of the substrate feeding composition on the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation capacity of an acetate enriched photosynthetic mixed culture (PMC). From the six tested organic acids - malate, citrate, lactate, acetate, propionate and butyrate - only the three volatile fatty acids (VFAs) enabled PHA production, with acetate and butyrate leading to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation and propionate leading to a HB:HV copolymer with a 51% fraction of hydroxyvalerate (HV). Also, results showed an acceleration of butyrate and propionate consumption when fed in the presence of acetate, suggesting that the latter can act as a co-substrate for butyrate and propionate uptake. Furthermore, results suggest that some PMC bacterial groups present a substrate preference for butyrate in relation to acetate and propionate. These findings indicate the possibility of feeding the PMC with cheap VFA rich fermented wastes, leading to a more cost-effective and environmentally sustainable PHA production system. PMID:24915131

  5. Incorporating Cultural Perspectives into Diabetes Self-Management Programs for East Asian Immigrants: A Mixed-Study Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Chorong; Nam, Soohyun; Whittemore, Robin

    2016-04-01

    It is important to understand East Asian immigrants (EAIs)' unique perspectives in managing diabetes in order to provide culturally-competent care. However, it is not known whether EAIs' perspectives are addressed in diabetes self-management interventions developed for EAIs. Therefore, a mixed-study review was conducted to identify EAIs' perspective from qualitative research (n = 9 studies) and to evaluate the components of EAI diabetes self-management interventions (n = 7). Themes from the qualitative synthesis demonstrated that EAIs have unique cultural values and traditional health beliefs while struggling with multi-contextual barriers due to immigration. The evaluation of EAI diabetes self-management interventions revealed that there was a lack of consensus on cultural strategies for EAIs' across the interventions. Addressing language barriers was the only factor consistently integrated in the cultural components of intervention by employing bilingual interventionists. EAIs' perspectives and experiences need to be incorporated in the future diabetes self-management interventions to better provide culturally-competent care. PMID:25740553

  6. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto,; Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-29

    Enriched–immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  7. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto, Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-01

    Enriched-immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  8. Bioethanol production from mixed sugars by Scheffersomyces stipitis free and immobilized cells, and co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Isabella; De Canio, Paola; Cuna, Daniela; Liuzzi, Federico; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2013-09-25

    Bioethanol can be produced from several biomasses including lignocellulosic materials. Besides 6-carbon sugars that represent the prevalent carbohydrates, some of these feedstocks contain significant amounts of 5-carbon sugars. One common limit of the major part of the xylose-fermenting yeasts is the diauxic shift between the uptake of glucose and xylose during the fermentation of mixed syrups. Thus, optimized fermentation strategies are required. In this paper the ability of Scheffersomyces stipitis strain NRRLY-11544 to ferment mixed syrups with a total sugar concentration in the range 40-80 g/L was investigated by using mono cultures, co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Bakers Yeast Type II and single cultures immobilized in silica-hydrogel films. The experimental design for the fermentations with immobilized cells included the process analysis in function of two parameters: the fraction of the gel in the broth and the concentration of the cells loaded in the gel. Furthermore, for each total sugars level, the fermentative course of S. stipitis was analyzed at several glucose-to xylose ratios. The results indicated that the use of S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae in free co-cultures ensured faster processes than single cultures of S. stipitis either free or immobilized. However, the rapid production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae inhibited S. stipitis and caused a stuck of the process. Immobilization of S. stipitis in silica-hydrogel increased the relative consumption rate of xylose-to-glucose by 2-6 times depending on the composition of the fermentation medium. Furthermore the films performances appeared stable over three weeks of continuous operations. However, on the whole, the final process yields obtained with the immobilized cells were not meaningfully different from that of the free cells. This was probably due to concurrent fermentations operated by the cells released in the broth. Optimization of the carrier characteristics could improve the

  9. Characterization of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, K.J.; Bielaga, B.A.; Jackowski, K.; Oduson, O.; Kilbane, J. II

    1992-12-31

    Growth assays reveal that Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can utilize a wide range of organosulfur compounds as the sole source of sulfur. Compounds that are utilized include thiophenes, sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, sulfoxides, and sulfones. None of the organosulfur compounds tested can serve as a carbon source. A convenient spectrophotometric assay (Gibbs assay) based on the chromogenic reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide with aromatic hydroxyl groups was developed and used in conjunction with GC/MS analysis to examine the kinetics of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cell cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. The desulfurization trait is expressed at uniform levels during the mid-exponential phase, reaches a maximum during idiophase, and then declines in stationary-phase cells. Desulfurization rates for dibenzothiophene (DBT) range from 8 to 15 {mu}M of DBT/10{sup 12} cells/hour. Mixtures of genetically marked Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 and an organisms incapable of cleaning carbon-sulfur bonds in relevant test compounds, Enterobacter cloacae, were prepared in ratios that varied over six orders of magnitude. Growth studies revealed that Enterobacter cloacae was able to gain access to sulfur liberated from organosulfur compounds by IGTS8; however, cell-to-cell contact was required. These data also indicate that the desulfurization activity of IGTS8 cells in mixed cultures may be as much as 200-fold higher than in axenic cultures.

  10. Transferability of Trypanosoma cruzi from mixed human host infection to Triatoma infestans and from insects to axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sylvia; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Saavedra, Miguel; Solari, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The etiologic agent of Chagas disease is Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan whose life cycle involves obligatory passage through vertebrate and invertebrate hosts in a series of stages. The aim of this study was to explore the transferability of mixed discrete typing units (DTUs) of T. cruzi present in chronic chagasic patients when passed through an invertebrate host during xenodiagnosis (XD) and then when transferred to axenic cultures to obtain T. cruzi isolates. DTUs of T. cruzi present in these two hosts and axenic cultures were identified by kDNA PCR amplification and subsequent hybridization with DTU-specific probes. Mixtures of Tc I, Tc II, Tc V and Tc VI DTUs were detected in blood samples. However as a result of XD and axenic cultures it was possible to identify mostly Tc V. We conclude that the transferability of an isolate of T.cruzi derived from mixed DTUs present in human blood depends upon the starved invertebrate host used for xenodiagnosis. PMID:25240699

  11. Sedimentation of mixed cultures using natural coagulants for the treatment of effluents generated in terrestrial fuel distribution terminals.

