Science.gov

Sample records for mixer overblow testing

  1. Pulse Jet Mixer Overblow Testing for Assessment of Loadings During Multiple Overblows

    SciTech Connect

    Pfund, David M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Michener, Thomas E.; Nigl, Franz; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Leigh, Richard J.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Baumann, Aaron W.; Kurath, Dean E.; Hoza, Mark; Combs, William H.; Fort, James A.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-07-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. The WTP consists of three primary facilities: pretreatment, low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification, and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The pretreatment facility will receive waste feed from the Hanford tank farms and separate it into 1) a high-volume, low-activity liquid stream stripped of most solids and radionuclides and 2) a much smaller volume of HLW slurry containing most of the solids and most of the radioactivity. Many of the vessels in the pretreatment facility will contain pulse jet mixers (PJMs) that will provide some or all of the mixing in the vessels. This technology was selected for use in so-called “black cell” regions of the WTP, where maintenance capability will not be available for the operating life of the WTP. PJM technology was selected for use in these regions because it has no moving mechanical parts that require maintenance. The vessels with the most concentrated slurries will also be mixed with air spargers and/or steady jets in addition to the mixing provided by the PJMs. This report contains the results of single and multiple PJM overblow tests conducted in a large, ~13 ft-diameter × 15-ft-tall tank located in the high bay of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 336 Building test facility. These single and multiple PJM overblow tests were conducted using water and a clay simulant to bound the lower and upper rheological properties of the waste streams anticipated to be processed in the WTP. Hydrodynamic pressures were measured at a number of locations in the test vessel using an array of nine pressure sensors and four hydrophones. These measurements were made under normal and limiting vessel operating conditions (i.e., maximum PJM fluid emptying velocity, maximum and minimum vessel

  2. Pulse Jet Mixer Overblow Testing for Assessment of Loadings During Multiple Overblows

    SciTech Connect

    Pfund, David M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Michener, Thomas E.; Nigl, Franz; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Leigh, Richard J.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Baumann, Aaron W.; Kurath, Dean E.; Hoza, Mark; Combs, William H.; Fort, James A.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2008-03-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. The WTP consists of three primary facilities: pretreatment, low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification, and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The pretreatment facility will receive waste feed from the Hanford tank farms and separate it into 1) a high-volume, low-activity liquid stream stripped of most solids and radionuclides and 2) a much smaller volume of HLW slurry containing most of the solids and most of the radioactivity. Many of the vessels in the pretreatment facility will contain pulse jet mixers (PJMs) that will provide some or all of the mixing in the vessels. This technology was selected for use in so-called “black cell” regions of the WTP, where maintenance capability will not be available for the operating life of the WTP. PJM technology was selected for use in these regions because it has no moving mechanical parts that require maintenance. The vessels with the most concentrated slurries will also be mixed with air spargers and/or steady jets in addition to the mixing provided by the PJMs. This report contains the results of single and multiple PJM overblow tests conducted in a large, ~13 ft-diameter × 15-ft-tall tank located in the high bay of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 336 Building test facility. These single and multiple PJM overblow tests were conducted using water and a clay simulant to bound the lower and upper rheological properties of the waste streams anticipated to be processed in the WTP. Hydrodynamic pressures were measured at a number of locations in the test vessel using an array of nine pressure sensors and four hydrophones. These measurements were made under normal and limiting vessel operating conditions (i.e., maximum PJM fluid emptying velocity, maximum and minimum vessel

  3. Phase C Flygt Mixer Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-06-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) teamed with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and ITT Flygt Corporation to conduct a test program evaluating shrouded axial propeller mixers (Flygt mixers) for heel removal in SRS Tank 19. SRS is identifying and investigating techniques to remove sludge heels from waste tanks such as Tank 19.

  4. Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    1999-05-12

    Mixer pump systems have been chosen as the method for retrieval of tank wastes contained in double shell tanks at Hanford. This document describes the plan for testing and demonstrating the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps to mobilize waste in tank AZ-101. The mixer pumps, equipment and instrumentation to monitor the test were installed by Project W-151.

  5. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Qualification Test Procedures (QTP)

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS, W.K.

    2000-01-10

    Describes the Qualification test procedure for the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Data Acquisition System (DAS). The purpose of this Qualification Test Procedure (QTP) is to confirm that the AZ-101 Mixer Pump System has been properly programmed and hardware configured correctly. This QTP will test the software setpoints for the alarms and also check the wiring configuration from the SIMcart to the HMI. An Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP), similar to this QTP will be performed to test field devices and connections from the field.

  6. Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, G.A.; Staehr, T.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has undertaken the task to develop and demonstrate a method of retrieval for double-shell tank (DST)waste. Mixer pumps were chosen as the planned method of retrieval for the DSTs, based on engineering technology studies,past experience with hydraulic sluicing at the Hanford Site, and experience with mixer pumps at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site. This document outlines a test plan to demonstrate the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps installed in the AZ-101 tank to mobilize waste.

  7. Qualification test of the Ross Double Planetary Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueders, Kurt F.

    1993-07-01

    This test report describes the qualification test of the Ross Double Planetary Mixer used to mix room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone (Dow Corning 90-006-2) for the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle joints. Testing was completed 18 June 1993 in the M-113A Nozzle Fabrication Facility at Thiokol Corporation, Space Operations, Brigham City, Utah. The Ross mixer provides better mixing and better control on temperature and humidity, resulting in better quality RTV and a longer usable pot life. The test began on 3 May 1993 and was stopped due to operator error during the tensile strength and elongation testing. Specimens were ruined without gathering any useful data. A 'no test' was declared, the problem was remedied, and the test was re-run with MSFC approval. The test was run and all pass/fail criteria were met, most with a considerable margin. The Ross Double Planetary Mixer met all certification objectives and is recommended for immediate use for mixing RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle joints.

  8. Jet mixer pump testing in Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    A mixer pump was found effective in controlling and possibly eliminating large flammable gas releases from Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. A gas release event (GRE) is initiated when gas-bearing sludge accumulates sufficient gas to become buoyant. The buoyant sludge pulls free from the surrounding material and rises to the surface releasing the trapped gas. Mixer pump operation is intended to keep gas-generating material in suspension so that it releases gas continuously instead of periodically in large, potentially dangerous GREs. A mixer pump was installed July 3, 1993, 7 days after a typical GRE. The initial pump operation in phase-A testing was extremely gentle, beginning with a series of daily pump {open_quotes}bumps{close_quotes} intended to keep the pump nozzles clear. Because nozzle plugging did occur, bump speed and duration were increased, eventually arriving at the accepted 5-min period at 1000 rpm on July 26. There has been no nozzle plugging since. Bumping was initially performed twice daily through mid-August and once daily until the start of phase-B testing. By the end of phase B, thrice-weekly bumping became the rule.

  9. Jet mixer pump testing in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A mixer pump was found effective in controlling and possibly eliminating large episodic flammable gas releases from Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. A gas release event (GRE) is initiated when the gas-bearing sludge layer accumulates sufficient gas to become buoyant. The buoyant sludge pulls free from the surrounding material and rises through the surface crust releasing the trapped gas to the dome space. Mixer pump operation is intended to keep enough of the gas-generating material in suspension so that it releases gas continuously instead of periodically in large, potentially dangerous GREs. A mixer pump was installed in the tank on July 3, 1993, seven days after a typical GRE that met the safety criteria for pump installation. Because nozzle plugging did occur, bump speed and duration were increased, eventually arriving at the accepted five-minute period at 1000 rpm on July 26. There has been no nozzle plugging since. Bumping was initially performed twice daily through mid-August and once daily until the start of Phase B testing. By the end of Phase B, thrice-weekly bumping during non-testing periods became the rule. The jets were aimed into previously undisturbed material and gas release induced by the pump increased immediately. In November, the pump was indexed progressively around the entire tank in 30{degrees} steps. This steadily released a large quantity of retained gas at each position and reduced the waste level to 400 inches, the minimum level in many years. By December, the jets had apparently excavated most of the gas-bearing sludge within reach, because only modest gas releases and essentially no level change occurred after pump operation. For the rest of Phase B testing, there were no large gas releases that would suggest a large volume of unmixed waste. The two thermocouple trees showed a uniform vertical temperature profile. In the month following Phase B, minimal pump operation apparently maintained most of the mixing achieved during testing.

  10. SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR TANK 241-AZ-101 MIXER PUMP PROCESS TEST

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMOND DM; HARRIS JP; MOUETTE P

    1997-06-09

    This document contains the completed safety analysis which establishes the safety envelope for performing the mixer pump process test in Tank 241-AZ-101. This process test is described in TF-210-OTP-001. All equipment necessary for the mixer pump test has been installed by Project W-151. The purpose of this document is to describe and analyze the mixer pump test for Aging Waste Facility (AWF) Tank 241-AZ-101 and to address the 'yes/maybe' responses marked for evaluation questions identified in Unreviewed Safety Question Evaluation (USQE) TF-94-0266. The scope of this document is limited to the performance of the mixer pump test for Tank 241-AZ-101. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD) TF-96-0018 verified that the installation of two mixer pumps into Tank 241-AZ-101 was within the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Authorization Basis. USQDs TF-96-0461, TF-96-0448, and TF-96-0805 verified that the installation of the in-tank video camera, thermocouples, and Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer (URSILLA), respectively, were within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. USQD TF-96-1041 verified that the checkout testing of the installed equipment was within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. Installation of the pumps and equipment has been completed. An evaluation of safety considerations associated with operation of the mixer pumps for the mixer pump test is provided in this document. This document augments the existing AWF authorization basis as defined in the Interim Safety Basis (Stahl 1997), and as such, will use the existing Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) of Heubach 1996 to adequately control the mixer pump test. The hazard and accident analysis is limited to the scope and impact of the mixer pump test, and therefore does not address hazards already addressed by the current AWF authorization basis. This document does not evaluate removal of the mixer pumps. Safety considerations for removal of the pumps will be addressed by

  11. QCGAT mixer compound exhaust system design and static big model test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, W. L.; Thompson, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A mixer exhaust system was designed to meet the proposed performance and exhaust jet noise goals for the AiResearch QCGAT engine. Some 0.35 scale models of the various nozzles were fabricated and aerodynamically and acoustically tested. Preliminary optimization, engine cycle matching, model test data and analysis are presented. A final mixer exhaust system is selected for optimum performance for the overall flight regime.

  12. Gen 2.0 Mixer/Ejector Nozzle Test at LSAF June 1995 to July 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arney, L. D.; Sandquist, D. L.; Forsyth, D. W.; Lidstone, G. L.; Long-Davis, Mary Jo (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Testing of the HSCT Generation 2.0 nozzle model hardware was conducted at the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, LSAF. Concurrent measurements of noise and thrust were made at critical takeoff design conditions for a variety of mixer/ejector model hardware. Design variables such as suppressor area ratio, mixer area ratio, liner type and thickness, ejector length, lobe penetration, and mixer chute shape were tested. Parallel testing was conducted at G.E.'s Cell 41 acoustic free jet facility to augment the LSAF test. The results from the Gen 2.0 testing are being used to help shape the current nozzle baseline configuration and guide the efforts in the upcoming Generation 2.5 and 3.0 nozzle tests. The Gen 2.0 results have been included in the total airplane system studies conducted at MDC and Boeing to provide updated noise and thrust performance estimates.

  13. Energy Efficient Engine exhaust mixer model technology report addendum; phase 3 test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, M. J.; Blatt, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase 3 exhaust mixer test program was conducted to explore the trends established during previous Phases 1 and 2. Combinations of mixer design parameters were tested. Phase 3 testing showed that the best performance achievable within tailpipe length and diameter constraints is 2.55 percent better than an optimized separate flow base line. A reduced penetration design achieved about the same overall performance level at a substantially lower level of excess pressure loss but with a small reduction in mixing. To improve reliability of the data, the hot and cold flow thrust coefficient analysis used in Phases 1 and 2 was augmented by calculating percent mixing from traverse data. Relative change in percent mixing between configurations was determined from thrust and flow coefficient increments. The calculation procedure developed was found to be a useful tool in assessing mixer performance. Detailed flow field data were obtained to facilitate calibration of computer codes.

  14. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  15. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Shop Test of the Gamma Cart System to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test. Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including: depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software.

  16. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests Data Management Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS, D.G.

    2000-02-22

    This document provides a plan for the analysis of the data collected during the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests. This document was prepared after a review of the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Plan (Revision 4) [1] and other materials. The plan emphasizes a structured and well-ordered approach towards handling and examining the data. This plan presumes that the data will be collected and organized into a unified body of data, well annotated and bearing the date and time of each record. The analysis of this data will follow a methodical series of steps that are focused on well-defined objectives. Section 2 of this plan describes how the data analysis will proceed from the real-time monitoring of some of the key sensor data to the final analysis of the three-dimensional distribution of suspended solids. This section also identifies the various sensors or sensor systems and associates them with the various functions they serve during the test program. Section 3 provides an overview of the objectives of the AZ-101 test program and describes the data that will be analyzed to support that test. The objectives are: (1) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can be operated within the operating requirements; (2) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can mobilize the sludge in sufficient quantities to provide feed to the private contractor facility, and (3) to determine if the in-tank instrumentation is sufficient to monitor sludge mobilization and mixer pump operation. Section 3 also describes the interim analysis that organizes the data during the test, so the analysis can be more readily accomplished. Section 4 describes the spatial orientation of the various sensors in the tank. This section is useful in visualizing the relationship of the Sensors in terms of their location in the tank and how the data from these sensors may be related to the data from other sensors. Section 5 provides a summary of the various analyses that will be performed on the data during the test

  17. Static jet noise test results of four 0.35 scale-model QCGAT mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D. E.; Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the NASA Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) engine mixer-nozzle exhaust system program, static jet exhaust noise was recorded at microphone angles of 45 to 155 deg relative to the nozzle inlet for a conventional profile coaxial nozzle and three 12-lobed coaxial mixer nozzles. Both flows in all four nozzles are internally mixed before being discharged from a single exhaust nozzle. The conventional profile coaxial nozzle jet noise is compared to the current NASA Lewis coaxial jet noise prediction and after applying an adjustment to the predicted levels based on the ratio of the kinetic energy of the primary and secondary flows, the prediction is within a standard deviation of 0.9 dB of the measured data. The mass average (mixed flow) prediction is also compared to the noise data for the three mixer nozzles with a reasonably good fit after applying another kinetic energy ratio adjustment (standard deviation of 0.7 to 1.5 dB with the measured data). The tests included conditions for the full-scale engine at takeoff (T.O.), cutback (86% T.O.) and approach (67% T.O.).

  18. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase A: Small-Scale Testing at ITT Flygt

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    The key findings of the small-scale Flygt mixer tests are provided in this section. Some of these findings may not apply in larger tanks, so these data must be applied carefully when making predictions for large tanks. Flygt mixer testing in larger tanks at PNNL and in a full-scale tank at the SRS will be used to determine the applicability of these findings. The principal objectives of the small-scale Flygt mixer tests were to measure the critical fluid velocities required for sludge mobilization and particle suspension, to evaluate the applicability of the Gladki (1997) method for predicting required mixer thrust, and to provide small-scale test results for comparison with larger-scale tests to observe the effects of scale-up. The tank profile and mixer orientation (i.e., stationary, horizontal mixers) were in the same configuration as the prototype system, however, available resources did not allow geometric, kinematic, and dynamic similitude to be achieved. The results of these tests will be used in conjunction with the results from similar tests using larger tanks and mixers (tank diameters of 1.8 and 5.7 m [Powell et al. 1999]) to evaluate the effects of scaling and to aid in developing a methodology for predicting performance at full scale.

  19. STME Hydrogen Mixer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenthal, Rob; Kim, Dongmoon; Bache, George

    1992-01-01

    The hydrogen mixer for the Space Transportation Main Engine is used to mix cold hydrogen bypass flow with warm hydrogen coolant chamber gas, which is then fed to the injectors. It is very important to have a uniform fuel temperature at the injectors in order to minimize mixture ratio problems due to the fuel density variations. In addition, the fuel at the injector has certain total pressure requirements. In order to achieve these objectives, the hydrogen mixer must provide a thoroughly mixed fluid with a minimum pressure loss. The AEROVISC computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was used to analyze the STME hydrogen mixer, and proved to be an effective tool in optimizing the mixer design. AEROVISC, which solves the Reynolds Stress-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variable form, was used to assess the effectiveness of different mixer designs. Through a parametric study of mixer design variables, an optimal design was selected which minimized mixed fuel temperature variation and fuel mixer pressure loss. The use of CFD in the design process of the STME hydrogen mixer was effective in achieving an optimal mixer design while reducing the amount of hardware testing.

  20. PJM Controller Testing with Prototypic PJM Nozzle Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Nigl, Franz; Weier, Dennis R.; Leigh, Richard J.; Johnson, Eric D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Pfund, David M.; Baumann, Aaron W.; Wang, Yeefoo

    2009-08-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pre-treat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. The WTP consists of three primary facilities—pretreatment, low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification, and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The pretreatment facility will receive waste piped from the Hanford tank farms and separate it into a high-volume, low-activity liquid stream stripped of most solids and radionuclides and a much smaller volume of HLW slurry containing most of the solids and most of the radioactivity. Many of the vessels in the pretreatment facility will contain pulse jet mixers (PJM) that will provide some or all of the mixing in the vessels. Pulse jet mixer technology was selected for use in black cell regions of the WTP, where maintenance cannot be performed once hot testing and operations commence. The PJMs have no moving mechanical parts that require maintenance. The vessels with the most concentrated slurries will also be mixed with air spargers and/or steady jets in addition to the mixing provided by the PJMs. Pulse jet mixers are susceptible to overblows that can generate large hydrodynamic forces, forces that can damage mixing vessels or their internal parts. The probability of an overblow increases if a PJM does not fill completely. The purpose of the testing performed for this report was to determine how reliable and repeatable the primary and safety (or backup) PJM control systems are at detecting drive overblows (DOB) and charge vessel full (CVF) conditions. Testing was performed on the ABB 800xA and Triconex control systems. The controllers operated an array of four PJMs installed in an approximately 13 ft diameter × 15 ft tall tank located in the high bay of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 336 Building test facility. The PJMs were fitted with 4 inch diameter discharge nozzles

  1. Full-scale altitude engine test of a turbofan exhaust-gas-forced mixer to reduce thrust specific fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullom, R. R.; Johnson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The specific fuel consumption of a low-bypass-ratio, confluent-flow, turbofan engine was measured with and without a mixer installed. Tests were conducted for flight Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.4 and altitudes from 10,670 to 14,630 meters (35,000 to 48,000 ft) for core-stream-to-fan-stream temperature ratios of 2.0 and 2.5 and mixing-length-to-diameter ratios of 0.95 and 1.74. For these test conditions, the reduction in specific fuel consumption varied from 2.5 percent to 4.0 percent. Pressure loss measurements as well as temperature and pressure surveys at the mixer inlet, the mixer exit, and the nozzle inlet were made.

  2. Mixer pump test plan for double-shell tank AZ-101. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has undertaken the task to develop and demonstrate a method of retrieval for double-shell tank waste. Mixer pumps were chosen as the planned method of retrieval for DSTs, based on engineering technology studies, past experience with hydraulic sluicing at the Hanford Site, and experience with mixer pumps at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site.

  3. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase B: Mid-Scale Testing at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Combs, W.H.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Johnson, M.A.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed mixer tests using 3-kW (4-hp) Flygt mixers in 1.8- and 5.7-m-diameter tanks at the 336 building facility in Richland, Washington to evaluate candidate scaling relationships for Flygt mixers used for sludge mobilization and particle suspension. These tests constituted the second phase of a three-phase test program involving representatives from ITT Flygt Corporation, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNNL. The results of the first phase of tests, which were conducted at ITT Flygt's facility in a 0.45-m-diameter tank, are documented in Powell et al. (1999). Although some of the Phase B tests were geometrically similar to selected Phase A tests (0.45-m tank), none of the Phase B tests were geometrically, cinematically, and/or dynamically similar to the planned Tank 19 mixing system. Therefore, the mixing observed during the Phase B tests is not directly indicative of the mixing expected in Tank 19 and some extrapolation of the data is required to make predictions for Tank 19 mixing. Of particular concern is the size of the mixer propellers used for the 5.7-m tank tests. These propellers were more than three times larger than required by geometric scaling of the Tank 19 mixers. The implications of the lack of geometric similarity, as well as other factors that complicate interpretation of the test results, are discussed in Section 5.4.

  4. Physical Properties of Kaolin/Sand Slurry Used During Submersible Mixer Pump Tests at TNX

    SciTech Connect

    HANSEN, ERICHK.

    2004-08-18

    The purpose of this task is to characterize the physical properties of kaolin/sand slurry used to test the performance of a new submersible mixer pump which is undergoing performance testing at the TNT Waste Tank mockup facility. Three different sample locations, the SMP cooling water exit, the SMP fluid flow field, and SMP effective cleaning radius were used for sampling over the seven day test. The physical properties determinations for the kaolin/sand slurry samples include rheology, weight percent total solids (wt TS), density, and particle size distribution were requested, though not all these determinations were performed on all the samples. The physical properties determinations are described in more detail in section 1.0. Measurements were performed at Savannah River National Laboratory in accordance with the Technical Assistance Request (TAR)1. The data, average of two measurements, is shown in the table below. This data clearly shows that the SMP-CWE samples contained more so lids than those at other sample locations for a given sample day. The SMP-FFF and SMP-ECR were similar in solids content. The rheology of the samples is dependent on the wt solids concentration and are all within the bounds stated in the TAR.

  5. Energy Efficient Engine Exhaust Mixer Model Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Larkin, M.

    1981-01-01

    An exhaust mixer test program was conducted to define the technology required for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The model configurations of 1/10 scale were tested in two phases. A parametric study of mixer design options, the impact of residual low pressure turbine swirl, and integration of the mixer with the structural pylon of the nacelle were investigated. The improvement of the mixer itself was also studied. Nozzle performance characteristics were obtained along with exit profiles and oil smear photographs. The sensitivity of nozzle performance to tailpipe length, lobe number, mixer penetration, and mixer modifications like scalloping and cutbacks were established. Residual turbine swirl was found detrimental to exhaust system performance and the low pressure turbine system for Energy Efficient Engine was designed so that no swirl would enter the mixer. The impact of mixer/plug gap was also established, along with importance of scalloping, cutbacks, hoods, and plug angles on high penetration mixers.

  6. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  7. Demystifying Mixers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Douglas Earl

    2012-01-01

    Using music technology is a daily reality for music educators. The task may be as simple as readying a CD player for use in an elementary classroom or as complex as setting up a complete sound system--including microphones, mixer, amplifier, and speakers--for a live music production. One piece of music technology music educators constantly…

  8. A 1/10 Scale Model Test of a Fixed Chute Mixer-Ejector Nozzle in Unsuppressed Model. Part 1; Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a test of a nozzle concept for a high-speed commercial aircraft. While a great deal of effort has been expended to und erstand the noise-suppressed, take-off performance of mixer-ejector n ozzles, little has been done to assess their performance in unsuppressed mode at other flight conditions. To address this, a 1/10th scale m odel mixer-ejector nozzle in unsuppressed mode was tested at conditio ns representing transonic acceleration, supersonic cruise, subsonic cruise, and approach. Various configurations were tested to understand the effects of acoustic liners and several geometric parameters, such as throat area, expansion ratio, and nozzle length on nozzle performance. Thrust, flow, and internal pressures were measured. A statistica l model of the peak thrust coefficient results is presented and discussed.

  9. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test MT Fury Suspended Solids Profiler Application and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MACLEAN, G.T.

    2000-01-06

    Describes the radiation testing and calibration of the AZ-101 tank suspended solids profiler unit mounted on 6 tank riser 24A. The Mt. Fury Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) is a microprocessor-controlled instrument that measures the turbidity of solid-liquid suspensions and sludges. The profiler is used commercially for the monitoring and control of clarifiers and thickeners in waste treatment, mining, pulp and paper, and other industrial processing facilities. The instrument includes a three inch diameter probe, a Kynar coated coaxial cable, a reel assembly with a clutch and drive shaft, a stepper motor, and electronics. The instrument measures insoluble or suspended solids content in liquids by transmitting infrared energy at a wavelength of 935 nm and measuring the extent of backscatter. This frequency is not affected by solution color. There are two detectors that allow the instrument to operate over a broad range of concentrations, from clear liquids to light sludges.

  10. Forced Mixer Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheoran, Yogi; Hoover, Robert; Schuster, William; Anderson, Morris; Weir, Donald S.

    1999-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and computational acoustic analyses (CAA) were performed for a TFE731-40 compound nozzle, a TFE731-60 mixer nozzle and an Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) mixer nozzle for comparison with available data. The CFD analyses were performed with a three dimensional, Navier-Stokes solution of the flowfield on an unstructured grid using the RAMPANT program. The CAA analyses were performed with the NASA Glenn MGB program using a structured grid. A successful aerodynamic solution for the TFE731-40 compound nozzle operating statically was obtained, simulating an engine operating on a test stand. Analysis of the CFD results of the TFE731-40 with the MGB program produced predicted sound power levels that agree quite well with the measured data front full-scale static engine tests. Comparison of the predicted sound pressure with the data show good agreement near the jet axis, but the noise levels are overpredicted at angles closer to the inlet. The predicted sound power level for the TFE731-60 did not agree as well with measured static engine data as the TFE731-40. Although a reduction in the predicted noise level due to the mixed flow was observed, the reduction was not as significant as the measured data. The analysis of the V2 mixer from the E(sup 3) study showed that peak temperatures predicted in the mixer exit flowfield were within 5 percent of the values measured by the exit probes. The noise predictions of the V2 mixer nozzle tended to be 3-5 dB higher in peak noise level than the measurements. In addition, the maximum frequency of the noise was also overpredicted. An analysis of the 3 candidate mixer nozzle configurations demonstrated the feasibility of using centerbody lobes and porosity to improve mixing efficiency. A final configuration was designed with a predicted thermal mixing efficiency that was 5 percent higher than the 3 candidate mixers. The results of the MGB noise calculations show that the final design will exceed the

  11. Laser doppler velocimeter system for subsonic jet mixer nozzle testing at the NASA Lewis Aeroacoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Bridges, James E.; Saiyed, Naseem H.; Krupar, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system developed for the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (APL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. This system was developed to acquire detailed flow field data which could be used to quantify the effectiveness of internal exhaust gas mixers (IEGM's) and to verify and calibrate computational codes. The LDV was used as an orthogonal, three component system to measure the flow field downstream of the exit of a series of IEGM's and a reference axisymmetric splitter configuration. The LDV system was also used as a one component system to measure the internal axial flow within the nozzle tailpipe downstream of the mixers. These IEGM's were designed for low-bypass ratio turbofan engines. The data were obtained at a simulated low flight speed, high-power operating condition. The optical, seeding, and data acquisition systems of the LDV are described in detail. Sample flow field measurements are provided to illustrate the capabilities of the system at the time of this test, which represented the first use of LDV at the APL. A discussion of planned improvements to the LDV is also included.

  12. BIB mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    We have determined that the multi-pin 'microprocessor style' packages in which current Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) devices are mounted will not meet our IF bandwidth spec of greater than 2 GHz for a practical mixer. Hence we have started to repackage the Ga:Ge BIB devices in new microwave compatible packages. The smaller size of the microwave package mount necessitates cutting the BIB array down to include only the 3 smallest detectors: 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mm sq. A FIR beam incident at f/1.5 can be focussed on the smallest element for wavelengths shorter than 100 microns. A more typical (easier) beam convergence of f/3 will require 0.4 mm elements at 100 microns and 0.6 mm elements at 170 microns wavelength. Since the device capacitance (parasitic loss) scales with detector size, there is a tradeoff of speed of response and optical convenience. Our existing optics produce only the slower convergence beam, so we need to redesign the optical layout and are looking at long focal length all-reflective microscope objectives. BIB detectors and the edge-coupled microbolometers have restricted IF bandwidths, an order of magnitude less than what is possible with the Schottky-diode mixers we currently use for astronomical observations. Consequently the frequencies of the FIR laser lines must be close to the astronomical line of interest to be an effective Local Oscillator (LO). We have therefore begun a coordinated effort to discover and measure new FIR laser transition lines in close frequency coincidence with important astrophysical lines. Most of this effort involves pumping isotopic variants of known good laser molecules with laser lines from isotopic variants of CO2. We have been most successful in detecting new FIR lines in deuterated ammonia. One line in particular is very close to the frequency of HD rotational line at 2675 GHz.

  13. Effect of mixing time and speed on experimental baking and dough testing with a 200g pin-mixer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under mixing or over mixing the dough results in varied experimental loaf volumes. Bread preparation requires a trained baker to evaluate dough development and determine stop points of mixer. Instrumentation and electronic control of the dough mixer would allow for automatic mixing. This study us...

  14. MM wave quasioptical SIS mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qing; Mears, C.A.; Richards, P.L.; Lloyd, F.L.

    1988-08-01

    We have tested the performance of planar SIS mixers with log-periodic antennas at near millimeter and submillimeter wave frequencies from 90 to 360 GHz. The large ..omega..R/sub N/C product (/approximately/10 at 90 GHz) of our Nb/NbO/sub x//Pb-In-Au junctions requires an integrated inductive tuning element to resonate the junction capacitance at the operating frequencies. We have used two types of integrated tuning element, which were designed with the aid of measurements using a Fourier transform spectrometer. Preliminary results indicate that the tuning elements can give very good mixer performance up to at least 200 GHz. An inductive wire in parallel with a 5-junction array gives a minimum mixer noise temperature of 115K (DSB) at 90 GHz with a FWHM bandwidth of 8 GHz. An open-ended microstrip stub in parallel with a single junction, gives minimum mixer noise temperatures of 150 and 200K (DSB) near 90 and 180 GHz with FWHM bandwidths of 4 and 3 GHz, respectively. The relatively high mixer noise temperatures compared to those of waveguide SIS mixers in a similar frequency range are attributed mainly to the losses in our optical system, which is being improved. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Cold Testing of a Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2002-01-29

    Russian pulsating mixer pump (PMP) technology was identified in FY 1996 during technical exchanges between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a technology that could be implemented in tank waste retrieval operations in the United States. The PMP is basically a jet mixer powered by a pressure/vacuum supply system. A prototype PMP was provided by the Russian Mining and Chemical Combine and evaluated as a potential retrieval tool in FY 1997 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Based on this evaluation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and DOE staff determined that a modified PMP would meet project needs for bulk mobilization of sludge from one or more of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) at ORNL. In FY 1998, PMP technology was selected for deployment in one of the GAAT to mobilize settled solids. Deployment of the PMP was expected to reduce operation and maintenance costs required to utilize more expensive retrieval systems. The following series of cold tests and inspections were conducted on one of the three PMP units provided to verify the acceptability and readiness of the mixing system for operation in the GAATs at ORNL: (1) Inspections and measurements designed to evaluate the integrity of the equipment: Fabrication shop inspections, Equipment inspections, Vibration/oscillation measurements, Hydrostatic pressure tests. (2) Functionality of the system components: Tank riser interface functionality, Decontamination spray ring (DSR) functionality, Valves, actuator, sensors, and control system functionality, Support fixture tests; and Contamination control assessment. (3) Mixing and operational performance of the PMP system: DSR performance, PMP debris tolerance, PMP performance with water only, PMP cleaning radius determination, and PMP performance with sludge surrogates. The results from these tests indicate

  16. Results of Aero/Acoustic Tests and Analytical Studies of a Two-Dimensional Eight-Lobe Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzle at Takeoff Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas (Technical Monitor); Schweiger, P.; Stern, A.; Gamble, E.; Barber, T.; Chiappetta, L.; LaBarre, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R.

    2005-01-01

    Hot flow aero-acoustic tests were conducted with Pratt & Whitney's High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzles by General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) in the GEAE Anechoic Freejet Noise Facility (Cell 41) located in Evendale, Ohio. The tests evaluated the impact of various geometric and design parameters on the noise generated by a two-dimensional (2-D) shrouded, 8-lobed, mixer-ejector exhaust nozzle. The shrouded mixer-ejector provides noise suppression by mixing relatively low energy ambient air with the hot, high-speed primary exhaust jet. Additional attenuation was obtained by lining the shroud internal walls with acoustic panels, which absorb acoustic energy generated during the mixing process. Two mixer designs were investigated, the high mixing "vortical" and aligned flow "axial", along with variations in the shroud internal mixing area ratios and shroud length. The shrouds were tested as hardwall or lined with acoustic panels packed with a bulk absorber. A total of 21 model configurations at 1:11.47 scale were tested. The models were tested over a range of primary nozzle pressure ratios and primary exhaust temperatures representative of typical HSCT aero thermodynamic cycles. Static as well as flight simulated data were acquired during testing. A round convergent unshrouded nozzle was tested to provide an acoustic baseline for comparison to the test configurations. Comparisons were made to previous test results obtained with this hardware at NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel (LSWT). Laser velocimetry was used to investigate external as well as ejector internal velocity profiles for comparison to computational predictions. Ejector interior wall static pressure data were also obtained. A significant reduction in exhaust system noise was demonstrated with the 2-D shrouded nozzle designs.

  17. Extended Cold Testing of a Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2002-12-23

    The effectiveness of a mixer is dependent on the size of the tank to be mixed, the characteristics of the waste, and the operating conditions. Waste tanks throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex require mixing and mobilization systems capable of (1) breaking up and suspending materials that are difficult to mix and pump, without introducing additional liquids into the tank; (2) complementing and augmenting the performance of other remotely operated and/or robotic waste retrieval systems; and (3) operating in tanks with various quantities of waste. The Oak Ridge Russian pulsating mixer pump (PMP) system was designed with the flexibility to permit deployment in a variety of cylindrical tanks. The PMP was installed at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the performance of the system over an extended range of operating conditions, including supply pressures up to 175 psig. Previously conducted cold tests proved the applicability of the PMP for deployment in ORNL gunite tank TH-4. The previous testing and hot demonstrations had been limited to operating at air supply pressures of <100 psig. The extended cold testing of the Russian PMP system showed that the system was capable of mobilizing waste simulants in tanks in excess of 20-ft diam. The waste simulant used in these tests was medium-grain quartz sand. The system was successfully installed, checked out, and operated for 406 pulse discharge cycles. Only minor problems (i.e., a sticking air distributor valve and a few system lockups) were noted. Some improvements to the design of the air distributor valve may be needed to improve reliability. The air supply requirements of the PMP during the discharge cycle necessitated the operation of the system in single pulse discharge cycles to allow time for the air supply reservoir to recharge to the required pressure. During the test program, the system was operated with sand depths of 2, 4, and 4.5 in.; at

  18. Demonstration of An Image Rejection Mixer for High Frequency Applications (26-36 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, Cheryl D.; Carlstrom, John E.

    1999-01-01

    A new high frequency image-rejection mixer was successfully tested in a 26-36 GHz band receiver. This paper briefly describes the motivation for implementation of an image rejection mixer in a receiver system, the basic operation of an image rejection mixer, and the development and testing of an image rejection mixer for a high frequency, cryogenic receiver system.

  19. Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

  20. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.; Allen, S. James; Lee, Mark

    2008-05-20

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  1. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  2. A Matlab-Based Graphical User Interface for Simulation and Control Design of a Hydrogen Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    A Graphical User Interface (GUI) that facilitates prediction and control design tasks for a propellant mixer is described. The Hydrogen mixer is used in rocket test stand operations at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. The mixer injects gaseous hydrogen (GH2) into a stream of liquid hydrogen (LH2) to obtain a combined flow with desired thermodynamic properties. The flows of GH2 and LH2 into the mixer are regulated by two control valves, and a third control valve is installed at the exit of the mixer to regulate the combined flow. The three valves may be simultaneously operated in order to achieve any desired combination of total flow, exit temperature and mixer pressure within the range of operation. The mixer, thus, constitutes a three-input, three-output system. A mathematical model of the mixer has been obtained and validated with experimental data. The GUI presented here uses the model to predict mixer response under diverse conditions.

  3. Experimental evaluation of exhaust mixers for an Energy Efficient Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Kraft, G.

    1980-01-01

    Static scale model tests were conducted to evaluate exhaust system mixers for a high bypass ratio engine as part of the NASA sponsored Energy Efficient program. Gross thrust coefficients were measured for a series of mixer configurations which included variations in the number of mixer lobes, tailpipe length, mixer penetration, and length. All of these parameters have a significant impact on exhaust system performance. In addition, flow visualization pictures and pressure/temperature traverses were obtained for selected configurations. Parametric performance trends are discussed and the results considered relative to the Energy Efficient Engine program goals.

  4. Optimization of SIS mixer elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) quantum mixers provide an approach to millimeter wave mixing - potentially offering conversion gain, a low local oscillator power demand, and potential mixer noise temperatures near the quantum limit. The development of a reliable fabrication technology for producing such high quality SIS devices for mixer applications in radio astronomy is the focus of the work.

  5. Acoustic characteristics of externally blown flap systems with mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.; Wagner, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Noise tests were conducted on a large scale, cold flow model of an engine-under-the-wing externally blown flap lift augmentation system employing a mixer nozzle. The mixer nozzle was used to reduce the flap impingement velocity and, consequently, try to attenuate the additional noise caused by the interaction between the jet exhaust and the wing flap. Results from the mixer nozzle tests are summarized and compared with the results for a conical nozzle. The comparison showed that with the mixer nozzle, less noise was generated when the trailing flap was in a typical landing setting (e.g., 60 deg). However, for a takeoff flap setting (20 deg), there was little or no difference in the acoustic characteristics when either the mixer or conical nozzle was used.

  6. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  7. Out-Of-Drum Grout Mixer Testing With Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Scholes; A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; S. H. Hinckley

    2003-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2003, alternatives were evaluated for grout formulation development and associated mixing for the Sodium-Bearing Waste cesium ion exchange process. The neutralization agents calcium or sodium hydroxide and the solidification agents Portland cement, with or without blast furnace slag were evaluated. A desired uniform formulation was pursued to develop a grout waste form without any bleed liquid and solidify within a reasonable period of about twenty-eight days. This testing evaluates the out-of-drum alternative of mixing the effluent with solidification agents prior to being poured into drums versus the in-drum alternative of mixing them all together after being poured into the drums. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout using the Autocon continuous mixer within the range of 66 to 72 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 30 weight percent NWCF scrubber simulant also produced an acceptable grout waste form.

  8. Introduction of electrodehydrators with built-in jet mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershuni, S.S.; Baimbetov, A.M.; Idrisova, T.S.; Makhov, A.F.

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes an effective technique of crude oil desalting which is recirculation of water within the electrodehydrator by means of built-in jet mixers. Vertical electrodehydrators with built-in jet mixers have been tested and approved at the Novo-Ufa refinery. Design and operation of the vessel is described. Results from analyses of the oil during the test period are summarized. Retrofitting of electrodehydrators with built-in jet mixers proved increased capacity and the consumption of water and electric power in desalting was cut in half while oil loss in the electric desalting units was reduced substantially.

  9. Active microfluidic mixer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xize; Liu, Liyu; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2006-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a chaotic mixer based on the electrorheological (ER) fluid-controlled valves. The flow in the main channel is perturbed by liquid flow in orthogonal side channels, driven by hydrodynamic pulsating pumps. Each pulsating pump consists of a chamber with diaphragm plus two out-of-phase ER valves operating in a push-pull mode. All the valves, pumps, and mixing channels are integrated in one polydimethylsioxane chip. Mixing characteristics in the main channel are controlled by the strength and frequency of external electric fields applied on the ER fluid.

  10. Design and performance of mass-produced sideband separating SIS mixers for ALMA band 4 receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takafumi; Kuroiwa, Koichi; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Fujii, Yumi; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Asayama, Shin'ichiro; Noguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    We have designed and mass-produced low-noise sideband separating superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) band 4 over the frequency range of 125-163 GHz. An integrated design was adopted for the band 4 sideband separating (2SB) mixer block because of the advantages it offers in terms of compactness, reduced testing time and lower cost. The mixer chip was designed to be robust for handling errors to avoid performance degradation caused by generation of the higher order mode in the mixer chip slot. Detailed analyses revealed its robustness and ability to ensure mass production of the 2SB mixers. Using the robust mixer design in addition to well-established waveguide technologies, all of the 2SB mixers met ALMA specifications for noise temperature and image rejection ratio.

