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Sample records for mixed-mode crack propagation

  1. Double noding technique for mixed mode crack propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    A simple dynamic finite element algorithm for analyzing a propagating mixed mode crack tip is presented. A double noding technique, which can be easily incorporated into existing dynamic finite element codes, is used together with a corrected J integral to extract modes I and II dynamic stress intensity factors of a propagating crack. The utility of the procedure is demonstrated by analyzing test problems involving a mode I central crack propagating in a plate subjected to uniaxial tension, a mixed mode I and II stationary, slanted central crack in a plate subjected to uniaxial impact loading, and a mixed mode I and II extending, slanted single edge crack in a plate subjected to uniaxial tension. Previously announced in STAR as N83-13491

  2. Analysis of mixed-mode crack propagation using the boundary integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Ghosn, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Crack propagation in a rotating inner raceway of a high speed roller bearing is analyzed using the boundary integral equation method. The method consists of an edge crack in a plate under tension, upon which varying Hertzian stress fields are superimposed. A computer program for the boundary integral equation method was written using quadratic elements to determine the stress and displacement fields for discrete roller positions. Mode I and Mode II stress intensity factors and crack extension forces G sub 00 (energy release rate due to tensile opening mode) and G sub r0 (energy release rate due to shear displacement mode) were computed. These calculations permit determination of that crack growth angle for which the change in the crack extension forces is maximum. The crack driving force was found to be the alternating mixed-mode loading that occurs with each passage of the most heavily loaded roller. The crack is predicted to propagate in a step-like fashion alternating between radial and inclined segments, and this pattern was observed experimentally. The maximum changes DeltaG sub 00 and DeltaG sub r0 of the crack extension forces are found to be good measures of the crack propagation rate and direction.

  3. Analysis of crack propagation in roller bearings using the boundary integral equation method - A mixed-mode loading problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    Crack propagation in a rotating inner raceway of a high-speed roller bearing is analyzed using the boundary integral method. The model consists of an edge plate under plane strain condition upon which varying Hertzian stress fields are superimposed. A multidomain boundary integral equation using quadratic elements was written to determine the stress intensity factors KI and KII at the crack tip for various roller positions. The multidomain formulation allows the two faces of the crack to be modeled in two different subregions, making it possible to analyze crack closure when the roller is positioned on or close to the crack line. KI and KII stress intensity factors along any direction were computed. These calculations permit determination of crack growth direction along which the average KI times the alternating KI is maximum.

  4. Mixed-mode crack behavior. ASTM special technical publication 1325

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.; McDowell, D.L.

    1999-07-01

    This conference was international and balanced in scope, as witnessed by the presentation of over 20 papers addressing the following topics: (1) Elastic-Plastic Fracture; (2) Three-Dimensional Cracks; (3) Anisotropic Fracture and Applications; (4) Fracture of Composite Materials; (5) Mixed-Mode Fracture Toughness; (6) Mixed-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth; and (7) Experimental Studies in Mixed-Mode Fatigue and Fracture. Separate abstracts were prepared for all papers.

  5. Atomic simulation of cracks under mixed mode loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1984-01-01

    A discrete atomic model of a crack tip in iron under mixed mode loads is examined. The results indicate that the behavior of the crack at the atomic scale as a function of the ratio of mode I to mode II component of load is quite complex. In general, crack tip plasticity appears to increase as the mode II component of load increases.

  6. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-31

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays. PMID:26765005

  7. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J.; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-01

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays.

  8. Assessment of Crack Path Prediction in Non-Proportional Mixed-Mode Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Shelby, Jr.; Johnson, Steve; Swanson, Gregory; Sayyah, Tarek; Pettit, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Non-proportional mixed-mode loading is present in many systems and a growing crack can experience any manner of mixed-mode loading. Prediction of the resulting crack path is important when assessing potential failure modes or when performing a failure investigation. Current crack path selection criteria are presented along with data for Inconel 718 under non-proportional mixed-mode loading. Mixed-mode crack growth can transition between path deflection mechanisms with very different orientations. Non-proportional fatigue loadings lack a single parameter for input to current crack path criteria. Crack growth transitions were observed in proportional and non-proportional FCG tests. Different paths displayed distinct fracture surface morphologies. New crack path drivers & transition criteria must be developed.

  9. Measurements of mixed-mode crack surface displacements and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altiero, N. J., Jr.; Sharpe, W. N., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and an experimental technique is used to determine crack surface displacements under mixed-mode conditions. Crack surface displacements proved to be quite useful in mode 1 fracture analysis in that they are directly related to strain energy release rate and stress intensity factor. It is felt that similar relationships can be developed for the mixed-mode case. A boundary-integral method was developed for application to two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems. This technique was applied to the mixed-mode problem. A laser interferometry technique, for measurement of crack surface displacements under mixed-mode conditions, is presented. The experimental measurements are reported and the results of the two approaches are compared and discussed.

  10. Mixed mode stress intensity factors for semielliptical surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, F. W.; Sorensen, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The three-dimensional equations of elasticity are solved for a flat elliptical crack which has nonuniform shear stresses applied to its surfaces. An alternating method is used to determine the mode two and mode three stress intensity factors for a semielliptical surface crack in the surface of a finite thickness solid. These stress intensity factors are presented as a function of position along the crack border for a number of crack shapes and crack depths. This same technique is followed to determine the mode one stress intensity factors for the semielliptical surface crack which has normal loading applied to its surface. Mode one stress intensity factors are presented and compared with the results obtained from previous work.

  11. Numerical Analysis of Crack Tip Plasticity and History Effects under Mixed Mode Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Crespo, Pablo; Pommier, Sylvie

    The plastic behaviour in the crack tip region has a strong influence on the fatigue life of engineering components. In general, residual stresses developed as a consequence of the plasticity being constrained around the crack tip have a significant role on both the direction of crack propagation and the propagation rate. Finite element methods (FEM) are commonly employed in order to model plasticity. However, if millions of cycles need to be modelled to predict the fatigue behaviour of a component, the method becomes computationally too expensive. By employing a multiscale approach, very precise analyses computed by FEM can be brought to a global scale. The data generated using the FEM enables us to identify a global cyclic elastic-plastic model for the crack tip region. Once this model is identified, it can be employed directly, with no need of additional FEM computations, resulting in fast computations. This is done by partitioning local displacement fields computed by FEM into intensity factors (global data) and spatial fields. A Karhunen-Loeve algorithm developed for image processing was employed for this purpose. In addition, the partitioning is done such as to distinguish into elastic and plastic components. Each of them is further divided into opening mode and shear mode parts. The plastic flow direction was determined with the above approach on a centre cracked panel subjected to a wide range of mixed-mode loading conditions. It was found to agree well with the maximum tangential stress criterion developed by Erdogan and Sih, provided that the loading direction is corrected for residual stresses. In this approach, residual stresses are measured at the global scale through internal intensity factors.

  12. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  13. Mixed-mode I and II fatigue threshold and crack deflection angle in SiCp/2024Al composite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Wang, Z.

    1996-04-15

    In the past decade, extensive studies were made on fatigue crack propagation behavior in particle or whisker reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) with specific emphasis on the pure mode I fatigue crack growth threshold condition. However, the pure mode I case seldom occurred in practice. In many components cracks are not normal to the maximum principal stress direction and the crack may not grow in the plane of initial crack. Therefore, it is important to study the fatigue behavior under mixed-mode condition. A particle reinforced metal-matrix composite and its matrix alloy were selected for this study. Special attention has been paid to the influence of crack faces friction on the mixed-mode thresholds and crack deflection angle {theta}c. The composite used in the present work is a 15% vol. SiC particulate (nominal size 14 {micro}m) reinforced 2024Al which was produced by casting and extruded at an extrusion ratio of 10:1 into 28 mm diameter rod. Also an unreinforced 2024 Al alloy with a processing history identical to that of the composite was used for comparison.

  14. A Mixed-Mode I/II Fracture Criterion and Its Application in Crack Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.; Deng, Xiaomin; Ma, Fashang; Newman, James S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A crack tip opening displacement (CTOD)-based, mixed mode fracture criterion is developed for predicting the onset and direction of crack growth. The criterion postulates that crack growth occurs in either the Mode I or Mode II direction, depending on whether the maximum in either the opening or the shear component of CTOD, measured at a specified distance behind the crack tip, attains a critical value. For crack growth direction prediction, the proposed CTOD criterion is shown to be equivalent to seven commonly used crack growth criteria under linearly elastic and asymptotic conditions. Under elastic-plastic conditions the CTOD criterion's prediction of the dependence of the crack growth direction on the crack-up mode mixity is in excellent agreement with the Arcan test results. Furthermore, the CTOD criterion correctly predicts the existence of a crack growth transition from mode I to mode II as the mode mixity approaches the mode II loading condition. The proposed CTOD criterion has been implemented in finite element crack growth simulation codes Z1P2DL and FRANC2DL to predict the crack growth paths in (a) a modified Arcan test specimen and fixture made of AL 2024-T34 and (b) a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen made of AL 7050. A series of crack growth simulations have been carried out for the crack growth tests in the Arcan and DCB specimens and the results further demonstrate the applicability of the mixed mode CTOD fracture criterion crack growth predictions and residual strength analyses for airframe materials.

  15. A surface crack in shells under mixed-mode loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1988-01-01

    The present consideration of a shallow shell's surface crack under general loading conditions notes that while the mode I state can be separated, modes II and III remain coupled. A line spring model is developed to formulate the part-through crack problem under mixed-mode conditions, and then to consider a shallow shell of arbitrary curvature having a part-through crack located on the outer or the inner surface of the shell; Reissner's transverse shear theory is used to formulate the problem under the assumption that the shell is subjected to all five moment and stress resultants.

  16. A mixed-mode crack analysis of isotropic solids using conservation laws of elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Wang, S. S.; Corten, H. T.

    1980-01-01

    A simple and convenient method of analysis for studying two-dimensional mixed-mode crack problems is presented. The analysis is formulated on the basis of conservation laws of elasticity and of fundamental relationships in fracture mechanics. The problem is reduced to the determination of mixed-mode stress-intensity factor solutions in terms of conservation integrals involving known auxiliary solutions. One of the salient features of the present analysis is that the stress-intensity solutions can be determined directly by using information extracted in the far field. Several examples with solutions available in the literature are solved to examine the accuracy and other characteristics of the current approach. This method is demonstrated to be superior in its numerical simplicity and computational efficiency to other approaches. Solutions of more complicated and practical engineering fracture problems dealing with the crack emanating from a circular hole are presented also to illustrate the capacity of this method

  17. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  18. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The examples are based on finite element models of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen. The examples are independent of the analysis software used and allow the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, quasi-static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Good agreement between the results obtained from the automated propagation analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting input parameters that had previously been determined during analyses of mode I Double Cantilever Beam and mode II End Notched Flexure specimens. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  19. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  20. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  1. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented. The example is based on a finite element model of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen for 50% mode II. The benchmarking is demonstrated for Abaqus/Standard, however, the example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, a quasi-static benchmark example was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement as well as delamination length versus applied load/displacement relationships from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall, the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  2. An equivalent domain integral method in the two-dimensional analysis of mixed mode crack problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1990-01-01

    An equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for calculating J-integrals for two-dimensional cracked elastic bodies is presented. The details of the method and its implementation are presented for isoparametric elements. The EDI method gave accurate values of the J-integrals for two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Numerical studies showed that domains consisting of one layer of elements are sufficient to obtain accurate J-integral values. Two procedures for separating the individual modes from the domain integrals are presented.

  3. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  4. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  5. Domain switching emission from the mixed-mode crack in ferroelectrics by birefringence measurement and phase field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Pan, Suxin; Liu, Qida; Wang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of domain switching near the tip of a mixed-mode crack (e.g., an inclined crack) is observed in ferroelectrics. The birefringence technique is used to measure the optical quantities to demonstrate the domain switching near the crack tip. The results show an intriguing feature that there appears electrical creep and domain switching emission from the crack tip. The actual time-dependence of domain switching emission and its anisotropic velocity is approximately measured. Moreover, the phase field modeling is developed to simulate polarization distribution and domain switching near the crack tip where the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation is used to describe the change of polarization. The phase field results indicate the same features of domain switching emission from the mixed-mode crack. A good agreement between phase field simulation and birefringence measurement is concluded by setting the appropriate kinetic coefficient in the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation.

  6. Crack front échelon instability in mixed mode fracture of a strongly nonlinear elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess the role of elastic nonlinearity in gel fracture, we study the échelon instability in gelatin under mixed mode tensile and antiplane shear loading —i.e. the emergence of segmented crack front structures connected by steps. We evidence the existence of an energy-release-rate-dependent mode mixity threshold. We show that échelons appear via nucleation of localized helical front distortions, and that their emergence is the continuation of the cross-hatching instability of gels and rubbers under pure tensile loading, shifted by the biasing effect of the antiplane shear. This result, at odds with the direct bifurcation predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics, can be assigned to the controlling role of elastic nonlinearity.

  7. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  8. Application of Benchmark Examples to Assess the Single and Mixed-Mode Static Delamination Propagation Capabilities in ANSYS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The application of benchmark examples for the assessment of quasi-static delamination propagation capabilities is demonstrated for ANSYS. The examples are independent of the analysis software used and allow the assessment of the automated delamination propagation in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). The examples selected are based on two-dimensional finite element models of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB), End-Notched Flexure (ENF), Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) and Single Leg Bending (SLB) specimens. First, the quasi-static benchmark examples were recreated for each specimen using the current implementation of VCCT in ANSYS . Second, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading from its initial location using the automated procedure implemented in the finite element software. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for three-dimensional solid models is required.

  9. Numerical Observation of Three-Dimensional Wing Cracking of Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc Rock Specimen Subjected to Mixed Mode Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N. W.; Dai, F.; Wei, M. D.; Xu, Y.; Zhao, T.

    2016-01-01

    The cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) specimen has been suggested by International Society for Rock Mechanics for measuring mode I fracture toughness of rocks. Subsequently, this specimen geometry has been widely extended to conduct mixed mode fracture tests on rocks as well. A straight through crack front during the fracturing process upon the root of the chevron notch is assumed in the testing principle, but has never been thoroughly evaluated before. In this study, for the first time, the progressive rock fracture mechanism of the CCNBD rock specimen under mixed mode loading is numerically simulated. Specimens under representative mixed mode loading angles are modelled; and the assumption of the straight through crack front growth is critically assessed. The results show that not only the notch tip but also the saw-cut chevron notch cracks during the experiments, yielding a prominent twisted front, far from being straight. The crack front never grows up to the root of the notch ligament and the straight through crack front assumption is never satisfied in the realistic rock fracture progress of this chevron notched specimen subjected to mixed mode loads. In contrast, the fracture progress features typical three-dimensional wing cracking towards the loading ends. The numerically observed progressive fracture mechanism reveals that the measuring principle of mixed mode fracture tests employing CCNBD specimens is significantly violated and the measures of both modes I and II fracture toughness are uncertain.

  10. Polycrystal orientation effects on microslip and mixed-mode behavior of microstructural small cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, V.; McDowell, D.L.

    1999-07-01

    There are two sources of mode mixity--on a macro level (combined loading situation), and on the micro level--that affect the propagation of small crystallographic cracks. This work explores mode mixity on the micro level by utilizing a computational model to simulate microstructural influences on driving forces for the formation and growth of small cracks. Two-dimensional computational cyclic crystal plasticity calculations are conducted to study the distribution of cyclic slip and critical plane-type fatigue parameters in a material with nominal stress-strain characteristics of 4340 steel. Cases of applied cyclic tension-compression and cyclic shear are analyzed at strain amplitudes below macroscopic yielding. Emphasis is placed on stress state and amplitude dependence of the distribution of these parameters among grains. The role of anisotropic plasticity is isolated by assuming the elastic behavior of grains to obey homogeneous, isotropic linear elasticity. All grains are of equal dimension and are assigned a random orientation distribution. It is found that the distribution of the Fatemi-Socie critical plane fatigue parameter among grains is Weibull-distributed, and it is argued that it forms an improved linkage to cyclic crack tip displacement for microstructurally small cracks. The authors also present computed crack tip opening and sliding displacements as a function of maximum applied tensile strain (from well below to just above nominal yielding) for small cracks within surface grains surrounded by a nearly random orientation distribution of grains. Multiple realizations of the local microstructure are examined for each crack length for sub-grain size cracks, with results normalized to the ratio of crack length to grain size. Key results include a very strong role of the free surface on crack tip displacement, with opening displacement being much greater than the sliding for suitably small crystallographic cracks in the surface grains. There is also a

  11. Mixed-mode toughness of human cortical bone containing a longitudinal crack in far-field compression.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Diana; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O

    2012-01-01

    Bone is generally loaded under multiaxial conditions in vivo; as it invariably contains microcracks, this leads to complex mixed-mode stress-states involving combinations of tension, compression and shear. In previous work on the mixed-mode loading of human cortical bone (using an asymmetric bend test geometry), we found that the bone toughness was lower when loaded in far-field shear than in tension (opposite to the trend in most brittle materials), although only for the transverse orientation. This is a consequence of the competition between preferred mechanical vs. microstructural crack-path directions, the former dictated by the direction of the maximum mechanical "driving force" (which changes with the mode-mixity), and the latter by the "weakest" microstructural path (which in human bone is along the osteonal interfaces or cement lines). As most microcracks are oriented longitudinally, we investigate here the corresponding mixed-mode toughness of human cortical bone in the longitudinal (proximal-distal) orientation using a "double cleavage drilled compression" test geometry, which provides a physiologically-relevant loading condition for bone in that it characterizes the toughness of a longitudinal crack loaded in far-field compression. In contrast to the transverse toughness, results show that the longitudinal toughness, measured using the strain-energy release rate, is significantly higher in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I). This is consistent, however, with the individual criteria of preferred mechanical vs. microstructural crack paths being commensurate in this orientation. PMID:22115793

  12. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  13. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and “weakest” microstructural resistance. PMID:20409579

  14. Mixed-mode fatigue-crack growth thresholds in Ti-6Al-4V at high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-10-22

    Multiaxial loading conditions exist at fatigue-critical locations within turbine engine components, particularly in association with fretting fatigue in the blade dovetail/disk contact section. For fatigue-crack growth in such situations, the resultant crack-driving force is a combination of the influence of a mode I (tensile opening) stress-intensity range, {Delta}K{sub I}, as well as mode II (in-plane shear) and/or mode III (anti-plane shear) stress-intensity ranges, {Delta}K{sub II} and {Delta}K{sub III}, respectively. For the case of the high-cycle fatigue of turbine-engine alloys, it is critical to quantify such behavior, as the extremely high cyclic loading frequencies ({approximately}1--2 kHz) and correspondingly short times to failure may necessitate a design approached based on the fatigue-crack growth threshold. Moreover, knowledge of such thresholds is required for accurate prediction of fretting fatigue failures. Accordingly, this paper presents the mixed-mode fatigue crack growth thresholds for mode I + II loading (phase angles from 0{degree} to 82{degree}) in a Ti-6Al-4V blade alloy. These results indicate that when fatigue-crack growth in this alloy is characterized in terms of the crack-driving force {Delta}G, which incorporates both the applied tensile and shear loading, the mode 1 fatigue-crack growth threshold is a lower bound (worst case) with respect to mixed-mode (I + II) crack-growth behavior.

  15. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Gears used in current helicopters and turboprops are designed for light weight, high margins of safety, and high reliability. However, unexpected gear failures may occur even with adequate tooth design. To design an extremely safe system, the designer must ask and address the question, "What happens when a failure occurs?" With gear-tooth bending fatigue, tooth or rim fractures may occur. A crack that propagates through a rim will be catastrophic, leading to disengagement of the rotor or propeller, loss of an aircraft, and possible fatalities. This failure mode should be avoided. A crack that propagates through a tooth may or may not be catastrophic, depending on the design and operating conditions. Also, early warning of this failure mode may be possible because of advances in modern diagnostic systems. One concept proposed to address bending fatigue fracture from a safety aspect is a splittooth gear design. The prime objective of this design would be to control crack propagation in a desired direction such that at least half of the tooth would remain operational should a bending failure occur. A study at the NASA Lewis Research Center analytically validated the crack-propagation failsafe characteristics of a split-tooth gear. It used a specially developed three-dimensional crack analysis program that was based on boundary element modeling and principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack shapes as well as the crack-propagation life were predicted on the basis of the calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack-propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack-growth theories. The preceding figures show the effect of the location of initial cracks on crack propagation. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth was simulated in a case study to evaluate crack-propagation paths. Tooth

  16. A comparison of pure mode I and mixed mode I-III cracking of an adhesive containing an open knit cloth carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripling, E. J.; Crosley, P. B.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Static and fatigue tests were carried out on two commercial modified epoxy film adhesives with a wide open knit polyester carrier in order to compare crack resistance in mode I and mixed mode I-III loading. The carrier cloth is found to have a significant influence on the cracking behavior of the adhesives. The open air net carrier used in this study separates from the adhesive in mode I cracking but shreds during mixed-mode crack extension. This decreases the opening mode toughness but increases the mixed-mode toughness as compared with results obtained earlier using a heavier knit carrier. The results suggest that the type of carrier may have a far larger influence on crack resistance than is generally recognized.

  17. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the

  18. Measurements of mixed-mode crack surface displacements and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Altiero, N. J.; Mirmohamadsadegh, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a finite-width tension specimen containing a crack oriented at various angles to the load axis is attacked from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Displacements of an electro-machined slot, 12.5 mm long and oriented at angles of 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 deg, are measured using a laser-based in-plane measuring technique. Various width specimens, ranging from a crack-length/width ratio of 0.167 to 0.794, are tested. A boundary-integral equation method is extended to deal with the presence of a sharp crack. Agreement between the two approaches is generally good except near the tips of the cracks.

  19. Mode I and mixed I/III crack initiation and propagation behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at 25{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture behavior of the production-scale heat (No. 832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated at 25{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens for a mode I crack and modified CT specimens for a mixed-mode I/III crack. The mode III to mode I load ratio was 0.47. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h after final machining. Both mode I and mixed-mode I/III specimens were fatigue cracked prior to J-integral testing. It was noticed that the mixed-mode I/III crack angle decreased from an initial 25 degrees to approximately 23 degrees due to crack plane rotation during fatigue cracking. No crack plane rotation occurred in the mode I specimen. The crack initiation and propagation behavior was evaluated by generating J-R curves. Due to the high ductility of this alloy and the limited specimen thickness (6.35 mm), plane strain requirements were not met so valid critical J-integral values were not obtained. However, it was found that the crack initiation and propagation behavior was significantly different between the mode I and the mixed-mode I/III specimens. In the mode I specimen crack initiation did not occur, only extensive crack tip blunting due to plastic deformation. During J-integral testing the mixed-mode crack rotated to an increased crack angle (in contrast to fatigue precracking) by crack blunting. When the crack initiated, the crack angle was about 30 degrees. After crack initiation the crack plane remained at 30 degrees until the test was completed. Mixed-mode crack initiation was difficult, but propagation was easy. The fracture surface of the mixed-mode specimen was characterized by microvoid coalescence.

  20. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  1. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The correlation between fatigue crack propagation and stress intensity factor is analyzed. When determining fatigue crack propagation rate, a crack increment, delta a, and its corresponding increment in load cycles, delta N, are measured. Fatigue crack propagation must be caused by a shear and/or a normal separation mode. Both of these two processes are discrete if one looks at the atomic level. If the average deformation and fracture properties over the crack increments, delta a, can be considered as homogeneous, if the characteristic discrete lengths of sigma a, if the plastic zone size is small, and if a plate is thick enough to insure a plane strain case, da/dN is proportional to delta K squared. Any deviation of empirical data from this relation must be caused by the fact that one or more of these conditions are not satisfied. The effects of plate thickness and material inhomogeneity are discussed in detail. A shear separation mode of fatigue crack propagation is described and is used to illustrate the effects of material inhomogeneity.

  2. Numerical analysis of blunting of a crack tip in a ductile material under small-scale yielding and mixed mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, M.; Abé, H.; Tanaka, S.

    1986-03-01

    The blunting of the tip of a crack in a ductile material is analysed under the conditions of plane strain, small-scale yielding, and mixed mode loading of Modes I and II. The material is assumed to be an elastic-perfectly plastic solid with Poisson's ratio being 1/2. The stress and strain fields for a sharp crack under mixed mode loading are first determined by means of elastic-plastic finite element analysis. It is shown that only one elastic sector exists around the crack tip, in contrast with the possibility of existence of two elastic sectors as discussed by Gao. The results obtained for a sharp crack are used as the boundary conditions for the subsequent numerical analysis of crack tip blunting under mixed mode loading, based on slip line theory. The characteristic shapes of the blunted crack tip are obtained for a wide range of Mode I and Mode II combinations, and found to resemble the tip of Japanese sword. Also the stress field around the blunted crack tip is determined.

  3. Experimental and simulation predicted crack paths for al-2024-t351 under mixed-mode i/ii fatigue loading using an arcan fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eileen

    Mixed mode I/II fatigue experiments and simulations are performed for an Arcan fixture and a 6.35mm thick Al-2024-T351 specimen. Experiments were performed for Arcan loading angles that gave rise to a range of Mode I/II crack tip conditions from 0 ¡U ¦¤KII/¦¤KI ¡U ¡TH. Measurements include the crack paths, loading cycles and maximum and minimum loads for each loading angle. Simulations were performed using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) with 10-noded tetrahedral elements via CRACK3D. While modeling the entire fixture-specimen geometry, a modified version of VCCT with automatic crack tip re-meshing and a maximum normal stress criterion were used to predict the direction of crack growth. Results indicate excellent agreement between experiments and simulations for the measured crack paths during the first several millimeters of crack extension.

  4. Consideration of Moving Tooth Load in Gear Crack Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2001-01-01

    Robust gear designs consider not only crack initiation, but crack propagation trajectories for a fail-safe design. In actual gear operation, the magnitude as well as the position of the force changes as the gear rotates through the mesh. A study to determine the effect of moving gear tooth load on crack propagation predictions was performed. Two-dimensional analysis of an involute spur gear and three-dimensional analysis of a spiral-bevel pinion gear using the finite element method and boundary element method were studied and compared to experiments. A modified theory for predicting gear crack propagation paths based on the criteria of Erdogan and Sih was investigated. Crack simulation based on calculated stress intensity factors and mixed mode crack angle prediction techniques using a simple static analysis in which the tooth load was located at the highest point of single tooth contact was validated. For three-dimensional analysis, however, the analysis was valid only as long as the crack did not approach the contact region on the tooth.

  5. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  6. Effects of mixed mode I/II loading and grain orientation on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2024-T3 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Boone, M.L.; Dawicke, D.S.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of material grain orientation and mixed mode I/II loading on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2.3-mm-thick, unclad 2024-T3 aluminum is experimentally investigated. Mode I experiments were performed on center-cracked specimens with the crack being oriented at various angles relative to the rolling direction. Defining {theta} to be the angle between the normal to the initial crack plane and the loading direction, Mode I/II experiments were performed using an Arcan test fixture for 0{degree} {le} {theta} {le} 90{degree} [corresponding to 90{degree} {ge} {beta} {ge} 0{degree}, where {beta} = atan (K{sub II}/K{sub I})] with the crack oriented either along the rolling direction (T-L) or perpendicular to the rolling direction (L-T). Results indicate that: 1. The Mode I crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) is a strong function of the orientation of the crack relative to the rolling direction; CTOD for a T-L specimen is 0.84 mm, increasing linearly with orientation angle to 1.05 mm for an L-T case. 2. The Mode I/II CTOD increases rapidly during initial increments of crack growth and then decreases towards a constant value as crack growth continues. 3. For {theta} < 68{degree} ({beta} > 29{degree}), all cracks kinked and the Mode I/II plastic zones are similar to rotated Mode I plastic zones throughout the crack growth process. 4. J{sub II} = 0 reasonably predicts the direction of tension-dominated crack growth, but does not predict the transition to shear crack growth which occurs for {theta} {ge} 75{degree}. 5. K{sub II} {ge} K{sub I} for {theta} {approx} 58{degree} ({beta} = 45{degree}) does not quantitatively predict the transition to shear crack growth for {theta} {ge} 75{degree} ({beta} {le} 22{degree}), but does provide an indication of changing conditions in the crack tip region.

  7. J-integral evaluation for 2D mixed-mode crack problems employing a meshfree stabilized conforming nodal integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoyuki; Suzuki, Hirotaka; Sadamoto, Shota; Sannomaru, Shogo; Yu, Tiantang; Bui, Tinh Quoc

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) in-plane mixed-mode fracture mechanics problems are analyzed employing an efficient meshfree Galerkin method based on stabilized conforming nodal integration (SCNI). In this setting, the reproducing kernel function as meshfree interpolant is taken, while employing the SCNI for numerical integration of stiffness matrix in the Galerkin formulation. The strain components are smoothed and stabilized employing Gauss divergence theorem. The path-independent integral ( J-integral) is solved based on the nodal integration by summing the smoothed physical quantities and the segments of the contour integrals. In addition, mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIFs) are extracted from the J-integral by decomposing the displacement and stress fields into symmetric and antisymmetric parts. The advantages and features of the present formulation and discretization in evaluation of the J-integral of in-plane 2D fracture problems are demonstrated through several representative numerical examples. The mixed-mode SIFs are evaluated and compared with reference solutions. The obtained results reveal high accuracy and good performance of the proposed meshfree method in the analysis of 2D fracture problems.

  8. Mixed-Mode Fracture and Fatigue Analysis of Cracked 3D Complex Structures using a 3D SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavanam, Sharada

    The aim of this thesis is to numerically evaluate the mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs) of complex 3D structural geometries with arbitrary 3D cracks using the Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method-Finite Element Method (SGBEM-FEM) Alternating Method. Various structural geometries with different loading scenarios and crack configurations were examined in this thesis to understand the behavior and trends of the mixed-mode SIFs as well as the fatigue life for these complex structural geometries. Although some 3D structures have empirical and numerical solutions that are readily available in the open literature, some do not; therefore this thesis presents the results of fracture and fatigue analyses of these 3D complex structures using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method to serve as reference for future studies. Furthermore, there are advantages of using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method compared to traditional FEM methods. For example, the fatigue-crack-growth and fatigue life can be better estimated for a structure because different fatigue models (i.e. Walker, Paris, and NASGRO) can be used within the same framework of the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method. The FEM (un-cracked structure)/BEM(crack model) meshes are modeled independently, which speeds up the computation process and reduces the cost of human labor. A simple coarse mesh can be used for all fracture and fatigue analyses of complex structures. In this thesis, simple coarse meshes were used for 3D complex structures, which were below 5000 elements as compared to traditional FEM, which require meshes where the elements range on the order of ˜250,000 to ˜106 and sometimes even more than that.

  9. TECHNICAL NOTE: Active control for stress intensity of crack-tips under mixed mode by shape memory TiNi fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, A.; Zhao, H.; Azakami, T.

    2007-06-01

    The paper presented the effectiveness of a shape memory alloy hybrid composite. It was designed to actively suppress stress intensity in the vicinity of a crack-tip. A shape memory alloy (SMA) TiNi fiber reinforced epoxy composite was fabricated based on the proposed design concept and its material and mechanical properties were investigated by photoelastic examinations. The stress intensity factors, KI and KII, at a crack-tip decreased temperatures greater than Af under mixed mode. The phenomenon was caused by the recovery force of the TiNi fiber. The relationship of the stress intensity factors with the prestrain in the SMA fiber as well as with the ambient temperature in an isothermal furnace was clarified. On this basis, the active control for stress intensity by a shape memory composite was discussed.

  10. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.

    1990-06-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  11. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  12. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  13. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well. PMID:24998298

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  15. Fracture mechanics of propagating 3-D fatigue cracks with parametric dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2013-07-01

    Propagation of 3-D fatigue cracks is analyzed using a discrete dislocation representation of the crack opening displacement. Three dimensional cracks are represented with Volterra dislocation loops in equilibrium with the applied external load. The stress intensity factor (SIF) is calculated using the Peach-Koehler (PK) force acting on the crack tip dislocation loop. Loading mode decomposition of the SIF is achieved by selection of Burgers vector components to correspond to each fracture mode in the PK force calculations. The interaction between 3-D cracks and free surfaces is taken into account through application of the superposition principle. A boundary integral solution of an elasticity problem in a finite domain is superposed onto the elastic field solution of the discrete dislocation method in an infinite medium. The numerical accuracy of the SIF is ascertained by comparison with known analytical solution of a 3-D crack problem in pure mode I, and for mixed-mode loading. Finally, fatigue crack growth simulations are performed with the Paris law, showing that 3-D cracks do not propagate in a self-similar shape, but they re-configure as a result of their interaction with external boundaries. A specific numerical example of fatigue crack growth is presented to demonstrate the utility of the developed method for studies of 3-D crack growth during fatigue.

  16. Evaluation of Mixed-mode Integral Invariant for Polymer Material Trough The Couple Experimental-Numerical Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meite, M.; Pop, O.; Dubois, F.; Absi, J.

    2010-06-01

    Usually the element of real structures is subject of the mixed mode loadings. This fact can be explained by the elements geometry and the loading orientations. In this case the propagation of the eventual cracks is characterised by the mixed mode kinematics. In order to characterize the fracture process in mixed mode it’s necessary to separate the fracture process in order to evaluate the influence of each mode. Our study is limited to plane configurations. The mixed mode is considered as an association of opening and shear modes. The mixed mode fracture is evaluated trough the experimental tests using the SEN specimen for different mixed mode ratios. The fracture process separation is operated by the invariant integral Mθ. Moreover, our study regroups an experimental and a numerical approaches.

  17. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  18. Burrowing mechanics: burrow extension by crack propagation.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kelly M; Jumars, Peter A; Johnson, Bruce; Boudreau, B P; Landis, Eric

    2005-02-01

    Until now, the analysis of burrowing mechanics has neglected the mechanical properties of impeding, muddy, cohesive sediments, which behave like elastic solids. Here we show that burrowers can progress through such sediments by using a mechanically efficient, previously unsuspected mechanism--crack propagation--in which an alternating 'anchor' system of burrowing serves as a wedge to extend the crack-shaped burrow. The force required to propagate cracks through sediment in this way is relatively small: we find that the force exerted by the annelid worm Nereis virens in making and moving into such a burrow amounts to less than one-tenth of the force it needs to use against rigid aquarium walls. PMID:15690029

  19. Crack propagation and arrest in pressurized containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.; Owczarek, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of crack propagation and arrest in a finite volume cylindrical container filled with pressurized gas is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder contains a symmetrically located longitudinal part-through crack with a relatively small net ligament. The net ligament suddenly ruptures initiating the process of fracture propagation and depressurization in the cylinder. Thus the problem is a coupled gas dynamics and solid mechanics problem the exact formulation of which does not seem to be possible. The problem is reduced to a proper initial value problem by introducing a dynamic fracture criterion which relates the crack acceleration to the difference between a load factor and the corresponding strength parameter. The results indicate that generally in gas filled cylinders fracture arrest is not possible unless the material behaves in a ductile manner and the container is relatively long.

  20. Crack propagation modeling using Peridynamic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafezi, M. H.; Alebrahim, R.; Kundu, T.

    2016-04-01

    Crack propagation and branching are modeled using nonlocal peridynamic theory. One major advantage of this nonlocal theory based analysis tool is the unifying approach towards material behavior modeling - irrespective of whether the crack is formed in the material or not. No separate damage law is needed for crack initiation and propagation. This theory overcomes the weaknesses of existing continuum mechanics based numerical tools (e.g. FEM, XFEM etc.) for identifying fracture modes and does not require any simplifying assumptions. Cracks grow autonomously and not necessarily along a prescribed path. However, in some special situations such as in case of ductile fracture, the damage evolution and failure depend on parameters characterizing the local stress state instead of peridynamic damage modeling technique developed for brittle fracture. For brittle fracture modeling the bond is simply broken when the failure criterion is satisfied. This simulation helps us to design more reliable modeling tool for crack propagation and branching in both brittle and ductile materials. Peridynamic analysis has been found to be very demanding computationally, particularly for real-world structures (e.g. vehicles, aircrafts, etc.). It also requires a very expensive visualization process. The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to researchers the impact of this cutting-edge simulation tool for a better understanding of the cracked material response. A computer code has been developed to implement the peridynamic theory based modeling tool for two-dimensional analysis. A good agreement between our predictions and previously published results is observed. Some interesting new results that have not been reported earlier by others are also obtained and presented in this paper. The final objective of this investigation is to increase the mechanics knowledge of self-similar and self-affine cracks.

  1. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data. PMID:23897295

  2. Mixed Mode Fracture of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis L.

    2008-01-01

    The combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of anisotropic ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the microsplat coating material was modeled using Finite Element approach to account for anisotropy and micro cracked structures, and predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  3. Ductile fracture in HY100 steel under mixed mode I/mode II loading

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, D. . Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy); Knott, J.F. . School of Metallurgy and Materials)

    1994-05-01

    A number of criteria have been proposed which predict the direction of cracking under mixed Mode 1/Mode 2 loading. All have been evaluated for brittle materials, in which a crack subjected to tension and shear propagates normal to the maximum tensile stress (i.e. fracture is of the Mode 1 type). In a ductile material, however, a notch subjected to mixed Mode 1/Mode 2 loading may initiate a crack in the direction of maximum shear. This paper shows that the profile of the notch tip changes with increasing mixed mode load in such a way that one side of the tip blunts while the other sharpens. Various specimens, subjected to the same mixed mode ratio, were unloaded from different points on the load-displacement curves to study the change in notch-tip profile. Studies under the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) have shown that cracks initiate at the sharpened end, along a microscopic shear band. Using a dislocation pile-up model for decohesion of the carbide-matrix interface, a micromechanical model has been proposed for crack initiation in the shear band. It is shown that a theoretical prediction of the shear strain required for decohesion gives a result that is, of magnitude, similar to that of the shear strain at crack initiation measured in the experiments.

  4. Crack propagation and arrest in pressurized containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.; Owczarek, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of crack propagation and arrest in a finite volume cylindrical container filled with pressurized gas is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder contains a symmetrically located longitudinal part-through crack with a relatively small net ligament. The net ligament suddenly ruptures initiating the process of fracture propagation and depressurization in the cylinder. The problem is formulated by making two major assumptions, namely, that the shell problem is quasi-static and the gas dynamics problem is one-dimensional. The problem is reduced to a proper initial value problem by introducing a dynamic fracture criterion which relates the crack acceleration to the difference between a load factor and the corresponding strength parameter. The main results are demonstrated by considering two examples, an aluminum cylinder which may behave in a quasi-brittle manner, and a steel cylinder which undergoes ductile fracture. The results indicate that generally in gas-filled cylinders fracture arrest is not possible unless the material behaves in a ductile manner and the container is relatively long.

  5. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  6. Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Grady, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic delamination crack propagation behavior during ballistic tests of (90/0)5s T-300/934 graphite/epoxy laminates with embedded interfacial cracks was investigated using high speed photography. The impact on the beam-like specimen was produced with a silicon rubber ball, and the crack propagation speeds and the threshold impact velocities required to initiate dynamic crack propagation were determined for several crack positions. The results suggest that the mode of crack propagation depends on the specimen geometry as well as the loading condition. A simplified finite element analysis of the experimental data obtained from one of the midplane-cracked specimens was used to estimate the critical strain energy release rate, which may determine the onset of unstable crack propagation.

  7. Irregular lattice model for quasistatic crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolander, J. E.; Sukumar, N.

    2005-03-01

    An irregular lattice model is proposed for simulating quasistatic fracture in softening materials. Lattice elements are defined on the edges of a Delaunay tessellation of the medium. The dual (Voronoi) tessellation is used to scale the elemental stiffness terms in a manner that renders the lattice elastically homogeneous. This property enables the accurate modeling of heterogeneity, as demonstrated through the elastic stress analyses of fiber composites. A cohesive description of fracture is used to model crack initiation and propagation. Numerical simulations, which demonstrate energy-conserving and grid-insensitive descriptions of cracking, are presented. The model provides a framework for the failure analysis of quasibrittle materials and fiber-reinforced brittle-matrix composites.

  8. Dynamic crack propagation through nanoporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thao; Wilkerson, Justin

    2015-06-01

    The deformation and failure of nanoporous metals may be considerably different than that of more traditional bulk porous metals. The length scales in traditional bulk porous metals are typically large enough for classic plasticity and buckling to be operative. However, the extremely small length scales associated with nanoporous metals may inhibit classic plasticity mechanisms. Here, we motivate an alternative nanovoid growth mechanism mediated by dislocation emission. Following an approach similar to Lubarda and co-workers, we make use of stability arguments applied to the analytic solutions of the elastic interactions of dislocations and voids to derive a simple stress-based criterion for emission activation. We then propose a dynamic nanovoid growth law that is motivated by the kinetics of dislocation emission. The resulting failure model is implemented into a commercial finite element software to simulate dynamic crack growth. The simulations reveal that crack propagation through a nanoporous media proceeds at somewhat faster velocities than through the more traditional bulk porous metal.

  9. Directional crack propagation of granular water systems.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nishimoto, Akihiro; Kitsunezaki, So; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Ichio

    2005-05-01

    Pattern dynamics of directional crack propagation phenomena observed in drying process of starch-water mixture is investigated. To visualize the three-dimensional structure of the drying-fracture process two kinds of experiments are performed, i.e., resin solidification planing method and real-time measurement of water content distribution with MR instruments. A cross section with polygonal structure is visualized in both experiments. The depth dependency of cell size is measured. The phenomenological model for water transportation is also discussed. PMID:16089617

  10. Investigation of Crack Propagation in Rock using Discrete Sphero-Polyhedral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behraftar, S.; Galindo-torres, S. A.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    In this study a micro-mechanical model is developed to study the fracture propagation process in rocks. The model is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Sphero-Polyhedral Element Model (DSEM), which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to be a suitable technique to model rock [1]. It allows the modelling of particles of general shape, with no internal porosity. The motivation behind using this technique is the desire to microscopically investigate the fracture propagation process and study the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic behaviour of rock. The DSEM method is used to model the Crack Chevron Notch Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) test suggested by the International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) for determining the fracture toughness of rock specimens. CCNBD samples with different crack inclination angles, are modelled to investigate their fracture mode. The Crack Mouth Opening Displacement (CMOD) is simulated and the results are validated using experimental results obtained from a previous study [2]. Fig. 1 shows the simulated and experimental results of crack propagation for different inclination angles of CCNBD specimens. The DSEM method can be used to predict crack trajectory and quantify crack propagation during loading. References: 1. Galindo-Torres, S. A., et al. "Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes." Computer Physics Communications 183.2 (2012): 266-277. 2. Erarslan, N., and D. J. Williams. "Mixed-mode fracturing of rocks under static and cyclic loading." Rock mechanics and rock engineering 46.5 (2013): 1035-1052.

  11. Temperature evolution and heat dissipation during crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, Olivier; Santucci, Stéphane; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Vincent-Dospital, Tom; Toussaint, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    During a crack propagation, energy is dissipated in mainly three ways: creation of new fracture surface (possibly at microscopic scale in a process zone), emission of elastic waves that get dissipated in the far field, and local Joule heating during friction in a process zone. There is in addition some reversible elastic energy change associated to the crack advance.Since the temperature variations can have an important impact on the physics of the crack propagation, establishing properly this balance in different crack propagation scenarios is of great importance. Notably, the physics of fracture propagation has been shown to be strongly affected by thermally activated rupture, even when the heterogeneity of material properties determines strongly the microscopic fracture geometry and the intermittency in the fracture propagation. A natural question, in such kinetic crack propagation, is the temperature field during the cracks propagation. This question is also central in earth science, where a lot of attention has been set recently on thermal effects, with the possibility of thermo-pressurization of faults due to thermal expansion of fluids present in faults. Independently of thermo pressurization, the rise of temperature locally, at the zone enduring damage, could significantly affect the creep in this zone, as understood by statistical physics and Arrhenius law, and thus the crack propagation. We are interested in quantifying directly these different effects in an experimental situation. We present results based on infrared and optical imaging of the propagation of a crack in a sheet of paper. The temperature field shows local increases of the temperature of several degrees during the crack propagation. Optical images acquired with a fast video camera are correlated in order to extract the deformation field at each time step. We show how the temperature in our paper sample varies with the deformation rate at the tip of the crack. We also present some numerical

  12. Anomalous crack propagation in reinforced natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotta, Paul; Gabrielle, Brice; Long, Didier; Vanel, Loic; Albouy, Pierre-Antoine; Peditto, Francesca

    2009-03-01

    In reinforced natural rubber, crack propagation in mode I exhibits rotation of the tear in a direction perpendicular to the usual one. Our objective is, first, to understand the impact of this phenomenon on fracture toughness of the material, and, secondly, to understand how this phenomenon is related to the specific properties of reinforced natural rubber. To this aim, we combine measurements of ultimate properties, measurements of the number and length of tear rotations as a function of loading velocity and temperature, and investigation of material heterogeneities at sub-micrometric scales, originating both from fillers and strain-induced crystallites (strain-induced crystallinity is measured up to failure by X ray diffraction), in natural rubber samples reinforced by nanometric aggregates. Observations suggest that tear rotation is related both to the mechanical anisotropy induced by strain-induced crystallinity and to the dissipative properties of the material at high strain.

  13. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  14. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in Zr-1% Nb claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibilashvily, Yu. K.; Dolgov, Yu. N.; Nesterov, B. I.; Novikov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental results on iodine induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are analyzed. The studies were performed at 350°C using Zr-1% Nb tubular specimens. Fatigue crack at internal surface served as an initial defect. The relationship was derived between crack propagation rate and stress intensity factor; the threshold stress intensity factor of 4.8 MPa m{1}/{2} was determined.

  15. Laser-Based Instrument Measures Propagation Of Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Rupert U.; Cox, Robert B.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Sentz, John T.; Rose, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes use of commerical laser displacement meter to measure propagation of cracks in stainless-steel specimens in stress tests in corrosive (salt-spray) environment. Measurements directed toward determining time from beginning of each test until onset of propagation of crack.

  16. Morphogenesis and propagation of complex cracks induced by thermal shocks.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Blaise; Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurini, Corrado; Sicsic, Paul

    2014-01-10

    We study the genesis and the selective propagation of complex crack networks induced by thermal shock or drying of brittle materials. We use a quasistatic gradient damage model to perform large-scale numerical simulations showing that the propagation of fully developed cracks follows Griffith criterion and depends only on the fracture toughness, while crack morphogenesis is driven by the material's internal length. Our numerical simulations feature networks of parallel cracks and selective arrest in two dimensions and hexagonal columnar joints in three dimensions, without any hypotheses on cracks geometry, and are in good agreement with available experimental results. PMID:24483901

  17. Multiple Cracks Propagate Simultaneously in Polymer Liquids in Tension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian; Alvarez, Nicolas J; Shabbir, Aamir; Hassager, Ole

    2016-08-19

    Understanding the mechanism of fracture is essential for material and process design. While the initiation of fracture in brittle solids is generally associated with the preexistence of material imperfections, the mechanism for initiation of fracture in viscoelastic fluids, e.g., polymer melts and solutions, remains an open question. We use high speed imaging to visualize crack propagation in entangled polymer liquid filaments under tension. The images reveal the simultaneous propagation of multiple cracks. The critical stress and strain for the onset of crack propagation are found to be highly reproducible functions of the stretch rate, while the position of initiation is completely random. The reproducibility of conditions for fracture points to a mechanism for crack initiation that depends on the dynamic state of the material alone, while the crack profiles reveal the mechanism of energy dissipation during crack propagation. PMID:27588883

  18. The equilibrium concentration of hydrogen atoms ahead of a mixed mode I-mode III crack tip in single crystal iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.Y.; Hack, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium hydrogen concentration profiles about a mixed ode I-mode III crack in single crystal iron were performed. Both material anisotropy and the tetragonal nature of the distortion induced in the iron crystal structure by interstitial hydrogen were incorporated. Results show that, unlike the case of a spherical distortion, a strong coupling exists between the strain field of the interstitial hydrogen and the stress field of the crack for orientations of the crack plane that are not coincident with the cube axes of the lattice. As a result, the predicated enhancement of hydrogen in the crack tip region increases with increasing levels of mode III loading for those orientations. The results may help reconcile conflicting observations concerning the potential role of shear stresses in hydrogen embrittlement and preferential cracking of grains ahead of loaded crack tips in sustained load cracking experiments.

  19. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, ..delta..t greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, ..delta..x, decreased linearly with ..delta..t. With ..delta..t less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, ..delta..x = ..delta..x* which approached a limiting value of 1 ..mu..m. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  20. Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a (90/0) 5s Graphite/Epoxy laminate with an embedded interfacial crack was investigated experimentally using high speed photography. The dynamic motion was produced by impacting the beamlike laminate specimen with a silicon rubber ball. The threshold impact velocities required to initiate dynamic crack propagation in laminates with varying initial crack positions were determined. The crack propagation speeds were estimated from the photographs. Results show that the through the thickness position of the embedded crack can significantly affect the dominant mechanism and the threshold impact velocity for the onset of crack movement. If the initial delamination is placed near the top of bottom surface of the laminate, local buckling of the delaminated plies may cause instability of the crack. If the initial delamination lies on the midplane, local buckling does not occur and the initiation of crack propagation appears to be dominated by Mode II fracture. The crack propagation and arrest observed was seen to be affected by wave motion within the delamination region.

  1. A thermodynamic analysis of propagating subcritical cracks with cohesive zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the so-called energetic approach to fracture with particular attention to the issue of energy dissipation due to crack propagation are applied to the case of a crack with cohesive zone. The thermodynamic admissibility of subcritical crack growth (SCG) is discussed together with some hypotheses that lead to the derivation of SCG laws. A two-phase cohesive zone model for discontinuous crack growth is presented and its thermodynamics analyzed, followed by an example of its possible application.

  2. Further progress on the wavy-crack model of dynamic crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Pawlikowski, K.