    PubMed

    Vieira, R B; Vieira, P A; Cardoso, S L; Ribeiro, E J; Cardoso, V L

    2012-09-15

    This study evaluated the use of natural coagulants (Moringa oleifera and chitosan) under different conditions with a mixed culture (C1 mixed culture). This culture was used for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons present in the effluent from fuel distribution terminals contaminated with diesel oil and gasoline. The biodegradation was evaluated by two central composite design (CCD) experiments: the first with varying concentrations of Moringa oleifera (MO), drying temperatures (TE) and seed drying times (TI); the second with varying concentrations of chitosan and the hydrochloric acid in which chitosan had been solubilized. The responses monitored in the CCD experiments included the sludge volume index (SVI), the turbidity removal (TR) and the specific rate of oxygen uptake (SOUR). Subsequently, the biodegradation was monitored in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under the optimal conditions obtained for each CCD experiment. The results indicated that the best coagulant was chitosan solubilized in 0.25 N HCl at a concentration of 50mg/L. Within five cycles with chitosan as a coagulant, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased from 77±1.0% to 82±0.5%, the volatile suspended solids (VSS) increased from 1.4±0.3 to 2.25±0.3 g/L and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal increased from 75±1.0% to 81±0.5%. PMID:22795394

  12. Cultural Socialization in Families with Adopted Korean Adolescents: A Mixed-Method, Multi-Informant Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Myo; Reichwald, Reed; Lee, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Transracial, transnational families understand and transmit cultural socialization messages in ways that differ from same-race families. This study explored the ways in which transracial, transnational adoptive families discuss race and ethnicity and how these family discussions compared to self-reports from adoptive parents and adolescents regarding the level of parental engagement in cultural socialization. Of the thirty families with at least one adolescent-aged child (60% female, average age 17.8 years) who was adopted from South Korea, nine families acknowledged racial and ethnic differences, six families rejected racial and ethnic differences, and fifteen families held a discrepancy of views. Parents also reported significantly greater engagement in cultural socialization than adolescents’ reports of parental engagement. However, only adolescent self-reports of parental engagement in cultural socialization matched the qualitative coding of family conversations. PMID:24235782

  13. Formation of Short-Chain Fatty Acids from H2 and CO2 by a Mixed Culture of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, I.; Cooney, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The biological utilization of CO2 and H2 for the formation of short-chain fatty acids was studied by using a mixed culture of bacteria. Optimization of a medium was carried out in continuous culture to identify limiting factors which controlled growth and production of organic acids. The optimal pH for growth and acid production was 7.0 at 37°C; the maximal cell concentration obtained was 5.9 g of cells per liter (dry weight), and the maximal amount of volatile acids formed was 4.7 g/liter, with acetic acid as the predominant acid. With the optimized medium, it was found that the rate of transfer of hydrogen or carbon dioxide, or both, from gas to liquid was the limiting factor which controlled growth and production of acids. PMID:16345680

  14. A novel isolation method for macrophage-like cells from mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2010-08-31

    We report a simple and efficient method to obtain macrophage-like cells from the mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells. A parenchymal hepatocyte enriched fraction was prepared from adult rat livers and seeded into culture flasks. After 7 to 10 days of culture, when most hepatocytes were degenerated or transformed into fibroblastic cells, macrophage-like cells vigorously proliferated on the cell sheet. By shaking the flasks, macrophage-like cells were readily detached. Subsequent transfer and incubation in plastic dishes resulted in quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells, while other contaminating cells remained suspended in the medium. After rinsing with saline, attached macrophage-like cells were harvested with 95 to 99% purity, as evaluated by flow cytometry or immunocytochemistry. These cells showed typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for markers of rat macrophages, such as ED-1, ED-3, and OX-41, but negative for cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. They possessed functional properties of typical macrophages, including active phagocytosis of latex beads, proliferative response to recombinant GM-CSF, secretion of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines upon stimulation with LPS, and formation of multinucleated giant cells. As more than 10(6) cells can be recovered repeatedly from a T75 culture flask at two to three day intervals for more than two weeks, our procedure might implicate a novel alternative to obtain Kupffer cells in sufficient number and purity without complex equipment and skills. PMID:20600081

  15. The Role of Leadership and Culture in Creating Meaningful Assessment: A Mixed Methods Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guetterman, Timothy C.; Mitchell, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    With increased demands for institutional accountability and improved student learning, involvement in assessment has become a fundamental role of higher education faculty (Rhodes, 2010). However, faculty members and administrators often question whether assessment efforts do indeed improve student learning (Hutchings, 2010). This mixed methods…

  16. Biofilm formation and interspecies interactions in mixed cultures of thermo-acidophilic archaea Acidianus spp. and Sulfolobus metallicus.

    PubMed

    Castro, Camila; Zhang, Ruiyong; Liu, Jing; Bellenberg, Sören; Neu, Thomas R; Donati, Edgardo; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of biofilm formation by bioleaching microorganisms is of great importance for influencing mineral dissolution rates and to prevent acid mine drainage (AMD). Thermo-acidophilic archaea such as Acidianus, Sulfolobus and Metallosphaera are of special interest due to their ability to perform leaching at high temperatures, thereby enhancing leaching rates. In this work, leaching experiments and visualization by microscopy of cell attachment and biofilm formation patterns of the crenarchaeotes Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) and the Acidianus isolates DSM 29038 and DSM 29099 in pure and mixed cultures on sulfur or pyrite were studied. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) combined with fluorescent dyes as well as fluorescently labeled lectins were used to visualize different components (e.g. DNA, proteins or glycoconjugates) of the aforementioned species. The data indicate that cell attachment and the subsequently formed biofilms were species- and substrate-dependent. Pyrite leaching experiments coupled with pre-colonization and further inoculation with a second species suggest that both species may negatively influence each other during pyrite leaching with respect to initial attachment and pyrite dissolution rates. In addition, the investigation of binary biofilms on pyrite showed that both species were heterogeneously distributed on pyrite surfaces in the form of individual cells or microcolonies. Physical contact between the two species seems to occur, as revealed by specific lectins able to specifically bind single species within mixed cultures. PMID:27388200

  17. The effects of concentration-dependent morphology of self-assembling RADA16 nanoscaffolds on mixed retinal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Dominic; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Bartlett, Carole A.; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Luzinov, Igor A.; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Swaminathan Iyer, K.

    2011-03-01

    RADA16 self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds (SAPNSs) have been shown to have positive effects on neural regeneration following injury to the central nervous system in vivo, but mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that RADA16 SAPNSs form scaffolds of increasing fiber density with increasing peptide concentration which in turn has a concentration-dependent effect on neurons and astrocytes in mixed retinal cultures. Importantly, we report that the final nanoscale fiber architecture is an important factor to consider in designing scaffolds to promote regeneration in the central nervous system.RADA16 self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds (SAPNSs) have been shown to have positive effects on neural regeneration following injury to the central nervous system in vivo, but mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that RADA16 SAPNSs form scaffolds of increasing fiber density with increasing peptide concentration which in turn has a concentration-dependent effect on neurons and astrocytes in mixed retinal cultures. Importantly, we report that the final nanoscale fiber architecture is an important factor to consider in designing scaffolds to promote regeneration in the central nervous system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures, additional SEM data and AFM analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00666a

  18. Cultural Border Crossing in Three Urban Classrooms: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roopnarine, Rupnarain

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the instruction of four youth cultural border crossing behaviors: flexibility, being at ease, playfulness, and citizenship as an intervention aimed at helping students to transition across three borders, student to student, student to science, and student to teacher. The research involved 12 ninth- and 10th-grade…