  11. Matlab GUI for a Fluid Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The Test and Engineering Directorate at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center developed an interest to study the modeling, evaluation, and control of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gas hydrogen (GH2) mixer subsystem of a ground test facility. This facility carries out comprehensive ground-based testing and certification of liquid rocket engines including the Space Shuttle Main engine. A software simulation environment developed in MATLAB/SIMULINK (M/S) will allow NASA engineers to test rocket engine systems at relatively no cost. In the progress report submitted in February 2004, we described the development of two foundation programs, a reverse look-up application using various interpolation algorithms, a variety of search and return methods, and self-checking methods to reduce the error in returned search results to increase the functionality of the program. The results showed that these efforts were successful. To transfer this technology to engineers who are not familiar with the M/S environment, a four-module GUI was implemented allowing the user to evaluate the mixer model under open-loop and closed-loop conditions. The progress report was based on an udergraduate Honors Thesis by Ms. Jamie Granger Austin in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Tulane University, during January-May 2003, and her continued efforts during August-December 2003. In collaboration with Dr. Hanz Richter and Dr. Fernando Figueroa we published these results in a NASA Tech Brief due to appear this year. Although the original proposal in 2003 did not address other components of the test facility, we decided in the last few months to extend our research and consider a related pressurization tank component as well. This report summarizes the results obtained towards a Graphical User Interface (GUI) for the evaluation and control of the hydrogen mixer subsystem model and for the pressurization tank each taken individually. Further research would combine the two

  12. Design and development of liquid hydrogen mixer unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. W.; Wuertz, K.; Rudich, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    A dc brushless motor driven mixer unit (a vaneaxial fan) was designed and evaluated for use in cryogenic fluids (liquids and gases). It was found to operate well in all fluids in which it was tested. The test fluids were liquid and gaseous helium, hydrogen in the liquid phase gas phase and mixtures of the two phases, and liquid nitrogen. It operated for over 100 hr at cryogenic temperatures without damage to the bearings and at the conclusion of testing the condition of the bearings was such that an operational life of 5000 hr appeared possible. The unit demonstrated that (with the brushless dc motor principle) useful pumping of cryogenic fluids could be accomplished with very small power inputs to the mixer motor. During test, the motor input power varied from approximately 0.5 W to 2.5 W, depending on fluid density. The high power input produced a mixer efficiency of over 49 percent. In an earlier program (see NASA Report CR-72365), a mixer using an ac induction motor demonstrated an efficiency of 17.7 percent under the same conditions, illustrating the advantage of the dc brushless motor driven unit. The mixer also demonstrated its ability to automatically vary speed as a function of the density of the fluid being pumped. This causes the unit to deliver higher volumetric flow rates as fluid density decreases.

  13. Static mixer improves desalting efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    An in-line static mixer has increased salt removal from crude oil at a large West Coast refinery, says the mixer supplier, Komax Systems Inc. The mixer was installed at a 150,000 b/d crude distillation unit's desalter. Crude at this refinery is a mixture of local production and imports from Indonesia and Alaska. In the past, the refiner used a typical globe-type mix valve to mix fresh water with crude at the desalters. The crude is heated to 300/sup 0/F., mixed with 5% fresh water, and then fed to the desalters. Chemical and electrostatic treatment is used in the desalters to remove salt and water from the crude.

  14. An Algorithm to Evaluate Imbalances of Quadrature Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji; Arai, Michiaki

    It is essential, as bandwidths of wireless communications get wider, to evaluate the imbalances among quadrature mixer ports, in terms of carrier phase offset, IQ gain imbalance, and IQ skew. Because it is time consuming to separate skew, gain imbalance and carrier phase offset evaluation during test is often performed using a composite value, without separation of the imbalance factors. This paper describes an algorithm for enabling separation among quadrature mixer gain imbalance, carrier phase offset, and skew. Since the test time is reduced by the proposed method, it can be applied during high volume production testing.

  15. Assessment of Differences in Phase 1 and Phase 2 Test Observations for Waste Treatment Plant Pulse Jet Mixer Tests with Non-Cohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-10-27

    The purpose of this work was to assess the apparent discrepancy in critical suspension velocity (UCS) between M3 Phase 1 (Meyer et al. 2009) and Phase 2 testing conducted by Energy Solutions (ES) at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) and to address the applicability of Phase 1 scale-up laws to Phase 2 test results. Three Phase 2 test sequences were analyzed in detail. Several sources of discrepancy were identified including differences in nominal versus actual velocity, definition of model input parameters, and definition of UCS. A remaining discrepancy was shown to not be solely an artifact of Phase 1 data correlations, but was fundamental to the tests. The non-prototypic aspects of Phase 1 testing were reviewed and assessed. The effects of non-prototypic refill associated with the closed loop operation of the jets, previously known to affect cloud height, can be described in terms of a modified settling velocity. When the modified settling velocity is incorporated into the Phase 1 “new” physical model the adjusted new physical model does a better job of predicting the Phase 2 test results. The adjusted new physical model was bench marked with data taken during three prototypic drive tests. Scale-up behavior of the Phase 1 tests was reviewed. The applicability of the Phase 1 scale-up behavior to Phase 2 prototypic testing was analyzed. The effects of non-prototypic refill caused measured values of UCS to be somewhat reduced at larger scales. Hence the scale-up exponents are believed to be smaller than they would have been had there been prototypic refill. Estimated scale-up exponents for the Phase 2 testing are 0.40 for 8-tube tests and 0.36 for 12-tube tests.

  16. Mixer Assembly for a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor); Smith, Lance L. (Inventor); Hautman, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer with fuel injection holes located between at least one radial swirler and at least one axial swirler, wherein the fuel injected into the main mixer is atomized and dispersed by the air flowing through the radial swirler and the axial swirler.

  17. Match broadband mixers to within 1-deg. phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, David; Roach, Patrick

    1987-01-01

    Phase matching (determined by the absolute phase difference between the mixer devices) and tracking are important mixer specifications in missile guidance and threat detection systems. In this paper, a phase-matching technique, based on a requirement that the devices track one another in sets, is presented. The technique measures phase errors down to the 1-deg level with a test setup that is repeatable and easy to use. A typical test setup and the steps of the measuring procedure are described, and data plots showing the phase-tracking performance of a set of three mixers are shown. A block diagram of a typical setup and a flow chart for a phase-matching and incremental-tracking program are included.

  18. Forced mixer lobes in ejector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, W. M., Jr.; Morin, B. L.; Gousy, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Forced mixer lobes in augmentor primary ejectors obtain a 100-percent increase in pumping over conventional design, together with nearly complete mixing in very short mixing ducts, through the generation of large scale axial vorticity in the mixing duct. The vorticity causes rapid mixing of the primary and secondary flows with low losses; since mixing length is minimized, wall friction losses are reduced, allowing more secondary flow to be pumped for a given total pressure in the primary flow. Analytical results are presented that are judged to have significant implications for future ejector test work.

  19. Liquid/Gas Flow Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, Gracio

    1994-01-01

    Improved devices mix gases and liquids into bubbly or foamy flows. Generates flowing, homogeneous foams or homogeneous dispersions of small, noncoalescing bubbles entrained in flowing liquids. Mixers useful in liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic electric-power generator, froth flotation in mining industry, wastewater treatment, aerobic digestion, and stripping hydrocarbon contaminants from ground water.

  20. Superconducting Mixers for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Grossman, E. R.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ono, R. H.; Gerecht, E.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to fabricate and test planar arrays of superconducting mixers for the 2-6 THz band. The technology is intended for multi-beam receivers aboard Explorer-class missions and the SOFIA Airborne Observatory. The mixer technology is the superconducting transition-edge microbolometer, which is more commonly known as the Hot-Electron micro-Bolometer (HEB). As originally proposed, two superconducting technologies were to be developed: (1) low-Tc niobium HEBs which could approach quantum-noise-limited sensitivities but require cooling to 2- 4 K, and (2) high-Tc YBCO HEBs with sensitivities 10 times worse but with a relaxed cooling requirement of 30-60 K. The low-Tc devices would be best for astronomy applications on SOFIA, whereas the high-Tc devices would be more suitable for planetary missions using systems without stored cryogens. The work plan called for planar micro-fabrication and initial testing of HEB devices at the NIST Boulder clean-room facility. Subsequent assembly and RF testing of selected devices would be done at the CASA laboratory at U. Colorado. Approximately 1-year after work began on this project, Dr. Eyal Gerecht joined the NIST group, and assumed day-to-day responsibility for Nb-HEB development at NIST outside of micro-fabrication. The YBCO-HEB work was to be guided by Dr. Ron Ono, who was the NIST expert in YBCO technology. Unfortunately, recurrent health problems limited the time Ron could devote to the project in its first year. These problems became aggravated in early 2001, and sadly led to Ron's death in October, 2001. His loss was not only a blow to his friends and associates at NIST, but was mounted by the US superconductivity community at large. With his passing, work on high-Tc HEBs ceased at NIST. There was no one to replace him or his expertise. Our work subsequently shifted solely to Nb-HEB devices. In the sections which follow, our progress in the development of diffusion-cooled Nb-HEB mixers is detailed. To

  1. Factors which influence the behavior of turbofan forced mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    A finite difference procedure was used to compute the mixing for three experimentally tested mixer geometries. Good agreement was obtained between analysis and experiment when the mechanisms responsible for secondary flow generation were properly modeled. Vorticity generation due to flow turning and vorticity generated within the centerbody lobe passage were found to be important. Results are presented for two different temperature ratios between fan and core streams and for two different free stream turbulence levels. It was concluded that the dominant mechanisms in turbofan mixers is associated with the secondary flows arising within the lobe region and their development within the mixing section.

  2. A multichannel dual-mixer stability analyzer: progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, C. A.; Kirk, A.; Stevens, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    A stability analyzer is being developed for frequency standards in JPL's Deep Space Network. Prototype hardware and software have been built. Initial tests on 100-MHz sources show an Allan deviation noise floor of about 7 X 10(sup -15) at 1 second for a dual-mixer channel.

  3. Frequency mixer having ferromagnetic film

    DOEpatents

    Khitun, Alexander; Roshchin, Igor V.; Galatsis, Kosmas; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-03-29

    A frequency conversion device, which may include a radiofrequency (RF) mixer device, includes a substrate and a ferromagnetic film disposed over a surface of the substrate. An insulator is disposed over the ferromagnetic film and at least one microstrip antenna is disposed over the insulator. The ferromagnetic film provides a non-linear response to the frequency conversion device. The frequency conversion device may be used for signal mixing and amplification. The frequency conversion device may also be used in data encryption applications.

  4. Ganged series potentiometer mixer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A ganged potentiometer with the interesting property of a constant 10k ohm or greater series impedance for all rotations of the shaft was rediscovered. The device provided a versatile passive mixer circuit when used with most signal sources and can be used as a variable series input summing resistor in operational amplifier networks. The potentiometer gave simple solutions to missing problems with a single control knob.

  5. Planar Submillimeter-Wave Mixer Technology with Integrated Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John J.; Lee, Choonsup; lombart, Muria L.; Thomas, Betrand

    2010-01-01

    High-performance mixers at terahertz frequencies require good matching between the coupling circuits such as antennas and local oscillators and the diode embedding impedance. With the availability of amplifiers at submillimeter wavelengths and the need to have multi-pixel imagers and cameras, planar mixer architecture is required to have an integrated system. An integrated mixer with planar antenna provides a compact and optimized design at terahertz frequencies. Moreover, it leads to a planar architecture that enables efficient interconnect with submillimeter-wave amplifiers. In this architecture, a planar slot antenna is designed on a thin gallium arsenide (GaAs) membrane in such a way that the beam on either side of the membrane is symmetric and has good beam profile with high coupling efficiency. A coplanar waveguide (CPW) coupled Schottky diode mixer is designed and integrated with the antenna. In this architecture, the local oscillator (LO) is coupled through one side of the antenna and the RF from the other side, without requiring any beam sp litters or diplexers. The intermediate frequency (IF) comes out on a 50-ohm CPW line at the edge of the mixer chip, which can be wire-bonded to external circuits. This unique terahertz mixer has an integrated single planar antenna for coupling both the radio frequency (RF) input and LO injection without any diplexer or beamsplitters. The design utilizes novel planar slot antenna architecture on a 3- mthick GaAs membrane. This work is required to enable future multi-pixel terahertz receivers for astrophysics missions, and lightweight and compact receivers for planetary missions to the outer planets in our solar system. Also, this technology can be used in tera hertz radar imaging applications as well as for testing of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs).

  6. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  7. Piezoelectric rotational mixer based on a first bending vibration mode.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki

    2013-10-01

    We propose a miniature piezoelectric mixer that can rotate a liquid inside a hole of several millimeters diameter. The mixer has dimensions 14 × 14 × 10 mm with a through-hole (7 mm), and piezoelectric elements bonded to its four identical sides. When the first bending vibration mode of the mixer is excited by ac voltages, rotational flow of liquid is generated by the rotation of an acoustic field (acoustic streaming) in the through-hole. This technology is useful in automating mixing processes such as the mixing by hand of a few drops of blood in medical testing. In this paper, we verify the driving principle experimentally and examine the characteristics of a prototype mixer, including the induced flow velocity, under changes of the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltages. A plastic test tube, used to prevent contamination, is inserted to the through-hole, and the liquid inside the tube is mixed by rotation of the acoustic field. PMID:24081258

  8. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Fowley, M.

    2013-09-23

    The Saltstone Production Facility has a 10-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer that mixes the premix dry feeds and low-level waste salt solution to make fresh (uncured) saltstone. Inspection of the mixer in January 2013 showed significant wear on the third, fourth and fifth paddle pairs after the conveying augers. A 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer was used to test alternate paddle configurations for use in the 10-inch mixer to decrease the wear rate on the paddles. Two wear tests were conducted to investigate a method of reducing wear on the mixer paddles. The first test (wear test 2a) had a paddle configuration similar to the currently installed 10-inch mixer in the SPF. This test established baseline wear. The second test (wear test 2b) had a reconfigured paddle arrangement that replaced the flat paddles with helical paddles for paddle pairs 2 - 6 and aligned paddle pair 1 with the augers. The intent of the reconfiguration was to more effectively convey the partially wetted dry feeds through the transition region and into the liquid feed where paddle wear is reduced due to dry feeds and salt solution being mixed at the intended water to premix ratio. The design of the helical paddles provides conveyance through the transition region to the liquid feed inlet. The alignment with the auger is aimed to provide a smoother transition (minimizing the discontinuity between the auger and paddle pair 1) into the downstream paddles. A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum) was used for the wear testing paddles to determine wear patterns while minimizing run time and maximizing wear rate. For the two paddle configurations tested using the scaled 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer, with the first six paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles and the remaining paddles were stainless steel. Since the 10-inch SPF mixer is designed with the liquid inlet centered over paddle pairs 5 and 6, the scaled 2-inch mixer was configured the

  9. Double-Balanced Graphene Integrated Mixer with Outstanding Linearity.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hongming; Wu, Huaqiang; Liu, Jinbiao; Lu, Qi; Zhang, Jinyu; Wu, Xiaoming; Li, Junfeng; Ma, Teng; Niu, Jiebin; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Huiming; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2015-10-14

    A monolithic double-balanced graphene mixer integrated circuit (IC) has been successfully designed and fabricated. The IC adopted the cross-coupled resistive mixer topology, integrating four 500 nm-gate-length graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), four on-chip inductors, and four on-chip capacitors. Passive-first-active-last fabrication flow was developed on 200 mm CMOS wafers. CMOS back-end-of-line processes were utilized to realize most fabrication steps followed by GFET-customized processes. Test results show excellent output spectrum purity with suppressed radio frequency (RF) and local oscillation (LO) signals feedthroughs, and third-order input intercept (IIP3) reaches as high as 21 dBm. The results are compared with a fabricated single-GEFT mixer, which generates IIP3 of 16.5 dBm. Stand-alone 500 nm-gate-length GFETs feature cutoff frequency 22 GHz and maximum oscillation frequency 20.7 GHz RF performance. The double-balanced mixer IC operated with off-chip baluns realizing a print-circuit-board level electronic system. It demonstrates graphene's potential to compete with other semiconductor technologies in RF front-end applications. PMID:26378374

  10. GUI for Computational Simulation of a Propellant Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Richter, Hanz; Barbieri, Enrique; Granger, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    Control Panel is a computer program that generates a graphical user interface (GUI) for computational simulation of a rocket-test-stand propellant mixer in which gaseous hydrogen (GH2) is injected into flowing liquid hydrogen (LH2) to obtain a combined flow having desired thermodynamic properties. The GUI is used in conjunction with software that models the mixer as a system having three inputs (the positions of the GH2 and LH2 inlet valves and an outlet valve) and three outputs (the pressure inside the mixer and the outlet flow temperature and flow rate). The user can specify valve characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the input fluids via userfriendly dialog boxes. The user can enter temporally varying input values or temporally varying desired output values. The GUI provides (1) a set-point calculator function for determining fixed valve positions that yield desired output values and (2) simulation functions that predict the response of the mixer to variations in the properties of the LH2 and GH2 and manual- or feedback-control variations in valve positions. The GUI enables scheduling of a sequence of operations that includes switching from manual to feedback control when a certain event occurs.

  11. Flashback resistant pre-mixer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Laster, Walter R.; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2012-02-14

    A pre-mixer assembly associated with a fuel supply system for mixing of air and fuel upstream from a main combustion zone in a gas turbine engine. The pre-mixer assembly includes a swirler assembly disposed about a fuel injector of the fuel supply system and a pre-mixer transition member. The swirler assembly includes a forward end defining an air inlet and an opposed aft end. The pre-mixer transition member has a forward end affixed to the aft end of the swirler assembly and an opposed aft end defining an outlet of the pre-mixer assembly. The aft end of the pre-mixer transition member is spaced from a base plate such that a gap is formed between the aft end of the pre-mixer transition member and the base plate for permitting a flow of purge air therethrough to increase a velocity of the air/fuel mixture exiting the pre-mixer assembly.

  12. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  13. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  14. Sideband separating mixer for 600-720 GHz for ALMA band 9 upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudchenko, Andrey; Hesper, Ronald; Baryshev, Andrey; Gerlofma, Gerrit; Barkhof, Jan; Adema, Joost; Mena, Patricio; Klapwijk, Teun; Spaans, Marco

    2012-09-01

    For high-frequency observational bands like ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) Band 9 (600—720 GHz), which tend to be dominated by atmospheric noise, implementation of sideband-separating mixers can reduce, up to a factor of two, the integration time needed to reach a certain signal-to-noise ratio for spectral line observations. Because of very high oversubscription factor for observation in ALMA Band 9, an upgrade of the current Double Sideband (DSB) mixer to a Two Sideband (2SB) configuration is a promising option for future ALMA development. Here we present a developed 2SB mixer and a modified cartridge design. The 2SB mixer includes a waveguide RF hybrid block, which have been produced on a micro-milling machine and equipped with standard Band 9 SIS mixer devices. These two SIS mixers have been separately tested in DSB mode. The SSB noise temperature is within the ALMA requirements of 336 K over 80% of the band, and 500 K over the entire band. The 2SB mixer has the sideband rejection ratio better than 12 dB over the full RF band, which is also well within the ALMA specifications of 10 dB.

  15. Subsonic Jet Noise Reduced With Improved Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Aircraft noise pollution is becoming a major environmental concern for the world community. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is responding to this concern by imposing more stringent noise restrictions for aircraft certification then ever before to keep the U.S. industry competitive with the rest of the world. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, attempts are underway to develop noise-reduction technology for newer engines and for retrofitting existing engines so that they are as quiet as (or quieter than) required. Lewis conducted acoustic and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) tests using Pratt & Whitney's Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers (IEGM). The IEGM's mix the core flow with the fan flow prior to their common exhaust. All tests were conducted in Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory--a semihemispheric dome open to the ambient atmosphere. This was the first time Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used in such a facility at Lewis. Jet exhaust velocity and turbulence and the internal velocity fields were detailed. Far-field acoustics were also measured. Pratt & Whitney provided 1/7th scale model test hardware (a 12-lobe mixer, a 20-lobe mixer, and a splitter) for 1.7 bypass ratio engines, and NASA provided the research engineers, test facility, and test time. The Pratt & Whitney JT8D-200 engine power conditions were used for all tests.

  16. Noise Reduction with Lobed Mixers: Nozzle-Length and Free-Jet Speed Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James C.; Boyd, Kathy C.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic test results are presented for 1/4th-scaled nozzles with internal lobed mixers used for reduction of subsonic jet noise of turbofan engines with bypass ratio above 5 and jet speeds up to 830 ft/s. One coaxial and three forced lobe mixers were tested with variations in lobe penetration, cut-outs in lobe-sidewall, lobe number and nozzle-length. Measured exit flow profiles and thrusts are used to assist the inferences from acoustic data. It is observed that lobed mixers reduce the low-frequency noise due to more uniformly mixed exit flow; but they may also increase the high-frequency noise at peak perceived noise (PNL) angle and angles upstream of it due to enhanced mixing inside the nozzle. Cut-outs and low lobe penetration reduce the annoying portion of the spectrum but lead to less uniform exit flow. Due to the dominance of internal duct noise in unscalloped, high-penetration mixers their noise is not reduced as much with increase in free-jet speed as that of coaxial or cut-out lobed mixers. The latter two mixers also show no change in PNL over the wide range of nozzle-lengths tested because most of their noise sources are outside the nozzle; whereas, the former show an increase in noise with decrease in nozzle-length.

  17. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  18. Mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine having a pilot mixer with a corner flame stabilizing recirculation zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer, and a pilot mixer having an annular housing in which a corner is formed between an aft portion of the housing and a bulkhead wall in which a corner recirculation zone is located to stabilize and anchor the flame of the pilot mixer. The pilot mixer can further include features to cool the annular housing, including in the area of the corner recirculation zone.

  19. Detailed evaluation of the performance of microfluidic T mixers using fluorescence and ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masca, Sergiu I.; Rodriguez-Mendieta, Iñigo R.; Friel, Claire T.; Radford, Sheena E.; Smith, D. Alastair

    2006-05-01

    A reliable device that produces efficient mixing with a short dead time has enormous utility in the kinetic analysis of biochemical and chemical processes. We have designed two different T mixers that use moderate flow rates (0.2-0.4ml/s), can monitor reactions up to several milliseconds, and achieve mixing times as low as 20μs. The two mixers are easy to build and dismantle, reliable, and can perform hundreds of experiments without blocking. The first mixer comprises a stainless steel block, containing a microchannel, glued to a quartz cuvette, containing a 200×200μm2 observation channel defining a conventional T mixer. The reactions are monitored by imaging the length of the observation channel onto a charge-coupled device camera. In the second mixer the entire T (200×200μm2 internal cross section) is contained within a 40-mm-long quartz cuvette. We have adopted a novel approach to controlling the entrance channel bore by inserting a stainless steel wire in order to increase the linear speed of the impinging fluids. Using a dye to visualize the flow profile inside the second T mixer, it was shown that in this T geometry segregation of the reactants is observed in the junction between the inlet channels and the observation channel (T junction) and mixing occurs entirely in the observation channel. We thoroughly tested the two mixers through several kinetic reactions using both fluorescence and ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy measurements. We show that both mixers provide efficient mixing with nominal dead times (using 1:10 v /v dilution), calculated using the quenching of the fluorescence of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide by N-bromosuccinimide, of 200±20 and 100±10μs, for each mixer, respectively. However, the ability to monitor within the inlet channels and the entire observation channel of the second mixer shows that this standard approach to estimating the dead time is artifactual, since it relies on assuming a constant flow speed throughout the

  20. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an integrated reformer-mixer nozzle-mixer diffuser

    DOEpatents

    Shockling, L.A.

    1991-09-10

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel, where the spent fuel recirculation channel, passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet to form a reformable mixture, where a reforming chamber contains an outer portion containing reforming material, an inner portion preferably containing a mixer nozzle and a mixer-diffuser, and a middle portion for receiving spent fuel, where the mixer nozzle and mixer-diffuser are preferably both within the reforming chamber and substantially exterior to the main portion of the apparatus, where the reformable mixture flows up and then backward before contacting the reforming material, and the mixer nozzle can operate below 400 C. 1 figure.

  1. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an integrated reformer-mixer nozzle-mixer diffuser

    DOEpatents

    Shockling, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel (46), where the spent fuel recirculation channel (46), passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) to form a reformable mixture, where a reforming chamber (54) contains an outer portion containing reforming material (56), an inner portion preferably containing a mixer nozzle (50) and a mixer-diffuser (52), and a middle portion (64) for receiving spent fuel, where the mixer nozzle (50) and mixer-diffuser (52) are preferably both within the reforming chamber (54) and substantially exterior to the main portion of the apparatus, where the reformable mixture flows up and then backward before contacting the reforming material (56), and the mixer nozzle (50) can operate below 400.degree. C.

  2. Quantum limited quasiparticle mixers at 100 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A; Hu, Qing; Richards, P.L. ); Worsham, A.H.; Prober, D.E. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Raeisaenen, A.V. . Radio Lab.)

    1990-09-01

    We have made accurate measurements of the noise and gain of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers employing small area (1{mu}m{sup 2}) Ta/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1} tunnel junctions. We have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 +/{minus} 0.31 quanta at 95.0 GHz, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit of 0.5 quanta. We have carried out a detailed comparison between theoretical predictions of the quantum theory of mixing and experimentally measured noise and gain. We used the shapes of I-V curves pumped at the upper and lower sideband frequencies to deduce values of the embedding admittances at these frequencies. Using these admittances, the mixer noise and gain predicted by quantum theory are in excellent agreement with experiment. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an exterior fuel mixer nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip; Doshi, Vinod B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel (46), where the spent fuel recirculation channel (46), a portion of which is in contact with the outside of a mixer chamber (52), passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at the entrance to the mixer chamber, and a mixer nozzle (50) is located at the entrance to the mixer chamber, where the mixer chamber (52) connects with the reforming chamber (54), and where the mixer-diffuser chamber (52) and mixer nozzle (50) are exterior to and spaced apart from the combustion chamber (24), and the generator chamber (22), and the mixer nozzle (50) can operate below 400.degree. C.

  4. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an exterior fuel mixer nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, P.; Doshi, V.B.

    1992-12-08

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel, where the spent fuel recirculation channel, a portion of which is in contact with the outside of a mixer chamber, passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at the entrance to the mixer chamber, and a mixer nozzle is located at the entrance to the mixer chamber, where the mixer chamber connects with the reforming chamber, and where the mixer-diffuser chamber and mixer nozzle are exterior to and spaced apart from the combustion chamber, and the generator chamber, and the mixer nozzle can operate below 400 C. 2 figs.

  5. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  6. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  7. High-speed Digital Baseband Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, F. P.; Quirk, M. P.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of designing a digital, complex, baseband mixer with a 50 MHz sampling rate is explored. The baseband filter must provide passbands with linear phase response to minimize intersymbol interference. The effects of signal quantization, filter coefficient quantization, dynamic range, filter response characteristics, and the performance of the mixer when used for cross correlation and autocorrelation pulse detection techniques are discussed. This filter was designed for use in the high speed data acquisition system (HSDAS), an advanced experimental system in the Deep Space Network.

  8. Heat Balance Study for Submersible Mixer Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-07-21

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on waste temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the Type-I SRS tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing long-shaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The model will also be used to provide input to the operation planning. This planning will be used as input to pump run duration in order to maintain temperature requirements within the tank during SMP operation.

  9. Design of a TF34 turbofan mixer for reduction of flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamay, A.; Edkins, D. P.; Mishler, R. B.; Clapper, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    This portion of the TF-34 turbofan quiet engine studies has been devoted to the selection and design of a special mixer exhaust nozzle system to reduce the maximum 150 m (500 foot) sideline noise generated by the impingement of four engine exhausts on a STOL wing flap system to less than 92 PNdB. The design concept selected consists of a 12-lobe internal mixer and a 12-lobe external mixer mounted in series. The internal mixer reduces maximum exhaust velocities by mixing the fan and turbine streams. The external mixer is designed to reduce the velocity of the exhaust stream striking the wing flap surfaces. A ground test version of this concept has been designed to be installed and tested on an acoustically treated TF-34 engine nacelle, with flexibility to simulate a flight version of this concept which has also been defined. Estimated noise levels are 2 PNdB below the objective at approach and 2 PNdB above the objective at takeoff, with an uncertainty band of +3, -2 PNdB.

  10. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  11. A Low-Noise NbTiN Hot Electron Bolometer Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Edward; Stern, Jeffrey; Megerian, Krikor; LeDuc, Henry; Sridharan, T. K.; Gibson, Hugh; Blundell, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer elements, based on niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) thin film technology, have been fabricated on crystalline quartz substrates over a 20 nm thick AlN buffer layer. The film was patterned by optical lithography, yielding bolometer elements that measure about 1 micrometer long and between 2 and 12 micrometers wide. These mixer chips were mounted in a fixed-tuned waveguide mixer block, and tested in the 600 and 800 GHz frequency range. The 3-dB output bandwidth of these mixers was determined to be about 2.5 GHz and we measured a receiver noise temperature of 270 K at 630 GHz using an intermediate frequency of 1.5 GHz. The receiver has excellent amplitude stability and the noise temperature measurements are highly repeatable. An 800 GHz receiver incorporating one of these mixer chips has recently been installed at the Sub-Millimeter Telescope in Arizona for field test and for astronomical observations.

  12. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  13. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  14. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  15. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  16. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  17. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  18. NbN/MgO/NbN SIS tunnel junctions for submm wave mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. A.; Hunt, B. D.; Leduc, H. G.; Judas, A.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Cypher, S. R.; Khanna, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on the fabrication and testing of all-refractory NbN/MgO/NbN SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) tunnel junctions for use as high-frequency mixers. Progress in the development of techniques for the fabrication of submicron-area tunnel junctions is described. Junction structures which have been investigated include mesa, crossline, and edge geometries. Using reactive sputtering techniques, NbN tunnel junctions with critical currents in excess of 104 A/sq cm have been fabricated with Vm values as high as 65 mV and areas down to 0.1 sq micron. Specific capacitance measurements on NbN/MgO/NbN mesa-type tunnel junctions give values in the range 60-90 fF/sq micron. These SIS tunnel junctions have been integrated with antennas and coupling structures for mixer tests in a waveguide receiver at 207 GHz. Preliminary mixer results are reported.

  19. Quasi-Optical SIS Mixer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported our ongoing development of sensitive quasi-optical SIS mixers for the submillimeter band. The technology developed under this grant is now being applied to NASA missions, including the NASA/USRA SOFIA airborne observatory and and the ESA/NASA FIRST/Herschel space astronomy mission.

  20. Oxide_Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Exhaust Mixer Development in the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, James D.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Szelagowski, J.; Sokhey, J.; Heffernan, T.; Clegg, J.; Pierluissi, A.; Riedell, J.; Atmur, S.; Wyen, T.; Ursic, J.

    2015-01-01

    Rolls-Royce North American Technologies, Inc. (LibertyWorksLW) began considering the development of CMC exhaust forced mixers in 2008, as a means of obtaining reduced weight and hotter operating temperature capability, while minimizing shape distortion during operation, which would improve mixing efficiency and reduce fuel burn. Increased component durability, enhanced ability to fabricate complex-shaped components, and engine noise reduction are other potential advantages of CMC mixers (compared to metallic mixers). In 2010, NASA was pursuing the reduction of NOx emissions, fuel burn, and noise from turbine engines in Phase I of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. ERA subtasks, including those focused on CMC components, were formulated with the goal of maturing technology from proof of concept validation (TRL 3) to a systemsubsystem or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment (TRL 6). In April 2010, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and LibertyWorks jointly initiated a CMC Exhaust System Validation Program within the ERA Project, teaming on CMC exhaust mixer development for subsonic jet engines capable of operating with increased performance. Our initial focus was on designing, fabricating, and characterizing the thrust and acoustic performance of a roughly quarter-scale 16-lobe oxide oxide CMC mixer and tail cone along with a conventional low bypass exhaust nozzle. Support Services, LLC (Allendale, MI) and ATK COI Ceramics, Inc. (COIC, in San Diego, CA) supported the design of a subscale nozzle assembly that consisted of an oxide oxide CMC mixer and center body, with each component mounted on a metallic attachment ring. That design was based upon the operating conditions a mixer would experience in a turbofan engine. Validation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the subscale mixer via testing and the achievement of TRL 4 encouraged the NASALWCOIC team to move to the next phase where a full scale CMC mixer sized for a RR

  1. Slot antenna SIS mixers for submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Leduc, Henry G.; Stern, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing improved versions of a slot antenna SIS mixer which we have previously described. The initial work demonstrated a double sideband noise temperature of 420 K for a 500 GHz quasi-optical SIS mixer employing a twin-slot antenna on a quartz dielectric substrate. A quartz hyperhemispherical lens is used to focus the incoming radiation onto the twin-slot antenna. The advantages of a twin-slot antenna include a low impedance (35 omega) and a clean, symmetric beam pattern into the dielectric with a 70 percent efficiency. In our original mixer, the radiation was coupled from the two slot antennas onto superconducting microstrip lines which fed the SIS junction. By performing an impedance transformation using tapered lines and by feeding the radiation from the two slots to the junction in parallel, the effective (real) impedance seen by the junction was reduced to just 4 omega. This very low impedance allowed a junction area of 2.3 sq micron to be used at 500 GHz, which was manufactured using optical lithography. However, no attempt was made to tune out the junction capacitance. We estimate that this capacitance reduces the impedance coupling efficiency to eta(sub Z) approx. equals 0.23, for our junction with omega R(sub N) C = 5.3 at 500 GHz. The recent development of techniques using electron-beam lithography to manufacture junctions with very small areas (approx. equals 0.1 sq microns) now allows considerably more flexibility in the design of SIS mixer circuits. We have redesigned the slot-antenna mixer to take advantage of this possibility. In particular, we have included a novel circuit which allows the junction capacitance to be tune out over a broad bandwidth. For instance, mixers designed for 800 GHz using NbN/MgO/NbN junctions with realistic parameters achieve a 3 dB impedance bandwidth of nearly 400 GHz. Furthermore, our circuit uses only short lengths of microstrip and should be less sensitive to RF losses than other designs. The improved

  2. Plutonium flowsheet development in miniature mixer-settlers

    SciTech Connect

    Hannaford, B.A.; Davis, G.D.

    1981-05-01

    Initial runs were completed in a new solvent extraction facility that has been built for testing coprocessing flowsheets with simulated LWR and FBR fuel solutions. The equipment, which is assembled in glove boxes, includes three 16-stage miniature mixer-settler banks with associated in-line monitors, pumping equipment, and sampling apparatus. Following shakedown runs with solutions containing uranium only, two flowsheet test runs were made with a simulated LWR fuel solution (U/Pu = 100). The solution was fed to an extraction-scrub bank, where 30% tributyl phosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent was used to coextract uranium and plutonium. The extract was fed to a second mixer-settler bank, where all of the plutonium was stripped into an aqueous product stream using hydroxylamine nitrate for plutonium reduction; a controlled fraction of the uranium was simultaneously stripped to produce a U/Pu ratio of {similar_to}2. The amount of the uranium stripped with the plutonium was regulated by careful control of an organic backscrub stream. Finally, the residual uranium in the solvent was stripped in the third mixer-settler bank. The success of the experiments depended on precise control of very low liquid flow rates, and on in-line monitors which indicated the uranium or total heavy-metal concentrations. The most useful in-line device was the Mettler-Paar density meter, from which metal concentrations could be determined to within {similar_to}1 g/L. A miniature spectrophotometer also gave promising results for uranium analysis. Preliminary use of a Hewlett-Packard data acquisition system was satisfactory; recorded variables were temperature, solution density, liquid flow rates, and liquid levels.

  3. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW.

  4. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW

  5. Assessment of the relative performance of a confined impinging jets mixer and a multi-inlet vortex mixer for curcumin nanoparticle production.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shing Fung; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Chow, Albert Hee Lum

    2014-10-01

    The relative performance of two specially designed mixers for nanoparticle production, namely, two-stream confined impinging jets with dilution mixer (CIJ-D-M) and four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM), was evaluated using the model compound, curcumin (CUR), under defined conditions of varying mixing rate and organic solvent. In the absence of turbulent fluctuations, higher mixing rate tended to generate finer particles. Among the three water-miscible organic solvents tested, acetone afforded the smallest particle size and the narrowest particle size distribution. Both mixers were capable of reproducibly fabricating CUR nanoparticles with particle size below 100 nm and high encapsulation efficiency (>99.9%). Specifically, CIJ-D-M yielded nanoparticles with smaller size and polydispersity index while the particles obtained by the MIVM displayed better short-term stability. In addition, CIJ-D-M tended to produce a mixture of irregular nanoaggregates and primary nanoparticles while roughly spherical nanoparticles were generated with the MIVM. The observed particle size and morphological differences could be attributed to the differences in the configuration of the mixing chamber and the related mixing order. PMID:25016977

  6. 241-SY-101 mixer pump lifetime expectancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1995-12-08

    The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-726, Rev. 0 241-SY-101 Mixer Pump Lifetime Expectancy is to determine a best estimate of the mean lifetime of non-repairable (located in the waste) essential features of the hydrogen mitigation mixer pump presently installed in 101-SY. The estimated mean lifetime is 9.1 years. This report does not demonstrate operation of the entire pump assembly within the Tank Farm ``safety envelope``. It was recognized by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) this test pump was not specifically designed for long term service in tank 101-SY. In June 95 the DNFSB visited Hanford and ask the question, ``how long will this test pump last and how will the essential features fail?`` During the 2 day meeting with the DNFSB it was discussed and defined within the meeting just exactly what essential features of the pump must operate. These essential features would allow the pump to operate for the purpose of extending the window for replacement. Operating with only essential features would definitely be outside the operating safety envelope and would require a waiver. There are three essential features: 1. The pump itself (i.e. the impeller and motor) must operate 2. Nozzles and discharges leg must remain unplugged 3. The pump can be re-aimed, new waste targeted, even if manually.

  7. Accurate experimental and theoretical comparisons between superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixers showing weak and strong quantum effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, W. R.; Richards, P. L.; Face, D. W.; Prober, D. E.; Lloyd, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    A systematic study of the gain and noise in superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixers employing Ta based, Nb based, and Pb-alloy based tunnel junctions was made. These junctions displayed both weak and strong quantum effects at a signal frequency of 33 GHz. The effects of energy gap sharpness and subgap current were investigated and are quantitatively related to mixer performance. Detailed comparisons are made of the mixing results with the predictions of a three-port model approximation to the Tucker theory. Mixer performance was measured with a novel test apparatus which is accurate enough to allow for the first quantitative tests of theoretical noise predictions. It is found that the three-port model of the Tucker theory underestimates the mixer noise temperature by a factor of about 2 for all of the mixers. In addition, predicted values of available mixer gain are in reasonable agreement with experiment when quantum effects are weak. However, as quantum effects become strong, the predicted available gain diverges to infinity, which is in sharp contrast to the experimental results. Predictions of coupled gain do not always show such divergences.

  8. Study on installation of the submersible mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.; Shi, W. D.; He, X. H.; Jiang, H.; Xu, Y. H.

    2013-12-01

    Study on installation of the submersible mixer for sewage treatment has been limited. In this article, large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was adopted. ICEM software was used to build an unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. Agitation pools on four different installation location cases were simulated respectively, and the external characteristic of the submersible mixer and the velocity cloud of the axial section were respectively comparatively analyzed. The best stirring effect can be reached by the installation location of case C, which is near the bottom of the pool 600 mm and blade distance the bottom at least for 200 mm wide and wide edge and narrow edge distance by 4:3. The conclusion can guide the engineering practice.

  9. Development of SIS Mixers for 1 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Kooi, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Stern, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    SIS heterodyne mixer technology based on niobium tunnel junctions has now been pushed to frequencies over 1 THz, clearly demonstrating that the SIS junctions are capable of mixing at frequencies up to twice the energy gap frequency (4 Delta/h). However, the performance degrades rapidly above the gap frequency of niobium (2 Delta/h approx. 700 GHz) due to substantial ohmic losses in the on-chip tuning circuit. To solve this problem, the tuning circuit should be fabricated using a superconducting film with a larger energy gap, such as NbN; unfortunately, NbN films often have a substantial excess surface resistance in the submillimeter band. In contrast, the SIS mixer measurements we present in this paper indicate that the losses for NbTiN thin films can be quite low.