    1995-12-31

    The state-of-the-art theory of dynamic crack propagation has not been able to provide an unequivocal explanation for a number of experimental findings. An important observation is that the crack surfaces, as the trace of fracture path, tend to exhibit a rough surface morphology during rapid crack propagation. In a wavy-crack model proposed recently by the author, the crack surface roughening is attributed to an inherent instability which causes the tip of the crack to propagate along an oscillatory fracture path. It appears that the wavy-crack model is capable of explaining important discrepancies currently existing between theory and experiments. In particular, experimentally observed terminal fracture speeds are significantly lower than the theoretically predicted value, i.e. the Rayleigh wave speed CR. This may be attributed to the oscillatory fracture path which makes the measured crack velocity appear lower than the actual crack speed. Also, the wavy-crack model explains how the local crack tip motion can exhibit high inertia behaviors while the measurable crack motion remains in the low inertia domain. As a result of different inertia effects associated with local and apparent crack motion, the high inertia field near the crack tip tends to induce nucleation of microcrack branches while the low inertia apparent crack field tends to suppress the microbranching. This view of dynamic fracture is not inconsistent with relevant experimental observations (e.g. see and references therein) and recent numerical simulation of fast crack motion. A planar wavy motion of a 3D crack front has been analyzed by Pice et al.. The wavy-crack model has also been applied to dynamic crack propagation along a weak interface having lower fracture resistance than the adjacent material. Further analytical and numerical developments of this model will be discussed in this presentation.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. T. V.; Ritchie, R. O.; Piascik, R. S.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The principal mechanisms which govern the fatigue crack propagation resistance of aluminum-lithium alloys are investigated, with emphasis on their behavior in controlled gaseous and aqueous environments. Extensive data describe the growth kinetics of fatigue cracks in ingot metallurgy Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 and in powder metallurgy alloys exposed to moist air. Results are compared with data for traditional aluminum alloys 2024, 2124, 2618, 7075, and 7150. Crack growth is found to be dominated by shielding from tortuous crack paths and resultant asperity wedging. Beneficial shielding is minimized for small cracks, for high stress ratios, and for certain loading spectra. While water vapor and aqueous chloride environments enhance crack propagation, Al-Li-Cu alloys behave similarly to 2000-series aluminum alloys. Cracking in water vapor is controlled by hydrogen embrittlement, with surface films having little influence on cyclic plasticity.

  4. The three thresholds for fatigue crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    The three governing threshold conditions in metal fatigue are considered, one relating to crack growth in single crystals, one concerned with crack growth in polycrystalline materials, and one based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). All three conditions are examined in relation to the two physical processes of cracking, i.e., Stage I (shear) and Stage II (tensile) crack growth. The LEFM threshold is seen as a lower bound condition for fatigue crack growth rate, and the single crystal threshold is viewed in relation to the fundamental threshold pertaining to the fatigue resistance of polycrystalline metals.

  5. Fatigue crack propagation behavior in dual-phase steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.; Priestner, R.

    1999-04-01

    The fatigue crack propagation in dual-phase steel was studied with the objective of developing ferritic-martensitic microstructures via intercritical annealing and thermomechanical processing. It was found that the changes in fatigue crack propagation rates and in the threshold stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub th}, resulting from microstructural variations, were directly related to tensile strength in the same manner that was observed in other types of structural steels. it was also observed that the relationship between tensile strength and fatigue crack propagation in intercritically annealed and thermomechanically processed dual-phase steel was much the same as for conventional steels of similar strength level.

  6. On Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Crack Propagation Under Sustained Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian p.; Schembri, Philip E.; Sofronis, Petros; Foulk, James W.; Nibur, Kevin A.; Balch, Dorian K.

    2014-08-01

    The failure of hydrogen containment components is generally associated with subcritical cracking. Understanding subcritical crack growth behavior and its dependence on material and environmental variables can lead to methods for designing structural components in a hydrogen environment and will be beneficial in developing materials resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. In order to identify the issues underlying crack propagation and arrest, we present a model for hydrogen-induced stress-controlled crack propagation under sustained loading. The model is based on the assumptions that (I) hydrogen reduces the material fracture strength and (II) crack propagation takes place when the opening stress over the characteristic distance ahead of a crack tip is greater than the local fracture strength. The model is used in a finite-element simulation of crack propagation coupled with simultaneous hydrogen diffusion in a model material through nodal release. The numerical simulations show that the same physics, i.e., diffusion-controlled crack propagation, can explain the existence of both stages I and II in the velocity versus stress intensity factor ( V- K) curve.

  7. Effect of Speed (Centrifugal Load) on Gear Crack Propagation Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of rotational speed (centrifugal force) on gear crack propagation direction was explored. Gears were analyzed using finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The analysis was validated with crack propagation experiments performed in a spur gear fatigue rig. The effects of speed, rim thickness, and initial crack location on gear crack propagation direction were investigated. Crack paths from the finite element method correlated well with those deduced from gear experiments. For the test gear with a backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) of nib = 0.5, cracks initiating in the tooth fillet propagated to rim fractures when run at a speed of 10,000 rpm and became tooth fractures for speeds slower than 10,000 rpm for both the experiments and anal sis. From additional analysis, speed had little effect on crack propagation direction except when initial crack locations were near the tooth/rim fracture transition point for a given backup ratio. When at that point, higher speeds tended to promote rim fracture while lower speeds (or neglecting centrifugal force) produced tooth fractures.

  8. Crack propagation, arrest and statistics in heterogeneous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kierfeld, J.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Dortmund Univ. of Technology

    2008-04-01

    We investigate theoretically statistics and thermally activated dynamics of crack nucleation and propagation in a two-dimensional heterogeneous material containing quenched randomly distributed defects. We consider a crack tip dynamics accounting for dissipation, thermal noise and the random forces arising from the elastic interactions of the crack opening with the defects. The equation of motion is based on the generalized Griffith criterion and the dynamic energy release rate and gives rise to Langevin-type stochastic dynamics in a quenched disordered potential. For different types of quenched random forces, which are characterized (a) by the range of elastic interactions with the crack tip and (b) the range of correlations between defects, we derive a number of static and dynamic quantities characterizing crack propagation in heterogeneous materials both at zero temperature and in the presence of thermal activation. In the absence of thermal fluctuations we obtain the nucleation and propagation probabilities, typical arrest lengths, the distribution of crack lengths and of critical forces. For thermally activated crack propagation we calculate the mean time to fracture. Depending on the range of elastic interactions between crack tip and frozen defects, heterogeneous material exhibits brittle or ductile fracture. We find that aggregations of defects generating long-range interaction forces (e.g. clouds of dislocations) lead to anomalously slow creep of the crack tip or even to its complete arrest. We demonstrate that heterogeneous materials with frozen defects contain a large number of arrested microcracks and that their fracture toughness is enhanced to the experimentally accessible timescales.

  9. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  10. Experimental study of thermodynamics propagation fatigue crack in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vshivkov, A. Iziumova, A. Plekhov, O.

    2015-10-27

    This work is devoted to the development of an experimental method for studying the energy balance during cyclic deformation and fracture. The studies were conducted on 304 stainless steel AISE samples. The investigation of the fatigue crack propagation was carried out on flat samples with stress concentrators. The stress concentrator was three central holes. The heat flux sensor was developed based on the Seebeck effect. This sensor was used for measuring the heat dissipation power in the examined samples during the fatigue tests. The measurements showed that the rate of fatigue crack growth depends on the heat flux at the crack tip and there are two propagation mode of fatigue crack with different link between the propagation mode and heat flux from crack tip.

  11. Scaling of crack propagation in rubber sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Zhang, H. P.; Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Marder, M.

    2011-11-01

    We have conducted experiments and numerical simulations to investigate supersonic cracks. The experiments are performed at 85 °C to suppress strain-induced crystallites that complicate experiments at lower temperature. Calibration experiments were performed to obtain the parameters needed to compare with a theory including viscous dissipation. We find that both experiments and numerical simulations support supersonic cracks, and we discover a transition from subsonic to supersonic as we plot experimental crack speed curves vs. extension ratio for different sized samples. Both experiments and simulations show two different scaling regimes: the speed of subsonic cracks scales with the elastic energy density while the speed of supersonic cracks scales with the extension ratio. Crack openings have qualitatively different shapes in the two scaling regimes.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation at polymer adhesive interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Delamination of polymer adhesive interfaces often occurs due to slow crack growth under either monotonic or cyclic loading. The author`s previous research showed that moisture-assisted crack growth at epoxy/glass and epoxy acrylate/glass interfaces under monotonic loading was directly related to the applied energy release rate and relative humidity and that cyclic loading could enhance crack growth. The purpose of the present research is to compare crack growth along epoxy acrylate/glass and epoxy/PMMA interfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading.

  13. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  14. Fatigue crack propagation in carburized X-2M steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbach, B. L.; Lou, Bingzhe; Pearson, P. K.; Fairchild, R. E.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1985-07-01

    The growth rates of fatigue cracks propagating through the case and into the core have been studied for carburized X-2M steel (0.14 C, 4.91 Cr, 1.31 Mo, 1.34 W, 0.42 V). Fatigue cracks were propagated at constant stress intensities, ΔK, and also at a constant cyclic peak load, and the crack growth rates were observed to pass through a minimum value as the crack traversed the carburized case. The reduction in the crack propagation rates is ascribed to the compressive stresses which were developed in the case, and a pinched clothespin model is used to make an approximate calculation of the effects of internal stress on the crack propagation rates. We define an effective stress intensity, Ke = Ka + Ki, where Ka is the applied stress intensity, Ki = σid{i/1/2}, σi is the internal stress, and di is a characteristic distance associated with the depth of the internal stress field. In our work, a value of di = 11 mm (0.43 inch) fits the data quite well. A good combination of resistance to fatigue crack propagation in the case and fracture toughness in the core can be achieved in carburized X-2M steel, suggesting that this material will be useful in heavy duty gears and in aircraft gas turbine mainshaft bearings operating under high hoop stresses.

  15. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  16. Effect of fluid salinity on subcritical crack propagation in calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostom, Fatma; Røyne, Anja; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, François

    2013-01-01

    The slow propagation of cracks, also called subcritical crack growth, is a mechanism of fracturing responsible for a ductile deformation of rocks under crustal conditions. In the present study, the double-torsion technique was used to measure the effect of fluid chemistry on the slow propagation of cracks in calcite single crystals at room temperature. Time-lapse images and measurements of force and load-point displacement allowed accurate characterization of crack velocities in a range of 10- 8 to 10- 4 m/s. Velocity curves as a function of energy-release rates were obtained for different fluid compositions, varying NH4Cl and NaCl concentrations. Our results show the presence of a threshold in fluid composition, separating two regimes: weakening conditions where the crack propagation is favored, and strengthening conditions where crack propagation slows down. We suggest that electrostatic surface forces that modify the repulsion forces between the two surfaces of the crack may be responsible for this behavior.

  17. Metal crack propagation monitoring by photoluminescence enhancement of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziming; Luan, Weiling; Yin, Shaofeng; Brandner, Juergen J

    2015-07-20

    A visualization method for monitoring minor metal crack propagation is presented in this paper. Through CdS@ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) enhanced emission of photoluminescence (PL), this crack detection method provides a visualization signal in real time and through a noncontact fashion. The crack of the CdS@ZnS core-shell QDs-epoxy resin kept a synchronous propagation with the metal crack. Detection of the tip growth in the film layers demonstrated that the actual crack propagation on the metal surface could be deduced from the tips in the film layers. The fluorescence peak tended to increase along the crack from the initial opening to the tip. Crack width as small as 10 μm can be detected with a precision of 0.1 μm and the minimum crack tip width of the QDs-epoxy resin was measured as 0.72 μm. PMID:26367834

  18. Fatigue crack propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Piascik, R. S.; Dicus, D. L.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews fracture mechanics based, damage tolerant characterizations and predictions of fatigue crack growth in aerospace aluminum alloys. The results of laboratory experimentation and modeling are summarized in the areas of: (1) fatigue crack closure, (2) the wide range crack growth rate response of conventional aluminum alloys, (3) the fatigue behavior of advanced monolithic aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites, (4) the short crack problem, (5) environmental fatigue, and (6) variable amplitude loading. Remaining uncertainties and necessary research are identified. This work provides a foundation for the development of fatigue resistant alloys and composites, next generation life prediction codes for new structural designs and extreme environments, and to counter the problem of aging components.

  19. Rock Failure and Crack Propagation Beneath Disc Cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entacher, Martin; Schuller, E.; Galler, R.

    2015-07-01

    Analyses of rock failure mechanisms beneath disc cutters are presented. Full-scale cutting tests are conducted to assess the global energy input in comparison with rock chips and excavated volume. Small-scale cutting tests are subsequently used for macro- and microscopic analyses of rupture modes and crack propagation. A high spatial resolution allows to obtain pictures of crack networks in different rock types. It is shown that all specimens develop lateral cracks in sufficiently confined areas whereas median cracks typically develop in boundary regions. Regarding cutting forces, a hypothesis is proposed that associates sudden force drops accompanied by sudden sound emission with grain crushing in the proximity of the cutter tip.

  20. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  1. Experimental study on mixed mode fracture in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kezhuang; Li, Zheng; Fu, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Fiber reinforced composites are applied broadly in aeronautic and astronautic fields as a structural material. But the investigation in dynamic fracture behavior of fiber reinforced composite stands in the breach for scientists due to a large number of aircraft disasters. In this paper, the mixed mode fracture problems in fiber reinforced composites under impact are studied. First, based on the theory of the reflective dynamic caustic method for mixed mode fracture, corresponding experiments are carried out to study the dynamic fracture behaviors of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites under two kinds load conditions. By recording and analyzing the shadow spot patterns during the crack propagation process carefully, the dynamic fracture toughness and crack growth velocity of fiber reinforced composites are obtained. Via the observation of the crack growth routes and fracture sections, we further reveal the fracture mechanism of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. It concludes that opening mode still is the easier fracture type for the pre-crack initiation in fiber reinforced composites, while the interface between fibers and matrix becomes the fatal vulnerability during the crack propagation.

  2. Crack propagation in aluminum sheets reinforced with boron-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roderick, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis was developed to predict both the crack growth and debond growth in a reinforced system. The analysis was based on the use of complex variable Green's functions for cracked, isotropic sheets and uncracked, orthotropic sheets to calculate inplane and interlaminar stresses, stress intensities, and strain-energy-release rates. An iterative solution was developed that used the stress intensities and strain-energy-release rates to predict crack and debond growths, respectively, on a cycle-by-cycle basis. A parametric study was made of the effects of boron-epoxy composite reinforcement on crack propagation in aluminum sheets. Results show that the size of the debond area has a significant effect on the crack propagation in the aluminum. For small debond areas, the crack propagation rate is reduced significantly, but these small debonds have a strong tendency to enlarge. Debond growth is most likely to occur in reinforced systems that have a cracked metal sheet reinforced with a relatively thin composite sheet.

  3. Numerical Study on Mixed-mode Fracture in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rena C.; Saucedo, Luis; Ruiz, Gonzalo

    2010-05-01

    The object of this work is to model the propagation of fracture in mixed-mode in lightly reinforced concrete beams. When a notched beam does not have enough shear reinforcement, fracture can initiate and propagate unstably and lead to failure through diagonal tension. In order to study this phenomenon numerically, a model capable of dealing with both static and dynamic crack propagation as well as the natural transition of those two regimes is necessary. We adopt a cohesive model for concrete fracture and an interface model for the deterioration between concrete and steel re-bar, both combined with an insertion algorithm. The static process is solved by dynamic relaxation (DR) method together with a modified technique [1] to enhance convergence rate. The same DR method is used to detect a dynamic process and switch to a dynamic calculation. The numerically obtained load-displacement curves, load-CMOD curves and crack patterns fit reasonably well with their experimental counterparts, having in mind that we fed the calculations only with parameters measured experimentally.

  4. Fatigue-Crack Propagation in Aluminum-Alloy Tension Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whaley, Richard E.; Kurzhals, Peter R.

    1960-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of fatigue tests to study crack propagation and the resulting stress distributions in tension panels. The panels were all of the same general design, and configurations varied mainly in the relative amount of cross-sectional area in the skin, stiffeners, and flanges. The panels were constructed of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys. It was found that the average rate of crack growth was slower in panels made of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy than in panels made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. All cracks initiated in the skin, and the slowest crack growth was measured in configurations where the highest percentage of cross-sectional area was in the stiffeners. Strain-gage surveys were made to determine the redistribution of stress as the crack grew across the panels. As a crack approached a given point in the skin, the stress at that point increased rapidly. The stress in the stiffeners also increased as the crack approached the stiffeners. During the propagation of the crack the stress was not distributed uniformly in the remaining area.

  5. Micromechanical predictions of crack initiation, propagation and crack growth resistance in boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahishi, J. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    An elastoplastic, axisymmetric finite element model has been used to predict the initiation and propagation of a crack in a composite model consisting of a single broken boron fiber embedded in an annular sheath of aluminum matrix. The accuracy of the axisymmetric finite element model for crack problems has been established by solving the classical problem of a penny-shaped crack in a thick cylindrical rod under axial tension. Also, the stress intensity factors predicted by the present numerical model are compared with continuum results. A constant displacement boundary condition applied during an increment of crack growth permits a substantial amount of stable crack growth in the matrix material. The concept of Crack Growth Resistance Curves (KR-curves) has been used to determine the point of crack instability

  6. Modeling Crack Propagation in Polycrystalline Microstructure Using Variational Multiscale Method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, S.; Sundararaghavan, V.

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation in a polycrystalline microstructure is analyzed using a novel multiscale model. The model includes an explicit microstructural representation at critical regions (stress concentrators such as notches and cracks) and a reduced order model that statistically captures the microstructure at regions far away from stress concentrations. Crack propagation is modeled in these critical regions using the variational multiscale method. In this approach, a discontinuous displacement field is added to elements that exceed the critical values of normal or tangential tractions during loading. Compared to traditional cohesive zone modeling approaches, the method does not require the use of any specialmore » interface elements in the microstructure and thus can model arbitrary crack paths. The capability of the method in predicting both intergranular and transgranular failure modes in an elastoplastic polycrystal is demonstrated under tensile and three-point bending loads.« less

  7. Role of the pore fluid in crack propagation in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Céline; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Bouyer, Fréric

    2015-05-01

    We investigate pore fluid effects due to surface energy variation or due to chemical corrosion in cracked glass. Both effects have been documented through experimental tests on cracked borosilicate glass samples. Creep tests have been performed to investigate the slow crack propagation behavior. We compared the dry case (saturated with argon gas), the nonreactive water saturated case (commercial mineralized water), and the distilled and deionized water saturated case (pure water). Chemical corrosion effects have been observed and evidenced from pH and water composition evolution of the pure water. Then, the comparison of the dry case, the mineral water saturated case, and the corrosion case allow to (i) evidence the mechanical effect of the presence of a pore fluid and (ii) show also the chemical effect of a glass dissolution. Both effects enhance subcritical crack propagation.

  8. Slow crack propagation in glass and creep prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Celine; Fortin, Jerome; Gueguen, Yves

    2013-04-01

    The context of our study is the observation of the time-dependent deformation of cracked glass. The aim of our study is to observe the slow crack propagation, to quantify it and to predict finally the creep behavior. We performed creep experiments in compaction conditions in a triaxial cell, on cracked boro-silicate glass samples. The chemical composition of the investigated glass is very close to the composition of waste vitrified packages. The matrix of the original glass (OG) is perfectly amorphous, without porosity. A few isolated air bubbles are trapped during the glass flow. Cracks are introduced in the OG through thermal shocks. Strain and acoustic emission (AE) are recorded. Several experiments are performed at different confining pressures (15 or 25 MPa), different pore fluid conditions (with argon gas, considered as the dry case, with tap water saturated porosity, or with distilled water) and different temperatures (ambiant temperature, 50oC or 80oC). Linear increase of the volumetric strain is first observed. A dilatancy increase is recorded. Note that dilatancy does not appear in constant strain rate tests. Constant stress tests show that dilatancy develops during a time interval that depends on the stress level. In addition AE rate are recorded. A non zero AE rate is an evidence of crack propagation. We use a micro-mechanical model that gives the stress intensity factor at the crack tips. This factor depends on stress and geometrical parameters (all known). An exponential law describe the rate of crack propagation, as a function of temperature, environment and applied stresses. This model allows us to predict the creep rate in glass. Assuming a constant crack aspect ratio, crack length and volumetric strain are related. The volumetric strain rate is calculated from model and compared to the data.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  10. A two-scale generalized finite element method for fatigue crack propagation simulations utilizing a fixed, coarse hexahedral mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, P.; Hollkamp, J.; Duarte, C. A.; Eason, T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-scale extension of the generalized finite element method (GFEM) which allows for static fracture analyses as well as fatigue crack propagation simulations on fixed, coarse hexahedral meshes. The approach is based on the use of specifically-tailored enrichment functions computed on-the-fly through the use of a fine-scale boundary value problem (BVP) defined in the neighborhood of existing mechanically-short cracks. The fine-scale BVP utilizes tetrahedral elements, and thus offers the potential for the use of a highly adapted fine-scale mesh in the regions of crack fronts capable of generating accurate enrichment functions for use in the coarse-scale hexahedral model. In this manner, automated hp-adaptivity which can be used for accurate fracture analyses, is now available for use on coarse, uniform hexahedral meshes without the requirements of irregular meshes and constrained approximations. The two-scale GFEM approach is verified and compared against alternative approaches for static fracture analyses, as well as mixed-mode fatigue crack propagation simulations. The numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the proposed approach to deliver accurate results even in scenarios involving multiple discontinuities or sharp kinks within a single computational element. The proposed approach is also applied to a representative panel model similar in design and complexity to that which may be used in the aerospace community.

  11. TF41 Engine Fan Disk Seeded Fault Crack Propagation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Uncontained engine failures, although rare in occurrence, can have a catastrophic effect on aircraft performance and safety. Engine disk cracks can eventually lead to these type of failures. A number of techniques to detect engine disk cracks have been developed in recent years. However, these technologies have only been validated by disk spin pit tests, not actual engine tests. Due to this, a project was established to perform seeded fault engine tests on a TF41 engine disk fan. A defect was machined in the first stage fan disk of a TF41 engine. The disk was run in a spin pit to initiate a crack. Once initiated, the disk was run in an actual engine test facility. The engine was cycled by a number of start and stops with the goal of propagating the crack to disk burst through low cycle fatigue. Various crack detection techniques were installed on the engine and run real-time during the test to validate their abilities to detect disk cracks. These techniques were based on methods such as change in mass imbalance using vibration or shaft displacement, change in blade position, acoustic emission, and torsional resonance. At the completion of 4474 test cycles, the crack in the TF41 disk was determined to have grown approximately 0.025 inches. This was far less the predicted crack growth based on a fracture mechanics analysis and finite element stress analysis.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  13. A three-dimensional validation of crack curvature in muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Hill; J. W. Foulk III; P. A. Klein; E. P. Chen

    2001-01-07

    Experimental and computational efforts focused on characterizing crack tip curvature in muscovite mica. Wedge-driven cracks were propagated under monochromatic light. Micrographs verified the subtle curvature of the crack front near the free surface. A cohesive approach was employed to model mixed-mode fracture in a three-dimensional framework. Finite element calculations captured the crack curvature observed in experiment.

  14. Acoustic microscopy with mixed-mode transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.H.; Parent, P.; Khuri-Yakub, B.T.

    1988-12-31

    The new amplitude-phase acoustic microscope is versatile; it operates in a wide frequency range 1--200 MHz, with selection of longitudinal, shear, and mixed modes. This enables it to be used in many NDE applications for different kinds of materials. Besides the application examples presented in this paper (bulk defect imaging of lossy materials or at deep locations; leads of IC chip in epoxy package; amplitude images of surface crack on Si nitride ball bearing; thin Au film on quartz), this system can also be applied for residual stress and anisotropy mapping with high accuracy and good spatial resolution. 7 refs, 6 figs.

  15. Fatigue crack propagation resistance of highly crosslinked polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Letitia; Baker, David; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2004-12-01

    A higher degree of cross-linking has been shown to improve wear properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in laboratory studies. However, cross-linking can also affect the mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Fatigue crack propagation resistance was determined for electron beam cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and compared with gamma irradiation cross-linked and noncross-linked polyethylene fatigue specimens. Crosslinking was done with different dosages of irradiation followed by melting. For one irradiation dose (50 kGy) extrusion and molding processes were compared. A fracture mechanics approach was used to determine how the degree of cross-linking affects resistance to crack propagation in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Fatigue crack propagation resistance was reduced in proportion to the irradiation dose. The type of irradiation (gamma or electron beam) or manufacturing method (extrusion or molding) did not affect fatigue crack propagation resistance. The reduced fatigue strength of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene could lead to mechanical failure in conditions that are associated with cyclic local tensile stresses. PMID:15577468

  16. On the steady propagation of a semi-infinite crack

    SciTech Connect

    Paukshto, M.V.; Sulimov, M.G.

    1994-12-25

    We consider the rectilinear propagation of a semi-infinite crack with constant velocity in a crystal structure. We obtain the solutions of homogeneous boundary-value problems for the corresponding difference-differential operators in spaces of one and two dimensions. We give a justification of the computational aspect of the problem.

  17. Simulation of Crack Propagation in Metal Powder Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, S. M.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the fracture criterion of metal powder compact and simulation of the crack initiation and propagation during cold compaction process. Based on the fracture criterion of rock in compression, a displacement-based finite element model has been developed to analyze fracture initiation and crack growth in iron powder compact. Estimation of fracture toughness variation with relative density is established in order to provide the fracture parameter as compaction proceeds. A finite element model with adaptive remeshing technique is used to accommodate changes in geometry during the compaction and fracture process. Friction between crack faces is modelled using the six-node isoparametric interface elements. The shear stress and relative density distributions of the iron compact with predicted crack growth are presented, where the effects of different loading conditions are presented for comparison purposes.

  18. Mode III fatigue crack propagation in low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, R. O.; McClintock, F. A.; Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; Ritter, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    To provide a basis for estimating fatigue life in large rotating generator shafts subjected to transient oscillations, a study is made of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) in torsionally-loaded spheroidized AISI4340 steel, and results compared to analogous behavior in Mode I. Torsional S/N curves, determined on smooth bars containing surface defects, showed results surprisingly close to expected unnotched Mode I data, with lifetime increasing from 104 cycles at nominal yield to 106 cycles at half yield. Fatigue crack growth rates in Mode III, measured on circumferentially-notched samples, were found to be slower than in Mode I, although still power-law related to the alternating stress intensity (△K III) for small-scale yielding. Mode III growth rates were only a small fraction (0.002 to 0.0005) of cyclic crack tip displacements (△CTD III) per cycle, in contrast to Mode I where the fraction was much larger (0.1 to 0.01). A micromechanical model for Mode III growth is proposed, where crack advance is considered to take place by a Mode II coalescence of cracks, initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front. This mechanism is consistent with the crack increment being a small fraction of △CTDIII per cycle.

  19. Crack propagation induced heating in crystalline energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W.; Francis, R. S.; Fayer, M. D.

    1999-02-01

    A model is presented for time and spatial dependences of the heating of molecular vibrations and the possible initiation of chemical reaction from heat dissipated in the vicinity of a propagating crack in a molecular crystal. In the model, energy from a moving crack tip is released as phonons in proximity to the crack. Initially the phonons and the molecular vibrations are not in thermal equilibrium. Subsequently, there is a competition between excitation of molecular vibrations by multiphonon up-pumping and diffusion of phonons from the crack region. If the coupling between the locally hot phonon bath and the molecular vibrations is sufficiently large, a transitory high vibrational temperature will be achieved prior to eventual thermal equilibration with the bulk of the crystal. It is found that the peak vibrational temperature can be sufficiently high for a significant time period for chemical reactions to occur. The model calculates the local time-dependent vibrational temperature using reasonable values of the physical input parameters. For a crack tip moving near the speed of sound, the calculations show that vibrational temperatures can reach ˜800 K in 55 ps and exceed 550 K for ˜1 ns after the initial heating. This temperature change is sufficient to produce chemical reaction in a secondary explosive such as HMX, but given the duration and size of the heated region, a single crack should not result in self-sustaining chemical reaction. The role that cracks may play in shock sensitivity is discussed.

  20. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  1. Multiscale modeling of crack initiation and propagation at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiari, Behrouz; Miller, Ronald E.

    2016-03-01

    Fracture occurs on multiple interacting length scales; atoms separate on the atomic scale while plasticity develops on the microscale. A dynamic multiscale approach (CADD: coupled atomistics and discrete dislocations) is employed to investigate an edge-cracked specimen of single-crystal nickel, Ni, (brittle failure) and aluminum, Al, (ductile failure) subjected to mode-I loading. The dynamic model couples continuum finite elements to a fully atomistic region, with key advantages such as the ability to accommodate discrete dislocations in the continuum region and an algorithm for automatically detecting dislocations as they move from the atomistic region to the continuum region and then correctly "converting" the atomistic dislocations into discrete dislocations, or vice-versa. An ad hoc computational technique is also applied to dissipate localized waves formed during crack advance in the atomistic zone, whereby an embedded damping zone at the atomistic/continuum interface effectively eliminates the spurious reflection of high-frequency phonons, while allowing low-frequency phonons to pass into the continuum region. The simulations accurately capture the essential physics of the crack propagation in a Ni specimen at different temperatures, including the formation of nano-voids and the sudden acceleration of the crack tip to a velocity close to the material Rayleigh wave speed. The nanoscale brittle fracture happens through the crack growth in the form of nano-void nucleation, growth and coalescence ahead of the crack tip, and as such resembles fracture at the microscale. When the crack tip behaves in a ductile manner, the crack does not advance rapidly after the pre-opening process but is blunted by dislocation generation from its tip. The effect of temperature on crack speed is found to be perceptible in both ductile and brittle specimens.

  2. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  3. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon wafers under thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Danilewsky, Andreas; Wittge, Jochen; Kiefl, Konstantin; Allen, David; McNally, Patrick; Garagorri, Jorge; Elizalde, M. Reyes; Baumbach, Tilo; Tanner, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of microcracks in silicon during thermal annealing has been studied using in situ X-ray diffraction imaging. Initial cracks are produced with an indenter at the edge of a conventional Si wafer, which was heated under temperature gradients to produce thermal stress. At temperatures where Si is still in the brittle regime, the strain may accumulate if a microcrack is pinned. If a critical value is exceeded either a new or a longer crack will be formed, which results with high probability in wafer breakage. The strain reduces most efficiently by forming (hhl) or (hkl) crack planes of high energy instead of the expected low-energy cleavage planes like {111}. Dangerous cracks, which become active during heat treatment and may shatter the whole wafer, can be identified from diffraction images simply by measuring the geometrical dimensions of the strain-related contrast around the crack tip. Once the plastic regime at higher temperature is reached, strain is reduced by generating dislocation loops and slip bands and no wafer breakage occurs. There is only a small temperature window within which crack propagation is possible during rapid annealing. PMID:24046487

  4. Fatigue crack propagation in carburized high alloy bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbach, B. L.; Lou, Bingzhe; Pearson, P. K.; Fairchild, R. E.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1985-07-01

    Fatigue cracks were propagated through carburized cases in M-50NiL (0.1 C,4 Mo, 4 Cr, 1.3 V, 3.5 Ni) and CBS-1000M (0.1 C, 4.5 Mo, 1 Cr, 0.5 V, 3 Ni) steels at constant stress intensity ranges, ΔK, and at a constant cyclic peak load. Residual compressive stresses of the order of 140 MPa (20 Ksi) were developed in the M-50NiL cases, and in tests carried out at constant ΔK values it was observed that the fatigue crack propagation rates, da/dN, slowed significantly. In some tests, at constant peak loads, cracks were stopped in regions with high compressive stresses. The residual stresses in the cases in CBS-1000M steel were predominantly tensile, probably because of the presence of high retained austenite contents, and da/dN was accelerated in these cases. The effects of residual stress on the fatigue crack propagation rates are interpreted in terms of a pinched clothespin model in which the residual stresses introduce an internal stress intensity, Ki where Ki, = σid{i/1/2} (σi = internal stress, di = characteristic distance associated with the internal stress distribution). The effective stress intensity becomes Ke = Ka + Ki where Ka is the applied stress intensity. Values of Ki were calculated as a function of distance from the surface using experimental measurements of σi and a value of di = 11 mm (0.43 inch). The resultant values of Ke were taken to be equivalent to effective ΔK values, and da/dN was determined at each point from experimental measurements of fatigue crack propagation obtained separately for the case and core materials. A reasonably good fit was obtained with data for crack growth at a constant ΔK and at a constant cyclic peak load. The carburized case depths were approximately 4 mm, and the possible effects associated with the propagation of short cracks were considered. The major effects were observed at crack lengths of about 2 mm, but the contributions of short crack phenomena were considered to be small in these experiments, since the

  5. Gear Crack Propagation Path Studies-- Guidelines Developed for Ultrasafe Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Effective gear designs balance strength, durability, reliability, size, weight, and cost. However, unexpected gear failures may occur even with adequate gear tooth design. To design an extremely safe system, the designer must ask and address the question "What happens when a failure occurs?" With regard to gear-tooth bending fatigue, tooth or rim fractures may occur. For aircraft, a crack that propagated through a rim would be catastrophic, leading to the disengagement of a rotor or propeller, the loss of an aircraft, and possible fatalities. This failure mode should be avoided. However, a crack that propagated through a tooth might or might not be catastrophic, depending on the design and operating conditions. Also, early warning of this failure mode might be possible because of advances in modern diagnostic systems. An analysis was performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop design guidelines to prevent catastrophic rim fracture failure modes in the event of gear-tooth bending fatigue. The finite element method was used with principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack propagation paths were predicted for a variety of gear tooth and rim configurations. The effects of rim and web thicknesses, initial crack locations, and gear-tooth geometry factors such as diametral pitch, number of teeth, pitch radius, and tooth pressure angle were considered. Design maps of tooth and rim fracture modes, including the effects of gear geometry, applied load, crack size, and material properties were developed. The occurrence of rim fractures significantly increased as the backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) decreased. The occurrence of rim fractures also increased as the initial crack location was moved down the root of the tooth. Increased rim and web compliance increased the occurrence of rim fractures. For gears with constant-pitch radii, coarser-pitch teeth increased the occurrence of tooth fractures over rim fractures. Also, 25 degree

  6. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of a single crystalline superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1990-01-01

    Crack propagation mechanisms occurring at various temperatures in a single crystalline Ni-base alloy, Rene N4, were investigated. The rates of crack growth at 21, 704, 927, 1038, and 1093 C were measured in specimens with 001-line and 110-line directions parallel to the load axis and the machined notch, respectively, using a pulsed dc potential drop apparatus, and the fracture surfaces at each temperature were examined using SEM. Crack growth rates (CGRs) for specimens tested at or below 927 C were similar, while at two higher temperatures, the CGRs were about an order of magnitude higher than at the lower temperatures. Results of SEM observations showed that surface morphologies depended on temperature.

  7. Formation and propagation of cracks on the flame surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Minaev, S. S.

    1996-02-01

    In the framework of the simplified Sivashinsky equation it is shown that the process of formation, propagation and interactions of cracks on flame fronts can be considered as the interference between nonlinear effects and instabilities of plane flame fronts. It is demonstrated that in a model with a constant growth rate cracks can form webs with triple vertices. At late times, the crack web consists of straight line segments. In agreement with recent observations [D. Breadly and C.M. Hamer, Comb. Flames 99 (1994) 562], the fourth order (and higher) vertices are rare and can appear as a result of scattering of triple vertices with each other. Within this model we predict the merging of small cells into neighboring larger cells.

  8. Dynamic crack propagation in single-crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, T.; Gumbsch, P.; Wanner, A.

    1999-08-01

    Tensile tests on notched plates of single-crystalline silicon were carried out at high overloads. Cracks were forced to propagate on {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes in a {l_angle}1{bar 1}0{r_angle} direction. The dynamics of the fracture process was measured using the potential drop technique and correlated with the fracture surface morphology. Crack propagation velocity did not exceed a terminal velocity of v{sub c} = 3,800 m/s, which corresponds to 83% of the Rayleigh wave velocity v{sub R}. Specimens fractured at low stresses exhibited crystallographic cleavage whereas a transition from mirror-like smooth regions to rougher hackle zones was observed in case of the specimens fractured at high stresses. Inspection of the mirror zone at high magnification revealed a deviation of the {l_brace}110{r_brace} plane onto {l_brace}111{r_brace}crystallographic facets.

  9. Fatigue crack propagation rate model based on a dislocation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.; Jeelani, S.

    1986-01-01

    It has been noted that the crack propagation exponent p for most metals usually varies between values of 2 and 4, and that the motion of dislocations plays an important part in determining the exponent p. Attention is presently given to the significance of the exponent p in terms of the motion of dislocations, in view of the theory of thermally activated plastic flow and the cumulative plastic strain concept for a failure criterion.

  10. Mode III fatigue crack propagation in low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.; McClintock, F.A.; Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; Ritter, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    To provide a basis for estimating fatigue life in large rotating generator shafts subjected to transient oscillations, a study is made of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) in torsionally-loaded spheroidized AISI 4340 steel. Results are compared to analogous behavior in Mode I. The approach investigated the feasibility of using continuum fracture mechanics and preliminary mechanistic modeling to serve as a basis for defect-tolerant life estimation procedures. 38 refs.

  11. Atomistic study on mixed-mode fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron interacting with coherent copper and nickel nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Motasem, Ahmed Tamer; Mai, Nghia Trong; Choi, Seung Tae; Posselt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper and/or nickel nanoclusters, generally formed by neutron irradiation, on fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron was investigated by using molecular statics simulation. The equilibrium configuration of nanoclusters was obtained by using a combination of an on-lattice annealing based on Metropolis Monte Carlo method and an off-lattice relaxation by molecular dynamics simulation. Residual stress distributions near the nanoclusters were also calculated, since compressive or tensile residual stresses may retard or accelerate, respectively, the propagation of a crack running into a nanocluster. One of the nanoclusters was located in front of a straight crack in ferrite iron with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. Two crystallographic directions, of which the crack plane and crack front direction are (010)[001] and (111) [ 1 bar 10 ] , were considered, representing cleavage and non-cleavage orientations in ferrite iron, respectively. Displacements corresponding to pure opening-mode and mixed-mode loadings were imposed on the boundary region and the energy minimization was performed. It was observed that the fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron under the pure opening-mode loading are strongly influenced by the presence of nanoclusters, while under the mixed-mode loading the nanoclusters have no significant effect on the crack propagation behavior of ferrite iron.

  12. Analysis of crack propagation as an energy absorption mechanism in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Murphy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The crack initiation and crack propagation capability was extended to the previously developed generalized plane strain, finite element micromechanics analysis. Also, an axisymmetric analysis was developed, which contains all of the general features of the plane analysis, including elastoplastic material behavior, temperature-dependent material properties, and crack propagation. These analyses were used to generate various example problems demonstrating the inelastic response of, and crack initiation and propagation in, a boron/aluminum composite.

  13. Modeling of slow crack propagation in heterogeneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, Olivier; Stormo, Arne; Hansen, Alex; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Crack propagation in heterogeneous media is a rich problem which involves the interplay of various physical processes. The problem has been intensively investigated theoretically, numerically, and experimentally, but a unifying model capturing all the experimental features has not been entirely achieved despite its broad range of implications in Earth sciences problems. The slow propagation of a crack front where long range elastic interactions are dominant, is of crucial importance to fill the gap between experiments and models. Several theoretical and numerical works have been devoted to quasi-static models. Such models give rise to an intermittent local activity characterized by a depinning transition and can be viewed as a critical phenomenon. However these models fail to reproduce all experimental conditions, notably the front morphology does not display any cross-over length with two different roughness exponents above and below the cross-over as observed experimentally. Here, we compare experimental observations of a slow interfacial crack propagation along an heterogeneous interface to numerical simulations from a cantilever fiber bundle model. The model consists of a planar set of brittle fibers between an elastic half-space and a rigid square root shaped plate which loads the system in a cantilever configuration. The latter is shown to provide an improved opening and stress field in the process zone around the crack tip. The model shares a similar scale invariant roughening of the crack front both at small and large scales and a similar power law distribution of the local velocity of the crack front to experiments. Implications for induced seismicity at the brittle-creep transition are discussed. We show that a creep route for induced seismicity is possible when heterogeneities exist along the fault. Indeed, seismic event occurrences in time and space are in strong relation with the development of the aseismic motion recorded during the experiment and the

  14. Crack initiation and near-threshold surface fatigue crack propagation behavior of the iron-base superalloy A-286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeubler, M. A.; Thompson, A. W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1988-02-01

    The fatigue behavior of the iron-base superalloy A-286 was studied at room temperature in air for three aging conditions: underaged, peak aged, and overaged. A fatigue strength at 107 cycles of about 200 MPa, independent of aging condition, was measured for an applied load ratio of R =0.1. Surface crack initiation and propagation were measured using hourglass specimens. Surface cracks were invariably initiated in slip bands orientated between 45 and 55 deg to the load axis, and an average ratio of crack depth to crack length of about 0.45 for these semi-elliptical cracks was measured. These earliest observable short surface cracks grew at an accelerated propagation rate in the near-threshold regime but were retarded in a transition stage, resulting in a minimum in crack growth rate. This behavior was correlated to the interaction of the crack with specific microstructure features. Following this minimum, the crack growth accelerated again with increasing Δ K and appeared to converge with the crack growth behavior expected for long through cracks. The crack propagation rate at fixed Δ K was lowest in underaged, compared to peak aged and overaged microstructures. The minimum and trends in crack growth rate appeared to depend on the development of roughness-induced closure.

  15. The effect of adhesive layer on crack propagation in laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gecit, M. R.; Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the adhesive layer on crack propagation in composite materials is investigated. The composite medium consists of parallel load carrying laminates and buffer strips arranged periodically and bonded with thin adhesive layers. The strips, assumed to be isotropic and linearly elastic, contain symmetric cracks of arbitrary lengths located normal to the interfaces. Two problems are considered: (1) thin adhesive layers are approximated by uncoupled tension and shear springs distributed along the interfaces of the strips for which only the case of internal cracks can be treated rigorously; (2) broken laminates and the true singular behavior in the presence of the adhesive layer are studied. The adhesive is then treated as an isotropic, linearly elastic continuum. General expressions for field quantities are obtained in terms of infinite Fourier integrals. These expressions give a system of singular integral equations in terms of the crack surface displacement derivatives. By using appropriate quadrature formulas, the integral equations reduce to a system of linear algebraic equations which are solved numerically.

  16. Incubation time for sub-critical crack propagation in SiC-SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the time for sub-critical crack propagation is SiC-SiC composites at high temperatures. The effects of fiber thermal creep on the relaxation of crack bridging tractions in SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is considered in the present work, with the objective of studying the time-to propagation of sub-critical matrix cracks in this material at high temperatures. Under the condition of fiber stress relaxation in the bridiging zone, it is found that the crack opening and the stress intensity factor increase with time for sub-critical matrix cracks. The time elapsed before the stress intensity reaches the critical value for crack propagation is calculated as a function of the initial crack length, applied stress and temperature. Stability domains for matrix cracks are defined, which provide guidelines for conducting high-temperature crack propagation experiments.

  17. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  18. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  19. Low-pH SCC: Mechanical effects on crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Hagerdorn, E.L.

    1996-09-06

    A better definition of the role of mechanical factors on low-pH stress corrosion crack propagation is needed to aid in the prediction of crack growth rates on operating pipelines and to develop strategies to mitigate this form of cracking. The overall objective of the project was to determine the roles and synergistic effects of pressure, pressure fluctuations, and hydrotesting on low-pH stress corrosion crack growth. All testing was performed in a low-pH electrolyte (NS4 solution) under cyclic load conditions on pre-cracked specimens of one X-65 line pipe steel. The cyclic load conditions in the testing were related to field conditions using the J-integral parameter. This project consisted of the following three tasks, Task 1 - Development of Test Protocol, Task 2 - Mechanical Effects, and Task 3 - Effects of Hydrotesting. The purposes of Task 1 were to prepare the test specimens and experimental apparatus and to establish a standard test protocol for conducting the cyclic load tests and analyzing the test data. The specimen preparation procedures and environmental conditions were similar to those used in a previous project for TransCanada PipeLines (TCPL). The most significant difference between the tests performed in this project and the previous research was in the mode of loading. The previous work was performed under constant extension rate loading while this project was performed under cyclic load conditions. It is difficult to relate test conditions under constant extension rate loading with field conditions. However, the cyclic load conditions in the laboratory test can be directly related to field test conditions using the J-integral parameter. Modifications also were necessary in the data analysis procedure to account for the change in loading mode.

  20. Crack propagation in functionally graded strip under thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. V.; Sadowski, T.; Pietras, D.

    2013-09-01

    The thermal shock problem in a strip made of functionally graded composite with an interpenetrating network micro-structure of Al2O3 and Al is analysed numerically. The material considered here could be used in brake disks or cylinder liners. In both applications it is subjected to thermal shock. The description of the position-dependent properties of the considered functionally graded material are based on experimental data. Continuous functions were constructed for the Young's modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity and implemented as user-defined material properties in user-defined subroutines of the commercial finite element software ABAQUS™. The thermal stress and the residual stress of the manufacturing process distributions inside the strip are considered. The solution of the transient heat conduction problem for thermal shock is used for crack propagation simulation using the XFEM method. The crack length developed during the thermal shock is the criterion for crack resistance of the different graduation profiles as a step towards optimization of the composition gradient with respect to thermal shock sensitivity.

  1. Burrowing in marine muds by crack propagation: kinematics and forces.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kelly M; Arwade, Sanjay R; Jumars, Peter A

    2007-12-01

    The polychaete Nereis virens burrows through muddy sediments by exerting dorsoventral forces against the walls of its tongue-depressor-shaped burrow to extend an oblate hemispheroidal crack. Stress is concentrated at the crack tip, which extends when the stress intensity factor (KI) exceeds the critical stress intensity factor (KIc). Relevant forces were measured in gelatin, an analog for elastic muds, by photoelastic stress analysis, and were 0.015+/-0.001 N (mean +/- s.d.; N=5). Measured elastic moduli (E) for gelatin and sediment were used in finite element models to convert the forces in gelatin to those required in muds to maintain the same body shapes observed in gelatin. The force increases directly with increasing sediment stiffness, and is 0.16 N for measured sediment stiffness of E=2.7 x 10(4) Pa. This measurement of forces exerted by burrowers is the first that explicitly considers the mechanical behavior of the sediment. Calculated stress intensity factors fall within the range of critical values for gelatin and exceed those for sediment, showing that crack propagation is a mechanically feasible mechanism of burrowing. The pharynx extends anteriorly as it everts, extending the crack tip only as far as the anterior of the worm, consistent with wedge-driven fracture and drawing obvious parallels between soft-bodied burrowers and more rigid, wedge-shaped burrowers (i.e. clams). Our results raise questions about the reputed high energetic cost of burrowing and emphasize the need for better understanding of sediment mechanics to quantify external energy expenditure during burrowing. PMID:18025018

  2. Finite-element blunt-crack propagation: a modified J-integral approach. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.C.; Marchertas, A.H.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    In assessing the safety of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), a major concern is the behavior of concrete structures subjected to high temperatures. The potential of concrete cracking is an important parameter which could significantly influence the safety assessment of thermally attacked concrete. A new modified J-integral approach for the blunt crack model has been derived to provide a general procedure to accurately predict the direction of crack growth. This formulation has been incorporated into the coupled heat transfer-stress analysis finite element code TEMP-STRESS. A description of the formulation is presented in this paper. Results for the problems of a Mode I and mixed mode crack in a plate using regular and slanted meshes subjected to uniaxial and shear loading are presented.

  3. Characterization and Prediction of Cracks in Coated Materials: Direction and Length of Crack Propagation in Bimaterials.

    PubMed

    Pruncu, C I; Azari, Z; Casavola, C; Pappalettere, C

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of materials is governed by the surrounding environment. The contact area between the material and the surrounding environment is the likely spot where different forms of degradation, particularly rust, may be generated. A rust prevention treatment, like bluing, inhibitors, humidity control, coatings, and galvanization, will be necessary. The galvanization process aims to protect the surface of the material by depositing a layer of metallic zinc by either hot-dip galvanizing or electroplating. In the hot-dip galvanizing process, a metallic bond between steel and metallic zinc is obtained by immersing the steel in a zinc bath at a temperature of around 460°C. Although the hot-dip galvanizing procedure is recognized to be one of the most effective techniques to combat corrosion, cracks can arise in the intermetallic δ layer. These cracks can affect the life of the coated material and decrease the lifetime service of the entire structure. In the present paper the mechanical response of hot-dip galvanized steel submitted to mechanical loading condition is investigated. Experimental tests were performed and corroborative numerical and analytical methods were then applied in order to describe both the mechanical behaviour and the processes of crack/cracks propagation in a bimaterial as zinc-coated material. PMID:27347531

  4. Characterization and Prediction of Cracks in Coated Materials: Direction and Length of Crack Propagation in Bimaterials

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Z.; Pappalettere, C.

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of materials is governed by the surrounding environment. The contact area between the material and the surrounding environment is the likely spot where different forms of degradation, particularly rust, may be generated. A rust prevention treatment, like bluing, inhibitors, humidity control, coatings, and galvanization, will be necessary. The galvanization process aims to protect the surface of the material by depositing a layer of metallic zinc by either hot-dip galvanizing or electroplating. In the hot-dip galvanizing process, a metallic bond between steel and metallic zinc is obtained by immersing the steel in a zinc bath at a temperature of around 460°C. Although the hot-dip galvanizing procedure is recognized to be one of the most effective techniques to combat corrosion, cracks can arise in the intermetallic δ layer. These cracks can affect the life of the coated material and decrease the lifetime service of the entire structure. In the present paper the mechanical response of hot-dip galvanized steel submitted to mechanical loading condition is investigated. Experimental tests were performed and corroborative numerical and analytical methods were then applied in order to describe both the mechanical behaviour and the processes of crack/cracks propagation in a bimaterial as zinc-coated material. PMID:27347531

  5. Mixed-Mode Decohesion Elements for Analyses of Progressive Delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; deMoura, Marcelo F.

    2001-01-01

    A new 8-node decohesion element with mixed mode capability is proposed and demonstrated. The element is used at the interface between solid finite elements to model the initiation and propagation of delamination. A single displacement-based damage parameter is used in a strain softening law to track the damage state of the interface. The method can be used in conjunction with conventional material degradation procedures to account for inplane and intra-laminar damage modes. The accuracy of the predictions is evaluated in single mode delamination tests, in the mixed-mode bending test, and in a structural configuration consisting of the debonding of a stiffener flange from its skin.

  6. Curve fitting of mixed-mode isopachics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, R. I.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Worden, K.; Tatum, P.

    2009-08-01

    Recent work has focused on exploiting the observation that the stress-sum contours (isopachics), obtained from TSA, in the vicinity of the tip take the form of a simple curve - the cardioid. The analysis made use of the cardioid nature of the isopachics by deriving expressions for the SIFs in terms of the cardioid area and the positions of certain tangents to the curve. Both Genetic Algorithms (GAs) and Differential Evolution (DE) have also proved successful for parameter estimation, but some of the curve-fits indicated that the cardioid form was inappropriate for the base model, particularly for mixed-mode cracks. The effect of crack-tip interaction has been explored and shows this has a small effect on the cardioid form. New, higher resolution infra-red detectors have become available since the original data was collected, so the object of the current paper is to use new techniques to extract the cardioid form and use a GA to perform the curve fitting.