  19. Adaptation of a mixed culture of acidophiles for a tank biooxidation of refractory gold concentrates containing a high concentration of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeongsik; Silva, Rene A; Park, Jeonghyun; Lee, Eunseong; Park, Jayhyun; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-05-01

    We adapted a mixed culture of acidophiles to high arsenic concentrations to confirm the possibility of achieving more than 70% biooxidation of refractory gold concentrates containing high arsenic (As) concentration. The biooxidation process was applied to refractory gold concentrates containing approximately 139.67 g/kg of total As in a stirred tank reactor using an adapted mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The percentage of the biooxidation process was analyzed based on the total As removal efficiency. The As removal was monitored by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, conducted every 24 h. The results obtained with the adapted culture were compared with the percentage of biooxidation obtained with a non-adapted mixed culture of A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans, and with their respective pure cultures. The percentages of biooxidation obtained during 358 h of reaction were 72.20%, 38.20%, 27.70%, and 11.45% for adapted culture, non-adapted culture, and pure cultures of A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans, respectively. The adapted culture showed a peak maximum percentage of biooxidation of 77% at 120 h of reaction, confirming that it is possible to obtain biooxidation percentages over 70% in gold concentrates containing high As concentrations. PMID:26481159

  20. Selective antimicrobial action of chitosan against spoilage yeasts in mixed culture fermentations.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Rivas, Leticia; Escudero-Abarca, Blanca I; Aguilar-Uscanga, M Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M; Mendoza, Patricia; Ramírez, Mario

    2004-01-01

    The effect of chitosan on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the yeast that carries out alcohol fermentation), Brettanomyces bruxellensis and Brettanomyces intermedius (contaminants of alcohol fermentations), was investigated. The effect of chitosan was tested on each yeast, as well as on mixed cultivations of S. cerevisiae + B. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae + B. intermedius. Chitosan enhanced the lag period of both strains of Brettanomyces (80 h for B. bruxellensis and 170 h for B. intermedius with 6 and 2 g/l chitosan, respectively). The growth rate of S. cerevisiae was inversely proportional to the chitosan concentration; the former was 50% when 6 g/l polysaccharide was used. Moreover, in mixed cultivations of S. cerevisiae and Brettanomyces strains, it was found that both B. bruxellensis and B. intermedius failed to grow while growth of S. cerevisiae was not affected (using 3 and 6 g/l chitosan, respectively). An interesting collateral result was that the presence of chitosan accelerated the consumption of glucose in the mixed cultivations (60 h instead of 120 h). PMID:14747932

  1. Selective Enrichment Media Bias the Types of Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Mixed Strain Cultures and Complex Enrichment Broths

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella. PMID:22496847

  2. High concentrations of extracellular potassium enhance bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide-induced neurotoxicity in glia-neuron mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Chang, R C; Hudson, P M; Wilson, B C; Liu, B; Abel, H; Hong, J S

    2000-01-01

    A sudden increase in extracellular potassium ions (K(+)) often occurs in cerebral ischemia and after brain trauma. This increase of extracellular K(+) constitutes the basis for spreading depression across the cerebral cortex, resulting in the expansion of neuronal death after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. Besides spreading depression, it has become clear that cerebral inflammation also is a key factor contributing to secondary brain injury in acute neurological disorders. Experiments to validate the relationship between elevated levels of extracellular K(+) and inflammation have not been studied. This study aims to elucidate the roles of high concentrations of extracellular K(+) in bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory factors. Increased concentration of KCl in the medium (20mM) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity by lipopolysaccharide in glia-neuron mixed cultures. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of increased neurotoxicity, the effects of high extracellular K(+) were examined by using mixed glial cultures. KCl at 20mM significantly enhanced nitrite, an index for nitric oxide, production by about twofold, and was pronounced from 24 to 48h, depending on the concentration of KCl. Besides nitric oxide production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was also enhanced. The augmentative effects of high KCl on the production of inflammatory factors were probably due to the further activation of microglia, since high KCl also enhanced the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in microglia-enriched cultures. The increased production of nitrite by high K(+) was eliminated through use of a K(+)-blocker. Taken together, the results show that increases of extracellular K(+) concentrations in spreading depression augment lipopolysaccharide-elicited neurotoxicity, because production of inflammatory factors such as nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are potentiated. Since spreading depression and cerebral inflammation

  3. Biodegradation potential of oily sludge by pure and mixed bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Vanessa S; Hollenbach, Emanuel B; Maboni, Franciele; Vainstein, Marilene H; Camargo, Flávio A O; do Carmo R Peralba, Maria; Bento, Fátima M

    2011-12-01

    The biodegradation capacity of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons of petrochemical oily sludge in liquid medium by a bacterial consortium and five pure bacterial cultures was analyzed. Three bacteria isolated from petrochemical oily sludge, identified as Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila, Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cibi, and two bacteria isolated from a soil contaminated by petrochemical waste, identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus demonstrated efficiency in oily sludge degradation when cultivated during 40 days. The bacterial consortium demonstrated an excellent oily sludge degradation capacity, reducing 90.7% of the aliphatic fraction and 51.8% of the aromatic fraction, as well as biosurfactant production capacity, achieving 39.4% reduction of surface tension of the culture medium and an emulsifying activity of 55.1%. The results indicated that the bacterial consortium has potential to be applied in bioremediation of petrochemical oily sludge contaminated environments, favoring the reduction of environmental passives and increasing industrial productivity. PMID:21993328

  4. Cultural border crossing in three urban classrooms: A mixed methods study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, Rupnarain

    This study examined the effects of the instruction of four youth cultural border crossing behaviors: flexibility, being at ease, playfulness, and citizenship as an intervention aimed at helping students to transition across three borders, student to student, student to science, and student to teacher. The research involved 12 ninth- and 10th-grade students in a large urban school district in three diverse classrooms, A, B, and C. Four students in each classroom volunteered for the study. The students in Groups A and B were in 9th grade Living Environment and students in Group B were in 10th grade chemistry. These students participated in this instructional intervention for three months. The study was conducted using both quantitative and qualitative methods based on participant observations, interviews, and questionnaire. The result indicated that there was no significant effect of the cultural border crossing instructions on the students' interactions across the three borders examined. However, the instructions helped Group A and Group B to be more flexible but not group C. Also, the instructions helped Group A to be more playful and at ease but not Group B and C. The instructions also helped Group A to show more citizenship but not Group B and C. In addition, there was no difference between the pretest and posttest cultural bother crossing behavior. Moreover, qualitative data analysis showed that the participants were more flexible, at ease, and playful among peers than across student to teacher and student to science borders. Also, the use of citizenship in the three groups showed no effect on the participants' interaction with peers. Although, the findings showed no effect of cultural border crossing instructions on students' interactions, it is suggested that we continue to find ways to help students feel more comfortable in science.