  10. Temperature automation for a propellant mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Wilson, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis and installation of an automatic temperature controller on a propellant mixer is presented. Ultimately, the entire mixing process will come under automation, but since precise adherence to the temperature profile is very difficult to sustain manually, this was the first component to be automated. Automation is not only important for producing a uniform product, but it is necessary for envisioned space-based propellant production.

  11. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump Deployment in the Gunite and Associated Tanks at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Lewis, Ben; Johnson, Marshall A.; Randolph, J. G.

    2001-03-01

    In FY 1998, Pulsating Mixer Pump (PMP) technology, consisting of a jet mixer powered by a reciprocating air supply, was selected for deployment in one of the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to mobilize settled solids. The pulsating mixer pump technology was identified during FY 1996 and FY 1997 technical exchanges between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a promising technology that could be implemented in the DOE complex. During FY 1997, the pulsating mixer pump technology, provided by the Russian Integrated Mining Chemical Company, was tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to observe its ability to suspend settled solids. Based on the results of this demonstration, ORNL and DOE staff determined that a modified pulsating mixer pump would meet project needs for remote sludge mobilization of Gunite tank sludge and reduce the cost of operation and maintenance of more expensive mixing systems. The functions and requirements of the system were developed by combining the results and recommendations from the pulsating mixer pump demonstration at PNNL with the requirements identified by staff at ORNL involved with the remediation of the Gunite and Associated Tanks. The PMP is comprised of a pump chamber, check valve, a working gas supply pipe, a discharge manifold, and four jet nozzles. The pump uses two distinct cycles, fill and discharge, to perform its mixing action. During the fill cycle, vacuum is applied to the pump chamber by an eductor, which draws liquid into the pump. When the liquid level inside the chamber reaches a certain level, the chamber is pressurized with compressed air to discharge the liquid through the jet nozzles and back into the tank to mobilize sludge and settled solids.

  12. Lobed Mixer Optimization for Advanced Ejector Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives are: 1) to pursue analytical, computational, and experimental studies that enhance basic understanding of forced mixing phenomena relevant to supersonic jet noise reduction, and 2) to integrate this enhanced understanding (analytical, computational, and empirical) into a design-oriented model of a mixer-ejector noise suppression system. The work is focused on ejector geometries and flow conditions typical of those being investigated in the NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP). The research will be carried out in collaboration with the NASA HSRP Nozzle Integrated Technology Development (ITD) Team, and will both contribute to, and benefit from, the results of other HSRP research. The noise suppressor system model that is being developed under this grant is distinct from analytical tools developed by industry because it directly links details of lobe geometry to mixer-ejector performance. In addition, the model provides a 'technology road map to define gaps in the current understanding of various phenomena related to mixer-ejector design and to help prioritize research areas. This report describes research completed in the past year, as well as work proposed for the following year.

  13. Microfluidic Mixers for Studying Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Wu, Ling; Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which a protein folds into its native conformation is highly relevant to biology and human health yet still poorly understood. One reason for this is that folding takes place over a wide range of timescales, from nanoseconds to seconds or longer, depending on the protein1. Conventional stopped-flow mixers have allowed measurement of folding kinetics starting at about 1 ms. We have recently developed a microfluidic mixer that dilutes denaturant ~100-fold in ~8 μs2. Unlike a stopped-flow mixer, this mixer operates in the laminar flow regime in which turbulence does not occur. The absence of turbulence allows precise numeric simulation of all flows within the mixer with excellent agreement to experiment3-4. Laminar flow is achieved for Reynolds numbers Re ≤100. For aqueous solutions, this requires micron scale geometries. We use a hard substrate, such as silicon or fused silica, to make channels 5-10 μm wide and 10 μm deep (See Figure 1). The smallest dimensions, at the entrance to the mixing region, are on the order of 1 μm in size. The chip is sealed with a thin glass or fused silica coverslip for optical access. Typical total linear flow rates are ~1 m/s, yielding Re~10, but the protein consumption is only ~0.5 nL/s or 1.8 μL/hr. Protein concentration depends on the detection method: For tryptophan fluorescence the typical concentration is 100 μM (for 1 Trp/protein) and for FRET the typical concentration is ~100 nM. The folding process is initiated by rapid dilution of denaturant from 6 M to 0.06 M guanidine hydrochloride. The protein in high denaturant flows down a central channel and is met on either side at the mixing region by buffer without denaturant moving ~100 times faster (see Figure 2). This geometry causes rapid constriction of the protein flow into a narrow jet ~100 nm wide. Diffusion of the light denaturant molecules is very rapid, while diffusion of the heavy protein molecules is much slower, diffusing less than 1 μm in 1 ms

  14. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  15. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 2: Three-dimensional inviscid mixer analysis (FLOMIX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional potential analysis (FLOMIX) was formulated and applied to the inviscid flow over a turbofan foced mixer. The method uses a small disturbance formulation to analytically uncouple the circumferential flow from the radial and axial flow problem, thereby reducing the analysis to the solution of a series of axisymmetric problems. These equations are discretized using a flux volume formulation along a Cartesian grid. The method extends earlier applications of the Cartesian method to complex cambered geometries. The effects of power addition are also included within the potential formulation. Good agreement is obtained with an alternate small disturbance analysis for a high penetration symmetric mixer in a planar duct. In addition, calculations showing pressure distributions and induced secondary vorticity fields are presented for practical trubofan mixer configurations, and where possible, comparison was made with available experimental data. A detailed description of the required data input and coordinate definition is presented along with a sample data set for a practical forced mixer configuration. A brief description of the program structure and subroutines is also provided.

  16. Computational studies of lobed forced mixer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Wu, S. S.; Yu, S. C. M.

    1998-03-01

    Full Navier-Stokes Analyses have been conducted for the flows behind the trailing edge of a lobed forced mixer. The governing equations are derived from the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations and discretized in the finite-difference form. A simple two-layer eddy viscosity model has also been used to account for the turbulence. Computed results are compared with some of the velocity measurements using a laser-Doppler anemometer (Yu and Yip (1997)). In general, good agreement can be obtained in the streamwise mean velocity distribution but the decay of the streamwise circulation is underpredicted. Some suggestions to the discrepancy are proposed.

  17. PULSED MIXER-SETTLER SOLVENT EXTRACTION CONTACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Figg, W.S.

    1958-08-12

    A mixer-settler extractor is described for contacting immiscible liquids having different specific gravities in order to withdraw one or more components from one liquid with the aid of the other liquid. The extractor consists of a hollow column, a rotary drive shafi extending : through the column with a number of impellers spaced thereon, an equal nunnber of separator plate sets each consisting of one fluorothene and one stainless steel plate with peripheral recesses and flow slots mounted on the column, and a pulse generator. This apparatus is particularly useful in solvent extraction processes for recovering plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of irradiated uranium.

  18. Biasable, Balanced, Fundamental Submillimeter Monolithic Membrane Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Tsang, Raymond; Dengler, Robert; Lin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This device is a biasable, submillimeter-wave, balanced mixer fabricated using JPL s monolithic membrane process a simplified version of planar membrane technology. The primary target application is instrumentation used for analysis of atmospheric constituents, pressure, temperature, winds, and other physical and chemical properties of the atmospheres of planets and comets. Other applications include high-sensitivity gas detection and analysis. This innovation uses a balanced configuration of two diodes allowing the radio frequency (RF) signal and local oscillator (LO) inputs to be separated. This removes the need for external diplexers that are inherently narrowband, bulky, and require mechanical tuning to change frequency. Additionally, this mixer uses DC bias-ability to improve its performance and versatility. In order to solve problems relating to circuit size, the GaAs membrane process was created. As much of the circuitry as possible is fabricated on-chip, making the circuit monolithic. The remainder of the circuitry is precision-machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs circuit. The most critical alignments are performed using micron-scale semiconductor technology, enabling wide bandwidth and high operating frequencies. The balanced mixer gets superior performance with less than 2 mW of LO power. This can be provided by a simple two-stage multiplier chain following an amplifier at around 90 GHz. Further, the diodes are arranged so that they can be biased. Biasing pushes the diodes closer to their switching voltage, so that less LO power is required to switch the diodes on and off. In the photo, the diodes are at the right end of the circuit. The LO comes from the waveguide at the right into a reduced-height section containing the diodes. Because the diodes are in series to the LO signal, they are both turned on and off simultaneously once per LO cycle. Conversely, the RF signal is picked up from the RF waveguide by the probe at the left, and flows

  19. A “twisted” microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications

    PubMed Central

    Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Salama, Khaled Nabil

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new “twisted” 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27453767

  20. A "twisted" microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications.

    PubMed

    Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Salama, Khaled Nabil

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new "twisted" 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27453767

  1. AlGaAs/GaAs quasi-bulk effect mixers: Analysis and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Yang, J.-X.; Agahi, F.; Dai, D.; Musante, C.; Grammer, W.; Lau, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    The lowest noise temperature for any receiver in the 0.5 to 1 THz range has been achieved with the bulk InSb hot electron mixer, which unfortunately suffers from the problem of having a very narrow bandwidth (1-2 MHz). We have demonstrated a three order of magnitude improvement in the bandwidth of hot electron mixers, by using the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) medium at the hetero-interface between AlGaAs and GaAs. We have tested both inhouse MOCVD-grown material, and MBE materials, with similar results. The conversion loss (L(sub c)) at 94 GHz is presently 18 dB for a mixer operating at 20 K, and calculations indicate that L(sub c) can be decreased to about 10 dB in future devices. Calculated and measured curves of L(sub c), versus PLO and IDC, respectively, agree well. We argue that there are several different configurations of hot electron mixers, which will also show wide bandwidth, and that these devices are likely to become important as low-noise THz receivers in the future.

  2. Broadband quasi-optical SIS mixers with large area junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pance, Gordana; Wengler, Micheal J.

    1994-04-01

    A broadband quasi-optical superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) mixer with integrated tuning elements was designed and tested. We are able to achieve very low noise performance using commercially available niobium integrated circuit (IC) technology. The low critical current density (980 A/sq cm) and large area (12 sq micron) of the commercial SIS's is compensated by the ability to fabricate accurate integrated tuning structures in the mature niobium IC process available from Hypres, Inc. Noise measurements were made in the frequency range from 70 to 105 GHz. The best uncorrected double sideband receiver noise is 38 K at 77 GHz, with receiver noise temperatures less than 100 K from 75 to 102 GHz.

  3. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  4. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer....

  8. Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA grant NAG5-9493. entitled "Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers". The goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a new generation of superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) receivers with extremely wide instantaneous (intermediate-frequency, or IF) bandwidths. of order 12 GHz. along with the wideband low-noise microwave HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) amplifiers which follow the SIS mixer. These wideband SIS/HEMT receivers would allow rapid submillimeter wavelength spectral line surveys to be carried out, for instance with the NASA airborne observatory SOFIA. and could potentially be useful for future submillimeter space missions such as SAFIR. In addition, there are potential NASA earth science applications. such as the monitoring of the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere and troposphere using the limb-sounding technique. The overall goals of this project have been achieved: a broadband 200-300 SIS receiver was designed and constructed, and was demonstrated in the field through a test run at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea. HI. The technical details are described in the appendices. which are primarily conference publications. but Appendix A also includes an unpublished summary of the latest results. The work on the SIS mixer design are described in the conference publications (appendices B and C). The "Supermix" software package that was developed at Caltech and used for the SIS design is also described in two conference papers, but has been substantially revised, debugged. and extended as part of the work completed for this grant. The Supermix package is made available to the community at no charge. The electromagnetic design of a radial waveguide probe similar to the one used in this work is described in a journal publication. Details of the novel fabrication procedure used for producing the SIS devices at JPL are also given in an

  9. Terahertz hot electron bolometer waveguide mixers for GREAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, P.; Honingh, C. E.; Jacobs, K.; Justen, M.; Schultz, M.; Stutzki, J.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Supplementing the publications based on the first-light observations with the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) on SOFIA, we present background information on the underlying heterodyne detector technology. This Letter complements the GREAT instrument Letter and focuses on the mixers itself. Aims: We describe the superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) detectors that are used as frequency mixers in the L1 (1400 GHz), L2 (1900 GHz), and M (2500 GHz) channels of GREAT. Measured performance of the detectors is presented and background information on their operation in GREAT is given. Methods: Our mixer units are waveguide-based and couple to free-space radiation via a feedhorn antenna. The HEB mixers are designed, fabricated, characterized, and flight-qualified in-house. We are able to use the full intermediate frequency bandwidth of the mixers using silicon-germanium multi-octave cryogenic low-noise amplifiers with very low input return loss. Results: Superconducting HEB mixers have proven to be practical and sensitive detectors for high-resolution THz frequency spectroscopy on SOFIA. We show that our niobium-titanium-nitride (NbTiN) material HEBs on silicon nitride (SiN) membrane substrates have an intermediate frequency (IF) noise roll-off frequency above 2.8 GHz, which does not limit the current receiver IF bandwidth. Our mixer technology development efforts culminate in the first successful operation of a waveguide-based HEB mixer at 2.5 THz and deployment for radioastronomy. A significant contribution to the success of GREAT is made by technological development, thorough characterization and performance optimization of the mixer and its IF interface for receiver operation on SOFIA. In particular, the development of an optimized mixer IF interface contributes to the low passband ripple and excellent stability, which GREAT demonstrated during its initial successful astronomical observation runs.

  10. Advanced Design Mixer Pump Tank 18 Design Modifications Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.J.

    2002-12-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is preparing to retrieve high level waste (HLW) from Tank 18 in early FY03 to provide feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and to support tank closure in FY04. As part of the Tank 18 project, WSRC will install a single Advanced Design Mixer Pump (ADMP) in the center riser of Tank 18 to mobilize, suspend, and mix radioactive sludge in preparation for transfer to Tank 7. The use of a single ADMP is a change to the current baseline of four (4) standard slurry pumps used during previous waste retrieval campaigns. The ADMP was originally conceived by Hanford and supported by SRS to provide a more reliable and maintainable mixer pump for use throughout the DOE complex. The ADMP underwent an extensive test program at SRS between 1998 and 2002 to assess reliability and hydraulic performance. The ADMP ran for approximately 4,200 hours over the four-year period. A detailed tear down and inspection of the pump following the 4,2 00-hour run revealed that the gas mechanical seals and anti-friction bearings would need to be refurbished/replaced prior to deployment in Tank 18. Design modifications were also needed to meet current Authorization Basis safety requirements. This report documents the modifications made to the ADMP in support of Tank 18 deployment. This report meets the requirements of Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Milestone 3591.4-1, ''Issue Report on Modifications Made to the ADMP,'' contained in Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR16WT51, ''WSRC Retrieval and Closure.''

  11. Effect of Installation of Mixer/Ejector Nozzles on the Core Flow Exhaust of High-Bypass-Ratio Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas E.

    1998-01-01

    The aerospace industry is currently investigating the effect of installing mixer/ejector nozzles on the core flow exhaust of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. This effort includes both full-scale engine tests at sea level conditions and subscale tests in static test facilities. Subscale model tests are to be conducted prior to full-scale testing. With this approach, model results can be analyzed and compared with analytical predications. Problem areas can then be identified and design changes made and verified in subscale prior to committing to any final design configurations for engine ground tests. One of the subscale model test programs for the integrated mixer/ejector development was a joint test conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. This test was conducted to study various mixer/ejector nozzle configurations installed on the core flow exhaust of advanced, high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines for subsonic, commercial applications. The mixer/ejector concept involves the introduction of largescale, low-loss, streamwise vortices that entrain large amounts of secondary air and rapidly mix it with the primary stream. This results in increased ejector pumping relative to conventional ejectors and in more complete mixing within the ejector shroud. The latter improves thrust performance through the efficient energy exchange between the primary and secondary streams. This experimental program was completed in April 1997 in Lewis' CE-22 static test facility. Variables tested included the nozzle area ratio (A9/A8), which ranged from 1.6 to 3.0. This ratio was varied by increasing or decreasing the nozzle throat area, A8. Primary nozzles tested included both lobed mixers and conical primaries. These configurations were tested with and without an outer shroud, and the shroud position was varied by inserting spacers in it. In addition, data were acquired with and without secondary flow.

  12. Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a new generation of superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) receivers with extremely wide instantaneous (intermediate-frequency, or IF) bandwidths, of order 12 GHz. Such mixers would allow rapid submillimeter wavelength spectral line surveys to be carried out with SOFIA, and could potentially be used for future submillimeter space missions such as SAFIR. There are two major components which are being developed: (1) SIS mixers with broad (12 GHz) IF bandwidths; and (2) low-noise, broadband microwave, (6-18 GHz) amplifiers, which amplify the IF output from the SIS mixer. The work on these components is discussed in two sections

  13. Life-cycle cost analysis of advanced design mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.N., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-23

    This analysis provides cost justification for the Advanced Design Mixer Pump program based on the cost benefit to the Hanford Site of 4 mixer pump systems defined in terms of the life-cycle cost.A computer model is used to estimate the total number of service hours necessary for each mixer pump to operate over the 20-year retrieval sequence period for single-shell tank waste. This study also considered the double-shell tank waste retrieved prior to the single-shell tank waste which is considered the initial retrieval.

  14. Quadrature Mixer LO Leakage Suppression Through Quadrature DC Bias

    SciTech Connect

    BALDWIN, JESSE G; DUBBERT, DALE F.

    2002-05-01

    A new concept has been developed which allows direct-to-RF conversion of digitally synthesized waveforms. The concept named Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesis (QECDWS) employs quadrature amplitude and phase predistortion to the complex waveform to reduce the undesirable quadrature image. Another undesirable product of QECDWS-based RF conversion is the Local Oscillator (LO) leakage through the quadrature upconverter (mixer). A common technique for reducing this LO leakage is to apply a quadrature bias to the mixer I and Q inputs. This report analyzes this technique through theory, lab measurement, and data analysis for a candidate quadrature mixer for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications.

  15. Diffusion-Cooled Tantalum Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; McGrath, William; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry

    2004-01-01

    A batch of experimental diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers (HEBs), suitable for use as mixers having input frequencies in the terahertz range and output frequencies up to about a gigahertz, exploit the superconducting/normal-conducting transition in a thin strip of tantalum. The design and operation of these HEB mixers are based on mostly the same principles as those of a prior HEB mixer that exploited the superconducting/normal- conducting transition in a thin strip of niobium and that was described elsewhere.

  16. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 3: A computer code for 3-D mixing in axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference method is developed for making detailed predictions of three dimensional subsonic turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers. The governing equations are solved by a forward-marching solution procedure which corrects an inviscid potential flow solution for viscous and thermal effects, secondary flows, total pressure distortion and losses, internal flow blockage and pressure drop. Test calculations for a turbulent coaxial jet flow verify that the turbulence model performs satisfactorily for this relatively simple flow. Lobe mixer flows are presented for two geometries typical of current mixer design. These calculations included both hot and cold flow conditions, and both matched and mismatched Mach number and total pressure in the fan and turbine streams.

  17. Are genetic self-tests dangerous? Assessing the commercialization of genetic testing in terms of personal autonomy.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Ludvig

    2004-01-01

    Should a growing market for genetic self-tests be welcomed or feared? From the point of view of personal autonomy the increasing availability of predictive health information seems promising. Yet it is frequently pointed out that genetic information about future health may cause anxiety, distress and even loss of "life-hopes." In this article the argument that genetic self-tests undermine personal autonomy is assessed and criticized. I contend that opportunities for autonomous choice are not reduced by genetic information but by misperceptions and misunderstandings of the results of genetic tests. Since the interpretation of genetic information is sometimes distorted by the information provided about the genetic products, more attention should be given to deceitful marketing that overblows the utility of genetic products. Yet personal autonomy is reduced neither by genetic tests nor by genetic information and there is consequently no compelling case for the conclusion that genetic self-tests should be prohibited. PMID:15690941

  18. FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND POWER HOUSE (RIGHT). - Tennessee Coal & Iron Company, Ensley Works, Open Hearth Furnace (Ruins), West of Ensley commercial & residential districts, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND POWER HOUSE (RIGHT - Tennessee Coal & Iron Company, Ensley Works, Open Hearth Furnace (Ruins), West of Ensley commercial & residential districts, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. 35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer Baldwin Filtration plant - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. 41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from atop chemical spray nozzels. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Low Power Upconversion Mixer for Medical Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lioe, De Xing; Shafie, Suhaidi; Tan, Gim Heng

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the design of a low power upconversion mixer adapted in medical remote sensing such as wireless endoscopy application. The proposed upconversion mixer operates in ISM band of 433 MHz. With the carrier power of −5 dBm, the proposed mixer has an output inferred 1 dB compression point of −0.5 dBm with a corresponding output third-order intercept point (OIP3) of 7.1 dBm. The design of the upconversion mixer is realized on CMOS 0.13 μm platform, with a current consumption of 594 μA at supply voltage headroom of 1.2 V. PMID:25133266

  3. 47. Pouring deck columns, steampowered concrete mixer at center; direction ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Pouring deck columns, steam-powered concrete mixer at center; direction of view not clear, but probably to north. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  4. A Low-noise Micromachined Millimeter-Wave Heterodyne Mixer using Nb Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLange, Gert; Jacobson, Brian R.; Hu, Qing

    1996-01-01

    A heterodyne mixer with a micromachined horn antenna and a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction as mixing element is tested in the W-band (75-115 GHz) frequency range. Micromachined integrated horn antennas consist of a dipole antenna suspended on a thin Si3N4 dielectric membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The mixer performance is optimized by using a backing plane behind the dipole antenna to tune out the capacitance of the tunnel junction. The lowest receiver noise temperature of 30 +/- 3 K (without any correction) is measured at 106 GHz with a 3-dB bandwidth of 8 GHz. This sensitivity is comparable to the state-of-the-art waveguide and quasi-optical SIS receivers, showing the potential use of micromachined horn antennas in imaging arrays.

  5. Embedding impedance approximations in the analysis of SIS mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.; Pan, S.-K.; Withington, S.

    1992-01-01

    Future millimeter-wave radio astronomy instruments will use arrays of many SIS receivers, either as focal plane arrays on individual radio telescopes, or as individual receivers on the many antennas of radio interferometers. Such applications will require broadband integrated mixers without mechanical tuners. To produce such mixers, it will be necessary to improve present mixer design techniques, most of which use the three-frequency approximation to Tucker's quantum mixer theory. This paper examines the adequacy of three approximations to Tucker's theory: (1) the usual three-frequency approximation which assumes a sinusoidal LO voltage at the junction, and a short-circuit at all frequencies above the upper sideband; (2) a five-frequency approximation which allows two LO voltage harmonics and five small-signal sidebands; and (3) a quasi five-frequency approximation in which five small-signal sidebands are allowed, but the LO voltage is assumed sinusoidal. These are compared with a full harmonic-Newton solution of Tucker's equations, including eight LO harmonics and their corresponding sidebands, for realistic SIS mixer circuits. It is shown that the accuracy of the three approximations depends strongly on the value of omega R(sub N)C for the SIS junctions used. For large omega R(sub N)C, all three approximations approach the eight-harmonic solution. For omega R(sub N)C values in the range 0.5 to 10, the range of most practical interest, the quasi five-frequency approximation is a considerable improvement over the three-frequency approximation, and should be suitable for much design work. For the realistic SIS mixers considered here, the five-frequency approximation gives results very close to those of the eight-harmonic solution. Use of these approximations, where appropriate, considerably reduces the computational effort needed to analyze an SIS mixer, and allows the design and optimization of mixers using a personal computer.

  6. Development of Balanced SIS Mixers for ALMA Band-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, Sergey V.; Koryukin, Oleg V.; Uzawa, Yoshinory; Noguchi, Takashi; Uvarov, Andrey V.; Cohn, Ilya A.

    2006-05-01

    A few concepts of a wide-band balanced SIS mixer employing submicron-sized SIS junctions are under development for 787-950 GHz frequency range. A quasioptical DSB balanced mixer with integrated cross-slot antenna is considered as the less laborious and cheaper option. The silicon lens-antenna beam efficiency is expected above 80 % across the whole band with first-order sidelobe below -16 dB. To use the conservative horn antenna solution, a single chamber waveguide DSB balanced mixer is developed. Two equal probe-type SIS chips are inserted into a full-height waveguide through its opposite broad walls; these two mixers are driven by the signal waveguide in series. The LO current is transferred to the mixers in parallel via a capacitive probe inserted through the narrow wall of the signal waveguide from the neighboring LO waveguide. The HFSS model demonstrated the LO power coupling efficiency above -3 dB, almost perfect signal transfer and the LO cross talk below -30 dB that take into account misalignment (misbalance) of the chips. It is demonstrated numerically using Tucker's 3-port model that unequal pump of junctions of a twin-SIS mixer can lead, in spite of the perfect signal coupling, to degradation of the gain performance up to -3 dB, especially at the top of the ALMA Band-10.

  7. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, C F

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined. PMID:27500029

  8. Terahertz-frequency waveguide HEB mixers for spectral line astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaha, Faouzi; Kawamura, Jonathan; Stern, Jeffery; Jung, Cecile; Skalare, Anders; White, Victor

    2012-09-01

    We report on the development of waveguide-based mixers for operation beyond 2 THz. The mixer element is a superconducting hot-electron bolometer (HEB) fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Because it is beyond the capability of conventional machining techniques to produce the fine structures required for the waveguide embedding circuit for use at such high frequencies, we employ two lithography-based approaches to produce the waveguide circuit: a metallic micro-plating process akin to 3-D printing and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) silicon micromachining. Various mixer configurations have been successfully produced using these approaches. A single-ended mixer produced by the metal plating technique has been demonstrated with a receiver noise temperature of 970 K (DSB) at a localoscillator frequency of 2.74 THz. A similar mixer, produced using a silicon-based micro-machining technique, has a noise temperature of 2000 K (DSB) at 2.56 THz. In another example, we have successfully produced a waveguide RF hybrid for operation at 2.74 THz. This is a key component in a balanced mixer, a configuration that efficiently utilizes local oscillator power, which is scarce at these frequencies. In addition to allowing us to extend the frequency of operation of waveguide-based receivers beyond 2 THz, these technologies we employ here are amenable to the production of large array receivers, where numerous copies of the same circuit, precisely the same and aligned to each other, are required.

  9. Biasable Subharmonic Membrane Mixer for 520 to 600 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich; Siegel, Peter; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Peralta, Alejandro; Tsang, Raymond; Oswald, John; Dengler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure shows a biasable subharmonic mixer designed to operate in the frequency range from 520 to 600 GHz. This mixer is a prototype of low-power mixers needed for development of wideband, high-resolution spectrometers for measuring spectra of molecules in the atmospheres of Earth, other planets, and comets in the frequency range of 400 to 700 GHz. Three considerations dictated the main features of the design: It is highly desirable to operate the spectrometers at or slightly below room temperature. This consideration is addressed by choosing Schottky diodes as the frequency-mixing circuit elements because of all mixer diodes, Schottky diodes are the best candidates for affording sufficient sensitivity at or slightly below room-temperature range. The short wavelengths in the intended operating-frequency range translate to stringent requirements for precision of fabrication and assembly of the circuits; these requirements are even more stringent for wide-bandwidth circuits. This consideration is addressed in two ways: (1) As much as possible of the mixer circuitry is fabricated in the form of a monolithic integrated circuit on a GaAs membrane, employing a modified version of a process used previously to fabricate a non-subharmonic mixer for a frequency of 2.5 THz and frequency multipliers for frequencies up to 2 THz. (2) The remainder of the circuitry is precision machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs integrated circuit.

  10. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined.

  11. Sub-Micron Long HTS Ho Electron Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harnack, 0.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The hot-electron bolometer mixer made from a high-T, superconductor (HTS) was introduced recently as an alternative to a Schottky mixer at THz frequencies. The performance of the mixer depends on the total thermal conductance for heat removal from the phonon sub-system due to either length-dependent phonon diffusion or phonon escape to the substrate. We have measured both the length and temperature dependencies of the IF bandwidth of the mixers fabricated from 25-35 mn thick YBCO films on MgO and sapphire substrates. The films were grown by a laser deposition technique and electron-beam lithography was used to define bridge lengths down to 50 nm. Mixer measurements were done using signal frequencies in the range of 1-100 GHz. For 50 nm and 400 nm long devices on MgO, the 3-dB bandwidth was about 100 MHz. At temperatures below 60 K, the hot-electron plateau was clearly seen starting around 2-3 GHz. At temperatures above 70 K, the flux-flow effects begin to dominate and the IF bandwidth increases to 1-8 GHz, while the conversion efficiency drops by several dB. This temperature dependence of the IF bandwidth can account for previously reported unexpectedly high bandwidth of HTS mixers.

  12. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T.; Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P.; Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias; Boissin, J.-C.

    2014-01-29

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  13. Evaluation of Static Mixer Flow Enhancements for Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Prototype for ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Ha, Tam T; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, Theodore M; Rasmussen, David A; Hechler, Michael P; Pearce, R.J.H.; Dremel, M.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (50 to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype

  14. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T.; Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P.; Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias; Boissin, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  15. Experiments on high bypass internal mixer nozzle jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Model scale jet noise data are presented for a variety of internal lobed mixer nozzle configurations for take off power settings in a static environment. The results are presented for a 17.5 cm diameter fan nozzle to show the effect on noise levels caused by changes in geometric shape of the internal, or core flow, nozzle. The geometric variables include the lobe discharge angle, the number of lobes, spacing between the center plug and lobe valley, lobe side wall shape and axial contour of the lobes. An annular plug core flow nozzle was also tested and is used as a baseline for comparative purposes. Comparison of data from the internal lobed configurations showed that for comparative effect, in terms of the effect on full scale perceived noise levels, was caused by a change in the lobe discharge angle. The results showed that increasing the discharge angle caused an increase as large as 7 dB in sound pressure levels in the high frequency portion of the spectra. Changes in the other geometric variables cause negligible effects.

  16. Experiments on high bypass internal mixer nozzle jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1982-12-01

    Model scale jet noise data are presented for a variety of internal lobed mixer nozzle configurations for take off power settings in a static environment. The results are presented for a 17.5 cm diameter fan nozzle to show the effect on noise levels caused by changes in geometric shape of the internal, or core flow, nozzle. The geometric variables include the lobe discharge angle, the number of lobes, spacing between the center plug and lobe valley, lobe side wall shape and axial contour of the lobes. An annular plug core flow nozzle was also tested and is used as a baseline for comparative purposes. Comparison of data from the internal lobed configurations showed that for comparative effect, in terms of the effect on full scale perceived noise levels, was caused by a change in the lobe discharge angle. The results showed that increasing the discharge angle caused an increase as large as 7 dB in sound pressure levels in the high frequency portion of the spectra. Changes in the other geometric variables cause negligible effects.

  17. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  18. MM wavecomponents - SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Stephen R.

    1989-04-01

    Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction mixers are known to provide ultra-high sensitivity receiver applications above 30 GHz. In this two year (Phase 2) program, HYPRES, in collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, developed novel fully integrated SIS mixer circuits, and demonstrated a unique high efficiency cooling system. The integrated SIS mixer chip contains, aside from the actual mixer elements, passive tuning components, an IF filter, a coplanar transmission line, and a waveguide coupler, necessary components heretofore realized off-chip. Fabrication of the integrated mixer required development of a nine level process and optimization of the process dependent electrical parameters of the SIS devices. The device performs efficiently in the range of 75-115 GHz. A novel dewar-based cooler, which makes use of the extremely low thermal conductivity of the fused silica chip substrate to achieve an incremental thermal load of 25 mW, was fabricated and demonstrated. Such a cryostat allows relatively long term unattended operation of SIS, or other, cryogenic devices.

  19. Design of Balanced Mixers for ALMA Band-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, Sergey V.; Koryukin, Oleg V.; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Takashi; Uvarov, Andrey V.; Bukovski, Maksim A.; Cohn, Ilya A.

    2007-06-01

    Two variants of balanced mixer employing twin-SIS structure are under development for 787-950 GHz frequency range. Easy-to-use Geometry Transformation method for modeling of superconducting microstrips is developed, compared to referenced methods and used for design of the mixers. Lens-antenna mixer is based on cross-slot antenna; it does not need any intervening optics between its lens and sub-reflector of ALMA telescope; simple yet efficient composition of lens-antenna cartridge is suggested. Compact single-chamber balanced waveguide mixer employs two SIS chips and capacitive probe for LO injection; coupling above -3 dB and signal loss below -20 dB are expected. Need in shifting of resonance frequency of twin-SIS mixer towards top of the frequency band is predicted using Tucker's theory in large-signal approximation. TRX considerably below 200 K (DSB) is simulated using high-quality hybrid SIS junction for NbTiN/Nb - AlOx - Nb/Al for Jc = 12 kA/cm2.

  20. Recommendations for Advanced Design Mixer Pump Operation in Savannah River Site Tank 18F

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, Carl W.; Terrones, Guillermo; Bates, Cameron J.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Adkins, Brannen

    2003-10-30

    This report discusses technical issues and presents recommendations for operating the advanced design mixer pump (ADMP) in Tank 18 at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Also presented are the results obtained from simulated scaled pump-down tests carried out in the 1/4-scale double shell tank (DST) test facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The work was conducted for the DOE Tanks Focus Area (TFA) by the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement (RPD&E) program. The ability of the Tank 18 retrieval system to mobilize the solid waste and transport it through the retrieval pump, efficiently removing the solids from the tank, are evaluated.

  1. Wide-bandwidth electron bolometric mixers - A 2DEG prototype and potential for low-noise THz receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jian-Xun; Agahi, Farid; Dai, Dong; Musante, Charles F.; Grammer, Wes; Lau, Kei M.; Yngvesson, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of electron bolometric ('hot electron') mixer. We have demonstrated a 3 order-of-magnitude improvement in the bandwidth compared with previously known types of electron bolometric mixers, by using the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) medium at the heterointerface between AlGaAs and GaAs. We have tested both in-house MOCVD-grown material and MBE material, with similar results. The conversion loss (Lc) at 94 GHz is presently 18 dB for a mixer operating at 20 K, and calculations indicate that Lc can be decreased to about 10 dB in future devices. Calculated and measured curves of Lc versus P(LO), and I(DC), respectively, agree well. We argue that there are several different configurations of electron bolometric mixers, which will all show wide bandwidth, and that these devices are likely to become important as low-noise THz receivers in the future.

  2. Saturation by Noise and CW Signals in SIS Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    2002-03-01

    In ALMA Memo 321, Plambeck points out that saturation (gain compression) is likely to be a significant factor limiting the calibration accuracy of ALMA observations. In this paper, saturation by broadband noise and CW signals is analyzed for representative SIS receivers operating at different frequencies. Many SIS mixers in current use are expected to exhibit a significant degree of gain compression when connected to a room-temperature source. Previous analyses of saturation in SIS mixers have applied only to CW signals. To analyze saturation by noise, the statistics of the output voltage are derived from those of the input signal. A single constant, applicable to all SIS mixers, is determined experimentally by fitting the predicted CW gain compression curve to measured data.

  3. An X-Band Mixer Engineered for 77 K Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An X-band Si-diode singly balanced mixer developed specifically for cryogenic operation is presented. In order to reduce thermal demands on a mechanical cooler, the mixer was designed to operate with a minimum of local oscillator (LO) power. That is, since the LO had to be cooled to reduce phase noise, it was desirable to minimize the LO drive. Novel embedding circuit strategy was responsible for nearly theoretical performance. The signal-matching circuit simultaneously provided a reactive termination to the image, sum, and first, second, and third LO harmonic frequencies. A conversion loss of 3.2 dB at 77 K with an LO drive of +1 dBm was measured. This loss included IF filter, dc block, and hybrid coupler losses. Mixer conversion loss is shown to be consistent with the theoretical performance limit expected from the intrinsic diode. The relationship among junction capacitance, flat-band potential, and conversion loss is examined.

  4. AEA Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    AEA's Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer was developed to mix and maintain the suspension of solids and to blend process liquids. The mixer can be used to combine a tank's available supernate with the sludge into a slurry that is suitable for pumping. The system uses jet nozzles in the tank coupled to a charge vessel. Then, a jet pump creates a partial vacuum in the charge vessel allowing it to be filled with waste. Next, air pressure is applied to the charge vessel, forcing sludge back into the tank and mixing it with the liquid waste. When the liquid waste contains 10% solids, a batch is pumped out of the tank.

  5. A corner-reflector mixer mount for far infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Zmuidzinas, J; Betz, A L; Boreiko, R T

    1989-01-01

    A new type of corner-reflector mixer mount, which has the advantages of ease of fabrication and assembly as well as frequency versatility, has been designed and constructed. The mixer works with arbitrary antenna lengths > or = 4 lambda with the reflector to antenna spacing adjusted to give a strong and symmetric central lobe. The predicted response patterns have been experimentally verified for various antenna lengths and operating frequencies between 800 and 2000 GHz. An important design feature is the incorporation of a microstrip matching network which eliminates IF impedance mismatch and provides mechanical isolation of the whisker antenna. PMID:11539754

  6. Josephson effect gain and noise in SIS mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wengler, Michael J.; Dubash, Noshir B.; Pance, Gordana; Miller, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel diode (SIS) mixers are used for radio astronomy from 100 to 500 GHz. They are being considered for NASA spaceborne astronomy at frequencies near 1000 GHz. Measurements of gain and noise in SIS mixers at 230 and 492 GHz are reported. Relatively high gain and noise associated with Josephson currents are measured that have not been previously reported. These measurements show that Josephson currents are increasingly important as operating frequencies are raised. The techniques used to make these measurements are discussed. Measurements made with hot and cold black-bodies are shown to be inaccurate at high frequencies.

  7. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent, 22-Lobed, and Unique-Lobed Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Martens, S.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R. K.; Krejsa, Gene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a design methodology and noise reduction concepts for high bypass exhaust systems which could be applied to both existing production and new advanced engine designs. Special emphasis was given to engine cycles with bypass ratios in the range of 4:1 to 7:1, where jet mixing noise was a primary noise source at full power takeoff conditions. The goal of this effort was to develop the design methodology for mixed-flow exhaust systems and other novel noise reduction concepts that would yield 3 EPNdB noise reduction relative to 1992 baseline technology. Two multi-lobed mixers, a 22-lobed axisymmetric and a 21-lobed with a unique lobe, were designed. These mixers along with a confluent mixer were tested with several fan nozzles of different lengths with and without acoustic treatment in GEAE's Cell 41 under the current subtask (Subtask C). In addition to the acoustic and LDA tests for the model mixer exhaust systems, a semi-empirical noise prediction method for mixer exhaust system is developed. Effort was also made to implement flowfield data for noise prediction by utilizing MGB code. In general, this study established an aero and acoustic diagnostic database to calibrate and refine current aero and acoustic prediction tools.

  8. 11. VIEW OF HORIZONTAL MIXER (GedgeGray Co., Lockland, Ohio), LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF HORIZONTAL MIXER (Gedge-Gray Co., Lockland, Ohio), LOCATED IN THE BASEMENT, MIXED ANIMAL FEED TO ORDER. THE WATER-POWERED MIXER WAS SUPERSEDED BY TWO ELECTRIC-POWERED VERTICAL MIXERS, ADDED IN THE 1940S. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  9. A low-noise double-dipole antenna SIS mixer at 1 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, S. V.; Jackson, B. D.; Baryshev, A. M.; Markov, A. V.; Iosad, N. N.; Gao, J.-R.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2002-08-01

    A quasi-optical mixer employing a Nb/Al/AlO x/Nb twin-SIS junction with a NbTiN/SiO 2/Al microstrip coupling circuit is tested at 800-1000 GHz. The receiver noise temperature TRX=250 K (DSB) is measured at 935 GHz for the bath temperature 2 K at IF=1.5 GHz; TRX remains below 350 K within the frequency range 850-1000 GHz. The integrated lens-antenna demonstrated good beam symmetry with sidelobes below -16 dB.

  10. Applying Hanford Tank Mixing Data to Define Pulse Jet Mixer Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Holton, Langdon K.