  7. Preferred propagation patterns of axial surface cracks in thick-walled cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, E.H.; Kendall, D.P.

    1996-12-01

    Semi-elliptical axial surface cracks, growing due to cyclic pressure loading in thick-walled cylinders undergo significant shape change during the propagation process. These growing cracks change their shapes such that they approach and follow preferred propagation patterns (PPPs). These PPPs depend on the diameter ratio of the cylinder and on the fatigue crack propagation constant, ``m`` in the Paris equation. The objective of this paper is to show the crack shape variation during fatigue crack growth using linear elastic fracture mechanics. It is shown that a crack whose initial shape does not agree with this preferred propagation pattern will grow such that its shape converges to the preferred pattern. The results of this study also show the effect of autofrettage on the PPPs and the final shape of the cracks at breakthrough.

  8. Experimental study on fatigue crack propagation rate of RC beam strengthened with carbon fiber laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Man

    2008-11-01

    The experimental research on fatigue crack propagation rate of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminate (CFL) is carried out by MTS system in this paper. The experimental results show that, the main crack propagation on strengthened beam can be summarized into three phases: 1) fast propagation phase; 2) steady propagation and rest phase; 3) unsteady propagation phase. The phase 2-i.e. steady propagation and rest stage makes up about 95% of fatigue life of the strengthened beam. The propagation rate of the main crack, da/dN, in phase 2 can be described by Paris formula, and the constant C and m can be confirmed by the fatigue crack propagation experiments of the RC beams strengthened with CFL under three-point bending loads.

  9. Low-pH stress corrosion crack propagation in API X-65 line pipe steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harle, B.A.; Beavers, J.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Preliminary results of ongoing crack growth studies being performed on an API X-65 line pipe steel in a low-pH cracking environment were reported. Objectives were to reproduce low-pH crack propagation in the laboratory, to identify a crack driving force parameter, and to evaluate the influence of environmental and mechanical parameters on crack growth. A J-integral test technique was used in the study. Significant crack growth was observed. The parameter J appeared to be a good driving force parameter to describe crack growth.

  10. Fatigue crack propagation in ceria-partially-stabilized zirconia (Ce-TZP)-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.F.; Yu, C.S.; Shetty, D.K.

    1990-10-10

    Fatigue crack propagation rates in tension-tension load cycling were measured in ZrO{sub 2}-12 mol% CeO{sub 2}-10 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics using precracked and annealed compact tension specimens. The fatigue crack growth behavior was examined for Ce-TZPs. The fatigue crack growth behavior was strongly influenced by the history of crack shielding via the development of the crack-tip transformation zones. Crack growth rates under sustained peak loads were also measured and found to be significantly lower and occurred at higher peak stress intensities as compared to the fatigue crack growth rates.

  11. Acoustic Emission Detection and Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Composite Patch Repairs Using Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Singh, Navdeep; Singh, Navrag

    2007-03-21

    An aircraft is subjected to severe structural and aerodynamic loads during its service life. These loads can cause damage or weakening of the structure especially for aging military and civilian aircraft, thereby affecting its load carrying capabilities. Hence composite patch repairs are increasingly used to repair damaged aircraft metallic structures to restore its structural efficiency. This paper presents the results of Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of crack propagation in 2024-T3 Clad aluminum panels repaired with adhesively bonded octagonal, single sided boron/epoxy composite patch under tension-tension fatigue loading. Crack propagation gages were used to monitor crack initiation. The identified AE sensor features were used to train neural networks for predicting crack length. The results show that AE events are correlated with crack propagation. AE system was able to detect crack propagation even at high noise condition of 10 Hz loading; that crack propagation signals can be differentiated from matrix cracking signals that take place due to fiber breakage in the composite patch. Three back-propagation cascade feed forward networks were trained to predict crack length based on the number of fatigue cycles, AE event number, and both the Fatigue Cycles and AE events, as inputs respectively. Network using both fatigue cycles and AE event number as inputs to predict crack length gave the best results, followed by Network with fatigue cycles as input, while network with just AE events as input had a greater error.

  12. [Monitoring of Crack Propagation in Repaired Structures Based on Characteristics of FBG Sensors Reflecting Spectra].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shen-fang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Lei; Huang, Hong-mei

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the security of aircraft repaired structures, a method of crack propagation monitoring in repaired structures is put forward basing on characteristics of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) reflecting spectra in this article. With the cyclic loading effecting on repaired structure, cracks propagate, while non-uniform strain field appears nearby the tip of crack which leads to the FBG sensors' reflecting spectra deformations. The crack propagating can be monitored by extracting the characteristics of FBG sensors' reflecting spectral deformations. A finite element model (FEM) of the specimen is established. Meanwhile, the distributions of strains which are under the action of cracks of different angles and lengths are obtained. The characteristics, such as main peak wavelength shift, area of reflecting spectra, second and third peak value and so on, are extracted from the FBGs' reflecting spectral which are calculated by transfer matrix algorithm. An artificial neural network is built to act as the model between the characteristics of the reflecting spectral and the propagation of crack. As a result, the crack propagation of repaired structures is monitored accurately and the error of crack length is less than 0.5 mm, the error of crack angle is less than 5 degree. The accurately monitoring problem of crack propagation of repaired structures is solved by taking use of this method. It has important significance in aircrafts safety improvement and maintenance cost reducing. PMID:26117887

  13. Fatigue and static crack propagation in yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals: Crack growth micromechanisms and precracking effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alcala, J.; Anglada, M.

    1997-11-01

    The influence of precracking techniques in the crack growth behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) is investigated. Load-bridge and cyclic-compression precracking enhance subsequent tensile crack growth rates, in comparison to results that are found with precracks that are extended under four-point bending prior to testing. The actual influence of these precracking techniques in the near-threshold crack growth regime is remarkably different. Although load-bridge precracking produces a pattern of crack growth fluctuations for stress intensity factors, K, lower than the effective crack-growth threshold of the material, compression-fatigue precracks start to propagate under far-field tensile loads at very fast growth rates and for K values that are slightly higher than the effective threshold. Crack-tip shielding by tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation develops gradually, influencing the crack growth behavior in Y-TZP. Proposed fatigue crack growth micromechanisms involve damage accumulation at the crack-tip region. For K{sub max} > 3 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, fatigue crack growth rates are strongly affected by environmental interactions at the crack tip, and postulated fatigue micromechanisms include the cyclic degradation of crack-tip shielding.

  14. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, J.; van Herwijnen, A.; Chambon, G.; Schweizer, J.; Birkeland, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e. to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. For instance, it is not uncommon to perform field measurements with widespread crack propagation on one day, while a few days later, with very little changes to the snowpack, crack propagation does not occur anymore. Thus far, there is no clear theoretical framework to interpret such observations, and it is not clear how and which snowpack properties affect dynamic crack propagation. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST) experiments applying the discrete element (DE) method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, the relation between mechanical parameters of the snowpack was taken into account so as to compare numerical and experimental results, which were in good agreement, suggesting that the simulations can reproduce crack propagation in PSTs. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the mechanical

  15. Pressure-Induced Crack Propagation Behavior in a Particle-Reinforced Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study pressure-induced crack propagation behavior of a particle-reinforced composite (PRC) under various pressurization rate conditions. A pre-cracked specimen of a metallic particle-reinforced rubbery composite was fixed in a holder which is installed in a windowed test chamber, and then high compressed nitrogen gas rapidly pressurized the chamber and the specimen. Chamber pressures were measured during the test, and detailed sequences of crack initiation and propagation were recorded by a high-speed digital video camera. Pressure vs. time traces were obtained from test results, and pressurization rates were defined from them. The crack propagation contours and lengths under various pressurization rates were observed through a stereoscopic microscope. Also, a progression of the crack initiation and propagation was observed by the sequences of the crack recorded by the high-speed digital video camera.

  16. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation in particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianku.

    1989-01-01

    Consequences of the interaction of cracks with SiC particles are examined with emphasis on micromechanisms influencing fatigue crack propagation in high strength aluminum alloy matrix composites. Fatigue crack propagation is found to show three distinct regimes; each accompanied by growth mechanisms reflecting different roles of SiC particles. At near-threshold levels, SiC particles impeded fatigue crack growth by deflecting the crack to promote roughness-induced crack closure and by acting as crack traps along the crack front. A two-dimensional crack trapping analysis based on the interaction of a finite crack with a SiC particle indicates that a limiting criterion for fatigue crack growth in SiC{sub p}/Al composites can be established, which requires that the maximum plastic-zone size exceed the effective mean particle size or that the tensile stress in the matrix beyond the particle on the crack front exceed the yield strength of the material. Implications of crack closure and crack trapping to near-threshold crack growth, including load-ration and particle-size dependence of fatigue thresholds, are discussed in terms of contributions from each mechanism. At higher stress intensities, limited fracture of SiC particles ahead of the crack tip leads to the development of uncracked ligaments along the crack length, resulting in a reduced crack-tip stress intensity from ligament bridging. Micromechanical models are developed for such bridges induced by both overlapping cracks and co-planar ligaments, based on the notion of a limiting crack opening displacement or limiting strain in the ligament. The predicted reduction in crack tip stress intensity is shown to be consistent with experimental observations.

  17. Time-dependent corrosion fatique crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research is to characterize environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth for the susceptible short-longitudinal orientation of aluminum alloy 7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution. This work is necessary in order to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA-FLAGRO (NASGRO). This effort concentrates on determining relevant inputs to a superposition model in order to more accurately model environmental fatigue crack propagation.

  18. Time-dependent corrosion fatique crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys. M.S. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, M.E.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of this research is to characterize environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth for the susceptible short-longitudinal orientation of aluminum alloy 7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution. This work is necessary in order to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA-FLAGRO (NASGRO). This effort concentrates on determining relevant inputs to a superposition model in order to more accurately model environmental fatigue crack propagation.

  19. Study on a Controlling Method for Crack Nucleation and Propagation Behavior in Laser Cutting of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Yukio; Mogi, Masashi; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Sujatanod, Supamard; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    Laser cutting is one of methods for breaking a brittle material by using local thermal stress due to laser irradiation without melting and vaporization of the material. In this study, a method for controlling crack nucleation and propagation behavior was studied experimentally as well as numerically. In case of a specimen with a starter notch, crack propagated by following a laser spot. However, crack did not follow the laser spot trace when the laser scanning direction changed. It was found from the result of FEM analysis that crack propagation behavior was controlled by a stress intensity factor for the maximum tangential stress, Kθmax ahead of crack tip. Twin beam is considered as an effective method to control crack propagation direction for the laser cutting. Crack nucleation behavior was studied with a glass specimen without a starter notch. A crack could nucleate from an edge for staring of laser irradiation in case of the specimen with defects induced by polishing with abrasive papers. However, crack nucleation and propagation behavior was unstable in case of the specimen with mirror-like smooth surface. Effect of laser spot radius on crack nucleation behavior was also studied by FEM analysis.

  20. Effects of gear crack propagation paths on vibration responses of the perforated gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Qibin; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behaviors of a perforated gear system considering effects of the gear crack propagation paths and this study focuses on the effects of a crack propagating through the rim on the time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) and vibration responses. Considering the effects of the extended tooth contact, a finite element (FE) model of a gear pair is established based on ANSYS software. TVMS of the perforated gear with crack propagating through tooth and rim are calculated by using the FE model. Furthermore, a lumped mass model is adopted to investigate the vibration responses of the perforated gear system. The results show that there exist three periods related to slots of the gear body in a rotating period of the perforated gear. Gear cracks propagating through tooth and rim both reduce the gear body stiffness and lead to reduction of TVMS besides the crack tooth contact moment, and the TVMS weakening for the former is less than that for the latter. Moreover, the results also show that the gear crack propagating through the rim (CPR) has a greater effect on vibration responses than the gear crack propagating through the tooth (CPT) under the same crack level. Vibration level increases with the increasing crack depth, especially for the gear with CPR.

  1. Fatigue crack propagation thresholds for long and short cracks in Rene 95 nickel-base super alloy

    SciTech Connect

    McCarver, J.F.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1981-10-01

    A study has been made of the near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a wroght Ni-base superalloy, Rene 95, with reference to the effect of crack size on the threshold stress intensity ..delta..K/sub 0/ for no detectable crack growth. Measured threshold ..delta..K/sub 0/ values at low load ratios (R = 0.1) for physically short cracks (0.01 to 0.20 mm) were found to be 60% smaller than the corresponding ..delta..K/sub 0/ values for long cracks (approx. 25 mm). However, short crack threshold values at R = 0.1 were found to be similar to long crack thresholds at R = 0.8. Such behavior is rationalized in terms of fatigue crack closure, specifically involving the role of fracture surface roughness from crystallographic crack growth in Ni-base alloys. The large difference observed in threshold values for long and physically-short cracks serves to illustrate the potential problems in applying conventional (long crack) fatigue data to defect-tolerant lifetime predictions for structural components containing small flaws.

  2. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650

  3. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. PMID:27479896

  4. Near-neutral pH SCC in pipelines: Effects of pressure fluctuations on crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Jaake, C.E.

    1998-12-31

    Currently, there is a poor understanding of the effects of pressure related parameters (operating pressure, pressure fluctuations, and hydrostatic testings) on external stress corrosion crack propagation in pipelines in near-neutral-pH environments. A better definition of the role of these parameters on crack propagation is needed to aid in the prediction of crack growth rates on operating pipelines and to develop strategies to mitigate this form of cracking. The objective of the research described in this paper was to determine the roles and synergistic effects of operating pressure, pressure fluctuations, and hydrostatic testing on crack growth in line pipe steels in a near-neutral-pH SCC environment. All testing was performed on one X-65 line pipe steel in a near-neutral-pH cracking environment, designated NS4. Fatigue precracked compact-type specimens of the line pipe steel were cyclically loaded while immersed in the cracking environment. The desired loading regime was applied using a servo-hydraulic tensile testing machine. Crack growth was monitored using the electric potential drop technique. The loading conditions applied to the specimen were related to field conditions using the J-integral parameter. It was found that the prior load history applied to the specimens had a significant effect on crack growth behavior. Overloading inhibited crack growth while unloading stimulated crack growth. Hydrostatic testing, which combines overloading and unloading, caused some crack extension but reduced the crack velocity.

  5. Pulsed holographic microscopy as a measurement method of dynamic fracture toughness for fast propagating cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Homma, Hiroomi; Kusaka, Riichiro

    A METHOD OF pulsed holographic microscopy is applied to take instantaneous microscopic photographs of the neighborhoods of crack tips propagating through PMMA or through AISI 4340 steel specimens at a speed of several hundred meters per second. The cracks are in the opening mode. A fast propagating crack is recorded as a hologram at an instant during its propagation. A microscopic photograph of the crack is taken with a conventional microscope to magnify the reconstructed image from the hologram. From the microscopic photograph, crack opening displacement (COD) is measured along the crack in the vicinity of the crack tip. The COD is of the order often to one hundred microns, and in proportion to the square root of the distance from the crack tip. The dynamic fracture toughness KID is obtained using the formula for COD in the singular stress field of a fast propagating crack. Simultaneous KID measurement both through pulsed holographic microscopy and through the caustic method is furthermore carried out with PMMA specimens. The values of KID obtained through pulsed holographic microscopy are in agreement with those through the caustic method. Microcracks accompanied by a main crack are also photographed with the method of pulsed holographic microscopy.

  6. Effect of the coating properties on crack propagation in fiber-reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Singh, R.N.

    1996-12-31

    A finite element technique is used to study the effects of the coating properties on the crack propagation in fiber-reinforced materials. Crack opening stresses and energy release rates for the crack penetration and deflection have been studied in SCS6 (fiber) -C/BN (coating) - Zircon (matrix) composites. Effect of the coating thickness on crack propagation has been also studied. In general, no significant changes are found in stress ratio (ratio of hoop stresses along the crack and at the interface) and energy release rate ratio (ratio of energy release rates for the crack penetration and crack deflection), but the magnitudes of the stresses and energy release rates change substantially with the change in the coating thickness.

  7. Dynamic crack propagation and arrest in orthotropic DCB fiber composite specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Kousiounelos, P. N.

    1981-01-01

    An orthotropic double cantilever beam (DCB) model is used to study dynamic crack propagation and arrest in 90 deg unidirectional Hercules AS/3501-6 graphite fiber epoxy composites. The dynamic fracture toughness of the composite is determined from tests performed on the long-strip specimen and DCB crack arrest experiments are conducted. By using the dynamic fracture toughness in a finite-difference solution of the DCB governing partial differential equations, a numerical solution of the crack propagation and arrest events is computed. Excellent agreement between the experimental and numerical crack arrest results are obtained.

  8. Diffraction-based study of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vipul K.

    The crack initiation sites and microstructure-sensitive growth of small fatigue cracks are experimentally characterized in two precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys, 7075-T651 and 7050-T7451, stressed in ambient temperature moist-air (warm-humid) and -50°C dry N2 (cold-dry) environmental conditions. Backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the fracture surfaces showed that Fe-Cu rich constituent particle clusters are the most common initiation sites within both alloys stressed in either environment. The crack growth within each alloy, on average, was observed to be slowed in the cold-dry environment than in the warm-humid environment, but only at longer crack lengths. Although no overwhelming effects of grain boundaries and grain orientations on small-crack growth were observed, crack growth data showed local fluctuations within individual grains. These observations are understood as crack propagation through the underlying substructure at the crack surface and frequent interaction with low/high-angle grain and subgrain boundaries, during cyclic loading, and, are further attributed to periodic changes in crack propagation path and multiple occurrences of crack-branching observed in the current study. SEM-based stereology in combination with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) established fatigue crack surface crystallography within the region from ˜1 to 50 mum of crack initiating particle clusters. Fatigue crack facets were parallel to a wide variety of crystallographic planes, with pole orientations distributed broadly across the irreducible stereographic triangle between the {001} and {101}-poles within both warm-humid and cold-dry environments. The results indicate environmentally affected fatigue cracking in both cases, given the similarity between the observed morphology and crystallography with that of a variety of aerospace aluminum alloys cracked in the presence of moist-air. There was no evidence of

  9. Evaluation on Fatigue Crack Propagation of Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1) at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Kim, Sa Woong; Lee, Sang Pill; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    Recently, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are embossed for nuclear fusion reactor in accordance with the coolant. Especially, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel is very suitable material for nuclear fusion reactor, because it has low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent heat conductivity. The objective of this study is to investigate fatigue crack propagation behavior in the Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1). The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the JLF-1 steel was investigated by the constant-amplitude loading test for the stress ratios R = 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. The fatigue crack growth tests carried out at room temperature and 400°C for base metal and weld metal. The effects of stress ratio, test temperature, specimen size and TIG welding on the fatigue crack propagation behaviors for JLF-1 steel were discussed within the Paris law. Particularly, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a weld metal was similar to that of base metal at the stress ratio of 0.3. Also, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a half size specimen was similar to that of a full size specimen at the stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. From this result, we can recognize that the fatigue crack propagation behavior of this material can be evaluated by using the half size specimens.

  10. Monitoring of solidification crack propagation mechanism in pulsed laser welding of 6082 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Witzendorff, P.; Kaierle, S.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed laser sources with pulse durations in the millisecond regime can be used for spot welding and seam welding of aluminum. Seam welds are generally produced with several overlapping spot welds. Hot cracking has its origin in the solidification process of individual spot welds which determines the cracking morphology along the seam welding. This study used a monitoring unit to capture the crack geometry within individual spot welds during seam welding to investigate the conditions for initiation, propagation and healing (re-melting) of solidification cracking within overlapping pulsed laser welds. The results suggest that small crack radii and high crack angles with respect to welding direction are favorable conditions for crack healing which leads to crack-free seam welds. Optimized pulse shapes were used to produce butt welds of 0.5 mm thick 6082 aluminum alloys. Tensile tests were performed to investigate the mechanical strength in the as-welded condition.

  11. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  12. Study on subsurface-inclined crack propagation during machining of brittle crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiawen; Chen, Jianbin; Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen

    2016-05-01

    There is an immense need to obtain high-quality surface and subsurface on brittle material owing to the advantage of its improved performance. Thus, in this paper, we proposed a mechanical and numerical study of fracture mechanics from the perspective of external loading and indentation geometry in brittle machining. Stress intensity factors are computed to analyze various impacts of external loading and indentation configuration on subsurface crack propagation. Results indicate that the main fracture mode for inclined crack is shear rather than opening and the apex angle of the indentation plays an important role in fracture behavior. As a certain external loading is exerted to the surface of the silicon, a large apex angle of indentation may lead to strong shielding effect on mode II crack propagation. A relationship between critical value of external loading to the crack propagation and the apex angle of the indentation is given in this paper that shows quantitative indication for suppression of crack growth.

  13. Interlaminar crack growth in fiber reinforced composites during fatigue, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Wang, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    Interlaminar crack growth behavior in fiber-reinforced composites subjected to fatigue loading was investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experimental phase, inter-laminar crack propagation rates and mechanisms were determined for the cases of various geometries, laminate parameters and cyclic stress levels. A singular hybrid-stress finite element method was used in conjuction with the experimental results to examine the local crack-tip behavior and to characterize the crack propagation during fatigue. Results elucidate the basic nature of the cyclic delamination damage, and relate the interlaminar crack growth rate to the range of mixed-mode crack-tip stress intensity factors. The results show that crack growth rates are directly related to the range of the mixed-mode cyclic stress intensity factors by a power law relationship.

  14. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  15. The effect of temperature upon the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1990-12-31

    Fatigue crack propagation of annealed Alloy 625 was studied in air at 24--649 C. Crack growth rates tend to increase with temperature. Two heats were studied; differences in behavior between them suggest a heat-to-heat variability. Characterization of stress ratio (R=K{sub min}/K{sub max}) effects was also done at 538 C.

  16. In situ investigation of the effect of hydrogen on the plastic deformation ahead of the crack tip and the crack propagation of 0.15C-1.5Mn-0.17V-0.012N steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, B.; Nan, Y.; Hu, Y.; Kang, D.T.

    1998-02-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the deformation ahead of the crack tip and the crack propagation were observed and studied in situ under transmission electron microscopy with dynamic tensile deformation for steel. The results show that hydrogen can promote local plastic deformation ahead of the crack tip and change the mode of crack propagation so that the crack will propagate in a zigzag path.

  17. 3D characterization of crack propagation in building stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusi, N.; Martinez-Martinez, J.; Crosta, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    Opening of fractures can strongly modify mechanical characteristics of natural stones and thus significantly decrease stability of historical and modern buildings. It is commonly thought that fractures origin from pre-existing structures of the rocks, such as pores, veins, stylolythes (Meng and Pan, 2007; Yang et al., 2008). The aim of this study is to define relationships between crack formation and textural characteristics in massive carbonate lithologies and to follow the evolution of fractures with loading. Four well known Spanish building limestones and dolostones have been analysed: Amarillo Triana (AT): a yellow dolomitic marble, with fissures filled up by calcite and Fe oxides or hydroxides; Blanco Tranco (BT): a homogeneous white calcitic marble with pore clusters orientated parallel to metamorphic foliation; Crema Valencia (CV): a pinkish limestone (mudstone), characterized by abundant stilolythes, filled mainly by quartz (80%) and kaolin (11%); Rojo Cehegin (RC): a red fossiliferous limestone (packstone) with white veins, made up exclusively by calcite in crystals up to 300 micron. All lithotypes are characterized by homogeneous mineralogical composition (calcitic or dolomitic) and low porosity (<10%). Three cores 20 mm in diameter have been obtained for each lithotype. Uniaxial compressive tests have been carried out in order to induce sample fracturing by a series of successive steps with application of a progressive normal stress. Crack propagation has been checked after each stress level application by microCT-RX following Hg impregnation of the sample (in a Hg porosimeter). Combination of both tests (microCT-RX and Hg porosimeter) guarantees a better characterization of small defects and their progressive propagation inside low-porous rocks than by employing solely microCT-RX (Fusi et al., 2009). Due to the reduced dimensions of sample holder (dilatometers) in porosimeter, cores have been cut with a non standard h/d = 1.5. Several cycles of: a) Hg

  18. Kohn-Sham density functional theory prediction of fracture in silicon carbide under mixed mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. W. K.; Pan, Z. L.; Warner, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    The utility of silicon carbide (SiC) for high temperature structural application has been limited by its brittleness. To improve its ductility, it is paramount to develop a sound understanding of the mechanisms controlling crack propagation. In this manuscript, we present direct ab initio predictions of fracture in SiC under pure mode I and mixed mode loading, utilizing a Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KSDFT) framework. Our results show that in both loading cases, cleavage occurs at a stress intensity factor (SIF) only slightly higher than the Griffith toughness, focusing on a (1 1 1) [1 \\bar{1} 0] crack in the 3C-SiC crystal structure. This lattice trapping effect is shown to decrease with mode mixity, due to the formation of a temporary surface bond that forms during decohesion under shear. Comparing the critical mode I SIF to the value obtained in experiments suggests that some plasticity may occur near a crack tip in SiC even at low temperatures. Ultimately, these findings provide a solid foundation upon which to study the influence of impurities on brittleness, and upon which to develop empirical potentials capable of realistically simulating fracture in SiC.

  19. Peak Stress Intensity Factor Governs Crack Propagation Velocity In Crosslinked UHMWPE

    PubMed Central

    Sirimamilla, P. Abhiram; Furmanski, Jevan; Rimnac, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been successfully used as a bearing material in total joint replacement components. However, these bearing materials can fail as a result of in vivo static and cyclic loads. Crack propagation behavior in this material has been considered using the Paris relationship which relates fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN (mm/cycle) versus the stress intensity factor range, ΔK (Kmax-Kmin, MPa√m). However, recent work suggests that the crack propagation velocity of conventional UHMWPE is driven by the peak stress intensity (Kmax), not ΔK. The hypothesis of this study is that the crack propagation velocity of highly crosslinked and remelted UHMWPE is also driven by the peak stress intensity, Kmax, during cyclic loading, rather than by ΔK. To test this hypothesis, two highly crosslinked (65 kGy and 100 kGy) and remelted UHMWPE materials were examined. Frequency, waveform and R-ratio were varied between test conditions to determine the governing factor for fatigue crack propagation. It was found that the crack propagation velocity in crosslinked UHMWPE is also driven by Kmax and not ΔK, and is dependent on loading waveform and frequency in a predictable quasi-static manner. The current study supports that crack growth in crosslinked UHMWPE materials, even under cyclic loading conditions, can be described by a relationship between the velocity of crack growth, da/dt and the peak stress intensity, Kmax. The findings suggest that stable crack propagation can occur as a result of static loading only and this should be taken into consideration in design of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. PMID:23165898

  20. Influence of the resin on interlaminar mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    Both literature review data and new data on toughness behavior of seven matrix and adhesive systems in four types of tests were studied in order to assess the influence of the resin on interlaminar fracture. Mixed mode (i.e., various combinations of opening mode 1, G sub 1, and shearing mode 2; G sub 2) fracture toughness data showed that the mixed mode relationship for failure appears to be linear in terms of G sub 1 and G sub 2. The study further indicates that fracture of brittle resins is controlled by the G sub 1 component, and that fracture of many tough resins is controlled by total strain-energy release rate, G sub T. Regarding the relation of polymer structure and the mixed mode fracture: high mode 1 toughness requires resin dilatation; dilatation is low in unmodified epoxies at room temperature/dry conditions; dilatation is higher in plasticized epoxies, heated epoxies, and in modified epoxies; modification improves mode 2 toughness only slightly compared with mode 1 improvements. Analytical aspects of the cracked lap shear test specimen were explored.

  1. Dynamic crack propagation in a 2D elastic body: The out-of-plane case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicaise, Serge; Sandig, Anna-Margarete

    2007-05-01

    Already in 1920 Griffith has formulated an energy balance criterion for quasistatic crack propagation in brittle elastic materials. Nowadays, a generalized energy balance law is used in mechanics [F. Erdogan, Crack propagation theories, in: H. Liebowitz (Ed.), Fracture, vol. 2, Academic Press, New York, 1968, pp. 498-586; L.B. Freund, Dynamic Fracture Mechanics, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1990; D. Gross, Bruchmechanik, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1996] in order to predict how a running crack will grow. We discuss this situation in a rigorous mathematical way for the out-of-plane state. This model is described by two coupled equations in the reference configuration: a two-dimensional scalar wave equation for the displacement fields in a cracked bounded domain and an ordinary differential equation for the crack position derived from the energy balance law. We handle both equations separately, assuming at first that the crack position is known. Then the weak and strong solvability of the wave equation will be studied and the crack tip singularities will be derived under the assumption that the crack is straight and moves tangentially. Using the energy balance law and the crack tip behavior of the displacement fields we finally arrive at an ordinary differential equation for the motion of the crack tip.

  2. Grain-by-grain study of the mechanisms of crack propagation during iodine stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, R.E.; Dorado, A.O.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the tests conducted to determine the conditions leading to cracking of a specified grain of metal, during the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium alloys, focusing on the crystallographic orientation of crack paths, the critical stress conditions, and the significance of the fractographic features encountered. In order to perform crystalline orientation of fracture surfaces, a specially heat-treated Zircaloy-4 having very large grains, grown up to the wall thickness, was used. Careful orientation work has proved that intracrystalline pseudo-cleavage occurs only along basal planes. the effects of anisotropy, plasticity, triaxiality, and residual stresses originated in thermal contraction have to be considered to account for the influence of the stress state. A grain-by-grain calculation led to the conclusion that transgranular cracking always takes place on those bearing the maximum resolved tensile stress perpendicular to basal planes. Propagation along twin boundaries has been identified among the different fracture modes encountered.

  3. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, J.; van Herwijnen, A.; Chambon, G.; Birkeland, K. W.; Schweizer, J.

    2015-10-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e., to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST) experiments applying the discrete element (DE) method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, in order to compare the numerical and experimental results, the slab mechanical properties (Young's modulus and strength) which are not measured in the field were derived from density. The simulations nicely reproduced the process of crack propagation observed in field PSTs. Finally, the mechanical processes at play were analyzed in depth which led to suggestions for minimum column length in field PSTs.

  4. Effect of random microstructure on crack propagation in cortical bone tissue under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, S.; Adel-Wahab, A.; Silberschmidt, V.

    2013-07-01

    A fracture process in a cortical bone tissue depends on various factors, such as bone loss, heterogeneous microstructure, variation of its material properties and accumulation of microcracks. Therefore, it is crucial to comprehend and describe the effect of microstructure and material properties of the components of cortical bone on crack propagation in a dynamic loading regime. At the microscale level, osteonal bone demonstrates a random distribution of osteons imbedded in an interstitial matrix and surrounded by a thin layer known as cement line. Such a distribution of osteons can lead to localization of deformation processes. The global mechanical behavior of bone and the crack-propagation process are affected by such localization under external loads. Hence, the random distribution of microstructural features plays a key role in the fracture process of cortical bone. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to develop two-dimensional microstructured numerical models of cortical bone tissue in order to examine the interaction between the propagating crack and bone microstructure using an extended finite-element method under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions; secondly, to investigate the effect of randomly distributed microstructural constituents on the crack propagation processes and crack paths. The obtained results of numerical simulations showed the influence of random microstructure on the global response of bone tissue at macroscale and on the crack-propagation process for quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions.

  5. Theory for accelerated slow crack propagation in polyethylene fuel pipes. Annual report, 1987-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Moet, A.; Chudnovsky, A.; Chaoui, K.; Strebel, J.

    1988-06-01

    The report describes a test for assessing the resistance of polyethylene fuel gas pipe materials to brittle crack propagation. The test employs fatigue loading to a notched specimen. Pipe specimens prepared from 2306-IIC and 2306-IA exhibit an initial stage of brittle crack propagation which becomes progressively ductile as it approaches ultimate failure by tearing. The complete test duration is extremely short in comparison to others currently employed, yet it similarly ranks both materials tested. Further, crack layer analysis is employed to evaluate the specific energy of fracture, gamma, a fundamental parameter characteristic of the material's resistance to brittle-crack propagation. It is also found from microscopic examinations that brittle fatigue involves a crazing mechanism known to occur under creep condition.

  6. Effect of Microstructure on the Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of TC4-DT Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ping; Zhao, Yongqing; Zeng, Weidong; Liu, Jianglin

    2015-05-01

    This paper focused on the fatigue crack growth behavior of TC4-DT titanium alloy with different microstructures. Heat treatments were performed to produce different microstructures, which varied in α lamella width and cluster size. The fatigue crack propagation route was observed for different microstructures. The deformation characteristic of the crack tip plastic zone was analyzed. The results demonstrated that, for adequate mechanical properties of the alloy, the microstructure formed after performing two treatments (first, air cooling from the β-phase field, and then annealing at 550 °C for 4 h) exhibited a better fatigue anti-crack propagation ability. This result was related to the existing higher plastic deformation field in the crack tip. Wide α lamellae and coarse α colonies were found to contribute to the improvement of the fracture toughness.

  7. Decohesion Elements using Two and Three-Parameter Mixed-Mode Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.

    2001-01-01

    An eight-node decohesion element implementing different criteria to predict delamination growth under mixed-mode loading is proposed. The element is used at the interface between solid finite elements to model the initiation and propagation of delamination. A single displacement-based damage parameter is used in a softening law to track the damage state of the interface. The power law criterion and a three-parameter mixed-mode criterion are used to predict delamination growth. The accuracy of the predictions is evaluated in single mode delamination and in the mixed-mode bending tests.

  8. Origin of moisture effects on crack propagation in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the origin of unexpected moisture effects on crack extension in fiberglass laminates. Water immersion has been found to greatly reduce the rate of crack growth under constant loading, while increasing the rate under cyclic loading, the latter effect being the expected one. Observations were made of the extension of the stable damage zone at the tip of precut notches in wet and dry environments. The damage zone size is postulated as a critical element in the relaxation of high stress concentrations in composites, such as those at notch or crack tips. Under constant load, moisture is shown to greatly expand the interply delamination region in the damage zone, thus reducing the local fiber stresses and increasing crack resistance. Under cyclic loading moisture has little effect on the delamination region, which is large even for dry environments, and the only effect is weakening of the material and acceleration of cracks. Severe hygrothermal conditions can so weaken the material that the crack resistance is reduced under constant loading as well.

  9. Observation of crack propagation in saline ice and freshwater ice with fluid inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, M.; Petrenko, V. F.

    2003-01-01

    A key process of crack propagation in saline ice is the interaction between the crack and fluid inclusions. We observed their interaction in freshwater ice using very high-speed photography (VHSP) and found that the low-density fluids (air and inert liquid, Fluorinert, 1.78 g/cm(3)) could not impede the crack effectively, interrupting the propagation for less than 10 mus. The high-density liquid mercury, (13.8 g/cm(3)) impeded the crack more effectively, stalling the development of the crack for more than 20 mus. The crack velocity in saline ice was measured using two different methods: electrical resistance method (ERM) and VHSP. These two methods returned very different mean velocities, 15 m/s for the ERM and 250 m/s for the VHSP. We found that in ice with conductive liquid inclusions, the ERM measured the time it took to break liquid bridges stretched across a crack rather than the crack velocity. Results from the VHSP show that the maximum crack velocity in saline ice was 500 m/s, which is one-half of that found in freshwater ice. From our results using freshwater ice with inclusions, we conclude that liquid inclusions in saline ice may play a role in this retardation.

  10. Dislocation mechanism based model for stage II fatigue crack propagation rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated plastic deformation, which of course depends on dislocation mechanism, at or near the crack tip leads to the fatigue crack propagation. By involving the theory of thermally activated flow and the cumulative plastic strain criterion, an effort is made here to model the stage II fatigue crack propagation rate in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The model, therefore, provides capability to ascertain: (1) the dislocation mechanism (and hence the near crack tip microstructures) assisting the crack growth, (2) the relative resistance of dislocation mechanisms to the crack growth, and (3) the fracture surface characteristics and its interpretation in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The local microstructure predicted for the room temperature crack growth in copper by this model is in good agreement with the experimental results taken from the literature. With regard to the relative stability of such dislocation mechanisms as the cross-slip and the dislocation intersection, the model suggests an enhancement of crack growth rate with an ease of cross-slip which in general promotes dislocation cell formation and is common in material which has high stacking fault energy (produces wavy slips). Cross-slip apparently enhances crack growth rate by promoting slip irreversibility and fracture surface brittleness to a greater degree.

  11. A Continuum-Atomistic Analysis of Transgranular Crack Propagation in Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.

    2009-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain is used to study plastic processes at a crack tip in a single crystal of aluminum. The case of mode I loading is studied. A transition from deformation twinning to full dislocation emission from the crack tip is found when the crack plane is rotated around the [111] crystallographic axis. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [112] twinning direction, the crack propagates through a twinning mechanism. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [011] slip direction, the crack propagates through the emission of full dislocations. In intermediate orientations, a transition from full dislocation emission to twinning is found to occur with an increase in the stress intensity at the crack tip. This finding confirms the suggestion that the very high strain rates, inherently present in MD simulations, which produce higher stress intensities at the crack tip, over-predict the tendency for deformation twinning compared to experiments. The present study, therefore, aims to develop a more realistic and accurate predictive modeling of fracture processes.

  12. Determining the propagation angle for non-vertical surface-breaking cracks and its effect on crack sizing using an ACFM sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. L.; Zhou, L.; Rowshandel, H.; Nicholson, G. L.; Davis, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Alternating current field measurement (ACFM) probes are used to detect and size cracks in a range of engineering components. Crack sizing for this, and other electromagnetic (EM) based NDT systems, relies on relating the signal obtained to the actual crack length. For cracks that do not propagate vertically, such as rolling contact fatigue cracks in rails, predicting the crack depth, which determines the rail depth to be removed by grinding, requires an assumed propagation angle into the material as no method to determine crack vertical angle from the EM signals has been reported. This paper discusses the relationship between ACFM signals and propagation angles for surface-breaking cracks using a COMSOL model. The Bx signal accurately predicts the crack pocket length when the vertical angle is 30-90° but underestimates pocket length for shallower angles, e.g. a 50% underestimate is seen for a 3.2 mm pocket length crack propagating at a vertical angle of 10°. A new measure, the Bz trough-peak ratio, is proposed to determine the crack vertical angle. These are verified by experimental measurements using a commercial ACFM pencil probe for cracks with a range of vertical angles between 10° and 90°.

  13. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, D.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  14. Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Propagation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerday, B. P.; Dadfarnia, M.; Balch, D. K.; Nibur, K. A.; Cadden, C. H.; Sofronis, P.

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds of the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steel 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9), using fracture mechanics methods. The fracture initiation toughness and crack growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 230 wppm (1.3 at. pct) hydrogen. The fracture initiation toughness and slope of the crack growth resistance curve for the hydrogen-precharged weld were reduced by as much as 60 and 90 pct, respectively, relative to the noncharged weld. A physical model for hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in the welds was formulated from microscopy evidence and finite-element modeling. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation proceeded by a sequence of microcrack formation at the weld ferrite, intense shear deformation in the ligaments separating microcracks, and then fracture of the ligaments. One salient role of hydrogen in the crack propagation process was promoting microcrack formation at austenite/ferrite interfaces and within the ferrite. In addition, hydrogen may have facilitated intense shear deformation in the ligaments separating microcracks. The intense shear deformation could be related to the development of a nonuniform distribution of hydrogen trapped at dislocations between microcracks, which in turn created a gradient in the local flow stress.

  15. Dynamic calibration and analysis of crack tip propagation in energetic materials using real-time radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Ali

    Crack propagation in a solid rocket motor environment is difficult to measure directly. This experimental and analytical study evaluated the viability of real-time radiography for detecting bore regression and propellant crack propagation speed. The scope included the quantitative interpretation of crack tip velocity from simulated radiographic images of a burning, center-perforated grain and actual real-time radiographs taken on a rapid-prototyped model that dynamically produced the surface movements modeled in the simulation. The simplified motor simulation portrayed a bore crack that propagated radially at a speed that was 10 times the burning rate of the bore. Comparing the experimental image interpretation with the calibrated surface inputs, measurement accuracies were quantified. The average measurements of the bore radius were within 3% of the calibrated values with a maximum error of 7%. The crack tip speed could be characterized with image processing algorithms, but not with the dynamic calibration data. The laboratory data revealed that noise in the transmitted X-Ray intensity makes sensing the crack tip propagation using changes in the centerline transmitted intensity level impractical using the algorithms employed.

  16. Visualization of non-propagating Lamb wave modes for fatigue crack evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2015-03-01

    This article develops a non-propagating Lamb wave mode (NPL) imaging technique for fatigue crack visualization. NPL has a great potential for crack evaluation in that it significantly contributes local mode amplitudes in the vicinity of a crack without spatial propagation. Such unique physical phenomenon is theoretically proven and experimentally measured through laser scanning. Although its measurement is a quite challenging work due to the fact that it is quite localized and coexists with complex propagating Lamb wave modes, a NPL filter proposed in this article overcomes the technical challenge by eliminating all propagating Lamb modes from laser scanned full Lamb wavefields. Through the NPL filtering process, only fatigue crack-induced NPLs can be measured and retained. To verify such physical observation and the corresponding NPL filter, a real micro fatigue crack is created by applying repeated tensile loading, and its detectability is tested using a surface-mounted piezoelectric transducer for generating Lamb waves and a laser Doppler vibrometer for measuring the corresponding responses. The experimental results confirm that even an invisible fatigue crack can be instantaneously visualized and effectively evaluated through the proposed NPL measurement and filtering processes.

  17. A methodology for the investigation of toughness and crack propagation in mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Ritchie, Robert O

    2014-11-01

    Bone fracture is a health concern for those with aged bone and brittle bone diseases. Mouse bone is widely used as a model of human bone, especially to investigate preclinical treatment strategies. However, little is known about the mechanisms of mouse bone fracture and its similarities and differences from fracture in human bone. In this work we present a methodology to investigate the fracture toughness during crack initiation and crack propagation for mouse bone. Mouse femora were dissected, polished on their periosteal surface, notched on the posterior surface at their mid-diaphysis, and tested in three-point bending under displacement control at a rate of 0.1mm/min using an in situ loading stage within an environmental scanning electron microscope. We obtained high-resolution real-time imaging of the crack initiation and propagation in mouse bone. From the images we can measure the crack extension at each step of the crack growth and calculate the toughness of the bone (in terms of stress intensity factor (K) and work to fracture (Wf)) as a function of stable crack length (Δa), thus generating a resistance curve for the mouse bone. The technique presented here provides insight into the evolution of microdamage and the toughening mechanisms that resist crack propagation, which are essential for preclinical development of treatments to enhance bone quality and combat fracture risk. PMID:25084121

  18. Mixed-Mode-Bending Delamination Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Reeder, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Mixed-mode-bending delamination apparatus generates two types of delamination stress simultaneously in specimen from single externally applied point load. In technique, indivial mode I and mode II contributions to delamination in specimen analyzed by use of simple beam-theory equations, eliminating need for time-consuming, difficult numerical analysis. Allows wider range of mode I/mode II ratios than possible with many other methods. Mixed-mode delamination testing of interest in all fields utilizing composite materials, used mostly in aerospace field, but also used in automobiles, lightweight armored military vehicles, boats, and sporting equipment. Useful in general lumber, plywood, and adhesive industries, as well.

  19. Laser cutting silicon-glass double layer wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yecheng; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at introducing the laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) technology to solve the silicon-glass double layer wafer dicing problems in the packaging procedure of silicon-glass device packaged by WLCSP technology, investigating the feasibility of this idea, and studying the crack propagation process of LITP cutting double layer wafer. In this paper, the physical process of the 1064 nm laser beam interact with the double layer wafer during the cutting process was studied theoretically. A mathematical model consists the volumetric heating source and the surface heating source has been established. The temperature and stress distribution was simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) was added to the simulation as the supplementary features to simulate the crack propagation process and the crack propagation profile. The silicon-glass double layer wafer cutting verification experiment under typical parameters was conducted by using the 1064 nm semiconductor laser. The crack propagation profile on the fracture surface was examined by optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and XFEM status. It was concluded that the quality of the finished fracture surface has been greatly improved, and the experiment results were well supported by the numerical simulation results.

  20. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.J. Sydney Univ., NSW . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Mai, Y.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, long'' (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, small'' (1 to 100 [mu]m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  1. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.J. |; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O.; Mai, Y.W.

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, ``long`` (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, ``small`` (1 to 100 {mu}m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  2. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Kim, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  3. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  4. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  5. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijerathne, M. L. L.; Hori, Muneo; Sakaguchi, Hide; Oguni, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  6. Extreme stress gradient effects on microstructural fatigue crack propagation rates in Ni microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Tohidi, F.; Pierron, O. N.

    2015-05-18

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of microstructurally small cracks growing under extreme stress gradients was investigated in Ni microbeams under fully reversed cyclic loading. A technique to calculate the crack growth rates in microbeams with two different normalized stress gradients (17% and 50% μm{sup −1}) is developed and validated. Decreasing crack propagation rates are observed over the first 2 μm, and the rates are more than 1 order of magnitude slower for the devices with 50% μm{sup −1} stress gradients. This fundamental knowledge is critical to predict the fatigue reliability of advanced metallic microcomponents under bending such as in microelectromechanical systems or flexible/stretchable electronics.

  7. Fatigue Crack Propagation from Notched Specimens of 304 SS in elevated Temperature Aqueous Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G. L.; Mills, W. J.

    2002-08-01

    Fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates for 304 stainless steel (304SS) were determined in 24 degree C and 288 degree C air and 288 degree C water using double-edged notch (DEN) specimens of 304 stainless steel (304 SS). Test performed at matched loading conditions in air and water at 288 degree C with 20-6- cc h[sub]2/kg h[sub]2O provided a direct comparison of the relative crack growth rates in air and water over a wide range of crack growth rates. The DEN crack extension ranged from short cracks (0.03-0.25 mm) to long cracks up to 4.06 mm, which are consistent with conventional deep crack tests. Crack growth rates of 304 SS in water were about 12 times the air rate. This 12X environmental enhancement persisted to crack extensions up to 4.06 mm, far outside the range associated with short crack effects. The large environmental degradation for 304 SS crack growth is consistent with the strong reduction of fatigue life in high hydrogen water. Further, very similar environmental effects w ere reported in fatigue crack growth tests in hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). Most literature data in high hydrogen water show only a mild environmental effect for 304 SS, of order 2.5 times air or less, but the tests were predominantly performed at high cyclic stress intensity or equivalently, high air rates. The environmental effect in low oxygen environments at low stress intensity depends strongly on both the stress ratio, R, and the load rise time, T[sub]r, as recently reported for austenitic stainless steel in BWR water. Fractography was performed for both tests in air and water. At 288 degree C in water, the fracture surfaces were crisply faceted with a crystallographic appearance, and showed striations under high magnification. The cleavage-like facets on the fracture surfaces suggest that hydrogen embrittlement is the primary cause of accelerated cracking.

  8. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Spot-Welded Joints Based on Fracture Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanifard, S.; Bonab, M. A. Mohtadi; Jabbari, Gh.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fatigue crack propagation life of resistance spot welds in tensile-shear specimens is investigated based on the calculation of stress intensity factors and J-integral using three-dimensional finite element method. For comparison, experimental works on 5083-O aluminum alloy spot-welded joints have been carried out to verify the numerical predictions of fatigue crack propagation of welded joints. A lot of analyses have been performed to obtain stress intensity factors and J-integral in tensile-shear specimens of spot-welded joints by using commercial software ANSYS. These gathered data have been formulated by using statistical software SPSS. The results of fatigue propagation life and predicted fatigue crack path revealed very good agreement with the experimental fatigue test data and photograph of cross-section of the fatigued spot-weld specimens.

  9. Simulation of Crack Propagation in Engine Rotating Components under Variable Amplitude Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, P. J.; Ghosn, L. J.; Telesman, J.; Calomino, A. M.; Kantzos, P.

    1998-01-01

    The crack propagation life of tested specimens has been repeatedly shown to strongly depend on the loading history. Overloads and extended stress holds at temperature can either retard or accelerate the crack growth rate. Therefore, to accurately predict the crack propagation life of an actual component, it is essential to approximate the true loading history. In military rotorcraft engine applications, the loading profile (stress amplitudes, temperature, and number of excursions) can vary significantly depending on the type of mission flown. To accurately assess the durability of a fleet of engines, the crack propagation life distribution of a specific component should account for the variability in the missions performed (proportion of missions flown and sequence). In this report, analytical and experimental studies are described that calibrate/validate the crack propagation prediction capability ]or a disk alloy under variable amplitude loading. A crack closure based model was adopted to analytically predict the load interaction effects. Furthermore, a methodology has been developed to realistically simulate the actual mission mix loading on a fleet of engines over their lifetime. A sequence of missions is randomly selected and the number of repeats of each mission in the sequence is determined assuming a Poisson distributed random variable with a given mean occurrence rate. Multiple realizations of random mission histories are generated in this manner and are used to produce stress, temperature, and time points for fracture mechanics calculations. The result is a cumulative distribution of crack propagation lives for a given, life limiting, component location. This information can be used to determine a safe retirement life or inspection interval for the given location.

  10. Crack propagation studies to determine benign or catastrophic failure modes for aerospace thin-rim gears. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, D.G.

    1996-05-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear tooth crack propagation. The goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. Gear tooth crack propagation was simulated using a finite element based computer program. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics were used. Quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. Crack tip stress intensity factors were estimated and used to determine crack propagation direction and fatigue crack growth rate. The computer program used had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically using an automated re-meshing scheme. In addition, experimental studies were performed in the NASA Lewis Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack path predictions. Also, specialized crack propagation gages were installed on the test gears to measure gear tooth crack growth rate. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios (film thickness divided by tooth height) of 3.3 and 1.0 produced tooth fractures while a backup ratio of 0.3 produced rim fractures. For a backup ratio of 0.5, the experiments produced rim fractures and the predictions produced both rim and tooth fractures, depending on the initial crack conditions. Good correlation between the predicted number of crack propagation cycles and measured number of cycles was achieved using both the Paris fatigue crack growth method and the Collipfiest crack growth equation when fatigue crack closure was considered.

  11. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in sapphire in air and simulated physiological environments.