  5. Development of a floating photobioreactor with internal partitions for efficient utilization of ocean wave into improved mass transfer and algal culture mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Hong, Seong-Joo; Lim, Sang-Min; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Culturing microalgae in the ocean has potentials that may reduce the production cost and provide an option for an economic biofuel production from microalgae. The ocean holds great potentials for mass microalgal cultivation with its high specific heat, mixing energy from waves, and large cultivable area. Suitable photobioreactors (PBRs) that are capable of integrating marine energy into the culture systems need to be developed for the successful ocean cultivation. In this study, prototype floating PBRs were designed and constructed using transparent low-density polyethylene film for microalgal culture in the ocean. To improve the mixing efficiency, various types of internal partitions were introduced within PBRs. Three different types of internal partitions were evaluated for their effects on the mixing efficiency in terms of mass transfer (k(L)a) and mixing time in the PBRs. The partition type with the best mixing efficiency was selected, and the number of partitions was varied from one to three for investigation of its effect on mixing efficiency. When the number of partitions is increased, mass transfer increased in proportion to the number of partitions. However, mixing time was not directly related to the number of partitions. When a green microalga, Tetraselmis sp. was cultivated using PBRs with the selected partition under semi-continuous mode in the ocean, biomass and fatty acid productivities in the PBRs were increased by up to 50 % and 44% at high initial cell density, respectively, compared to non-partitioned ones. The results of internally partitioned PBRs demonstrated potentials for culturing microalgae by efficiently utilizing ocean wave energy into culture mixing in the ocean. PMID:26857371

  6. Do furanic and phenolic compounds of lignocellulosic and algae biomass hydrolyzate inhibit anaerobic mixed cultures? A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Monlau, F; Sambusiti, C; Barakat, A; Quéméneur, M; Trably, E; Steyer, J-P; Carrère, H

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest on the use of both lignocellulosic and algae biomass to produce biofuels (i.e. biohydrogen, ethanol and methane), as future alternatives to fossil fuels. In this purpose, thermal and thermo-chemical pretreatments have been widely investigated to overcome the natural physico-chemical barriers of such biomass and to enhance biofuel production from lignocellulosic residues and, more recently, marine biomass (i.e. macro and microalgae). However, the pretreatment technologies lead not only to the conversion of carbohydrate polymers (ie cellulose, hemicelluloses, starch, agar) to soluble monomeric sugar (ie glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose), but also the generation of various by-products (i.e. furfural and 5-HMF). In the case of lignocellulosic residues, part of the lignin can also be degraded in lignin derived by-products, mainly composed of phenolic compounds. Although the negative impact of such by-products on ethanol production has been widely described in literature, studies on their impact on biohydrogen and methane production operated with mixed cultures are still very limited. This review aims to summarise and discuss literature data on the impact of pre-treatment by-products on H2-producing dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion processes when using mixed cultures as inoculum. As a summary, furanic (5-HMF, furfural) and phenolic compounds were found to be stronger inhibitors of the microbial dark fermentation than the full anaerobic digestion process. Such observations can be explained by differences in process parameters: anaerobic digestion is performed with more complex mixed cultures, lower substrate/inoculum and by-products/inoculum ratios and longer batch incubation times than dark fermentation. Finally, it has been reported that, during dark fermentation process, the presence of by-products could lead to a metabolic shift from H2-producing pathways (i.e. acetate and butyrate) to non-H2-producing pathways (i

  7. Acetogenesis from dichloromethane by a two-component mixed culture comprising a novel bacterium.

    PubMed

    Magli, A; Rainey, F A; Leisinger, T

    1995-08-01

    A strictly anaerobic two-component culture able to grow exponentially with a doubling time of 20 h on a medium containing dichloromethane as the carbon and energy source was characterized. On a medium without sulfate, we observed (per mol of dichloromethane) a mass balance of 2 mol of chloride, 0.26 mol of acetate, 0.05 mol of formate, and 0.25 mol of carbon in biomass. One component of the culture, strain DMB, was identified by a 16S ribosomal DNA analysis as a Desulfovibrio sp. The other component, the gram-positive organism strain DMC, could not be isolated. It was possible, however, to associate strain DMC on a medium containing dichloromethane in a coculture with Acetobacterium woodii or Methanospirillum hungatei. Coculture of strain DMC with the Archaeon M. hungatei allowed us to specifically amplify by PCR the 16S rRNA gene of strain DMC. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence revealed that this organism groups within the radiation of the Clostridium-Bacillus subphylum and exhibits the highest levels of sequence similarity (89%) with Desulfotomaculum orientis and Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans. Since the novel organism strain DMC was able to grow acetogenically with dichloromethane when it was associated with one of three metabolically different partners and since, in contrast to strain DMB, strain DMC contained carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity, this bacterium is responsible for both the dehalogenation of dichloromethane and the acetogenesis observed in the original two-component culture. The obligatory dependence of strain DMC on a partner during growth with dichloromethane is thought to stem from the need for a growth factor produced by the associated organism. PMID:16535097

  8. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  9. Why and How Do Nursing Homes Implement Culture Change Practices? Insights from Qualitative Interviews in a Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Renée R.; Looze, Jessica; Tyler, Denise; Lepore, Michael; Miller, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the process of instituting culture change (CC) practices in nursing homes (NHs). Methods NH Directors of Nursing (DONs) and Administrators (NHAs) at 4,149 United States NHs were surveyed about CC practices. Follow-up interviews with 64 NHAs were conducted and analyzed by a multidisciplinary team which reconciled interpretations recorded in an audit trail. Results The themes include: 1) Reasons for implementing CC practices vary; 2) NH approaches to implementing CC practices are diverse; 3) NHs consider resident mix in deciding to implement practices; 4) NHAs note benefits and few implementation costs of implementing CC practices; 5) Implementation of changes is challenging and strategies for change are tailored to the challenges encountered; 6) Education and communication efforts are vital ways to institute change; and 7) NHA and other staff leadership is key to implementing changes. Discussion Diverse strategies and leadership skills appear to help NHs implement reform practices, including CC innovations. PMID:24652888

  10. Nitroxides as anti-biofilm compounds for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed-culture biofilms.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stefanie-Ann; Kyi, Caroline; Schiesser, Carl H

    2015-04-28

    A series of 23 nitroxides () was tested for biofilm modulatory activity using a crystal violet staining technique. 3-(Dodecane-1-thiyl)-4-(hydroxymethyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolinoxyl () was found to significantly suppress biofilm formation and elicit dispersal events in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed-culture biofilms. Twitching and swarming motilities were enhanced by nitroxide , leaving the planktonic-specific swimming motility unaffected and suggesting that the mechanism of -mediated biofilm modulation is linked to the hyperactivation of surface-associated cell motilities. Preliminary structure-activity relationship studies identify the dodecanethiyl chain, hydroxymethyl substituent and the free radical moiety to be structural features pertinent to the anti-biofilm activity of . PMID:25804546

  11. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Primary Mixed Neural Cell Cultures: Uptake, Oxidative Stress and Acute Calcium Responses