    2015-12-07

    Pulse jet mixed (PJM) process vessels are being developed for storing, blending, and chemical processing of nuclear waste slurries at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to be built at Hanford, Washington. These waste slurries exhibit variable process feed characteristics including Newtonian to non-Newtonian rheologies over a range of solids loadings. Waste feed to the WTP from the Hanford Tank Farms will be accomplished via the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) system which includes million-gallon underground storage double-shell tanks (DSTs) with dual-opposed jet mixer pumps. Experience using WFD type jet mixer pumps to mobilize actual Hanford waste in DSTs may be used to establish design threshold criteria of interest to pulse jet mixed process vessel operation. This paper describes a method to evaluate the pulse jet mixed vessel capability to process waste based on information obtained during mobilizing and suspending waste by the WFD system jet mixer pumps in a DST. Calculations of jet velocity and wall shear stress in a specific pulse jet mixed process vessel were performed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The CFD-modelled process vessel consists of a 4.9-m- (16-ft-) diameter tank with a 2:1 semi-elliptical head, a single, 10-cm (4-in.) downward facing 60-degree conical nozzle, and a 0.61-m (24-in.) inside diameter PJM. The PJM is located at 70% of the vessel radius with the nozzle stand-off-distance 14 cm (6 in.) above the vessel head. The CFD modeled fluid velocity and wall shear stress can be used to estimate vessel waste-processing performance by comparison to available actual WFD system process data. Test data from the operation of jet mixer pumps in the 23-m (75-ft) diameter DSTs have demonstrated mobilization, solid particles in a sediment matrix were moved from their initial location, and suspension, mobilized solid particles were moved to a higher elevation in the vessel than their initial location, of waste solids

  11. S-I-S mm-wave mixers and detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jillie, D. W.; Kroger, H.; Smith, L. N.; Shaw, D. M.

    1983-10-01

    This program is an effort to achieve the ultimate goal of fabricating refractory superconducting S-I-S mixer devices for operation in mm-wave receivers in the quantum mode and in the 8-10 K temperature range. The following progress has been made toward the above goal: (1) development of in-house capability of depositing niobium carbonitride films (Nb (x) N(y) of device quality with transition temperatures to approx. 16 K; (2) development of NbC(x)N(y):aSi:Nb and NbC(x)N(y):Ge:Nb devices of very high quality; (3) fabrication and successful operation of niobium based S-I-S mixer chips; and (4) fabrication and evaluation of aSi and Ge barrier all-NbC(x)N(y) devices. NbC(x)N(y):Ge:Nb devices have been fabricated with chemical vapor deposited (CVD) polycrystalline arsenic-doped germanium barriers. All-Nb-S-I-S mixer chips were fabricated and sent to Goddard Institute for Space Studies to be evaluated. The noise temperature was approx. 60 K and the conversion loss of 5 dB. These results are comparable to Pb alloy junction results. A second-generation mixer was designed by GISS.

  12. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleva, I.; Lecheva, A.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  13. Superconducting Nb DHEB Mixer Arrays for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerecht, E.; Reintsema, C. D.; Grossman, E. N.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a heterodyne focal plane array with up to eight elements to study lines of the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres with frequencies of 2 THz and above. Our fabrication process utilizes selective ion milling techniques to produce Nb Diffusion-Cooled Hot Electron Bolometric (DHEB) mixers from a bilayer thin film of Au/Nb deposited on a silicon substrate. A micro-bridge of 10 nm thick Nb forms the HEB device. The first generation of devices with lateral dimensions of 100 nm by 80 nm were fabricated at the feed of a broadband spiral antenna with a frequency response designed for up to 16 THz. Harmonic multiplier sources becoming available within the next few years should have sufficient power to provide a local-oscillator source for small-format, quasi-optically coupled arrays of these mixers. First generation devices measured at our laboratory have demonstrated a critical temperature (Tc) of 4.8 K with a 0.5 K transition width. These DHEB mixers are expected to have an optimum operational temperature of 1.8-2.0 K. The current four element array mixer block will ultimately be replaced by a dual polarization slot-ring array configuration with up to eight elements.

  14. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleva, I.; Lecheva, A.

    2015-10-28

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  15. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Mixer-Ejector Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric, S.; Seidel, Jonathan, A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of an engine for a civil supersonic aircraft presents a difficult multidisciplinary problem to propulsion system engineers. There are numerous competing requirements for the engine, such as to be efficient during cruise while yet quiet enough at takeoff to meet airport noise regulations. The use of mixer-ejector nozzles presents one possible solution to this challenge. However, designing a mixer-ejector which will successfully address both of these concerns is a difficult proposition. Presented in this paper is an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the analysis and design of these systems. A process that uses several low-fidelity tools to evaluate both the performance and acoustics of mixer-ejectors nozzles is described. This process is further expanded to include system-level modeling of engines and aircraft to determine the effects on mission performance and noise near airports. The overall process is developed in the OpenMDAO framework currently being developed by NASA. From the developed process, sample results are given for a notional mixer-ejector design, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of the method.

  16. A 640 GHz Planar-Diode Fundamental Mixer/Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P.; Mehdi, I.; Dengler, R.; Lee, T.; Humphrey, D.; Pease, A.

    1998-01-01

    The design and performance of a 640 GHz solid-state receiver using a fundamental planar-Schottky-diode mixer, InP Gunn diode oscillator, whisker-contacted Schottky-varactor-diode sextupler and folded-Fabry-Perot diplexer are reported.

  17. Making Wide-IF SIS Mixers with Suspended Metal-Beam Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Bumble, Bruce; Lee, Karen; LeDuc, Henry; Rice, Frank; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    A process that employs silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates and silicon (Si) micromachining has been devised for fabricating wide-intermediate-frequency-band (wide-IF) superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) mixer devices that result in suspended gold beam leads used for radio-frequency grounding. The mixers are formed on 25- m-thick silicon membranes. They are designed to operate in the 200 to 300 GHz frequency band, wherein wide-IF receivers for tropospheric- chemistry and astrophysical investigations are necessary. The fabrication process can be divided into three sections: 1. The front-side process, in which SIS devices with beam leads are formed on a SOI wafer; 2. The backside process, in which the SOI wafer is wax-mounted onto a carrier wafer, then thinned, then partitioned into individual devices; and 3. The release process, in which the individual devices are separated using a lithographic dicing technique. The total thickness of the starting 4-in. (10.16-cm)-diameter SOI wafer includes 25 m for the Si device layer, 0.5 m for the buried oxide (BOX) layer, and 350 m the for Si-handle layer. The front-side process begins with deposition of an etch-stop layer of SiO2 or AlN(x), followed by deposition of a Nb/Al- AlN(x) /Nb trilayer in a load-locked DC magnetron sputtering system. The lithography for four of a total of five layers is performed in a commercial wafer-stepping apparatus. Diagnostic test dies are patterned concurrently at certain locations on the wafer, alongside the mixer devices, using a different mask set. The conventional, self-aligned lift-off process is used to pattern the SIS devices up to the wire level.

  18. Noise in Josepson effect mixers and the RSJ model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoelkopf, R.; Phillips, T.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1992-01-01

    Josephson effect mixers have previously been observed to display 'excess' noise both in experiments with point contacts and in numerical simulations using the resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. This excess noise causes the mixer noise temperature to be a factor of typically 20-100 times the physical temperature of the device. Previously, this excess was ascribed to conversion from unwanted sidebands of the local oscillator and Josephson frequencies and their harmonics. Our numerical modeling of the RSJ equations has led to a new understanding of the excess noise, which is simply due to the intrinsic Josephson oscillations of the device. In addition, we have extended the modeling to include the previously ignored case of finite device capacitance (i.e. RSJ capacitance parameter beta(sub c) does not equal 0, which is more realistic for lithographically defined Josephson such as shunted tunnel junctions or SNS bridges. For some cases, this yields an improvement of a factor of two in noise temperature from the zero capacitance models. We will discuss the device parameters which optimize the mixer performance for frequencies approaching the characteristic frequency of the device, which is given by the Josephson frequency at the I(sub c)R(sub n) voltage (nu = 2eI(sub c)R(sub n)/h). These modeling results predict good conversion efficiency and a noise temperature within a factor of a few of the physical temperature. Experiments are in progress to determine the accuracy of this modeling using a waveguide mixer at 100 GHz with optimized, resistively shunted Nb tunnel junctions. If the modeling results are valid, they are particularly encouraging for mixers in the submillimeter regime, given the possibility of obtaining non-hysteretic Josephson devices with I(sub c)R(sub n) products in excess of a millivolt, using for instance, high-T(sub c) SNS bridges. We discuss the modifications to the classical RSJ model which are necessary in the quantum regime (h nu greater

  19. Reduced T(sub c) Niobium Superconducting HEB Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddiqi, I.; Prober, D. E.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    A reduction in the mixer noise is expected when using superconductors with a lower transition temperature (T(sub c)) since the thermal noise components of the mixer noise should scale with T(sub c). Also, the local oscillator (LO) power required for a diffusion-cooled device should decrease as T(sub c) when T(sub bath) << T(sub c). We previously studied mixing in aluminum based hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) at microwave frequencies (approximately 30 GHz), and observed a significant improvement in noise performance, and a reduction in LO power as predicted. However, the bias voltage range over which good mixer performance was observed was approximately 5 - 10 microV. These devices are thus susceptible to saturation effects, in particular output saturation. In the present work, we have investigated Nb HEBs whose T(sub c) is lowered by applying a magnetic field. The goal is to study a case intermediate between Nb and Al, and hopefully to find properties that will allow use in practical receivers. A 15 kOe perpendicular magnetic field was applied to a Nb HEB (L = 0.16 micrometers, W = 0.08 micrometers, R(sub N) = 90 ohms) to reduce T(sub c) from 5.2 K to 2.4 K. The mixer noise, as inferred from the output noise and the conversion efficiency, decreased from 390 K, DSB to 171 K, DSB. The LO power required for near optimum mixer conversion efficiency (eta(sub mixer) = -9 dB in this device) was 8 nW in zero field, and approximately 2 nW when T(sub c) was reduced to 2.4 K. T(sub bath) = 0.22 K. The conversion bandwidth was previously measured to be 2.4 GHz and the same bandwidth was observed in the presence of a magnetic field. By lowering T(sub c), the voltage range over which good mixing was observed also decreased. However, even with T(sub c) reduced to 2.4 K, the conversion efficiency dropped by 3 dB from its maximum value only when the bias voltage was changed by approximately 90 microV. Saturation effects should thus be much less of a concern in these devices than in

  20. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression: Plume, Aerodynamic and Acoustic Data. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Baker, V. David; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft per s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASE's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude and also noise in the reference frame of the nozzle. This volume is divided into three parts: in the first two parts, we collate the plume survey data in graphical form (line, contour and surface plots) and analyze it; in part 3, we tabulate the aerodynamic data for the acoustics tests and the acoustic data in one-third octave band levels.

  1. Effects of Crust Ingestion on Mixer Pump Performance in Tank 241-SY-101: Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, C.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    In August 1999, a workshop was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to discuss the effects of crust ingestion on mixer pump performance in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The main purpose of the workshop was to evaluate the potential for crust ingestion to degrade mixing and/or damage the mixer pump. The need for a previously determined 12-inch separation between the top of the mixer pump inlet and the crust base was evaluated. Participants included a representative from the pump manufacturer, an internationally known expert in centrifugal pump theory, Hanford scientists and engineers, and operational specialists representing relevant fields of expertise. The workshop focused on developing an understanding of the pump design, addressing the physics of entrainment of solids and gases into the pump, and assessing the effects of solids and gases on pump performance. The major conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) Entrainment of a moderate amount of solids or gas from the crust should not damage the pump or reduce its lifetime, though mixing effectiveness will be somewhat reduced. (2) Air binding should not damage the pump. Vibrations due to ingestion of gas, solids, and objects potentially could cause radial loads that might reduce the lifetime of bearings and seals. However, significant damage would require extreme conditions not associated with the small bubbles, fine solids, and chunks of relatively weak material typical of the crust. (3) The inlet duct extension opening, 235 inches from the tank bottom, should be considered the pump inlet, not the small gap at 262 inches. (4) A suction vortex exists at the inlet of all pumps. The characteristics of the inlet suction vortex in the mixer pump are very hard to predict, but its effects likely extend upward several feet. Because of this, the current 12-inch limit should be replaced with criteria based on actual monitored pump performance. The most obvious criterion (in addition to current operational

  2. Optimization of integrated impeller mixer via radiotracer experiments.

    PubMed

    Othman, N; Kamarudin, S K; Takriff, M S; Rosli, M I; Engku Chik, E M F; Adnan, M A K

    2014-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments are carried out in order to determine the mean residence time (MRT) as well as percentage of dead zone, V dead (%), in an integrated mixer consisting of Rushton and pitched blade turbine (PBT). Conventionally, optimization was performed by varying one parameter and others were held constant (OFAT) which lead to enormous number of experiments. Thus, in this study, a 4-factor 3-level Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was introduced to obtain an accurate optimization of mixing efficiency with minimal number of experiments. This paper describes the optimal conditions of four process parameters, namely, impeller speed, impeller clearance, type of impeller, and sampling time, in obtaining MRT and V dead (%) using radiotracer experiments. The optimum conditions for the experiments were 100 rpm impeller speed, 50 mm impeller clearance, Type A mixer, and 900 s sampling time to reach optimization. PMID:24741344

  3. Optimization of Integrated Impeller Mixer via Radiotracer Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Othman, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Takriff, M. S.; Rosli, M. I.; Engku Chik, E. M. F.; Adnan, M. A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments are carried out in order to determine the mean residence time (MRT) as well as percentage of dead zone, Vdead (%), in an integrated mixer consisting of Rushton and pitched blade turbine (PBT). Conventionally, optimization was performed by varying one parameter and others were held constant (OFAT) which lead to enormous number of experiments. Thus, in this study, a 4-factor 3-level Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was introduced to obtain an accurate optimization of mixing efficiency with minimal number of experiments. This paper describes the optimal conditions of four process parameters, namely, impeller speed, impeller clearance, type of impeller, and sampling time, in obtaining MRT and Vdead (%) using radiotracer experiments. The optimum conditions for the experiments were 100 rpm impeller speed, 50 mm impeller clearance, Type A mixer, and 900 s sampling time to reach optimization. PMID:24741344

  4. Design of a Broadband Millimeter-Wave Monolithic IQ Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Leijun; Wang, Zhigong; Li, Qin

    2010-05-01

    A 26˜40 GHz millimeter-wave monolithic passive IQ mixer was designed by using Win’s 0.15-µm GaAs pHEMT process. It utilizes a ring diode structure, and the performance can be improved effectively by a modified Marchand balun and U-type coupled lines. Through on-wafer measurement, the mixer shows a conversion loss of 6.6˜9 dB over a bandwidth of 26˜40 GHz, an IF bandwidth from DC to 6 GHz, an image rejection ratio of 21˜30 dB, an LO-RF isolation of above 24 dB, an LO-IF isolation of above 35 dB, and an RF-IF isolation of above 25 dB.

  5. Ionic electroactive polymer actuators as active microfluidic mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Meis, Catherine; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-11-06

    On-chip sample processing is integral to the continued development of lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. An active microfluidic mixer prototype is proposed using ionic electroactive polymer actuators (IEAPAs) as artificial cilia. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed in which the actuators were shown to produce localized flow pattern disruptions in the laminar flow regime. Suggestions for further engineering and optimization of a scaled-down, complete device are provided. Furthermore, the device in its current state of development necessitates further engineering, the use of IEAPAs addresses issues currently associated with the use of electromechanical actuators as active microfluidic mixers and may prove to be a useful alternative to other similar materials.

  6. Ionic electroactive polymer actuators as active microfluidic mixers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meis, Catherine; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-11-06

    On-chip sample processing is integral to the continued development of lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. An active microfluidic mixer prototype is proposed using ionic electroactive polymer actuators (IEAPAs) as artificial cilia. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed in which the actuators were shown to produce localized flow pattern disruptions in the laminar flow regime. Suggestions for further engineering and optimization of a scaled-down, complete device are provided. Furthermore, the device in its current state of development necessitates further engineering, the use of IEAPAs addresses issues currently associated with the use of electromechanical actuators as active microfluidic mixers and may prove tomore » be a useful alternative to other similar materials.« less

  7. Mixing Study in a Multi-dimensional Motion Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R.; Manickam, S. S.; Tomei, J.; Bergman, T. L.; Chaudhuri, B.

    2009-06-01

    Mixing is an important but poorly understood aspect in petrochemical, food, ceramics, fertilizer and pharmaceutical processing and manufacturing. Deliberate mixing of granular solids is an essential operation in the production of industrial powder products usually constituted from different ingredients. The knowledge of particle flow and mixing in a blender is critical to optimize the design and operation. Since performance of the product depends on blend homogeneity, the consequence of variability can be detrimental. A common approach to powder mixing is to use a tumbling blender, which is essentially a hollow vessel horizontally attached to a rotating shaft. This single axis rotary blender is one of the most common batch mixers among in industry, and also finds use in myriad of application as dryers, kilns, coaters, mills and granulators. In most of the rotary mixers the radial convection is faster than axial dispersion transport. This slow dispersive process hinders mixing performance in many blending, drying and coating applications. A double cone mixer is designed and fabricated which rotates around two axes, causing axial mixing competitive to its radial counterpart. Discrete Element Method (DEM) based numerical model is developed to simulate the granular flow within the mixer. Digitally recorded mixing states from experiments are used to fine tune the numerical model. Discrete pocket samplers are also used in the experiments to quantify the characteristics of mixing. A parametric study of the effect of vessel speeds, relative rotational speed (between two axes of rotation), on the granular mixing is investigated by experiments and numerical simulation. Incorporation of dual axis rotation enhances axial mixing by 60 to 85% in comparison to single axis rotation.

  8. Low Noise SIS Mixer for the Frequency above 1 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Alexander; Miller, D.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Stern, J. A.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, H. G.

    We developed a SIS mixer for the 1.1-1.25 THz band of the heterodyne receiver of Herschel space observatory. Our approach may be used up to 1.6 THz. The quasi-optical SIS mixer has two NbN/AlN/Nb junctions with the critical current 30-50 kA/cm2 and the gap voltage of 3.4 mV. The tuning circuit integrated with SIS junction has the base electrode of Nb and a gold wire layer. This approach simplifies the SIS junction technology, compared to a design using NbTiN base electrode. The junction base electrode and the ground of the tuning micro strip circuit are formed in one step. The frequency of operation of the mixer is well above the gap frequency of Nb, and it behaves here as a normal metal. The resistivity of Nb at the critical temperature of 0.2 mOhm cm is below the resistivity of the best normal metal films. The measured receiver noise temperature is below 600 K.

  9. Topics in the optimization of millimeter-wave mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P. H.; Kerr, A. R.; Hwang, W.

    1984-01-01

    A user oriented computer program for the analysis of single-ended Schottky diode mixers is described. The program is used to compute the performance of a 140 to 220 GHz mixer and excellent agreement with measurements at 150 and 180 GHz is obtained. A sensitivity analysis indicates the importance of various diode and mount characteristics on the mixer performance. A computer program for the analysis of varactor diode multipliers is described. The diode operates in either the reverse biased varactor mode or with substantial forward current flow where the conversion mechanism is predominantly resistive. A description and analysis of a new H-plane rectangular waveguide transformer is reported. The transformer is made quickly and easily in split-block waveguide using a standard slitting saw. It is particularly suited for use in the millimeter-wave band, replacing conventional electroformed stepped transformers. A theoretical analysis of the transformer is given and good agreement is obtained with measurements made at X-band.

  10. A general numerical analysis program for the superconducting quasiparticle mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. G.; Feldman, M. J.; Kerr, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program SISCAP (SIS Computer Analysis Program) for analyzing SIS mixers is described. The program allows arbitrary impedance terminations to be specified at all LO harmonics and sideband frequencies. It is therefore able to treat a much more general class of SIS mixers than the widely used three-frequency analysis, for which the harmonics are assumed to be short-circuited. An additional program, GETCHI, provides the necessary input data to program SISCAP. The SISCAP program performs a nonlinear analysis to determine the SIS junction voltage waveform produced by the local oscillator. The quantum theory of mixing is used in its most general form, treating the large signal properties of the mixer in the time domain. A small signal linear analysis is then used to find the conversion loss and port impedances. The noise analysis includes thermal noise from the termination resistances and shot noise from the periodic LO current. Quantum noise is not considered. Many aspects of the program have been adequately verified and found accurate.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Spatially-Periodic Scalar Patterns in an Inline Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskan, Ozge; Speetjens, Michel F. M.; Clercx, Herman J. H.

    2015-11-01

    Spatially persisting patterns with exponentially decaying intensities form during the downstream evolution of passive scalars in three-dimensional (3D) spatially periodic flows due to the coupled effect of the chaotic nature of the flow and the diffusivity of the material. This has been investigated in many computational and theoretical studies on 3D spatially-periodic flow fields. However, in the limit of zero-diffusivity, the evolution of the scalar fields results in more detailed structures that can only be captured by experiments due to limitations in the computational tools. Our study employs the-state-of-the-art experimental methods to analyze the evolution of 3D advective scalar field in a representative inline mixer, called Quatro static mixer. The experimental setup consists of an optically accessible test section with transparent internal elements, accommodating a pressure-driven pipe flow and equipped with 3D Laser-Induced Fluorescence. The results reveal that the continuous process of stretching and folding of material creates finer structures as the flow progresses, which is an indicator of chaotic advection and the experiments outperform the simulations by revealing far greater level of detail.

  12. Biosensing enhancement of dengue virus using microballoon mixers on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Djordjevic, Ivan; Hosseini, Samira; Rothan, Hussin A; Yusof, Rohana; Madou, Marc J

    2015-05-15

    Dengue is the current leading cause of death among children in several Latin American and Asian countries. Due to poverty in areas where the disease is prevalent and the high cost of conventional diagnostic systems, low cost devices are needed to reduce the burden caused by dengue infection. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms are an alternative solution to reduce costs and increase the availability of a rapid diagnostic system. The rate of chemical reactions in such devices often depends on the efficiency of the mixing techniques employed in their microfluidic networks. This paper introduces a micromixer that operates by the expansion and contraction of a microballoon to produce a consistent periodical 3D reciprocating flow. We established that microballoons reduced mixing time of 12 μl liquids from 170 min, for diffusional mixing, to less than 23 s. We have also tested the effect of the microballoon mixers on the detection of the dengue virus. The results indicate that employing a microballoon mixer enhances the detection sensitivity of the dengue virus by nearly one order of magnitude compared to the conventional ELISA method. PMID:25220800

  13. Experimental Investigation of Spatially-periodic Scalar Patterns in an Inline Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskan, Ozge; Speetjens, Michel; Clercx, Herman

    2014-11-01

    Spatially persisting patterns with exponentially decaying intensities form during the downstream evolution of passive scalars in three-dimensional (3D) spatially periodic flows due to the coupled effect of the chaotic nature of the flow and the diffusivity of the material. This has been investigated in many computational and theoretical studies on 2D time-periodic and 3D spatially-periodic flow fields, however, experimental studies, to date, have mainly focused on flow visualization with streaks of dye rather than fully 3D scalar field measurements. Our study employs the-state-of-the-art experimental methods to analyze the evolution of 3D scalar fields and the correlation between the coherent flow/scalar field structures in a representative inline mixer, called Quatro static mixer. The experimental setup consists of an optically accessible test section with transparent internal elements, accommodating a pressure-driven pipe flow. The 3D scalar fields are measured by 3D Laser-Induced Fluorescence. The preliminary results are consistent with the literature and we discuss the comparative analysis between our experimental observations and the numerical simulations from the previous studies. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support by Dutch Technology Foundation STW.

  14. Low-noise submillimeter-wave NbTiN superconducting tunnel junction mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Chen, Jian; Miller, David; Kooi, Jacob; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a low-noise 850 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor quasiparticle mixer with NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning circuits and hybrid Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions. The mixer uses a quasioptical configuration with a planar twin-slot antenna feeding a two-junction tuning circuit. At 798 GHz, we measured an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of TRX=260 K at 4.2 K bath temperature. This mixer outperforms current Nb SIS mixers by a factor of nearly 2 near 800 GHz. The high-gap frequency and low loss at 800 GHz make NbTiN an attractive material with which to fabricate tuning circuits for SIS mixers. NbTiN mixers can potentially operate up to the gap frequency, 2Δ/h˜1.2 THz.

  15. Low-Noise Submillimeter-Wave NbTiN Superconducting Tunnel Junction Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, J.; Chen, J.; Miller, D.; Kooi, J.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Stern, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a low-noise 850 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) quasi-particle mixer with NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning circuits and hybrid Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions. The mixer uses a quasioptical configuration with a planar twin-slot antenna feeding a two-junction tuning circuit. At 798 GHz, we measured an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of T(sub RX) = 260 K at 4.2 K bath temperature. This mixer outperforms current Nb SIS mixers by a factor of nearly 2 near 800 GHz. The high gap frequency and low loss at 800 GHz make NbTiN an attractive material with which to fabricate tuning circuits for SIS mixers. NbTiN mixers can potentially operate up to the gap frequency, 2(delta)/h is approximately 1.2THz.

  16. Very high-current-density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions for low-noise submillimeter mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Miller, David; Chen, Jian; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    2000-04-01

    We have fabricated and tested submillimeter-wave superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers using very high-current-density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions (Jc≈30 kA cm-2). The junctions have low-resistance-area products (RNA≈5.6 Ω μm2), good subgap-to-normal resistance ratios Rsg/RN≈10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, we infer that ωRNC=1 at 270 GHz. This is a factor of 2.5 improvement over what is generally available with Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions suitable for low-noise mixers. The AlN-barrier junctions are indeed capable of low-noise operation: we measure an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of TRX=110 K at 533 GHz for an unoptimized device. In addition to providing wider bandwidth operation at lower frequencies, the AlN-barrier junctions will considerably improve the performance of THz SIS mixers by reducing rf loss in the tuning circuits.

  17. Very High Current Density Nb/AlN/Nb Tunnel Junctions for Low-Noise Submillimeter Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Miller, David; Chen, Jian; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated and tested submillimeter-wave superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers using very high current density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions (J(sub c) approximately equal 30 kA/sq cm) . The junctions have low resistance-area products (R(sub N)A approximately 5.6 Omega.sq micron), good subgap to normal resistance ratios R(sub sg)/R(sub N) approximately equal 10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, we infer that omega.R(sub N)C = 1 at 270 GHz. This is a factor of 2.5 improvement over what is generally available with Nb/AlO(x)/Nb junctions suitable for low-noise mixers. The AlN-barrier junctions are indeed capable of low-noise operation: we measure an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of T(sub RX) = 110 K (DSB) at 533 GHz for an unoptimized device. In addition to providing wider bandwidth operation at lower frequencies, the AlN-barrier junctions will considerably improve the performance of THz SIS mixers by reducing RF loss in the tuning circuits.

  18. Self-Anchoring Mast for Deploying a High-Speed Submersible Mixer in a Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Cato, Joseph E. Jr.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip 0.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  19. An integrated membrane sub-harmonic Schottky diode mixers at 340GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Dabao; Xing, Dong; Liang, Shixiong; Zhang, Lisen; Zhao, Xiangyang; Feng, Zhihong

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a sub-harmonic mixer operating over the spectral band 332-348 GHz. The mixers employ integrated GaAs membrane Schottky diode technology. The simulated results show that the conversion loss of the mixer is below dB in the band from 333 GHz to 347 GHz with a local oscillator power requirement of 5mW.The minimum is 8.2dB at 344GHz.

  20. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley, D; Schuler, B; Bakajin, O

    2006-03-20

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein secondary structure formation with Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The mixers are designed to rapidly initiate protein folding reaction through the dilution of denaturant. The devices are fabricated out of fused silica, so that they are transparent in the UV. We present characterization of mixing in the fabricated devices, as well as the initial SRCD data on proteins inside the mixers.

  1. Self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank

    DOEpatents

    Cato, Jr., Joseph E.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip O.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  2. Application of Superconducting Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers for Terahertz-Band Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a next-generation heterodyne mixer detector - a hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer employing a superconducting microbridge - has gradually opened up terahertz-band astronomy. The surrounding state-of-the-art technologies including fabrication processes, 4 K cryostats, cryogenic low-noise amplifiers, local oscillator sources, micromachining techniques, and spectrometers, as well as the HEB mixers, have played a valuable role in the development of super-low-noise heterodyne spectroscopy systems for the terahertz band. The current developmental status of terahertz-band HEB mixer receivers and their applications for spectroscopy and astronomy with ground-based, airborne, and satellite telescopes are presented.

  3. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. Part 3: Application to augment engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Moore, G. C.; Blatt, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Military engines frequently need large quantities of thrust for short periods of time. The addition of an augmentor can provide such thrust increases but with a penalty of increased duct length and engine weight. The addition of a forced mixer to the augmentor improves performance and reduces the penalty, as well as providing a method for siting the required flame holders. In this report two augmentor concepts are investigated: a swirl-mixer augmentor and a mixer-flameholder augmentor. Several designs for each concept are included and an experimental assessment of one of the swirl-mixer augmentors is presented.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF POLYMER MICROENCAPSULATION OF MIXED WASTE USING KINETIC MIXER PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    LAGERAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.; MILIAN,L.W.; ADAMS,J.W.

    1997-11-01

    Thermokinetic mixing was investigated as an alternative processing method for polyethylene microencapsulation, a technology well demonstrated for treatment of hazardous, low-level radioactive and low-level mixed wastes. Polyethylene encapsulation by extrusion has been previously shown to be applicable to a wide range of waste types but often pretreatment of the wastes is necessary due to process limitations regarding the maximum waste moisture content and particle size distribution. Development testing was conducted with kinetic mixing in order to demonstrate technology viability and show improved process applicability in these areas. Testing to establish process capabilities and relevant operating parameters was performed with waste surrogates including an aqueous evaporator concentrate and soil. Using a pilot-scale kinetic mixer which was installed and modified for this program, the maximum waste moisture content and particle size was determined. Following process development with surrogate wastes, the technology was successfully demonstrated at BNL using actual mixed waste.

  5. Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers on Silicon-on-Insulator Substrates for Terahertz Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; Stern, Jeffrey; Bumble, Bruce; Maiwald, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A terahertz Hot-Electron Bolometer (HEB) mixer design using device substrates based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology is described. This substrate technology allows very thin chips (6 pm) with almost arbitrary shape to be manufactured, so that they can be tightly fitted into a waveguide structure and operated at very high frequencies with only low risk for power leakages and resonance modes. The NbTiN-based bolometers are contacted by gold beam-leads, while other beamleads are used to hold the chip in place in the waveguide test fixture. The initial tests yielded an equivalent receiver noise temperature of 3460 K double-sideband at a local oscillator frequency of 1.462 THz and an intermediate frequency of 1.4 GHz.

  6. Submillimeter-Wave Receiver Containing An SIS Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Febvre, Pascal; Mcgrath, William R.; Batelaan, Paul D.; Leduc, Henry G.; Bumble, Bruce; Frerking, Margaret A.; Hernichel, Juergen

    1996-01-01

    Submillimeter-wave heterodyne receiver designed to operate at input frequencies in range of 480 to 650 GHz. Intended for use in radio astronomy at frequency of 547 or 626 GHz. Heart of receiver is waveguide mixer that includes adjustable backshort and electric-field-plane tuner. Mixing element high-current-density superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction integrated with superconductive microstrip radio-frequency circuit that tunes out capacitance of junction; matching complex impedance of junction to available tuning range of waveguide mount.

  7. Wide-band operation of quasi-optical distributed superconductor/insulator/superconductor mixers with epitaxial NbN/AlN/NbN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, S.; Shitov, S. V.; Wang, Z.; Uzawa, Y.; Miki, S.; Kawakami, A.; Shoji, A.

    2004-05-01

    For the optimum design of integrated receivers operating above the gap frequency of Nb, we have designed, fabricated and tested NbN-based quasi-optical superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) mixers. The mixer chip incorporates a resonant half-wavelength epitaxial NbN/AlN/NbN junction, a twin-slot antenna and their coupling circuits. We adopted two kinds of coupling circuit between the antenna and the SIS junction: one is an in-phase feed with a length of 95 µm and the other is an anti-phase feed of 30 µm length. It was found that the anti-phase mixer reveals a 3 dB bandwidth of 43% of the centre frequency; the uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature TRX = 691 K at 0.91 THz and TRX = 844 K at 0.80 THz, while 17% and TRX = 1250 K at 0.79 THz for the in-phase version. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed, which could be transmission loss and its robustness with respect to the variation of junction parameters. These experimental results suggest the NbN-based distributed mixer with the anti-phase feed is a better candidate for wide-band integrated receivers operating above 0.7 THz.

  8. On the feasibility of constructing an imaging array of slot-antennas integrated with SIS mixers. [radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, D.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Nilsson, B.; Claeson, T.; Johansson, J.; Kollberg, E.; Yngvesson, K. S.; Rudner, S.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype 700 GHz subharmonically pumped superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer integrated with a tapered slot antenna on a silicon substrate is described. Imaging using integrated SIS-mixer-antenna chips is discussed.

  9. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  10. Noise and loss in balanced and subharmonically pumped mixers. I - Theory. II - Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of noise and frequency conversion for two-diode balanced and subharmonically pumped mixers is presented. The analysis is based on the equivalent circuit of the Schottky diode, having nonlinear capacitance, series resistance, and shot and thermal noise. Expressions for the conversion loss, noise temperature, and input and output impedances are determined in a form suitable for numerical analysis. In Part II, the application of the theory to practical mixers is demonstrated, and the properties of some two-diode mixers are examined. The subharmonically pumped mixer is found to be much more strongly affected by the loop inductance than the balanced mixer, and the ideal two-diode mixer using exponential diodes has a multiport noise-equivalent network (attenuator) similar to that of the ideal single-diode mixer. It is concluded that the theory can be extended to mixers with more than two diodes and will be useful for their design and analysis, provided a suitable nonlinear analysis is available to determine the diode waveforms.

  11. Two-phase, gas-liquid flows in static mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.F.; Kale, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that static mixers are used for many gas-liquid two-phase operations. some of the typical applications are processing of natural gas to remove hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide, waste water treatment, dissolution of gases, hydrogenation, chlorination, and so on. They have experimentally studied the pressure drop for oxygen-water system in a bubble column packed with Sulzer-Koch-type mixing elements. They observed that the ratio of pressure drop through the packed bubble column to that through the unpacked one was slightly greater than one. The suitability of static mixers to mix fluids of very widely different viscosities has been demonstrated. Two-phase operations in polymer industry involve very viscous fluids. Due to the high viscosity of these fluids, the flow will be predominantly in laminar region for both fluids. There are no data on gas-liquid two-phase systems incorporating viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids where flows are predominantly in laminar region.

  12. A Planar Microfluidic Mixer Based on Logarithmic Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Thomas; Quitadamo, Christian; Tesvich, Preston; Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Tiersch, Terrence; Hayes, Daniel; Choi, Jin-Woo; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    A passive, planar micromixer design based on logarithmic spirals is presented. The device was fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane soft photolithography techniques, and mixing performance was characterized via numerical simulation and fluorescent microscopy. Mixing efficiency initially declined as Reynolds number increased, and this trend continued until a Reynolds number of 15 where a minimum was reached at 53%. Mixing efficiency then began to increase reaching a maximum mixing efficiency of 86% at Re = 67. Three-dimensional simulations of fluid mixing in this design were compared to other planar geometries such as the Archimedes spiral and Meandering-S mixers. The implementation of logarithmic curvature offers several unique advantages that enhance mixing, namely a variable cross-sectional area and a logarithmically varying radius of curvature that creates 3-D Dean vortices. These flow phenomena were observed in simulations with multilayered fluid folding and validated with confocal microscopy. This design provides improved mixing performance over a broader range of Reynolds numbers than other reported planar mixers, all while avoiding external force fields, more complicated fabrication processes, and the introduction of flow obstructions or cavities that may unintentionally affect sensitive or particulate-containing samples. Due to the planar design requiring only single-step lithographic features, this compact geometry could be easily implemented into existing micro-total analysis systems requiring effective rapid mixing. PMID:23956497

  13. Measurement and Computation of Supersonic Flow in a Lobed Diffuser-Mixer for Trapped Vortex Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brankovic, Andreja; Ryder, Robert C., Jr.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Gallagher, John R.; Shouse, Dale T.; Roquemore, W. Melvyn; Cooper, Clayton S.; Burrus, David L.; Hendricks, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The trapped vortex combustor (TVC) pioneered by Air Force Research Laboratories (AFRL) is under consideration as an alternative to conventional gas turbine combustors. The TVC has demonstrated excellent operational characteristics such as high combustion efficiency, low NO(x) emissions, effective flame stabilization, excellent high-altitude relight capability, and operation in the lean-burn or rich burn-quick quench-lean burn (RQL) modes of combustion. It also has excellent potential for lowering the engine combustor weight. This performance at low to moderate combustor mach numbers has stimulated interest in its ability to operate at higher combustion mach number, and for aerospace, this implies potentially higher flight mach numbers. To this end, a lobed diffuser-mixer that enhances the fuel-air mixing in the TVC combustor core was designed and evaluated, with special attention paid to the potential shock system entering the combustor core. For the present investigation, the lobed diffuser-mixer combustor rig is in a full annular configuration featuring sixfold symmetry among the lobes, symmetry within each lobe, and plain parallel, symmetric incident flow. During hardware cold-flow testing, significant discrepancies were found between computed and measured values for the pitot-probe-averaged static pressure profiles at the lobe exit plane. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were initiated to determine whether the static pressure probe was causing high local flow-field disturbances in the supersonic flow exiting the diffuser-mixer and whether shock wave impingement on the pitot probe tip, pressure ports, or surface was the cause of the discrepancies. Simulations were performed with and without the pitot probe present in the modeling. A comparison of static pressure profiles without the probe showed that static pressure was off by nearly a factor of 2 over much of the radial profile, even when taking into account potential axial displacement of the

  14. A 100 GHz Josephson mixer using resistively-shunted Nb tunnel junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoelkopf, R. J.; Phillips, T. G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe preliminary mixer results using resistively shunted Nb/AlO(x)/Nb tunnel junctions in a 100-GHz waveguide mixer mount. The mixer utilizes robust, lithographically defined devices which have nonhysteretic I-V curves. A receiver temperature of 390 K (DSB) has been obtained with a conversion loss of -6.5 dB. The receiver's behavior agrees qualitatively with the behavior predicted by the resistively shunted junction model. Substantial improvements in performance are expected with the use of better-optimized shunted junctions, and numerical simulations suggest that, if devices with higher ICRN (critical current-normal state resistance) products can be obtained, Josephson effect mixers could be competitive with SIS mixers at high frequencies.

  15. Comparison of measured and predicted performance of a SIS waveguide mixer at 345 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honingh, C. E.; Delange, G.; Dierichs, M. M. T. M.; Schaeffer, H. H. A.; Wezelman, J.; Vandekuur, J.; Degraauw, T.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The measured gain and noise of a SIS waveguide mixer at 345 GHz have been compared with theoretical values, calculated from the quantum mixer theory using a three port model. As a mixing element, we use a series array of two Nb-Al2O3-Nb SIS junctions. The area of each junction is 0.8 sq microns and the normal state resistance is 52 omega. The embedding impedance of the mixer has been determined from the pumped DC-IV curves of the junction and is compared to results from scale model measurements (105 x). Good agreement was obtained. The measured mixer gain, however, is a factor of 0.45 plus or minus 0.5 lower than the theoretical predicted gain. The measured mixer noise temperature is a factor of 4-5 higher than the calculated one. These discrepancies are independent on pump power and are valid for a broad range of tuning conditions.

  16. 26 CFR 48.4061-1 - Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. 48.4061-1 Section 48.4061-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 48.4061-1 Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. (a... of tax on motor vehicles) on the sale of a cement mixer after June 30, 1968, and before January...

  17. 26 CFR 48.4061-1 - Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. 48.4061-1 Section 48.4061-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 48.4061-1 Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. (a... of tax on motor vehicles) on the sale of a cement mixer after June 30, 1968, and before January...