    PubMed

    Asoo, B; McNaney, J M; Mitamura, Y; Ritchie, R O

    2000-12-01

    Single-crystal aluminas are being considered for use in the manufacture of prosthetic heart valves. To characterize such materials for biomedical application, subcritical crack growth by stress corrosion (static fatigue) and by cyclic fatigue has been examined in sapphire along (1100) planes in 24 degrees C humid air and 37 degrees C Ringer's solution (the latter as a simulated physiological environment). The relationships between crack-propagation rates and the linear-elastic stress intensity have been determined for the first time in sapphire for both modes of subcritical cracking. It was found that growth rates were significantly faster at a given stress intensity in the Ringer's solution compared to the humid air environment. Mechanistically, a true cyclic fatigue effect was not found in sapphire as experimentally measured cyclic fatigue-crack growth rates could be closely predicted simply by integrating the static fatigue-crack growth data over the cyclic loading cycle. PMID:11007616

  12. SH0 Guided Wave Interaction with a Crack Aligned in the Propagation Direction in a Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratassepp, M.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are currently of interest for structural health monitoring of large structures such as storage tanks and pipelines. This study focuses on the scattering of the fundamental horizontal shear (SH0) mode at a through-thickness notch or crack in a plate whose alignment is in the direction of the wave propagation. The reflection and diffraction of the wave at a crack are examined using 2D finite element simulations. It is shown that the main reflection is generated by Rayleigh-like surface waves created on the faces of the crack, which radiate energy back into the plate. The amplitudes of the reflected and diffracted signals are verified experimentally.

  13. Finite Element Simulations on Erosion and Crack Propagation in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. S.; Fu, L. H.; Yang, L.; Zhou, Y. C.; Lu, C.

    2015-07-01

    Erosion of thermal barrier coatings occurs when atmospheric or carbon particles from the combustion chamber are ingested into aviation turbine engines. To understand the influence of erosion on the service life of thermal barrier coatings, we introduce the erosion and crack propagation models, and then by using finite element simulations, determine the relationship between the penetrating depth, the maximum principle stress and impingement variables such as velocity and angle. It is shown that cracks nucleate and extend during the erosion process and the length of a crack increases with the increase of the particle velocity and impact angle.

  14. Tracking and Motion Analysis of Crack Propagations in Crystals for Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Duchaineau, M; Goldgof, D B

    2001-05-14

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis for a discovery in molecular dynamics. Recent simulations have shown that velocities of crack propagations in crystals under certain conditions can become supersonic, which is contrary to classical physics. In this research, they present a framework for tracking and motion analysis of crack propagations in crystals. It includes line segment extraction based on Canny edge maps, feature selection based on physical properties, and subsequent tracking of primary and secondary wavefronts. This tracking is completely automated; it runs in real time on three 834-image sequences using forty 250 MHZ processors. Results supporting physical observations are presented in terms of both feature tracking and velocity analysis.

  15. Fatigue of Self-Healing Nanofiber-based Composites: Static Test and Subcritical Crack Propagation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; Sett, Soumyadip; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2016-07-20

    Here, we studied the self-healing of composite materials filled with epoxy-containing nanofibers. An initial incision in the middle of a composite sample stretched in a static fatigue test can result in either crack propagation or healing. In this study, crack evolution was observed in real time. A binary epoxy, which acted as a self-healing agent, was encapsulated in two separate types of interwoven nano/microfibers formed by dual-solution blowing, with the core containing either epoxy or hardener and the shell being formed from poly(vinylidene fluoride)/ poly(ethylene oxide) mixture. The core-shell fibers were encased in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) matrix. When the fibers were damaged by a growing crack in this fiber-reinforced composite material because of static stretching in the fatigue test, they broke and released the healing agent into the crack area. The epoxy used in this study was cured and solidified for approximately an hour at room temperature, which then conglutinated and healed the damaged location. The observations were made for at least several hours and in some cases up to several days. It was revealed that the presence of the healing agent (the epoxy) in the fibers successfully prevented the propagation of cracks in stretched samples subjected to the fatigue test. A theoretical analysis of subcritical cracks was performed, and it revealed a jumplike growth of subcritical cracks, which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27332924

  16. Prediction of fatigue crack propagation life in notched members under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z.; Rauf, A.; Younas, M.

    1997-06-01

    One of the interesting phenomenon in the study of fatigue crack propagation under variable amplitude load cycling is the crack growth retardation that normally occurs due to the application of a periodic overload. Fatigue crack growth rate under simple variable amplitude loading sequence incorporating period overloads is studied using single edge notched specimens of AISI304 stainless steel. Load interaction effects due to single and multiple overload have been addressed. Substantial retardation of fatigue crack growth rate is observed due to the introduction of periodic tensile overloads. Estimates of fatigue life have been obtained employing Wheeler model (using Paris and modified Paris equations) and Elber’s model. Analytical predictions are compared with experimental results. Results of these analytical fatigue life predictions show good agreement with the experimental fatigue life data. Fatigue crack propagation rates also have been evaluated from the fractographic study of fatigue striations seen on the fracture surface. Good agreement was found between the experimentally observed crack growth rates and the fatigue crack growth rates determined by the fractographic studies.

  17. The influence of edge effects on crack propagation in snow stability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, E. H.; Simenhois, R.; van Herwijnen, A.; Birkeland, K.

    2014-08-01

    The Extended Column Test (ECT) and the Propagation Saw Test (PST) are two commonly used tests to assess the likelihood of crack propagation in a snowpack. Guidelines suggest beams with lengths of around 1 m, yet little is known about how test length affects propagation. Thus, we performed 163 ECTs and PSTs 1.0-10.0 m long. On days with full crack propagation in 1.0-1.5 m tests, we then made videos of tests 2.0-10.0 m long. We inserted markers for particle tracking to measure collapse amplitude, propagation speed, and wavelength. We also used a finite element (FE) model to simulate the strain energy release rate at fixed crack lengths. We find that (1) the proportion of tests with full propagation decreased with test length; (2) collapse was greater at the ends of the beams than in the centers; (3) collapse amplitude was independent of beam length and did not reach a constant value; (4) collapse wavelengths in the longer tests were around 3 m, two times greater than what is predicted by the anticrack model. We also confirmed the prediction that centered PSTs had double the critical length of edge PSTs. Based on our results, we conclude that cracks propagated more frequently in the shorter tests because of increased stress concentration from the far edge. The FE model suggests this edge effect occurs for PSTs of up to 2 m long or a crack to beam length ratio ≥ 0.20. Our results suggest that ECT and PST length guidelines may need to be revisited.

  18. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  19. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mayao; Gao, Xing; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Li, Simin; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Riedel, Christoph; Busse, Björn; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control), young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM) was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the lowest.

  20. The influence of edge effects on crack propagation in snow stability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, E. H.; Simenhois, R.; van Herwijnen, A.; Birkeland, K.

    2014-01-01

    Propagation tests are used to assess the likelihood of crack propagation in a snowpack, yet little is known about how test length affects propagation. Guidelines suggest beams with lengths around 1 m for Extended Column Tests (ECTs) and Propagation Saw Tests (PSTs). To examine how test length affects propagation, we performed 163 ECTs and PSTs 1 to 10 m long. On days with full crack propagation in 1.0 to 1.5 m tests, we then made videos of tests 2 to 10 m long. We inserted markers for particle tracking to measure collapse amplitude, collapse wave speed, and wavelength. We also used a finite element model to simulate the strain energy release rate at fixed crack lengths. We find that: (1) the proportion of tests with full propagation decreased with test length; (2) collapse was greater at the ends of the beams than in the centers; (3) collapse amplitudes in the longer tests were consistent with the shorter tests and did not reach a constant value; (4) collapse wavelengths in the longer tests were around 3 m, 2 × greater than what is predicted by the anticrack model. Based on our field tests and FE models, we conclude that the shorter tests fully propagated more frequently because of increased stress concentration from the far edge. The FE model suggests this edge effect occurs for PSTs up to 2 m long or a crack to beam length ratio ≥ 0.20. Our results suggest that ECT and PST length guidelines may need to be revisited.

  1. Consolidation of fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data for design use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. C.; Davies, K. B.; Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical methods developed for consolidation of fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components are evaluated. A comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and 300M steel was established by obtaining information from both published literature and reports furnished by aerospace companies. Analyses are restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Both fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data are analyzed on a statistical basis using a least-squares regression approach. For fatigue, an equivalent strain parameter is used to account for mean stress or stress ratio effects and is treated as the independent variable; cyclic fatigue life is considered to be the dependent variable. An effective stress-intensity factor is used to account for the effect of load ratio on fatigue-crack-propagation and treated as the independent variable. In this latter case, crack-growth rate is considered to be the dependent variable. A two term power function is used to relate equivalent strain to fatigue life, and an arc-hyperbolic-tangent function is used to relate effective stress intensity to crack-growth rate.

  2. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation under variable amplitude loading in PMMA and bone cement.

    PubMed

    Evans, S L

    2007-09-01

    Fatigue failure of PMMA bone cement is an important factor in the failure of cemented joint replacements. Although these devices experience widely varying loads within the body, there has been little or no study of the effects of variable amplitude loading (VAL) on fatigue damage development. Fatigue crack propagation tests were undertaken using CT specimens made from pure PMMA and Palacos R bone cement. In PMMA, constant amplitude loading tests were carried out at R- ratios ranging from 0.1 to 0.9, and VAL tests at R = 0.1 with 30% overloads every 100 cycles. Palacos R specimens were tested with and without overloads every 100 cycles and with a simplified load spectrum representing daily activities. The R- ratio had a pronounced effect on crack propagation in PMMA consistent with the effects of slow crack growth under constant load. Single overloads caused pronounced crack retardation, especially at low da/dN. In Palacos R, similar overloads had little effect, whilst individual overloads at low da/dN caused pronounced acceleration and spectrum loading retarded crack growth relative to Paris Law predictions. These results demonstrate that VAL can have dramatic effects on crack growth, which should be considered when testing bone cements. PMID:17483908

  4. Acoustic emission for characterising the crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composites (SHCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.C.; Pirskawetz, S.; Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Schmidt, W.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the analysis of crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composite (SHCC) under tensile and flexural load by using acoustic emission (AE). AE is a non-destructive technique to monitor the development of structural damage due to external forces. The main objective of this research was to characterise the cracking behaviour in SHCC in direct tensile and flexural tests by using AE. A better understanding of the development of microcracks in SHCC will lead to a better understanding of pseudo strain-hardening behaviour of SHCC and its general performance. ARAMIS optical deformation analysis was also used in direct tensile tests to observe crack propagation in SHCC materials. For the direct tensile tests, SHCC specimens were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibre with three different volume percentages (1%, 1.85% and 2.5%). For the flexural test beam specimens, only a fibre dosage of 1.85% was applied. It was found that the application of AE in SHCC can be a good option to analyse the crack growth in the specimens under increasing load, the location of the cracks and most importantly the identification of matrix cracking and fibre rupture or slippage.

  5. Comparison of the Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of Two Different Forms of PMMA Using Two-Stage Zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Ma, Liting; Chen, Xinwen; Yuan, Yanan; Ma, Yinji

    2016-02-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of two different forms of PMMA was studied using two-stage zone model. First, the fatigue crack length and fatigue crack propagation velocities of different specimens were obtained experimentally. Then the effect of material forms and specimen types on the fatigue crack propagation velocities was analyzed. Finally, the data scatter of da/ dN-Δ K curves in different forms and different types of specimens was analyzed. The results show that the expressions of fatigue crack propagation velocities of middle crack tension (MT) specimens and compact tension (CT) specimens in the same form PMMA are similar. And the scatter of MT specimens is larger than CT specimens in two forms of PMMA.

  6. Mode I Cohesive Law Characterization of Through-Crack Propagation in a Multidirectional Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed and assessed for the experimental characterization of through-the-thickness crack propagation in multidirectional composite laminates with a cohesive law. The fracture toughness and crack opening displacement are measured and used to determine a cohesive law. Two methods of computing fracture toughness are assessed and compared. While previously proposed cohesive characterizations based on the R-curve exhibit size effects, the proposed approach results in a cohesive law that is a material property. The compact tension specimen configuration is used to propagate damage while load and full-field displacements are recorded. These measurements are used to compute the fracture toughness and crack opening displacement from which the cohesive law is characterized. The experimental results show that a steady-state fracture toughness is not reached. However, the proposed method extrapolates to steady-state and is demonstrated capable of predicting the structural behavior of geometrically-scaled specimens.

  7. Research on a Lamb Wave and Particle Filter-Based On-Line Crack Propagation Prognosis Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Jian; Yang, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics and health management techniques have drawn widespread attention due to their ability to facilitate maintenance activities based on need. On-line prognosis of fatigue crack propagation can offer information for optimizing operation and maintenance strategies in real-time. This paper proposes a Lamb wave-particle filter (LW-PF)-based method for on-line prognosis of fatigue crack propagation which takes advantages of the possibility of on-line monitoring to evaluate the actual crack length and uses a particle filter to deal with the crack evolution and monitoring uncertainties. The piezoelectric transducers (PZTs)-based active Lamb wave method is adopted for on-line crack monitoring. The state space model relating to crack propagation is established by the data-driven and finite element methods. Fatigue experiments performed on hole-edge crack specimens have validated the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:26950130

  8. Research on a Lamb Wave and Particle Filter-Based On-Line Crack Propagation Prognosis Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Jian; Yang, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics and health management techniques have drawn widespread attention due to their ability to facilitate maintenance activities based on need. On-line prognosis of fatigue crack propagation can offer information for optimizing operation and maintenance strategies in real-time. This paper proposes a Lamb wave-particle filter (LW-PF)-based method for on-line prognosis of fatigue crack propagation which takes advantages of the possibility of on-line monitoring to evaluate the actual crack length and uses a particle filter to deal with the crack evolution and monitoring uncertainties. The piezoelectric transducers (PZTs)-based active Lamb wave method is adopted for on-line crack monitoring. The state space model relating to crack propagation is established by the data-driven and finite element methods. Fatigue experiments performed on hole-edge crack specimens have validated the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:26950130

  9. Effects of microstructure on the fatigue crack propagation resistance in composite microstructure by 3D fabric modeling for energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, T.; Kim, J.K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, martensite-ferrite dual phase steel composed of martensite in hard phase and ferrite in soft phase is made 3 dimensions fabric composite for energy transport and the difference in fatigue crack propagation behavior resulting from the structural size is investigated by fracture mechanics and microstructural method. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) the fatigue crack propagation rate is influenced by the ferrite grain size, in other words, in the low {Delta}K region the fatigue crack propagation rate is decreased with decreasing of the grain size but the difference of propagation rate resulted from the structural size is decreased as {Delta}K is increased; (2) the above results are explained by the degree of crack arrest effect of the martensite phase for the fatigue crack propagation depending on the ratio of reversed plastic zone size to the ferrite grain size.

  10. Grain boundary oxidation and oxidation accelerated fatigue crack nucleation and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Oshida, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue life at elevated temperatures is often shortened by oxidation. Grain boundary oxidation penetrates deeper than the surface oxidation. Therefore, grain boundary oxide penetration could be the primary cause of accelerated fatigue crack nucleation and propagation, and the shortened fatigue life at elevated temperatures. Grain boundary oxidation kinetics was studied and its statistical scatter was analyzed by the Weibull's distribution function. The effects of grain boundary oxidation on shortened fatigue life was analyzed and discussed. A model of intermittent microruptures of the grain boundary oxide was proposed for the fatigue crack growth in the low frequency region. The proposed model is consistent with the observations that fatigue crack growth rate in the low frequency region with hold time at K sub max is inversely proportional to cyclic frequency and that crack growth is intergranular.

  11. The Evolution of Stress Intensity Factors and the Propagation of Cracks in Elastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Avner; Hu, Bei; Velazquez, Juan J. L.

    When a crack Γs propagates in an elastic medium the stress intensity factors evolve with the tip x(s) of Γs. In this paper we derive formulae which describe the evolution of these stress intensity factors for a homogeneous isotropic elastic medium under plane strain conditions. Denoting by ψ=ψ(x,s) the stress potential (ψ is biharmonic and has zero traction along the crack Γs) and by κ(s) the curvature of the crack at the tip x(s), we prove that the stress intensity factors A1(s), A2(s), as functions of s, satisfy: where , are stress intensity factors of the tangential derivative of in the polar coordinate system at x(s) with θ=0 in the direction of the crack at x(s). The case of antiplane shearing is also briefly considered; in this case ψ is harmonic.

  12. Computer simulation of fast crack propagation and arrest in steel plate with temperature gradient based on local fracture stress criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Susumu; Yoshinari, Hitoshi; Aihara, Shuji

    1997-12-31

    A fracture mechanics model for fast crack propagation and arrest is proposed based on the local fracture stress criterion. Dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub D}) for a propagating crack is calculated as a function of crack velocity and temperature. The model is extended to incorporate the effect of unbroken ligament (UL) formed near the plate surfaces and crack-front-tunneling. The model simulates acceleration, deceleration and arrest of a crack in a ESSO or a double-tension test plate with temperature-gradient. Calculated arrested crack lengths compare well with experimental results. It is shown that the conventional crack arrest toughness calculated from applied stress and arrested crack length depends on temperature-gradient and the toughness is not a unique material property.

  13. Nonlinear analysis of flexural wave propagation through 1D waveguides with a breathing crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-05-01

    An analytical-numerical approach is presented to investigate the flexural wave propagation through a slender semi-infinite beam with a breathing edge-crack. A Fourier transform based spectral finite element method is employed in an iterative manner to analyze the nonlinear response of the cracked beam subjected to a transverse tone burst excitation. Results obtained using the spectral finite element method are corroborated using 1D finite element analysis that involves the formulation and solution of a linear complementarity problem at every time step. In both the methods, an equivalent rotational spring is used to model the local flexibility caused by an open crack and the respective damaged beam element is formulated. The effect of crack-breathing is accounted for by an intermittent contact force acting at the nodes of the damaged beam element. A parallel study involving the open crack model is performed in the same setting to facilitate a comparison between the open and the breathing crack model. An illustrative case study reveals clearly the existence of higher order harmonics originating from the crack-breathing phenomenon which are absent if the crack is assumed to remain open throughout. A thorough investigation of the wrap-around effect associated with spectral finite element method reveals that the relative strengths of the higher order harmonics are not influenced by the wrap-around effect. A brief parametric study involving the variation of crack depth is presented at the end which suggests that the magnitudes of the higher harmonic peaks increase with increasing levels of crack severity. The present study can be potentially useful in the efforts geared toward the development of damage detection/localization strategies based on the nonlinear wave-damage interaction.

  14. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation behaviour in SiC particulate Al2O3 whisker reinforced hybrid MMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, AKM Asif; Arai, Yoshio

    2016-02-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of a cast hybrid metal matrix composite (MMC) was investigated and compared with the crack propagation behaviour of MMC with Al2O3 and Al alloy in this article. Three dimensional (3D) surface analysis is carried out to analyze the crack propagation mechanism. All three materials clearly show near threshold and stable crack growth regions, but the rapid crack growth region is not clearly understood. The crack propagation resistance is found higher in hybrid MMC than that of MMC with Al2O3 whisker and the Al alloy in the low ΔK region. The crack propagation in the hybrid MMC in the near-threshold region is directed by the debonding of reinforcement-matrix followed by void nucleation in the Al alloy matrix. Besides, the crack propagation in the stable- or midcrack-growth region is controlled by the debonding of particle-matrix and whisker-matrix interface caused by the cycle-by-cycle crack growth along the interface. The transgranular fracture of the reinforcement and void formation are also observed. Due to presence of large volume of inclusions and the microstructural inhomogeneity, the area of striation formation is reduced in the hybrid MMC, caused the unstable fracture.

  15. Microbe-enhanced environmental fatigue crack propagation in HY130 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Kelly, R.G. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Research was undertaken to characterize the effect of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) on aqueous environment-enhanced fatigue cracking in a high-strength alloy steel. Desulfovibrio vulgaris in Postgate C solution greatly increased rates of ambient-temperature fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in tempered martensitic HY130 steel (MIL-S-24371A) under cathodic polarization and low-frequency, constant stress intensity range ([Delta]K) loading. Crack growth rates (da/dN) in the SRB solution increased 50- to 1,000-fold relative to FCP in sterile sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at [minus]1,000 mV[sub SCE] and under vacuum, respectively. The presence of microbes shifted fatigue cracking from a transgranular path (typical in sterile NaCl) to an intergranular crack path consistent with the enhanced growth rates. The SRB reduced fatigue crack initiation resistance, countering the beneficial effect of cathodic polarization for sterile NaCl. Metal embrittlement and increased hydrogen uptake at the occluded crack tip caused by bacterially produced hydrosulfide (HS[sup [minus

  16. Dynamic crack propagation in elastic-perfectly plastic solids under plane stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaomin; Rosakis, Ares J.

    THE phenomenon of steady-state dynamic crack propagation in elastic-perfectly plastic solids under mode I plane stress, small-scale yielding conditions is investigated numerically. An Eulerian finite element scheme is employed. The materials are assumed to obey the von Mises yield criterion and the associated flow rule. The ratio of the crack tip plastic zone size to that of the element nearest to the crack tip is of the order of 1.6 × 10 4. Two subjects of general interest are discussed. These are the asymptotic structure of the crack tip stress and deformation fields, and the appropriateness of a crack growth fracture criterion based on the far-field dynamic stress intensity factor. The crack-line solution by ACHENBACH and LI (Report NU-SML-TR-No. 84-1, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201, 1984a; in Fundamentals of Deformation and Fracture (edited by B.A. Brilby et al.). Cambridge University Press, 1984b) is discussed and compared to the numerical solution. The results of this study strongly indicate that the crack tip strain and velocity fields possess logarithmic singularities, which is consistent with the assumptions in the asymptotic analysis by Gao ( Int. J. Fracture34, 111, 1987). However, it is revealed that the crack tip field variations in Gao's solution present features often contrary to the numerical findings. To this end, a preliminary asymptotic analysis is performed in an effort to resolve certain issues. Finally, the critical plastic strain criterion ( MCCLINTOCK and IRWIN, in Fracture Toughness Testing and Its Applications, ASTM STP 381, p. 84, 1964) is adopted to obtain theoretical relations between the critical dynamic stress intensity factor and the crack propagation speed. These relations are found to agree well with experimental measurements by Rosakis et al. ( J. Mech. Phys. Solids32, 443, 1984) and by ZEHNDER and ROSAKIS ( Int. J. Fracture, to appear 1990), performed on thin 4340 steel plates whose

  17. Mixed-mode, time-dependent rubber/metal debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liechti, Kenneth M.; Wu, Jeng-Dah

    2001-05-01

    This paper examines the need to incorporate a rate-dependent traction-separation law in order to model quasi-static debonding between rubber and metal. A pseudo-stress model was used to account for the nonlinear, multi-axial and time-dependent nature of the filled rubber that was used in the experiments. The parameters for the traction-separation law were extracted on the basis of measurements of load, crack length and crack opening displacements in an opening mode experiment at one applied displacement rate. The form of the traction-separation law was consistent with observations of ligament content on the metal fracture surface. Additional experiments were then conducted in opening mode at different rates and in mixed mode with positive and negative shear so that comparisons with predictions from the calibrated cohesive zone model could be made. The crack length history proved to be the most discriminating measure of the validity of the model, which was most effective at higher loading rates.

  18. Gear Crack Propagation Path Studies: Guidelines for Ultra-Safe Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2001-01-01

    Design guidelines have been established to prevent catastrophic rim fracture failure modes when considering gear tooth bending fatigue. Analysis was performed using the finite element method with principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack propagation paths were predicted for a variety of gear tooth and rim configurations. The effects of rim and web thicknesses, initial crack locations, and gear tooth geometry factors such as diametral pitch, number of teeth, pitch radius, and tooth pressure angle were considered. Design maps of tooth/rim fracture modes including effects of gear geometry, applied load, crack size, and material properties were developed. The occurrence of rim fractures significantly increased as the backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) decreased. The occurrence of rim fractures also increased as the initial crack location was moved down the root of the tooth. Increased rim and web compliance increased the occurrence of rim fractures. For gears with constant pitch radii, coarser-pitch teeth increased the occurrence of tooth fractures over rim fractures. Also, 25 deg pressure angle teeth had an increased occurrence of tooth fractures over rim fractures when compared to 20 deg pressure angle teeth. For gears with constant number of teeth or gears with constant diametral pitch, varying size had little or no effect on crack propagation paths.

  19. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite-element analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Chermahini, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Fatigue cracks are a major problem in designing structures subjected to cyclic loading. Cracks frequently occur in structures such as aircraft and spacecraft. The inspection intervals of many aircraft structures are based on crack-propagation lives. Therefore, improved prediction of propagation lives under flight-load conditions (variable-amplitude loading) are needed to provide more realistic design criteria for these structures. The main thrust was to develop a three-dimensional, nonlinear, elastic-plastic, finite element program capable of extending a crack and changing boundary conditions for the model under consideration. The finite-element model is composed of 8-noded (linear-strain) isoparametric elements. In the analysis, the material is assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic. The cycle stress-strain curve for the material is shown Zienkiewicz's initial-stress method, von Mises's yield criterion, and Drucker's normality condition under small-strain assumptions are used to account for plasticity. The three-dimensional analysis is capable of extending the crack and changing boundary conditions under cyclic loading.

  20. Influence of gaseous environments on rates of near-threshold fatigue crack propagation in nicrmov steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Peter K.; Hudak, S. J.; Donald, J. Keith

    1982-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen environment (448 kPa) on near-threshold fatigue crack propagation rates was examined in a 779 MPa yield strength NiCrMoV steel at 93 °C. An automatically decreasing and increasing stress intensity technique was employed to generate crack growth rates at three load ratios (R = 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8). Results show that the crack propagation rates in hydrogen are slower than those in air for levels of stress intensity range, ΔK, below about 12 MPa√m. The crack closure concept does not explain the slower crack growth rates in hydrogen than in air. Near-threshold growth rates appear to be controlled by the levels of residual moisture in the environments. In argon and air, the fracture morphology is transgranular, while in H2 the amount of intergranularity varies with ΔK and achieves a maximum when the cyclic plastic zone is approximately equal to the prior austenite grain size.

  1. Crack propagation in stainless steels and nickel base alloys in a commercial operating BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, A.; Morin, U.; Bengtsson, B.; Jansson, C.

    1995-12-31

    Crack propagation was investigated to study critical stress intensity factors for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), and crack growth rates in various materials. Modified bolt loaded compact tension (CT) specimens were exposed to BWR normal water chemistry (NWC) in a commercially operating BWR. The test facility was a pressure vessel, originally designed for high temperature magnetite filters. Stainless steels (SS) of Types 304 SS and 316 SS were included in the test matrix, as well as the Ni base weld materials alloys 82 and 182. The SS were investigated both in sensitized and in cold worked condition. For alloy 182 various parameters were studied, such as the effect of the carbon stabilization parameter, and the as-welded condition versus a post weld heat treatment (PWHT). Crack growth was measured annually, during the normal outages, by an optical microscope. The results were evaluated as crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity. A few specimens have been removed from testing for fractographic examination. Most of the specimens were exposed to NWC for more than 30,000 hours. Alloy 82 in as welded condition was found to be susceptible to IGSCC, at least at stress intensities above 30 MPa{radical}m. For alloy 182, in as welded condition, significant crack growth was detected in all specimens. No beneficial effect of the carbon stabilization parameter could be found. PWHT had a beneficial effect on the IGSCC susceptibility of alloy 182, and at stress intensities below 30 MPa{radical}m the crack growth rates were one to two orders of magnitude lower, compared to alloy 182 in as welded condition. As expected, an increasing susceptibility to IGSCC with increasing degree of cold work was found for stainless steel. At 5% cold work Type 304 SS cracked at a higher rate than Type 316NG with the same degree of cold work. At 20% cold work Type 304 SS and Type 316NG cracked at essentially the same rate.

  2. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  3. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  4. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in the shape-memory and superelastic alloy nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Aindrea Leigh

    This dissertation presents a detailed study on the fatigue-crack propagation behavior in 50Ni-50Ti (at. %), and the effect of a stress-induced martensitic transformation on the material's crack-growth resistance. Furthermore, the effect of environment on crack-growth rates was also investigated. Specifically, fatigue-crack growth was characterized in stable austenite (120°C), superelastic austenite (37°C), and martensite (-65°C and -196°C). In general, as the temperature decreased the fatigue-crack growth resistance increased, where the fatigue threshold was greater and crack-growth rates slower in martensite compared to stable austenite and superelastic austenite. It was found that plane-strain superelastic austenite fatigue specimens did not transform to martensite near the crack tip. The stress-induced transformation was prevented by the existence of the tensile hydrostatic stress-state near the crack tip in fatigue specimens. Plane stress samples, however, did undergo the stress-induced martensitic transformation, as the tensile hydrostatic stress-state was reduced in thinner samples. Fatigue-crack growth rates in Nitinol at a frequency of 10 Hz were found to be essentially identical in air, aerated deionized water, and aerated Hank's solution (a simulated physiological environment), suggesting that at this frequency, any environmentally-assisted contributions to crack growth are minimal. Specifically, the threshold for the onset of fatigue-crack growth was equal to ˜2 MPa√m for all three environments. Furthermore, the slopes of the mid-growth regime were also similar and equal to ˜3; the maximum applied stress-intensity range at instability prior to failure was 30 MPa√m for all three environments. However, when compared to other biomedical implant alloys, the fatigue-crack growth resistance of Nitinol was the lowest. Specifically, the fatigue threshold, at a fixed load ratio value of ˜0.1, was significantly less (by a factor between 2 and 5) than

  5. Effects of texture and microstructure on the propagation of iodine stress corrosion cracks in Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.B.; Pelloux, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Failure of some fuel elements in light water nuclear reactors has been attributed to stress corrosion cracking of the fuel cladding. Mechanical interaction between the fuel pellets and cladding tube generates a tensile hoop stress. Release of volatile fission products, most likely iodine, provides a corrosive environment. An investigation of stress corrosion crack propagation is performed at 300/degree/C in four Pa flowing iodine environment. By varying the orientation of fracture mechanics specimens, the effect of crystallographic texture, heat treatment, and microstructure on K/sub I/(SCC) is studied. 27 refs.

  6. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior of ASTM A27 cast steel in simulated Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation (FCP) tests were conducted on specimens of cast ASTM A27 steel in simulated Hanford ground-water at 150/sup 0/C and 250C/sup 0/C. Fatigue loadings were employed as the most feasible means of accelerating the environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) process. A tentative threshold for EAC was established, and an example calculation was used to show how such a threshold can be related to allowable stress levels and flaw sizes to assure that EAC will not occur.

  7. Crack Propagation in Bi-Material System via Pseudo-Spring Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sukanta; Shaw, Amit

    2014-05-01

    A Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) based framework with material constitutive model is developed to simulate crack initiation and propagation in a bi-material system. An efficient immediate neighbor interaction is formulated by connecting neighbors through pseudo-springs. A damage evolution law defines degradation of the inter-neighbor spring forces and corresponding reduced interaction is introduced in mass, momentum, and energy-conserving particle collocation. The proposed technique is validated through a simple test on a pre-notched bi-material system producing a conformal crack path.

  8. Brittle creep and subcritical crack propagation in glass submitted to triaxial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Céline; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Bouyer, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    An experimental work is presented that aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanical evolution of cracks under brittle creep conditions. Brittle creep may be an important slow deformation process in the Earth's crust. Synthetic glass samples have been used to observe and document brittle creep due to slow crack-propagation. A crack density of 0.05 was introduced in intact synthetic glass samples by thermal shock. Creep tests were performed at constant confining pressure (15 MPa) for water saturated conditions. Data were obtained by maintaining the differential-stress constant in steps of 24 h duration. A set of sensors allowed us to record strains and acoustic emissions during creep. The effect of temperature on creep was investigated from ambient temperature to 70°C. The activation energy for crack growth was found to be 32 kJ/mol. In secondary creep, a large dilatancy was observed that did not occur in constant strain rate tests. This is correlated to acoustic emission activity associated with crack growth. As a consequence, slow crack growth has been evidenced in glass. Beyond secondary creep, failure in tertiary creep was found to be a progressive process. The data are interpreted through a previously developed micromechanical damage model that describes crack propagation. This model allows one to predict the secondary brittle creep phase and also to give an analytical expression for the time to rupture. Comparison between glass and crystalline rock indicates that the brittle creep behavior is probably controlled by the same process even if stress sensitivity for glass is lower than for rocks.

  9. Stellar evolution as seen by mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Benoît

    2015-09-01

    The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants allows us to monitor stellar evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch and draw seismic evolutionary tracks. Quantified asteroseismic definitions that characterize the change in the evolutionary stages have been defined. This seismic information can now be used for stellar modelling, especially for studying the energy transport in the helium burning core or for specifying the inner properties of stars all along their evolution. Modelling will also allow us to study stars identified in the helium subflash stage, high-mass stars either arriving or quitting the secondary clump, or stars that could be in the blue-loop stage.

  10. Mixed Mode Fuel Injector And Injection System

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Chris Lee; Tian, Ye; Wang, Lifeng; Shafer, Scott F.

    2005-12-27

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set that are controlled respectively by first and second three way needle control valves. Each fuel injector includes first and second concentric needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position for a homogenous charge injection event, while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. The fuel injector has the ability to operate in a homogenous charge mode with a homogenous charge spray pattern, a conventional mode with a conventional spray pattern or a mixed mode.

  11. Fatigue-crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys processed by power and ingot metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Kim, N.J. ); Pizzo, P.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in powder-metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys, namely, mechanically-alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.80{sub 2} (Inco 905-XL) and rapid-solidification-processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions, has been studied, and results compared with data on an equivalent ingot-metallurgy (I/M) Al-Li alloy, 2090-T81 plate. Fatigue-crack growth resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is found to be comparable to the I/M Al-Li alloy; in contrast, crack velocities in MA 905-XL extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster. Growth-rate response in both P/M Al-Li alloys, however, is high anisotropic. Results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural influence of strengthening mechanism, slip mode, grain morphology and texture on the development of crack-tip shielding from crack-path deflection and crack closure. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Mode I, Mode II, and Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in air at 25 and 1316 C in asymmetric four-point flexure with single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) test specimens. The mode I fracture toughness was found to be K(sub Ic) = 1.15 plus or minus 0.07 and 0.98 plus or minus 0.13 MPa the square root of m, respectively, at 25 and 1316 C. The respective mode II fracture toughness values were K(sub IIc) = 0.73 plus or minus 0.10 and 0.65 plus or minus 0.04 MPa the square root of m. Hence, there was an insignificant difference in either K(sub Ic or K(sub IIc) between 25 and 1316 C for the coating material, whereas there was a noticeable distinction between K(sub Ic) and K(sub IIc), resulting in K(sub IIc) per K(sub Ic) = 0.65 at both temperatures. The empirical mixed-mode fracture criterion best described the coatings' mixed-mode fracture behavior among the four mixed-mode fracture theories considered. The angle of crack propagation was in reasonable agreement with the minimum strain energy density criterion. The effect of the directionality of the coating material in on K(sub Ic) was observed to be insignificant, while its sintering effect at 1316 C on K(sub Ic) was significant.

  13. Modeling time-dependent corrosion fatigue crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mark E.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted with the susceptible S-L orientation of AA7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution, to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO. This environment enhances da/dN by five to ten-fold compared to fatigue in moist air. Time-based crack growth rates from quasi-static load experiments are an order of magnitude too small for accurate linear superposition prediction of da/dN for loading frequencies above 0.001 Hz. Alternate methods of establishing da/dt, based on rising-load or ripple-load-enhanced crack tip strain rate, do not increase da/dt and do not improve linear superposition. Corrosion fatigue is characterized by two regimes of frequency dependence; da/dN is proportional to f(exp -1) below 0.001 Hz and to F(exp 0) to F(exp -0.1) for higher frequencies. Da/dN increases mildly both with increasing hold-time at K(sub max) and with increasing rise-time for a range of loading waveforms. The mild time-dependence is due to cycle-time-dependent corrosion fatigue growth. This behavior is identical for S-L nd L-T crack orientations. The frequency response of environmental fatigue in several 7000 series alloys is variable and depends on undefined compositional or microstructural variables. Speculative explanations are based on the effect of Mg on occluded crack chemistry and embritting hydrogen uptake, or on variable hydrogen diffusion in the crack tip process zone. Cracking in the 7075/NaCl system is adequately described for life prediction by linear superposition for prolonged load-cycle periods, and by a time-dependent upper bound relationship between da/dN and delta K for moderate loading times.

  14. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    Structural integrity is the science and technology of the margin between safety and disaster. Proper evaluation of the structural integrity and fatigue life of any structure (aircraft, ship, railways, bridges, gas and oil transmission pipelines, etc.) is important to ensure the public safety, environmental protection, and economical consideration. Catastrophic failure of any structure can be avoided if structural integrity is assessed and necessary precaution is taken appropriately. Structural integrity includes tasks in many areas, such as structural analysis, failure analysis, nondestructive testing, corrosion, fatigue and creep analysis, metallurgy and materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue life assessment, welding metallurgy, development of repairing technologies, structural monitoring and instrumentation etc. In this research fatigue life assessment of welded and weld-repaired joints is studied both in numerically and experimentally. A new approach for the simulation of fatigue crack growth in two elastic materials has been developed and specifically, the concept has been applied to butt-welded joint in a straight plate and in tubular joints. In the proposed method, the formation of new surface is represented by an interface element based on the interface potential energy. This method overcomes the limitation of crack growth at an artificial rate of one element length per cycle. In this method the crack propagates only when the applied load reaches the critical bonding strength. The predicted results compares well with experimental results. The Gas Metal Arc welding processes has been simulated to predict post-weld distortion, residual stresses and development of restraining forces in a butt-welded joint. The effect of welding defects and bi-axial interaction of a circular porosity and a solidification crack on fatigue crack propagation life of butt-welded joints has also been investigated. After a weld has been repaired, the specimen was tested in a universal

  15. Study of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Propagation in Pipeline Steels in High Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Near threshold fatigue crack propagation in pipeline steels in high pressure environments was studied. The objective was to determine the level of threshold stress intensity for fatigue crack growth rate behavior in a high strength low alloy X60 pipeline-type steel. Complete results have been generated for gaseous hydrogen at ambient pressure, laboratory air at ambient pressure and approximately 60% relative humidity as well as vacuum of 0.000067 Pa ( 0.0000005 torr) at R-ratios = K(min)/K(max) of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fatigue crack growth rate behavior in gaseous hydrogen, methane, and methane plus 10 percent hydrogen at 6.89 MPa (100 psi) was determined.

  16. Experimental Characterization and Simulation of Slip Transfer at Grain Boundaries and Microstructurally-Sensitive Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Vipul; Hochhalter, Jacob; Yamakov, Vesselin; Scott, Willard; Spear, Ashley; Smith, Stephen; Glaessgen, Edward

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study of crack tip interaction with grain boundaries is critical for improvement of multiscale modeling of microstructurally-sensitive fatigue crack propagation and for the computationally-assisted design of more durable materials. In this study, single, bi- and large-grain multi-crystal specimens of an aluminum-copper alloy are fabricated, characterized using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and deformed under tensile loading and nano-indentation. 2D image correlation (IC) in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is used to measure displacements near crack tips, grain boundaries and within grain interiors. The role of grain boundaries on slip transfer is examined using nano-indentation in combination with high-resolution EBSD. The use of detailed IC and EBSD-based experiments are discussed as they relate to crystal-plasticity finite element (CPFE) model calibration and validation.

  17. Quenched versus thermal disorder in crack propagation: size (and scales) matter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Cochard, Alain; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    The slow propagation of crack in heterogeneous material is of fundamental importance for the failure of engineering structure and of natural system, such as seismic faults. Owing to the many interacting processes at play, it however still remains a challenge to describe the precise mechanical formulation that governs the dynamics of such systems. Previous studies dedicated to this issue have mostly been restricted to the zero temperature limit, giving rise to extremal dynamics, or to systems with short range interactions. Here we incorporate in a numerical model of slow crack growth the effect of temperature and long range elastic interactions. This approach provides a more realistic model of crack propagation in heterogeneous media under natural conditions. We adopt the configuration of an interfacial crack system, similar to a designed experimental setup. We recover both at the macroscopic and at the microscopic scales all the reported experimental observations. Namely we are able to observe a similar macroscopic crack evolution, a similar morphology of the crack front line and a similar distribution of local speeds: a self affine morphology with roughness exponent around 0.5 at small scale, and a lower effective roughness at larger scale for the front morphology [1], and a non Gaussian power law velocity distribution, with a fat tail P(v) v-2.6 at large speeds [2,3]. We also evidenced the competition between temperature and disorders, influencing the crack dynamics and modifying the crack pattern. We present analytical derivations that independently recover our numerical and experimental findings of two regimes dominated at small [4] and large scales [5] by quenched and annealed disorders respectively. We demonstrate that the cross-over length between these two regimes varies with the inverse of the temperature. We also show that the distribution of local speeds in our system is controlled by a parameter which depend both on temperature and disorder fluctuations

  18. Observations of crack propagation along a Zr-doped alumina grain boundary.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, A; Kondo, S; Tochigi, E; Shibata, N; Ikuhara, Y

    2014-11-01

    Structural ceramics are typically used in polycrystalline form. It is well known that polycrystalline ceramics often show the intergranular fracture. To improve their mechanical properties, transition metals can be used as dopants into a bulk material, which tend to segregate into the grain boundaries[1]. However, the effect of dopant segregation on grain boundary fracture is still uncertain. In order to investigate the fracture behavior of a dopant-segregated grain boundary, we observed the crack propagation of a Zr-doped alumina grain boundary by in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and characterized the fracture surface by scanning TEM (STEM).An alumina bicrystal with a Zr-doped Σ13 grain boundary was fabricated by diffusion bonding at 1500(o)C for 10 hours in air, where a face of one crystal was coated by Zr metal in advance to the bonding (Fig. 1a). A TEM sample was prepared from the bicrystal by mechanical grinding and Ar ion milling. For in situ indentation, the sample had a free edge perpendicular to the grain boundary (Fig. 1b). The indentation experiment was performed by using a double-tilt indentation holder (Nanofactory) and JEM-2010 (200kV, JEOL). The fracture surface was further observed by high angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM (ARM-200F, 200kV, JEOL).jmicro;63/suppl_1/i20-a/DFU064F1F1DFU064F1Fig. 1.(a) Schematic illustrations of bicrystal fabrication by diffusion bonding and (b) Bright field TEM image showing the geometric arrangement of the in situ nanoindentation experiment In the in situ TEM nanoindentation experiment, at first a crack was introduced in bulk close to the grain boundary and propagated with the amount of indentation. After the crack reached the grain boundary, it preferentially propagated along the grain boundary. To identify the crack pass at the atomic level, the STEM analysis was performed. We found that three-atomic-layer Zr was formed in the unbroken region of the grain boundary, whereas

  19. Initiation and Propagation Behavior of a Fatigue Crack of Alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoishi, Norio; Goto, Masahiro; Wang, Xishu; Wang, Qingyuan

    Rotating bending fatigue tests were carried out at room temperature and 500°C for alloy 718 with nearly the same static strength but different precipitated particles, i.e. a peak aged condition (720°C-10h) and a double aged one (720°C-8h, 620°C-8h), in order to investigate the effect of precipitated particles on crack initiation and propagation behavior. Fatigue strength was higher in the double aged material than in the peak one at both temperatures. The main reason for high fatigue strength of the double aged material was that the propagation of a small crack with a few grain sizes was suppressed by the carbide particles precipitated in a grain.

  20. An Atomistic Simulation of Crack Propagation in a Nickel Single Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to determine mechanisms of crack propagation in a nickel single crystal. Motivation for selecting nickel as a case study is because we believe that its physical properties are very close to that of nickel-base super alloy. We are directed in identifying some generic trends that would lead a single crystalline material to failure. We believe that the results obtained here would be of interest to the experimentalists in guiding them to a more optimized experimental strategy. The dynamic crack propagation experiments are very difficult to do. We are partially motivated to fill the gap by generating the simulation results in lieu of the experimental ones for the cases where experiment can not be done or when the data is not available.

  1. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Present U.S. Air Force and proposed U.S. civil airworthiness regulations are based on considerations of 'damage tolerance' in aircraft structures. Airworthiness is assured by demonstrating that damage that escapes one in a sequence of periodic inspections will not grow to critical size before the next inspection. The evaluations conducted employ fracture mechanics analyses. Problems arise because the features of fracture mechanics applications related to aircraft structures are more complex than the cases of fracture mechanics which have been mainly investigated. NASA has, therefore, conducted a variety of research tasks to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to deal with some of these complexities. The current stage of development of these capabilities is described. Attention is given to the limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics, a two-parameter fracture criterion, aspects of fatigue crack propagation, and crack propagation and fracture in built-up structures.

  2. Stress-ratio effect on mode II propagation of interlaminar fatigue cracks in graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the stress ratio on the propagation behavior of Mode II interlaminar fatigue cracks was studied with unidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates, Toray T800H/{number_sign}3631. End-notched flexure (ENF) specimens were used for fatigue tests under the stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.6; and end-loaded split (ELS) specimens were used for tests under R = {minus}1.0, {minus}0.5, and 0.2. For each stress ratio, the crack propagation rate was given by a power function of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11}, in the region of rates above 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle. Below this region, there exists the threshold for fatigue crack propagation. The threshold condition is given by a constant value of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11th} = 1.8 MPa{radical}m. The crack propagation rate is determined by {Delta}K{sub 11} near the threshold, while by the maximum stress identity factor, K{sub 11max}, at high rates. A fracture mechanics equation is proposed for predicting the propagation rate of Mode II fatigue cracks under various stress ratios. The effect of the stress ratio on the micromechanism of Mode II fatigue crack propagation was discussed on the basis of the microscopic observations of fracture surfaces and near-crack-tip regions.

  3. Predicting fatigue properties of cast aluminum by characterizing small-crack propagation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Michael John

    2001-07-01

    The increased use of cast aluminum in structural components requires a deeper understanding of the mechanisms controlling fatigue properties in order to enable improved predictive capabilities. Of particular interest is the ability to model the influence of processing variables on the fatigue performance of alloys used in automotive applications such as engine blocks and cylinder heads. This thesis describes the results of a study conducted on cast W319 aluminum, a commercial Al-Si-Cu alloy used in automotive engine components, and presents a model that effectively predicts fatigue properties in this alloy as a function of material condition. The very high cycle fatigue regime (˜109 cycles) was examined using ultrasonic testing equipment (20 kHz) and distinct endurance limits were observed. The initiation and propagation of small fatigue cracks (˜5 mum to 2 mm) were monitored by a standard replication technique. It was observed that cracks initiate almost exclusively from microshrinkage pores and that the initiation life is negligible even at stresses below the endurance limit. The endurance limits result from the arrest of small cracks. Small crack growth rates were determined for a variety of material conditions where the influence of solidification time, heat treatment, and grain refinement were investigated. In addition, the influences of applied stress amplitude, stress ratio, and loading frequency on small crack growth were examined. A significant small crack effect was identified in this alloy and standard correlating parameters such as DeltaK and DeltaJ do not adequately characterize small crack growth. A correlating parameter written as [(epsilonmax sigmaa/sigma yield)s a] is proposed and shown to effectively characterize small crack growth for a wide range of stresses and a wide range of solidification conditions. In this parameter, epsilonmax is the total strain corresponding to the maximum applied stress, sigmaa is the stress amplitude, sigma yield is

  4. Temperature fields generated by the elastodynamic propagation of shear cracks in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    Thermal perturbations associated with seismic slip on faults may significantly affect the dynamic friction and the mechanical energy release during earthquakes. This paper investigates details of the coseismic temperature increases associated with the elastodynamic propagation of shear cracks and effects of fault heating on the dynamic fault strength. Self-similar solutions are presented for the temperature evolution on a surface of a mode II shear crack and a self-healing pulse rupturing at a constant velocity. The along-crack temperature distribution is controlled by a single parameter, the ratio of the crack thickness to the width of the conductive thermal boundary layer, ?. For "thick" cracks, or at early stages of rupture (? > 1), the local temperature on the crack surface is directly proportional to the amount of slip. For "thin" cracks, or at later times (? < 1), the temperature maximum shifts toward the crack tip. For faults having slip zone thickness of the order of centimeters or less, the onset of thermally induced phenomena (e.g., frictional melting, thermal pressurization, etc.) may occur at any point along the rupture, depending on the degree of slip localization and rupture duration. In the absence of significant increases in the pore fluid pressure, localized fault slip may raise temperature by several hundred degrees, sufficient to cause melting. The onset of frictional melting may give rise to substantial increases in the effective fault strength due to an increase in the effective fault contact area, and high viscosity of silicate melts near solidus. The inferred transient increases in the dynamic friction ("viscous braking") are consistent with results of high-speed rock sliding experiments and might explain field observations of the fault wall rip-out structures associated with pseudotachylites. Possible effects of viscous braking on the earthquake rupture dynamics include (1) delocalization of slip and increases in the effective fracture

  5. Comparison of optical and acoustical monitoring during a crack propagation, implication for slow earthquake dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Elkhoury, Jean; Toussaint, Renaud; Daniel, Guillaume; Maloy, Knut Jurgen

    2010-05-01

    Observations of aseismic transients in several tectonic context suggest that they might be linked to seismicity. However a clear observation and description of these phenomena and their interaction is lacking. This owes to the difficulty of characterizing with a sufficient resolution processes taking place at depth. Here we aim to study these interactions between aseismic and seismic slip taking advantage of an unique experimental setup. We conducted a series of mode I crack propagation experiments on transparent materials (PMMA). The crack advance is trapped in a weakness plane which is the interface between two previously sandblasted and annealed plexiglass plates. A fast video camera taking up to 500 frames per second ensures the tracking of the front rupture. The acoustic system is composed of a maximum of 44 channels continuously recording at 5 MHz for a few tens of seconds. Piezo-electric sensors are composed of a 32 elements linear array and individual sensors surrounding the crack front. An automatic detection and localization procedure allows us to obtain the position of acoustic emission (A.E.) that occurred during the crack advance. Crack front image processing reveals an intermittent opening which might be linked to the time and space clustering of the AE. An analogy between the mode I (opening) and the mode III (antiplane slip) allows us to interpret our results in term of slip on faults. Our experiment thus helps to reveal the interplay between seismic and aseismic slip on faults.

  6. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C

    2004-02-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K{sub IC}) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width ({sigma}-{delta}) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K{sub IC} and ({sigma}-{delta}) relationship, are known.

  7. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  8. Experimental study on propagation of liquid-filled crack in gelatin: Shape and velocity in hydrostatic stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira

    1990-06-01

    The three-dimensional shape and velocity of propagating cracks in the hydrostatic stress condition were studied by using gelatin, the physical properties of which were controlled to be constant. Various liquids (with various densities, viscosities, and volumes as the governed parameters) were injected in gelatin to form liquid-filled cracks. The directions of the crack growth and the propagation of an isolated crack are governed by the density difference between injected liquid and gelatin (Δρ), that is, a buoyancy. The propagation of a crack has two critical values: the first is the transition value to brittle fracture; the second is the value where segmentation begins to occur. The condition of a stable isolated crack formation is discussed. The crack shape of an isolated crack in the direction perpendicular to the crack plane is different from that of a growing crack with a fat tear drop form: the former has an elliptical top and a nearly flat bottom. The upper termination of an isolated crack in the vertical cross section has an elliptical shape, and the lower termination has a cusped shape. The lower part of the crack occupies the preexiting fracture which has formed by fracturing at the crack top. The crack thickness (w)/crack height (h) ratio is proportional to Δρ A, if the elastic moduli are constant. The crack length l/h ratio increase with h in the primary fracture, while the l/h ratio decreases with h in the preexisting fracture except for air-filled cracks. The ascending velocity of an isolated crack is proportional to Δρ3 h4, that is, Δρ w2, if the other physical properties are constant. The height and length of a growing penny-shaped crack are approximately proportional to A 3d1/3t4/9, so that the growth rate of height is in proportion to A3d3t-5/9 (A3d is constant injection rale). Some comparisons with the two-dimensional crack theory and applications for magma-filled cracks are discussed on the basis of these results.