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Andrea; Rott, Stephanie; Mantion, Alexandre; Graf, Philipp; Plendl, Johanna; Thünemann, Andreas F.; Meier, Wolfgang P.; Taubert, Andreas; Luch, Andreas; Reiser, Georg

    2012-01-01

    In the body, nanoparticles can be systemically distributed and then may affect secondary target organs, such as the central nervous system (CNS). Putative adverse effects on the CNS are rarely investigated to date. Here, we used a mixed primary cell model consisting mainly of neurons and astrocytes and a minor proportion of oligodendrocytes to analyze the effects of well-characterized 20 and 40 nm silver nanoparticles (SNP). Similar gold nanoparticles served as control and proved inert for all endpoints tested. SNP induced a strong size-dependent cytotoxicity. Additionally, in the low concentration range (up to 10 μg/ml of SNP), the further differentiated cultures were more sensitive to SNP treatment. For detailed studies, we used low/medium dose concentrations (up to 20 μg/ml) and found strong oxidative stress responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected along with the formation of protein carbonyls and the induction of heme oxygenase-1. We observed an acute calcium response, which clearly preceded oxidative stress responses. ROS formation was reduced by antioxidants, whereas the calcium response could not be alleviated by antioxidants. Finally, we looked into the responses of neurons and astrocytes separately. Astrocytes were much more vulnerable to SNP treatment compared with neurons. Consistently, SNP were mainly taken up by astrocytes and not by neurons. Immunofluorescence studies of mixed cell cultures indicated stronger effects on astrocyte morphology. Altogether, we can demonstrate strong effects of SNP associated with calcium dysregulation and ROS formation in primary neural cells, which were detectable already at moderate dosages. PMID:22240980

  12. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from fermented sugar cane molasses by a mixed culture enriched in glycogen accumulating organisms.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Simon; Pisco, Ana R; Reis, Maria A M; Lemos, Paulo C

    2010-02-01

    Batch production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under aerobic conditions by an open mixed culture enriched in glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) with fermented sugar cane molasses as substrate was studied. The produced polymers contained five types of monomers, namely 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV), 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutyrate (3H2MB), 3-hydroxy-2-methylvalerate (3H2MV) and the medium chain length monomer 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx). With fermented molasses as substrate, PHA was produced under concurrent consumption of stored glycogen with yields of 0.47-0.66 C-mol PHA per C-mol of total carbon substrate and with rates up to 0.65 C-mol/C-molX h. In order to investigate the role of glycogen during aerobic PHA accumulation in GAOs, synthetic single volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were used as substrates and it was found that the fate of glycogen was dependent on the type of VFA being consumed. Aerobic PHA accumulation occurred under concurrent glycogen consumption with acetate as substrate and under minor concurrent glycogen production with propionate as substrate. With butyrate and valerate as substrates, PHA accumulation occurred with the glycogen pool unaffected. The composition of the PHA was dependent on the VFA composition of the fermented molasses and was 56-70 mol-% 3HB, 13-43 mol-% 3HV, 1-23 mol-% 3HHx and 0-2 mol-% 3H2MB and 3H2MV. The high polymer yields and production rates suggest that enrichment of GAOs can be a fruitful strategy for mixed culture production of PHA from waste substrates. PMID:19958801

  13. Responses of neotropical mangrove seedlings grown in monoculture and mixed culture under treatments of hydroperiod and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardona-Olarte, P.; Twilley, R.R.; Krauss, K.W.; Rivera-Monroy, V.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of salinity and hydroperiod on seedlings of Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa grown under experimental conditions of monoculture and mixed culture by using a simulated tidal system. The objective was to test hypotheses relative to species interactions to either tidal or permanent flooding at salinities of 10 or 40 g/l. Four-month-old seedlings were experimentally manipulated under these environmental conditions in two types of species interactions: (1) seedlings of the same species were grown separately in containers from September 2000 to August 2001 to evaluate intraspecific response and (2) seedlings of each species were mixed in containers to evaluate interspecific, competitive responses from August 2002 to April 2003. Overall, L. racemosa was strongly sensitive to treatment combinations while R. mangle showed little effect. Most plant responses of L. racemosa were affected by both salinity and hydroperiod, with hydroperiod inducing more effects than salinity. Compared to R. mangle, L. racemosa in all treatment combinations had higher relative growth rate, leaf area ratio, specific leaf area, stem elongation, total length of branches, net primary production, and stem height. Rhizophora mangle had higher biomass allocation to roots. Species growth differentiation was more pronounced at low salinity, with few species differences at high salinity under permanent flooding. These results suggest that under low to mild stress by hydroperiod and salinity, L. racemosa exhibits responses that favor its competitive dominance over R. mangle. This advantage, however, is strongly reduced as stress from salinity and hydroperiod increase. ?? Springer 2006.

  14. The formal-informal patient payment mix in European countries. Governance, economics, culture or all of these?

    PubMed

    Tambor, Marzena; Pavlova, Milena; Golinowska, Stanisława; Sowada, Christoph; Groot, Wim

    2013-12-01

    Cost-sharing for health care is high on the policy agenda in many European countries that struggle with deficits in their public budget. However, such policy often meets with public opposition, which might delay or even prevent its implementation. Increased reliance on patient payments may also have adverse equity effects, especially in countries where informal patient payments are widespread. The factors which might influence the presence of both, formal and informal payments can be found in economic, governance and cultural differences between countries. The aim of this paper is to review the formal-informal payment mix in Europe and to outline factors associated with this mix. We use quantitative analyses of macro-data for 35 European countries and a qualitative description of selected country experiences. The results suggest that the presence of obligatory cost-sharing for health care services is associated with governance factors, while informal patient payments are a multi-cause phenomenon. A consensus-based policy, supported by evidence and stakeholders' engagement, might contribute to a more sustainable patient payment policy. In some European countries, the implementation of cost-sharing requires policy actions to reduce other patient payment obligations, including measures to eliminate informal payments. PMID:24149101

  15. Monophyletic group of unclassified γ-Proteobacteria dominates in mixed culture biofilm of high-performing oxygen reducing biocathode.