  18. 26 CFR 48.4061-1 - Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. 48.4061-1 Section 48.4061-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 48.4061-1 Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. (a... of tax on motor vehicles) on the sale of a cement mixer after June 30, 1968, and before January...

  19. 26 CFR 48.4061-1 - Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. 48.4061-1 Section 48.4061-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 48.4061-1 Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. (a... of tax on motor vehicles) on the sale of a cement mixer after June 30, 1968, and before January...

  20. Noise and Bandwidth Measurements of Diffusion-Cooled Nb Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers at Frequencies Above the Superconductive Energy Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-cooled Nb hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers have the potential to simultaneously achieve high intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths and low mixer noise temperatures for operation at THz frequencies (above the superconductive gap energy). We have measured the IF signal bandwidth at 630 GHz of Nb devices with lengths L = 0.3, 0.2, and 0.1 micrometer in a quasioptical mixer configuration employing twin-slot antennas. The 3-dB EF bandwidth increased from 1.2 GHz for the 0.3 gm long device to 9.2 GHz for the 0.1 gm long device. These results demonstrate the expected 1/L squared dependence of the IF bandwidth at submillimeter wave frequencies for the first time, as well as the largest EF bandwidth obtained to date. For the 0.1 gm device, which had the largest bandwidth, the double sideband (DSB) noise temperature of the receiver was 320-470 K at 630 GHz with an absorbed LO power of 35 nW, estimated using the isothermal method. A version of this mixer with the antenna length scaled for operation at 2.5 THz has also been tested. A DSB receiver noise temperature of 1800 plus or minus 100 K was achieved, which is about 1,000 K lower than our previously reported results. These results demonstrate that large EF bandwidth and low-noise operation of a diffusion-cooled HEB mixer is possible at THz frequencies with the same device geometry.

  1. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kise, Drew P; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient. PMID:26855478

  2. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Drew P.; Reddish, Michael J.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-12-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient.

  3. Credit BG. This view looks northwest (290°) in the mixer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. This view looks northwest (290°) in the mixer room at the 30-gallon Baker-Perkins model 121/2 PVM mixer and its associated equipment. The hopper in the left background feeds ingredients to the mixing pot when the hopper is mounted on the mixer frame; the hoist overhead is used to mount the hopper. The mixing pot is in its lowered position beneath the mixer blades. The pot is normally raised and secured to the upper half of the mixer, and a vacuum is applied during mixing operations to prevent the entrainment of air bubbles in the mix. A second mixing pot appears in the right background, and a pot vacuum lid appears in the extreme right foreground. The equipment on the palette in the left foreground is not related to the mixer. Note the explosion-proof fluorescent lighting fixtures suspended from the ceiling. The floor has an electrically conductive coating to dissipate static electrical charges - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Mixer & Casting Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Dependence of density and burning rate of composite solid propellant on mixer size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sumit; Ramakrishna, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of mixer size on the density of the propellant and it also explores the role of the propellant density with regards to burning rate and burn rate pressure index. Propellant samples were prepared in the four different size (15, 70, 200 and 1000 g) mixers with identical input of ingredients to examine the effect of mixer size on density and burning rate of the composite solid propellant. It was noticed that density and burning rate of the propellant changes significantly with change in the mixer size from 15 g to 1000 g. This is because for the smaller mixers the surface area to volume ratio is large and the actual percentage of aluminum and ammonium perchlorate (especially coarse) that goes into the propellant reduces. High burning rate with decrease in mixer size is also accompanied with increase in burn rate pressure index. The composition analysis was also carried out and it is noticed that the actual percentage of the ingredients is different from the intended percentage of the ingredients and percentage change is more when the mixer size decreases.

  5. Three-dimensional measurement of the laminar flow field inside a static mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speetjens, Michel; Jilisen, Rene; Bloemen, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Static mixers are widely used in industry for laminar mixing of viscous fluids as e.g. polymers and food stuffs. Moreover, given the similarities in flow regime, static mixers often serve as model for compact mixers for process intensification and even for micro-mixers. This practical relevance has motivated a host of studies on the mixing characteristics of static mixers and their small-scale counterparts. However, these studies are primarily theoretical and numerical. Experimental studies, in contrast, are relatively rare and typically restricted to local 2D flow characteristics or integral quantities (pressure drop, residence-time distributions). The current study concerns 3D measurements on the laminar flow field inside a static mixer using 3D Particle-Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV) Key challenges to the 3D-PTV image-processing procedure are the optical distortion and degradation of the particle imagery due to light refraction and reflection caused by the cylindrical boundary and the internal elements. Ways to tackle these challenges are discussed and first successful 3D measurements in an actual industrial static mixer are presented.

  6. Re-refiner fluidizes tank residue using portable mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-05

    Mohawk Lubricants Ltd. returned a 12,000 gal storage tank to service by fluidizing and removing 8,000 gal of 4-year-old residue. A portable mixer, manufactured by Pulsair Systems Inc., Bellevue, Wash., was used to cut lighter oil into the partially gelled residue, thus enabling Mohawk to pump it from the tank. While consulting with Pulsair regarding blending operations at its North Vancouver, B.C., used motor oil plant, Mohawk described the gelled residue. The company wished to place the residue storage tank back into service and either sell the removed residue or run it through the re-refining process. The material involved is the distillation-tower bottoms from used oil processing what Mohawk calls tar residue.'' Mohawk had attempted to fluidize the residue at one time by applying steam, but the procedure did not produce a mixture that could be pumped out of the tank. The paper describes the fluidization procedures and their results.

  7. A chemical mixer with dark-green nails.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence K; Harding, John

    2015-01-01

    Nails are integral extensions of the skin and they together form the largest organ of the human body. Changes in nail appearance can be due to external insults or internal pathologies, and nail signs have to be interpreted in light of a good history. We present an interesting case of a man who developed dark-green discolouration of his nails over a short period of time. His work as a chemical mixer rendered him susceptible to hazardous chemical exposure. A notification was filed and the local Occupational Health Department discovered insufficient protective gear and lack of protocols regarding hazards of isocyanate-based resin. The patient also reported washing utensils with bare hands. Based on the meniscal demarcation borders between the discoloured and normal areas, plus a positive bacterial culture from nail clippings, the final diagnosis of isocyanate-resin-induced onycholysis with secondary Pseudomonas infection remained as the most likely clinical diagnosis. PMID:26040827

  8. Retrieval Pump Flexible Suction Hose Dynamic Response Induced by Impact of a Mixer Pump Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, C.W.; Terrones, G.; Bamberger, J.A.; White, M.; Combs, W.H.

    1999-10-07

    Experiments were conducted to investigate whether it may be feasible to simultaneously mix and retrieve radioactive waste slurries that are stored in million-gallon, double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Oscillating mixer pumps, located near the floor of these tanks, are used to mobilize and mix the slurry prior to retrieval. Operational scenarios that may be beneficial for retrieval may require simultaneous operation of a decant/transfer pump and the jet mixer pumps. The effects of jet-induced agitation and jet impingement upon the decant/transfer pump's flexible suction hose have not previously been experimentally evaluated. Possible effects of the jet impacting the hose include hose fatigue, hose collision or entanglement with other structures, and induced static and dynamic loads on the decant/transfer pump equipment. The objective of this work was to create operating conditions in a test tank that produce a dynamic response (in the flexible suction hose upon impingement from an above-floor jet) that is similar to that anticipated in the actual tank. A scaling analysis was conducted to define the interactions between the jet, the tank floor and the suction hose. The complexity of scaling the multi-layer flexible hose (matching its hydroelastic parameters at full and 1/4-scale) led to an alternate approach, that of matching the expected full-scale forces on the full-scale hose in the scaled tank. Two types of tests were conducted: characterization of the jet velocity profile in the test tank at two axial locations from the nozzle and observation of the motion induced in the flexible retrieval hose from impact by the jet. The velocity profile of the jet in the test tank was measured to compare the measured profiles with profile predictions for an above-floor jet. These data were used to obtain a refined estimate of the velocity profile and therefore, the force acting upon the test article at a particular location in the tank. The hose

  9. 670 GHz Schottky Diode Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70 GHz IF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Sin, Seth (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) based subharmonic mixer working at 670 GHz using GaAs Schottky diodes. One example of the mixer has a LO input, an RF input and an IF output. Another possible mixer has a LO input, and IF input and an RF output. Each input or output is connected to a coplanar waveguide with a matching network. A pair of antiparallel diodes provides a signal at twice the LO frequency, which is then mixed with a second signal to provide signals having sum and difference frequencies. The output signal of interest is received after passing through a bandpass filter tuned to the frequency range of interest.

  10. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  11. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-28

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  12. Ultrasound as a Complementary Tool to Internal Mixers for Investigation of Thermal Mechanical Degradation of PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Zhao, Lijuan; Tatibouët, Jacques; Jen, Cheng-kuei

    2008-07-01

    An ultrasonically instrumented internal mixer was used to study thermal mechanical degradation of PET samples with different levels of water content and under different processing temperatures and blade speeds. The strength of ultrasound signals reflected from a roller blade of an internal mixer appeared to be more sensitive to PET degradation than the torque measurement means available on the internal mixer, suggesting that ultrasound could provide additional information on material property changes. A main advantage of ultrasonic degradation monitoring over torque measurement is that it could be implemented at various locations of an extruder to obtain localized melt degradation information.

  13. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 1: A benchmark experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow field within a model turbofan forced mixer nozzle is described. Velocity and thermodynamic state variable data for use in assessing the accuracy and assisting the further development of computational procedures for predicting the flow field within mixer nozzles are provided. Velocity and temperature data suggested that the nozzle mixing process was dominated by circulations (secondary flows) of a length scale on the order the lobe dimensions which were associated with strong radial velocities observed near the lobe exit plane. The 'benchmark' model mixer experiment conducted for code assessment purposes is discussed.

  14. Oxide_Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Exhaust Mixer Development in the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Bansal, Narottam P.; Szelagowski, James; Sokhey, Jagdish; Heffernan, Tab; Clegg, Joseph; Pierluissi, Anthony; Riedell, Jim; Wyen, Travis; Atmur, Steven; Ursic, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    LibertyWorks®, a subsidiary of Rolls-Royce Corporation, first studied CMC (ceramic matrix composite) exhaust mixers for potential weight benefits in 2008. Oxide CMC potentially offered weight reduction, higher temperature capability, and the ability to fabricate complex-shapes for increased mixing and noise suppression. In 2010, NASA was pursuing the reduction of NOx emissions, fuel burn, and noise from turbine engines in Phase I of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project (within the Integrated Systems Research Program). ERA subtasks, including those focused on CMC components, were being formulated with the goal of maturing technology from Proof of Concept Validation (Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3)) to System/Subsystem or Prototype Demonstration in a Relevant Environment (TRL 6). LibertyWorks®, a subsidiary of Rolls-Royce Corporation, first studied CMC (ceramic matrix composite) exhaust mixers for potential weight benefits in 2008. Oxide CMC potentially offered weight reduction, higher temperature capability, and the ability to fabricate complex-shapes for increased mixing and noise suppression. In 2010, NASA was pursuing the reduction of NOx emissions, fuel burn, and noise from turbine engines in Phase I of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project (within the Integrated Systems Research Program). ERA subtasks, including those focused on CMC components, were being formulated with the goal of maturing technology from Proof of Concept Validation (Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3)) to System/Subsystem or Prototype Demonstration in a Relevant Environment (TRL 6). Oxide CMC component at both room and elevated temperatures. A TRL˜5 (Component Validation in a Relevant Environment) was attained and the CMC mixer was cleared for ground testing on a Rolls-Royce AE3007 engine for performance evaluation to achieve TRL 6.

  15. Structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump in a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvani, M.A.; Strehlow, J.P.; Baliga, R.

    1993-08-01

    The double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 is a 1,000,000 gallon tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With time the waste has formed two layers of sludge, a convective and a nonconvective layer. In addition, a crest has formed over the surface of the waste, isolating the convective layer from the vapor space. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer and under the crust. Over time, this hydrogen buildup increases pressure on the crest from beneath. Every 100 to 140 days, the pressure is released when the crust lifts upward in what is called a waste rollover. To prevent the release of a large volume of hydrogen to the vapor space, a mixer pump has been designed to be installed in the tank to circulate the waste and reduce or prevent the hydrogen buildup. The structural analysis and evaluation designed as part of the hydrogen mitigation test process and presented herein addresses the response of the mixer pump and the tank dome resulting from expected operational and design loads. The loads include deadweight, waste rollover, asymmetric thrust, and pump vibration, as well as seismic loads. The seismically induced loads take into consideration both the convective and the impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank. The structural evaluations were performed in accordance with applicable national codes and standards. The qualification of the mixer pump required the design of a unique mounting assembly to transfer the loads from the pump to the surrounding soil without overstressing the structural components such as the dome penetration riser. Also, special consideration was given to minimize the additional stresses in the already stressed concrete tank dome.

  16. Acoustic Characteristics of Various Treatment Panel Designs Specific to HSCT Mixer-Ejector Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Kinzie, K.; Vu, D. D.; Langenbrunner, L. E.; Szczepkowski, G. T.

    2006-01-01

    The development process of liner design methodology is described in several reports. The results of the initial effort of concept development, screening, laboratory testing of various liner concepts, and preliminary correlation (generic data) are presented in a report Acoustic Characteristics of Various Treatment Panel Designs for HSCT Ejector Liner Acoustic Technology Development Program. The second phase of laboratory test results of more practical concepts and their data correlations are presented in this report (product specific). In particular, this report contains normal incidence impedance measurements of several liner types in both a static rig and in a high temperature flow duct rig. The flow duct rig allows for temperatures up to 400 F with a grazing flow up to Mach 0.8. Measurements of impedance, DC flow resistance, and in the flow rig cases, impact of the liner on boundary layer profiles are documented. In addition to liner rig tests, a limited number of tests were made on liners installed in a mixer-Ejector nozzle to confirm the performance of the liner prediction in an installed configuration.

  17. An Integrated Balanced Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor Heterodyne Mixer on a Silicon Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westig, M. P.; Jacobs, K.; Schultz, M.; Justen, M.; Stutzki, J.; Honingh, C. E.

    2011-03-01

    We have designed and fabricated a 380-520 GHz integrated balanced NbAlAlOxNb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) heterodyne waveguide mixer for submillimeter astrophysics. The response of the mixer measured with a Fourier transform spectrometer shows excellent agreement with the design. The novelty of our device is that we deposit the complete superconducting mixer circuit (tapered slotline antennas, hybrid coupler, MIM capacitors, SIS junctions, tuning circuits and blocking filters) on top of a 9 μ m silicon membrane. The membrane is held suspended in a waveguide by 2.5 μ m thick gold plated beamleads. We will show that silicon membrane technology and a thorough device design render the integration of SIS devices with larger circuits feasible. This is an important step towards large arrays of mixers. When using an appropriate superconductor technology, these devices are scalable to higher frequencies. We will present the design, fabrication results and first results of heterodyne measurements.

  18. 26. JUNCTION STRUCTURE. WATER LEVEL 1190FT, INNER RING MIXER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. JUNCTION STRUCTURE. WATER LEVEL 1190FT, INNER RING MIXER OF STATE AND COLORADO, WATER EXITS THROUGH OUTER RING. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Three-Wing Optical Mixer Design, Fabrication and Application to a μ-TAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Hiroo; Takada, Kosaku; Akagi, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Takakazu; Nonohara, Yasunari

    Optically driven 3-wing mixers are designed, fabricated and applied to liquid mixing in a microchannel. Three-wing mixers are easily fabricated into the desired shape by photolithography based on a large wing angle, and they are stable against trapping and rotation. Two-liquid mixing is visualized by the variation in milk fat colloid density, and velocity vectors are obtained through a stable and fast rotation rate of 500 rpm, even in a flow of 67 μm/s.

  20. Mixing characteristics of mixers in flow analysis. Application to two-dimensional detection in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Three mixer designs, a back-flow tee mixer (BT), an end-blocked membrane tee mixer (EMT), and a tubular membrane mixer (TM), were fabricated and compared to three commercially available mixers, Visco-Jet Micro mixer (VJM) and HS binary tee mixer with 2 and 10 μL volume (HS-2 and HS-10) mixing cartridges. Internal volumes ranged from 8.3 to 20.3 μL. Performance characteristics were evaluated by the Villermaux-Dushman reaction, noise in baseline conductance upon mixing an electrolyte solution with water, and dispersion/relative dispersion of an injected solute. No single characteristic would uniquely qualify a particular device. In typical postcolumn use when a small reagent flow is added to a principal flow stream using a low-pulsation high-end chromatographic pump, with the worst of these mixers, imperfect mixing accounted for 99.6% of the observed noise. EMT, BT, and TM with asymmetric inlets provided better mixing performances relative to VJM, HS-2, and HS-10 with symmetric inlet ports, especially when the secondary liquid flow rate was much lower than the principal stream-flow rate. Dispersion per unit residence time was singularly large for HS-2. Based on its mixing efficiency and small dispersion, the BT design was found to be the best for practicing postcolumn reaction. As an illustrative application, this was then used to introduce electrogenerated LiOH in a suppressed ion chromatography system to perform sensitive detection of weak acids in a second dimension. PMID:25426864

  1. Piloted Evaluation of a UH-60 Mixer Equivalent Turbulence Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusardi, Jeff A.; Blanken, Chris L.; Tischeler, Mark B.

    2002-01-01

    A simulation study of a recently developed hover/low speed Mixer Equivalent Turbulence Simulation (METS) model for the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter was conducted in the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). The experiment was a continuation of previous work to develop a simple, but validated, turbulence model for hovering rotorcraft. To validate the METS model, two experienced test pilots replicated precision hover tasks that had been conducted in an instrumented UH-60 helicopter in turbulence. Objective simulation data were collected for comparison with flight test data, and subjective data were collected that included handling qualities ratings and pilot comments for increasing levels of turbulence. Analyses of the simulation results show good analytic agreement between the METS model and flight test data, with favorable pilot perception of the simulated turbulence. Precision hover tasks were also repeated using the more complex rotating-frame SORBET (Simulation Of Rotor Blade Element Turbulence) model to generate turbulence. Comparisons of the empirically derived METS model with the theoretical SORBET model show good agreement providing validation of the more complex blade element method of simulating turbulence.

  2. 670-GHz Schottky Diode-Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70-GHz IF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lee, Choonsup; Lin, Robert H.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Sin, Seth; Deal, William; Loi, Kwok K.; Nam, Peta; Rodriguez, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    GaAs-based, sub-harmonically pumped Schottky diode mixers offer a number of advantages for array implementation in a heterodyne receiver system. Since the radio frequency (RF) and local oscillator (LO) signals are far apart, system design becomes much simpler. A proprietary planar GaAs Schottky diode process was developed that results in very low parasitic anodes that have cutoff frequencies in the tens of terahertz. This technology enables robust implementation of monolithic mixer and frequency multiplier circuits well into the terahertz frequency range. Using optical and e-beam lithography, and conventional epitaxial layer design with innovative usage of GaAs membranes and metal beam leads, high-performance terahertz circuits can be designed with high fidelity. All of these mixers use metal waveguide structures for housing. Metal machined structures for RF and LO coupling hamper these mixers to be integrated in multi-pixel heterodyne array receivers for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Moreover, the recent developments of terahertz transistors on InP substrate provide an opportunity, for the first time, to have integrated amplifiers followed by Schottky diode mixers in a heterodyne receiver at these frequencies. Since the amplifiers are developed on a planar architecture to facilitate multi-pixel array implementation, it is quite important to find alternative architecture to waveguide-based mixers.

  3. Flow regimes in a T-mixer operating with a binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, Simone; Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Galletti, Chiara; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2015-11-01

    Efficient mixing in small volumes is a key target in many processes. Among the most common micro-devices, passive T-shaped micro-mixers are widely used. For this reason, T-mixers have been studied in the literature and its working flow regimes have been identified. However, in most of the available theoretical studies it is assumed that only one working fluid is used, i.e. that the same fluid at the same thermodynamic conditions is entering the two inlet conduits of the mixer. Conversely, the practical use of micro-devices often involves the mixing of two different fluids or of the same fluid at different thermodynamic conditions. In this case flow regimes significantly different than those observed for a single working fluid may occur. The present work aims at investigating the flow regimes in a T-mixers when water at two different temperatures, i.e. having different viscosity and density, is entering the mixer. The effect of the temperature difference on the flow regimes in a 3D T-mixer is investigated by DNS and stability analysis and the results are compared to the case in which a single working fluid is employed.

  4. Hot-electron bolometer terahertz mixers for the Herschel Space Observatory.

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, Sergey; Drakinskiy, Vladimir; Berg, Therese; Khosropanah, Pourya; Kollberg, Erik

    2008-03-01

    We report on low noise terahertz mixers (1.4-1.9 THz) developed for the heterodyne spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The mixers employ double slot antenna integrated superconducting hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) made of thin NbN films. The mixer performance was characterized in terms of detection sensitivity across the entire rf band by using a Fourier transform spectrometer (from 0.5 to 2.5 THz, with 30 GHz resolution) and also by measuring the mixer noise temperature at a limited number of discrete frequencies. The lowest mixer noise temperature recorded was 750 K [double sideband (DSB)] at 1.6 THz and 950 K DSB at 1.9 THz local oscillator (LO) frequencies. Averaged across the intermediate frequency band of 2.4-4.8 GHz, the mixer noise temperature was 1100 K DSB at 1.6 THz and 1450 K DSB at 1.9 THz LO frequencies. The HEB heterodyne receiver stability has been analyzed and compared to the HEB stability in the direct detection mode. The optimal local oscillator power was determined and found to be in a 200-500 nW range. PMID:18377032

  5. A Dual Polarized Quasi-Optical SIS Mixer at 550-GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Miller, David; LeDuc, Henry G.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and the performance of a low-noise dual-polarized quasi-optical superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) mixer at 550 GHz. The mixer utilizes a novel cross-slot antenna on a hyperhemispherical substrate lens, two junction tuning circuits, niobium trilayer junctions, and an IF circuit containing a lumped element 180 deg hybrid. The antenna consists of an orthogonal pair of twin-slot antennas, and has four feed points, two for each polarization. Each feed point is coupled to a two-junction SIS mixer. The 180 deg IF hybrid is implemented using a lumped element/microstrip circuit located inside the mixer block. Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements of the mixer frequency response show good agreement with computer simulations. The measured co-polarized and cross-polarized patterns for both polarizations also agree with the theoretical predictions. The noise performance of the dual-polarized mixer is excellent, giving uncorrected receiver noise temperature of better than 115 K (DSB) at 528 GHz for both the polarizations.

  6. Performance of NbN superconductive tunnel junctions as SIS mixers at 205 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, W. R.; Stern, J. A.; Javadi, H. H. S.; Cypher, S. R.; Hunt, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    Small area (less than 1 sq micron), high-current-density NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions with I-V characteristics suitable for high-frequency mixers have been fabricated. Mesa-geometry junctions with an area of about 1 sq micron and critical current density of 5-10 kA/sq cm are integrated with superconducting microstrip lines designed to resonate out the junction capacitance. A study was made of the mixer gain and noise performance near 205 GHz as a function of the inductance provided by the microstrip line. This has confirmed, at a high millimeter-wave frequency, values of junction capacitance of 85 fF/sq micron and recently measured values of a magnetic penetration depth of 380 nm. Mixer noise temperatures as low as 134 K at 1.5 K have been obtained for properly tuned junctions. A significant improvement in mixer performance on cooling from 4.2 K to 1.5 K was observed. Edge-geometry junctions with an area of 0.3 sq microns and critical current density of 18-25 kA/sq cm have also been fabricated. These junctions give a mixer noise temperature of 145 K at 4.2 K without the use of integrated tuning elements. These are the best results ever achieved for NbN-based SIS mixers.

  7. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    This sludge mixing/mobilization system was developed in Russia. A prototype system was evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) and Industry and University Programs (INDP). The Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump showed promise for mixing highly viscous sludges. This project is to refine the system design (especially the control subsystem) and manufacture the system in Russia in accordance with quality standards required for deployment in radioactive waste storage tanks. Specifications and requirements are being developed by the TFA and INDP. The requirements may call for two or three of the sludge mixing systems to be delivered to Oak Ridge. DOE-Oak Ridge and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will deploy the pulsating mixing pump system in their Gunite Tanks. These tanks are being emptied and cleaned prior to closure. Oak Ridge has deployed a number of innovative technologies in these efforts. If successful at Oak Ridge, the pulsating mixing pump system has potential application at several other DOE sites, including Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho.

  8. Studying enzymatic bioreactions in a millisecond microfluidic flow mixer

    PubMed Central

    Buchegger, Wolfgang; Haller, Anna; van den Driesche, Sander; Kraft, Martin; Lendl, Bernhard; Vellekoop, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the pre-steady state development of enzymatic bioreactions using a microfluidic mixer is presented. To follow such reactions fast mixing of reagents (enzyme and substrate) is crucial. By using a highly efficient passive micromixer based on multilaminar flow, mixing times in the low millisecond range are reached. Four lamination layers in a shallow channel reduce the diffusion lengths to a few micrometers only, enabling very fast mixing. This was proven by confocal fluorescence measurements in the channel’s cross sectional area. Adjusting the overall flow rate in the 200 μm wide and 900 μm long mixing and observation channel makes it possible to investigate enzyme reactions over several seconds. Further, the device enables changing the enzyme/substrate ratio from 1:1 up to 3:1, while still providing high mixing efficiency, as shown for the enzymatic hydrolysis using β-galactosidase. This way, the early kinetics of the enzyme reaction at multiple enzyme/substrate concentrations can be collected in a very short time (minutes). The fast and easy handling of the mixing device makes it a very powerful and convenient instrument for millisecond temporal analysis of bioreactions. PMID:22662071

  9. Skid-mounted self-leveling mixer apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemoeller, C.L.; Davis, G.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a self-leveling mixer apparatus. It comprises: a transportable skid frame; a mixing tube supported from the frame in a manner such that the tub is movable between first and second positions relative to the frame. The tub having a tub fluid outlet defined in a lower portion thereof; suction conduit means, supported from the skid frame for transport therewith. Aid conduit means including: a manifold inlet means for connection to a fluid source located separate from the skid frame; a manifold outlet means for connection to a suction of a pump located separate from the skid frame; and a tub outlet conduit portion located upstream of the manifold outlet and connected to the tub fluid outlet; leveling valve means, disposed in the suction conduit means upstream of the manifold outlet, for controlling a level of fluid in the tub; and connector means, operably associated with the tub and the leveling valve means, for adjusting the leveling valve means in response to movement of the tub relative to the skid frame.

  10. Performance and application of the Quantiflex air/oxygen mixer.

    PubMed

    Richardson, F J; Nunn, J F

    1976-11-01

    The Quantiflex air/oxygen mixer is designed to dispense mixtures of air and oxygen with separate controls for total gas flow rate and oxygen concentration of the mixture within the range 21-100%. A monitoring flowmeter is provided for the mixture and also, as a safety measure, for the oxygen component. This serves as an indicator that oxygen is flowing and also permits independent calculation of the oxygen concentration of the mixture. Delivered oxygen concentrations were found to be within +/- 2% of the indicated value at flow rates between 4 and 12 litre/min with the input pressures of either or both gases at 208-415 kPa (30-60 lbf/in2.) gauge, and with or without an output pressure of 20 kPa. At total flow rates of 1.5-2 litre/min there was a maximum discrepancy of 4% below and 8% above the indicated concentration in some delivered concentrations. Acceptability, ease, accuracy and quickness of use by nurses were compared with current methods using separate flowmeters for air and oxygen and calculating the required flow rates by means of arithmetic, graph and special-purpose slide-rule (Blease). The Quantiflex prototype was the most acceptable, the easiest, the most accurate and the fastest of the techniques investigated. PMID:136976

  11. Performance analysis of vortex based mixers for confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschhagen, Timo

    The hybrid rocket is still sparsely employed within major space or defense projects due to their relatively poor combustion efficiency and low fuel grain regression rate. Although hybrid rockets can claim advantages in safety, environmental and performance aspects against established solid and liquid propellant systems, the boundary layer combustion process and the diffusion based mixing within a hybrid rocket grain port leaves the core flow unmixed and limits the system performance. One principle used to enhance the mixing of gaseous flows is to induce streamwise vorticity. The counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) mixer utilizes this principle and introduces two vortices into a confined flow, generating a stirring motion in order to transport near wall media towards the core and vice versa. Recent studies investigated the velocity field introduced by this type of swirler. The current work is evaluating the mixing performance of the CVP concept, by using an experimental setup to simulate an axial primary pipe flow with a radially entering secondary flow. Hereby the primary flow is altered by the CVP swirler unit. The resulting setup therefore emulates a hybrid rocket motor with a cylindrical single port grain. In order to evaluate the mixing performance the secondary flow concentration at the pipe assembly exit is measured, utilizing a pressure-sensitive paint based procedure.

  12. Progress on a Multichannel, Dual-Mixer Stability Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Albert; Cole, Steven; Stevens, Gary; Tucker, Blake; Greenhall, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Several documents describe aspects of the continuing development of a multichannel, dual-mixer system for simultaneous characterization of the instabilities of multiple precise, low-noise oscillators. One of the oscillators would be deemed to be a reference oscillator, its frequency would be offset by an amount (100 Hz) much greater than the desired data rate, and each of the other oscillators would be compared with the frequency-offset signal by operation of a combination of hardware and software. A high-rate time-tag counter would collect zero-crossing times of the approximately equal 100-Hz beat notes. The system would effect a combination of interpolation and averaging to process the time tags into low-rate phase residuals at the desired grid times. Circuitry that has been developed since the cited prior article includes an eight-channel timer board to replace an obsolete commercial time-tag counter, plus a custom offset generator, cleanup loop, distribution amplifier, zero-crossing detector, and frequency divider.

  13. Theoretical SIS mixer research. Final technical report, 1 June 1990-30 November 1992. [SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    Theoretical research has been conducted to elucidate the basic physics behind the properties of superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction receiving devices. The properties of SIS mixers using nonideal junctions and finite LO power, were determined by analytic expansion of the equations of the quantum theory of mixing, and also by computer simulations of SIS receivers over the entire range of experimental parameters. The result is a new coherent and intuitive picture of SIS mixer behavior. Many of the outstanding mysteries and questions about SIS receivers are resolved, and this contributes greatly to the design and interpretation of SIS mixer experiments. Other calculations show how to achieve sub-quantum noise temperatures in the phase sensitive SIS mixer, an important step towards realization of ultra-low-noise detectors. A simplified model casts doubt on the superlative experimental results reported for the rf-series dc-parallel biased array SIS mixer. Superconductivity; SIS mixer; Submillimeter-wave detection.

  14. Analysis of Fuel Vaporization, Fuel-Air Mixing, and Combustion in Integrated Mixer-Flame Holders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deur, J. M.; Cline, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Requirements to limit pollutant emissions from the gas turbine engines for the future High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) have led to consideration of various low-emission combustor concepts. One such concept is the Integrated Mixer-Flame Holder (IMFH). This report describes a series of IMFH analyses performed with KIVA-II, a multi-dimensional CFD code for problems involving sprays, turbulence, and combustion. To meet the needs of this study, KIVA-II's boundary condition and chemistry treatments are modified. The study itself examines the relationships between fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, and combustion. Parameters being considered include: mixer tube diameter, mixer tube length, mixer tube geometry (converging-diverging versus straight walls), air inlet velocity, air inlet swirl angle, secondary air injection (dilution holes), fuel injection velocity, fuel injection angle, number of fuel injection ports, fuel spray cone angle, and fuel droplet size. Cases are run with and without combustion to examine the variations in fuel-air mixing and potential for flashback due to the above parameters. The degree of fuel-air mixing is judged by comparing average, minimum, and maximum fuel/air ratios at the exit of the mixer tube, while flame stability is monitored by following the location of the flame front as the solution progresses from ignition to steady state. Results indicate that fuel-air mixing can be enhanced by a variety of means, the best being a combination of air inlet swirl and a converging-diverging mixer tube geometry. With the IMFH configuration utilized in the present study, flashback becomes more common as the mixer tube diameter is increased and is instigated by disturbances associated with the dilution hole flow.

  15. SIS Mixer Design for a Broadband Millimeter Spectrometer Suitable for Rapid Line Surveys and Redshift Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, F.; Sumner, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Hu, R.; LeDuc, H.; Harris, A.; Miller, D.

    2004-01-01

    We present some detail of the waveguide probe and SIS mixer chip designs for a low-noise 180-300 GHz double- sideband receiver with an instantaneous RF bandwidth of 24 GHz. The receiver's single SIS junction is excited by a broadband, fixed-tuned waveguide probe on a silicon substrate. The IF output is coupled to a 6-18 GHz MMIC low- noise preamplifier. Following further amplification, the output is processed by an array of 4 GHz, 128-channel analog autocorrelation spectrometers (WASP 11). The single-sideband receiver noise temperature goal of 70 Kelvin will provide a prototype instrument capable of rapid line surveys and of relatively efficient carbon monoxide (CO) emission line searches of distant, dusty galaxies. The latter application's goal is to determine redshifts by measuring the frequencies of CO line emissions from the star-forming regions dominating the submillimeter brightness of these galaxies. Construction of the receiver has begun; lab testing should begin in the fall. Demonstration of the receiver on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) telescope should begin in spring 2003.

  16. Cold Aero Performance of a Two-Dimensional Mixer Ejector Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, C.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1986, NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry have been assessing the economic viability and environmental acceptability of a second-generation supersonic civil transport, or High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Environmental acceptability in terms of airport community noise and economic viability are critical elements in this endeavor. Development of a propulsion system that satisfies strict airport noise regulations (FAR36 Stage III levels), at acceptable performance and weight, is critical to the success of any HSCT program. Two-dimensional mixer-ejector (2DME) exhaust systems are one approach in achieving this goal. In support of HSCT development, GEAE (GE Aircraft Engines), under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center, conducted this test program at the NASA Langley 16 ft transonic wind tunnel to evaluate the cold aerodynamic performance aspects of the 2DME exhaust system concept. The effects of SAR (SAR, suppressor area ratio, = mixed-flow area/primary nozzle throat area), MAR (MAR = overall exhaust system exit/mixing-plane area), flap length, CER (suppressor chute expansion ratio), chute alignment, and free stream Mach number were investigated on a 1/11th cold aerodynamic scale model of a 2DME exhaust system.

  17. Design and Evaluation of a Passive Alcove-based Microfluidic Mixer

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Durand, Jorge L.; Hayden, Eric; Rousseau, Denis L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2012-01-01

    A novel passive microfluidic silicon mixer has been designed, optimized and fabricated. The architecture of the mixer consists of a simple “T” junction, made up by a 20 μm wide by 82 μm deep channel, followed by three repeats of an alcove, each with a triangular obstruction, arranged in a zigzag fashion. Numerical simulations were employed to optimize the geometry, particularly the dimensions of the alcoves, the relative orientation and the spacing between them, and the degree of intrusion associated with them. The simulation results demonstrate that chaotic flow due to recirculation within the alcoves results in transverse velocity that promotes effective fluid mixing. The microfluidic mixer with the simulation-optimized geometry was fabricated with photolithographic techniques and characterized by optical imaging, fluorescence and Raman microscope spectroscopy. At a sample flow rate of 20 μL/s, the mixer exhibits a short mixing deadtime of ~22 μs and a high mixing efficiency under both low and high viscosity conditions. The alcove-based microfluidic silicon mixer offers unique advantages for its short deadtime and slow sample consumption rate. In addition, it provides a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip applications for its ease of development into multiple networks for massively parallel analytical processes. PMID:19140669

  18. Mm-wave components - SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) mixers. Final report, November 1986-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, S.R.

    1989-04-26

    Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) tunnel-junction mixers are known to provide ultra-high sensitivity receiver applications above 30 GHz. In this two year (Phase II) program, HYPRES, in collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, have developed novel fully integrated SIS mixer circuits, and demonstrated a unique high efficiency cooling system. The integrated SIS mixer chip contains, aside from the actual mixer elements, passive tuning components, an IF filter, a coplanar transmission line, and a waveguide coupler, necessary components heretofore realized off-chip. Fabrication of the integrated mixer required development of a nine-level process and optimization of the process dependent electrical parameters of the SIS devices. The device performs efficiently in the range of 75-115 GHz. A novel dewar-based cooler, which makes use of the extremely low thermal conductivity of the fused silica chip substrate to achieve an incremental thermal load of 25 mW, was fabricated and demonstrated. Such a cryostat allows relatively long-term unattended operation of SIS, or other, cryogenic devices.

  19. Submillisecond mixing in a continuous-flow, microfluidic mixer utilizing mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging detection

    PubMed Central

    Kise, Drew P.; Magana, Donny; Reddish, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a continuous-flow, microfluidic mixer utilizing mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging detection, with an experimentally determined, submillisecond mixing time. The simple and robust mixer design has the microfluidic channels cut through a polymer spacer that is sandwiched between two IR transparent windows. The mixer hydrodynamically focuses the sample stream with two side flow channels, squeezing it into a thin jet and initiating mixing through diffusion and advection. The detection system generates a mid-infrared hyperspectral absorbance image of the microfluidic sample stream. Calibration of the hyperspectral image yields the mid-IR absorbance spectrum of the sample versus time. A mixing time of 269 μs was measured for a pD jump from 3.2 to above 4.5 in a D2O sample solution of adenosine monophosphate (AMP), which acts as an infrared pD indicator. The mixer was further characterized by comparing experimental results with a simulation of the mixing of an H2O sample stream with a D2O sheath flow, showing good agreement between the two. The IR microfluidic mixer eliminates the need for fluorescence labeling of proteins with bulky, interfering dyes, because it uses the intrinsic IR absorbance of the molecules of interest, and the structural specificity of IR spectroscopy to follow specific chemical changes such as the protonation state of AMP. PMID:24302515

  20. Design of turbulent tangential micro-mixers that mix liquids on the nanosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Mitic, Sandra; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan W; van den Berg, Albert; de Vries, Simon

    2015-01-15

    Unravelling (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms and macromolecular folding pathways on the (sub)microsecond time scale is limited by the time resolution of kinetic instruments for mixing reactants and observation of the progress of the reaction. To improve the mixing time resolution, turbulent four- and two-jet tangential micro-mixers were designed and characterized for their mixing and (unwanted) premixing performances employing acid-base reactions monitored by a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. The mixing performances of the micro-mixers were determined after the mixing chamber in a free-flowing jet. The premixing behavior in the vortex chamber was assessed in an optically transparent glass-silicon replica of a previously well-characterized stainless-steel four-jet tangential micro-mixer. At the highest flow rates, complete mixing was achieved in 160ns with only approximately 9% premixing of the reactants. The mixing time of 160ns is at least 50 times shorter than estimated for other fast mixing devices. Key aspects to the design of ultrafast turbulent micro-mixers are discussed. The integration of these micro-mixers with an optical flow cell would enable the study of the very onset of chemical reactions in general and of enzyme catalytic reactions in particular. PMID:25447461

  1. Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vleet, R.J.

    1994-10-05

    This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

  2. Noise performance of phase-insensitive multicasting in multi-stage parametric mixers.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Christopher K; Tong, Zhi; Myslivets, Evgeny; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Adleman, James R; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Jacobs, Everett W; Radic, Stojan

    2013-01-14

    Noise properties of large-count spectral multicasting in a phase-insensitive parametric mixer were investigated. Scalable multicasting was achieved using two-tone continuous-wave seeded mixers capable of generating more than 20 frequency non-degenerate copies. The mixer was constructed using a multistage architecture to simultaneously manage high Figure-of-Merit frequency generation and suppress noise generation. The performance was characterized by measuring the conversion efficiency and noise figure of all signal copies. Minimum noise figure of 8.09dB was measured. Experimental findings confirm that noise of the multicasted signal does not grow linearly with copy count and that it can be suppressed below this limit. PMID:23388973

  3. The evaluation of a metered mixer for RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle backfill operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardell, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    Metered mixing specifically for the RSRM backfill operation was investigated. Projected advantages were the elimination of waste RTV silicone produced in the operation and the elimination of entrapped air during the mix. Although metered mixing proved to be a viable method for mixing the Dow Corning DC 90-0006 rubber with its catalyst, applying the technology to the RSRM backfill operation has several disadvantages that are decisive. Use of a metered mixer would increase the amount of material that was being scraped for each backfill and increase the amount of time required to clean up the equipment after each operation. Therefore, use of metered static mixers is not recommended for use in the RSRM nozzle backfill operations. Because metered mixers proved to have significant disadvantages other methods of mixing and dispensing the RTV during the backfill operation are being investigated, and will be reported in a separate document.