  9. Mixed-Mode Decohesion Finite Elements for the Simulation of Delamination in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, Pedro P.; Davila, Carlos G.

    2002-01-01

    A new decohesion element with mixed-mode capability is proposed and demonstrated. The element is used at the interface between solid finite elements to model the initiation and non-self-similar growth of delaminations. A single relative displacement-based damage parameter is applied in a softening law to track the damage state of the interface and to prevent the restoration of the cohesive state during unloading. The softening law for mixed-mode delamination propagation can be applied to any mode interaction criterion such as the two-parameter power law or the three-parameter Benzeggagh-Kenane criterion. To demonstrate the accuracy of the predictions and the irreversibility capability of the constitutive law, steady-state delamination growth is simulated for quasistatic loading-unloading cycles of various single mode and mixed-mode delamination test specimens.

  10. Dynamic steady-state analysis of crack propagation in rubber-like solids using an extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a computational framework for studying high-speed crack growth in rubber-like solids under conditions of plane stress and steady-state is proposed. Effects of inertia, viscoelasticity and finite strains are included. The main purpose of the study is to examine the contribution of viscoelastic dissipation to the total work of fracture required to propagate a crack in a rubber-like solid. The computational framework builds upon a previous work by the present author (Kroon in Int J Fract 169:49-60, 2011). The model was fully able to predict experimental results in terms of the local surface energy at the crack tip and the total energy release rate at different crack speeds. The predicted distributions of stress and dissipation around the propagating crack tip are presented. The predicted crack tip profiles also agree qualitatively with experimental findings.

  11. An equivalent domain integral for analysis of two-dimensional mixed mode problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1989-01-01

    An equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for calculating J-integrals for two-dimensional cracked elastic bodies subjected to mixed mode loading is presented. The total and product integrals consist of the sum of an area or domain integral and line integrals on the crack faces. The EDI method gave accurate values of the J-integrals for two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Numerical studies showed that domains consisting of one layer of elements are sufficient to obtain accurate J-integral values. Two procedures for separating the individual modes from the domain integrals are presented. The procedure that uses the symmetric and antisymmetric components of the stress and displacement fields to calculate the individual modes gave accurate values of the integrals for all the problems analyzed.

  12. The surface-forming energy release rate based fracture criterion for elastic-plastic crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Si; Wang, He-Ling; Liu, Bin; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2015-11-01

    The J-integral based criterion is widely used in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. However, it is not rigorously applicable when plastic unloading appears during crack propagation. One difficulty is that the energy density with plastic unloading in the J-integral cannot be defined unambiguously. In this paper, we alternatively start from the analysis on the power balance, and propose a surface-forming energy release rate (ERR), which represents the energy available for separating the crack surfaces during the crack propagation and excludes the loading-mode-dependent plastic dissipation. Therefore the surface-forming ERR based fracture criterion has wider applicability, including elastic-plastic crack propagation problems. Several formulae are derived for calculating the surface-forming ERR. From the most concise formula, it is interesting to note that the surface-forming ERR can be computed using only the stress and deformation of the current moment, and the definition of the energy density or work density is avoided. When an infinitesimal contour is chosen, the expression can be further simplified. For any fracture behaviors, the surface-forming ERR is proven to be path-independent, and the path-independence of its constituent term, so-called Js-integral, is also investigated. The physical meanings and applicability of the proposed surface-forming ERR, traditional ERR, Js-integral and J-integral are compared and discussed. Besides, we give an interpretation of Rice paradox by comparing the cohesive fracture model and the surface-forming ERR based fracture criterion.

  13. Effect of service exposure on fatigue crack propagation of Inconel 718 turbine disc material at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Dae-Ho; Choi, Myung-Je; Goto, Masahiro; Lee, Hong-Chul; Kim, Sangshik

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718 turbine disc with different service times from 0 to 4229 h was investigated at 738 and 823 K. No notable change in microstructural features, other than the increase in grain size, was observed with increasing service time. With increasing service time from 0 to 4229 h, the fatigue crack propagation rates tended to increase, while the ΔK{sub th} value decreased, in low ΔK regime and lower Paris' regime at both testing temperatures. The fractographic observation using a scanning electron microscope suggested that the elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation mechanism of Inconel 718 changed from crystallographic cleavage mechanism to striation mechanism in the low ΔK regime, depending on the grain size. The fatigue crack propagation mechanism is proposed for the crack propagating through small and large grains in the low ΔK regime, and the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718 with different service times at elevated temperatures is discussed. - Highlights: • The specimens were prepared from the Inconel 718 turbine disc used for 0 to 4229 h. • FCP rates were measured at 738 and 823 K. • The ΔK{sub th} values decreased with increasing service time. • The FCP behavior showed a strong correlation with the grain size of used turbine disc.

  14. The effect of aqueous environments upon the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks in low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.; Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of elevated temperature aqueous environments upon the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks in low-alloy steels is discussed in terms of the several parameters which influence such behavior. These parameters include water chemistry, impurities within the steels themselves, as well as factors such as the water flow rate, loading waveform and loading rates. Some of these parameters have similar effects upon both crack initiation and propagation, while others exhibit different effects in the two stages of cracking. In the case of environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth, the most important impurities within the steel are metallurgical sulfide inclusions which dissolve upon contact with the water. A ``critical`` concentration of sulfide ions at the crack tip can then induce environmentally-assisted cracking which proceeds at significantly increased crack growth rates over those observed in air. The occurrence, or non-occurrence, of EAC is governed by the mass-transport of sulfide ions to and from the crack-tip region, and the mass-transport is discussed in terms of diffusion, ion migration, and convection induced within the crack enclave. Examples are given of convective mass-transport within the crack enclave resulting from external free stream flow. The initiation of fatigue cracks in elevated temperature aqueous environments, as measured by the S-N fatigue lifetimes, is also strongly influenced by the parameters identified above. The influence of sulfide inclusions does not appear to be as strong on the crack initiation process as it is on crack propagation. The oxygen content of the environment appears to be the dominant factor, although loading frequency (strain rate) and temperature are also important factors.

  15. The effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation in 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiuto, R. A.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1984-01-01

    Tests were conducted on three thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet to investigate the effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation under constant amplitude loading conditions and on retardation following a single peak overload. Constant amplitude loading tests were performed at stress ratios of 0.05 and 0.75 to obtain data for conditions with crack closure and without crack closure, respectively. At both stress ratios a thickness effect was clearly evident, with thicker specimens exhibiting higher growth rates in the transition from plane strain to plane stress region. The effect of thickness for a stress ratio of 0.05 corresponded well with the fracturing mode transitions observed on the specimens. A model based on the strain energy release rate which accounted for the fracture mode transition was found to correlate the thickness effects well. The specimens tested at the stress ratio of 0.75 did not make the transition from tensile mode to shear mode, indicating that another mechanism besides crack closure or fracture mode transition was active.

  16. Fatigue crack propagation of nickel-base superalloys at 650 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The 650 C fatigue crack propagation behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene 95 and Waspaloy, is studied with particular emphasis placed on understanding the roles of creep, environment, and two key grain boundary alloying additions, boron and zirconium. Comparison of air and vacuum data shows the air environment to be detrimental over a wide range of frequencies for both alloys. More in-depth analysis on Rene 95 shows at lower frequencies, such as 0.02 Hz, failure in air occurs by intergranular, environmentally-assisted creep crack growth, while at higher frequencies, up to 5.0 Hz, environmental interactions are still evident but creep effects are minimized. The effect of B and Zr in Waspaloy is found to be important where environmental and/or creep interactions are presented. In those instances, removal of B and Zr dramatically increases crack growth and it is therefore plausible that effective dilution of these elements may explain a previously observed trend in which crack growth rates increase with decreasing grain size.

  17. Fatigue crack propagation of nickel-base superalloys at 650 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1988-01-01

    The 650 C fatigue crack propagation behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene 95 and Waspaloy, is studied with particular emphasis placed on understanding the roles of creep, environment, and two key grain boundary alloying additions, boron and zirconium. Comparison of air and vacuum data shows the air environment to be detrimental over a wide range of frequencies for both alloys. More in-depth analysis on Rene 95 shows at lower frequencies, such as 0.02 Hz, failure in air occurs by intergranular, environmentally-assisted creep crack growth, while at higher frequencies, up to 5.0 Hz, environmental interaction are still evident but creep effects are minimized. The effect of B and Zr in Waspaloy is found to be important where environmental and/or creep interactions are presented. In those instances, removal of B and Zr dramatically increases crack growth and it is therefore plausible that effective dilution of these elements may explain a previously observed trend in which crack growth rates increase with decreasing grain size.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation of nickel-base superalloys at 650 deg C

    SciTech Connect

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T.P.; Miner, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    The 650 C fatigue crack propagation behavior of two nickel-base superalloys, Rene 95 and Waspaloy, is studied with particular emphasis placed on understanding the roles of creep, environment, and two key grain boundary alloying additions, boron and zirconium. Comparison of air and vacuum data shows the air environment to be detrimental over a wide range of frequencies for both alloys. More in-depth analysis on Rene 95 shows at lower frequencies, such as 0.02 Hz, failure in air occurs by intergranular, environmentally-assisted creep crack growth, while at higher frequencies, up to 5.0 Hz, environmental interactions are still evident but creep effects are minimized. The effect of B and Zr in Waspaloy is found to be important where environmental and/or creep interactions are presented. In those instances, removal of B and Zr dramatically increases crack growth and it is therefore plausible that effective dilution of these elements may explain a previously observed trend in which crack growth rates increase with decreasing grain size.

  19. A study of spectrum fatigue crack propagation in two aluminum alloys. 2: Influence of microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    The important metallurgical factors that influence both constant amplitude and spectrum crack growth behavior in aluminum alloys were investigated. The effect of microstructural features such as grain size, inclusions, and dispersoids was evaluated. It was shown that a lower stress intensities, the I/M 7050 alloy showed better fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance than P/M 7091 alloy for both constant amplitude and spectrum testing. It was suggested that the most important microstructural variable accounting for superior FCP resistance of 7050 alloy is its large grain size. It was further postulated that the inhomogenous planar slip and large grain size of 7050 limit dislocation interactions and thus increase slip reversibility which improves FCP performance. The hypothesis was supported by establishing that the cyclic strain hardening exponent for the 7091 alloy is higher than that of 7050.

  20. Effect of tangential traction and roughness on crack initiation/propagation during rolling contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soda, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    1980-01-01

    Rolling fatigue tests of 0.45 percent carbon steel rollers were carried out using a four roller type rolling contact fatigue tester. Tangential traction and surface roughness of the harder mating rollers were varied and their effect was studied. The results indicate that the fatigue life decreases when fraction is applied in the same direction as that of rolling. When the direction of fraction is reversed, the life increases over that obtained with zero traction. The roughness of harder mating roller also has a marked influence on life. The smoother the mating roller, the longer the life. Microscopic observation of specimens revealed that the initiation of cracks during the early stages of life is more strongly influenced by the surface roughness, while the propagation of these cracks in the latter stages is affected mainly by the tangential traction.

  1. Analysis of crack propagation and transport properties in rock samples using micro computer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, David; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The use of imaged based methods to determine properties of geological materials is becoming an alternative to laboratory experiments. Furthermore, the combination of laboratory experiments and image based methods using micro computer tomography have advanced the understanding of geophysical and geochemical processes. Within the scope of the "Shynergie" project, two special topics have been studied using such combination: a) the generation and propagation of cracks in rocks (specially wing cracks) and b) the time dependence of transport properties of rocks due to chemical weathering. In this publication, we describe the design considerations of our micro CT scanner to manipulate rock samples that have been subjected to the experiments to determine the above mentioned phenomena. Additionally, we discuss the preliminary experimental results and the initial interpretations we have gathered from the observations of the digitized rock samples.

  2. A study of spectrum fatigue crack propagation in two aluminum alloys. 1: Spectrum simplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of two commercial Al alloys was studied using spectrum loading conditions characteristics of those encountered at critical locations in high performance fighter aircraft. A tension dominated (TD) and tension compression (TC) spectrum were employed for each alloy. Using a mechanics-based analysis, it was suggested that negative loads could be eliminated for the TC spectrum for low to intermediate maximum stress intensities. The suggestion was verified by subsequent testing. Using fractographic evidence, it was suggested that a further similification in the spectra could be accomplished by eliminating low and intermediate peak load points resulting in near or below threshold maximum peak stress intensity values. It is concluded that load interactions become more important at higher stress intensities and more plasticity at the crack tip. These results suggest that a combined mechanics/fractographic mechanisms approach can be used to simplify other complex spectra.

  3. On the fatigue crack propagation behavior of superalloys at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.; Gabb, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Two superalloys used in gas-turbine disks, Rene 95 and IN-100 were tested in several forms at 0.33 Hz in air, and the results were compared with earlier data on Astroloy to gain a better understanding of the effects of grain size, strength, and alloy composition on the fatigue crack propagation behavior. In addition, selected forms of Rene 95 were tested at 0.33 Hz in vacuum and in air using a cycle with a 120-sec tensile dwell to evaluate the effects of environment and creep. Results of the study emphasize the beneficial effect of large grain size on the fatigue and crep-fatigue crack growth resistance of the superalloys in the temperature range corresponding to the operating temperatures of aircraft gas-turbine engine disk rims.

  4. On the Theory and Numerical Simulation of Cohesive Crack Propagation with Application to Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudraraju, Siva Shankar; Garikipati, Krishna; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of crack propagation is among the predominant modes of failure in many natural and engineering structures, often leading to severe loss of structural integrity and catastrophic failure. Thus, the ability to understand and a priori simulate the evolution of this failure mode has been one of the cornerstones of applied mechanics and structural engineering and is broadly referred to as "fracture mechanics." The work reported herein focuses on extending this understanding, in the context of through-thickness crack propagation in cohesive materials, through the development of a continuum-level multiscale numerical framework, which represents cracks as displacement discontinuities across a surface of zero measure. This report presents the relevant theory, mathematical framework, numerical modeling, and experimental investigations of through-thickness crack propagation in fiber-reinforced composites using the Variational Multiscale Cohesive Method (VMCM) developed by the authors.

  5. Insights into Volcanic Tremor: A Linear Stability Analysis of Waves Propagating Along Fluid-Filled Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    Crack waves are guided waves along fluid-filled cracks that propagate with phase velocity less than the sound wave speed. Chouet (JGR, 1986) and Ferrazzini and Aki (JGR, 1977) have shown that such waves could explain volcanic tremor in terms of the resonant modes of a finite length magma-filled crack. Based on an idealized lumped-parameter model, Julian (JGR, 1994) further proposed that the steady flow of a viscous magma in a volcanic conduit is unstable to perturbations, leading to self-excited oscillations of the conduit walls and radiation of seismic waves. Our objective is to evaluate the possibility of self-excited oscillations within a rigorous, continuum framework. Our specific focus has been on basaltic fissure eruptions. In a typical basaltic fissure system, the magnitudes of the wave restoring forces, fluid compressibility and wall elasticity, are highly depth dependent. Because of the elevated fluid compressibility from gas exsolution at shallow depths, fluid pressure perturbations in this regime propagate as acoustic waves with effectively rigid conduit walls. Below the exsolution depth, the conduit walls are more compliant relative to the magma compressibility and perturbations propagate as dispersive crack waves. Viscous magma flow through such a fissure will evolve to a fully developed state characterized by a parabolic velocity profile in several to tens of seconds. This time scale is greater than harmonic tremor periods, typically 0.1 to 1 second. A rigorous treatment of the wave response to pressure perturbations therefore requires a general analysis of conduit flow that is not in a fully developed state. We present a linearized analysis of the coupled fluid and elastic response to general flow perturbations. We assume that deformation of the wall is linear elastic. As our focus is on wavelengths greatly exceeding the crack width, fluid flow is described by a quasi-one dimensional, or width-averaged, model. We account for conservation of magma

  6. Fatigue crack propagation in single-crystal CMSX- 2 at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolovich, B. F.; Saxena, A.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1993-08-01

    The fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behavior of the nickel-base superalloy CMSX-2 in single-crystal form was investigated. Tests were conducted for two temperatures (25 and 700 °C), two orientations ([001][110] and [001][010]), and in two environments (laboratory air and ultra-high vacuum 10-7 torr). Following FCP testing, the fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FCP rates were found to be relatively independent of the temperature, environment, and orientation when correlated with the conventional mode I stress-intensity factor. Examination of the fracture sur-faces revealed two distinct types of fracture. One type was characterized by 111 fracture surfaces, which were inclined relative to both the loading and crack propagation directions. These features, al-though clearly a result of the fatigue process, resembled cleavage fractures along 111 planes. Such fea-tures were observed at 25 and 700 °C; they were the only features observed for the 25 °C tests. The second type had a macroscopically dull loading appearance, was microscopically rough, and grew normal to the loading axis. These features were observed on the specimens tested at 700 °C (in both air and vacuum) and appeared similar to conventional fatigue fractures. Although in this region the crack plane was mac-roscopically normal to the loading direction, it deviated microscopically to avoid shearing the y ’ precipi-tates. In view of the complex crack growth mechanisms, mixed fracture modes, and lack of any difference in FCP rates, it is hypothesized that the correlation between FCP rates and the stress-intensity parameter is probably coincidental. The implications for life prediction of higher temperature turbine components based on conventional fracture mechanics are significant and should be investigated further.

  7. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models. PMID:23005490

  8. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models.

  9. Effects of Laser Peening Treatment on High Cycle Fatigue and Crack Propagation Behaviors in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Kiyotaka; Ochi, Yasuo; Matsumura, Takashi; Ikarashi, Takaaki; Sano, Yuji

    Laser peening without protective coating (LPwC) treatment is one of surface enhancement techniques using an impact wave of high pressure plasma induced by laser pulse irradiation. High compressive residual stress was induced by the LPwC treatment on the surface of low-carbon type austenitic stainless steel SUS316L. The affected depth reached about 1mm from the surface. High cycle fatigue tests with four-points rotating bending loading were carried out to confirm the effects of the LPwC treatment on fatigue strength and surface fatigue crack propagation behaviors. The fatigue strength was remarkably improved by the LPwC treatment over the whole regime of fatigue life up to 108 cycles. Specimens with a pre-crack from a small artificial hole due to fatigue loading were used for the quantitative study on the effect of the LPwC treatment. The fracture mechanics investigation on the pre-cracked specimens showed that the LPwC treatment restrained the further propagation of the pre-crack if the stress intensity factor range ΔK on the crack tip was less than 7.6 MPa√m. Surface cracks preferentially propagated into the depth direction as predicted through ΔK analysis on the crack by taking account of the compressive residual stresses due to the LPwC treatment.

  10. Experimental study of crack initiation and propagation in high- and gigacycle fatigue in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikov, Mikhail E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru Naimark, Oleg E-mail: oborin@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    Fatigue (high- and gigacycle) crack initiation and its propagation in titanium alloys with coarse and fine grain structure are studied by fractography analysis of fracture surface. Fractured specimens were analyzed by interferometer microscope and SEM to improve methods of monitoring of damage accumulation during fatigue test and to verify the models for fatigue crack kinetics. Fatigue strength was estimated for high cycle fatigue regime using the Luong method [1] by “in-situ” infrared scanning of the sample surface for the step-wise loading history for different grain size metals. Fine grain alloys demonstrated higher fatigue resistance for both high cycle fatigue and gigacycle fatigue regimes. Fracture surface analysis for plane and cylindrical samples was carried out using optical and electronic microscopy method. High resolution profilometry (interferometer-profiler New View 5010) data of fracture surface roughness allowed us to estimate scale invariance (the Hurst exponent) and to establish the existence of two characteristic areas of damage localization (different values of the Hurst exponent). Area 1 with diameter ∼300 μm has the pronounced roughness and is associated with damage localization hotspot. Area 2 shows less amplitude roughness, occupies the rest fracture surface and considered as the trace of the fatigue crack path corresponding to the Paris kinetics.

  11. 3D numerical analysis of crack propagation of heterogeneous notched rock under uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Sloan, S. W.; Sheng, D. C.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    Macroscopic notches play an important role in evaluating the fracture process zone (FPZ) and the strengths of a heterogeneous rock mass. Crack initiation, propagation and coalescence for unnotched, single-notched and double-notched rock specimens are numerically simulated in a 3-D numerical model (RFPA3D). A feature of the code RFPA3D is that it can numerically simulate the evolution of cracks in three-dimensional space, as well as the heterogeneity of the rock mass. For the unnotched case, special attention is given to the complete stress-strain curve and the corresponding AE events for the failure process of rock specimen. By comparing with published experimental results, the simulation results from RFPA3D are found to be satisfactory. For the single-notched case, the effect of the length and the depth of the single notch and the thickness of the specimen on the failure mode and peak stress are evaluated. The 3D FPZ is very different from that in two dimensions. For the double-notched case, the effects of the separation distance and overlap distance of the double notches, as well as influence of the homogeneity index (m) are also investigated. As the overlap distance increases, the direction of the principal tensile stress at each notch-end changes from a perpendicular direction (tensile stress field) to a nearly parallel direction (compressive stress field), which affects the evolution of the cracks from the two notches.

  12. Mechanisms of decrease in fatigue crack propagation resistance in irradiated and melted UHMWPE#

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2005-01-01

    Adhesive/abrasive wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been minimized by radiation cross-linking. Irradiation is typically followed by melting to eliminate residual free radicals that cause oxidative embrittlement. Irradiation and subsequent melting reduce the strength and fatigue resistance of the polymer. We determined the radiation dose dependence and decoupled the effects of post-irradiation melting on the crystallinity, mechanical properties and fatigue crack propagation resistance of room temperature irradiated UHMWPE from those of irradiation alone. Stiffness and yield strength, were largely not affected by increasing radiation dose but were affected by changes in crystallinity, whereas plastic properties, ultimate tensile strength and elongation at break, were dominated at different radiation dose ranges by changes in radiation dose or crystallinity. Fatigue crack propagation resistance was shown to decrease with increase in radiation dose and with decrease in crystalline content. Morphology of fracture surfaces revealed loss of ductility with increase in radiation dose and more detrimental effects on ductility at lower radiation doses after post-irradiation melting. PMID:16105682

  13. Mixed-mode interfacial adhesive strength of a thin film on an anisotropic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitey, Rajesh; Geubelle, Philippe H.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2009-01-01

    The mixed-mode interfacial adhesion strength between a gold (Au) thin film and an anisotropic passivated silicon (Si) substrate is measured using laser-induced stress wave loading. Test specimens are prepared by bonding a fused silica (FS) prism to the back side of a <1 0 0> Si substrate with a thin silicon nitride (Si xN y) passivation layer deposited on the top surface. A high-amplitude stress wave is developed by pulsed laser ablation of a sacrificial absorbing layer on one of the lateral surfaces of the FS prism. Due to the negative non-linear elastic properties of the FS, the compressive stress wave evolves into a decompression shock with fast fall time. Careful selection of the incident angle between the pulse and the FS/Si interface generates a mode-converted shear wave in refraction, subjecting the Si xN y/Au thin film interface to dynamic mixed-mode loading, sufficient to cause interfacial fracture. A detailed analysis of the anisotropic wave propagation combined with interferometric measurements of surface displacements enables calculation of the interfacial stresses developed under mixed-mode loading. The mixed-mode interfacial strength is compared to the interfacial strength measured under purely tensile loading.

  14. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior of 2195 aluminum-lithium-alloy—prediction of crack propagation direction and influence of stress ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. L.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2000-06-01

    Tensile properties and fatigue crack propagation behavior of a 2195-T8 Al-Li alloy were investigated at different stress ratios, with particular emphasis on their dependence on specimen orientation. Specimens with orientations of 0, 15, 30, 45, and 90 deg to the rolling direction were tested. The alloy contained a strong brass-type texture and a profuse distribution of platelike precipitates of T 1 (Al2CuLi) phase on {111} matrix planes. Both tensile strength and fatigue thresholds were found to be strongly dependent on the specimen orientation, with the lowest values observed along the direction at 45 deg to the rolling direction. The effect of stress ratio on fatigue threshold could generally be explained by a modified crack closure concept. The growth of fatigue crack in this alloy was found to exhibit a significant crystallographic cracking and especially macroscopic crack deflection. The specimens oriented in the L-T + 45 deg had the smallest deflection angle, while the specimens in the L-T and T-L orientations exhibited a large deflection angle. The dependence of the fatigue threshold on the specimen orientation could be rationalized by considering an equivalent fatigue threshold calculated from both mode I and mode II values due to the crack deflection. A four-step approach on the basis of Schmid’s law combined with specific crystallographic textures is proposed to predict the fatigue crack deflection angle. Good agreement between the theoretical prediction and experimental results was observed.

  15. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  16. The effect of mixed mode precracking on the mode 1 fracture toughness of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Prashanth; Bascom, Williard D.; Nairn, John A.

    1993-01-01

    We subjected double cantilever beam specimens from four different composite materials to mixed-mode precracking. Three different precracking mode 1 to mode 2 ratios were used--1 to 4, 1 to 1, and 4 to 1. Following precracking the specimens were tested for mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode precracking often influenced the mode 1 toughness and its influence persisted for as much as 60 mm of mode 1 crack growth. We tested composites with untoughened matrices, composites with rubber-toughened matrices, and composites with interlayer toughening. Depending on material type and precracking mode ratio, the precracking could cause either a significant increase or a significant decrease in the mode 1 fracture toughness.

  17. Effects of Changing Stress Amplitude on the Rate of Fatigue-Crack Propagation in Two Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. Michael; Hardrath, Herbert F.

    1961-01-01

    A series of fatigue tests with specimens subjected to constant amplitude and two-step axial loads were conducted on 12-inch-wide sheet specimens of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy to study the effects of a change in stress level on fatigue-crack propagation. Comparison of the results of the tests in which the specimens were tested at first a high and then a low stress level with those of the constant-stress- amplitude tests indicated that crack propagation was generally delayed after the transition to the lower stress level. In the tests in which the specimens were tested at first a low and then a high stress level, crack propagation continued at the expected rate after the change in stress levels.

  18. Prediction of fatigue crack propagation rate on the interface of wood-FRP using the artificial neural network (ANN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Jia, Junhui; Liu, Yongjun

    2008-11-01

    Crack propagation rate of the interface of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bonded to red maple wood, is analyzed and predicted using an artificial neural network (ANN) method. The performance of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and Modular Neural Network (MNN) is compared to obtain an optimal ANN model to predict the crack propagation rate. The effect of various parameters of the MNN and MLP models are investigated. The number of input vectors of MLP and MNN models is studied to see if this will affect the training and predicting performance by the scatter of input vectors. At last, a new method called sensitivity analysis is adopted to explore the influenced proportion of the input vectors and the effect of load ratio, frequency, et al., on the crack propagation rate.

  19. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  20. Study of interfacial crack propagation in flip chip assemblies with nano-filled underfill materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Sakethraman

    No-flow underfill materials that cure during the solder reflow process is a relatively new technology. Although there are several advantages in terms of cost, time and processing ease, there are several reliability challenges associated with no-flow underfill materials. When mum-sized filler particles are introduced in no-flow underfills to enhance the solder bump reliability, such filler particles could prevent the solder bumps making reliable electrical contacts with the substrate pads during solder reflow, and therefore, the assembly yield would be adversely affected. The use of nano-sized filler particles can potentially improve assembly yield while offering the advantages associated with filled underfill materials. The objective of this thesis is to study the thermo-mechanical reliability of nano-filled epoxy underfills (NFU) through experiments and theoretical modeling. In this work, the thermo-mechanical properties of NFU's with 20-nm filler particles have been measured. An innovative residual stress test method has been developed to measure the interfacial fracture toughness. Using the developed residual stress method and the single-leg bending test, the mode-mixity-dependent fracture toughness for NFU-SiN interface has been determined. In addition to such monotonic interfacial fracture characterization, the interface crack propagation under thermo-mechanical fatigue loading has been experimentally characterized, and a model for fatigue interface crack propagation has been developed. A test vehicle comprising of several flip chips was assembled using the NFU material and the reliability of the flip-chip assemblies was assessed under thermal shock cycles between -40°C and 125°C. The NFU-SiN interfacial delamination propagation and the solder bump reliability were monitored. In parallel, numerical models were developed to study the interfacial delamination propagation in the flip chip assembly using conventional interfacial fracture mechanics as well as

  1. Analysis of a Generally Oriented Crack in a Functionally Graded Strip Sandwiched Between Two Homogeneous Half Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeb, N.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K.

    1999-01-01

    The driving forces for a generally oriented crack embedded in a Functionally Graded strip sandwiched between two half planes are analyzed using singular integral equations with Cauchy kernels, and integrated using Lobatto-Chebyshev collocation. Mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIF) and Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) are calculated. The Stress Intensity Factors are compared for accuracy with previously published results. Parametric studies are conducted for various nonhomogeneity ratios, crack lengths. crack orientation and thickness of the strip. It is shown that the SERR is more complete and should be used for crack propagation analysis.

  2. Enhanced toughness and stable crack propagation in a novel tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite produced by chemical vapour infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, J.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten is a promising candidate for the plasma-facing components of a future fusion reactor, but its use is strongly restricted by its inherent brittleness. An innovative concept to overcome this problem is tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite. In this paper we present the first mechanical test of such a composite material using a sample containing multiple fibres. The in situ fracture experiment was performed in a scanning electron microscope for close observation of the propagating crack. Stable crack propagation accompanied with rising load bearing capacity is observed. The fracture toughness is estimated using the test results and the surface observation.

  3. A Linearized Model for Wave Propagation through Coupled Volcanic Conduit-crack Systems Filled with Multiphase Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Dunham, E. M.; OReilly, O. J.; Karlstrom, L.

    2015-12-01

    Both the oscillation of magma in volcanic conduits and resonance of fluid-filled cracks (dikes and sills) are appealing explanations for very long period signals recorded at many active volcanoes. While these processes have been studied in isolation, real volcanic systems involve interconnected networks of conduits and cracks. The overall objective of our work is to develop a model of wave propagation and ultimately eruptive fluid dynamics through this coupled system. Here, we present a linearized model for wave propagation through a conduit with multiple cracks branching off of it. The fluid is compressible and viscous, and is comprised of a mixture of liquid melt and gas bubbles. Nonequilibrium bubble growth and resorption (BGR) is quantified by introducing a time scale for mass exchange between phases, following the treatment in Karlstrom and Dunham (2015). We start by deriving the dispersion relation for crack waves travelling along the multiphase-magma-filled crack embedded in an elastic solid. Dissipation arises from magma viscosity, nonequilibrium BGR, and radiation of seismic waves into the solid. We next introduce coupling conditions between the conduit and crack, expressing conservation of mass and the balance of forces across the junction. Waves in the conduit, like those in the crack, are influenced by nonequilibrium BGR, but the deformability of the surrounding solid is far less important than for cracks. Solution of the coupled system of equations provides the evolution of pressure and fluid velocity within the conduit-crack system. The system has various resonant modes that are sensitive to fluid properties and to the geometry of the conduit and cracks. Numerical modeling of seismic waves in the solid allows us to generate synthetic seismograms.

  4. Crack initiation and propagation behavior of WC particles reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composite produced by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang

    2016-08-01

    It is generally believed that cracks in metal matrix composites (MMC) parts manufacturing are crucial to the reliable material properties, especially for the reinforcement particles with high volume fraction. In this paper, WC particles (WCp) reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composites (WCp/Fe) were manufactured by laser melting deposition (LMD) technology to investigate the characteristics of cracks formation. The section morphology of composites were analyzed by optical microscope (OM), and microstructure of WCp, matrix and interface were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in order to study the crack initiation and propagation behavior under different laser process conditions. The temperature of materials during the laser melting deposition was detected by the infrared thermometer. The results showed that the cracks often appeared after five layers laser deposition in this experiment. The cracks crossed through WC particles rather than the interface, so the strength of interface obtained by the LMD was relatively large. When the thermal stress induced by high temperature gradient during LMD and the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between WC and matrix was larger than yield strength of WC, the cracks would initiate inside WC particle. Cracks mostly propagated along the eutectic phases whose brittleness was very large. The obtained thin interface was beneficial to transmitting the stress from particle to matrix. The influence of volume fraction of particles, laser power and scanning speed on cracks were investigated. This paper investigated the influence of WC particles size on cracks systematically, and the smallest size of cracked WC in different laser processing parameters was also researched.

  5. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Tadashi Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi

    2014-03-10

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655 nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490 nm and 500–600 nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  6. Empirical modeling of environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys for component life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Edward, III

    1995-01-01

    This research aims to develop the methods and understanding needed to incorporate time and loading variable dependent environmental effects on fatigue crack propagation (FCP) into computerized fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO (NASGRO). In particular, the effect of loading frequency on FCP rates in alpha + beta titanium alloys exposed to an aqueous chloride solution is investigated. The approach couples empirical modeling of environmental FCP with corrosion fatigue experiments. Three different computer models have been developed and incorporated in the DOS executable program. UVAFAS. A multiple power law model is available, and can fit a set of fatigue data to a multiple power law equation. A model has also been developed which implements the Wei and Landes linear superposition model, as well as an interpolative model which can be utilized to interpolate trends in fatigue behavior based on changes in loading characteristics (stress ratio, frequency, and hold times).

  7. Bacterial division. Mechanical crack propagation drives millisecond daughter cell separation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxue; Halladin, David K; Rojas, Enrique R; Koslover, Elena F; Lee, Timothy K; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Theriot, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    When Staphylococcus aureus undergoes cytokinesis, it builds a septum, generating two hemispherical daughters whose cell walls are only connected via a narrow peripheral ring. We found that resolution of this ring occurred within milliseconds ("popping"), without detectable changes in cell volume. The likelihood of popping depended on cell-wall stress, and the separating cells split open asymmetrically, leaving the daughters connected by a hinge. An elastostatic model of the wall indicated high circumferential stress in the peripheral ring before popping. Last, we observed small perforations in the peripheral ring that are likely initial points of mechanical failure. Thus, the ultrafast daughter cell separation in S. aureus appears to be driven by accumulation of stress in the peripheral ring and exhibits hallmarks of mechanical crack propagation. PMID:25931560

  8. Mechanical crack propagation drives millisecond daughter cell separation in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxue; Halladin, David K.; Rojas, Enrique R.; Koslover, Elena F.; Lee, Timothy K.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Theriot, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    When Staphylococcus aureus undergoes cytokinesis, it builds a septum generating two hemispherical daughters whose cell walls are only connected via a narrow peripheral ring. We found that resolution of this ring occurred within milliseconds (“popping”), without detectable changes in cell volume. The likelihood of popping depended on cell wall stress, and the separating cells split open asymmetrically leaving the daughters connected by a hinge. An elastostatic model of the wall indicated high circumferential stress in the peripheral ring before popping. Finally, we observed small perforations in the peripheral ring that are likely initial points of mechanical failure. Thus, the ultrafast daughter cell separation in S. aureus appears to be driven by accumulation of stress in the peripheral ring, and exhibits hallmarks of mechanical crack propagation. PMID:25931560

  9. Mixed-mode chromatography in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kelly; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) is a fast growing area in recent years, thanks to the new generation of mixed-mode stationary phases and better understanding of multimode interactions. MMC has superior applications in the separation of compounds that are not retained or not well resolved by typical reversed-phase LC methods, especially for polar and charged molecules. Due to the multiple retention modes that a single MMC column can offer, often MMC provides additional dimension to a separation method by adjusting the mobile phase conditions. Mixed-mode media is also an effective way to clean up complex sample matrices for purification purposes or for sensitive detection of trace amounts of analytes. In this article, we discuss mixed-mode stationary phases and separation mechanisms and review recent advances in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical applications including the analysis and/or purification of counterions, small molecule drugs, impurities, formulation excipients, peptides and proteins. PMID:27236100

  10. Internal Crack Propagation in a Continuously Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Analyzed by Actual Residual Stress Tensor Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Youichi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Initiation, propagation, and termination of internal cracks in a continuously cast austenitic stainless steel has been investigated with emphasis on stress loading of the solidified shell during casting. Cracks were formed at the center of the slab, parallel to the width of the cast, and were observed near the narrow faces. Optimized two-dimensional X-ray diffraction method was employed to measure residual stress tensor distributions around the cracks in the as-cast slab with coarse and strongly preferentially oriented grains. The tensor distributions had a sharp peak, as high as 430 MPa, at the crack end neighboring the columnar grains. On the other hand, lower values were measured at the crack end neighboring the equiaxed grains, where the local temperatures were higher during solidification. The true residual stress distributions were determined by evaluating the longitudinal elastic constant for each measured position, resulting in more accurate stress values than before. Electron probe micro-analysis at the terminal crack position showed that Ni, Ti, and Si were concentrated at the boundaries of the equiaxed grains, where the tensile strength was estimated to be lower than at the primary grains. A model of the crack formation and engineering recommendations to reduce crack formation are proposed.

  11. Transient cracks and triple junctions induced by Cocos-Nazca propagating rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Mitchell, G. A.; Cann, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Galapagos triple junction is a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction where the Cocos, Nazca, and Pacific plates meet around the Galapagos microplate (GMP). On the Cocos plate, north of the large gore that marks the propagating Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift, a 250-km-long and 50-km-wide band of NW-SE-trending cracks crosscuts the N-S-trending abyssal hills of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These appear as a succession of minor rifts, accommodating some NE-SW extension of EPR-generated seafloor. The rifts successively intersected the EPR in triple junctions at distances of 50-100 km north of the tip of the C-N Rift. We proposed a simple crack interaction model to explain the location of the transient rifts and their junction with the EPR. The model predicts that crack locations are controlled by the stress perturbation along the EPR, induced by the dominant C-N Rift, and scaled by the distance of its tip to the EPR (Schouten et al., 2008). The model also predicts that tensile stresses are symmetric about the C-N Rift and thus, similar cracks should have occurred south of the C-N Rift prior to formation of the GMP about 1 Ma. There were no data at the time to test this prediction. In early 2009 (AT 15-41), we mapped an area on the Nazca plate south of the C-N rift out to 4 Ma. The new bathymetric data confirm the existence of a distinctive pattern of cracks south of the southern C-N gore that mirrors the pattern on the Cocos plate until about 1 Ma, and lends support to the crack interaction model. The envelope of the symmetric cracking pattern indicates that the distance between the C-N Rift tip and the EPR varied between 40 and 65 km during this time (1-4 Ma). The breakdown of the symmetry at 1 Ma accurately dates the onset of a southern plate boundary of the GMP, now Dietz Deep Rift. At present, the southern rift boundary of the GMP joins the EPR with a steep-sided, 80 km long ridge. This ridge releases the stress perturbation otherwise induced along the EPR by elastic

  12. Measurement of mixed-mode stress intensity factors using digital image correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; He, Lingfeng

    2012-07-01

    Applications of the digital image correlation method (DIC) for the determination of the mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIF) is investigated in this paper. Experiments were performed on an edge fatigue cracked aluminum specimen using a special loading device, which is an appropriate apparatus for experimental mixed-mode fracture analysis. The full-field displacements around the crack-tip region of the test sample were calculated using DIC. And then the SIF associated with unavoidable rigid-body displacement motion were calculated simultaneously from the experimental data. The effect of the rigid body motion on the measured displacements was then eliminated using the computed rigid body translation and rotation. A coarse-fine searching method was developed to determine the crack-tip location. For validation, the SIF thus determined is compared with theoretical results, confirming the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique. Therefore it reveals that the DIC is a practical and effective tool for full-field deformation and SIF measurement.

  13. Effect of amorphous lamella on the crack propagation behavior of crystalline Mg/amorphous Mg-Al nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Yang, Song; Yu-Long, Li

    2016-02-01

    The effects of amorphous lamella on the crack propagation behavior in crystalline/amorphous (C/A) Mg/Mg-Al nanocomposites under tensile loading are investigated using the molecular dynamics simulation method. The sample with an initial crack of orientation [0001] is considered here. For the nano-monocrystal Mg, the crack growth exhibits brittle cleavage. However, for the C/A Mg/Mg-Al nanocomposites, the ‘double hump’ behavior can be observed in all the stress-strain curves regardless of the amorphous lamella thickness. The results indicate that the amorphous lamella plays a critical role in the crack deformation, and it can effectively resist the crack propagation. The above mentioned crack deformation behaviors are also disclosed and analyzed in the present work. The results here provide a strategy for designing the high-performance hexagonal-close-packed metal and alloy materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372256 and 11572259), the 111 Project (Grant No. B07050), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-12-1046), and the Program for New Scientific and Technological Star of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2012KJXX-39).

  14. Cohesive Laws for Analyzing Through-Crack Propagation in Cross Ply Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Davila, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    The laminate cohesive approach (LCA) is a methodology for the experimental characterization of cohesive through-the-thickness damage propagation in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites. LCA has several advantages over other existing approaches for cohesive law characterization, including: visual measurements of crack length are not required, structural effects are accounted for, and LCA can be applied when the specimen is too small to achieve steady-state fracture. In this work, the applicability of this method is investigated for two material systems: IM7/8552, a conventional prepreg, and AS4/VRM34, a non-crimp fabric cured using an out-of-autoclave process. The compact tension specimen configuration is used to propagate stable Mode I damage. Trilinear cohesive laws are characterized using the fracture toughness and the notch tip opening displacement. Test results are compared for the IM7/8552 specimens with notches machined by waterjet and by wire slurry saw. It is shown that the test results are nearly identical for both notch tip preparations methods, indicating that significant specimen preparation time and cost savings can be realized by using the waterjet to notch the specimen instead of the wire slurry saw. The accuracy of the cohesive laws characterized herein are assessed by reproducing the structural response of the test specimens using computational methods. The applicability of the characterization procedure for inferring lamina fracture toughness is also discussed.

  15. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  16. A metallurgical evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in large diameter stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.; Rawl, D.E. Jr.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing (UT) of the stainless steel piping in the primary coolant water system of SRS reactors indicates the presence of short, partly-through-wall stress corrosion cracks in the heat-affected zone of approximately 7% of the circumferential pipe welds. These cracks are thought to develop by intergranular nucleation and mixed mode propagation. Metallographic evaluations have confirmed the UT indications of crack size and provided evidence that crack growth involved the accumulation of chloride inside the growing crack. It is postulated that the development of an oxygen depletion cell inside the crack results in the migration of chloride ions to the crack tip to balance the accumulation of positively charged metallic ions. The results of this metallurgicial evaluation, combined with structural assessments of system integrity, support the existence of leak-before-break conditions in the SRS reactor piping system. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Stress-Intensity Factor Corrections for Out-of-Plane Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Herman, Dave J.; James, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate testing is performed by automated data collection systems that assume straight crack growth in the plane of symmetry and use standard polynomial solutions to compute crack length and stress-intensity factors from compliance or potential drop measurements. Visual measurements used to correct the collected data typically include only the horizontal crack length, which for cracks that propagate out-of-plane, under-estimates the crack growth rates and over-estimates the stress-intensity factors. The authors have devised an approach for correcting both the crack growth rates and stress-intensity factors based on two-dimensional mixed mode-I/II finite element analysis (FEA). The approach is used to correct out-of-plane data for 7050-T7451 and 2025-T6 aluminum alloys. Results indicate the correction process works well for high DeltaK levels but fails to capture the mixed-mode effects at DeltaK levels approaching threshold (da/dN approximately 10(exp -10) meter/cycle).

  18. Stochastic propagation of an array of parallel cracks: Exploratory work on matrix fatigue damage in composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    Transverse cracking of polymeric matrix materials is an important fatigue damage mechanism in continuous-fiber composite laminates. The propagation of an array of these cracks is a stochastic problem usually treated by Monte Carlo methods. However, this exploratory work proposes an alternative approach wherein the Monte Carlo method is replaced by a more closed-form recursion relation based on fractional Brownian motion.'' A fractal scaling equation is also proposed as a substitute for the more empirical Paris equation describing individual crack growth in this approach. Preliminary calculations indicate that the new recursion relation is capable of reproducing the primary features of transverse matrix fatigue cracking behavior. Although not yet fully tested or verified, this cursion relation may eventually be useful for real-time applications such as monitoring damage in aircraft structures.

  19. Fatigue crack propagation behaviour of unidirectionally solidified gamma/gamma-prime-delta eutectic alloys. [Ni-Nb-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretz, P. E.; Hertzberg, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation studies were carried out on unidirectionally solidified gamma/gamma-prime-delta (Ni-Nb-Al) alloys over an aluminum content range of 1.5-2.5% by weight. The variation of Al content of as-grown alloys did not significantly affect the crack growth behavior of these eutectic composites. The results indicate that the addition of Al to the eutectic dramatically improved the FCP behavior. The gamma/gamma-prime-delta alloy exhibited crack growth rates for a given stress intensity range that are an order of magnitude lower than those for the gamma-delta alloy. It is suggested that this difference in FCP behavior can be explained on the basis of stacking fault energy considerations. Extensive delaminations at the crack tip were also revealed, which contributed to the superior fatigue response. Delamination was predominantly intergranular in nature.

  20. Toughened epoxy polymers: Fatigue crack propagation mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines several mechanisms by which the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance of shear-yielding thermoset polymers can be improved. Specifically, this research has four objectives as follows: first, to develop a mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified thermoset polymers; second, to understand the effect of strength and shape of the inorganic fillers on the FCP resistance and micromechanisms in filled epoxy polymers; third, to elucidate the nature of the interactions among the crack-tip shielding mechanisms in thermoset polymers subjected to cyclic loading and synergistically toughened with both rubber and inorganic particles (i.e., hybrid composites); fourth, to study the role of interfaces on the synergistic interactions in FCP behavior of hybrid composites. The model - matrix material consists of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) based type epoxy cured with piperidine. Parallel to the first objective, the epoxy matrix was modified with rubber while changing volume fraction, type, and size of the rubber particles. To accomplish the second goal, the epoxy polymers were modified by a total 10 volume percent of either one of the following three types of inorganic modifiers: hollow glass spheres (HGS); solid glass spheres (SGS); and short glass fibers (SGF). The third goal was met by processing three different systems of hybrid epoxy composites modified by (1) CTBN rubber and HGS, (2) CTBN rubber and SGS, and (3) CTBN rubber and SGF. The total volume fraction of the two modifiers in each hybrid system was kept constant at 10 percent while systematically changing their ratio. To meet the fourth objective, the surface properties of the SGS particles in the hybrid system were altered using adhesion promoter. A mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified epoxies was achieved by relating fractographs to observed FCP behavior.

  1. Vibration based baseline updating method to localize crack formation and propagation in reinforced concrete members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahalathantri, Buddhi L.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Fawzia, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) schemes are useful for proper management of the performance of structures and for preventing their catastrophic failures. Vibration based SHM schemes has gained popularity during the past two decades resulting in significant research. It is hence evitable that future SHM schemes will include robust and automated vibration based damage assessment techniques (VBDAT) to detect, localize and quantify damage. In this context, the Damage Index (DI) method which is classified as non-model or output based VBDAT, has the ability to automate the damage assessment process without using a computer or numerical model along with actual measurements. Although damage assessment using DI methods have been able to achieve reasonable success for structures made of homogeneous materials such as steel, the same success level has not been reported with respect to Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures. The complexity of flexural cracks is claimed to be the main reason to hinder the applicability of existing DI methods in RC structures. Past research also indicates that use of a constant baseline throughout the damage assessment process undermines the potential of the Modal Strain Energy based Damage Index (MSEDI). To address this situation, this paper presents a novel method that has been developed as part of a comprehensive research project carried out at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. This novel process, referred to as the baseline updating method, continuously updates the baseline and systematically tracks both crack formation and propagation with the ability to automate the damage assessment process using output only data. The proposed method is illustrated through examples and the results demonstrate the capability of the method to achieve the desired outcomes.

  2. Implementation of equivalent domain integral method in the two-dimensional analysis of mixed mode problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1989-01-01

    An equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for calculating J-intergrals for two-dimensional cracked elastic bodies is presented. The details of the method and its implementation are presented for isoparametric elements. The total and product integrals consist of the sum of an area of domain integral and line integrals on the crack faces. The line integrals vanish only when the crack faces are traction free and the loading is either pure mode 1 or pure mode 2 or a combination of both with only the square-root singular term in the stress field. The EDI method gave accurate values of the J-integrals for two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Numerical studies showed that domains consisting of one layer of elements are sufficient to obtain accurate J-integral values. Two procedures for separating the individual modes from the domain integrals are presented. The procedure that uses the symmetric and antisymmetric components of the stress and displacement fields to calculate the individual modes gave accurate values of the integrals for all problems analyzed. The EDI method when applied to a problem of an interface crack in two different materials showed that the mode 1 and mode 2 components are domain dependent while the total integral is not. This behavior is caused by the presence of the oscillatory part of the singularity in bimaterial crack problems. The EDI method, thus, shows behavior similar to the virtual crack closure method for bimaterial problems.

  3. Effect of interstitial content on high- temperature fatigue crack propagation and low- cycle fatigue of alloy 720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, S.; Thomas, M. C.

    1993-08-01

    Alloy 720 is a high-strength cast and wrought turbine disc alloy currently in use for temperatures up to about 650 °C in Allison’s T800, T406, GMA 2100, and GMA 3007 engines. In the original composition in-tended for use as turbine blades, large carbide and boride stringers formed and acted as preferred crack initiators. Stringering was attributed to relatively higher boron and carbon levels. These interstitials are known to affect creep and ductility of superalloys, but the effects on low-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation have not been studied. Recent emphasis on the total life approach in the design of turbine discs necessitates better understanding of the interactive fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue behavior at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to improve the damage tolerance of Alloy 720 by systematically modifying boron and carbon levels in the master melt, without altering the low-cy-cle fatigue and strength characteristics of the original composition. Improvement in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue life was achieved by fragmenting the continuous stringers via composition modifica-tion. The fatigue crack propagation rate was reduced by a concurrent reduction of both carbon and bo-ron levels to optimally low levels at which the frequency of brittle second phases was minimal. The changes in composition have been incorporated for production disc forgings.

  4. Effect of interstitial content on high-temperature fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue of Alloy 720

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, S. ); Thomas, M.C. . Allison Gas Turbine Div.)