    PubMed

    Rothballer, Michael; Picot, Matthieu; Sieper, Tina; Arends, Jan B A; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Boon, Nico; Buisman, Cees J N; Barrière, Frédéric; Strik, David P B T B

    2015-12-01

    Several mixed microbial communities have been reported to show robust bioelectrocatalysis of oxygen reduction over time at applicable operation conditions. However, clarification of electron transfer mechanism(s) and identification of essential micro-organisms have not been realised. Therefore, the objective of this study was to shape oxygen reducing biocathodes with different microbial communities by means of surface modification using the electrochemical reduction of two different diazonium salts in order to discuss the relation of microbial composition and performance. The resulting oxygen reducing mixed culture biocathodes had complex bacterial biofilms variable in size and shape as observed by confocal and electron microscopy. Sequence analysis of ribosomal 16S rDNA revealed a putative correlation between the abundance of certain microbiota and biocathode performance. The best performing biocathode developed on the unmodified graphite electrode and reached a high current density for oxygen reducing biocathodes at neutral pH (0.9 A/m(2)). This correlated with the highest domination (60.7%) of a monophyletic group of unclassified γ-Proteobacteria. These results corroborate earlier reports by other groups, however, higher current densities and higher presence of these unclassified bacteria were observed in this work. Therefore, members of this group are likely key-players for highly performing oxygen reducing biocathodes. PMID:25912513

  16. No horizontal numerical mapping in a culture with mixed-reading habits.

    PubMed

    Rashidi-Ranjbar, Neda; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Jahangiri, Sorour; Brugger, Peter; Loetscher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Reading habits are thought to play an important role in the emergence of cultural differences in visuo-spatial and numerical tasks. Left-to-right readers show a slight visuo-spatial bias to the left side of space, and automatically associate small numbers to the left and larger numbers to the right side of space, respectively. A paradigm that demonstrated an automatic spatial-numerical association involved the generation of random numbers while participants performed lateral head turns. That is, Westerners have been shown to produce more small numbers when the head was turned to the left compared to the right side. We here employed the head turning/random number generation (RNG) paradigm and a line bisection (LB) task with a group of 34 Iranians in their home country. In the participants' native language (Farsi) text is read from right-to-left, but numbers are read from left-to-right. If the reading direction for text determines the layout of spatial-numerical mappings we expected to find more small numbers after right than left head turns. Yet, the generation of small or large numbers was not modulated by lateral head turns and the Iranians showed therefore no association of numbers with space. There was, however, a significant rightward shift in the LB task. Thus, while the current results are congruent with the idea that text reading habits play an important role in the cultural differences observed in visuo-spatial tasks, our data also imply that these habits on their own are not strong enough to induce significant horizontal spatial-numerical associations. In agreement with previous suggestions, we assume that for the emergence of horizontal numerical mappings a congruency between reading habits for words and numbers is required. PMID:24605093

  17. Type II pneumocytes in mixed cell culture of human lung: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Bingle, L; Bull, T B; Fox, B; Guz, A; Richards, R J; Tetley, T D

    1990-01-01

    Alveolar Type II epithelial cells dedifferentiate rapidly in vitro. Studies with animal tissue suggest that cell-cell and extracellular matrix-cell interactions are important in the retention of Type II cell morphology in vitro. Thus, in this study with human tissue, alveolar Type II cells, alveolar macrophages, and spindle cells were prepared from the same sample of lung (obtained following lobectomy for cancer, n = 3), cocultured on glass cover slips or tissue culture plastic, and studied by light microscopy with scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy for 8 days. The primary cell isolates contained approximately 45% Type II cells; the remainder were macrophages or unidentifiable cells. Clusters, made up of a single layer of cuboidal Type II cells around a central core of connective tissue (largely collagen and some elastic tissue), formed above a monolayer of spindle cells. The Type II cells were morphologically similar to those seen in vivo. The cells were still cuboidal at 8 days but had lost their lamellar bodies, which were released into the medium via the apical surface. The clusters increased in size with time (area, microns 2: day 1, 29(5-143) x 10(2); day 8, 63(10-311) x 10(2); mean(range); p less than 0.02) without changing in number per culture, suggesting Type II cell proliferation. This may have been due to factors produced by the other cells and adherence to the extracellular matrix (ECM); (free collagen fibers, present in the original preparation, spindle cells, and/or Type II cells could be responsible for presence of ECM). We propose this as a useful model for the study of human Type II epithelial cells in vitro. Images FIGURE 1. a FIGURE 1. b FIGURE 1. c FIGURE 1. d FIGURE 1. e FIGURE 1. f FIGURE 2. a FIGURE 2. b FIGURE 2. c FIGURE 2. d FIGURE 2. e FIGURE 2. f FIGURE 2. g FIGURE 3. PMID:2384069

  18. Mixed populations of marine microalgae in continuous culture: Factors affecting species dominance and biomass productivity.

    PubMed

    Regan, D L; Ivancic, N

    1984-11-01

    Marine microalgae were grown in multispecies continuous cultures. Under carbon dioxide limitation, blue-green algae dominated. Under nitrate and light limitation, species dominance depended on the initial conditions. When the inoculum consisted primarily of blue-green algae with smaller amounts of other species, blue-green algae and pennate diatoms dominated. When the inoculum consisted of equal amounts of all species, green flagellates and pennate diatoms dominated. Green flagellates and blue-green algae were incompatible and never shared dominance. When nutrient limitations were overcome, the productivity of seawater was increased 100-fold before light limitation occurred. The productivity could be further increased by reducing photorespiration in the culture. The dilution rates studied (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 day(-1)) had no effect on species dominance, nor did the higher dilution rates select for smaller cells. The maximum productivity occurred at a dilution rate of 0.2 day(-1). Temperature had the greatest effect on species dominance, with green flagellates, pennate diatoms, and blue-green algae dominating at 20 degrees C and only blue-green algae dominating at 35 degrees C. The productivity at 35 degrees C was lower than that at 20 degrees C because of the lower solubility of carbon dioxide at higher temperatures. At 10% salinity, green flagellates and pennate diatoms dominated. The productivity at this salinity was 50% that obtained at the salinity of seawater (3.5%). At 25% salinity, only the green flagellate, Dunaliella salina, survived at a productivity of 1% that obtained at the salinity of seawater. PMID:18551649

  19. No horizontal numerical mapping in a culture with mixed-reading habits

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi-Ranjbar, Neda; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Jahangiri, Sorour; Brugger, Peter; Loetscher, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Reading habits are thought to play an important role in the emergence of cultural differences in visuo-spatial and numerical tasks. Left-to-right readers show a slight visuo-spatial bias to the left side of space, and automatically associate small numbers to the left and larger numbers to the right side of space, respectively. A paradigm that demonstrated an automatic spatial-numerical association involved the generation of random numbers while participants performed lateral head turns. That is, Westerners have been shown to produce more small numbers when the head was turned to the left compared to the right side. We here employed the head turning/random number generation (RNG) paradigm and a line bisection (LB) task with a group of 34 Iranians in their home country. In the participants’ native language (Farsi) text is read from right-to-left, but numbers are read from left-to-right. If the reading direction for text determines the layout of spatial-numerical mappings we expected to find more small numbers after right than left head turns. Yet, the generation of small or large numbers was not modulated by lateral head turns and the Iranians showed therefore no association of numbers with space. There was, however, a significant rightward shift in the LB task. Thus, while the current results are congruent with the idea that text reading habits play an important role in the cultural differences observed in visuo-spatial tasks, our data also imply that these habits on their own are not strong enough to induce significant horizontal spatial-numerical associations. In agreement with previous suggestions, we assume that for the emergence of horizontal numerical mappings a congruency between reading habits for words and numbers is required. PMID:24605093