  4. Noise performance of phase-insensitive frequency multicasting in parametric mixer with finite dispersion.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Huynh, Chris K; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2013-07-29

    Noise performance of dual-pump, multi-sideband parametric mixer operated in phase-insensitive mode is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, in case when a large number of multicasting idlers are generated, the noise performance is strictly dictated by the dispersion characteristics of the mixer. We find that the sideband noise performance is significantly degraded in anomalous dispersion region permitting nonlinear noise amplification. In contrast, in normal dispersion region, the noise performance converges to the level of four-sideband parametric process, rather than deteriorates with increased sideband creation. Low noise generation mandates precise dispersion-induced phase mismatch among pump and sideband waves in order to control the noise coupling. We measure the noise performance improvement for a many-sideband, multi-stage mixer by incorporating new design technique. PMID:23938638

  5. Balanced Waveguide HEB Mixer for APEX 1.3 THz receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meledin, Denis; Pantaleev, Miroslav; Pavolotsky, Alexey; Risacher, Christophe; Perez Robles, Victor A.; Belitsky, Victor; Drakinskiy, Vladimir; Cherednichenko, Sergey

    2005-05-01

    We present results on the design and construction of a waveguide balanced Hot Electron Bolometer (HEB) Terahertz mixer for Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX), band T2 covering 1250-1390 GHz frequency range. In the proposed design, a waveguide balanced mixer is realized using a quadrature scheme. The two identical HEB elements are integrated with RF choke filters, DC-bias, IF circuitry, and fabricated from 4 nm thick NbN film deposited on a crystalline quartz substrate with dimensions of 1100 μm×70 μm × 17 μm. We have designed and fabricated an input 3 dB quadrature waveguide hybrid. For its fabrication, we use micromachining approach to achieve low insertion loss and symmetrical division of the RF and local oscillator (LO) power within the band of interest. We plan to use two HEB mixer configurations with different probe impedance values of 55, 70 Ohm within 1250-1390 GHz frequency range.

  6. Superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver for 800-GHz operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Blundell, R.; Tong, C.-Y. E.; Papa, D. C.; Hunter, T. R.; Paine, S. N.; Patt, F.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Cherednichenko, S.; Voronov, B.; Gershenzon, E.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver designed to operate in the partially transmissive 350-μm atmospheric window. The receiver employs an NbN thin-film microbridge as the mixer element, in which the main cooling mechanism of the hot electrons is through electron-phonon interaction. At a local-oscillator frequency of 808 GHz, the measured double-sideband receiver noise temperature is Trx=970 K, across a 1-GHz intermediate-frequency bandwidth centered at 1.8 GHz. We have measured the linearity of the receiver and the amount of local-oscillator power incident on the mixer for optimal operation, which is PLO ≈ 1 microwatt. This receiver was used in making observations as a facility instrument at the Heinrich Hertz Telescope, Mt. Graham, AZ, during the 1998-1999 winter observing season.

  7. Drug residues recovered in feed after various feedlot mixer truck cleanout procedures.

    PubMed

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Sit, Dan; Gibbons, Nicole; Ramogida, Caterina; Hendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of two methods of equipment cleanout, sequencing or flushing, for reducing drug carryover in feedlot mixer trucks. Feed samples were collected from total mixed rations before and after various feed mixer equipment cleanout procedures. Medicated rations contained either 11 ppm of tylosin or 166 or 331 ppm of chlortetracycline. There were no differences between sequencing and flushing or between flushing with dry barley and flushing with barley silage in the median proportion of drug recovered in the next ration. A larger drug reduction was achieved using flush material at a volume of 10 versus 5% of the mixer capacity and mixing the flush material for 3 versus 4 min. Regardless of the drug or prescription concentrations in the total mixed rations or the equipment cleanout procedure used, concentrations of chlortetracycline and tylosin recovered were very low. PMID:20051207

  8. A compact design for the Josephson mixer: The lumped element circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Pillet, J.-D.; Flurin, E.; Mallet, F. Huard, B.

    2015-06-01

    We present a compact and efficient design in terms of gain, bandwidth, and dynamical range for the Josephson mixer, the superconducting circuit performing three-wave mixing at microwave frequencies. In an all lumped-element based circuit with galvanically coupled ports, we demonstrate nondegenerate amplification for microwave signals over a bandwidth up to 50 MHz for a power gain of 20 dB. The quantum efficiency of the mixer is shown to be about 70%, and its saturation power reaches −112 dBm.

  9. A User's Guide for the Differential Reduced Ejector/Mixer Analysis "DREA" Program. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence J.; Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1999-01-01

    A system of analytical and numerical two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle models that require minimal empirical input has been developed and programmed for use in conceptual and preliminary design. This report contains a user's guide describing the operation of the computer code, DREA (Differential Reduced Ejector/mixer Analysis), that contains these mathematical models. This program is currently being adopted by the Propulsion Systems Analysis Office at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A brief summary of the DREA method is provided, followed by detailed descriptions of the program input and output files. Sample cases demonstrating the application of the program are presented.

  10. Packaging design criteria, transfer and disposal of 102-AP mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1994-11-23

    A mixer pump installed in storage tank 241-AP-102 (102-AP) has failed. This pump is referred to as the 102-AP mixer pump (APMP). The APMP will be removed from 102-AP 1 and a new pump will be installed. The main purpose of the Packaging Design Criteria (PDC) is to establish criteria necessary to design and fabricate a shipping container for the transfer and storage of the APMP from 102-AP. The PDC will be used as a guide to develop a Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP).

  11. Feasibility Study on Using a Single Mixer Pump for Tank 241-AN-101 Waste Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Terrones, Guillermo

    2003-02-11

    The objective of this evaluation was to determine whether a single rotating pump located 20 ft off-center would adequately mix expected AN-101 waste. Three-dimensional, AN-101 pump jet mixing simulation results indicate that a single, 20-ft off-centered mixer pump would mobilize almost all solids even at the furthest tank wall for sludge yield strength up to 150 Pa or less. Because the yield strength of the AN-101 waste was estimated to be less than 150 Pa, the AN-101 pump mixing model results indicate that a single mixer pump would be suffice to mobilize bulk of the disturbed and diluted AN-101 solids.

  12. Optimal Elevation and Configuration of Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Waste Mixer Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Majumder, Catherine A.

    2002-05-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the mixing performance of the Lawrence pump, which has injection nozzles at the top, with an alternative pump that has injection nozzles at the bottom, and to determine the optimal elevation for the alternative pump. Sixteen cases were evaluated: two sludge thicknesses at eight levels. A two-step evaluation approach was used: Step 1 to evaluate all 16 cases with the non-rotating mixer pump model and Step 2 to further evaluate four of those cases with the more realistic rotating mixer pump model. The TEMPEST code was used.

  13. On-chip recalcification of citrated whole blood using a microfluidic herringbone mixer.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Marcus; Wallbank, Alison M; Dennis, Kimberly A; Wufsus, Adam R; Davis, Kara M; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Neeves, Keith B

    2015-11-01

    In vitro assays of platelet function and coagulation are typically performed in the presence of an anticoagulant. The divalent cation chelator sodium citrate is among the most common because its effect on coagulation is reversible upon reintroduction of divalent cations. Adding divalent cations into citrated blood by batch mixing leads to platelet activation and initiation of coagulation after several minutes, thus limiting the time blood can be used before spontaneously clotting. In this work, we describe a herringbone microfluidic mixer to continuously introduce divalent cations into citrated blood. The mixing ratio, defined as the ratio of the volumetric flow rates of citrated blood and recalcification buffer, can be adjusted by changing the relative inlet pressures of these two solutions. This feature is useful in whole blood assays in order to account for differences in hematocrit, and thus viscosity. The recalcification process in the herringbone mixer does not activate platelets. The advantage of this continuous mixing approach is demonstrated in microfluidic vascular injury model in which platelets and fibrin accumulate on a collagen-tissue factor surface under flow. Continuous recalcification with the herringbone mixer allowed for flow assay times of up to 30 min, more than three times longer than the time achieved by batch recalcification. This continuous mixer allows for measurements of thrombus formation, remodeling, and fibrinolysis in vitro over time scales that are relevant to these physiological processes. PMID:26634014

  14. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 1: Experimental and analytical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Paterson, R. W.; Skebe, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint analytical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional flowfield development within the lobe region of turbofan forced mixer nozzles is described. The objective was to develop a method for predicting the lobe exit flowfield. In the analytical approach, a linearized inviscid aerodynamical theory was used for representing the axial and secondary flows within the three-dimensional convoluted mixer lobes and three-dimensional boundary layer analysis was applied thereafter to account for viscous effects. The experimental phase of the program employed three planar mixer lobe models having different waveform shapes and lobe heights for which detailed measurements were made of the three-dimensional velocity field and total pressure field at the lobe exit plane. Velocity data was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and total pressure probing and hot wire anemometry were employed to define exit plane total pressure and boundary layer development. Comparison of data and analysis was performed to assess analytical model prediction accuracy. As a result of this study a planar mixed geometry analysis was developed. A principal conclusion is that the global mixer lobe flowfield is inviscid and can be predicted from an inviscid analysis and Kutta condition.

  15. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  16. On the Relationship Between Schottky Barrier Capacitance and Mixer Performance at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1996-01-01

    The flat-band voltage is the Schottky junction voltage required to shrink the depletion width to zero. At cryogenic temperatures, mixer diodes are generally biased and/or pumped beyond the flat-band condition to minimize conversion loss and noise figure. This occurs despite the presumed sharp increase in junction capacitance near flat-band, which should instead limit mixer performance. Past moderate forward bias, the diode C-V relationship is difficult to measure. A simple analytic expression for C(V) is usually used to model and predict mixer performance. This letter provides experimental data on C(V) at 77 K based on a microwave measurement and modeling technique. Data is also provided on the conversion loss of a singly balanced mixer optimized for 77 K operation. The connection between junction capacitance, flat-band potential, and conversion loss is examined. It is shown that the analytic expression greatly overestimates the junction capacitance that occurs as flat-band is approached.

  17. Mixer pump long term operations plan for Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1994-09-07

    This document provides the general Operations Plan for performance of the mixer pump long term operations for Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation of gas retention and periodic release in Tank 101-SY. This operations plan will utilize a 112 kW (150 hp) mixing pump to agitate/suspend the particulates in the tank.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. BROWN; SWITCHER, BILL CLARK; DESULPHUR OPERATORS, CHARLIE WILLIAMS AND TIM BUSH - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Q-Bop Furnace, North of Valley Road & West of Ensley, Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  19. INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. BROWN; SWITCHER, BILL CLARK; DESULPHUR OPERATORS, CHARLIE WILLIAMS AND TIM BUSH. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Q-Bop Furnace, North of Valley Road & West of Ensley, Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  20. 7 CFR 58.228 - Dump hoppers, screens, mixers and conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dump hoppers, screens, mixers and conveyors. 58.228 Section 58.228 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED)...

  1. 7 CFR 58.228 - Dump hoppers, screens, mixers and conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dump hoppers, screens, mixers and conveyors. 58.228 Section 58.228 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE...

  2. Analysis of a High-Tc Hot-Electron Superconducting Mixer for Terahertz Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Gaidis, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    The prospects of a YBa2Cu3O7(delta)(YBCO) hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixer for a THz heterodyne receiver is discussed. The modeled device is a submicron bridge made from a 10 nm thick film on a high thermal conductance substrate.

  3. Engineering scale mixing system tests for MWTF title II design

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.C.

    1994-10-10

    Mixing tests for the Multifunction Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) were conducted in 1/25 and 1/10 scale test tanks with different slurry levels, solids concentrations, different jet mixers and with simulated in-tank structures. The same test procedure was used as in the Title I program, documented in WHC-SD-W236A-ER-005. The test results support the scaling correlation derived previously in the Title I program. The tests also concluded that a partially filled tank requires less mixing power, and horizontal and angled jets in combination (H/A mixer) are significantly more effective than the two horizontal jet mixers (H/H mixer) when used for mixing slurry with a high solids concentrations.

  4. Development of hot-electron THz bolometric mixers using MgB2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnane, Daniel; Kawamura, Jonathan; Karasik, Boris S.; Wolak, Matthaeus A.; Xi, X. X.

    2014-07-01

    Terahertz high-resolution spectroscopy of interstellar molecular clouds greatly relies on hot-electron superconducting bolometric (HEB) mixers. Current state-of-the-art receivers use mixer devices made from ultrathin (~ 3-5 nm) films of NbN with critical temperature ~ 9-11 K. Such mixers have been deployed on a number of groundbased, suborbital, and orbital platforms including the HIFI instrument on the Hershel Space Observatory. Despite its good sensitivity and well-established fabrication process, the NbN HEB mixer suffers from the narrow intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth ~ 2-3 GHz and is limited to operation at liquid Helium temperature. As the heterodyne receivers are now trending towards "high THz" frequencies, the need in a larger IF bandwidth becomes more pressing since the same velocity resolution for a Doppler shifted line at 5 THz requires a 5-times greater IF bandwidth than at 1 THz. Our work is focusing on the realization of practical HEB mixers using ultrathin (10-20 nm) MgB2 films. They are prepared using a Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) process yielding ultrathin films with critical temperature ~ 37-39 K. The expectation is that the combination of small thickness, high acoustic phonon transparency at the interface with the substrate, and very short electron-phonon relaxation time may lead to IF bandwidth ~ 10 GHz or even higher. SiC continues to be the most favorable substrate for MgB2 growth and as a result, a study has been conducted on the transparency of SiC at THz frequencies. FTIR measurements show that semi-insulating SiC substrates are at least as transparent as Si up to 2.5 THz. Currently films are passivated using a thin (10 nm) SiO2 layer which is deposited ex-situ via RF magnetron sputtering. Micron-sized spiral antenna-coupled HEB mixers have been fabricated using MgB2 films as thin as 10 nm. Fabrication was done using contact UV lithography and Ar Ion milling, with E-beam evaporated Au films deposited for the

  5. 1.5 THz heterodyne receiver with waveguide superconducting NbTiN hot electron bolometer mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.; Shiino, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Zhang, W.; Liu, Y. F.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present measured results and theoretical modeling of a 1.5 THz waveguide NbTiN HEB mixer, which is fabricated by in situ process. The NbTiN HEB mixer with dimensions of 1 μm in width and 0.15 μm in length is measured to be as low as 570 K in noise temperature (7hν/k) even with a relatively thick NbTiN film (10.8 nm). The intrinsic mixer noise temperature is 300 K after the correction of the losses of quasi-optical and IF amplifier chain. At the same time, we adopt an optimized hot spot model to simulate the DC and RF behaviors of the NbTiN HEB mixer by combining phonon-cooling and diffusion-cooling mechanisms together. The measured and calculated current-voltage curves are in good agreement. The calculated intrinsic mixer noise temperature is 100 K and IF gain bandwidth is 2.7 GHz at the optimum bias point. The difference between the measured and simulated mixer noise temperature is factor of 3 times, which is probably due to misalignment of quasi-optical RF coupling system and air loss. The calculated and measured results show the two cooling mechanism work together to lower the noise temperature of the waveguide NbTiN HEB mixers. The details will be presented in this paper.

  6. Multiband terahertz quasi-optical balanced hot-electron mixers based on dual-polarization sinuous antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenguo; Rahman, Syed M.; Ruggiero, Steven T.; Fay, Patrick; Liu, Lei

    2014-05-01

    Receivers based on superconducting Hot-Electron Bolometers (HEBs) are widely used for terahertz (THz) sensing owing to their advantages of high sensitivity, low noise, and low LO power requirement. Balanced HEB mixers are superior to single-element ones since the thermal noise and AM noise from the LO injection can be effectively suppressed. Although a 1.3 THz balanced waveguide HEB mixer has been reported, waveguide mixer configurations offer relatively narrow RF bandwidths. We report on the development, fabrication and characterization of a THz quasioptical balanced superconducting HEB mixer utilizing a dual-polarization sinuous antenna that can potentially achieve both multiband operation and ultra-high sensitivity. In the balanced mixer configuration, a lens-coupled four-arm sinuous antenna was designed for operation from 0.2-1.0 THz with a nearly frequency-independent embedding impedance of ~106 Ω. Two identical superconducting niobium HEB devices have been integrated at the antenna feedpoints, connecting each opposing pair of antenna arms to form a balanced mixer configuration. An air-bridge was also fabricated to separate the two mixer branches. The HEB devices were fabricated from 10 nm thick niobium film sputtered on semi-insulating silicon substrates. Each HEB device has dimensions of 80 nm × 240 nm (3 squares) for approaching a resistance of 105 Ω for impedance matching. Mixer properties including antenna radiation patterns, broadband operation and polarization isolation have been characterized. Finally, in order to achieve multiband mixer operation, electronically reconfigurable THz quasi-optical mesh filters are needed. Frequency-tunable antenna elements using Schottky varactor diodes suitable for the above applications have been designed, simulated and demonstrated at Gband (140-220 GHz) showing 50 GHz tuning range.

  7. Submillimeter SIS Mixers Using High Current Density Nb/AIN/Nb Tunnel Junctions and NbTiN Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Miller, D.; Chen, J.; Kooi, J.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, H.; Stern, J.

    1999-03-01

    We are currently exploring ways to improve the performance of SIS mixers above 700 GHz. One approach is to use NbTiN in place of Nb for all or some of the mixer circuitry. With its high gap frequency and low losses demonstrated up to 800 GHz, it should be possible to fabricate an all-NbTiN SIS mixer with near quantum-limited noise performance up to 1.2 THz. Using a quasioptical twin-slot two-junction mixer with NbTiN ground plane and wiring and hybrid Nb/A1N/NbTiN junctions, we measured an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of TRx ~ 500 K across 790-850 GHz at 4.2 K bath temperature. Our second approach is to reduce the RC product of the mixer by employing very high current density Nb/A1N/Nb junctions. By using these we will greatly relax the requirement on tuning circuits, which is where substantial losses occur in mixers operating above the Nb gap frequency. These junctions have resistance-area products of R_N*A ~ 5.6 Ohm um2, good subgap to normal resistance ratios, R_sg/R_N ~ 10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From FTS measurements we infer that omega*R_N*C = 1 at 270 GHz in these junctions. This is a substantial improvement over that available using Nb/Al0x/Nb technology. The sensitivity of a receiver incorporating these high current density mixers is T_Rx = 110 K at 533 GHz using a design for lower J_c mixers, which is close to the best we have measured with lower J_c Nb/Al0x/Nb mixers.

  8. Waste Tank Size Determination for the Hanford River Protection Project Cold Test, Training, and Mockup Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.

    2001-03-30

    The objective of the study was to determine the minimum tank size for the Cold Test Facility process testing of Hanford tank waste. This facility would support retrieval of waste in 75-ft-diameter DSTs with mixer pumps and SSTs with fluidic mixers. The cold test model will use full-scale mixer pumps, transfer pumps, and equipment with simulated waste. The study evaluated the acceptability of data for a range of tank diameters and depths and included identifying how the test data would be extrapolated to predict results for a full-size tank.

  9. HgCdTe Photoconductive Mixers for 2-8 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Sivananthan, S.; Ashokan, R.

    2001-01-01

    Heterodyne spectroscopy has been taken to wavelengths as short as 63 micrometers with Schottky-diode mixers. Schottkys, however, are relatively insensitive compared to superconducting mixers such as the hot-electron microbolometer (HEB), which has an effective quantum efficiency of 3% at 120 micrometers (2.5 THz). Although HEB sensitivities are bound to improve, there will always be losses associated with antenna coupling of radiation into sub-micron size devices. Another approach to far infrared (FIR) mixer design is to use a photoconductive device which can be made much larger than a wavelength, and thus act as its own antenna. For example, HgCdTe photodiodes have been used as mixers in the lambda = 10 micrometers band for over 25 years, with sensitivities now only a factor of 2 from the quantum-noise-limit. HgCdTe can also be applied at FIR wavelengths, but surprisingly little work has been done to date. The exception is the pioneering work of Spears and Kostiuk and Spears, who developed HgCdTe photomixers for the 20-120 micrometer region. The spectral versatility of the HgCdTe alloy is well recognized for wavelengths as long as 8-20 micrometers. What is not so recognized, however, is that theoretically there is no long wavelength limit for appropriately composited HgCdTe. Although Spears successfully demonstrated a photoconductive response from HgCdTe at 120 micrometers, this initial effort was apparently never followed up, in part because of the difficulty of controlling the HgCdTe alloy composition with liquid-phase-epitaxy (LPE) techniques. With the availability of precise molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) since the early 1990's, it is now appropriate to reconsider HgCdTe for detector applications longward of lambda = 20 micrometers. We recently initiated an effort to fabricate detectors and mixers using II-VI materials for FIR wavelengths. Of particular interest are device structures called superlattices, which offer a number of advantages for high sensitivity

  10. Design of a mixer for the thrust-vectoring system on the high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph W.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Yeager, Jessie C.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    One of the advanced control concepts being investigated on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) is multi-axis thrust vectoring using an experimental thrust-vectoring (TV) system consisting of three hydraulically actuated vanes per engine. A mixer is used to translate the pitch-, roll-, and yaw-TV commands into the appropriate TV-vane commands for distribution to the vane actuators. A computer-aided optimization process was developed to perform the inversion of the thrust-vectoring effectiveness data for use by the mixer in performing this command translation. Using this process a new mixer was designed for the HARV and evaluated in simulation and flight. An important element of the Mixer is the priority logic, which determines priority among the pitch-, roll-, and yaw-TV commands.

  11. A 2-GHz Low-Power Down-Conversion Mixer in 0.18-μm CMOS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Da; Lin, Zhi-Ming; Row, Jeen-Sheen

    A low-voltage and low-power RF mixer for WCDMA applications is presented. The paper presents a novel topology mixer that leads to a better performance in terms of isolation and power consumption for low supply voltage. The measuring results of the proposed mixer achieve: 7dB power conversion gain, 10.4dB double side band (DSB) noise figure, -2dBm input third-order intercept point (IIP3), and the total dc power consumption of this mixer including output buffers is 2.2mW from a 1V supply voltage. The current output buffer is about 1.96mW, the excellent LO-RF, LO-IF and RF-IF isolation achieved up to 49dB, 39.5dB and 57.3dB, respectively.

  12. A Novel Split-Waveguide Mount Design For MM and SubMM wave frequency multipliers and Harmonic Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisanen, Anti V.; Choudhury, Debabani; Dengler, Robert J.; Oswald, John E.; Siegel, Peter H.

    1993-01-01

    A novel split-waveguide mount for millimeter and submillimeter wave frequency multipliers and harmonic mixers is presented. It consists of only two pieces, block halves, which are mirror images of each other.

  13. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Data Acquisition System and Gamma Cart Data Acquisition Control System Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, D.A.

    1999-12-29

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the AZ1101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Data Acquisition System (DAS) and the Sludge Mobilization Cart (Gamma Cart) Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS).

  14. Status of the RBCC Direct-Connect Mixer Combustor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Kamhawi, Hani; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Thomas, Scott R.; Smith, Timothy D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing hydrogen based combined cycle propulsion technology for a single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle application under a project called GTX. Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems incorporate one or more rocket engines into an airbreathing flow path to increase specific impulse as compared to an all rocket-powered vehicle. In support of this effort, an RBCC direct-connect test capability was established at the Engine Components Research Laboratory to investigate low speed, ejector ramjet, and initial ramjet operations and performance. The facility and test article enables the evaluation of two candidate low speed operating schemes; the simultaneous mixing and combustion (SMC) and independent ramjet stream (IRS). The SMC operating scheme is based on the fuel rich operations of the rocket where performance depends upon mixing between the rocket plume and airstream. In contrast, the IRS scheme fuels the airstream separately and uses the rocket plume to ignite the fuel-air mixture. This paper describes the test hardware and facility upgrades installed to support the RBCC tests. It also defines and discusses low speed technical challenges being addressed by the experiments. Finally, preliminary test results, including rocket risk mitigating tests, unfueled airflow tests, and the integrated system hot fire test will be presented.

  15. Frequency-Domain Analysis of Diffusion-Cooled Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, A.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1998-01-01

    A new theoretical model is introduced to describe heterodyne mixer conversion efficiency and noise (from thermal fluctuation effects) in diffusion-cooled superconducting hot-electron bolometers. The model takes into account the non-uniform internal electron temperature distribution generated by Wiedemann-Franz heat conduction, and accepts for input an arbitrary (analytical or experimental) superconducting resistance-versus- temperature curve. A non-linear large-signal solution is solved iteratively to calculate the temperature distribution, and a linear frequency-domain small-signal formulation is used to calculate conversion efficiency and noise. In the small-signal solution the device is discretized into segments, and matrix algebra is used to relate the heating modulation in the segments to temperature and resistance modulations. Matrix expressions are derived that allow single-sideband mixer conversion efficiency and coupled noise power to be directly calculated. The model accounts for self-heating and electrothermal feedback from the surrounding bias circuit.

  16. Feasibility Study on Using Two Mixer Pumps for Tank 241-AY-102 Waste Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.

    2004-08-30

    The current waste retrieval plan at Hanford calls for using two mixer pumps to mix the waste stored in double-shell Tank 214-AY-102. The objective of this evaluation was to determine whether two rotating 300-hp mixer pumps placed 22 ft (6.7 m) off-center in the tank could adequately mix the AY-102 waste. The tank currently contains high-level waste that is 248 inches (6.3 m) deep, comprising 62 inches (1.58 m) of sludge and 186 inches (4.72 m) of supernatant liquid (Galbraith et al. 2002). Based on the available data, AY-102 waste properties were determined, including the densities of liquid and agglomerated settled solids and crystals, the volume fraction of settled solids, the solid particle size distribution, the liquid and slurry viscosities, and the yield stress in shear (shear strength) of the settled solids layer. To evaluate the likely and bounding cases of AY-102 waste mixing, sludge erosion modeling was performed with a median value of 1,090 Pa (likely condition) and a conservative (more difficult to erode) 97.5 percentile value of 2,230 Pa for shear strength. According to model predictions, the two rotating mixer pumps would erode 89% of the sludge with shear strength of 1,090 Pa. They would erode sludge up to 41 ft (12.5 m) away from the mixer pumps but would not mobilize the bottom 2.5 inches (0.06-m) of sludge or sludge in the areas next to the tank wall, more than 26 ft (7.9 m) away. Once the sludge is mobilized, the solids were predicted to be uniformly suspended within the tank within a 1-vol% concentration variation except those in few inches at the bottom. With shear strength of 2,230 Pa, the two pumps would erode 85% of the sludge, slightly less than the 1,090-Pa shear strength case. In this case, the pump jets would mobilize the sludge up to 38 ft (11.6 m), except the bottom 2.5 inches of sludge. The mixer pumps would also leave the sludge at the tank wall, which is 20 ft or more from the pumps. Similar to the 1,090 Pa case, the solids were

  17. Low Conversion Loss Mixers with Improved Finline Transition and Bandstop Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Changfei; Xu, Jinping; Chen, Mo

    2009-03-01

    A Ka-Band hybrid integrated single-ended mixer with low conversion loss is designed in this paper. In the proposed circuit architecture, metallic via holes are implemented along the mounting edge of substrate embedded in the split-block of WG (waveguide)-finline-microstrip transition. Simulated results show that the effect of high-order modes due to the mounting groove is effectively eliminated and the transition loss is greatly improved. Meanwhile, a slow wave and bandstop filter at Ka band, which presents an equivalent short circuit, is designed for the maximized utilization of idle frequency energy, RF and LO signal energy. In this way, the conversion loss of the mixer can be further improved. The lowest measured conversion loss 3.52dB is obtained at 32.2 GHz; the conversion loss is flat and less than 5.68dB over the frequency band from 29 to 34 GHz.

  18. Shot-noise in resistive-diode mixers and the attenuator noise model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The representation of a pumped exponential diode, operating as a mixer, by an equivalent lossy network, is reexamined. It is shown that the model is correct provided the network has ports for all sideband frequencies at which (real) power flow can occur between the diode and its embedding. The temperature of the equivalent network is eta/2 times the physical temperature of the diode. The model is valid only if the series resistance and nonlinear capacitance of the diode are negligible. Expressions are derived for the input and output noise temperature and the noise-temperature ratio of ideal mixers. Some common beliefs concerning noise-figure and noise-temperature ratio are shown to be incorrect.

  19. Submicron area NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions for SIS mixer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leduc, H. G.; Judas, A.; Cypher, S. R.; Bumble, B.; Hunt, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    The development of submicron area mixer elements for operation in the submillimeter wave range is discussed. High-current-density NbN/MgO/NbN tunnel junctions with areas down to 0.1 sq microns have been fabricated in both planar and edge geometries. The planar junctions were fabricated from in situ deposited trilayers using electron-beam lithography to pattern submicron area mesas. Modifications of fabrication techniques used in larger-area NbN tunnel junctions are required and are discussed. The NbN/MgO/NbN edge junction process using sapphire substrates has been transferred to technologically important quartz substrates using MgO buffer layers to minimize substrate interactions. The two junction geometries are compared and contrasted in the context of submillimeter wave mixer applications.

  20. Characteristics of Residual Mixing Noise From Internal Fan/Core Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1997-01-01

    The jet mixing noise from two fan/core mixer nozzles is studied. Acoustic data from two fan/core mixer nozzles are analyzed to determine the properties of the noise signatures. It was assumed that there were three major contributors to the total noise signature: noise from mixing of the fan and core streams internal to the nozzle; noise from residual mixing of the fan and core streams external to the nozzle; and the noise associated with the fully mixed jet. In general, the low frequency portion of the noise spectra can be associated with the fully mixed jet and can be predicted using an empirical correlation for single round nozzle jet noise. The properties of the noise in excess of the fully mixed levels are studied.

  1. Modeling and Optimization of a High-Tc Hot-Electron Superconducting Mixer for Terahertz Applicaitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Gaidis, M. C.; Burns, M. J.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Delin, K. A.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a YBa(sub 2)Cu(sub 3)O(sub 7-(kronecker delta))(YBCO) hot-electron bolometer (HEB) quasioptical mixer for a 2.5 heterodyne receiver is discussed. The modeled device is a submicron bridge made from a 10 nm thick film on a high thermal conductance substrate. The mixer performance expected for this device is analyzed in the framework of a two-temperature model which includes heating both of the electrons and the lattice. Also, the contribution of heat diffusion from the film through the substrate and from the film to the normal metal contacts is evaluated....a single sideband temperature of less than 2000k is predicted.

  2. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 2: Computational fluid dynamic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, M. J.; Vasta, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    A general program was conducted to develop and assess a computational method for predicting the flow properties in a turbofan forced mixed duct. The detail assessment of the resulting computer code is presented. It was found that the code provided excellent predictions of the kinematics of the mixing process throughout the entire length of the mixer nozzle. The thermal mixing process between the hot core and cold fan flows was found to be well represented in the low speed portion of the flowfield.

  3. Generation of wideband frequency combs by continuous-wave seeding of multistage mixers with synthesized dispersion.

    PubMed

    Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-01-30

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate efficient generation of an equalized optical comb with 150-nm bandwidth. The comb was generated by low-power, continuous-wave seeds, eliminating the need for pulsed laser sources. The new architecture relies on efficient creation of higher-order mixing tones in phase-matched nonlinear fiber stages separated by a linear compressor. Wideband generation was enabled by precise dispersion engineering of multiple-stage parametric mixers. PMID:22330571

  4. Oesophageal motility and digestion of cream liqueurs in combination with common alcohol mixers.

    PubMed

    Byrne, P J; McGrath, J P; Lawlor, P; Hennessy, T P

    1998-01-01

    When acidic mixers are added to cream liqueur curdling occurs. Oesophageal motility was studied in normal volunteers during ingestion of this mixture and the effect of combining with gastric juice was assessed in a simulated physiological environment. Twenty-four h ambulatory manometry and pH (n = 22) and gastric studies (n = 7) were carried out. There was no detrimental effect on oesophageal motility. The precipitation is rapidly broken down by the digestive process in the stomach. PMID:9540298

  5. An All-Optical Microwave Mixer with 8db RF Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, W.; Yao, S. X.; Lutes, G.; Maleki, L.

    1997-01-01

    An all-optical microwave mixer with an 8dB RF gain is demonstrated by using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). 6GHz RF signal on a 1312 nm optical carrier is up-converted and down-converted to 1GHZ and 11 GHz by a 5GHz local oscillation (LO) signal on a 1320 nm optical carrier. Such a carrier could readily extend to millimeter wave range.

  6. Safety Evaluation for Packaging 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump package

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1994-10-05

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides analysis and considered necessary to approve a one-time transfer of the 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump (HMMP). This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer of the HMMP in a new shipping container will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting US Department of Transportation (DOT)/US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. This fulfills onsite, transportation requirements implemented by WHC-CM-2-14.

  7. Split-Waveguide Mounts For Submillimeter-Wave Multipliers And Harmonic Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raisanen, Antti; Choudhury, Debabani; Dengler, Robert J.; Oswald, John E.; Siegel, Peter H.

    1996-01-01

    Novel variation of split-waveguide mount for millimeter-and submillimeter-wavelength frequency multipliers and harmonic mixers developed. Designed to offer wide range of available matching impedances, while maintaining relatively simple fabrication sequence. Wide tuning range achieved with separate series and parallel elements, consisting of two pairs of noncontacting sliding backshorts, at fundamental and harmonic frequencies. Advantages include ease of fabrication, reliability, and tunability.

  8. Performance comparison of a lobed-daisy mixer nozzle with a convergent nozzle at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance, in terms of thrust minus nozzle axial force, of a lobed-daisy mixer nozzle has been conducted in a 16-foot transonic tunnel at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.90 at angles of attack from 4 minus to 8. Jet-total-pressure ratio was varied from about 1.2 to 2.0. The performance of a reference convergent nozzle with a similar nozzle throat area and length was used as a base line to evaluate the performance of the lobed-daisy mixer nozzle. The results of this investigation indicate that with no external airflow (Mach number M of 0), and at values of jet-total-pressure ratio between 1.2 and 2.0, the static thrust exerted by the lobed-daisy mixer nozzle is less than that of the convergent nozzle by about 10 percent of ideal gross thrust. About 3.4 percent of the thrust loss was attributed to an unintentional internal area expansion in the fan passage.

  9. A fast and switchable microfluidic mixer based on ultrasound-induced vaporization of perfluorocarbon.

    PubMed

    Bezagu, Marine; Arseniyadis, Stellios; Cossy, Janine; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Monti, Fabrice; Tabeling, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Mixing two fluids together within a microfluidic device still remains a challenging operation today. In order to achieve this goal, a number of effective micromixers have been developed over the years based on the use of either passive or active systems. Typically, passive mixers require no external energy, are more robust, and are easy to manufacture albeit they are poorly flexible. Active mixers, on the other hand, rely on external disturbance and are thus more difficult to use but are proven to have greater efficacy. Here, we report a particularly effective, remotely induced and switchable microfluidic mixer, which relies on the concomitant use of ultrasound and a perfluorocarbon (PFC) phase, with the latter benefiting from its immiscibility with most fluids and its low boiling point. More specifically, our approach is based on localized vaporization of a PFC phase at the focal zone of a transducer leading to efficient mixing of two adjacent fluids. The results show that mixing occurs ~100 ms following the delivery of the acoustic pulse, while a laminar flow is re-established on roughly the same time scale. Overall, this method is simple and effective, does not require tailored channel geometries, is compatible with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic microfluidic systems, and is applicable to a wide range of Reynolds numbers (10(-4) < Re < 2.10(0)), and the PFC phase can be easily separated from the mixed phase at the end of the run. PMID:25778877

  10. Mixing behaviour of cohesive and non-cohesive particle mixtures in a ribbon mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musha, H.; Dong, K.; Chandratilleke, G. R.; Bridgwater, J.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-06-01

    Ribbon mixers are used in a wide range of applications involving pharmaceuticals, ceramics and cosmetics, to name a few. Here, the discrete element method is used to investigate the effect of impeller speed on the mixing behaviours of cohesive as well as non-cohesive particle mixtures in a ribbon mixer, which has a horizontal cylindrical vessel. The mixing behaviours are characterized by particle-scale and macroscopic mixing indexes. Simulations show that the mixing rate increases with the impeller speed for both the cohesive and non-cohesive mixtures up to a certain speed, beyond which it showed a reduction. There is a possibility that the mixture quality becomes poorer at higher impeller speeds for the non-cohesive particles, but it was not the case with the cohesive particles. Inspection of velocity fields shows that many local recirculation regions exist in the case of non-cohesive particle mixing, preventing the overall mixing. By contrast, in the case of the cohesive mixture, there exists a circumferential motion about the shaft and a convective motion in the horizontal axial direction, improving the particle mixing. Force analyses are also carried out, which show that the particle contact forces increase with the impeller speed for non-cohesive particles, but in the case of cohesive particles, they increase initially with the impeller speed, and then show a reduction after a certain speed. The results will be useful in selecting operation conditions of a ribbon mixer.

  11. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, B.G.

    1998-01-29

    This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ``Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151`` and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ``Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF`` in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work.

  12. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

  13. Results From a Parametric Acoustic Liner Experiment Using P and W GEN1 HSR Mixer/Ejector Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Kathleen C.; Wolter, John D.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results of an acoustic liner test performed using a Gen 1 HSR mixer/ejector model installed on the Jet Exit Rig in the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory or NASA Glenn Research Center. Acoustic liner effectiveness and single-component thrust performance results are discussed. Results from 26 different types of single-degree-of-freedom and bulk material liners are compared with each other and against a hardwall baseline. Design parameters involving all aspects of the facesheet, the backing cavity, and the type of bulk material were varied in order to study the effects of these design features on the acoustic impedance, acoustic effectiveness and on nozzle thrust performance. Overall, the bulk absorber liners are more effective at reducing the jet noise than the single-degree-of-freedom liners. Many of the design parameters had little effect on acoustic effectiveness, such as facesheeet hole diameter and honeycomb cell size. A relatively large variation in the impedance of the bulk absorber in a bulk liner is required to have a significant impact on the noise reduction. The thrust results exhibit a number of consistent trends, supporting the validity of this new addition to the facility. In general, the thrust results indicate that thrust performance benefits from increased facesheet thickness and decreased facesheet porosity.