    1993-08-01

    Alloy 720 is a high-strength cast and wrought turbine disc alloy currently in use for temperatures up to about 650 C in Allison's T800, T406, GMA 2100, and GMA 3007 engines. In the original composition intended for use as turbine blades, large carbide and borides stringers formed and acted as preferred crack initiators. Stringering was attributed to relatively higher boron and carbon levels. These interstitial are known to affect creep and ductility of superalloys, but the effects on low-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation have not been studied. Recent emphasis on the total life approach in the design of turbine discs necessitates better understanding of the interactive fatigue crack propagation and low-cycle fatigue behavior at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to improve the damage tolerance of Alloy 720 by systematically modifying boron and carbon levels in the master melt, without altering the low-cycle fatigue and strength characteristics of the original composition. Improvement in strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue life was achieved by fragmenting the continuous stringers via composition modification. The fatigue crack propagation rate was reduced by a concurrent reduction of both carbon and boron levels to optimally low levels at which the frequency of brittle second phases was minimal. The changes in composition have been incorporated for production disc forgings.

  5. Fatigue-crack-propagation thresholds in a nickel-base superalloy at high frequencies and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, A.; Milligan, W. W.; Padula, S. A.; Marras, S. I.

    2002-07-01

    Fatigue-crack-propagation (FCP) tests were conducted on the powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy KM4 at temperatures of 20 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C. Two different heat treatments were investigated, one yielding a relatively coarse grain size of 55 µm and another yielding a fine grain size of 6 µm. Tests were conducted at 100 Hz and 1000 Hz and at load ratios between 0.3 and 0.7. In the Paris regime, trends observed at high frequencies for KM4 were identical to those observed by earlier investigators at lower frequencies: coarse grains, low load ratios, low temperatures, and higher frequencies generally resulted in lower crack-propagation rates. However, in contrast to the Paris-regime behavior, thresholds were a complicated function of microstructure, load ratio, temperature, and frequency, and the only variable that resulted in a consistent trend in threshold was the load ratio. For example, thresholds increased from 100 to 1000 Hz for the fine-grained material at 550 °C, but decreased with the same frequency variation at 650 °C. One reason for this complexity was a change to intergranular fracture in the fine-grained microstructure at 650 °C, which was beneficial for high-frequency thresholds. Higher load ratios and lower frequencies promoted intergranular fracture. However, not all of the complexity could be explained by changing fracture mechanisms. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereofractography was utilized to determine quantitative measures of fracture-surface roughness. The most useful quantitative measure was found to be the standard deviation of the fracture-surface height, which is a physically meaningful length parameter and which corresponded to about half the grain size during room-temperature fatigue at near-threshold Δ K levels. The roughness of the fracture surface was found to increase as the load ratio was increased for both microstructures. For the coarse-grained microstructure, there was a direct correlation between fracture

  6. The fatigue-crack propagation behavior of ASTM A533-B steel tested in vacuo at LWR operating temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fatigue-crack propagation (FCP) behavior of ASTM A533-B-1 steel was characterized in vacuo at 288/sup 0/C. Tests were conducted at two stress ratios: R = 0.05 and R = 0.7. Results of these tests were compared with results from previous studies for the same type of steel tested in an air environment, and FCP rates in vacuo were generally lower than those in air. Stress ratio effects in vacuo were not as great as those in air, and both stress ratio effects and environmental effects are discussed from the standpoint of crack closure concepts.

  7. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  8. Elevated temperature creep-fatigue crack propagation in nickel-base alloys and 1 Cr-Mo-V steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmy, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Wüthrich, C.

    1988-04-01

    The crack growth behavior of several high temperature nickel-base alloys, under cyclic and static loading, is studied and reviewed. In the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) MA 6000 and MA 754 alloys, the high temperature crack propagation exhibited orientation dependence under cyclic as well as under static loading. The creep crack growth (CCG) behavior of cast nickel-base IN-738 and IN-939* superalloys at 850 °C could be characterized by the stress intensity factor, K 1. In the case of the alloy IN-901 at 500 °C and 600 °C, K 1 was found to be the relevant parameter to characterize the creep crack growth behavior. The energy rate line integral, C*, may be the appropriate loading parameter to describe the creep crack growth behavior of the nickel-iron base IN-800H alloy at 800 °C. The creep crack growth data of 1 Cr-Mo-V steel, with bainitic microstructure, at 550 °C could be correlated better by C * than by K 1.

  9. A new impact test for the identification of a dynamic crack propagation criterion using a gas-gun device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, I.; Pantalé, O.; Caperaa, S.

    2006-08-01

    The modelling of damage and fracture behaviour under high rates of loadings for metallic structures presents the more and more interests for engineering design, especially for crash phenomena. In order to perform a numerical simulation of such phenomena a crack propagation criterion must be identified using adapted laboratory tests. The objective of this paper is to present a new impact test intended for the identification of a cohesive crack criterion implemented into a home-made FEM code based on Extended Finite Element Method. Therefore, a double-notched specimen is impacted using a gas-gun device in order to obtain different crack paths depending on projectile speed. A post-impact macro-photographic observation allows to measure the crack path, the angles and the advancing length. These experimental results are used as input responses in the identification procedure for determining the crack cohesive criterion parameters. Some experimental results, for an aluminium alloy crack criterion identification, are presented to illustrate the proposed approach.

  10. The effect of local texture on crack propagation in Fe-Al ordered alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fionova, L.; Juarez-Islas, J.A.; Perez, R.; Albarran, J.L.; Flores, O.; Martinez, L. . Lab. de Cuernavaca); Titovets, Yu. . Dept. of Metal Physics)

    1994-12-15

    The ordered Fe-Al alloys have received considerable attention during the last few years, due to their possible high temperature structural use. B2 iron aluminide is attractive also from a density consideration and might be a promising matrix material for fiber reinforce composite systems. However, poor ductility prevents potential applications of this material. Iron aluminides exhibit preferentially intergranular fracture at room temperature which indicates the importance of grain boundary (GB) properties for mechanical behavior of these polycrystals. It is well known that the type of GB strongly affects its cohesion energy, which leads to preferential crack propagation along high energy GBs, whereas, the low energy GBs are resistant to the fracture. The effect of GB parameters on fracture behavior was an impetus for the study of GB characteristics in the ordered alloys. In these works, an enhanced plasticity is associated with the higher portion of small angle and low-[Sigma] GBs in polycrystal. Obviously, these data evidence the possibility of GB design, which can be used in addition to the alloying to improve the plasticity of these materials. This paper aims to study the GB characteristics (misorientation parameters and spatial distribution of different type GBs) in Fe-Al alloy to elucidate the microstructural aspects of fracture behavior of B2 FeAl.

  11. Asymmetric crack propagation near waterfall cliff and its influence on the waterfall lip shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastola, G.

    2011-11-01

    By means of Finite Element Method (FEM) calculations and fatigue fracture mechanics analysis, we show that crack propagation in bedrocks close to the waterfall cliff is preferential towards the cliff face rather than upstream the river. Based on this effect, we derive the corresponding expression for the velocity of recession vr of the waterfall lip, and find that vr has a quadratic dependence on the hydrostatic pressure. Quantitatively, this erosion mechanism generates recession rates of the order of ~cm-dm/y, consistent with the recession rates of well-known waterfalls. We enclose our expression for vr into a growth model to investigate the time evolution of a waterfall lip subject to this erosional mechanism. Because of the dependence on hydrostatic pressure, the shape of the waterfall is influenced by the transverse profile of the river that generates the waterfall. If the river has a transverse concavity, the waterfall evolves a curved shape. Evolution for the case of meanders with asymmetric transverse profile is also given.

  12. Recent Enhancements to the National Transonic Facility (Mixed Mode Operations)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. Allen; Chan, David; Balakrishna, S.; Wahls, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. National Transonic Facility continues to make enhancements to provide quality data in a safe, efficient and cost effective method for aerodynamic ground testing. Recent enhancements discussed in this paper include the development of a Mixed-mode of operations that combine Air-mode operations with Nitrogen-mode operations. This implementation and operational results of this new Mixed-mode expands the ambient temperature transonic region of testing beyond the Air-mode limitations at a significantly reduced cost over Nitrogen Mode operation.

  13. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  14. A study of spectrum fatigue crack propagation in two aluminum alloys. I - Spectrum simplification. II - Influence of microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack propagation FCP behavior of two aluminum alloys is performed to simulate spectrum loading conditions found at critical locations in high performance fighter aircraft. Negative loads are shown to be eliminated for the tension-compression spectrum for low to intermediate maximum stress intensities, and load interactions are found to be more significant at higher stress intensities and with more plasticity at the crack tip. In the second part, the influence of microstructural features including grain size, inclusions, and dispersoids on constant amplitude and spectrum crack growth behavior in aluminum alloys is studied. At low stress intensities the I/M alloy demonstrated better FCP resistance than the P/M 7091 alloy for both constant amplitude and spectrum testing, and the inhomogeneous planar slip and large grain size of 7050 limit dislocation interactions, thereby improving FCP performance.

  15. Stretch-Induced Drug Delivery from Superhydrophobic Polymer Composites: Use of Crack Propagation Failure Modes for Controlling Release Rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Julia; Kaplan, Jonah A; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-02-18

    The concept of using crack propagation in polymeric materials to control drug release and its first demonstration are reported. The composite drug delivery system consists of highly-textured superhydrophobic electrosprayed microparticle coatings, composed of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers poly(caprolactone) and poly(glycerol monostearate carbonate-co-caprolactone), and a cellulose/polyester core. The release of entrapped agents is controlled by the magnitude of applied strain, resulting in a graded response from water infiltration through the propagating patterned cracks in the coating. Strain-dependent delivery of the anticancer agents cisplatin and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin to esophageal cancer cells (OE33) in vitro is observed. Finally the device is integrated with an esophageal stent to demonstrate delivery of fluorescein diacetate, using applied tension, to an ex vivo esophagus. PMID:26804182

  16. Intrinsic fatigue crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys - The effect of gaseous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous environmental effects on intrinsic fatigue crack growth are significant for the Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090, peak aged. For both moderate Delta K-low R and low Delta K-high R regimes, crack growth rates decrease according to the environment order: purified water vapor, moist air, helium and oxygen. Gaseous environmental effects are pronounced near threshold and are not closure dominated. Here, embrittlement by low levels of H2O (ppm) supports hydrogen embrittlement and suggests that molecular transport controlled cracking, established for high Delta K-low R, is modified near threshold. Localized crack tip reaction sites or high R crack opening shape may enable the strong, environmental effect at low levels of Delta K. Similar crack growth in He and O2 eliminates the contribution of surface films to fatigue damage in alloy 2090. While 2090 and 7075 exhibit similar environmental trends, the Al-Li-Cu alloy is more resistant to intrinsic corrosion fatigue crack growth.

  17. Metal magnetic memory technique used to predict the fatigue crack propagation behavior of 0.45%C steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongchong, Li; Lihong, Dong; Haidou, Wang; Guolu, Li; Binshi, Xu

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring fatigue crack propagation behavior of ferromagnetic components is very important. In this paper, the tension-tension fatigue tests of center cracked tension (CCT) specimens were carried out; the variation regularity of both tangential and normal components of magnetic signals during fatigue process were investigated. The results showed that the initial abnormal signals which appeared at the notch were reversed after cyclic loading. The abnormal magnetic signals became more significant with the increase of fatigue cycles and reversed again after failure. The characteristic parameters, i.e., the peak value of tangential component, Btp, and maximum gradient value of normal component, Km, showed similar variation trends during the fatigue process, which can be divided into three different stages. An approximate linear relationship was found between the characteristic parameters and fatigue crack length 2a. The feasibility of predicting the fatigue crack propagation using the abnormal magnetic signals was discussed. What's more, the variation and distribution of the magnetic signals were also analyzed based on the theory of magnetic charge.

  18. The effect of initiation feature and environment on fatigue crack formation and early propagation in aluminum zinc magnesium copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.

    The current research provides insight into fatigue crack formation and progression in the poorly understood size regime that bridges safe-life and damage tolerance approaches; particular attention is given to the influences of corrosion-induced degradation and time-cycle dependent loading environment effects. Quantitative analysis of crack formation life (Ni), microstructurally small crack (<500 microm) propagation kinetics (da/dN), and the effect of cold loading environment provide the means to validate mechanism-based modeling. Both pristine and corroded (L-S surface) 7075-T651 specimens were fatigued at 23°C, -50°C and -90°C under various applied stresses. Microscopy of programmed loading-induced crack surface marks produced an unparalleled Ni and small crack da/dN database. Results show that fatigue crack formation involves a complex interaction of elastic stress concentration, due to a 3-dimensional macro-pit, coupled with local micro-feature (and constituent) induced plastic strain concentration. Such interactions cause high Ni variability, but, from an engineering perspective, a broadly corroded surface should contain an extreme group of features driving Ni to ˜0. At low-applied stresses, Ni consumes a significant portion of total life, which is well predicted by coupling elastic-plastic FEA with empirical low-cycle fatigue life models. All pristine and corroded da/dN were uniquely correlated using complex continuum stress intensity (K) and crack opening solutions which account for the stress concentrating formation feature. Multiple crack growth regimes were observed, typical of environment enhanced fatigue in Al alloys. Such behavior is not captured by prominent mechanics-based small crack models. Furthermore, neither local closure nor slip-based models captured the order of magnitude variability in da/dN attributed to microstructure. Low temperature loading produces an order of magnitude increase in Ni, and even larger reduction in da/dN, due to

  19. Mixed Mode Effects in a Community College Graduate Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goho, James

    This paper describes the results of research evaluating the use of mixed-mode surveys in institutional research. Surveys were administered to 1999-2000 graduates at Red River Community College in 2 phases. Phase 1 offered three modes of response: mail, Web-based, and touch-tone data entry (TDE). Phase 2 (administered to non-respondents of Phase 1)…

  20. Crack propagation monitoring in a full-scale aircraft fatigue test based on guided wave-Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Mei, Hanfei; Ren, Yuanqiang

    2016-05-01

    For aerospace application of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology, the problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions must be addressed and the SHM technology has to be fully validated on real aircraft structures under realistic load conditions on ground before it can reach the status of flight test. In this paper, the guided wave (GW) based SHM method is applied to a full-scale aircraft fatigue test which is one of the most similar test status to the flight test. To deal with the time-varying problem, a GW-Gaussian mixture model (GW-GMM) is proposed. The probability characteristic of GW features, which is introduced by time-varying conditions is modeled by GW-GMM. The weak cumulative variation trend of the crack propagation, which is mixed in time-varying influence can be tracked by the GW-GMM migration during on-line damage monitoring process. A best match based Kullback–Leibler divergence is proposed to measure the GW-GMM migration degree to reveal the crack propagation. The method is validated in the full-scale aircraft fatigue test. The validation results indicate that the reliable crack propagation monitoring of the left landing gear spar and the right wing panel under realistic load conditions are achieved.

  1. Fatigue Analysis of the Piston Rod in a Kaplan Turbine Based on Crack Propagation under Unsteady Hydraulic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Y Luo, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2014-03-01

    As an important component of the blade-control system in Kaplan turbines, piston rods are subjected to fluctuating forces transferred by the turbines blades from hydraulic pressure oscillations. Damage due to unsteady hydraulic loads might generate unexpected down time and high repair cost. In one running hydropower plant, the fracture failure of the piston rod was found twice at the same location. With the transient dynamic analysis, the retainer ring structure of the piston rod existed a relative high stress concentration. This predicted position of the stress concentration agreed well with the actual fracture position in the plant. However, the local strain approach was not able to explain why this position broke frequently. Since traditional structural fatigue analyses use a local stress strain approach to assess structural integrity, do not consider the effect of flaws which can significantly degrade structural life. Using linear elastic fracture mechanism (LEFM) approaches that include the effect of flaws is becoming common practice in many industries. In this research, a case involving a small semi-ellipse crack was taken into account at the stress concentration area, crack growth progress was calculated by FEM. The relationship between crack length and remaining life was obtained. The crack propagation path approximately agreed with the actual fracture section. The results showed that presence of the crack had significantly changed the local stress and strain distributions of the piston rod compared with non-flaw assumption.

  2. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. I - Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness of aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl; and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  3. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 1: Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  4. Crystallography of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Precipitation-Hardened Al-Cu-Mg/Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo; Agnew, Sean R.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2007-12-01

    A combined electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)/stereology method successfully quantifies the orientation of fatigue crack surfaces for Al-Li-Cu and Al-Cu-Mg alloys stressed at low Δ K, in which deformation is localized in slip bands and cracking is highly faceted. The method orients features as small as ˜1 μm in complex microstructures. Vacuum fatigue facets align within 15 deg of up to four variants of {111} slip planes, governed by the distribution of crack tip resolved shear stress. The small fraction of precisely oriented {111} facets suggests that cracking involves complex intraband and multiple-band interface paths. Water vapor and NaCl solution affect a similar dramatic change in the crack path; near-{111} facets are never observed, at odds with mechanisms for H-enhanced slip localization and associated slip band cracking. Rather, two environmental crack facet morphologies, broad flat and repeating step, exhibit a wide range of orientations between {001} and {110}, as governed by crack tip resolved normal stresses. The repetitive stepped facets appear to contain areas parallel to {100}/{110} on the ˜1- μm scale, coupled with surface curvature consistent with a mechanism of discontinuous fatigue crack growth involving H-enhanced {100}/{110} cleavage and intermingled crack tip plasticity. Broad-flat faceted regions are parallel to a variety of planes, consistent with a mechanism combining high crack tip tensile stresses and H trapped at the dislocation structure from cyclic deformation, within 1 μm of the crack tip.

  5. Fatigue crack propagation in Ni-base superalloy single crystals under multiaxial cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. S.; Hack, J. E.; Leverant, G. R.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of crystallographic orientation and stress state on the multiaxial fatigue behavior of MAR-M200* single crystals were examined. Using notched tubular specimens subjected to combined tension/torsion cyclic loads, crack growth rates were determined at ambient temperature as functions of stress intensity range, the shear stress range-to-normal stress range ratio, and crystallographic orientation. Comparison of crack growth data at the same effective ΔK reveals a weak dependence of the crack growth rate on both the tube axis and the notch orientation. For a given set of tube axis and notch orientation, the crack growth rate might or might not vary with the applied stress state, depending on whether roughness-induced crack closure is present. In most cases, subcritical cracking occurs either along a single 111 slip plane or on ridges formed with two 111 slip planes. Neither fracture mode is altered by a change in the applied stress state. This complex crack growth behavior will be discussed in terms of the crack-tip stress field, slip morphology, and crack closure.

  6. Substructuring FE-XFE approaches applied to three-dimensional crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyart, E.; Duflot, M.; Coulon, D.; Martiny, P.; Pardoen, T.; Remacle, J. F.; Lani, F.

    2008-06-01

    Two substructuring methods are investigated in order to allow for the use of the eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) within commercial finite element (FE) codes without need for modifying their kernel. The global FE problem is decomposed into two subdomains, the safe domain and the cracked domain based on the value of the level sets representing the crack. The safe domain is treated by the host FE software while the cracked domain is treated by an independent XFE code. The first substructuring method consists of calculating the Schur matrix of a cracked super-element with the XFE code. The second technique introduces the finite element tearing and interconnecting method (FETI) which ensures the compatibility of the displacements at the interface between the cracked and safe subdomains. The stiffness matrices and nodal forces are provided by the XFE and FE codes for the cracked and safe subdomains, respectively. The solutions obtained with these two techniques are rigorously equivalent to those computed with the stand-alone XFE code. First, the computational efficiency of the two approaches is demonstrated. Second, a validation is proposed towards comparison with reference values of the stress intensity factors in simple 3D cracked geometries. Finally, this contribution presents an application of the FE-XFE-FETI method to the computation of the stress intensity factor induced by a crack inside a hydraulic cylinder under internal pressure.

  7. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation rate of short fiber reinforced epoxy composites for analogue cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alexander C M; Miller, Forrest; Buxton, McKee; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Third-generation mechanical analogue bone models and synthetic analogue cortical bone materials manufactured by Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. (PRL) are popular tools for use in mechanical testing of various orthopedic implants and biomaterials. A major issue with these models is that the current third-generation epoxy-short fiberglass based composite used as the cortical bone substitute is prone to crack formation and failure in fatigue or repeated quasistatic loading of the model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the current baseline (established PRL "third-generation" E-glass-fiber-epoxy) composite analogue for cortical bone to a new composite material formulation proposed for use as an enhanced fourth-generation cortical bone analogue material. Standard tensile, plane strain fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation rate tests were performed on both the third- and fourth-generation composite material formulations using standard ASTM test techniques. Injection molding techniques were used to create random fiber orientation in all test specimens. Standard dog-bone style tensile specimens were tested to obtain ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Compact tension fracture toughness specimens were utilized to determine plane strain fracture toughness values. Reduced thickness compact tension specimens were also used to determine fatigue crack propagation rate behavior for the two material groups. Literature values for the same parameters for human cortical bone were compared to results from the third- and fourth-generation cortical analogue bone materials. Tensile properties of the fourth-generation material were closer to that of average human cortical bone than the third-generation material. Fracture toughness was significantly increased by 48% in the fourth-generation composite as compared to the third-generation analogue bone. The threshold stress intensity to propagate the crack

  8. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  9. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  10. Subcritical crack propagation due to chemical rock weakening: macroscale chemo-plasticity and chemo-elasticity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueckel, T.; Hu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crack propagation in a subcritically stressed rock subject to chemically aggressive environment is analyzed and numerically simulated. Chemically induced weakening is often encountered in hydraulic fracturing of low-permeability oil/gas reservoirs and heat reservoirs, during storage of CO2 and nuclear waste corroding canisters, and other circumstances when rock matrix acidizing is involved. Upon acidizing, mineral mass dissolution is substantially enhanced weakening the rock and causing crack propagation and eventually permeability changes in the medium. The crack process zone is modeled mathematically via a chemo-plastic coupling and chemo-elastic coupling model. In plasticity a two-way coupling is postulated between mineral dissolution and a yield limit of rock matrix. The rate of dissolution is described by a rate law, but the mineral mass removal per unit volume is also a function of a variable internal specific surface area, which is in turn affected by the micro-cracking (treated as a plastic strain). The behavior of the rock matrix is modeled as rigid-plastic adding a chemical softening capacity to Cam-Clay model. Adopting the Extended Johnson's approximation of processes around the crack tip, the evolution of the stress field and deformation as a function of the chemically enhanced rock damage is modeled in a simplified way. In addition, chemical reactive transport is made dependent on plastic strain representing micro-cracking. Depending on mechanical and chemical boundary conditions, the area of enhanced chemical softening is near or somewhat away from the crack tip.In elasticity, chemo-mechanical effect is postulated via a chemical volumetric shrinkage strain proportional to mass removal variable, conceived analogously to thermal expansion. Two versions are considered: of constant coefficient of shrinkage and a variable one, coupled to deviatoric strain. Airy Potential approach used for linear elasticity is extended considering an extra term, which is

  11. The Molecular Volcano Revisited: Determination of Crack Propagation and Distribution During the Crystallization of Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Water Films.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2012-02-02

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is utilized to determine the length distribution of cracks formed through amorphous solid water (ASW) during crystallization. This distribution is determined by monitoring how the thickness of an ASW overlayer alters desorption of an underlayer of O2. As deposited the ASW overlayer prevents desorption of O2. During crystallization, cracks form through the ASW overlayer and open a path to vacuum which allows O2 to escape in a rapid episodic release known as the 'molecular volcano'. Sufficiently thick ASW overlayers further trap O2 resulting in a second O2 desorption peak commensurate with desorption of the last of the ASW overlayer. The evolution of this trapping peak with overlayer thickness is the basis for determining the distribution of crystallization induced cracks through the ASW. Reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and TPD of multicomponent parfait structures of ASW, O2 and Kr indicate that a preponderance of these cracks propagate down from the outer surface of the ASW.

  12. The Crack Initiation and Propagation in threshold regime and S-N curves of High Strength Spring Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubeljak, N.; Predan, J.; Senčič, B.; Chapetti, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    An integrated fracture mechanics approach is proposed to account for the estimation of the fatigue resistance of component. Applications, estimations and results showed very good agreements with experimental results. The model is simple to apply, accounts for the main geometrical, mechanical and material parameters that define the fatigue resistance, and allows accurate predictions. It offers a change in design philosophy: It could be used for design, while simultaneously dealing with crack propagation thresholds. Furthermore, it allows quantification of the material defect sensitivity. In the case of the set of fatigue tests carried out by rotational bending of specimens without residual stresses, the estimated results showed good agreement and that an initial crack length of 0.5 mm can conservatively explain experimental data. In the case of fatigue tests carried out on the springs at their final condition with bending at R = 0.1 our data shows the influence of compressive residual stresses on fatigue strength. Results also showed that the procedures allow us to analyze the different combinations of initial crack length and residual stress levels, and how much the fatigue resistance can change by changing that configuration. For this set of tests, the fatigue resistance estimated for an initial crack length equal to 0.35 mm, can explain all testing data observed for the springs.

  13. Experimental simulation of frost wedging-induced crack propagation in alpine rockwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hailiang; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Frost wedging is widely presumed to be the principal mechanism responsible for shattering jointed low-porosity rocks in high alpine rockwalls. The interaction of ice and rock physics regulates the efficacy of frost wedging. In order to better understand temporal aspects of this interaction, we present results of a series of laboratory experiments monitoring crack widening as a result of ice formation in an artificial crack (4mm wide, 80mm deep) cut 20 mm from the end of a rectangular granite block. Our results indicate that i) freezing direction plays a key role in determining the magnitude of crack widening; in short-term (1 day) experiments, maximum crack widening during top-down freezing (associated with 'autumn' conditions) was around 0.11mm, while inside-out freezing (resulting from 'spring' conditions) produced only 0.02 mm of deformation; ii) neither ice, nor water pressure (direct tension and hydraulic fracturing respectively) caused measurable irreversible crack widening during short-term tests, as the calculated maximum stress intensity at the crack tip was less than the fracture toughness of our granite sample; iii) development of ice pressure is closely related to the mechanical properties of the fracture in which it forms, and as such, the interaction of ice and rock is intrinsically dynamic; iv) irreversible crack widening (about 0.03mm) was only observed following a long-term (53 day) experiment representing a simplified transition from autumn to winter conditions. We suggest this is the result of stress corrosion aided by strong opening during freezing, and to a lesser degree by ice segregation up to one week after the initial freezing period, and downward migration of liquid water during the remainder of the test. Our results suggest the fundamental assumption of frost wedging, that rapid freezing from open ends of cracks can seal water inside the crack and thus cause damage through excessive stresses induced by volumetric expansion seems

  14. The Release of Trapped Gases from Amorphous Solid Water Films: I. “Top-Down” Crystallization-Induced Crack Propagation Probed using the Molecular Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II) we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath of amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano". The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length and distribution are independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2 or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ/mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rate reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization/crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  15. The effect of coarse second phase particles on fatigue crack propagation of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guerbuez, R.; Alpay, S.P. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of the most commonly observed coarse second phase particles; Al[sub 7]Cu[sub 2]Fe, Mg[sub 2]Si and CuAl[sub 2]Mg on the Stage 2 fatigue crack propagation of a 7050 aluminum alloy. The differences in the composition of this alloy when compared to the conventional 7075 alloy are: (1) increased Cu content for additional strengthening during aging and for increasing the temperature range of GP zone stability; (2) replacement of Cr by Zr to reduce quench sensitivity; (3) reduced Fe and Si contents to improve fracture toughness which, however, decreases fatigue crack growth threshold, [Delta]K[sub th], slightly; and (4) increased Zn content for strengthening.

  16. The use of COD and plastic instability in crack propagation and arrest in shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Ratwani, M.

    1974-01-01

    The initiation, growth, and possible arrest of fracture in cylindrical shells containing initial defects are dealt with. For those defects which may be approximated by a part-through semi-elliptic surface crack which is sufficiently shallow so that part of the net ligament in the plane of the crack is still elastic, the existing flat plate solution is modified to take into account the shell curvature effect as well as the effect of the thickness and the small scale plastic deformations. The problem of large defects is then considered under the assumptions that the defect may be approximated by a relatively deep meridional part-through surface crack and the net ligament through the shell wall is fully yielded. The results given are based on an 8th order bending theory of shallow shells using a conventional plastic strip model to account for the plastic deformations around the crack border.

  17. Wave Propagation Analysis of Edge Cracked Circular Beams under Impact Force

    PubMed Central

    Akbaş, Şeref Doğuşcan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents responses of an edge circular cantilever beam under the effect of an impact force. The beam is excited by a transverse triangular force impulse modulated by a harmonic motion. The Kelvin–Voigt model for the material of the beam is used. The cracked beam is modelled as an assembly of two sub-beams connected through a massless elastic rotational spring. The considered problem is investigated within the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory by using energy based finite element method. The system of equations of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equations. The obtained system of linear differential equations is reduced to a linear algebraic equation system and solved in the time domain by using Newmark average acceleration method. In the study, the effects of the location of crack, the depth of the crack, on the characteristics of the reflected waves are investigated in detail. Also, the positions of the cracks are calculated by using reflected waves. PMID:24972050

  18. Mixed-mode cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composite joints. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental-analytical investigation to characterize the cyclic failure mechanism of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint is conducted. The cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens of graphite/epoxy adherend bonded with EC-3445 adhesive are tested under combined mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, fatigue failure occurs in the form of cyclic debonding. The cyclic debond growth rates are measured. The finite element analysis is employed to compute the mode 1, mode 2, and total strain energy release rates (i.e., GI, GII, and GT). A wide range of mixed-mode loading, i.e., GI/GII ranging from 0.03 to 0.38, is obtained. The total strain energy release rate, G sub T, appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding in the tested composite bonded system.

  19. Numerical Modeling of the Surface Fatigue Crack Propagation Including the Closure Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchinsky, Ruslan; Petinov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Presently modeling of surface fatigue crack growth for residual life assessment of structural elements is almost entirely based on application of the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, it is assumed that the crack front does not essentially change its shape, although it is not always confirmed by experiment. Furthermore, LEFM approach cannot be applied when the stress singularity vanishes due to material plasticity, one of the leading factors associated with the material degradation and fracture. Also, evaluation of stress intensity factors meets difficulties associated with changes in the stress state along the crack front circumference. An approach proposed for simulation the evolution of surface cracks based on application of the Strain-life criterion for fatigue failure and of the finite element modeling of damage accumulation. It takes into account the crack closure effect, the nonlinear behavior of damage accumulation and material compliance increasing due to the damage advance. The damage accumulation technique was applied to model the semi-elliptical crack growth from the initial defect in the steel compact specimen. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  20. Fatigue crack growth simulations of interfacial cracks in bi-layered FGMs using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Singh, I. V.; Mishra, B. K.; Bui, T. Q.

    2013-10-01

    An investigation of fatigue crack growth of interfacial cracks in bi-layered materials using the extended finite element method is presented. The bi-material consists of two layers of dissimilar materials. The bottom layer is made of aluminium alloy while the upper one is made of functionally graded material (FGM). The FGM layer consists of 100 % aluminium alloy on the left side and 100 % ceramic (alumina) on the right side. The gradation in material property of the FGM layer is assumed to be exponential from the alloy side to the ceramic side. The domain based interaction integral approach is extended to obtain the stress intensity factors for an interfacial crack under thermo-mechanical load. The edge and centre cracks are taken at the interface of bi-layered material. The fatigue life of the interface crack plate is obtained using the Paris law of fatigue crack growth under cyclic mode-I, mixed-mode and thermal loads. This study reveals that the crack propagates into the FGM layer under all types of loads.

  1. Application of the J integral to fracture under mixed-mode loading. [MMJINT; 4330V steel

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The calculation of the J integral proved to be a successful method for characterizing the stress and displacement fields around a crack tip under mixed mode loading. A computer program was written to determine the symmetric and antisymmetric J integral quantities. The stress intensity factors from these J integral calculations were in excellent agreement with other calculations. The compact shear specimen used contains three loading holes, the load applied at the center hole being the opposite direction to the load applied at the two outer holes. For 7075-T6 aluminum, K/sub IIc/ was 1.9 times larger than K/sub Ic/. In the brittle photoelastic material K/sub IIc/ was less than K/sub Ic/. Failure of the 4330V steel compact shear specimens came as a result of the average shear stress in the region ahead of the crack tip exceeding the material flow shear stress. The experimental results suggest that the angle of crack growth is best predicted by the maximum tangential stress theory.

  2. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of a polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy in the near threshold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, Santo A., II

    Fatigue crack propagation tests were performed on the polycrystalline, powder metallurgy Ni-base superalloy, KM4. Two different heat treatments, producing grain sizes of 6 mum and 55 mum, were investigated. Tests were conducted at load ratios ranging from R = 0.3 to R = 0.7 at two different frequencies, 100 and 1000 Hz. Fatigue crack propagation behavior was studied at 20°C, 550°C and 650°C. Intermediate growth rate observations showed results similar to those observed by other researchers at frequencies lower than those employed in this study. The general observations showed that increasing the grain size, decreasing the load ratio, decreasing the temperature and increasing the frequency all had the effect of increasing the fatigue crack propagation resistance at intermediate growth rates. Threshold FCP behavior showed a much more complicated dependence on load ratio, grain size, frequency and temperature. In some cases, increased frequency resulted in decreased FCP threshold while in other cases, it produced the opposite effect. This complex behavior can, in part, be attributed to a transition in the mode of failure from transgranular to intergranular, however, analysis also revealed that system variable interactions (for instance frequency/temperature interactions or grain size/temperature interactions) must also be accounted for in order to understand the complex threshold behavior. Optical profilometry was utilized to obtain a quantitative assessment of the fracture surface roughness in an attempt to correlate measured threshold values. Typical roughness parameters such as RL, R a, and Rq (or RMS) were studied. An alternate parameter, the average microscopic slope ( m), was also investigated. No direct correlation was observed between fracture surface roughness, as defined by these parameters, and measured threshold. Compliance measurements did, however, reveal the presence of fatigue crack closure for some conditions at room temperature and 550°C. It was

  3. Aqueous environmental crack propagation in high-strength beta titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Young, G.A. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1995-05-01

    The aqueous environment-assisted cracking (EAC) behavior of two peak-aged beta-titanium was characterized with a fracture mechanics method. Beta-21S is susceptible to EAC under rising load in neutral 3.5 pct NaCi at 25 C and {minus}600 mV{sub SCE}, as indicated by a reduced threshold for subcritical crack growth (K{sub TH}), an average crack growth rate of up to 10 {mu}m s, and intergranular fracture compared to microvoid rupture in air. In contrast, the initiation fracture toughness (K{sub ICi}) of Ti-15-3 in moist air is lower than that of Beta-21S at similar high {sigma}{sub YS} (1,300 MPa) but is not degraded by chloride, and cracking is by transgranular microvoid formation. The intergranular EAC susceptibility of Beta-21S correlates with both {alpha}-colonies precipitated at {beta} grain boundaries and intense slip localization; however, the causal factor is not defined. Data suggest that both features, and EAC, are promoted by prolonged solution treatment at high temperature. In a hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) scenario, crack-tip H could be transported by planar slip bands to strongly binding trap sites and stress/strain concentrations at {alpha} colony or {beta} grain boundaries. The EAC in Beta-21S is eliminated by cathodic polarization (to {minus}1,000 mV{sub SCE}), as well as by static loading for times that otherwise produce rising-load EAC.

  4. Mixed mode control method and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Kesse, Mary L.; Duffy, Kevin P.

    2007-04-10

    A method of mixed mode operation of an internal combustion engine includes the steps of controlling a homogeneous charge combustion event timing in a given engine cycle, and controlling a conventional charge injection event to be at least a predetermined time after the homogeneous charge combustion event. An internal combustion engine is provided, including an electronic controller having a computer readable medium with a combustion timing control algorithm recorded thereon, the control algorithm including means for controlling a homogeneous charge combustion event timing and means for controlling a conventional injection event timing to be at least a predetermined time from the homogeneous charge combustion event.

  5. Studying the effect of cracks on the ultrasonic wave propagation in a two dimensional gearbox finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Fazel, Hossein; Cox, Justin; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth S.; Timmons, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Gearbox components of aerospace structures are typically made of brittle materials with high fracture toughness, but susceptible to fatigue failure due to continuous cyclic loading. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methods are used to monitor the crack growth in gearbox components. Damage detection methodologies developed in laboratory-scale experiments may not represent the actual gearbox structural configuration, and are usually not applicable to real application as the vibration and wave properties depend on the material, structural layers and thicknesses. Also, the sensor types and locations are key factors for frequency content of ultrasonic waves, which are essential features for pattern recognition algorithm development in noisy environments. Therefore, a deterministic damage detection methodology that considers all the variables influencing the waveform signature should be considered in the preliminary computation before any experimental test matrix. In order to achieve this goal, we developed two dimensional finite element models of a gearbox cross section from front view and shaft section. The cross section model consists of steel revolving teeth, a thin layer of oil, and retention plate. An ultrasonic wave up to 1 MHz frequency is generated, and waveform histories along the gearbox are recorded. The received waveforms under pristine and cracked conditions are compared in order to analyze the crack influence on the wave propagation in gearbox, which can be utilized by both active and passive SHM methods.

  6. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  7. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  8. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  9. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  10. Crack detection in a wheel end spindle using wave propagation via modal impacts and piezo actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackers, Spencer; Evans, Ronald; Johnson, Timothy; Kess, Harold; White, Jonathan; Adams, Douglas E.; Brown, Pam

    2006-03-01

    This research demonstrates two methodologies for detecting cracks in a metal spindle housed deep within a vehicle wheel end assembly. First, modal impacts are imposed on the hub of the wheel in the longitudinal direction to produce broadband elastic wave excitation spectra out to 7000 Hz. The response data on the flange is collected using 3000 Hz bandwidth accelerometers. It is shown using frequency response analysis that the crack produces a filter, which amplifies the elastic response of the surrounding components of the wheel assembly. Experiments on wheel assemblies mounted on the vehicle with the vehicle lifted off the ground are performed to demonstrate that the modal impact method can be used to nondestructively evaluate cracks of varying depths despite sources of variability such as the half shaft angular position relative to the non-rotating spindle. Second, an automatic piezo-stack actuator is utilized to excite the wheel hub with a swept sine signal extending from 20 kHz. Accelerometers are then utilized to measure the response on the flange. It is demonstrated using frequency response analysis that the crack filters waves traveling from the hub to the flange. A simple finite element model is used to interpret the experimental results. Challenges discussed include variability from assembly to assembly, the variability in each assembly, and the high amount of damping present in each assembly due to the transmission gearing, lubricant, and other components in the wheel end. A two-channel measurement system with a graphical user interface for detecting cracks was also developed and a procedure was created to ensure that operators properly perform the test.

  11. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  12. Mixed-mode oscillation suppression states in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debarati; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2015-11-01

    We report a collective dynamical state, namely the mixed-mode oscillation suppression state where the steady states of the state variables of a system of coupled oscillators show heterogeneous behaviors. We identify two variants of it: The first one is a mixed-mode death (MMD) state, which is an interesting oscillation death state, where a set of variables show dissimilar values, while the rest arrive at a common value. In the second mixed death state, bistable and monostable nontrivial homogeneous steady states appear simultaneously to a different set of variables (we refer to it as the MNAD state). We find these states in the paradigmatic chaotic Lorenz system and Lorenz-like system under generic coupling schemes. We identify that while the reflection symmetry breaking is responsible for the MNAD state, the breaking of both the reflection and translational symmetries result in the MMD state. Using a rigorous bifurcation analysis we establish the occurrence of the MMD and MNAD states, and map their transition routes in parameter space. Moreover, we report experimental observation of the MMD and MNAD states that supports our theoretical results. We believe that this study will broaden our understanding of oscillation suppression states; subsequently, it may have applications in many real physical systems, such as laser and geomagnetic systems, whose mathematical models mimic the Lorenz system.

  13. A Discontinuous Cellular Automaton Method for Modeling Rock Fracture Propagation and Coalescence Under Fluid Pressurization Without Remeshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Peng-Zhi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yan, Fei; Jiang, Quan

    2014-11-01

    We present a formulation of a discontinuous cellular automaton method for modeling of rock fluid pressure induced fracture propagation and coalescence without the need for remeshing. Using this method, modelers discretize a discontinuous rock-mass domain into a system composed of cell elements in which the numerical grid and crack geometry are independent of each other. The level set method, which defines the relationship between cracks and the numerical grid, is used for tracking the crack location and its propagation path. As a result, no explicit meshing for crack surfaces and no remeshing for crack growth are needed. Discontinuous displacement functions, i.e., the Heaviside functions for crack surfaces and asymptotic crack-tip displacement fields, are introduced to represent complex discontinuities. When two cracks intersect, the tip enrichment of the approaching crack is annihilated and is replaced by a Heaviside enrichment. We use the "partition of unity" concept to improve the integral precision for elements, including crack surfaces and crack tips. From this, we develop a cellular automaton updating rule to calculate the stress field induced by fluid pressure. Then, the stress is substituted into a mixed-mode fracture criterion. The cracking direction is determined from the stress analysis around the crack tips, where fracture fluid is assumed to penetrate into the newly developed crack, leading to a continuous crack propagation. Finally, we performed verification against independent numerical models and analytic solutions and conducted a number of simulations with different crack geometries and crack arrangements to show the robustness and applicability of this method.

  14. FRANC2D: A two-dimensional crack propagation simulator. Version 2.7: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawrzynek, Paul; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    FRANC 2D (FRacture ANalysis Code, 2 Dimensions) is a menu driven, interactive finite element computer code that performs fracture mechanics analyses of 2-D structures. The code has an automatic mesh generator for triangular and quadrilateral elements. FRANC2D calculates the stress intensity factor using linear elastic fracture mechanics and evaluates crack extension using several methods that may be selected by the user. The code features a mesh refinement and adaptive mesh generation capability that is automatically developed according to the predicted crack extension direction and length. The code also has unique features that permit the analysis of layered structure with load transfer through simulated mechanical fasteners or bonded joints. The code was written for UNIX workstations with X-windows graphics and may be executed on the following computers: DEC DecStation 3000 and 5000 series, IBM RS/6000 series, Hewlitt-Packard 9000/700 series, SUN Sparc stations, and most Silicon Graphics models.

  15. Effect of crystallinity on crack propagation and mineralization of bioactive glass 45S5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Satadru

    Bioactive glasses are a type of ceramic material designed to be used as bioresorbable therapeutic bone implants. Thermal treatment of bioactive glass ceramics dictates many important features such as microstructure, degree of crystallinity, mechanical properties, and mineralization. This study investigates the effects of temperature, time, and heating rates on the crystallization kinetics of melt cast bioactive glass 45S5. Bulk crystallization (three dimensional crystallite formation) was found to always occur in bulk bioactive glass 45S5 irrespective of the processing conditions. A comparative study of crack paths in amorphous and crystalline phases of bioactive glass 45S5 revealed crack deflections and higher fracture resistance in partially crystallized bioactive glass. Such toughening is likely attributed to different crystallographic orientations of crystals or residual thermal mismatch strains. Furthermore, in vitro immersion testing of partially crystalline glass ceramic revealed higher adhesion capabilities of the mineralized layer formed on amorphous regions as compared to its crystalline counterpart.

  16. Crack propagation and arrest in CFRP materials with strain softening regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilligan, Matthew Anthony

    Understanding the growth and arrest of cracks in composite materials is critical for their effective utilization in fatigue-sensitive and damage susceptible applications such as primary aircraft structures. Local tailoring of the laminate stack to provide crack arrest capacity intermediate to major structural components has been investigated and demonstrated since some of the earliest efforts in composite aerostructural design, but to date no rigorous model of the crack arrest mechanism has been developed to allow effective sizing of these features. To address this shortcoming, the previous work in the field is reviewed, with particular attention to the analysis methodologies proposed for similar arrest features. The damage and arrest processes active in such features are investigated, and various models of these processes are discussed and evaluated. Governing equations are derived based on a proposed mechanistic model of the crack arrest process. The derived governing equations are implemented in a numerical model, and a series of simulations are performed to ascertain the general characteristics of the proposed model and allow qualitative comparison to existing experimental results. The sensitivity of the model and the arrest process to various parameters is investigated, and preliminary conclusions regarding the optimal feature configuration are developed. To address deficiencies in the available material and experimental data, a series of coupon tests are developed and conducted covering a range of arrest zone configurations. Test results are discussed and analyzed, with a particular focus on identification of the proposed failure and arrest mechanisms. Utilizing the experimentally derived material properties, the tests are reproduced with both the developed numerical tool as well as a FEA-based implementation of the arrest model. Correlation between the simulated and experimental results is analyzed, and future avenues of investigation are identified

  17. Transient Elastodynamic Crack Growth in Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chalivendra, Vijaya B.

    2008-02-15

    A generalized elastic solution for an arbitrarily propagating transient crack in Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) is obtained through an asymptotic analysis. The shear modulus and mass density of the FGM are assumed to vary exponentially along the gradation direction. The mode-mixity due to the inclination of property gradient with respect to the propagating crack tip is accommodated in the analysis through superposition of the opening and shear modes. First three terms of out of plane displacement field and its gradients about the crack tip are obtained in powers of radial coordinates, with the coefficients depending on the time rate of change of crack tip speed and stress intensity factors. Using these displacement fields, the effect of transient stress intensity factors and acceleration on synthetic contours of constant out of plane displacement under both opening and mixed mode loading conditions has been studied. These contours show that the transient terms cause significant spatial variation on out of plane displacements around the crack tip. Therefore, in studying dynamic fracture of FGMs, it is appropriate to include the transient terms in the field equations for the situations of sudden variation of stress intensity factor or crack tip velocity.

  18. Mitigating crack propagation in a highly maneuverable flight vehicle using life extending control logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshabasy, Mohamed Mostafa Yousef Bassyouny

    In this research, life extending control logic is proposed to reduce the cost of treating the aging problem of military aircraft structures and to avoid catastrophic failures and fatal accidents due to undetected cracks in the airframe components. The life extending control logic is based on load tailoring to facilitate a desired stress sequence that prolongs the structural life of the cracked airframe components by exploiting certain nonlinear crack retardation phenomena. The load is tailored to include infrequent injections of a single-cycle overload or a single-cycle overload and underload. These irregular loadings have an anti-intuitive but beneficial effect, which has been experimentally validated, on the extension of the operational structural life of the aircraft. A rigid six-degree-of freedom dynamic model of a highly maneuverable air vehicle coupled with an elastic dynamic wing model is used to generate the stress history at the lower skin of the wing. A three-dimensional equivalent plate finite element model is used to calculate the stress in the cracked skin. The plate is chosen to be of uniform chord-wise and span-wise thickness where the mechanical properties are assigned using an ad-hoc approach to mimic the full scale wing model. An in-extensional 3-node triangular element is used as the gridding finite element while the aerodynamic load is calculated using the vortex-lattice method where each lattice is laid upon two triangular finite elements with common hypotenuse. The aerodynamic loads, along with the base-excitation which is due to the motion of the rigid aircraft model, are the driving forces acting on the wing finite element model. An aerodynamic control surface is modulated based on the proposed life extending control logic within an existing flight control system without requiring major modification. One of the main goals of life extending control logic is to enhance the aircraft's service life, without incurring significant loss of vehicle

  19. Mechanistic dissimilarities between environmentally-influenced fatigue-crack propagation at near-threshold and higher growth rates in lower-strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, S.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1981-11-01

    The role of hydrogen gas in influencing fatigue crack propagation is examined for several classes of lower strength pressure vessel and piping steels. Based on measurements over a wide range of growth rates from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -2/ mm/cycle, crack propagation rates are found to be significantly higher in dehumidified gaseous hydrogen compared to moist air in two distinct regimes of crack growth, namely (i) at the intermediate range of growth typically above approx. 10/sup -5/ mm/cycle, and (ii) at the near-threshold region below approx. 10/sup -6/ mm/cycle approaching lattice dimensions per cycle. Both effects are seen at maximum stress intensities (K/sub max/) far below the sustained-load threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-assisted cracking (K/sub Iscc/). Characteristics of environmentally influenced fatigue crack growth in each regime are shown to be markedly different with regard to fractography and the effect of such variables as load ratio and frequency. It is concluded that the primary mechanisms responsible for the influence of the environment in each regime are distinctly different. Whereas corrosion fatigue behavior at intermediate growth rates can be attributed to hydrogen embrittlement processes, the primary role of moist environments at near-threshold levels is shown to involve a contribution from enhanced crack closure due to the formation of crack surface corrosion deposits at low load ratios.

  20. Mixed mode fuel injector with individually moveable needle valve members

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Chris; Chockley, Scott A.; Ibrahim, Daniel R.; Lawrence, Keith; Tomaseki, Jay; Azam, Junru H.; Tian, Steven Ye; Shafer, Scott F.

    2004-08-03

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position while the other needle valve member remains stationary for a homogeneous charge injection event. The former needle valve member stays stationary while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. One of the needle valve members is at least partially positioned in the other needle valve member. Thus, the injector can perform homogeneous charge injection events, conventional injection events, or even a mixed mode having both types of injection events in a single engine cycle.

  1. Purification process of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with mixed mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maria, Sophie; Joucla, Gilles; Garbay, Bertrand; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Santarelli, Xavier; Cabanne, Charlotte

    2015-05-01

    An innovative process to purify mAb from CHO cell culture supernatant was developed. This three-step process involved two mixed mode resins and an anion exchange membrane. We used a human IgG mixture to determine the optimal conditions for each purification step. Thereafter, the whole process was evaluated and improved for the purification of a recombinant mAb produced in the supernatant of CHO cells. Once optimized, yield and purity of 88% and 99.9%, respectively were comparable to those obtained in a conventional process based on a capture step using protein A. In addition, aggregates, HCPs and DNA levels in the purified fraction were below regulatory specifications. Then we used mass spectrometry to identify contaminating proteins in the antibody fraction in order to highlight the behavior of HCPs. PMID:25805720

  2. Influences of gaseous environment on low growth-rate fatigue crack propagation in steels. Annual report No. 1, January 1980. Report No. FPL/R/80/1030

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.; Suresh, S.; Toplosky, J.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of gaseous environment is examined on fatigue crack propagation behavior in steels. Specifically, a fully martensitic 300-M ultrahigh strength steel and a fully bainitic 2-1/4Cr-1Mo lower strength steel are investigated in environments of ambient temperature moist air and low pressure dehumidified hydrogen and argon gases over a wide range of growth rates from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -2/ mm/cycle, with particular emphasis given to behavior near the crack propagation threshold ..delta..K/sub 0/. It is found that two distinct growth rate regimes exist where hydrogen can markedly accelerate crack propagation rates compared to air, (1) at near-threshold levels below (5 x 10/sup -6/ mm/cycle) and (2) at higher growth rates, typically around 10/sup -5/ mm/cycle above a critical maximum stress intensity K/sub max//sup T/. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation at higher growth rates is attributed to a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, with K/sub max//sup T/ nominally equal to K/sub Iscc/ (the sustained load stress corrosion threshold) in high strength steels, and far below K/sub Iscc/ in the strain-rate sensitive lower strength steels. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation at near-threshold levels is attributed to a new mechanism involving fretting-oxide-induced crack closure generated in moist (or oxygenated) environments. The absence of hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms at near-threshold levels is supported by tests showing that ..delta..K/sub 0/ values in dry gaseous argon are similar to ..delta..K/sub 0/ values in hydrogen. The potential ramifications of these results are examined in detail.