  20. Mixed culture biofilms of Salmonella Typhimurium and cultivable indigenous microorganisms on lettuce show enhanced resistance of their sessile cells to cold oxygen plasma.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Han, Noori; Zhang, Cheng-Yi; Ha, Sang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Control of foodborne pathogens in fresh produce is crucial for food safety, and numerous Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) outbreaks have been reported already. The present study was done to assess effectiveness of cold oxygen plasma (COP) against biofilms of ST mixed with cultivable indigenous microorganisms (CIM). ST and CIM were grown at 15 °C as monocultures and mixed cultures for planktonic state, biofilm on stainless steel, and lettuce leaves. Thereafter, the samples were treated with COP and surviving populations were counted using plate counting methods. Biofilms and stomatal colonization were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and food quality was assessed after treatment. Mixed cultures of ST and CIM showed an antagonistic interaction on lettuce but not on SS or in planktonic state. Mixed cultures showed significantly (p < 0.05) greater resistance to COP compared to monoculture biofilms on lettuce but not on SS or planktonic state. Shift from smooth to rugose colony type was found for planktonic and for biofilms on SS but not on lettuce for ST. Mixed culture biofilms colonized stomata on the inside as demonstrated by FESEM. Although, lettuce quality was not affected by COP, this technology has to be optimized for further development of the successful inactivation of complex multispecies biofilm structures presented by real food environment. PMID:25475308

  1. Effective remediation of fish processing waste using mixed culture biofilms capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification.

    PubMed

    Markande, Anoop R; Kapagunta, Chandrika; Patil, Pooja S; Nayak, Binaya B

    2016-09-01

    Fish processing waste water causes pollution and eutrophication of water bodies when released untreated. Use of bacteria capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) as biofilms on carriers in a moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) is a popular approach but seldom used for fish processing waste water remediation. Here, we studied the variations in biofilm formation and application activities by isolates Lysinibacillus sp. HT13, Alcaligenes sp. HT15 and Proteus sp. HT37 previously reported by us. While HT13 and HT15 formed significantly higher biofilms in polystyrene microtitre plates than on carriers, HT37 exhibited highest on carriers. A consortium of the three selected bacteria grown as biofilm on MBBR carriers exhibited better remediation of ammonia (200-600 ppm and 50 mM) than the individual isolates on carriers. The mixed biofilm set on the carriers was used for nitrogenous waste removal from fish processing waste water in 2 and 20 L setups. The total nitrogen estimated by elemental analysis showed complete remediation from 250 ppm in both 2 and 20 L waste water systems within 48 h. The usual toxic nitrogenous components-ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were also remediated efficiently. PMID:27213464

  2. Microbial reduction and precipitation of vanadium (V) in groundwater by immobilized mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Liting; Tian, Caixing; Yuan, Songhu; Feng, Chuanping; Ni, Jinren; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2015-09-01

    Vanadium is an important contaminant impacted by natural and industrial activities. Vanadium (V) reduction efficiency as high as 87.0% was achieved by employing immobilized mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculated seed within 12h operation, while V(IV) was the main reduction product which precipitated instantly. Increasing initial V(V) concentration resulted in the decrease of V(V) removal efficiency, while this index increased first and then decreased with the increase of initial COD concentration, pH and conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicated the decreased microbial diversity. V(V) reduction was realized through dissimilatory reduction process by significantly enhanced Lactococcus and Enterobacter with oxidation of lactic and acetic acids from fermentative microorganisms such as the enriched Paludibacter and the newly appeared Acetobacterium, Oscillibacter. This study is helpful to detect new functional species for V(V) reduction and constitutes a step ahead in developing in situ bioremediations of vanadium contamination. PMID:26067477

  3. Community perspectives: mixed-methods investigation of culture, stress, resilience, and health.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Cleopatra M; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Jones, Felica; Roubinov, Danielle; Tsai, Sid; Jones, Loretta; Lu, Michael; Hobel, Calvin

    2010-01-01

    Despite well-documented ethnic and socioeconomic disparities, our understanding of child, maternal and family health is based disproportionately on White middle-class populations in the United States. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the Community Child Health Network (CCHN) in 2004, a partnership of five academic institutions and community organizations, to collaborate in the design and conduct of a study to foster new understandings of these disparities. Reported here are findings from a pilot study conducted at one site to inform CCHN regarding community views of stress, coping resources, family and health. Mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) interviews were conducted with 54 adult participants recruited from public healthcare clinics to obtain both their self-reports and their reports of their communities' perspectives. Findings include the pervasiveness of experiences of racism and gender differences in support seeking and coping behavior. There was little recognition of some common health conditions, such as low birth weight and preterm birth, which disproportionately affect poor and minority communities. Many indicators of strength and resilience in individuals, families, and the communities at large emerged in these interviews. Communities were described as valuing achievement and upward mobility. Participants also indicated an intuitive understanding of effective parenting and of the roles of nature (genetics) and nurture (environment and behavior) in determining child health. The results inform intervention and stress research in underrepresented communities. PMID:20629246

  4. Concomitant biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from dark fermentation effluents by adapted Rhodobacter sphaeroides and mixed photofermentative cultures.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Valentino, Serena; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed at investigating concomitant production of biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by photofermentation (PF) using dark fermentation effluents (DFE). An adapted culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides AV1b (pH 6.5, 24±2°C) achieved H2 and PHB yields of 256 (±2) NmLH2/g Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and 273.8mgPHB/gCOD (32.5±3% of the dry cells weight (DCW)), respectively. When a diluted (1:2) DFE medium was applied to the adapted pure and mixed photofermentative culture, the respective H2 yields were 164.0 (±12) and 71.3 (±6) NmLH2/gCOD and the PHB yields were 212.1 (±105.2) and 50.7 (±2.7) mgPHB/gCOD added, corresponding to 24 (±0.7) and 6.3 (±0) % DCW, respectively. The concomitant H2 and PHB production from the PF process gave a good DFE post treatment achieving up to 80% COD removal from the initial DFE. PMID:27005789

  5. Direct surfactin-gramicidin S antagonism supports detoxification in mixed producer cultures of Bacillus subtilis and Aneurinibacillus migulanus.