  14. Partitioning of actinides and fission products in highly-active raffinate from purex process by mixer-settlers

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, M.; Nemoto, S.; Togashi, A.; Kawata, T.; Onishi, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Batch, and counter-current flowsheet tests using mixer-settlers have been carried out in the chemical processing facility (CPF). Tokai-works, PNC. Counter-current experiments aim to provide the data for prediction of the Truex process applicability in actinides partitioning in high level liquid waste (HLLW) from the Purex process. Real highly-active (HA) raffinate from FBR spent fuel reprocessing experiments were used in these runs without adjusting the acidity. A mixed solvent composed of 0.2M CMPO in the purex solvent was employed as a Truex solvent. Some noteworthy behaviors for ruthenium were recognized; The rare earths and some fraction of ruthenium were coextracted to the actinides stream. Although they were stripped out by dilute nitric acid as expected, plutonium and some of ruthenium also remained in the organic phase during the stripping of americium. A peculiar extraction behavior of ruthenium of changing its D values stage by stage suggests a mixture of various kinds of complexes in the HA raffinate. A series of counter-current tests resulted in giving sufficiently low alpha contaminated waste giving DF's of over 10[sup 3] for major actinides separation, which will endorse the Truex process. In successive counter-current runs after 1992, an effort for the selective(Am/Np/Pu/U) stripping will be continued including the solvent cleanup step as one of the separation steps. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Mixer: Introducing the Concept of Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segrist, Dan J.; Pawlow, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    This study entailed the development and implementation of a classroom activity designed to introduce students to the concept of factor analysis. We implemented the activity in both a personality theories course and a tests and measurements course. Data suggest that students learned about factor analysis from this activity, while enjoying it.…

  16. Development of a Liner Design Methodology and Relevant Results of Acoustic Suppression in the Farfield for Mixer-Ejector Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a process to predict noise field interior to the ejector and in the farfield for any liner design for a mixer-ejector of arbitrary scale factor. However, a number of assumptions, not verified for the current application, utilized in this process, introduce uncertainties in the final result, especially, on a quantitative basis. The normal impedance model for bulk with perforated facesheet is based on homogeneous foam materials of low resistivity. The impact of flow conditions for HSCT application as well as the impact of perforated facesheet on predicted impedance is not properly accounted. Based on the measured normal impedance for deeper bulk samples (i.e., 2.0 in.) the predicted reactance is much higher compared to the data at frequencies above 2 kHz for T-foam and 200 ppi SiC. The resistance is under predicted at lower frequencies (below 4 kHz) for these samples. Thus, the use of such predicted data in acoustic suppression is likely to introduce inaccuracies. It should be noted that the impedance prediction methods developed recently under liner technology program are not utilized in the studies described in this report due to the program closeout. Acoustic suppression prediction is based on the uniform flow and temperature conditions in a two-sided treated constant area rectangular duct. In addition, assumptions of equal energy per mode noise field and interaction of all frequencies with the treated surface for the entire ejector length may not be accurate. While, the use of acoustic transfer factor minimizes the inaccuracies associated with the prediction for a known test case, the assumption of the same factor for other liner designs and with different linear scale factor ejectors seems to be very optimistic. As illustrated in appendix D that the predicted noise suppression for LSM-1 is lower compared to the measured data is an indication of the above argument. However, the process seems to be more reliable when used for the same scale

  17. Development of a THz heterodyne receiver with quantum cascade laser and hot electron bolometer mixer for standoff detection of explosive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, H.; Semenov, A. D.; Pavlov, S. G.; Mahler, L.; Tredicucci, A.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ortolani, M.; Schade, U.; Il'in, K. S.; Siegel, M.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2009-05-01

    The terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum provides specific spectroscopic information for substance identification. It has been shown that the spectral features of explosive materials might be used for detection and identification at stand-off distances. We report on the development of a THz spectrometer for explosive detection and identification. The system is based on THz quantum cascade lasers working at different frequencies. These are used for illumination of the object under test. The reflected and backscattered radiation from the object under test is detected with a sensitive heterodyne receiver. As a first step a single frequency, liquid-cryogen free heterodyne receiver operating at 2.5 THz has been developed. In order to realize maximum sensitivity a phonon-cooled NbN hot electron bolometric mixer with a quantum cascade laser as local oscillator were chosen. The concept of the system and first results will be presented.

  18. A user oriented computer program for the analysis of microwave mixers, and a study of the effects of the series inductance and diode capacitance on the performance of some simple mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P. H.; Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    A user oriented computer program for analyzing microwave and millimeter wave mixers with a single Schottky barrier diode of known I-V and C-V characteristics is described. The program first performs a nonlinear analysis to determine the diode conductance and capacitance waveforms produced by the local oscillator. A small signal linear analysis is then used to find the conversion loss, port impedances, and input noise temperature of the mixer. Thermal noise from the series resistance of the diode and shot noise from the periodically pumped current in the diode conductance are considered. The effects of the series inductance and diode capacitance on the performance of some simple mixer circuits using a conventional Schottky diode, a Schottky diode in which there is no capacitance variation, and a Mott diode are studied. It is shown that the parametric effects of the voltage dependent capacitance of a conventional Schottky diode may be either detrimental or beneficial depending on the diode and circuit parameters.

  19. Full characterization of small volume NbN HEB mixers for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselmans, J.; Kooi, J.; Baryshev, A.; Yang, Z. Q.; Hajenius, M.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Voronov, B.; Gol'tsman, G.

    2005-05-01

    NbN phonon cooled HEB's are one of the most promising bolometer mixer technologies for (near) future (space) applications. Their performance is usually quantified by measuring the receiver noise temperature at a given IF frequency, usually around 1 - 2 GHz. However, for any real applications it is vital that one fully knows all the relevant properties of the mixer, including LO power, stability, direct detection, gain bandwidth and noise bandwidth, not only the noise temperature at low IF frequencies. To this aim we have measured all these parameters at the optimal operating point of one single, small volume quasioptical NbN HEB mixer. We find a minimum noise temperature of 900 K at 1.46 THz. We observe a direct detection effect indicated by a change in bias current when changing from a 300 K hot load to a 77 K cold load. Due to this effect we overestimate the noise temperature by about 22% using a 300 K hot load and a 77 K cold load. The LO power needed to reach the optimal operating point is 80 nW at the receiver lens front, 59 nW inside the NbN bridge. However, using the isothermal technique we find a power absorbed in the NbN bridge of 25 nW, a difference of about a factor 2. We obtain a gain bandwidth of 2.3 GHz and a noise bandwidth of 4 GHz. The system Allan time is about 1 sec. in a 50 MHz spectral bandwidth and a deviation from white noise integration (governed by the radiometer equation) occurs at 0.2 sec., which implies a maximum integration time of a few seconds in a 1 MHz bandwidth spectrometer.

  20. Effects of molecular confinement and crowding on horseradish peroxidase kinetics using a nanofluidic gradient mixer.

    PubMed

    Wichert, William R A; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-03-01

    The effects of molecular confinement and crowding on enzyme kinetics were studied at length scales and under conditions similar to those found in biological cells. These experiments were carried out using a nanofluidic network of channels constituting a nanofluidic gradient mixer, providing the basis for measuring multiple experimental conditions simultaneously. The 100 nm × 40 μm nanochannels were wet etched directly into borosilicate glass, then annealed and characterized with fluorescein emission prior to kinetic measurements. The nanofluidic gradient mixer was then used to measure the kinetics of the conversion of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of non-fluorescent Amplex Red (AR) to the fluorescent product resorufin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The design of the gradient mixer allows reaction kinetics to be studied under multiple (five) unique solution compositions in a single experiment. To characterize the efficiency of the device the effects of confinement on HRP-catalyzed AR conversion kinetics were studied by varying the starting ratio of AR : H2O2. Equimolar concentrations of Amplex Red and H2O2 yielded the highest reaction rates followed by 2 : 1, 1 : 2, 5 : 1, and finally 1 : 5 [AR] : [H2O2]. Under all conditions, initial reaction velocities were decreased by excess H2O2. Crowding effects on kinetics were studied by increasing solution viscosity in the nanochannels in the range 1.0-1.6 cP with sucrose. Increasing the solution viscosities in these confined geometries decreases the initial reaction velocity at the highest concentration from 3.79 μM min(-1) at 1.00 cP to 0.192 μM min(-1) at 1.59 cP. Variations in reaction velocity are interpreted in the context of models for HRP catalysis and for molecular crowding. PMID:26792298

  1. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of a Rectangular Multi-Element Supersonic Jet Mixer-Ejector Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Taghavi, Ray

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a unique, detailed evaluation of the acoustics and aerodynamics of a rectangular multi-element supersonic jet mixer-ejector noise suppressor. The performance of such mixer-ejectors is important in aircraft engine application for noise suppression and thrust augmentation. In contrast to most prior experimental studies on ejectors that reported either aerodynamic or acoustic data, our work documents both types of data. We present information on the mixing, pumping, ejector wall pressure distribution, thrust augmentation and noise suppression characteristics of four simple, multi-element, jet mixer-ejector configurations. The four configurations included the effect of ejector area ratio (AR = ejector area/primary jet area) and the effect of non-parallel ejector walls. We also studied in detail the configuration that produced the best noise suppression characteristics. Our results show that ejector configurations that produced the maximum maximum pumping (entrained flow per secondary inlet area) also exhibited the lowest wall pressures in the inlet region, and the maximum thrust augmentation. When cases having the same total mass flow were compared, we found that noise suppression trends corresponded with those for pumping. Surprisingly, the mixing (quantified by the peak Mach number, and flow uniformity) at the ejector exit exhibited no relationship to the noise suppression at moderate primary jet fully expanded Mach numbers (Mj is less than 1.4). However, the noise suppression dependence on the mixing was apparent at higher Mj. The above observations are justified by noting that the mixing at the ejector exit is ot a strong factor in determining the radiated noise when noise produced internal to the ejector dominates the noise field outside the ejector.

  2. Forward flight effects on mixer nozzle design and noise considerations for STOL externally blown flap systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.; Sekas, N.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data of the peak axial-velocity decay in a moving airstream are presented for several types of nozzles. The nozzles include a six-tube mixer nozzle of a type considered for reduction of jet-flap interaction noise for externally-blown-flap STOL aircraft. The effect of secondary flow on the core flow velocity decay of a bypass nozzle is also discussed. Tentative correlation equations are suggested for the configurations evaluated. Recommendations for minimizing forward velocity effects on velocity decay and jet-flap interaction noise are made.

  3. Forward flight effects on mixer nozzle design and noise considerations for STOL externally blown flap systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.; Sekas, N.; Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data of the peak axial-velocity decay in a moving airstream are presented for several types of nozzles. The nozzles include a six-tube mixer nozzle of a type considered for reduction of jet-flap interaction noise for externally-blown-flap STOL aircraft. The effect of secondary flow on the core flow velocity decay of a bypass nozzle is also discussed. Tentative correlation equations are suggested for the configurations evaluated. Recommendations for minimizing forward velocity effects on velocity decay and jet-flap interaction noise are made.

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Oscillations in a Mixer: An Internal Aeroacoustic Feedback System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Loh, Ching Y.

    2004-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element method is employed to numerically study the acoustic feedback system in a high temperature, high speed wind tunnel mixer. The computation captures the self-sustained feedback loop between reflecting Mach waves and the shear layer. This feedback loop results in violent instabilities that are suspected of causing damage to some tunnel components. The computed frequency is in good agreement with the available experimental data. The physical phenomena are explained based on the numerical results.

  5. High-T{sub c} superconducting Josephson mixers for terahertz heterodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Malnou, M.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Olanier, L.; Lesueur, J.; Bergeal, N.; Ulysse, C.; Faini, G.; Febvre, P.; Sirena, M.

    2014-08-21

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of the high-frequency mixing properties of ion-irradiated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} Josephson junctions embedded in THz antennas. We investigated the influence of the local oscillator power and frequency on the device performances. The experimental data are compared with theoretical predictions of the general three-port model for mixers in which the junction is described by the resistively shunted junction model. A good agreement is obtained for the conversion efficiency in different frequency ranges, spanning above and below the characteristic frequencies f{sub c} of the junctions.

  6. A multi-purpose ultrasonic streaming mixer for integrated magnetic bead ELISAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandhoff, Lukas; Zirath, Helene; Salas, Mariugenia; Haller, Anna; Peham, Johannes; Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert; Spittler, Andreas; Schnetz, Guntram; Lang, Walter; Vellekoop, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    We present an ultrasonic streaming mixer for disposable and on-chip magnetic bead ELISAs. The ultrasonic transducer is placed at system-level to keep cost per chip as low as possible, and is coupled to the chip by means of a solid ultrasonic horn. The system provides mixing of liquids, as well as dispersion of the superparamagnetic beads in the ELISA. Additionally it can be used clean the chamber surface from nonspecifically bound proteins during the washing steps in the ELISA protocol. Using our system the time for the ELISA protocol has been greatly reduced down to 30 min.

  7. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Ito, N; Nagayama, Y; Yoshinaga, T; Yamaguchi, S; Yoshikawa, M; Kohagura, J; Sugito, S; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2014-11-01

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array. PMID:25430218

  8. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sugito, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  9. Reduction of pesticide exposure with protective clothing for applicators and mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.E.; Freed, V.H.; Enos, H.F.; Duncan, R.C.; Barquet, A.; Morgade, C.; Peters, L.J.; Danauskas, J.X.

    1982-06-01

    Systemic pesticide illness in agricultural workers may result from excessive dermal exposure to pesticides. Workers who apply and mix pesticides (applicators and mixers) are not at special risk. Both acute and chronic exposures can occur from spillage or by environmental contamination of clothing. Two exposure assessment studies were conducted of Central Florida citrus grove workers who applied ethion daily. Measuring the percentage of penetration of ethion through clothing and measuring the daily urinary excretion of diethyl phosphate (DEP) were the techniques used to assess the protection afforded by changing daily to freshly laundered 100% cotton coveralls. Coveralls provided significantly greater protection than did regular clothing and the use of respirators.

  10. Ultrawide Noise Bandwidth of NbN Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers With In Situ Gold Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, Ivan; Ryabchun, Sergey; Finkel, Matvey; Maslennikov, Sergey; Maslennikova, Anna; Kaurova, Natalia; Lobastova, Anastasia; Voronov, Boris; Gol'tsman, Gregory

    2011-06-01

    We report a noise bandwidth of 7 GHz in the new generation of NbN hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers that are being developed for the space observatory Millimetron. The HEB receiver driven by a 2.5-THz local oscillator offered a noise temperature of 600 K in a 50-MHz final detection bandwidth. As the filter center frequency was swept this value remained nearly constant up to the cutoff frequency of the cryogenic amplifier at 7 GHz. We believe that such a low value of the noise temperature is due to reduced radio frequency (RF) loss at the interface between the superconducting film and the gold contacts. We have also performed gain bandwidth measurements at the superconducting transition on HEB mixers with various lengths and found them to be in excellent agreement with the results of the analytical and numerical models developed for the HEB mixer with both diffusion and phonon cooling of hot electrons.

  11. Low-noise room-temperature and cryogenic mixers for 80-120 GHz. [design for use on radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of two new mixers designed to operate in the 80-120-GHz range on 36-ft radio telescope. It is shown that for a hard-driven diode the parasitic resistance and capacitance are the primary factors influencing the design of the diode mount. A room-temperature mixer is described which achieves a single-sideband (SSB) conversion loss (L) of 5.5 dB, and a SSB noise temperature (Tm) of 500 K (excluding the IF contribution) with a 1.4-GHz IF. A cryogenically cooled version, using a quartz structure to support the diode chip and contact whisker, achieves values of L = 5.8 dB and Tm = 300 K with a 4.75-GHz IF. The mixers use high-quality Schottky-barrier diodes in a one-quarter-height waveguide mount.

  12. Comparison of scaled model data to full size energy efficient engine test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, S. P.; Ho, P. Y.; Chamberlin, R.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic tests of a subscale fan and a subscale mixer nozzle were conducted in anechoic chambers over a variety of operating conditions. The subscale fan test was an investigation into the effects of vane/blade ratio and spacing on fan generated noise. A turbulence control structure (TCS) was used to simulate the 'turbulence-free' condition in flight. The subscale mixer nozzle test investigated the acoustic properties of several different forced mixer designs. A tertiary flow was utilized on the mixer model to simulate the forward velocity effects on the jet. The results were scaled up to full size conditions and compared with measured engine data. The comparisons showed good agreement between the component scaled model results and the full scale engine data.

  13. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Effect of Viscosities on Mixing in A Patterned Micro Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Shuo; Liu, Yang; Xu, You-Sheng

    2010-05-01

    The effect of viscosity and viscosity difference and boundary patterned slip on mixing in a micro mixer has been numerically studied using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The slip and no-slip ratio is not constant and varies irregularly, and viscosity is altered by changing the relaxation time in LBE equation. The slip boundary condition is simulated by specular reflection boundary and the no-slip boundary condition is simulated by bounce back boundary. It has been found that it is feasible to optimize the micro mixer design by combining the viscosity effect and boundary patterned ratio altogether.

  14. Ultra-low-voltage CMOS-based current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF isolation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gim Heng; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Chong, Wei Keat; Lioe, De Xing

    2014-01-01

    This journal presents an ultra-low-voltage current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF port-to-port isolation, implemented on 0.13 μm standard CMOS technology for ZigBee application. The architecture compliments a modified current bleeding topology, consisting of NMOS-based current bleeding transistor, PMOS-based switching stage, and integrated inductors achieving low-voltage operation and high LO-RF isolation. The mixer exhibits a conversion gain of 7.5 dB at the radio frequency (RF) of 2.4 GHz, an input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 1 dBm, and a LO-RF isolation measured to 60 dB. The DC power consumption is 572 µW at supply voltage of 0.45 V, while consuming a chip area of 0.97 × 0.88 mm(2). PMID:25197694

  15. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  16. Simulations for membrane-based HEB mixers in array configuration for SHAHIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baubert, Jean; Salez, Morvan; Merkel, Harald F.; Pons, Patrick; Delorme, Yan; Lecomte, Benoit

    2004-10-01

    We present in this paper the front-end design and the results of RF simulations, carried out with Microwave Studio (CST) and HFSS for SHAHIRA (Submillimeter Heterodyne Array for High-speed Radio Astronomy), a 4x4 heterodyne array at 2.5 THz and 4.7 THz. One can then observe 16 spatial positions at 2 frequencies. The design has been chosen to be quasi-optic, because of its simplicity, novelty and multi-pixels applicability. Pixels are made of Niobium Nitride HEB mixers with double-slot antennas, processed on 1 μm thick stress-less Si3N4/SiO2 membrane. The use of the membrane shows numerous advantages: for instance the use of the mixers at higher RF frequencies, a better power coupling efficiency or a solution for avoiding dielectric modes, losses and reflections. This work is supported by ESA and is a collaboration between LERMA, CHALMERS and LAAS. The Camera is expected to find applications, for SOFIA or CIDRE.

  17. Parametric Study of a Mixer/Ejector Nozzle with Mixing Enhancement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DalBello, T.; Steffen, C. J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    A numerical study employing a simplified model of the High Speed Civil Transport mixer/ejector nozzle has been conducted to investigate the effect of tabs (vortex generators) on the mixing process. More complete mixing of the primary and secondary flows within the confined ejector lowers peak exit velocity resulting in reduced jet noise. Tabs were modeled as vortex pairs and inserted into the computational model. The location, size, and number of tabs were varied and its effect on the mixing process is presented here both quantitatively and qualitatively. A baseline case (no tabs) along with six other cases involving two different vortex strengths at three different orientations have been computed and analyzed. The case with the highest vorticity (six vortices representing large tabs) gives the best mixing. It is shown that the influence of the vorticity acts primarily in the forward or middle portions of the duct, significantly alters the flow structure, and promotes some mixing in the lateral direction. Unmixed pockets were found at the top and bottom of the lobe, and more clever placement of tabs improved mixing in the vertical direction. The technique of replacing tabs with vortices shows promise as an efficient tool for quickly optimizing tab placement in lobed mixers.

  18. 100-GHz Phase Switch/Mixer Containing a Slot-Line Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Wells, Mary; Dawson, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A circuit that can function as a phase switch, frequency mixer, or frequency multiplier operates over a broad frequency range in the vicinity of 100 GHz. Among the most notable features of this circuit is a grounded uniplanar transition (in effect, a balun) between a slot line and one of two coplanar waveguides (CPWs). The design of this circuit is well suited to integration of the circuit into a microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) package. One CPW is located at the input end and one at the output end of the top side of a substrate on which the circuit is fabricated (see Figure 1). The input CPW feeds the input signal to antiparallel flip-chip Schottky diodes connected to the edges of the slot line. Phase switching is effected by the combination of (1) the abrupt transition from the input CPW to the slot line and (2) CPW ground tuning effected by switching of the bias on the diodes. Grounding of the slot metal to the bottom metal gives rise to a frequency cutoff in the slot. This cutoff is valuable for separating different frequency components when the circuit is used as a mixer or multiplier. Proceeding along the slot line toward the output end, one encounters the aforementioned transition, which couples the slot line to the output CPW. Impedance tuning of the transition is accomplished by use of a high-impedance section immediately before the transition.

  19. Nanopatterning and Hot Spot Modeling of YBCO Ultrathin Film Constrictions for THz Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladret, Romain G.; Degardin, Annick F.; Kreisler, Alain J.

    2013-06-01

    High-TC hot electron bolometers (HEB) are promising THz mixers due to their expected wide bandwidth, large mixing gain, and low intrinsic noise. To achieve this goal, 0.6-μm-size constrictions were patterned on YBaCuO-based, 10-40-nm-thick films grown on (100) MgO substrates, which as previously reported, exhibited good DC superconducting properties. In this paper, we have simulated the DC and mixer characteristics of YBaCuO HEBs with a hot spot model usually dedicated to low-TC devices. For a 100 nm × 100 nm × 10 nm constriction, the expected double sideband noise temperature TN is 2000 K for 5 μW local oscillator (LO) power (G = -13.5 dB conversion gain). For a larger (but more realistic according to YBaCuO aging effects) 600 nm × 1000 nm × 35 nm constriction, TN = 1300 K at 200 μW LO power (G = -12 dB). This approach is expected to allow optimizing the operation of the HEB constriction coupled to a THz planar antenna.

  20. Structural design and analysis of a mixer pump for beyond-design- basis load

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvani, M.A.; Strehlow, J.P.; Baliga, R.; Kok, S.B.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the structural evaluation of a mixer pump for a postulated drop accident. The mixer pump will be installed in a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. This tank has a 1,000,000-gallon (3,785,000 liter) capacity and is used to store radioactive waste before final disposal. The beyond-design-basis load case presented here is a postmulated drop of the pump during installation or removal. It is assumed that the pump assembly might be dropped approximateely 140 ft (15 m) from a height at which the bottom of the pump assembly is slightly above the top of the access riser to the bottom of the tank. The acceptance criterion for this load case is that the pump assembly shall not penetrate the primary tank liner. To ensure the integrity of the liner, the kinetic energy (developed in the pump drop) must be absorbed by some means to limit the impact force on the tank dome and thereby keep the pump from contacting the bottom of the tank. The limited clearance near the mounting assembly warranted an innovative two-step design of the energy absorbing system to limit the impact force on the tank dome to an acceptable value. This innovative design incorporates two energy absorbers in a unique series arrangement, one with the pump assembly and tile other in the pump pit.

  1. Optimization of a Continuous Hybrid Impeller Mixer via Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Othman, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Takriff, M. S.; Rosli, M. I.; Engku Chik, E. M. F.; Meor Adnan, M. A. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary steps required for conducting experiments to obtain the optimal operating conditions of a hybrid impeller mixer and to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, impeller speed and clearance parameters are examined. The hybrid impeller mixer consists of a single Rushton turbine mounted above a single pitched blade turbine (PBT). Four impeller speeds, 50, 100, 150, and 200 rpm, and four impeller clearances, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm, were the operation variables used in this study. CFD was utilized to initially screen the parameter ranges to reduce the number of actual experiments needed. Afterward, the residence time distribution (RTD) was determined using the respective parameters. Finally, the Fluent-predicted RTD and the experimentally measured RTD were compared. The CFD investigations revealed that an impeller speed of 50 rpm and an impeller clearance of 25 mm were not viable for experimental investigations and were thus eliminated from further analyses. The determination of RTD using a k-ε turbulence model was performed using CFD techniques. The multiple reference frame (MRF) was implemented and a steady state was initially achieved followed by a transient condition for RTD determination. PMID:25170524

  2. Optimization of a continuous hybrid impeller mixer via computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Othman, N; Kamarudin, S K; Takriff, M S; Rosli, M I; Engku Chik, E M F; Meor Adnan, M A K

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary steps required for conducting experiments to obtain the optimal operating conditions of a hybrid impeller mixer and to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, impeller speed and clearance parameters are examined. The hybrid impeller mixer consists of a single Rushton turbine mounted above a single pitched blade turbine (PBT). Four impeller speeds, 50, 100, 150, and 200 rpm, and four impeller clearances, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm, were the operation variables used in this study. CFD was utilized to initially screen the parameter ranges to reduce the number of actual experiments needed. Afterward, the residence time distribution (RTD) was determined using the respective parameters. Finally, the Fluent-predicted RTD and the experimentally measured RTD were compared. The CFD investigations revealed that an impeller speed of 50 rpm and an impeller clearance of 25 mm were not viable for experimental investigations and were thus eliminated from further analyses. The determination of RTD using a k-ε turbulence model was performed using CFD techniques. The multiple reference frame (MRF) was implemented and a steady state was initially achieved followed by a transient condition for RTD determination. PMID:25170524

  3. Silicon Carbide Mixers Demonstrated to Improve the Interference Immunity of Radio-Based Aircraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    Concern over the interference of stray radiofrequency (RF) emissions with key aircraft avionics is evident during takeoff and landing of every commercial flight when the flight attendant requests that all portable electronics be switched off. The operation of key radio-based avionics (such as glide-slope and localizer approach instruments) depends on the ability of front-end RF receivers to detect and amplify desired information signals while rejecting interference from undesired RF sources both inside and outside the aircraft. Incidents where key navigation and approach avionics malfunction because of RF interference clearly represent an increasing threat to flight safety as the radio spectrum becomes more crowded. In an initial feasibility experiment, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the NASA Lewis Research Center recently demonstrated the strategic use of silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor components to significantly reduce the susceptibility of an RF receiver circuit to undesired RF interference. A pair of silicon carbide mixer diodes successfully reduced RF interference (intermodulation distortion) in a prototype receiver circuit by a factor of 10 (20 dB) in comparison to a pair of commercial silicon-based mixer diodes.

  4. Cross-Stream PIV Measurements of Jets With Internal Lobed Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    With emphasis being placed on enhanced mixing of jet plumes for noise reduction and on predictions of jet noise based upon turbulent kinetic energy, unsteady measurements of jet plumes are a very important part of jet noise studies. Given that hot flows are of most practical interest, optical techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applicable. When the flow has strong azimuthal features, such as those generated by chevrons or lobed mixers, traditional PIV, which aligns the measurement plane parallel to the dominant flow direction is very inefficient, requiring many planes of data to be acquired and stacked up to produce the desired flow cross-sections. This paper presents PIV data acquired in a plane normal to the jet axis, directly measuring the cross-stream gradients and features of an internally mixed nozzle operating at aircraft engine flow conditions. These nozzle systems included variations in lobed mixer penetration, lobe count, lobe scalloping, and nozzle length. Several cases validating the accuracy of the PIV data are examined along with examples of its use in answering questions about the jet noise generation processes in these nozzles. Of most interest is the relationship of low frequency aft-directed noise with turbulence kinetic energy and mean velocity.

  5. Influence of pressure driven secondary flows on the behavior of turbofan forced mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B.; Povinelli, L.; Gerstenmaier, W.

    1980-01-01

    A finite difference procedure was developed to analyze the three dimensional subsonic turbulent flows in turbofan forced mixer nozzles. The method is based on a decomposition of the velocity field into primary and secondary flow components which are determined by solution of the equations governing primary momentum, secondary vorticity, thermal energy, and continuity. Experimentally, a strong secondary flow pattern was identified which is associated with the radial inflow and outflow characteristics of the core and fan streams and forms a very strong vortex system aligned with the radial interface between the core and fan regions. A procedure was developed to generate a similar generic secondary flow pattern in terms of two constants representing the average radial outflow or inflow in the core and fan streams as a percentage of the local streamwise velocity. This description of the initial secondary flow gave excellent agreement with experimental data. By identifying the nature of large scale secondary flow structure and associating it with characteristic mixer nozzle behavior, it is felt that the cause and effect relationship between lobe design and nozzle performance can be understood.

  6. Conversion gain and noise of niobium superconducting hot-electron-mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstrom, Hans; Karasik, Boris S.; Kollberg, Erik L.; Yngvesson, Sigfrid

    1995-01-01

    A study has been done of microwave mixing at 20 GHz using the nonlinear (power dependent) resistance of thin niobium strips in the resistive state. Our experiments give evidence that electron-heating is the main cause of the nonlinear phenomenon. Also a detailed phenomenological theory for the determination of conversion properties is presented. This theory is capable of predicting the frequency-conversion loss rather accurately for arbitrary bias by examining the I-V-characteristic. Knowing the electron temperature relaxation time, and using parameters derived from the I-V-characteristic also allows us to predict the -3 dB IF bandwidth. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. The requirements on the mode of operation and on the film parameters for minimizing the conversion loss (and even achieving conversion gain) are discussed in some detail. Our measurements demonstrate an intrinsic conversion loss as low as 1 dB. The maximum IF frequency defined for -3 dB drop in conversion gain, is about 80 MHz. Noise measurements indicate a device output noise temperature of about 50 K and SSB mixer noise temperature below 250 K. This type of mixer is considered very promising for use in low-noise heterodyne receivers at THz frequencies.

  7. The effect of particle shape on mixing in a high shear mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Matthew D.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-09-01

    Discrete element method modelling is used to study the effect of particle shape on the flow dynamics and mixing in a high shear mixer. The blade generates strong flow over its top surface while compacting and pushing forward particles that are directly in front of the blade. A complex three dimensional flow is established with vertical and radial flow components that are shape dependent and which control the nature of the mixing. Mixing was found to be fast in the azimuthal direction, of intermediate speed in the vertical direction and comparatively slow in the radial mixing. Diffusive mixing is characterised using the granular temperature which shows that the regions of higher granular temperature are larger for round particles than non-round ones leading to stronger diffusive mixing. The spatial distribution of the convective component of mixing is identified using novel calculation of shear strain rate. This size and shape of the high shear region is found to be only slightly sensitive to the particle shape indicating that the convective mixing is relatively independent of shape, except in the middle of the mixer. The blockiness of the particles has the strongest impact on flow and mixing while the mixing has only a weak dependence on the particle aspect ratio.

  8. Suspended Solids Profiler Shop Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-01-19

    The Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) Instrument is planned to be installed in the AZ-101 tank to measure suspended solids concentrations during mixer pump testing. The SSP sensor uses a reflectance measurement principle to determine the suspended solids concentrations. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the SSP operate properly.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT PERFORMANCE OF INDUCTION MIXERS FOR DISINFECTION OF WET WEATHER FLOWS, GAS MASTRRR SERIES 32 SUBMERSIBLE CHEMICAL INDUCTION MIXERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wet-Weather Flow Technologies Pilot of the EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program under a partnership with NSF International has verified the performance of the GAS MASTRRR Series 32 Submersible Chemical Induction Mixers used for disinfection of wet-weather...

  10. Influence of Geometry and Flow Variations on NO Formation in the Quick Mixer of a Staged Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Staged combustion, such as Rich-Burn/Quick-Mix/Lean-Burn (RQL), is a viable strategy to meet nitric oxide (NO) emission goals for both stationary and propulsion gas turbine engines. A critical element of the design is the quick mixer section where the potential for NO production is high. While numerical calculations of the quick mixer under reacting conditions have been conducted, the hostile environment and lack of appropriate diagnostics have, to date, precluded experimental probing of the reacting case. As an alternative to understanding the effect of geometry and flow variations on the production of NO in the quick mixer, the present paper presents (1) a series of non-reacting parametric studies, and (2) a computational method to extrapolate the results of the non-reacting experiments to reacting conditions. The results show that the rate of NO production is highest in the immediate vicinity of the injection plane. For a given momentum flux ratio between the jets and mainstream, the most effective mixing geometry is that which mixes effectively in both (1) the plane of injection, and (2) the wall regions downstream of the plan of injection. The tailoring of the mixing is key to minimize the NO formed. As a result, the best overall mixer with respect to the minimization of NO production may depend on the system specific characteristics of the particular application.

  11. A Handheld LED Coloured-Light Mixer for Students to Learn Collaboratively the Primary Colours of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny…

  12. Design of an exhaust mixer nozzle for the Avco-Lycoming Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, J. F.; Anson, L.; Wilson, C.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the design configuration and method used to design the forced engine exhaust to bypass air mixing system for Lycoming's QCGAT engine. This mixer is an integral part of the total engine and nacelle system and was configured to reduce the propulsion system noise and fuel consumption levels.

  13. A 1.5 THz hot-electron bolometer mixer operated by a planar diode based local oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Y. E.; Meledin, D.; Blundell, R.; Erickson, N.; Mehdi, I.; Goltsman, G.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a 1.5 THz superconducting NbN Hot-Electron Bolometer mixer. It is oprated by an all-solid-state Local Oscillator comprising of a cascade of 4 planar doublers following an MMIC based W-band power amplifier.

  14. 670-GHz Down- and Up-Converting HEMT-Based Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Enrich T.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Deal, William; Rodriquez, Bryan; Bayuk, Brian; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    A large category of scientific investigation takes advantage of the interactions of signals in the frequency range from 300 to 1,000 GHz and higher. This includes astronomy and atmospheric science, where spectral observations in this frequency range give information about molecular abundances, pressures, and temperatures of small-sized molecules such as water. Additionally, there is a minimum in the atmospheric absorption at around 670 GHz that makes this frequency useful for terrestrial imaging, radar, and possibly communications purposes. This is because 670 GHz is a good compromise for imaging and radar applications between spatial resolution (for a given antenna size) that favors higher frequencies, and atmospheric losses that favor lower frequencies. A similar trade-off applies to communications link budgets: higher frequencies allow smaller antennas, but incur a higher loss. All of these applications usually require converting the RF (radio frequency) signal at 670 GHz to a lower IF (intermediate frequency) for processing. Further, transmitting for communication and radar generally requires up-conversion from IF to the RF. The current state-of-the-art device for performing the frequency conversion is based on Schottky diode mixers for both up and down conversion in this frequency range for room-temperature operation. Devices that can operate at room temperature are generally required for terrestrial, military, and planetary applications that cannot tolerate the mass, bulk, and power consumption of cryogenic cooling. The technology has recently advanced to the point that amplifiers in the region up to nearly 1,000 GHz are feasible. Almost all of these have been based on indium phosphide pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs), in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). Since the processing of HEMT amplifiers is quite differ en t from that of Schottky diodes, use of Schottky mixers requires separate MMICs for the mixers

  15. Superconducting Hot-Electron Bolometric Mixer Receivers, and Evolution of Ionized Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hiroyuki Jonathan

    Receivers incorporating niobium nitride phonon-cooled hot-electron bolometric mixers have been constructed and characterized. The mixer elements are thin-film NbN microbridges with dimensions of ~4 nm thickness, 1-20 μm width and 1.5-4 μm length. These are incorporated in waveguide receivers operating at 200 GHz, 450 GHz, 660 GHz, and 900 GHz. Operating at 4.2 K, the double-sideband receiver noise temperatures in each frequency band were 750 K at 244 GHz, 410 K at 430 GHz, 483 K at 606 GHz, and 1150 K at 800 GHz, a an intermediate frequency of 1.4 GHz and 200 MHz bandwidth. The receiver noise temperature is generally less than 3 GHz K-1 for mixers most recently fabricated. The intermediate frequency bandwidth exceeds 2 GHz, and the local oscillator power for optimal mixing is ~1μW. In addition, the time-evolution of ionized nebulae was studied using difference maps generated by combining new high sensitivity Very Large Array radio interferometrer observations with archived data, separated by a time baseline of ~10 yr. The distances to two bright planetary nebulae are determined by detecting their expansion parallax: the distance to BD +30o3639 is 1.5 ± 0.4 kpc, and to NGC 6572 is 1.2 ± 0.4 kpc. These distances incorporate a new correction term, and are considerably more accurate than those reported previously. The difference mapping technique is for the first time used to study another class of objects, and applied to observe changes in two bright, well-studied compact H scII regions, W 3(OH) and NGC 7538. W 3(OH) is observed to expand at a rate of 3 km s-1, which although significantly smaller than the plasma sound speed, implies an age of ~3×103 yr. This measurement has important consequences for modeling evolution of compact H scII regions. In contrast NGC 7538 exhibits significant changes in the structure whose interpretation is difficult, but nevertheless suggest that structures observed in compact H scII regions are not static.

  16. Remotely powered distributed microfluidic pumps and mixers based on miniature diodes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Suk Tai; Beaumont, Erin; Petsev, Dimiter N; Velev, Orlin D

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate new principles of microfluidic pumping and mixing by electronic components integrated into a microfluidic chip. The miniature diodes embedded into the microchannel walls rectify the voltage induced between their electrodes from an external alternating electric field. The resulting electroosmotic flows, developed in the vicinity of the diode surfaces, were utilized for pumping or mixing of the fluid in the microfluidic channel. The flow velocity of liquid pumped by the diodes facing in the same direction linearly increased with the magnitude of the applied voltage and the pumping direction could be controlled by the pH of the solutions. The transverse flow driven by the localized electroosmotic flux between diodes oriented oppositely on the microchannel was used in microfluidic mixers. The experimental results were interpreted by numerical simulations of the electrohydrodynamic flows. The techniques may be used in novel actively controlled microfluidic-electronic chips. PMID:18094769

  17. Downstream evolution of proper orthogonal decomposition eigenfunctions in a lobed mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukeiley, L.; Glauser, M.; Wick, D.

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional (one space and time) scalar adaptation of the proper orthogonal decomposition was applied to streamwise velocity data obtained in a lobed mixer flowfield, using a rake of 15 single-component hot wires. Through the application of the proper orthogonal decomposition, the amount of streamwise turbulent kinetic energy contained in the various proper orthogonal modes was examined for two different downstream locations (z/h = 2.6 and 3.9). The large eddy or dominant mode was shown to have a measurable decrease in the relative streamwise component of the kinetic energy between these two downstream locations. This indicates that the large eddy, as defined by the proper orthogonal decomposition, breaks down, and the flow becomes more homogeneous. A pseudoflow visualization technique was then employed to help visualize this process.

  18. Rheological characterization of microcrystalline cellulose and silicified microcrystalline cellulose wet masses using a mixer torque rheometer.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, P; Schaefer, T; Hellén, L; Juppo, A M; Yliruusi, J

    1999-10-25

    The rheological properties of silicified microcrystalline cellulose (Prosolv 50) were compared with those of standard grades of microcrystalline cellulose (Emcocel 50 and Avicel PH 101). Cellulose samples were analyzed using nitrogen adsorption together with particle size, flowability, density and swelling volume studies. The rheological behaviour of the wet powder masses was studied as a function of mixing time using a mixer torque rheometer (MTR). Silicified microcrystalline cellulose exhibited improved flow characteristics and increased specific surface area compared to standard microcrystalline cellulose grades. Although the silicification process affected the swelling properties and, furthermore, the mixing kinetics of microcrystalline cellulose, the source of the microcrystalline cellulose had a stronger influence than silicification on the liquid requirement at peak torque. PMID:10518674

  19. Low-Loss NbTiN Films for THz SIS Mixer Tuning Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, J. W.; Stern, J. A.; Chattopadhyay, G.; LeDuc, H. G.; Bumble, B.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent results at 1 THz using normal-metal tuning circuits have shown that SIS mixers can work well up to twice the gap frequency of the junction material (niobium). However, the performance at 1 THz is limited by the substantial loss in the normal metal films. For better performance superconducting films with a higher gap frequency than niobium and with low RF loss are needed. Niobium nitride has long been considered a good candidate material, but typical NbN films suffer from high RF loss. To circumvent this problem we are currently investigating the RF loss in NbTiN films, a 15 K Tc compound superconductor, by incorporating them into quasi-optical slot antenna SIS devices.

  20. Numerical analysis and characterization of a Wankel pump as a miniaturized mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Stephen; Huanming, Xia; Kumar, Pankaj

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, particle track simulations of inert particles belonging to two species (binary mixing), carried out using a commercially available CFD code indicate that pumps based on Wankel type geometries (Wankel pumps) are capable of functioning as mixers, as well as pumps; and hence such devices could also drive a semi-batch micro-reactor system. The numerical results reveal that mixing quality improves as the particles loop through the pump cavity and then saturates after a time, and that mixing rate increases with rotor speed. Examination of the structure of the flow-field suggests that the underlying mechanism of mixing is a combination of the stretching (resulting in particle dispersion) and folding of streamlines into Taylor-like vortex pairs, accounting for the vertical symmetry in the particle distributions. Differences in the flow structure, detected by plots of fluid velocity components, could account for differences in particle distributions generated for various rotor speeds.