  3. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of microstructure and fatigue-crack propagation in single-crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husseini, Naji Sami

    Single-crystal nickel-base superalloys are ubiquitous in demanding turbine-blade applications, and they owe their remarkable resilience to their dendritic, hierarchical microstructure and complex composition. During normal operations, they endure rapid low-stress vibrations that may initiate fatigue cracks. This failure mode in the very high-cycle regime is poorly understood, in part due to inadequate testing and diagnostic equipment. Phase-contrast imaging with coherent synchrotron x rays, however, is an emergent technique ideally suited for dynamic processes such as crack initiation and propagation. A specially designed portable ultrasonic-fatigue apparatus, coupled with x-ray radiography, allows real-time, in situ imaging while simulating service conditions. Three contrast mechanisms - absorption, diffraction, and phase contrast - span the immense breadth of microstructural features in superalloys. Absorption contrast is sensitive to composition and crack displacements, and diffraction contrast illuminates dislocation aggregates and crystallographic misorientations. Phase contrast enhances electron-density gradients and is particularly useful for fatigue-crack studies, sensitive to internal crack tips and openings less than one micrometer. Superalloy samples were imaged without external stresses to study microstructure and mosaicity. Maps of rhenium and tungsten concentrations revealed strong segregation to the center of dendrites, as manifested by absorption contrast. Though nominally single crystals, dendrites were misoriented from the bulk by a few degrees, as revealed by diffraction contrast. For dynamic studies of cyclic fatigue, superalloys were mounted in the portable ultrasonic-fatigue apparatus, subjected to a mean tensile stress of ˜50-150 MPa, and cycled in tension to initiate and propagate fatigue cracks. Radiographs were recorded every thousand cycles over the multimillion-cycle lifetime to measure micron-scale crack growth. Crack

  4. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  5. Numerical simulation of out-of-plane distortion fatigue crack growth in bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIller, Paula A.

    Aging of the United States infrastructure systems has resulted in the degradation of many operational bridge structures throughout the country. Structural deficiencies can result from material fatigue caused by cyclical loadings leading to localized structural damage. While fatigue crack growth is viewed as a serviceability problem, unstable crack growth can compromise the integrity of the structure. Multi-girder bridges designed with transverse cross bracing systems can be prone to distortion fatigue at unstiffened web gaps. Cracking is exhibited within this fatigue prone region from the application of cyclical multi-mode loadings. Focus of fatigue analysis has largely been directed at pure Mode I loading through the development of AASHTO fatigue classifications for crack initiation and the Paris Law for crack propagation. Numerical modeling approaches through the ABAQUS Extended Finite Element Method offers a unique avenue in which this detail can be assessed. Finite element simulations were developed to first evaluate the applicability of the Paris Law crack propagation under multi-mode loading against experimental data. Following the validation, fatigue crack growth in plate girders with various web gap sizes was assessed due to mixed-mode loadings. Modeling results showed enlargement of horizontal initial crack lengths within stiffer web gap regions arrested crack development. Crack directionality was also seen to change as initial crack lengths were increased. From this research it is hypothesized that deterioration of the transverse stiffener connection can be minimized by increasing the horizontal length of initial fatigue cracks. Enlargement of the crack plane away from regions of localized stress concentrations within the web gap may result in arrestment of the out-of-plane distortion induced cracking.

  6. New Developments in the Embedded Statistical Coupling Method: Atomistic/Continuum Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Yamakov, V.; Glaessgen, E.

    2008-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain has been enhanced. The concurrent MD-FEM coupling methodology uses statistical averaging of the deformation of the atomistic MD domain to provide interface displacement boundary conditions to the surrounding continuum FEM region, which, in turn, generates interface reaction forces that are applied as piecewise constant traction boundary conditions to the MD domain. The enhancement is based on the addition of molecular dynamics-based cohesive zone model (CZM) elements near the MD-FEM interface. The CZM elements are a continuum interpretation of the traction-displacement relationships taken from MD simulations using Cohesive Zone Volume Elements (CZVE). The addition of CZM elements to the concurrent MD-FEM analysis provides a consistent set of atomistically-based cohesive properties within the finite element region near the growing crack. Another set of CZVEs are then used to extract revised CZM relationships from the enhanced embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM) simulation of an edge crack under uniaxial loading.

  7. Plates and shells containing a surface crack under general loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Paul F.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1987-01-01

    Various through and part-through crack problems in plates and shells are considered. The line-spring model of Rice and Levy is generalized to the skew-symmetric case to solve surface crack problems involving mixed-mode, coplanar crack growth. Compliance functions are introduced which are valid for crack depth to thickness ratios at least up to .95. This includes expressions for tension and bending as well as expressions for in-plane shear, out-of-plane shear, and twisting. Transverse shear deformation is taken into account in the plate and shell theories and this effect is shown to be important in comparing stress intensity factors obtained from the plate theory with three-dimensional solutions. Stress intensity factors for cylinders obtained by the line-spring model also compare well with three-dimensional solution. By using the line-spring approach, stress intensity factors can be obtained for the through crack and for part-through crack of any crack front shape, without recalculation integrals that take up the bulk of the computer time. Therefore, parameter studies involving crack length, crack depth, shell type, and shell curvature are made in some detail. The results will be useful in brittle fracture and in fatigue crack propagation studies. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reducted to strongly singular integral equations which make use of the finite-part integrals of Hadamard. The equations are solved numerically in a manner that is very efficient.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2015-10-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s {n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  10. Characterization of microstructure and crack propagation in alumina using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Michael, J.R.; Readey, M.J.; Wright, S.I.; Field, D.P.

    1996-12-01

    A more complete description requires the lattice orientations of a statistically significant number of grains, coupled with morphology such as grain size and shape; this can be obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), which uses crystallographic orientation data from Backscattered Electron Kikuchi patterns (BEKP) collected using a SEM. This report describes the OIM results for alumina; these include image quality maps, grain boundary maps, pole figures, and lattice misorientations depicted on MacKenzie plot and in Rodrigues space. High quality BEKP were obtained and the images and data readily reveal the grain morphology, texture, and grain boundary misorientations, including those for cracked boundaries. A larger number of grains should be measured to make statistical comparisons between materials with different processing histories.

  11. Time-Dependent Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of Two Solid-Solution-Strengthened Ni-Based Superalloys—INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longzhou; Roy, Shawoon K.; Hasan, Muhammad H.; Pal, Joydeep; Chatterjee, Sudin

    2012-02-01

    The fatigue crack propagation (FCP) as well as the sustained loading crack growth (SLCG) behavior of two solid-solution-strengthened Ni-based superalloys, INCONEL 617 (Special Metals Corporation Family of Companies) and HAYNES 230 (Haynes International, Inc., Kokomo, IN), were studied at increased temperatures in laboratory air under a constant stress-intensity-factor ( K) condition. The crack propagation tests were conducted using a baseline cyclic triangular waveform with a frequency of 1/3 Hz. Various hold times were imposed at the maximum load of a fatigue cycle to study the hold time effect. The results show that a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter, stress intensity factor ( K), is sufficient to describe the FCP and SLCG behavior at the testing temperatures ranging from 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C). As observed in the precipitation-strengthened superalloys, both INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 exhibited the time-dependent FCP, steady SLCG behavior, and existence of a damage zone ahead of crack tip. A thermodynamic equation was adapted to correlate the SLCG rates to determine thermal activation energy. The fracture modes associated with crack propagation behavior were discussed, and the mechanism of time-dependent FCP as well as SLCG was identified. Compared with INCONEL 617, the lower crack propagation rates of HAYNES 230 under the time-dependent condition were ascribed to the different fracture mode and the presence of numerous W-rich M6C-type and Cr-rich M23C6-type carbides. Toward the end, a phenomenological model was employed to correlate the FCP rates at cycle/time-dependent FCP domain. All the results suggest that an environmental factor, the stress assisted grain boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) mechanism, is mainly responsible for the accelerated time-dependent FCP rates of INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230.

  12. Fracture mechanics. [review of fatigue crack propagation and technology of constructing safe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a rapidly emerging discipline for assessing the residual strength of structures containing flaws due to fatigue, corrosion or accidental damage and for anticipating the rate of which such flaws will propagate if not repaired. The discipline is also applicable in the design of structures with improved resistance to such flaws. The present state of the design art is reviewed using this technology to choose materials, to configure safe and efficient structures, to specify inspection procedures, to predict lives of flawed structures and to develop reliability of current and future airframes.

  13. Characterization of microstructure and crack propagation in alumina using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Michael, J.R.; Readey, M.J.; Wright, S.I.; Field, D.P.

    1996-12-01

    TEM, while capable of determining misorientation of adjacent grains, can practicably provide information only for a small number of grain boundaries. A more complete description of the structure of a polycrystal can be obtained using a new technique OIM, which uses crystallographic orientation data obtained from Backscattered Electron Kikuchi patterns (BEKP), collected using SEM. This paper describes general OIM results for 99.7 and 99.99% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples with grain sizes 4-27 {mu}m. The results include image quality maps, grain boundary maps, pole figures, and lattice misorientations depicted on MacKenzie plots and in Rodrigues space. High quality BEKPs were obtained from all specimens. Images and data readily reveal the grain morphology, texture, and grain boundary structure. Subtle differences in texture and grain boundary structure (crystallite lattice misorientations) are observed for the different alumina specimens. Distributions of misorientations for cracked boundaries in alumina are compared to the bulk distribution of boundaries and generally larger misorientations are observed.

  14. The mechanics and physics of fracturing: application to thermal aspects of crack propagation and to fracking.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, Genady P

    2015-03-28

    By way of introduction, the general invariant integral (GI) based on the energy conservation law is presented, with mention of cosmic, gravitational, mass, elastic, thermal and electromagnetic energy of matter application to demonstrate the approach, including Coulomb's Law generalized for moving electric charges, Newton's Law generalized for coupled gravitational/cosmic field, the new Archimedes' Law accounting for gravitational and surface energy, and others. Then using this approach the temperature track behind a moving crack is found, and the coupling of elastic and thermal energies is set up in fracturing. For porous materials saturated with a fluid or gas, the notion of binary continuum is used to introduce the corresponding GIs. As applied to the horizontal drilling and fracturing of boreholes, the field of pressure and flow rate as well as the fluid output from both a horizontal borehole and a fracture are derived in the fluid extraction regime. The theory of fracking in shale gas reservoirs is suggested for three basic regimes of the drill mud permeation, with calculating the shape and volume of the local region of the multiply fractured rock in terms of the pressures of rock, drill mud and shale gas. PMID:25713454

  15. 3-D Mixed Mode Delamination Fracture Criteria - An Experimentalist's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Many delamination failure criteria based on fracture toughness have been suggested over the past few decades, but most only covered the region containing mode I and mode II components of loading because that is where toughness data existed. With new analysis tools, more 3D analyses are being conducted that capture a mode III component of loading. This has increased the need for a fracture criterion that incorporates mode III loading. The introduction of a pure mode III fracture toughness test has also produced data on which to base a full 3D fracture criterion. In this paper, a new framework for visualizing 3D fracture criteria is introduced. The common 2D power law fracture criterion was evaluated to produce unexpected predictions with the introduction of mode III and did not perform well in the critical high mode I region. Another 2D criterion that has been shown to model a wide range of materials well was used as the basis for a new 3D criterion. The new criterion is based on assumptions that the relationship between mode I and mode III toughness is similar to the relation between mode I and mode II and that a linear interpolation can be used between mode II and mode III. Until mixed-mode data exists with a mode III component of loading, 3D fracture criteria cannot be properly evaluated, but these assumptions seem reasonable.

  16. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Intercritically Tempered Fe-9Ni-0.1C and Fe-4Mn-0.15C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H. J.; Schwartz, L. H.

    1983-06-01

    Fatigue crack propagation was studied for two intercritically tempered cryogenic steels, Fe-9Ni-0.1C and Fe-4Mn-0.15C, at both intermediate (stage II) and low (stage I, near threshold) stress intensity ranges. Propagation rates were determined for varying intercritical tempering times corresponding to varying amounts of retained austenite and untempered martensite. The results show that the heat treatments that optimize impact fracture properties in the nickel steel are also beneficial with respect to the fatigue crack propagation rate in stage I, while no beneficial effect beyond that attributable to carbon redistribution was observed for stage II. For the manganese steel, heat treatments leading to increased concentrations of retained austenite also increased the threshold stress even though no improvement in fracture toughness was observed. To clarify the origin of this improved behavior, the fracture surface was analyzed by Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Auger Electron Microprobe. The Mössbauer results indicated that the retained austenite in the crack path is transformed to martensite as was earlier shown in this laboratory for Charpy specimens. Auger composition analysis suggested a tendency for a stage I crack tip to avoid the mechanically induced brittle untempered martensite in the Fe-Mn steel, while no such preference was observed for stage II.

  17. Effect of Decarburization on Notch Sensitivity and Fatigue-Crack-Propagation Rates in 12 MoV Stainless-Steel Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrnstein, William H., III; McEvily, Arthur J., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Tests were conducted in order to determine the effect of surface decarburization on the notch sensitivity and rate of fatigue crack propagation in 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet at room temperature. Three specimen configurations were utilized in the course of the investigation: standard tensile specimen, 9-inch-wide specimens containing fatigue cracks or thread-cut notches of 0.005-inch radius, and 2-inch-wide specimens containing fatigue cracks. The 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet in the normal condition was found to have an ultimate tensile strength of 251 ksi and to be extremely notch sensitive. The material in the decarburized condition was found to have an ultimate tensile strength of 210 ksi and to be considerably stronger than the normal material in the presence of fatigue cracks. Decarburization did not appear to have any significant influence on the rate of fatigue crack propagation in the 2-inch-wide specimens at the stress levels considered. In addition to the tests, two methods for predicting residual static strength and their application to the material are discussed.

  18. Investigating the effect of crack on propagation of ultrasonic guided waves in pipes via wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammad; Gholami, Pouya

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have rapidly become an effective device in the field of NDT in recent years. Main reason for this is the ability of transmission from one point on the pipe to travel a long distance along it length. These waves are typically used in relatively low frequencies, and as a result, die out in longer periods of time. In this study, by designing and building a system to generate the needed signal for the stimulation of guided waves through using a piezoelectric crystal, these waves were generated and transmitted along a pipe. After propagation, waves were relieved by an ultrasonic probe and were saved by a digital oscilloscope. The received waves were then processed and filtered to eliminate noise and compared with each other. In order to compare the results and study the effective parameters of inspecting ability by these waves, the receiving probe was moved along the length of the pipe and through clanging the number of entering sinusoidal pulses along with altering the frequency signal; the data was recorded in the highest amplitude frequency. By adjusting the frequency within 30-40 KHz range, it would be possible to receive signals at any point in the experiment. Although the received signals weaken by further distance, however; through increase in the number of pulses of inlet signals, the guided waves better stimulate and become stronger at the outlet signal.

  19. Using Mixed-Mode Contacts in Client Surveys: Getting More Bang for Your Buck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Glenn D.

    2013-01-01

    Surveys are commonly used in Extension to identify client needs or evaluate program outcomes. This article examines how available email addresses can be incorporated into mixed-mode procedures for surveys. When mail and email addresses are used to implement a sequence of email and postal invitations in a mixed-mode survey, response rates were…

  20. Mixed-Mode Surveys: A Strategy to Reduce Costs and Enhance Response Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Daniel; Thomson, Joan; Radhakrishna, Rama; LaBorde, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-mode surveys present one opportunity for Extension to determine program outcomes at lower costs. In order to conduct a follow-up evaluation, we implemented a mixed-mode survey that relied on communication using the Web, postal mailings, and telephone calls. Using multiple modes conserved costs by reducing the number of postal mailings yet…

  1. The propagation of in-plane P-SV waves in a layered elastic plate with periodic interface cracks: exact versus spring boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasha, Oleg V.; Boström, Anders; Glushkova, Natalia V.; Glushkov, Evgeny V.

    2011-08-01

    The propagation of in-plane (P-SV) waves in a symmetrically three-layered thick plate with a periodic array of interface cracks is investigated. The exact dispersion relation is derived based on an integral equation approach and Floquet's theorem. The interface cracks can be a model for interface damage, but a much simpler model is a recently developed spring boundary condition. This boundary condition is used for the thick plate and also in the derivation of plate equations with the help of power series expansions in the thickness coordinate. For low frequencies (cracks small compared to the wavelength) the three approaches give more or less coinciding dispersion curves, and this is a confirmation that the spring boundary condition is a reasonable approximation at low frequencies.

  2. Control Strategies for HCCI Mixed-Mode Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean

    2010-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to expand the operational range of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mixed-mode combustion for gasoline en-gines. ORNL has extensive experience in the analysis, interpretation, and control of dynamic engine phenomena, and Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain compo-nents and subsystems. The partnership of these knowledge bases was important to address criti-cal barriers associated with the realistic implementation of HCCI and enabling clean, efficient operation for the next generation of transportation engines. The foundation of this CRADA was established through the analysis of spark-assisted HCCI data from a single-cylinder research engine. This data was used to (1) establish a conceptual kinetic model to better understand and predict the development of combustion instabilities, (2) develop a low-order model framework suitable for real-time controls, and (3) provide guidance in the initial definition of engine valve strategies for achieving HCCI operation. The next phase focused on the development of a new combustion metric for real-time characterization of the combustion process. Rapid feedback on the state of the combustion process is critical to high-speed decision making for predictive control. Simultaneous to the modeling/analysis studies, Delphi was focused on the development of engine hardware and the engine management system. This included custom Delphi hardware and control systems allowing for flexible control of the valvetrain sys-tem to enable HCCI operation. The final phase of this CRADA included the demonstration of conventional and spark assisted HCCI on the multi-cylinder engine as well as the characterization of combustion instabilities, which govern the operational boundaries of this mode of combustion. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout this project. Meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis with additional reports, presentation, and

  3. Interlaminar fracture toughness: Three-dimensional finite element modeling for end-notch and mixed-mode flexure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A computational procedure is described for evaluating End-Notch-Flexure (ENF) and Mixed-Mode-Flexure (MMF) interlaminar fracture toughness in unidirectional fiber composites. The procedure consists of a three-dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with the strain energy release rate concept and with composite micromechanics. The procedure is used to analyze select cases of ENF and MMF. The strain energy release rate predicted by this procedure is in good agreement with limited experimental data. The procedure is used to identify significant parameters associated with interlaminar fracture toughness. It is also used to determine the critical strain energy release rate and its attendant crack length in ENF and/or MMF. This computational procedure has considerable versatility/generality and provides extensive information about interlaminar fracture toughness in fiber composites.

  4. S-N Fatigue and Fatigue Crack Propagation Behaviors of X80 Steel at Room and Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dae-Ho; Kwon, Jae-Ki; Woo, Nam-Sub; Kim, Young-Ju; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Sangshik

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, the S-N fatigue and the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behaviors of American Petroleum Institute X80 steel were examined in the different locations of the base metal (BM), weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) at 298 K, 223 K, and 193 K (25 °C, -50 °C, and -80 °C). The resistance to S-N fatigue of X80 BM specimen increased greatly with decreasing temperature from 298 K to 193 K (25 °C to -80 °C) and showed a strong dependency on the flow strength (½(yield strength + tensile strength)). The FCP rates of X80 BM specimen were substantially reduced with decreasing temperature from 298 K to 223 K (25 °C to -50 °C) over the entire ∆ K regime, while further reduction in FCP rates was not significant with temperature from 223 K to 193 K (-50 °C to -80 °C). The FCP rates of the X80 BM and the WM specimens were comparable with each other, while the HAZ specimen showed slightly better FCP resistance than the BM and the WM specimens over the entire ∆K regime at 298 K (25 °C). Despite the varying microstructural characteristics of each weld location, the residual stress appeared to be a controlling factor to determine the FCP behavior. The FCP behaviors of high strength X80 steel were discussed based on the microstructural and the fractographic observations.

  5. Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Concrete Structures Using a Constitutive Relation with Embedded Discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruszczak, Stanisław; Haghighat, Ehsan

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the problem of modeling of mixed mode cracking in concrete structures is addressed within the context of a constitutive law with embedded discontinuity (CLED). This approach, which was originally developed for describing the propagation of localized deformation in a "smeared" sense, is enhanced here to model a discrete nature of crack propagation. The latter is achieved by coupling the CLED approach with the level-set method, which is commonly used within the framework of Extended Finite Element (XFEM). Numerical simulations of experimental tests conducted at Delft University, which involve four-point bending of a notched concrete beam under the action of two independent actuators, are presented. The results based on enhanced CLED approach are directly compared with XFEM simulations. The predictions from both these methodologies are quite consistent with the experimental data, thereby giving advantage to CLED scheme in view of its simplicity in the numerical implementation.

  6. ENANTIOSEPARATION OF MALATHION, CRUFORMATE, AND FENSULFOTHION ORGANOSPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES BY MIXED-MODE ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixed-mode electrokinetic capillary chromatography (mixed-ECC) has been used for the enantioseparation of organophosphorus pesticides. In mixed-ECC, a combination of three pseudostationary phases including surfactants, neutral, and charged cyclodextrins, are used to resolve very ...

  7. MASSES OF SUBGIANT STARS FROM ASTEROSEISMOLOGY USING THE COUPLING STRENGTHS OF MIXED MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Benomar, O.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Deheuvels, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-02-15

    For a few decades now, asteroseismology, the study of stellar oscillations, has enabled us to probe the interiors of stars with great precision. It allows stringent tests of stellar models and can provide accurate radii, masses, and ages for individual stars. Of particular interest are the mixed modes that occur in subgiant solar-like stars since they can place very strong constraints on stellar ages. Here, we measure the characteristics of the mixed modes, particularly the coupling strength, using a grid of stellar models for stars with masses between 0.9 and 1.5 M{sub Sun }. We show that the coupling strength of the l = 1 mixed modes is predominantly a function of stellar mass and appears to be independent of metallicity. This should allow an accurate mass evaluation, further increasing the usefulness of mixed modes in subgiants as asteroseismic tools.

  8. A simple analytical model to assess the critical length for crack propagation in weak snowpack layers derived from discrete element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Johan; van Herwijnen, Alec; Chambon, Guillaume; Schweizer, Jürg

    2015-04-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) slab tensile failure leading to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e. to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. However, the most complete model to date, namely the anticrack model, is based on fracture mechanics and is therefore not applicable to avalanche forecasting procedures which assess snowpack stability in terms of stresses and strength. Furthermore, the anticrack model requires the knowledge of the specific fracture energy of the weak layer which is very difficult to evaluate in practice and very sensitive to the experimental method used. To overcome this limitation, a new and simple analytical model was developed to evaluate the critical length as a function of the mechanical properties of the slab, the strength of the weak layer as well as the collapse height. This model was inferred from discrete element simulations of the propagation saw test (PST) allowing to reproduce the high porosity, and thus the collapse, of weak snow layers. The analytical model showed a very good agreement with PST field data, and could thus be used in practice to refine stability indices.

  9. Mixed-mode sorption of hydroxylated atrazine degradation products to sell: A mechanism for bound residue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerch, R.N.; Thurman, E.M.; Kruger, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sorption of hydroxylated atrazine degradation products (HADPs: hydroxyatrazine, HA; deethylhydroxyatrazine, DEHA; and deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, DIHA) to soils occurs by mixed-mode binding resulting from two simultaneous mechanisms: (1) cation exchange and (2) hydrophobic interaction. The objective was to use liquid chromatography and soil extraction experiments to show that mixed-mode binding is the mechanism controlling HADP sorption to soils and is also a mechanism for bound residue. Overall, HADP binding to solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents occurred in the order: cation exchange >> octadecyl (C18) >> cyanopropyl. Binding to cation exchange SPE and to a high-performance liquid chromatograph octyl (C8) column showed evidence for mixed-mode binding. Comparison of soil extracted by 0.5 M KH2P04, pH 7.5, or 25% aqueous CH3CN showed that, for HA and DIHA, cation exchange was a more important binding mechanism to soils than hydrophobic interaction. Based on differences between several extractants, the extent of HADP mixed-mode binding to soil occurred in the following order: HA > DIHA > DEHA. Mixed-mode extraction recovered 42.8% of bound atrazine residues from aged soil, and 88% of this fraction was identified as HADPs. Thus, a significant portion of bound atrazine residues in soils is sorbed by the mixed-mode binding mechanisms.

  10. Angular momentum redistribution by mixed modes in evolved low-mass stars. II. Spin-down of the core of red giants induced by mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, K.; Marques, J. P.; Goupil, M. J.; Mosser, B.; Sonoi, T.; Ouazzani, R. M.; Dupret, M. A.; Mathis, S.; Grosjean, M.

    2015-07-01

    The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants by the CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions allows us to investigate the internal structure of evolved low-mass stars, from the end of the main sequence to the central helium-burning phase. In particular, the measurement of the mean core rotation rate as a function of the evolution places stringent constraints on the physical mechanisms responsible for the angular momentum redistribution in stars. It showed that the current stellar evolution codes including the modelling of rotation fail to reproduce the observations. An additional physical process that efficiently extracts angular momentum from the core is thus necessary. Our aim is to assess the ability of mixed modes to do this. To this end, we developed a formalism that provides a modelling of the wave fluxes in both the mean angular momentum and the mean energy equations in a companion paper. In this article, mode amplitudes are modelled based on recent asteroseismic observations, and a quantitative estimate of the angular momentum transfer is obtained. This is performed for a benchmark model of 1.3 M⊙ at three evolutionary stages, representative of the evolved pulsating stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler. We show that mixed modes extract angular momentum from the innermost regions of subgiants and red giants. However, this transport of angular momentum from the core is unlikely to counterbalance the effect of the core contraction in subgiants and early red giants. In contrast, for more evolved red giants, mixed modes are found efficient enough to balance and exceed the effect of the core contraction, in particular in the hydrogen-burning shell. Our results thus indicate that mixed modes are a promising candidate to explain the observed spin-down of the core of evolved red giants, but that an other mechanism is to be invoked for subgiants and early red giants.

  11. NASA-Langley Research Center's participation in a round-robin comparison between some current crack-propagation prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Lewis, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted which evaluated and compared different methods currently in practice for predicting crack growth in surface-cracked specimens. This report describes the prediction methods used by the Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, at NASA-Langley Research Center, and presents a comparison between predicted crack growth and crack growth observed in laboratory experiments. For tests at higher stress levels, the correlation between predicted and experimentally determined crack growth was generally quite good. For tests at lower stress levels, the predicted number of cycles to reach a given crack length was consistently higher than the experimentally determined number of cycles. This consistent overestimation of the number of cycles could have resulted from a lack of definition of crack-growth data at low values of the stress intensity range. Generally, the predicted critical flaw sizes were smaller than the experimentally determined critical flaw sizes. This underestimation probably resulted from using plane-strain fracture toughness values to predict failure rather than the more appropriate values based on maximum load.

  12. Mixed mode stress field effect in adhesive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical or analytical analyses were performed on seven different test specimens including blister test, 90-degree peel test, torsion test, and various cone tests. These specimens are in general subjected to complex stress fields having various amounts of Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III loads. The specimens were then constructed using polymethyl methacrylate for the adherends and a transparent polyurethane elastomer (Solithane 113) for the adhesive. This combination permitted direct observation of the bondline as load was applied. Although initial debonds as well as bond end termination singularities were present in all specimens, in some cases the debond did not initiate at the singularity points as would normally have been expected. An explanation for this behavior is presented, as well as a comparison of loading mode effect on those specimens for which the debond did propagate from a bond terminus singular point.

  13. Analysis of flexural wave propagation through beams with a breathing crack using wavelet spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2016-08-01

    An analytical-numerical method, based on the use of wavelet spectral finite elements (WSFE), is presented for studying the nonlinear interaction of flexural waves with a breathing crack present in a slender beam. The cracked beam is discretized using wavelet spectral finite elements which use compactly supported Daubechies scaling functions for approximating the temporal dependence of the transverse displacement. Rotational spring is used to model the open crack condition, and behavior of the beam in closed-crack condition is assumed to be similar to that of an intact beam. An intermittent switching between the open- and closed-crack conditions simulates crack-breathing, leading to a set of nonlinear equations which is solved using an iterative method. Results of the proposed method are compared with those obtained using the Fourier spectral finite element (FSFE) and 1D finite element (FE) methods, which show a close agreement. Existence of the higher-order harmonic components, indicative of the crack-induced bilinearity, is confirmed in the frequency domain response. Moreover, the time domain analysis reveals separation of harmonics resulting from the dispersive nature of the waveguide, which is further used for localizing the damage. A parametric study is presented to bring out the influence of crack-severity and -location on the extent of harmonic separation and on the relative strength of higher order harmonic. In addition to elaborating the use of WSFE in addressing the nonlinear wave-damage interaction, results of the present investigation can be potentially useful in devising strategies for an inverse analysis.

  14. An analytical model which combines roughness- and plasticity- induced fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nong

    In this study an analytical PICC-RICC Model was developed to describe better the near-threshold fatigue behavior. The PICC-RICC Model was built upon a strip-yield type PICC model originally proposed by Newman and later modified by Hou and Lawrence. A zigzag crack growth path was introduced to simulate surface roughness. The two opposing crack surfaces were considered to be translated and thus mismatched by the mixed-mode displacements occurring near the deflected crack tip. The model is powerful and unique in that it combines the effects of RICC and PICC. Thus, the gradual transition from RICC to PICC dominated crack closure is handled naturally by this model. The influences of the geometrical features of the surface roughness, R-ratio and the cyclic load range on RICC were examined using the PICC-RICC Model. Near-threshold fatigue behavior of various materials was predicted. The effect of microstructure on the RICC level was studied. The predicted results compared favorably with experimental data. The fatigue notch size effect was investigated using the PICC-RICC model. The initial crack length (asb{i}) for propagation was estimated. The predicted notch fatigue strength compared favorably with the Initiation-Propagation (I-P) Model prediction and test data. The existence of a "worst case notch" previously postulated using the I-P Model was confirmed.

  15. Refinements to the Mixed-Mode Bending Test for Delamination Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2000-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending (MMB) test for delamination toughness was first introduced in 1988. This simple test is a combination of the standard Mode I (opening) test and a Mode II (sliding) test. This MMB test has become widely used in the United States and around the world for mixed-mode toughness measurements. Because of the widespread use of this test method, it is being considered for standardization by ASTM Committee D30. This paper discusses several improvements to the original test method. The improvements to the MMB test procedure include an improved method for calculating toughness from the measured test quantities, a more accurate way of setting the mixed-mode ratio to be tested, and the inclusion of a new alignment criterion for improved consistency in measured values.

  16. Mixed-mode oscillations in a three time-scale model for the dopaminergic neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Martin; Popović, Nikola; Kopell, Nancy; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2008-03-01

    Mixed-mode dynamics is a complex type of dynamical behavior that has been observed both numerically and experimentally in numerous prototypical systems in the natural sciences. The compartmental Wilson-Callaway model for the dopaminergic neuron is an example of a system that exhibits a wide variety of mixed-mode patterns upon variation of a control parameter. One characteristic feature of this system is the presence of multiple time scales. In this article, we study the Wilson-Callaway model from a geometric point of view. We show that the observed mixed-mode dynamics is caused by a slowly varying canard structure. By appropriately transforming the model equations, we reduce them to an underlying three-dimensional canonical form that can be analyzed via a slight adaptation of the approach developed by M. Krupa, N. Popović, and N. Kopell (unpublished).

  17. PRO data collection in clinical trials using mixed modes: report of the ISPOR PRO mixed modes good research practices task force.

    PubMed

    Eremenco, Sonya; Coons, Stephen Joel; Paty, Jean; Coyne, Karin; Bennett, Antonia V; McEntegart, Damian

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this report was to address the use and mixing of data collection modes within and between trials in which patient-reported outcome (PRO) end points are intended to be used to support medical product labeling. The report first addresses the factors that should be considered when selecting a mode or modes of PRO data collection in a clinical trial, which is often when mixing is first considered. Next, a summary of how to "faithfully" migrate instruments is presented followed by a section on qualitative and quantitative study designs used to evaluate measurement equivalence of the new and original modes of data collection. Finally, the report discusses a number of issues that must be taken into account when mixing modes is deemed necessary or unavoidable within or between trials, including considerations of the risk of mixing at different levels within a clinical trial program and mixing between different types of platforms. In the absence of documented evidence of measurement equivalence, it is strongly recommended that a quantitative equivalence study be conducted before mixing modes in a trial to ensure that sufficient equivalence can be demonstrated to have confidence in pooling PRO data collected by the different modes. However, we also strongly discourage the mixing of paper and electronic field-based instruments and suggest that mixing of electronic modes be considered for clinical trials and only after equivalence has been established. If proceeding with mixing modes, it is important to implement data collection carefully in the trial itself in a planned manner at the country level or higher and minimize ad hoc mixing by sites or individual subjects. Finally, when mixing occurs, it must be addressed in the statistical analysis plan for the trial and the ability to pool the data must be evaluated to then evaluate treatment effects with mixed modes data. A successful mixed modes trial requires a "faithful migration," measurement equivalence

  18. Mixed-mode oscillations via canard explosions in light-emitting diodes with optoelectronic feedback.

    PubMed

    Marino, F; Ciszak, M; Abdalah, S F; Al-Naimee, K; Meucci, R; Arecchi, F T

    2011-10-01

    Chaotically spiking attractors in semiconductor lasers with optoelectronic feedback have been recently observed to be the result of canard phenomena in three-dimensional phase space (incomplete homoclinic scenarios). Since light-emitting diodes display the same dynamics and are much more easily controllable, we use one of these systems to complete the attractor analysis demonstrating experimentally and theoretically the occurrence of complex sequences of periodic mixed-mode oscillations. In particular, we investigate the transition between periodic and chaotic mixed-mode states and analyze the effects of the unavoidable experimental noise on these transitions. PMID:22181318

  19. Mixed-mode oscillations via canard explosions in light-emitting diodes with optoelectronic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, F.; Ciszak, M.; Abdalah, S. F.; Al-Naimee, K.; Meucci, R.; Arecchi, F. T.

    2011-10-01

    Chaotically spiking attractors in semiconductor lasers with optoelectronic feedback have been recently observed to be the result of canard phenomena in three-dimensional phase space (incomplete homoclinic scenarios). Since light-emitting diodes display the same dynamics and are much more easily controllable, we use one of these systems to complete the attractor analysis demonstrating experimentally and theoretically the occurrence of complex sequences of periodic mixed-mode oscillations. In particular, we investigate the transition between periodic and chaotic mixed-mode states and analyze the effects of the unavoidable experimental noise on these transitions.

  20. Irregular-regular-irregular mixed mode oscillations in a glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sabuj Shaw, Pankaj Kumar Saha, Debajyoti Janaki, M. S. Iyengar, A. N. Sekar

    2015-05-15

    Floating potential fluctuations of a glow discharge plasma are found to exhibit different kinds of mixed mode oscillations. Power spectrum analysis reveals that with change in the nature of the mixed mode oscillation (MMO), there occurs a transfer of power between the different harmonics and subharmonics. The variation in the chaoticity of different types of mmo was observed with the study of Lyapunov exponents. Estimates of correlation dimension and the Hurst exponent suggest that these MMOs are of low dimensional nature with an anti persistent character. Numerical modeling also reflects the experimentally found transitions between the different MMOs.

  1. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  2. Effect of proof testing on the flaw growth characteristics of 304 stainless steel. [crack propagation in welded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of proof overload frequency and magnitude on the cyclic crack growth rates of 304 stainless steel weldments were investigated. The welding procedure employed was typical of those used on over-the-road cryogenic vessels. Tests were conducted at room temperature with an overload ratio of 1.50 to determine the effect of overload frequency. Effect of overload magnitude was determined from tests where a room temperature overload was applied between blocks of 1000 cycles applied at 78 K (-320 F). The cyclic stress level used in all tests was typical of the nominal membrane stress generally encountered in full scale vessels. Test results indicate that judicious selection of proof overload frequency and magnitude can reduce crack growth rates for cyclic stress levels.

  3. Mixed-mode dynamics and the canard phenomenon: Towards a classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, N.

    2008-11-01

    Mixed-mode dynamics is a complex type of oscillatory behavior that is characterized by an alternation of small-amplitude oscillations and large-amplitude excursions. In this overview article, we focus on one particular mechanism that has been shown to generate mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) in multiple-scale systems: the generalized canard mechanism. After a brief review of the classical canard phenomenon, we present a model problem that was proposed in [23] as a canonical form for a family of three-dimensional three time-scale systems, and we reiterate some of the results obtained there. In particular, we discuss how that canonical form can be placed in the context of the well-developed geometric theory of canards in three dimensions. Finally, we introduce two examples of problems from mathematical neuroscience that fit into the framework of our model problem, and we discuss the implications of our results for the mixed-mode dynamics observed in these two examples. Our results are intended as a first step towards a more general classification of the mixed-mode dynamics that can arise via the generalized canard mechanism, with the long-term goal of constructing a 'toolbox' of prototypical minimal models.

  4. Determination of mixed-mode energy release rates in laminated carbon fiber composite structures using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puishys, Joseph F., III

    Carbon fiber composites have recently seen a large scale application in industry due to its high strength and low weight. Despite numerous beneficial attributes of composite materials, they are subject to several unique challenges; the most prevalent and troubling is delamination fracture. This research program is focused on developing an appropriate damage model capable of analyzing microscopic stress strain growth at the crack tip of laminated composites. This thesis focuses on capturing and identifying the varying stress and strain fields, as well as other microstructural details and phenomena unique to crack tip propagation in carbon fiber panels using a novel mechanical characterization technique known as Digital Image Correlation (DIC).

  5. Effect of load ratio on fatigue crack propagation behavior of solid-solution-strengthened Ni-based superalloys at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longzhou; Roy, Shawoon K.

    2013-04-01

    The fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behavior of two solid-solution-strengthened Ni-based superalloys, INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230, were studied simultaneously in laboratory air using a constant stress intensity factor (K)-controlled mode with different load ratios (R-ratio) at 700 °C. The FCP tests were performed in both cycle and time-dependent FCP domains to examine the effect of R-ratio on the FCP rate, da/dn. For cycle-dependent FCP test, a 1-s sinusoidal fatigue was applied for a compact tension (CT) specimen of INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 to measure their FCP rates. For time-dependent FCP test, a 3-s sinusoidal fatigue with a hold time of 300 s at maximum load was applied. Both cycle/time-dependent FCP behaviors were characterized and analyzed. The results showed that increasing R-ratio would introduce the fatigue incubation and decrease the FCP rates at cycle-dependent FCP tests. On the contrary, fatigue incubation was not observed at time-dependent FCP tests for both INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 at each tested R-ratio, suggesting that association of maximum load (Kmax) with crack tip open displacement (CTOD) and environmental factor governed the FCP process. Also, for time-dependent FCP, HAYNES 230 showed lower FCP rates than INCONEL 617 regardless of R-ratio. However, for cycle-dependent FCP, HAYNES 230 showed the lower FCP rates only at high R-ratios. Fracture surface of specimens were examined using SEM to investigate the cracking mechanism under cycle/time-dependent FCP condition with various R-ratios.

  6. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  7. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  8. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  9. Experimental compliance calibration for the mixed-mode bending (MMB) specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Hansen, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    A novel method to control the mixed-mode bending (MMB) specimen is presented. By maintaining a constant opening, or Mode 1, displacement rate, stable delamination growth is achieved for all mixed-mode ratios. A constant-opening displacement rate is achieved by attaching a second displacement transducer to the hinges of the specimen. The test machine is then controlled externally by the second displacement transducer. By achieving stable delamination growth and monitoring the opening displacement, an experimental compliance calibration may be derived for the Modes 1 and 2 parts. This new approach to control the test and determine the experimental compliance calibration, overcomes the potential inaccuracies of the previously used beam theory expressions to determine compliance and to separate the modal values of G.

  10. A unified potential-based cohesive model of mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery R.

    2009-06-01

    A generalized potential-based constitutive model for mixed-mode cohesive fracture is presented in conjunction with physical parameters such as fracture energy, cohesive strength and shape of cohesive interactions. It characterizes different fracture energies in each fracture mode, and can be applied to various material failure behavior (e.g. quasi-brittle). The unified potential leads to both intrinsic (with initial slope indicators to control elastic behavior) and extrinsic cohesive zone models. Path dependence of work-of-separation is investigated with respect to proportional and non-proportional paths—this investigation demonstrates consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The potential-based model is verified by simulating a mixed-mode bending test. The actual potential is named PPR (Park-Paulino-Roesler), after the first initials of the authors' last names.

  11. Response Rates for Mixed-Mode Surveys Using Mail and E-Mail/Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converse, Patrick D.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Huang, Xiaoting; Oswald, Frederick L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines response rates for mixed-mode survey implementation involving mail and e-mail/Web components. Using Dillman's Tailored Design Method, 1,500 participants were sent a survey either (a) via mail with a follow-up contact via e-mail that directed them to a Web-based questionnaire or (b) via e-mail that directed them to a Web-based…

  12. Mixed-mode chromatography with zwitterionic phosphopeptidomimetic selectors from Ugi multicomponent reaction.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Andrea F G; Leek, Tomas; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2013-11-22

    In the present contribution a novel Ugi multicomponent reaction (MCR) was used to generate zwitterionic chromatographic selectors with capability for application in mixed-mode chromatography featuring complementary selectivities in reversed-phase (RP) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Aminophosphonate zwitterionic chromatographic ligands were synthesized adopting a one pot microwave assisted three-component UGI-MCR synthesis and, after purification, were immobilized by thiol-ene click chemistry on silica beads. Chromatographic characteristics of these stationary phases were evaluated by variation of experimental conditions for a set of diverse analytes with neutral, acidic, basic and zwitterionic character revealing the presence of multimodal retention capabilities (i.e. tunable retention increments from ion exchange, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interaction were observed). To further investigate and classify the retention properties of the novel stationary phases we performed a comparative chromatographic study with commercially available mixed mode, HILIC and RP columns. The resultant chromatographic data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA revealed that the new reversed-phase/zwitterionic ion-exchangers (RP/ZWIX) are complementary to common RP, HILIC and mixed-mode phases on the market and could be a promising alternative in impurity profiling and 2D-HPLC concepts. Moreover, the adopted synthetic approach offers the capability to generate chemical diversity simply by the variation of the starting aldehyde, aminophosphonic acid and/or isonitrile components. This unique characteristics offer great possibility for the design of novel selectors for mixed mode chromatography like RP/ZWIX, HILIC, affinity and chiral chromatography. PMID:23932032

  13. Preparation and characterization of mixed-mode monolithic silica column for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fanggui; Wang, Shun; Zhao, Shulin

    2009-12-18

    A silica-based monolithic stationary phase with mixed-mode of reversed phase (RP) and weak anion-exchange (WAX) for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) has been prepared. The mixed-mode monolithic silica column was prepared using the sol-gel technique and followed by a post-modification with hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMS) and aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). The amino groups on the surface of the stationary phase were used to generate a substantial anodic EOF as well as to provide electrostatic interaction sites for charged compounds at low pH. A cathodic EOF was observed at pH above 7.3 due to the full ionization of residual silanol groups and the suppression in the ionization of amino groups. A variety of analytes were used to evaluate the electrochromatographic characterization and column performance. The monolithic stationary phase exhibited RP chromatographic behavior toward neutral solutes. The model anionic solutes were separated by the mixed-mode mechanism, which comprised RP interaction, WAX, and electrophoresis. Symmetrical peaks can be obtained for basic solutes because positively charged amino groups can effectively minimize the adsorption of positively charged analytes to the stationary phase. PMID:19913231

  14. Fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, C. Christopher; Carman, C. Davis; Hillberry, Ben M.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack delay behavior at high stress ratio caused by single peak overloads was investigated in two thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy. Closure measurements indicated no closure occurred before or throughout the overload plastic zones following the overload. This was further substantiated by comparing the specimen compliance following the overload with the compliance of a low R ratio test when the crack was fully open. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that crack tunneling and possibly reinitiation of the crack occurred, most likely a result of crack-tip blunting. The number of delay cycles was greater for the thinner mixed mode stress state specimen than for the thicker plane strain stress state specimen, which is similar to low R ratio test results and may be due to a larger plastic zone for the mixed mode cased.

  15. Computer assisted optimization of liquid chromatographic separations of small molecules using mixed-mode stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Edgar Y; Benito Quintana, José; Rodil, Rosario; Cela, Rafael

    2012-05-18

    Mixed-mode stationary phases are gaining adepts in liquid chromatography (LC) as more and more applications are published and new commercial columns appear in the market ought to their ability to retain and separate analytes with multiple functionalities. The increased number of adjustable variables gives these columns an enhanced value for the chromatographer, but, on the other hand, it complicates the process of developing satisfactory separations when complex samples must be analyzed. Thus, the availability of computer assisted methods development (CAMD) tools is highly desirable in this field. Therefore, the first specific tool for the CAMD of LC separations in mixed-mode columns is presented. The tool consists in two processes. The first one develops a retention model for peaks in a predefined experimental domain of pH and buffer concentration. In this domain, the retention as a function of the proportion of organic modifier is modeled using a two-stage re-calibration process departing from isocratic retention data and then, from gradient elutions. With this two-stage approach, reliability is gained. In the second process, the model is finally interpolated and used for the unattended optimization of the different possible elution modes available in these columns. This optimization process is driven by an evolutionary algorithm. The development and application of this new chemometrics tool is demonstrated by the optimization of a mixture of neutral and ionizable compounds. Hence, several different types of gradients were generated, showing a good agreement between simulated and experimental data, with retention time errors lower than 5% in most cases. On the other hand, classical CAMD tools, such as design of experiments, were unable to efficiently deal with mixed-mode optimizations, rendering errors above 30% for several compounds. PMID:22494641

  16. Crack Propagation Resistance of α-Al2O3 Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  17. Mixed-mode synchronization between two inhibitory neurons with post-inhibitory rebound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Roman; Osipov, Grigory; Komarov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    We study an array of activity rhythms generated by a half-center oscillator (HCO), represented by a pair of reciprocally coupled neurons with post-inhibitory rebounds (PIR). Such coupling-induced bursting possesses two time scales, one for fast spiking and another for slow quiescent periods, is shown to exhibit an array of synchronization properties. We discuss several HCO configurations constituted by two endogenous bursters, by tonic-spiking and quiescent neurons, as well as mixed-mode configurations composed of neurons of different type. We demonstrate that burst synchronization can be accompanied by complex, often chaotic, interactions of fast spikes within synchronized bursts.

  18. Adaptable Poly(ethylene glycol) Microspheres Capable of Mixed-mode Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Matthew; Johnson, Alexander; Hudalla, Gregory A.; Murphy, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a simple, degradable PEG microsphere system formed from a water-in-water emulsion process. Microsphere network degradation and erosion were controlled by adjusting the number of hydrolytically labile sites, by varying the PEG molecular weight, and by adjusting the emulsion conditions. Microsphere size was also controllable by adjusting the polymer formulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that alternative degradation and erosion mechanisms, such as proteolytic degradation, can be incorporated into PEG microspheres, resulting in mixed-mode degradation. Due to the adaptability of this approach, it may serve as an attractive option for emerging tissue engineering, drug delivery, and gene delivery applications. PMID:23958780

  19. Design and Implementation of Network Management System Based on Mixed-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xianmin

    With the growth of network scale size, structure is getting more and more sophisticated, how to effectively manage the network has been increasingly paid attention to. Development of network management systems, there are mainly two system models, that is, C/S mode and B/S mode. This paper focuses on analysis of advantages and disadvantages in the C/S mode and B/S mode, design and implementation network management system based on the mixed mode with C/S mode and B/S mode.

  20. Mixed-mode oscillations in slow-fast delayed optoelectronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talla Mbé, Jimmi H.; Talla, Alain F.; Chengui, Geraud R. Goune; Coillet, Aurélien; Larger, Laurent; Woafo, Paul; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the dynamical behavior of breathers in optoelectronic oscillators from the standpoint of mixed-mode oscillations. In the phase space, these breathers are composite oscillations that are damped to the attractive branches of an invariant manifold. Our study shows that the emergence of breather dynamics is linked to the apparition of inflection points in the phase space, and we develop an analytical framework based on the Liénard reduction form in order to provide an analytical insight into this phenomenology. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  1. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  2. Mixed mode transition in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Flow regimes exist where interaction of Klebanoff streaks and the Tollmien-Sclichting waves trigger transition but either mode is individually insufficient. Such interaction between orderly and bypass routes of transition is called Mixed mode transition. In zero pressure gradient boundary layers, mixed mode transition follows three routes depending upon strength of these perturbation modes. At high free-stream turbulence intensity (Tu), bypass transition is dominant and the flow is very weakly sensitive to the TS mode strength. In the presence of a strong TS mode, low Tu triggers secondary instability of the TS wave forming Λ vortices. The Λ vortices are forced response due to the weak streaks rather than resonance mechanism seen in monochromatic excitations. When both of these modes are weak, secondary instability of streaks trigger consequent breakdown to turbulent spots. Three-dimensional visualization of the perturbation fields shows toroidal n = 0 and helical n = 1 modes observed in instability of axisymmetric jets and wakes. In adverese pressure gradient boundary layers, the presence of an inflection point significantly increases the growth rate of TS mode thereby strengthening the secondary instability route and the interaction is more interesting. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  3. Redesign of the mixed-mode bending delamination test to reduce nonlinear effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending (MMB) test uses a lever to apply simultaneously mode I and mode II loading to a split-beam specimen. An iterative analysis that accounts for the geometric nonlinearity of the MMB test was developed. The analysis accurately predicted the measured load-displacement response and the strain energy release rate, G, of an MMB test specimen made of AS4/PEEK. The errors in G when calculated using linear theory were found to be as large as 30 percent in some cases. Because it would be inconvenient to use a nonlinear analysis to analyze MMB data, the MMB apparatus was redesigned to minimize the nonlinearity. With the improved apparatus, loads are applied just above the midplane of the test specimen through a roller attached to the lever. This apparatus was demonstrated by measuring the mixed-mode delamination fracture toughhess of the test specimen. The nonlinearity errors associated with testing this tough composite material were less than +/- 3 percent. The data from the improved MMB apparatus analyzed with a linear analysis were similar to those found with the original apparatus and the nonlinear analysis.