    PubMed

    Rautenbach, Marina; Eyéghé-Bickong, Hans André; Vlok, Nicolas Maré; Stander, Marietjie; de Beer, Abré

    2012-12-01

    Antibiotic production as a defence mechanism is a characteristic of a wide variety of organisms. In natural evolutionary adaptation, cellular events such as sporulation, biofilm formation and resistance to antibiotics enable some micro-organisms to survive environmental and antibiotic stress conditions. The two antimicrobial cyclic peptides in this study, gramicidin S (GS) from Aneurinibacillus migulanus and the lipopeptide surfactin (Srf) from Bacillus subtilis, have been shown to affect both membrane and intercellular components of target organisms. Many functions, other than that of antimicrobial activity, have been assigned to Srf. We present evidence that an additional function may exist for Srf, namely that of a detoxifying agent that protects its producer from the lytic activity of GS. We observed that Srf producers were more resistant to GS and could be co-cultured with the GS producer. Furthermore, exogenous Srf antagonized the activity of GS against both Srf-producing and non-producing bacterial strains. A molecular interaction between the anionic Srf and the cationic GS was observed with circular dichroism and electrospray MS. Our results indicate that the formation of an inactive complex between GS and Srf supports resistance towards GS, with the anionic Srf forming a chemical barrier to protect its producer. This direct detoxification combined with the induction of protective stress responses in B. subtilis by Srf confers resistance toward GS from A. migulanus and allows survival in mixed cultures. PMID:23103974

  6. Critical analysis of hydrogen production from mixed culture fermentation under thermophilic condition (60 °C).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hang; Zeng, Raymond J; O'Sullivan, Cathryn; Clarke, William P

    2016-06-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from mixed culture fermentation (MCF) of glucose was studied by conducting a comprehensive product measurement and detailed mass balance analysis of their contributions to the final H2 yield. The culture used in this study was enriched on glucose at 60 °C through a sequential batch operation consisting of daily glucose feeds, headspace purging and medium replacement every third day in serum bottles for over 2 years. 2-Bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was only required during the first three 3-day cycles to permanently eliminate methanogenic activity. Daily glucose feeds were fully consumed within 24 h, with a persistent H2 yield of 2.7 ± 0.1 mol H2/mol glucose, even when H2 was allowed to accumulate over the 3-day cycle. The measured H2 production exceeded by 14 % the theoretical production of H2 associated with the fermentation products, dominated by acetate and butyrate. Follow-up experiments using acetate with a (13)C-labelled methyl group showed that the excess H2 production was not due to acetate oxidation. Chemical formula analysis of the biomass showed a more reduced form of C5H11.8O2.1N1.1 suggesting that the biomass formation may even consume produced H2 from fermentation. PMID:27052381

  7. Flux balance analysis of mixed microbial cultures: application to the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from complex mixtures of volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pardelha, Filipa; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Reis, Maria A M; Dias, João M L; Oliveira, Rui

    2012-12-31

    Fermented agro-industrial wastes are potential low cost substrates for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production by mixed microbial cultures (MMC). The use of complex substrates has however profound implications in the PHA metabolism. In this paper we investigate PHA accumulation using a lumped metabolic model that describes PHA storage from arbitrary mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA). Experiments were conducted using synthetic and complex VFA mixtures obtained from the fermentation of sugar cane molasses. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and flux balance analysis (FBA) were performed at different stages of culture enrichment in order to investigate the effect of VFA composition and time of enrichment in PHA storage efficiency. Substrate uptake and PHA storage fluxes increased over enrichment time by 70% and 73%, respectively. MFA calculations show that higher PHA storage fluxes are associated to an increase in the uptake of VFA with even number of carbon atoms and a more effective synthesis of hydroxyvalerate (HV) precursors from VFA with odd number of carbons. Furthermore, FBA shows that the key metabolic objective of a MMC subjected to the feast and famine regimen is the minimization of the tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes. The PHA flux and biopolymer composition (hydroxybutyrate (HB): HV) could be accurately predicted in several independent experiments. PMID:23036926

  8. Essential oils have different effects on human pathogenic and commensal bacteria in mixed faecal fermentations compared with pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Dinesh; Louis, Petra; Losa, Riccardo; Zweifel, Béatrice; Wallace, R John

    2015-02-01

    A static batch culture system inoculated with human faeces was used to determine the influence of essential oil compounds (EOCs) on mixed faecal microbiota. Bacteria were quantified using quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA genes. Incubation for 24 h of diluted faeces from six individuals caused enrichment of Bifidobacterium spp., but proportions of other major groups were unaffected. Thymol and geraniol at 500 p.p.m. suppressed total bacteria, resulting in minimal fermentation. Thymol at 100 p.p.m. had no effect, nor did eugenol or nerolidol at 100 or 500 p.p.m. except for a slight suppression of Eubacterium hallii. Methyl isoeugenol at 100 or 500 p.p.m. suppressed the growth of total bacteria, accompanied by a large fall in the molar proportion of propionate formed. The relative abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was unaffected except with thymol at 500 p.p.m. The ability of EOCs to control numbers of the pathogen Clostridium difficile was investigated in a separate experiment, in which the faecal suspensions were amended by the addition of pure culture of C. difficile. Numbers of C. difficile were suppressed by thymol and methyl isoeugenol at 500 p.p.m. and to a lesser extent at 100 p.p.m. Eugenol and geraniol gave rather similar suppression of C. difficile numbers at both 100 and 500 p.p.m. Nerolidol had no significant effect. It was concluded from these and previous pure-culture experiments that thymol and geraniol at around 100 p.p.m. could be effective in suppressing pathogens in the small intestine, with no concern for beneficial commensal colonic bacteria in the distal gut. PMID:25500493

  9. A non-invasive method for in situ quantification of subpopulation behaviour in mixed cell culture.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Ben D; Tare, Rahul S; Please, Colin P; Prescott, Philip; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2006-02-22

    Ongoing advances in quantitative molecular- and cellular-biology highlight the need for correspondingly quantitative methods in tissue-biology, in which the presence and activity of specific cell-subpopulations can be assessed in situ. However, many experimental techniques disturb the natural tissue balance, making it difficult to draw realistic conclusions concerning in situ cell behaviour. In this study, we present a widely applicable and minimally invasive method which combines fluorescence cell labelling, retrospective image analysis and mathematical data processing to detect the presence and activity of cell subpopulations, using adhesion patterns in STRO-1 immunoselected human mesenchymal populations and the homogeneous osteoblast-like MG63 continuous cell line as an illustration. Adhesion is considered on tissue culture plastic and fibronectin surfaces, using cell area as a readily obtainable and individual cell specific measure of spreading. The underlying statistical distributions of cell areas are investigated and mappings between distributions are examined using a combination of graphical and non-parametric statistical methods. We show that activity can be quantified in subpopulations as small as 1% by cell number, and outline behaviour of significant subpopulations in both STRO-1+/- fractions. This method has considerable potential to understand in situ cell behaviour and thus has wide applicability, for example in developmental biology and tissue engineering. PMID:16849218

  10. Cultural responses to pain in UK children of primary school age: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Azize, Pary M; Endacott, Ruth; Cattani, Allegra; Humphreys, Ann

    2014-06-01

    Pain-measurement tools are often criticized for not addressing the influence of culture and ethnicity on pain. This study examined how children who speak English as a primary or additional language discuss pain. Two methods were used in six focus group interviews with 34 children aged 4-7 years: (i) use of drawings from the Pediatric Pain Inventory to capture the language used by children to describe pain; and (ii) observation of the children's placing of pain drawings on red/amber/green paper to denote perceived severity of pain. The findings demonstrated that children with English as an additional language used less elaborate language when talking about pain, but tended to talk about the pictures prior to deciding where they should be placed. For these children, there was a positive significant relationship between language, age, and length of stay in the UK. The children's placement of pain drawings varied according to language background, sex, and age. The findings emphasize the need for sufficient time to assess pain adequately in children who do not speak English as a first language. PMID:23991687