  4. Comprehensively simulating the mixed-mode progressive delamination in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhenyuan

    Delamination, or interlaminar debonding, is a commonly observed failure mechanism in composite laminates. It is of great significance to comprehensively simulate the mixed-mode progressive delamination in composite structures because by doing this, people can save a lot of effort in evaluating the safe load which a composite structure can endure. The objective of this thesis is to develop a numerical approach to simulating double-cantilever beam (DCB) and mixed-mode bending (MMB) tests and also of specifying/validating various cohesive models. A finite element framework, which consists of properly selecting time integration scheme (explicit dynamic), viscosity, load rate and mass scaling, is developed to yield converged and accurate results. Two illustrative cohesive laws (linear and power-law) are programmed with a user- defined material subroutine for ABAQUS/Explicit, VUMAT, and implemented into the finite element framework. Parameters defined in cohesive laws are studied to evaluate their effects on the predicted load-displacement curves. The finite element model, together with the predetermined model parameters, is found to be capable of producing converged and accurate results. The finite element framework, embedded with the illustrative cohesive laws, is found to be capable of handling various interfacial models. The present approach is concluded to be useful in simulating delamination with more sophisticated material models. Together with the method for determining model parameters, it can be used by computer codes other than ABAQUS.

  5. Reliability analysis and prediction of mixed mode load using Markov Chain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikabdullah, N.; Singh, S. S. K.; Alebrahim, R.; Azizi, M. A.; K, Elwaleed A.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the reliability analysis and prediction of mixed mode loading by using a simple two state Markov Chain Model for an automotive crankshaft. The reliability analysis and prediction for any automotive component or structure is important for analyzing and measuring the failure to increase the design life, eliminate or reduce the likelihood of failures and safety risk. The mechanical failures of the crankshaft are due of high bending and torsion stress concentration from high cycle and low rotating bending and torsional stress. The Markov Chain was used to model the two states based on the probability of failure due to bending and torsion stress. In most investigations it revealed that bending stress is much serve than torsional stress, therefore the probability criteria for the bending state would be higher compared to the torsion state. A statistical comparison between the developed Markov Chain Model and field data was done to observe the percentage of error. The reliability analysis and prediction was derived and illustrated from the Markov Chain Model were shown in the Weibull probability and cumulative distribution function, hazard rate and reliability curve and the bathtub curve. It can be concluded that Markov Chain Model has the ability to generate near similar data with minimal percentage of error and for a practical application; the proposed model provides a good accuracy in determining the reliability for the crankshaft under mixed mode loading.

  6. Reliability analysis and prediction of mixed mode load using Markov Chain Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nikabdullah, N.; Singh, S. S. K.; Alebrahim, R.; Azizi, M. A.; K, Elwaleed A.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    2014-06-19

    The aim of this paper is to present the reliability analysis and prediction of mixed mode loading by using a simple two state Markov Chain Model for an automotive crankshaft. The reliability analysis and prediction for any automotive component or structure is important for analyzing and measuring the failure to increase the design life, eliminate or reduce the likelihood of failures and safety risk. The mechanical failures of the crankshaft are due of high bending and torsion stress concentration from high cycle and low rotating bending and torsional stress. The Markov Chain was used to model the two states based on the probability of failure due to bending and torsion stress. In most investigations it revealed that bending stress is much serve than torsional stress, therefore the probability criteria for the bending state would be higher compared to the torsion state. A statistical comparison between the developed Markov Chain Model and field data was done to observe the percentage of error. The reliability analysis and prediction was derived and illustrated from the Markov Chain Model were shown in the Weibull probability and cumulative distribution function, hazard rate and reliability curve and the bathtub curve. It can be concluded that Markov Chain Model has the ability to generate near similar data with minimal percentage of error and for a practical application; the proposed model provides a good accuracy in determining the reliability for the crankshaft under mixed mode loading.

  7. Markov chain modelling of reliability analysis and prediction under mixed mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Salvinder; Abdullah, Shahrum; Nik Mohamed, Nik Abdullah; Mohd Noorani, Mohd Salmi

    2015-03-01

    The reliability assessment for an automobile crankshaft provides an important understanding in dealing with the design life of the component in order to eliminate or reduce the likelihood of failure and safety risks. The failures of the crankshafts are considered as a catastrophic failure that leads towards a severe failure of the engine block and its other connecting subcomponents. The reliability of an automotive crankshaft under mixed mode loading using the Markov Chain Model is studied. The Markov Chain is modelled by using a two-state condition to represent the bending and torsion loads that would occur on the crankshaft. The automotive crankshaft represents a good case study of a component under mixed mode loading due to the rotating bending and torsion stresses. An estimation of the Weibull shape parameter is used to obtain the probability density function, cumulative distribution function, hazard and reliability rate functions, the bathtub curve and the mean time to failure. The various properties of the shape parameter is used to model the failure characteristic through the bathtub curve is shown. Likewise, an understanding of the patterns posed by the hazard rate onto the component can be used to improve the design and increase the life cycle based on the reliability and dependability of the component. The proposed reliability assessment provides an accurate, efficient, fast and cost effective reliability analysis in contrast to costly and lengthy experimental techniques.

  8. Nonlinear analysis and redesign of the mixed-mode bending delamination test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Mixed Mode Bending (MMB) test uses a lever to simultaneously apply mode I and mode II loading to a split beam specimen. An iterative analysis that accounts for the geometric nonlinearity of the MMB test was developed. The analysis accurately predicted the measured load displacement response and the strain energy release rate, G, of an MMB test specimen made of APC2 (AS4/PEEK). The errors in G when calculated using linear theory were found to be as large as thirty percent in some cases. Because it would be inconvenient to use a nonlinear analysis to analyze MMB data, the MMB apparatus was redesigned to minimize the nonlinearity. The nonlinear analysis was used as a guide in redesigning the MMB apparatus. With the redesigned apparatus, loads were applied through a roller attached to the level and loaded just above the midplane of the test specimen. The redesigned apparatuus has geometric nonlinearity errors of less than three percent, even for materials substantially tougher than APC2. This apparatus was demonstrated by measuring the mixed mode delamination fracture toughness of APC2.

  9. Intra-individual variation of extreme response style in mixed-mode panel studies

    PubMed Central

    Aichholzer, Julian

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the self-report survey method suffers from many idiosyncratic biases, such as varying response styles due to different survey modes used. Using latent state-trait theory it is argued that response styles will also vary intra-individually, depending on the particular survey situation. In this study we examine intra-individual variation in extreme response style behavior (ERS) using mixed-mode survey panel data as a quasi-experimental setting. Data from the Irish National Election Study panel are used, which consists of repeated face-to-face and mail-back surveys. Latent transition analysis is used to detect switches in ERS, distinguishing ‘stable’ and ‘volatile’ respondents in terms of their response style. Overall, ERS is inflated in the intermediate mail component of the panel, whereas preliminary analyses suggest that low education and ideological extremity are drivers of that change. Results are discussed with regards to measurement errors in mixed-mode and longitudinal surveys. PMID:23522006

  10. Automatic crack growth tracking of bimaterial interface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yehia, Nabil A. B.; Shephard, Mark S.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation process of an interfacial crack in composite material is studied using the modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion, NT-criterion. Some necessary assumptions have been adopted to facilitate the use of the NT-criterion in this case. The stress intensity factors at the crack tip are extracted from the complex displacement field and finite element results. A simple algorithm for automatic crack propagation is presented with an illustrative example.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of protein retention in mixed-mode chromatography: An extended model for isocratic and dual gradient elution chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi Feng; Graalfs, Heiner; Frech, Christian

    2016-09-16

    An extended model is developed to describe protein retention in mixed-mode chromatography based on thermodynamic principles. Special features are the incorporation of pH dependence of the ionic interaction on a mixed-mode resin and the addition of a water term into the model which enables one to describe the total number of water molecules released at the hydrophobic interfaces upon protein-ligand binding. Examples are presented on how to determine the model parameters using isocratic elution chromatography. Four mixed-mode anion-exchanger prototype resins with different surface chemistries and ligand densities were tested using isocratic elution of two monoclonal antibodies at different pH values (7-10) and encompassed a wide range of NaCl concentrations (0-5M). U-shape mixed-mode retention curves were observed for all four resins. By taking into account of the deprotonation and protonation of the weak cationic functional groups in these mixed-mode anion-exchanger prototype resins, conditions which favor protein-ligand binding via mixed-mode strong cationic ligands as well as conditions which favor protein-ligand binding via both mixed-mode strong cationic ligands and non-hydrophobic weak cationic ligands were identified. The changes in the retention curves with pH, salt, protein, and ligand can be described very well by the extended model using meaningful thermodynamic parameters like Gibbs energy, number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions, total number of released water molecules as well as modulator interaction constant. Furthermore, the fitted model parameters based on isocratic elution data can also be used to predict protein retention in dual salt-pH gradient elution chromatography. PMID:27554024

  12. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.J.; Gokhale, A.M.; Antolovich, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measure of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. The objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such a height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scale-dependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  13. Effect of crack surface geometry on fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, W. J.; Gokhale, Arun M.; Antolovich, S. D.

    1995-10-01

    The geometry of crack faces often plays a critical role in reducing crack extension forces when crack closure occurs during fatigue crack growth. Most previous studies of fatigue crack closure are concerned with mechanical measures of closure as related to the crack growth rate; very little attention has been given to the geometry of the crack surfaces. Our objective is to identify those aspects of crack surface geometry that are important in the closure process, to develop quantitative fractographic techniques to estimate such attributes in a statistically significant and robust manner, and to correlate them to the physical process of crack closure. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation experiments were performed on a Ni-base superalloy and crack growth rates and crack closure loads were measured. Digital image profilometry and software-based analysis techniques were used for statistically reliable and detailed quantitative characterization of fatigue crack profiles. It is shown that the dimensionless, scale-independent attributes, such as height-to-width ratio of asperities, fractal dimensions, dimensionless roughness parameters, etc., do not represent the aspects of crack geometry that are of primary importance in the crack closure phenomena. Furthermore, it is shown that the scaledependent characteristics, such as average asperity height, do represent the aspects of crack geometry that play an interactive role in the closure process. These observations have implications concerning the validity of geometry-dependent, closure-based models for fatigue crack growth.

  14. Strain energy release rates of composite interlaminar end-notch and mixed-mode fracture: A sublaminate/ply level analysis and a computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valisetty, R. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code is presented for the sublaminate/ply level analysis of composite structures. This code is useful for obtaining stresses in regions affected by delaminations, transverse cracks, and discontinuities related to inherent fabrication anomalies, geometric configurations, and loading conditions. Particular attention is focussed on those layers or groups of layers (sublaminates) which are immediately affected by the inherent flaws. These layers are analyzed as homogeneous bodies in equilibrium and in isolation from the rest of the laminate. The theoretical model used to analyze the individual layers allows the relevant stresses and displacements near discontinuities to be represented in the form of pure exponential-decay-type functions which are selected to eliminate the exponential-precision-related difficulties in sublaminate/ply level analysis. Thus, sublaminate analysis can be conducted without any restriction on the maximum number of layers, delaminations, transverse cracks, or other types of discontinuities. In conjunction with the strain energy release rate (SERR) concept and composite micromechanics, this computational procedure is used to model select cases of end-notch and mixed-mode fracture specimens. The computed stresses are in good agreement with those from a three-dimensional finite element analysis. Also, SERRs compare well with limited available experimental data.

  15. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  16. Influence of Mixed Mode I-Mode II Loading on Fatigue Delamination Growth Characteristics of a Graphite Epoxy Tape Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode I-mode II interlaminar tests were conducted on IM7/8552 tape laminates using the mixed-mode bending test. Three mixed mode ratios, G(sub II)/G(sub T) = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8, were considered. Tests were performed at all three mixed-mode ratios under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, where the former static tests were used to determine initial loading levels for the latter fatigue tests. Fatigue tests at each mixed-mode ratio were performed at four loading levels, Gmax, equal to 0.5G(sub c), 0.4G(sub c), 0.3G(sub c), and 0.2G(sub c), where G(sub c) is the interlaminar fracture toughness of the corresponding mixed-mode ratio at which a test was performed. All fatigue tests were performed using constant-amplitude load control and delamination growth was automatically documented using compliance solutions obtained from the corresponding quasi-static tests. Static fracture toughness data yielded a mixed-mode delamination criterion that exhibited monotonic increase in Gc with mixed-mode ratio, G(sub II)/G(sub T). Fatigue delamination onset parameters varied monotonically with G(sub II)/G(sub T), which was expected based on the fracture toughness data. Analysis of non-normalized data yielded a monotonic change in Paris law exponent with mode ratio. This was not the case when normalized data were analyzed. Fatigue data normalized by the static R-curve were most affected in specimens tested at G(sub II)/G(sub T)=0.2 (this process has little influence on the other data). In this case, the normalized data yielded a higher delamination growth rate compared to the raw data for a given loading level. Overall, fiber bridging appeared to be the dominant mechanism, affecting delamination growth rates in specimens tested at different load levels and differing mixed-mode ratios.

  17. Advanced high pressure engine study for mixed-mode vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luscher, W. P.; Mellish, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure liquid rocket engine design, performance, weight, envelope, and operational characteristics were evaluated for a variety of candidate engines for use in mixed-mode, single-stage-to-orbit applications. Propellant property and performance data were obtained for candidate Mode 1 fuels which included: RP-1, RJ-5, hydrazine, monomethyl-hydrazine, and methane. The common oxidizer was liquid oxygen. Oxygen, the candidate Mode 1 fuels, and hydrogen were evaluated as thrust chamber coolants. Oxygen, methane, and hydrogen were found to be the most viable cooling candidates. Water, lithium, and sodium-potassium were also evaluated as auxiliary coolant systems. Water proved to be the best of these, but the system was heavier than those systems which cooled with the engine propellants. Engine weight and envelope parametric data were established for candidate Mode 1, Mode 2, and dual-fuel engines. Delivered engine performance data were also calculated for all candidate Mode 1 and dual-fuel engines.

  18. Advanced engine study for mixed-mode orbit-transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Engine design, performance, weight and envelope data were established for three mixed-mode orbit-transfer vehicle engine candidates. Engine concepts evaluated are the tripropellant, dual-expander and plug cluster. Oxygen, RP-1 and hydrogen are the propellants considered for use in these engines. Theoretical performance and propellant properties were established for bipropellant and tripropellant mixes of these propellants. RP-1, hydrogen and oxygen were evaluated as coolants and the maximum attainable chamber pressures were determined for each engine concept within the constraints of the propellant properties and the low cycle thermal fatigue (300 cycles) requirement. The baseline engine design and component operating characteristics are determined at a thrust level of 88,964N (20,000 lbs) and a thrust split of 0.5. The parametric data is generated over ranges of thrust and thrust split of 66.7 to 400kN (15 to 90 klb) and 0.4 to 0.8, respectively.

  19. Mixed-mode oscillations and chaos in return maps of an oscillatory chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, S. N.; Čupić, Ž.; Ivanović-Šašić, A.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2015-12-01

    The return maps, as an element of mathematical phenomenology appropriate for general examinations of complex dynamic states of the oscillatory systems were used to detect and explain the evolution of mixed-mode oscillations and chaos in a six-dimensional nonlinear reaction system of the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) reaction, a well-studied nonlinear chemical reaction system that exhibits complex dynamic behavior. For this purpose principally different Poincaré sections were applied and different transition scenarios between periodic and aperiodic states were examined by numerical simulations. It is shown that emergence of new periodic patterns can be detected by return maps already within chaotic windows. Besides, we also show that the higher dimensionality of manifold gives the impression of having several layers of manifolds.

  20. Does age matter? The influence of age on response rates in a mixed-mode survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Dietsch, Alia

    2014-01-01

    The appeal of cost savings and faster results has fish and wildlife management agencies considering the use of Internet surveys instead of traditional mail surveys to collect information from their constituents. Internet surveys, however, may suffer from differential age-related response rates, potentially producing biased results if certain age groups respond to Internet surveys differently than they do to mail surveys. We examined this concern using data from a mixed-mode angler survey conducted in South Dakota following the 2011 fishing season. Results indicated that young anglers (16–18) had the lowest return rates and senior anglers (65+) had the highest, regardless of survey mode. Despite this consistency in response rates, we note two concerns: (a) lower Internet response rates and (b) different age groups represented by the Internet and mail survey samples differed dramatically. Findings indicate that constituent groups may be represented differently with the use of various survey modes.

  1. A Medium-Format, Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector for Kilohertz X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, M. W.; Chamberlain, D.; Green, K. S.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Strohman, C.; Gruner, S. M.

    2013-03-01

    An x-ray pixel array detector (PAD) capable of framing up to 1 kHz is described. This hybrid detector is constructed from a 3-side buttable, 128×128 pixel module based upon the mixed-mode pixel array detector (MMPAD) chip developed jointly by Cornell and Area Detector Systems Corporation (Poway, CA). The chip uses a charge integrating front end for a high instantaneous count rate yet with single photon sensitivity. In-pixel circuitry utilizing a digital overflow counter extends the per frame dynamic range to >4×107 x-rays/pixel. Results are shown from a base configuration of a 2×3 module array (256×384 pixels).

  2. Mixed-Mode Oscillations of El Niño–Southern Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Andrew; Guckenheimer, John; Widiasih, Esther; Timmermann, Axel; Jones, Christopher K. R. T.

    2016-04-01

    Very strong El Ni\\~no events occur sporadically every 10-20 years. The origin of this bursting behavior still remains elusive. Using a simplified 3-dimensional dynamical model of the tropical Pacific climate system, which captures the El Ni\\~no-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) combined with recently developed mathematical tools for fast-slow systems we show that decadal ENSO bursting behavior can be explained as a Mixed Mode Oscillation (MMO), which also predicts a critical threshold for rapid amplitude growth. It is hypothesized that the MMO dynamics of the low-dimensional climate model can be linked to a saddle-focus equilibrium point, which mimics a tropical Pacific Ocean state without ocean circulation.

  3. Glutathione-based zwitterionic stationary phase for hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange mixed-mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aijin; Li, Xiuling; Dong, Xuefang; Wei, Jie; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-11-01

    As a naturally hydrophilic peptide, glutathione was facilely immobilized onto silica surface to obtain a novel hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange mixed-mode chromatographic stationary phase (Click TE-GSH) via copper-free "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The resulting material was characterized by solid state (13)C/CP MAS NMR and elemental analysis. The measurement of ζ-potential indicated the cation-exchange characteristics and adjustable surface charge density of Click TE-GSH material. The influence of acetonitrile content and pH value on the retention of ionic compounds was investigated for understanding the chromatographic behaviors. The results demonstrated that Click TE-GSH column could provide both hydrophilic and cation-exchange interaction. Taking advantage of the good hydrophilicity and inherent cation-exchange characteristics of Click TE-GSH material, the resolution of neutral fructosan with high degree of polymerization (DP), basic chitooligosaccharides and strongly acidic carrageenan oligosaccharides was successfully realized in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange mixed-mode chromatography (HILIC/CEX), cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) and electrostatic repulsion/hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC). On the other hand, the separation of standard peptides varying in hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and charge was achieved in both CEX and HILIC/CEX mode with high efficiency and distinct selectivity. To further demonstrate the versatility and applicability of Click TE-GSH stationary phase, the separation of a human serum albumin (HSA) tryptic digest was performed in HILIC/CEX mode. Peptides were adequately resolved and up to 86 HSA peptides were identified with sequence coverage of 85%. The results indicated the good potential of Click TE-GSH material in glycomics and proteomics. PMID:24075460

  4. Study of catalase adsorption on two mixed-mode ligands and the mechanism involved therein.

    PubMed

    Shiva Ranjini, S; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2012-11-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography sorbents n-hexylamine HyperCel™ (HEA) and phenylpropylamine HyperCel™ (PPA) were evaluated for the study of adsorption of catalase from two different sources. Various parameters such as buffer composition, ionic strength and pH were investigated to study the mechanism of interaction of commercially available pre-purified catalase from Bovine liver, purified catalase from black gram (Vigna mungo) and crude extract of black gram containing catalase with these mixed-mode ligands. A simple and economical screening protocol for identifying optimal buffer conditions for adsorption and desorption of catalase was established with micro volumes of the sorbent in batch mode. With HEA HyperCel, it was observed that pre-purified catalase from both bovine liver and black gram was completely retained at pH 7.0, irrespective of the presence or absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer, whereas the catalase from crude extract of black gram was completely retained only in the presence of 0.2 M salt in the adsorption buffer. The elution of catalase from both the sources was accomplished by lowering the pH to 4.5 in absence of salt. In case of PPA HyperCel, catalase from both the sources was very strongly adsorbed under different buffer conditions studied, and elution did not yield a significant catalase activity. From the screening experiments, it could be concluded that the interaction of catalase with HEA HyperCel could be dominated by hydrophobic forces with minor contributions from ionic interaction and with PPA HyperCel, it could be a combination of different non-covalent interactions acting on different loci on the surface of the protein. PMID:23108613

  5. Piecewise-linear Bonhoeffer-van der Pol dynamics explaining mixed-mode oscillation-incrementing bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kuniyasu; Inaba, Naohiko

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) generated by weakly driven piecewise-linear Bonhoeffer-van der Pol and Fitzhugh-Nagumo dynamics. Such a simple piecewise-linear oscillator can generate extremely complex MMO bifurcations such as mixed-mode oscillation-incrementing bifurcations (MMOIBs) and intermittently chaotic MMOs. These remarkable bifurcations are confirmed using explicit solutions of the piecewise-linear differential equation. Moreover, Lorenz plots are introduced, which strongly suggest that MMOIBs occur successively many times, and show that each MMO sequence is surrounded by chaos.

  6. Rift propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Schubert, G.

    1989-01-01

    A model for rift propagation which treats the rift as a crack in an elastic plate which is filled from beneath by upwelling viscous asthenosphere as it lengthens and opens. Growth of the crack is driven by either remotely applied forces or the pressure of buoyant asthenosphere in the crack and is resisted by viscous stresses associated with filling the crack. The model predicts a time for a rift to form which depends primarily on the driving stress and asthenosphere viscosity. For a driving stress on the order of 10 MPa, as expected from the topography of rifted swells, the development of rifts over times of a few Myr requires an asthenosphere viscosity of 10 to the 16th Pa s (10 to the 17th poise). This viscosity, which is several orders of magnitude less than values determined by postglacial rebound and at least one order of magnitude less than that inferred for spreading center propagation, may reflect a high temperature or large amount of partial melting in the mantle beneath a rifted swell.

  7. The NT-criterion for predicting crack growth increments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yehia, Nabil A. B.; Shephard, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach is presented to determine the crack propagation increment after the direction of crack propagation has been predicted. The maximum dilatational strain energy density (NT-criterion) is employed in the derivation for predicting both direction and increment of the propagating crack. The crack propagation path predicted by the NT-criterion is compared to the one predicted by the S-criterion and to some available experimental data.

  8. Learning Environment Associated with Use of Mixed Mode Delivery Model among Secondary Business Studies Students in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Noi Keng; Fraser, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    At many teacher education institutes around the world, preservice teachers are empowered to use pedagogical tools and strategies that engage their students. We used a modified version of the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) to evaluate the effectiveness of a pedagogical model known as the Mixed Mode Delivery (MMD) model in terms…

  9. Evaluation of mixed-mode chromatographic resins for separating IgG from serum albumin containing feedstock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Zhu; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Tong, Hong-Fei; Lu, Hui-Li; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2013-10-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography has been focused as a cost-effective new technique for antibody purification. In this study, four mixed-mode resins with N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanol amine, 2-benzamido-4-mercaptobutanoic acide, 4-mercapto-ethyl-pyridine and phenylpropylamine as the ligands were tested and the multi-functional interactions between ligand and protein were discussed. Immunoglobulin G (IgG), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the binary mixture of BSA and IgG were used as the model feedstock to compare the separation behaviors by pH gradient elution. The comparison analysis showed mixed-mode resin with N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanol amine as the ligand had the best ability to separate IgG and BSA. The results indicated that for four resins tested ionic interaction might play the dominant role in the separation of IgG and BSA while the hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding have some subsidiary effects. The pH stepwise elution and sample loading were optimized to improve the IgG purification from serum albumin containing feedstock. High purity (92.3%) and high recovery (95.6%) of IgG were obtained. The results indicated that mixed-mode chromatography would be a potential option for antibody purification with the control of loading and elution conditions. PMID:23973532

  10. [Simultaneous determination of iodide and thiocyanate powdered milk using ion chromatography with mixed-mode column].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yu; Liang, Lina

    2010-04-01

    The contents of iodide and thiocyanate are important detection items in powdered milk quality testing. Due to the complexity of the powdered milk matrix, chromatographic analysis is easily subjected to interference. Acclaim Mixed-Mode WAX-1 column incorporated both hydrophobic and weak anion-exchange properties was used to separate iodide and thiocyanate from interfering substances in powdered milk matrix, and detected by Ultraviolet (UV) detection. After powdered milk was dissolved in water, the protein was precipitated by acetonitrile. Then OnGuard RP pre-treatment column was used to remove the organic matters which might pollute the column. The eluent was acetonitrile-100 mmol/L phosphate buffer (pH 6)-water (45:5:50,v/v/v). The UV detection wavelength was 226 nm. The limits of detection of iodide and thiocyanate were 4.6 microg/L and 13.8 microg/L respectively, and the relative standard deviations of peak areas were 1.2% (n = 6) and 1.7% (n = 6) for 0.2 mg/L iodide and thiocyanate standard solutions. The method is accurate and reliable, and has wide linear range, low limit of detection. This method provides a viable approach for powdered milk quality dairy products. PMID:20712128

  11. Calixarene ionic liquid modified silica gel: A novel stationary phase for mixed-mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Zhang, Wenfen; Yang, Huaixia; Cui, Yongxia; Zhang, Jingya; Zhao, Wenjie; Yu, Ajuan; Zhang, Shusheng

    2016-05-15

    A novel calixarene ionic liquid functionalized silica material was synthesized by the preparation of a new calixarene monomer and its grafting on mercaptopropyl modified silica gel. The material was characterized by infrared spectra, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. To explore the retention mechanism of the stationary phase, linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) equation as an effective mathematical model was used. In addition to this, the distinct separation mechanisms were outlined by selected examples of chromatographic separations in the different modes. In reversed-phase liquid chromatography, this new stationary phase presented specific chromatographic performance when evaluated using alkylbenzenes, PAHs and phenols as solutes. Due to the existing polar functional groups, this stationary phase can also be used in hydrophilic interaction chromatography, six nucleosides and four ginsenosides were separated successfully in hydrophilic mode. Furthermore, anions can be separated on the column in anion exchange mode. Thus, this new material was can be applied as a new kind of mixed-mode stationary phase in liquid chromatography, which allows an exceptionally flexible adjustment of retention and selectivity by tuning the experimental conditions. PMID:26992535

  12. Fast core rotation in red-giant stars as revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul G; Montalban, Josefina; Kallinger, Thomas; De Ridder, Joris; Aerts, Conny; García, Rafael A; Hekker, Saskia; Dupret, Marc-Antoine; Mosser, Benoit; Eggenberger, Patrick; Stello, Dennis; Elsworth, Yvonne; Frandsen, Søren; Carrier, Fabien; Hillen, Michel; Gruberbauer, Michael; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Miglio, Andrea; Valentini, Marica; Bedding, Timothy R; Kjeldsen, Hans; Girouard, Forrest R; Hall, Jennifer R; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A

    2012-01-01

    When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant. Convection takes place over much of the star's radius. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars rotate faster than their envelopes; indirect evidence supports this. Information about the angular-momentum distribution is inaccessible to direct observations, but it can be extracted from the effect of rotation on oscillation modes that probe the stellar interior. Here we report an increasing rotation rate from the surface of the star to the stellar core in the interiors of red giants, obtained using the rotational frequency splitting of recently detected 'mixed modes'. By comparison with theoretical stellar models, we conclude that the core must rotate at least ten times faster than the surface. This observational result confirms the theoretical prediction of a steep gradient in the rotation profile towards the deep stellar interior. PMID:22158105

  13. Neural networks with dynamical synapses: From mixed-mode oscillations and spindles to chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Goltsev, A. V.; Lopes, M. A.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of short-term synaptic depression (STSD) and other forms of synaptic plasticity is a topical problem in neuroscience. Here we study the role of STSD in the formation of complex patterns of brain rhythms. We use a cortical circuit model of neural networks composed of irregular spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons having type 1 and 2 excitability and stochastic dynamics. In the model, neurons form a sparsely connected network and their spontaneous activity is driven by random spikes representing synaptic noise. Using simulations and analytical calculations, we found that if the STSD is absent, the neural network shows either asynchronous behavior or regular network oscillations depending on the noise level. In networks with STSD, changing parameters of synaptic plasticity and the noise level, we observed transitions to complex patters of collective activity: mixed-mode and spindle oscillations, bursts of collective activity, and chaotic behavior. Interestingly, these patterns are stable in a certain range of the parameters and separated by critical boundaries. Thus, the parameters of synaptic plasticity can play a role of control parameters or switchers between different network states. However, changes of the parameters caused by a disease may lead to dramatic impairment of ongoing neural activity. We analyze the chaotic neural activity by use of the 0-1 test for chaos (Gottwald, G. & Melbourne, I., 2004) and show that it has a collective nature.

  14. Capto MMC mixed-mode chromatography of murine and rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Storms, Michael; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Okumura, C J; Kita, Yoshiko

    2016-11-01

    Murine antibodies have weak affinity for Protein-A. Here, we have tested binding of murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Protein-A or Protein-A/Protein-G mixture under salting-out conditions. The addition of ammonium sulfate to HEK conditioned medium (CM) expressing murine mAb resulted in complete binding, leading to its elution by low pH or neutral arginine solution. Alternatively, a mixed-mode chromatography using Capto MMC resin was developed as a capture step. Binding of murine mAb occurred at neutral pH. The bound mAb was eluted with a gradient from 0.3 M NaCl to 0.3 M arginine/0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.0. The Capto MMC-purified murine mAb was further purified by hydroxyl apatite chromatography. Similarly, rabbit mAb was processed with some modifications. Binding of rabbit mAb to Capto MMC required a lower pH. Elution of the bound rabbit mAb was achieved by a gradient to 0.3 M NaCl, pH 7.0. PMID:27444249

  15. A concise model for mixed-mode phase transformations in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Sietsma, Jilt; Zwaag, Sybrand van der

    2004-08-16

    Using a Zener-like approach, the character of partitioning mixed-mode phase transformations in the solid state is shown to be governed by a single parameter Z. The parameter is proportional to the diffusivity of the partitioning element and the area-to-volume ratio of the growing grain, and inversely proportional to the interface mobility and to the driving pressure per unit of concentration difference. A value Z=0 implies a diffusion-controlled transformation, for Z{yields}{infinity} the transformation is interface-controlled. The significance of the parameter, both for the character of the transformation and for the transformation kinetics, is shown by the example of the austenite-to-ferrite transformation in iron-carbon alloys. A remarkable outcome is that all phase transformations start as an interface-controlled transformation and with proceeding growth of the newly forming phase gradually shift towards diffusion control. This gradual change in transformation character is accompanied by a gradual decrease of the interface velocity.

  16. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Philipp, Hugh T.; Wilke, Robin N.; Aquila, Andrew; Osterhoff, Markus; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Salditt, Tim; Gruner, Sol M.; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 108 8-keV photons pixel−1 s−1, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 1010 photons µm−2 s−1 within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described. PMID:25178008

  17. Complementary HFET technology for low-power mixed-mode applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Zolper, J.C.; Dubbert, D.F.; Hietala, V.M.; Shul, R.J.; Sloan, L.R.; Hafich, M.J.

    1996-06-01

    Development of a complementary heterostructure field effect transistor (CHFET) technology for low-power, mixed-mode digital-microwave applications is presented. An earlier digital CHFET technology with independently optimizable transistors which operated with 319 ps loaded gate delays at 8.9 fJ is reviewed. Then work demonstrating the applicability of the digital nJFET device as a low-power microwave transistor in a hybrid microwave amplifier without any modification to the digital process is presented. A narrow band amplifier with a 0.7 {times} 100 {micro}m nJFET as the active element was designed, constructed, and tested. At 1 mW operating power, the amplifier showed 9.7 dB of gain at 2.15 GHz and a minimum noise figure of 2.5 dB. In addition, next generation CHFET transistors with sub 0.5 {micro}m gate lengths were developed. Cutoff frequencies, f{sub t} of 49 GHz and 11.5 GHz were achieved for n- and p-channel FETs with 0.3 and 0.4 {micro}m gates, respectively. These FETs will enable both digital and microwave circuits with enhanced performance.

  18. Mixed mode and sequential oscillations in the cerium-bromate-4-aminophenol photoreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Jeffrey G.; Wang Jichang

    2013-09-15

    Cerium was introduced to the bromate-aminophenol photochemical oscillator to implement coupled autocatalytic feedbacks. Mixed mode and sequential oscillations emerged in the studied system, making it one of the few chemical oscillators known to support consecutive bifurcations in a batch system. The complex reaction behavior showed a strong dependence on the intensity of illumination supplied to the system. Removal of illumination during an oscillatory window affected both the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation but did not fully extinguish them, indicating that the cerium-bromate-4-aminophenol oscillator was photosensitive rather than photo-controlled. A moderate light intensity allowed for a slow evolution of the system, which proved to be critical for the emergence of transient complex oscillations. Variation of individual reaction parameters was carried out, which indicated that the development of complex oscillations occur in a narrow region and a phase diagram in the 4-aminophenol and sulfuric acid plane demonstrated this. Simulations provide strong support that transient complex oscillations observed experimentally arise from the coupling of two autocatalytic cycles.

  19. Drying characteristic of barley under natural convection in a mixed-mode type solar grain dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M.A.; Abe, T.

    1999-07-01

    Thin-layer solar drying characteristics of barley were determined at average natural air flow temperature ranging from 43.4 to 51.7 C and for relative humidities ranging from 16.5% to 37.5%. A mixed-mode type natural convection solar dryer was used for this experiment. The data of sample weight, and dry and wet bulb temperatures of the drying air were recorded continuously throughout the drying period for each test. The drying data were then fitted to the Page model. The model gave a good fit for the moisture content with an average standard error of 0.305% dry basis. The parameter N in Page's equation was assumed as a product-dependent constant which made it easy to compare the effects of independent variables on the natural convection solar drying rate without causing considerable error in predicting the drying rate for barley. A linear relationship was found between the parameter K, temperature T, and relative humidity R{sub H}.

  20. Mixed mode and sequential oscillations in the cerium-bromate-4-aminophenol photoreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Jichang

    2013-09-01

    Cerium was introduced to the bromate-aminophenol photochemical oscillator to implement coupled autocatalytic feedbacks. Mixed mode and sequential oscillations emerged in the studied system, making it one of the few chemical oscillators known to support consecutive bifurcations in a batch system. The complex reaction behavior showed a strong dependence on the intensity of illumination supplied to the system. Removal of illumination during an oscillatory window affected both the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation but did not fully extinguish them, indicating that the cerium-bromate-4-aminophenol oscillator was photosensitive rather than photo-controlled. A moderate light intensity allowed for a slow evolution of the system, which proved to be critical for the emergence of transient complex oscillations. Variation of individual reaction parameters was carried out, which indicated that the development of complex oscillations occur in a narrow region and a phase diagram in the 4-aminophenol and sulfuric acid plane demonstrated this. Simulations provide strong support that transient complex oscillations observed experimentally arise from the coupling of two autocatalytic cycles.

  1. Mixed-mode oscillations and population bursting in the pre-Bötzinger complex

    PubMed Central

    Bacak, Bartholomew J; Kim, Taegyo; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on computational and theoretical investigations of neuronal activity arising in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), a medullary region generating the inspiratory phase of breathing in mammals. A progressive increase of neuronal excitability in medullary slices containing the pre-BötC produces mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) characterized by large amplitude population bursts alternating with a series of small amplitude bursts. Using two different computational models, we demonstrate that MMOs emerge within a heterogeneous excitatory neural network because of progressive neuronal recruitment and synchronization. The MMO pattern depends on the distributed neuronal excitability, the density and weights of network interconnections, and the cellular properties underlying endogenous bursting. Critically, the latter should provide a reduction of spiking frequency within neuronal bursts with increasing burst frequency and a dependence of the after-burst recovery period on burst amplitude. Our study highlights a novel mechanism by which heterogeneity naturally leads to complex dynamics in rhythmic neuronal populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13403.001 PMID:26974345

  2. Mixed-mode oscillations in a stochastic, piecewise-linear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. J. W.; Kuske, R.

    2011-07-01

    We analyse a piecewise-linear FitzHugh-Nagumo model. The system exhibits a canard near which both small amplitude and large amplitude periodic orbits exist. The addition of small noise induces mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) in the vicinity of the canard point. We determine the effect of each model parameter on the stochastically driven MMOs. In particular we show that any parameter variation (such as a modification of the piecewise-linear function in the model) that leaves the ratio of noise amplitude to time-scale separation unchanged typically has little effect on the width of the interval of the primary bifurcation parameter over which MMOs occur. In that sense, the MMOs are robust. Furthermore, we show that the piecewise-linear model exhibits MMOs more readily than the classical FitzHugh-Nagumo model for which a cubic polynomial is the only nonlinearity. By studying a piecewise-linear model, we are able to explain results using analytical expressions and compare these with numerical investigations.

  3. Effect of adherend thickness and mixed mode loading on debond growth in adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Johnson, W. S.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Symmetric and unsymmetric double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were tested and analyzed to assess the effect of: (1) adherend thickness, and (2) a predominantly mode I mixed mode loading on cyclic debond growth and static fracture toughness. The specimens were made of unidirectional composite (T300/5208) adherends bonded together with EC3445 structural adhesive. The thickness was 8, 16, or 24 plies. The experimental results indicated that the static fracture toughness increases and the cyclic debond growth rate decreases with increasing adherend thickness. This behavior was related to the length of the plastic zone ahead of the debond tip. For the symmetric DCB specimens, it was further found that displacement control tests resulted in higher debond growth rates than did load control tests. While the symmetric DCB tests always resulted in cohesive failures in the bondline, the unsymmetric DCB tests resulted in the debond growing into the thinner adherend and the damage progressing as delamination in that adherend. This behavior resulted in much lower fracture toughness and damage growth rates than found in the symmetric DCB tests.

  4. A Criterion to Control Nonlinear Error in the Mixed-Mode Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending test ha: been widely used to measure delamination toughness and was recently standardized by ASTM as Standard Test Method D6671-01. This simple test is a combination of the standard Mode I (opening) test and a Mode II (sliding) test. This test uses a unidirectional composite test specimen with an artificial delamination subjected to bending loads to characterize when a delamination will extend. When the displacements become large, the linear theory used to analyze the results of the test yields errors in the calcu1ated toughness values. The current standard places no limit on the specimen loading and therefore test data can be created using the standard that are significantly in error. A method of limiting the error that can be incurred in the calculated toughness values is needed. In this paper, nonlinear models of the MMB test are refined. One of the nonlinear models is then used to develop a simple criterion for prescribing conditions where thc nonlinear error will remain below 5%.

  5. Stationary Crossflow Breakdown due to Mixed Mode Spectra of Secondary Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Duan, Lian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to study laminar breakdown characteristics associated with stationary crossflow instability in the boundary-layer flow over a subsonic swept-wing configuration. Previous work involving the linear and nonlinear development of individual, fundamental modes of secondary instability waves is extended by considering the role of more complex, yet controlled, spectra of the secondary instability modes. Direct numerical simulations target a mixed mode transition scenario involving the simultaneous presence of Y and Z modes of secondary instability. For the initial amplitudes investigated in this paper, the Y modes are found to play an insignificant role during the onset of transition, in spite of achieving rather large, O(5%), amplitudes of RMS velocity fluctuation prior to transition. Analysis of the numerical simulations shows that this rather surprising finding can be attributed to the fact that the Y modes are concentrated near the top of the crossflow vortex and exert relatively small influence on the Z modes that reside closer to the surface and can lead to transition via nonlinear spreading that does not involve interactions with the Y mode. Finally, secondary instability calculations reveal that subharmonic modes of secondary instability have substantially lower growth rates than those of the fundamental modes, and hence, are less likely to play an important role during the breakdown process involving complex initial spectra.

  6. Assessment of the stress corrosion cracking in a chloride medium of cables used in prestressed concrete structures by the acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, two main types of corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cables used in prestressed concrete structures, were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using extracted AE parameters. A novel analysis of the AE parameters using the principal component analysis (PCA) was done to discriminate localized corrosion from SCC. First, K-mean was used as an unsupervised method, and then to validate the clustering analysis k-nearest neighbour was used as a supervised method. The correlations of the AE parameters including amplitude, counts, hits and time were also used to identify corrosion mechanisms. In addition, the corrosion process characteristics of each type were explained by applying the AE signal analysis (time-frequency). Experimental results show the ability of AE to evaluate a crack propagation rate of 10-7 m s-1 in a chloride medium. Microscopic examinations revealed a mixed mode of crack propagation, modes I (shear-like mechanism) and II (cleavage-like mechanism), characterized by a multi-terrace appearance on the fractured steel surface.

  7. Surface crack problems in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1989-01-01

    The mode I crack problem in plates under membrane loading and bending is reconsidered. The purpose is to examine certain analytical features of the problem further and to provide some new results. The formulation and the results given by the classical and the Reissner plate theories for through and part-through cracks are compared. For surface cracks the three-dimensional finite element solution is used as the basis of comparison. The solution is obtained and results are given for the crack/contact problem in a plate with a through crack under pure bending and for the crack interaction problem. Also, a procedure is developed to treat the problem of subcritical crack growth and to trace the evolution of the propagating crack.

  8. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  9. A mixed-mode resin with tryptamine ligand for human serum albumin separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi-Ci; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-01-29

    Mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) is a new technology that uses specially-designed ligands to improve the adsorption selectivity with multimodal protein-ligand interactions for protein separation. A new MMC resin TA-B-6FF with tryptamine as the functional ligand was prepared and used for human serum albumin (HSA) separation. Adsorption equilibria of plasma-derived HSA (pHSA) were investigated and compared with a commercial tryptophan-based resin (MX-Trp-650m), and the influence of pH and salt addition was studied. The results showed that weak acidic conditions (pH 5.0-7.0) were favorable for HSA adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity of TA-B-6FF was 141.33mg/g at pH 5.0, which was two times higher than that of MX-Trp-650m. TA-B-6FF also showed better salt-tolerance than MX-Trp-650m. Moreover, TA-B-6FF was used to separate recombinant HSA (rHSA) from Pichia pastoris culture broth. The results indicated that rHSA could be directly captured by TA-B-6FF without dilution or pH adjustment. High purity (87.75%) of rHSA monomer could be obtained with a recovery of 98.53% through two-step elution process. Total content of rHSA monomer and degraded fragment was 99.75%, the removal of host cell proteins reached about 90%. The results demonstrate that new TA-B-6FF resin has a great potential for rHSA purification directly from the complex fermentation broth. PMID:26772961

  10. Singular Hopf bifurcations and mixed-mode oscillations in a two-cell inhibitory neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtu, Rodica

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of a firing rate model for neural competition as observed in binocular rivalry and central pattern generators [R. Curtu, A. Shpiro, N. Rubin, J. Rinzel, Mechanisms for frequency control in neuronal competition models, SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst. 7 (2) (2008) 609-649] showed that the variation of the stimulus strength parameter can lead to rich and interesting dynamics. Several types of behavior were identified such as: fusion, equivalent to a steady state of identical activity levels for both neural units; oscillations due to either an escape or a release mechanism; and a winner-take-all state of bistability. The model consists of two neural populations interacting through reciprocal inhibition, each endowed with a slow negative-feedback process in the form of spike frequency adaptation. In this paper we report the occurrence of another complex oscillatory pattern, the mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs). They exist in the model at the transition between the relaxation oscillator dynamical regime and the winner-take-all regime. The system distinguishes itself from other neuronal models where MMOs were found by the following interesting feature: there is no autocatalysis involved (as in the examples of voltage-gated persistent inward currents and/or intrapopulation recurrent excitation) and therefore the two cells in the network are not intrinsic oscillators; the oscillations are instead a combined result of the mutual inhibition and the adaptation. We prove that the MMOs are due to a singular Hopf bifurcation point situated in close distance to the transition point to the winner-take-all case. We also show that in the vicinity of the singular Hopf other types of bifurcations exist and we construct numerically the corresponding diagrams.

  11. Mechanism and Function of Mixed-Mode Oscillations in Vibrissa Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, David

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissa motoneurons in the facial nucleus innervate the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles that move the whiskers. Their intrinsic properties affect the way they process fast synaptic input from the vIRT and Bötzinger nuclei together with serotonergic neuromodulation. In response to constant current (Iapp) injection, vibrissa motoneurons may respond with mixed mode oscillations (MMOs), in which sub-threshold oscillations (STOs) are intermittently mixed with spikes. This study investigates the mechanisms involved in generating MMOs in vibrissa motoneurons and their function in motor control. It presents a conductance-based model that includes the M-type K+ conductance, gM, the persistent Na+ conductance, gNaP, and the cationic h conductance, gh. For gh = 0 and moderate values of gM and gNaP, the model neuron generates STOs, but not MMOs, in response to Iapp injection. STOs transform abruptly to tonic spiking as the current increases. In addition to STOs, MMOs are generated for gh>0 for larger values of Iapp; the Iapp range in which MMOs appear increases linearly with gh. In the MMOs regime, the firing rate increases with Iapp like a Devil's staircase. Stochastic noise disrupts the temporal structure of the MMOs, but for a moderate noise level, the coefficient of variation (CV) is much less than one and varies non-monotonically with Iapp. Furthermore, the estimated time period between voltage peaks, based on Bernoulli process statistics, is much higher in the MMOs regime than in the tonic regime. These two phenomena do not appear when moderate noise generates MMOs without an intrinsic MMO mechanism. Therefore, and since STOs do not appear in spinal motoneurons, the analysis can be used to differentiate different MMOs mechanisms. MMO firing activity in vibrissa motoneurons suggests a scenario in which moderate periodic inputs from the vIRT and Bötzinger nuclei control whisking frequency, whereas serotonergic neuromodulation controls whisking amplitude. PMID

  12. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  13. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  14. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to ‘endodontic triad’. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. Aim To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each – a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL –1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by ‘Phi’ and ‘Cramers’ test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at p< 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Stainless steel hand file group showed most cracks followed by ProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed

  16. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  17. Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Properties of Woven Glass/Epoxy Composite Laminates Under Mixed-Mode I/III Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Takeda, Tomo; Narita, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    We characterize the combined Mode I and Mode III delamination fracture behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates at cryogenic temperatures. The eight-point bending plate (8PBP) tests were conducted at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K) using a new test fixture. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was also performed to calculate the energy release rate distribution along the delamination front, and the delamination fracture toughnesses were evaluated for various mixed-mode I/III ratios. Furthermore, the microscopic examinations of the fracture surfaces were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the mixed-mode I/III delamination fracture mechanisms in the woven GFRP laminates at cryogenic temperatures were assessed. The fracture properties were then correlated with the observed characteristics.

  18. The advantage of mixed-mode separation in the first dimension of comprehensive two-dimensional liquid-chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Duxin; Dück, Roman; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensive two-dimension liquid chromatography (LC×LC) has exhibited its powerful ability to separate complex samples. However, the use of a single chromatographic mode in 1st dimension has been limited to the separation of components by their individual characteristics, such as hydrophobicity, ionic properties etc. The use of mixed-mode stationary phases has revealed opportunities to combine different retention mechanisms. In this respect, stationary phases featuring both RP-like hydrophobic and ion-exchange interactive sites promise great versatility in retaining both polar and more apolar ionic and non-ionic compounds. We have therefore developed an LC×LC system based on mixed-mode (strong anion exchange and reversed phase) in the first dimension and a C18 phase in the second dimension. The system has been evaluated with standard compounds and applied for the separation of white wine and Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM). The mixed-mode system SAX-PFP×C18 results in a better separation than a single mode system such as SAX×C18 or PFP×C18. Although little improvement in orthogonality (0.91 instead 0.86) is achieved with SAX×C18, the mixed-mode SAX-PFP×C18 gives a much larger effective peak distribution area in the analysis of e. g. white wine. But the analysis of aqueous extracts of CHM (Hdyotis diffusa and Scutellaria barbata) with SAX-PFP×RP leads to a very long analysis time because of strong hydrophobic interactions with the PFP column. Thus, the system was changed by using a cyano phase instead of a PFP phase. The improved SAX-CN×C18 system shows a better peak distribution and more importantly a reasonable analysis time. PMID:25042443

  19. Effect of Mixed-Mode Ratio on Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Woven Fabric Glass/Epoxy Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Y.; Horiguchi, K.; Kumagai, S.; Shinohe, D.

    2004-06-28

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental and analytical study conducted to investigate the effect of mixed-mode ratio on the cryogenic interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric glass/epoxy laminates. Interlaminar fracture tests were performed and a three-dimensional finite element analysis was carried out to obtain critical strain energy release rates. The cryogenic interlaminar fracture toughness increased upon the introduction of the mode II component.

  20. Determination of propofol glucuronide from hair sample by using mixed mode anion exchange cartridge and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hye Kyung; Choe, Sanggil; In, Sangwhan; Pyo, Jae Sung

    2016-03-15

    The main objective of this study was to develop and validate a simpler and less time consuming analytical method for determination of propofol glucuronide from hair sample, by using mixed mode anion exchange cartridge and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The study uses propofol glucuronide, a major metabolite of propofol, as a marker for propofol abuse. The hair sample was digested in sodium hydroxide solution and loaded in mixed-mode anion cartridge for solid phase extraction. Water and ethyl acetate were used as washing solvents to remove interfering substances from the hair sample. Consequently, 2% formic acid in ethyl acetate was employed to elute propofol glucuronide from the sorbent of mixed-mode anion cartridge, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The method validation parameters such as selectivity, specificity, LOD, LLOQ, accuracy, precision, recovery, and matrix effect were also tested. The linearity of calibration curves showed good correlation, with correlation coefficient 0.998. The LOD and LLOQ of the propofol glucuronide were 0.2 pg/mg and 0.5 pg/mg, respectively. The intra and inter-day precision and accuracy were acceptable within 15%. The mean values of recovery and matrix effect were in the range of 91.7-98.7% and 87.5-90.3%, respectively, signifying that the sample preparation, washing and extraction procedure were efficient, and there was low significant hair matrix effect for the extraction of propofol glucuronide from hair sample on the mixed mode anion cartridge. To evaluate the suitability of method, the hair of propofol administered rat was successfully analyzed with this method. PMID:26946424