  1. Quantum-limited 0.78-0.95-THz Waveguide SIS Mixers for the ALMA Band 10 Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takafumi

    2010-02-01

    This thesis describes the demonstration and the application of a low noise Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixer for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) band 10 covering the frequency range of 0.787-0.950 THz. The ALMA is one of the largest ground-based astronomy projects for the next decade. The ALMA telescope covers atmospheric windows in the frequency range from 30 GHz to 0.95 THz, which is divided into 10 frequency bands. Band 10 receivers of the ALMA, which is the highest frequency band, are expected as a key frequency band, e.g. for imaging observations with the very high angular resolution to detect the gaps created by planets undergoing formation in the disk. To enable such a challenging observation, band 10 receivers requires ultimate performance with a Double SideBand (DSB) noise temperature below 230 K (5hf/kB) for 80% bandwidth and 344 K (7.5hf/kB) for 100% bandwidth over the 4-12 GHz intermediate frequency (IF) band. The final goal of this study is to develop low noise and wideband SIS mixers so as to meet the specifications and to enable such challenging observation of ALMA band 10 by demonstrating high performances for each component. SIS junctions should be the most sensitive mixing elements in this frequency. However, there have been no mixers currently available that satisfy the requirements of both low noise and wideband operation for the ALMA band-10 specification. This is because, thus far, well-established all-Nb SIS mixers can not be used due to radio frequency (RF) losses in their microstrip tuning circuits which increase significantly as a result of the onset of pair-breaking above the Nb gap frequency of 0.7 THz. For example, RF signals are attenuated by more than 60% per the wavelength in this frequency range. Besides, the RF fractional bandwidth of about 20% is a critical problem for achieving the specifications as well as the quantum limited sensitivity. Since an SIS junction has a large capacitance, RF

  2. A high linearity current mode second IF CMOS mixer for a DRM/DAB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xu; Zheng, Zhou; Yiqiang, Wu; Zhigong, Wang; Jianping, Chen

    2015-05-01

    A passive current switch mixer was designed for the second IF down-conversion in a DRM/DAB receiver. The circuit consists of an input transconductance stage, a passive current switching stage, and a current amplifier stage. The input transconductance stage employs a self-biasing current reusing technique, with a resistor shunt feedback to increase the gain and output impedance. A dynamic bias technique is used in the switching stage to ensure the stability of the overdrive voltage versus the PVT variations. A current shunt feedback is introduced to the conventional low-voltage second-generation fully balanced multi-output current converter (FBMOCCII), which provides very low input impedance and high output impedance. With the circuit working in current mode, the linearity is effectively improved with low supply voltages. Especially, the transimpedance stage can be removed, which simplifies the design considerably. The design is verified with a SMIC 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The measurement results show that the voltage conversation gain is 1.407 dB, the NF is 16.22 dB, and the IIP3 is 4.5 dBm, respectively. The current consumption is 9.30 mA with a supply voltage of 1.8 V. This exhibits a good compromise among the gain, noise, and linearity for the second IF mixer in DRM/DAB receivers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306069), and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA010301).

  3. New approach to the design of Schottky barrier diodes for THz mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelenski, A.; Grueb, A.; Krozer, V.; Hartnagel, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    Near-ideal GaAs Schottky barrier diodes especially designed for mixing applications in the THz frequency range are presented. A diode fabrication process for submicron diodes with near-ideal electrical and noise characteristics is described. This process is based on the electrolytic pulse etching of GaAs in combination with an in-situ platinum plating for the formation of the Schottky contacts. Schottky barrier diodes with a diameter of 1 micron fabricated by the process have already shown excellent results in a 650 GHz waveguide mixer at room temperature. A conversion loss of 7.5 dB and a mixer noise temperature of less than 2000 K have been obtained at an intermediate frequency of 4 GHz. The optimization of the diode structure and the technology was possible due to the development of a generalized Schottky barrier diode model which is valid also at high current densities. The common diode design and optimization is discussed on the basis of the classical theory. However, the conventional fomulas are valid only in a limited forward bias range corresponding to currents much smaller than the operating currents under submillimeter mixing conditions. The generalized new model takes into account not only the phenomena occurring at the junction such as current dependent recombination and drift/diffusion velocities, but also mobility and electron temperature variations in the undepleted epi-layer. Calculated diode I/V and noise characteristics are in excellent agreement with the measured values. Thus, the model offers the possibility of optimizing the diode structure and predicting the diode performance under mixing conditions at THz frequencies.

  4. Test Procedure - pumping system for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    This test procedure provides the requirements for sub-system testing and integrated operational testing of the submersible mixer pump and caustic addition equipment by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E).

  5. Ultra-High Throughput Synthesis of Nanoparticles with Homogeneous Size Distribution Using a Coaxial Turbulent Jet Mixer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput production of nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled quality is critical for their clinical translation into effective nanomedicines for diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we report a simple and versatile coaxial turbulent jet mixer that can synthesize a variety of NPs at high throughput up to 3 kg/d, while maintaining the advantages of homogeneity, reproducibility, and tunability that are normally accessible only in specialized microscale mixing devices. The device fabrication does not require specialized machining and is easy to operate. As one example, we show reproducible, high-throughput formulation of siRNA-polyelectrolyte polyplex NPs that exhibit effective gene knockdown but exhibit significant dependence on batch size when formulated using conventional methods. The coaxial turbulent jet mixer can accelerate the development of nanomedicines by providing a robust and versatile platform for preparation of NPs at throughputs suitable for in vivo studies, clinical trials, and industrial-scale production. PMID:24824296

  6. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: January - March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-07-22

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is January 1 through March 31, 1999. During the quarter: There were changes in pumping parameters. Both the pump volute pressure and amperage decreased during the quarter. It is not clear whether this was due to changes in waste properties (due to less solids or more entrained gas) or due to degradation of the pump. There was an indication of a 7.5-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1 A, and an average growth rate of 0.082 inches per day. There was an indication of a 5.7-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 78 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 34 percent of the generation rate calculated prior to mixer pump installation in 1993. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of March 3 1. 1999. The pump was run 28 times between January 1 and March 31, 1999. All of the pump runs were intended to be normal 25-minute, 1000-rpm excavation runs performed to mix the waste and release gas. Because of the pump oil often reached the high temperature alarm setpoint of 190 F, many of the runs were shortened (by as many as 8 minutes). This phenomenon was identified in November 1998, but got progressively worse over the quarter. The pump schedule was nominally three runs per week. However, core sampling activities interrupted the usual pump schedule several times during the quarter

  7. A simple three-dimensional-focusing, continuous-flow mixer for the study of fast protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kelly S.; Parul, Dzmitry; Reddish, Michael J.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple, yet flexible microfluidic mixer with a demonstrated mixing time as short as 80 µs that is widely accessible because it is made of commercially available parts. To simplify the study of fast protein dynamics, we have developed an inexpensive continuous-flow microfluidic mixer, requiring no specialized equipment or techniques. The mixer uses three-dimensional, hydrodynamic focusing of a protein sample stream by a surrounding sheath solution to achieve rapid diffusional mixing between the sample and sheath. Mixing initiates the reaction of interest. Reactions can be spatially observed by fluorescence or absorbance spectroscopy. We characterized the pixel-to-time calibration and diffusional mixing experimentally. We achieved a mixing time as short as 80 µs. We studied the kinetics of horse apomyoglobin (apoMb) unfolding from the intermediate (I) state to its completely unfolded (U) state, induced by a pH jump from the initial pH of 4.5 in the sample stream to a final pH of 2.0 in the sheath solution. The reaction time was probed using the fluorescence of 1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) bound to the folded protein. We observed unfolding of apoMb within 760 µs, without populating additional intermediate states under these conditions. We also studied the reaction kinetics of the conversion of pyruvate to lactate catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase using the intrinsic tryptophan emission of the enzyme. We observe sub-millisecond kinetics that we attribute to Michaelis complex formation and loop domain closure. These results demonstrate the utility of the three-dimensional focusing mixer for biophysical studies of protein dynamics. PMID:23760106

  8. Design and realization of a broadband single-side-band mixer with a very short settling time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haßler, S.; Reichthalhammer, T.; Biebl, E.

    2010-10-01

    To achieve high range resolution in synthetic aperture radar imaging a frequency synthesizer with high bandwidth is a possible solution. To operate in the required frequency band an LF-signal usually has to be upconverted. In this paper we describe the design and realization of a broadband Single-Side-Band Mixer with a very short settling time between frequency steps of arbitrary length inside a high bandwidth. Compared to already existing SSB-Mixers, our novel concept has three major advantages: At first, the mixer could be used in combination with an arbitrary signal source. Due to a modular circuit concept it is possible to use the system for different input frequency ranges. Moreover, just by changing single modules, the output frequency-range can be adapted to individual requirements. Thirdly, as a main advantage, the system is able to generate a high frequency output span with a very fast settling time between frequency steps. Even with applied steps up to 400 MHz, the settling time remains below 3 μs, which is more than 5 times faster than the settling time of similar synthesizers.

  9. DESIGN OF 2.4 GHZ CMOS DIRECT CONVERSION LNA AND MIXER COMBINATION FOR WIRLESS DATA LINK TRANSCEIVER.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, D.; OCONNOR, P.

    2002-04-10

    Three LNA and mixer combinations in 0.6{micro}m and 0.4{micro}m standard CMOS processes for direct-conversion receiver of 2.4GHz ISM band short-range wireless data-link applications are described in this paper. Taking low power dissipation as first consideration, these designs, employing differential common-source LNA and double balanced mixer architectures, achieve total conversion gain as high as 42.4dB, DSB noise figure as low as 9.5dB, output-referred IP3 as high as of 21.3dBm at about 4mA DC current consumption. This proves it is possible to apply standard CMOS process to implement receiver front-end with low power dissipation for this kind of application, but gain changeable LNA is needed to combat the dominant flicker noise of the mixer in order to achieve acceptable sensitivity and dynamic range at the same time.

  10. Modelling and performance of Nb SIS mixers in the 1.3 mm and 0.8 mm bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpov, A.; Carter, M.; Lazareff, B.; Billon-Pierron, D.; Gundlach, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the modeling and subsequent improvements of SIS waveguide mixers for the 200-270 and 330-370 GHz bands (Blundell, Carter, and Gundlach 1988, Carter et al 1991). These mixers are constructed for use in receivers on IRAM radiotelescopes on Pico Veleta (Spain, Sierra Nevada) and Plateau de Bure (French Alps), and must meet specific requirements. The standard reduced height waveguide structure with suspended stripline is first analyzed and a model is validated through comparison with scale model and working scale measurements. In the first step, the intrinsic limitations of the standard mixer structure are identified, and the parameters are optimized bearing in mind the radioastronomical applications. In the second step, inductive tuning of the junctions is introduced and optimized for minimum noise and maximum bandwidth. In the 1.3 mm band, a DSB receiver temperature of less than 110 K (minimum 80 K) is measured from 180 through 260 GHz. In the 0.8 mm band, a DSB receiver temperature of less than 250 K (minimum 175 K) is obtained between 325 and 355 GHz. All these results are obtained with room-temperature optics and a 4 GHz IF chain having a 500 MHz bandwidth and a noise temperature of 14 K.

  11. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: October - December, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-05-11

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is October 1 through December 31, 1998. During the quarter: (1) There was an indication of a 7.0-inch increase in the waste level at riser lA, and an average growth rate of 0.076 inches per day. (2) There was an indication of a 2.3-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. (3) Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 60 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 44 percent of the pre-pump release rate. (4) There was no change in the parameters that monitor pump performance. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of December 31, 1998.

  12. An instrumented mixer setup for making tackifier dispersions used to make pressure-sensitive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Daoyun; Zhang, Wu; Melby, Earl G.; Gupta, Rakesh K.

    2008-04-01

    Water-based pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are made by combining a tackifier dispersion and a polymer latex. During the process of making the tackifier dispersion, the system initially forms a water-in-oil emulsion, and then inverts to an oil-in-water one as more water is continuously added with constant agitation. To better understand the process, an instrumented mixer setup was constructed to simulate the manufacturing process, and agitation was provided by an inner impeller and an outer impeller. Several variables were monitored in situ. They are the electrical resistance of the emulsion, torque exerted on the inner impeller, agitation speeds of both impellers, power consumption of both impellers and the flow rate of feeding water. Our measurements showed that torque reached a maximum at phase inversion, and this was verified by direct measurements of viscosity during the process. Simultaneously electrical resistance measurements monitored the chemical changes as well as phase inversion. Experiments showed that under a certain low water feeding flow rate, there appeared to be an intermediate agitation speed at which the phase inversion occurred the earliest. This, from the industrial standpoint, is really favorable due to both time and energy efficiency. Furthermore, this intermediate agitation speed also corresponded to a better quality product. All this information may be used for optimizing this process in the future.

  13. Interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons with mirror and mixer

    DOEpatents

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-06-01

    53 Systems and methods are described for an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device optically coupled to a source of coherent energy, the multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device i) including a mirror and a mixer and ii) converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a tunable phase adjuster optically coupled to the condenser device, the tunable phase adjuster changing a phase of at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam to generate a first interferometeric multi-color entangled photon beam; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the condenser device, the beam splitter combining the first interferometeric multi-color entangled photon beam with a second interferometric multi-color entangled photon beam.

  14. Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoran, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This journal issue addresses the issue of testing in the social studies classroom. The first article, "The Role of Testing" (Bragaw), focuses on the need for tests to reflect the objectives of the study completed. The varying functions of pop quizzes, weekly tests, and unit tests are explored. "Testing Thinking Processes" (Killoran, Zimmer, and…

  15. Influence of Geometry and Flow Variation on Jet Mixing and NO Formation in a Model Staged Combustor Mixer with Eight Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Hatch, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of non-reacting parametric experiments was conducted to investigate the effect of geometric and flow variations on mixing of cold jets in an axis-symmetric, heated cross flow. The confined, cylindrical geometries tested represent the quick mix region of a Rich-Burn/Quick-Mix/Lean-Burn (RQL) combustor. The experiments show that orifice geometry and jet to mainstream momentum-flux ratio significantly impact the mixing characteristic of jets in a cylindrical cross stream. A computational code was used to extrapolate the results of the non-reacting experiments to reacting conditions in order to examine the nitric oxide (NO) formation potential of the configurations examined. The results show that the rate of NO formation is highest immediately downstream of the injection plane. For a given momentum-flux ratio, the orifice geometry that mixes effectively in both the immediate vicinity of the injection plane, and in the wall regions at downstream locations, has the potential to produce the lowest NO emissions. The results suggest that further study may not necessarily lead to a universal guideline for designing a low NO mixer. Instead, an assessment of each application may be required to determine the optimum combination of momentum-flux ratio and orifice geometry to minimize NO formation. Experiments at reacting conditions are needed to verify the present results.

  16. Twin Screw Extruders as Continuous Mixers for Thermal Processing: a Technical and Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charlie

    2016-02-01

    Developed approximately 100 years ago for natural rubber/plastics applications, processes via twin screw extrusion (TSE) now generate some of the most cutting-edge drug delivery systems available. After 25 or so years of usage in pharmaceutical environments, it has become evident why TSE processing offers significant advantages as compared to other manufacturing techniques. The well-characterized nature of the TSE process lends itself to ease of scale-up and process optimization while also affording the benefits of continuous manufacturing. Interestingly, the evolution of twin screw extrusion for pharmaceutical products has followed a similar path as previously trodden by plastics processing pioneers. Almost every plastic has been processed at some stage in the manufacturing train on a twin screw extruder, which is utilized to mix materials together to impart desired properties into a final part. The evolution of processing via TSEs since the early/mid 1900s is recounted for plastics and also for pharmaceuticals from the late 1980s until today. The similarities are apparent. The basic theory and development of continuous mixing via corotating and counterrotating TSEs for plastics and drug is also described. The similarities between plastics and pharmaceutical applications are striking. The superior mixing characteristics inherent with a TSE have allowed this device to dominate other continuous mixers and spurred intensive development efforts and experimentation that spawned highly engineered formulations for the commodity and high-tech plastic products we use every day. Today, twin screw extrusion is a battle hardened, well-proven, manufacturing process that has been validated in 24-h/day industrial settings. The same thing is happening today with new extrusion technologies being applied to advanced drug delivery systems to facilitate commodity, targeted, and alternative delivery systems. It seems that the "extrusion evolution" will continue for wide

  17. Proximity Effects in Aluminum Diffusion-Cooled Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verevkin, A.; Siddiqi, I.; Prober, D.; Skalare, A.; Karasik, B.; McGrath, W. R.; Echternach, P. M.; Leduc, H. G.

    2000-03-01

    We studied aluminum thin-film hot-electron bolometers (HEB) for THz mixer applications. The devices are L=0.1-1μm long microbridges of 100nm width and 13nm thickness, with superconducting transition T_c1=1.6-1.8K and Al/Ti/Au (63/28/28nm thick) contact pads with T_c2=0.6K. We studied conversion efficiency, intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth, and dc characteristics at T=0.25-1.8K. When T_c1>T>T_c2, the device is a N-S-N structure, and when T

  18. Influence of metronidazole particle properties on granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan; Martelli, Sante; Joiris, Etienne; Barthélémy, Christine

    2007-02-01

    Metronidazole is a good example of high-dose drug substance with poor granulating and tableting properties. Tablets are generally produced by liquid granulation; however, the technological process failure is quite frequent. In order to verify how the metronidazole particle characteristics can influence granule properties, three metronidazole batches differing for crystal habit, mean particle size, BET surface area and wettability were selected, primarily designed according to their different elongation ratio: needle-shaped, stick-shaped, and isodimensional. In the presence of lactose monohydrate and pregelatinized maize starch, respectively as diluent and binder, they were included in a formula for wet granulation in a high-shear mixer-granulator. In order to render the process comparable as far as possible, all parameters and experimental conditions were maintained constant. Four granule batches were obtained: granules from placebo (G-placebo), granules from needle-shaped crystals (G-needle-shaped), granules from stick-shaped crystals (G-stick-shaped), and granules from isodimensional crystals (G-isodimensional). Different granule properties were considered, in particular concerning porosity, friability, loss on drying (LOD), and flowability. In order to study their tabletability and compressibility, the different granules obtained were then compressed in a rotary press. The best tabletability was obtained with the isodimensional batch, while the poorest was exhibited by the stick-shaped one. Differences in tabletability are in good accordance with compressibility results: to a better tabletability corresponds an important granule ability to undergo a volume reduction as a result of an applied pressure. In particular, it was proposed that the greatest compressibility of the G-isodimensional must be related to the greatest granule porosity percentage. PMID:17454043

  19. An I/Q mixer with an integrated differential quadrature all-pass filter for on-chip quadrature LO signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Najam Muhammad; Zhigong, Wang; Zhiqun, Li

    2015-05-01

    A down-conversion in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) mixer employing a folded-type topology, integrated with a passive differential quadrature all-pass filter (D-QAF), in order to realize the final down-conversion stage of a 60 GHz receiver architecture is presented in this work. Instead of employing conventional quadrature generation techniques such as a polyphase filter or a frequency divider for the local oscillator (LO) of the mixer, a passive D-QAF structure is employed. Fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process, the mixer exhibits a voltage gain of 7-8 dB in an intermediate frequency (IF) band ranging from 10 MHz-1.75 GHz. A fixed LO frequency of 12 GHz is used to down-convert a radio frequency (RF) band of 10.25-13.75 GHz. The mixer displays a third order input referred intercept point (IIP3) ranging from -8.75 to -7.37 dBm for a fixed IF frequency of 10 MHz and a minimum single-sideband noise figure (SSB-NF) of 11.3 dB. The mixer draws a current of 6 mA from a 1.2 V supply voltage dissipating a power of 7.2 mW. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA010200).

  20. Fiscal year 1993 1/25-scale sludge mobilization testing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Hymas, C.R.; McKay, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Sixteen 1/25-scale sludge mobilization experiments were conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1993. The results of this testing are presented in this document. The ability of a single, centrally-located, scale model mixer pump to resuspend a layer of simulated tank sludge was evaluated for five different simulant types. The resistance of these simulants to the mobilizing action of the mixer pump jets was not found to adequately correlate with simulant vane shear strength. The data indicate that the simulant cohesion, as quantified by tensile strength, may provide a good measure of mobilization resistance. A single test was done to evaluate whether indexed mixer pump rotation is significantly more effective than the planned continuous oscillation. No significant difference was found in the sludge mobilization caused by these two modes of operation. Two tests were conducted using a clay-based sludge simulant that contained approximately 5 wt% soluble solids. The distance to which the mixer pump jets were effective for this simulant was approximately 50% greater than on similar simulants that did not contain soluble solids. The implication is that sludge dissolution effects may significantly enhance the performance of mixer pumps in some tanks. The development of a means to correlate the magnitude of this effect with waste properties is a direction for future work. Two tests were performed with the goal of determining whether the 1/25-scale sludge mobilization data can be scaled linearly to 1/12-scale. The two 1/25-scale tests were conducted using the same simulant recipe as had been used in previous 1/12-scale tests. The difficulty of matching the 1/25-scale simulants, with those used previously is thought to have adversely affected the results. Further tests are needed to determine whether the data from sludge mobilization tests can be linearly scaled.

  1. Selectivity of competitive-consecutive reactions depending on the turbulent mixing conditions in a co-axial jet mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorny, A.; Kornev, N.; Hassel, E.

    2010-12-01

    This paper considers the numerical results on the interaction between a turbulent co-axial jet and a co-flow of incompressible fluid (Schmidt number Sc≈1000) when competitive-consecutive reactions occur in a co-axial jet mixer. Firstly, RANS modeling was performed to predict flow phenomena. Two different mixing regimes were analyzed with and without a recirculation zone near a mixer wall. To describe the problem mathematically, the two-parameter turbulence k-ɛ model and various models for the computation of the averaged mixture fraction \\skew3\\bar f and its variance σ2 were used and verified by comparing them with the experimental and large eddy simulation (LES) data. The results revealed that the decay of \\skew5\\bar f and σ2 obtained by the developed RANS mixing model with the low-Reynolds-number effects (mechanical-to-scalar time ratio and turbulent Schmidt number in the transfer equation for σ2 as a function of Ret) was similar to the one found by LES and experiment. Second, the behavior of the competitive-consecutive reactions (A+B→P, B+R→S) in the co-axial mixer was considered. To calculate averaged chemical reaction rates, the transfer equations for concentrations adopted two approaches: a model with no regard to concentration fluctuations and the Li-Toor model with the Gaussian PDF of the mixture fraction. The yield of a desired product R was found to depend strongly on the mixing regime. The regime without recirculation zone appeared to be preferable as the reaction selectivity was smaller within the whole range of Reynolds number and initial reactant concentration ratio. This means that the amount of an undesired by-product S to be formed is minimal.

  2. Ultrasonic interface level analyzer shop test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    1999-05-24

    The Royce Instrument Corporation Model 2511 Interface Level Analyzer (URSILLA) system uses an ultrasonic ranging technique (SONAR) to measure sludge depths in holding tanks. Three URSILLA instrument assemblies provided by the W-151 project are planned to be used during mixer pump testing to provide data for determining sludge mobilization effectiveness of the mixer pumps and sludge settling rates. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the three URSILLA instruments operate properly. Successful completion of this Shop Test Procedure (STP) is a prerequisite for installation in the AZ-101 tank. The objective of the test is to verify the operation of the URSILLA instruments and to verify data collection using a stand alone software program.

  3. Experimental simulation of a liquid-metal heat-transfer fluid flow in a T-shaped mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinskii, O. N.; Lobanov, P. D.; Kurdyumov, A. S.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2016-05-01

    The structure of the temperature field in a liquid-metal heat-transfer fluid flowing through a T-shaped mixer is studied experimentally. The experiments are carried out using Rose's alloy as a working fluid. To find the temperature distribution over the wall of a working section, IR thermography is applied. It is shown that the wall temperature distribution in the zone where fluid flows with different temperatures mix is heavily nonuniform. The temperature distribution substantially depends on the ratio between the hot and cold fluid flow rates. The results can be used to verify the thermal hydraulic computational codes for fluid metal flows.

  4. Three-dimensional mixers with non-planar microchannels in a monolithic glass substrate using oblique powder blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayah, Abdeljalil; Thivolle, Pierre-Antoine; Parashar, Virendra K.; Gijs, Martin A. M.

    2010-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) micromixers realized in a monolithic glass substrate using a simple oblique powder-blasting microfabrication method and a single photosensitive elastomeric mask. The mixer topology consists of a curved microchannel that incorporates a series of nozzle-diffuser elements buried inside the glass substrate. The strongly varying microfluidic cross-section of these elements and multiple channel bends result in the generation of multiple vortices. This results in achieving a high mixing index by chaotic advection, as visualized by a phenolphthalein-sodium hydroxide colour reaction, for flow rates in the range of 2 to 200 µl min-1.

  5. A handheld LED coloured-light mixer for students to learn collaboratively the primary colours of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-03-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) producing primary colours are combined with green intensity varying circuitry to generate the standard colour-triangle secondary colours and various shades ranging from yellow to orange and pale blue to cyan. In the laboratory, students worked collaboratively, predicting, observing and explaining, and finally discussing until there was a consensus.

  6. Influence of mixer nozzle velocity decay characteristics on CTOL-OTW jet noise shielding. [considering shielding effects in nozzle installation over wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Jet noise shielding benefits for CTOL engine-over-the-wing configurations were obtained with model scale multitube and lobed mixer nozzles and various shielding surface geometries. Spectral data were obtained with jet velocities from 585 to 1110 ft/sec. Correlation equations for predicting jet noise shielding benefits with single conical nozzle installations were modified to correlate the mixer nozzle data. The modification included consideration of the number of nozzle elements and the peak axial velocity decay in the flow field adjacent to the shielding surface. The effect of forward velocity on jet noise attenuation by a shielding surface is discussed.

  7. 50 MHz-10 GHz low-power resistive feedback current-reuse mixer with inductive peaking for cognitive radio receiver.

    PubMed

    Vitee, Nandini; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Chong, Wei-Keat; Tan, Gim-Heng; Kanesan, Jeevan; Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    A low-power wideband mixer is designed and implemented in 0.13 µm standard CMOS technology based on resistive feedback current-reuse (RFCR) configuration for the application of cognitive radio receiver. The proposed RFCR architecture incorporates an inductive peaking technique to compensate for gain roll-off at high frequency while enhancing the bandwidth. A complementary current-reuse technique is used between transconductance and IF stages to boost the conversion gain without additional power consumption by reusing the DC bias current of the LO stage. This downconversion double-balanced mixer exhibits a high and flat conversion gain (CG) of 14.9 ± 1.4 dB and a noise figure (NF) better than 12.8 dB. The maximum input 1-dB compression point (P1dB) and maximum input third-order intercept point (IIP3) are -13.6 dBm and -4.5 dBm, respectively, over the desired frequency ranging from 50 MHz to 10 GHz. The proposed circuit operates down to a supply headroom of 1 V with a low-power consumption of 3.5 mW. PMID:25133252

  8. Numerical analysis of lamination effect in a vortex micro T-mixer with non-aligned inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Ramin; Talebi, Shahram; Rabani, Mehrdad

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the lamination effect in a micro T-mixer with non-aligned inputs on the mixing index has been investigated numerically in four different cases. The multi-block lattice Boltzmann method has been implemented for the flow field simulation and the second order upwind finite difference scheme has been used to simulate mass transfer. Reynolds numbers includes in the range of 10 ≤ Re ≤ 70. The simulation results show that the lamination effect in the mixer inputs, despite of its simple design, causes the interface of two fluids to increase and also to make the vortex effect stronger in the confluence of two fluid streams that increases the mixing index considerably. Of four lamination cases included for the mixing input, the maximum mixing index is for the vertical and asymmetrical lamination at the Reynolds number of 70 that is equal 0.689 and the minimum mixing index is for the horizontal and asymmetrical lamination at the Reynolds number of 10 that is equal 0.198.

  9. Fabrication of a 3D active mixer based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS cones with magnetic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Elaheh

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an active 3D mixer for lab-on-chip applications is presented. The micrometer size cone shape holes are ablated on a PMMA sheet utilizing a CO2 laser. The holes are filled with Fe micro-particles and the whole structure is molded with PDMS which cause the Fe micro-particles to be trapped in a PDMS cone structure. These Fe-doped PDMS cones are placed in a PMMA micro-channel structure fabricated by CO2 laser machining. By applying an external periodic magnetic field, the cones periodically bend in the micro-channel and stir the fluid. The fabrication method and the effect of the magnetic field on the bending of the cones with different aspect ratios is also discussed utilizing computer simulation. Doping the polymers with micro- and nano-metallic particles has been carried out by different research groups before, but according to our knowledge, application of such structures for the fabrication of a 3D active mixer has not been presented before.

  10. Physico-chemical and technological properties of sodium naproxen granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Malaj, Ledjan; Censi, Roberta; Martelli, Sante

    2008-12-01

    In the present work, authors produced tablets of anhydrous sodium naproxen by wet granulation using a high-shear mixer-granulator. Drug hydrated to the tetrahydrated form, as observed by X-ray powder diffractometry. After wet granulation, authors then performed two different drying procedures, obtaining granules of different water content and crystallographic characteristics. The first procedure dried granules in the high-shear mixer-granulator by applying vacuum at room temperature (batch A), while the second employed the same apparatus and time, under vacuum at 40 degrees C (batch B). X-ray powder diffractometry revealed that the sodium naproxen (SN) contained in batch A granules was a mixture of dihydrated and tetrahydrated forms (as demonstrated by the coexistence of peaks typical of both hydrated forms), while that of batch B granules was a mixture of monohydrated and tetrahydrated forms. This means that differences in drying procedures could lead to products of different crystallographic properties. The behavior under compression was evaluated, revealing that batch A offered the best tabletability and compressibility. These results make it possible to conclude that differences in the crystallographic properties and water content of SN are such that different hydration/drying processes can alter the drug crystal form and thus the tabletability of the resulting granules. PMID:18398910

  11. 50 MHz–10 GHz Low-Power Resistive Feedback Current-Reuse Mixer with Inductive Peaking for Cognitive Radio Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    A low-power wideband mixer is designed and implemented in 0.13 µm standard CMOS technology based on resistive feedback current-reuse (RFCR) configuration for the application of cognitive radio receiver. The proposed RFCR architecture incorporates an inductive peaking technique to compensate for gain roll-off at high frequency while enhancing the bandwidth. A complementary current-reuse technique is used between transconductance and IF stages to boost the conversion gain without additional power consumption by reusing the DC bias current of the LO stage. This downconversion double-balanced mixer exhibits a high and flat conversion gain (CG) of 14.9 ± 1.4 dB and a noise figure (NF) better than 12.8 dB. The maximum input 1-dB compression point (P1dB) and maximum input third-order intercept point (IIP3) are −13.6 dBm and −4.5 dBm, respectively, over the desired frequency ranging from 50 MHz to 10 GHz. The proposed circuit operates down to a supply headroom of 1 V with a low-power consumption of 3.5 mW. PMID:25133252

  12. The Study of 0.34 THz Monolithically Integrated Fourth Subharmonic Mixer Using Planar Schottky Barrier Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiaodong; Li, Qian; An, Ning; Wang, Wenjie; Deng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Jianping; Li, Zhiqiang; Tang, Hailing; Xiong, Yong-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    A planar Schottky barrier diode with the designed Schottky contact area of approximately 3 μm2 is developed on gallium arsenide (GaAs) material. The measurements of the developed planar Schottky barrier diode indicate that the zero-biased junction capacitance Cj0 is 11.0 fF, the parasitic series resistance RS is 3.0 Ω, and the cut off frequency fT is 4.8 THz. A monolithically integrated fourth subharmonic mixer with this diode operating at the radio frequency (RF) signal frequency of 0.34 THz with the chip area of 0.6 mm2 is implemented. The intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth is from DC to 40 GHz. The local oscillator (LO) bandwidth is 37 GHz from 60 to 97 GHz. The RF bandwidth is determined by the bandwidth of the on chip antenna, which is 28 GHz from 322 to 350 GHz. The measurements of the mixer demonstrated a conversion loss of approximately 51 dB.

  13. Pesticide Safety for Non-Certified Mixers, Loaders and Applicators = Uso Seguro de Pesticidas para Mezcladores, Cargadores y Aplicadores no Certificados.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Bonnie; Fluker, Sam S.

    Written in English and Spanish and completely illustrated, this manual provides basic safety information for pesticide workers. Mixers, loaders, and applicators work with pesticides at their greatest strength and have the highest risk of poisoning. Understanding the pesticide label is the first step to pesticide safety. The words…

  14. Two- and three-dimensional modeling and optimization applied to the design of a fast hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic mixer for protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivorra, Benjamin; Redondo, Juana L.; Santiago, Juan G.; Ortigosa, Pilar M.; Ramos, Angel M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a design of a microfluidic mixer based on hydrodynamic focusing which is used to initiate the folding process (i.e., changes of the molecular structure) of a protein. The folding process is initiated by diluting (from 90% to 30%) the local denaturant concentration (initially 6 M GdCl solution) in a short time interval we refer to as mixing time. Our objective is to optimize this mixer by choosing suitable shape and flow conditions in order to minimize this mixing time. To this end, we first introduce a numerical model that enables computation of the mixing time of a mixer. This model is based on a finite element method approximation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the convective diffusion equation. To reduce the computational time, this model is implemented in both full three-dimensional (3D) and simplified two-dimensional (2D) versions; and we analyze the ability of the 2D model to approximate the mixing time predicted by the 3D model. We found that the 2D model approximates the mixing time predicted by the 3D model with a mean error of about 15%, which is considered reasonable. Then, we define a mixer optimization problem considering the 2D model and solve it using a hybrid global optimization algorithm. In particular, we consider geometrical variables and injection velocities as optimization parameters. We achieve a design with a predicted mixing time of 0.10 μs, approximately one order of magnitude faster than previous mixer designs. This improvement can be in part explained by the new mixer geometry including an angle of π/5 radians at the channel intersection and injections velocities of 5.2 m s-1 and 0.038 m s-1 for the side and central inlet channels, respectively. Finally, we verify the robustness of the optimized result by performing a sensitivity analysis of its parameters considering the 3D model. During this study, the optimized mixer was demonstrated to be robust by exhibiting mixing time variations of the same

  15. Full Navier-Stokes analysis of a two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle for noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debonis, James R.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional full Navier-Stokes (FNS) analysis was performed on a mixer/ejector nozzle designed to reduce the jet noise created at takeoff by a future supersonic transport. The PARC3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was used to study the flow field of the nozzle. The grid that was used in the analysis consisted of approximately 900,000 node points contained in eight grid blocks. Two nozzle configurations were studied: a constant area mixing section and a diverging mixing section. Data are presented for predictions of pressure, velocity, and total temperature distributions and for evaluations of internal performance and mixing effectiveness. The analysis provided good insight into the behavior of the flow.

  16. Idler-free microwave photonic mixer integrated with a widely tunable and highly selective microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Zheng, Xiaoping; Li, Shangyuan; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2014-07-01

    A novel structure consisting of an idler-free microwave photonic mixer integrated with a widely tunable and highly selective microwave photonic filter is presented, which is comprised of a spectrum-sliced broadband optical source, a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM), and a spatial light amplitude and phase processor (SLAPP). By adjusting the optical phase shift in the DPMZM, the dispersion-induced mixing power fading can be eliminated. By applying a phase processor with the SLAPP, the distortion of the mixing filter brought upon by third-order dispersion is also compensated. Experiments are performed and show that the up/down-conversion signal has a clean spectrum and the mixing filter can be tuned from 12 to 20 GHz without any change to the passband shape. The out-of-band suppression ratio of the mixing filter is more than 40 dB, and the 3 dB bandwidth is 140 MHz. PMID:24978780

  17. Further development of a method for computing three-dimensional subsonic viscous flows in turbofan lobe mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. J.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1983-01-01

    Procedure for computing subsonic, turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers was extended to allow consideration of flow fields in which a swirl component of velocity may be present. Additional, an optional k-lambda turbulence model was added to the procedure. The method of specifying the initial flow field was also modified, allowing parametric specification or radial secondary flow velocities, and making it possible to consider initial flow fields which have significant inlet secondary flow vorticity. A series of example calculations was performed which demonstrate the various capabilities of the modified code. These calculations demonstrate the effects of initial secondary flows of various magnitudes, the effects of swirl, and the effects of turbulence model on the mixing process. The results of these calculations indicate that the initial secondary flows, presumed to be generated within the lobes, play a dominant role in the mixing process, and that the predicted results are relatively insensitive to the turbulence model used.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  19. A 0.2-0.5 THz single-band heterodyne receiver based on a photonic local oscillator and a superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Maezawa, Masaaki; Furuta, Tomofumi; Wakatsuki, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Naofumi; Nagatsuma, Tadao; Kado, Yuichi

    2008-09-01

    We have demonstrated that a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer pumped by a photonic local oscillator (LO) covers the whole frequency range of 0.2-0.5THz. In the bandwidth of 74% of the center frequency, this single-band receiver exhibits noise temperature of TRX⩽20hf/kB, where h is Planck's constant, f is the frequency, and kB is Boltzmann's constant. Resultant TRX is almost equal to TRX of the identical SIS mixer pumped by three conventional frequency-multiplier-based LOs which share the 0.2-0.5THz band. This technique will contribute to simple, wide-band, and low-noise heterodyne receivers in the terahertz region.

  20. Combined Numerical/Analytical Perturbation Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Aerodynamic Ejector/Mixer Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    1998-01-01

    In spite of rapid advances in both scalar and parallel computational tools, the large number of variables involved in both design and inverse problems make the use of sophisticated fluid flow models impractical, With this restriction, it is concluded that an important family of methods for mathematical/computational development are reduced or approximate fluid flow models. In this study a combined perturbation/numerical modeling methodology is developed which provides a rigorously derived family of solutions. The mathematical model is computationally more efficient than classical boundary layer but provides important two-dimensional information not available using quasi-1-d approaches. An additional strength of the current methodology is its ability to locally predict static pressure fields in a manner analogous to more sophisticated parabolized Navier Stokes (PNS) formulations. To resolve singular behavior, the model utilizes classical analytical solution techniques. Hence, analytical methods have been combined with efficient numerical methods to yield an efficient hybrid fluid flow model. In particular, the main objective of this research has been to develop a system of analytical and numerical ejector/mixer nozzle models, which require minimal empirical input. A computer code, DREA Differential Reduced Ejector/mixer Analysis has been developed with the ability to run sufficiently fast so that it may be used either as a subroutine or called by an design optimization routine. Models are of direct use to the High Speed Civil Transport Program (a joint government/industry project seeking to develop an economically.viable U.S. commercial supersonic transport vehicle) and are currently being adopted by both NASA and industry. Experimental validation of these models is provided by comparison to results obtained from open literature and Limited Exclusive Right Distribution (LERD) sources, as well as dedicated experiments performed at Texas A&M. These experiments have

  1. Generation of microwaves by mixing two optical frequencies in a nonlinear crystal: a novel approach to high-bandwidth optical mixers.

    PubMed

    Tran, N H; Kachru, R; Gallagher, T F; Watjen, J P; Bjorklund, G C

    1984-04-01

    Optical mixing of waves separated in frequency by many gigahertz can be accomplished by allowing the waves to mix in a nonlinear medium to generate microwave difference frequencies. This basis for high-bandwidth optical mixers is demonstrated by mixing optical frequencies approximately 4 GHz apart of a pulsed dye-laser beam at approximately 660 nm in a LiTaO(3) crystal to produce readily detectable microwave power at approximately 4 GHz. PMID:19721519

  2. Incorporating Turbula mixers into a blending scale-up model for evaluating the effect of magnesium stearate on tablet tensile strength and bulk specific volume.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph

    2012-06-15

    Turbula bottle blenders are often used in lab-scale experiments during early-stage pharmaceutical product development. Unfortunately, applying knowledge gained with these blenders to larger-sized diffusion mixers is limited by the lack of blending models that include Turbula mixers. To address this need for lubrication blending scale-up, 2:1 blends of microcrystalline cellulose and spray-dried lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate were mixed with 1% magnesium stearate using Turbula bottle blenders, varying bottle volume, V (30-1250mL); bottle headspace fraction, F(headspace) (30-70%); and the number of blending cycles, r (24 to ∼190,000 cycles). The impact of lubrication blending on tensile strength and bulk specific volume quality attributes, QA, was modeled by:where QA(0) is initial QA value, β is sensitivity of QA to lubrication, γ is formulation-specific lubrication rate constant, and L is characteristic mixing length scale (i.e. 1.5V(1/3) for Turbula blenders, V(1/3) for simple diffusion mixers). The factor of 1.5 captures the bottle dimensions and the more complex mixing dynamics of the Turbula blender. This lubrication blending process model is valid for scale-up from 30-mL to 200-L blenders. Assessing bulk specific volume may provide a simpler, more material-sparing means for determining γ than tensile strength, since these QAs exhibited similar γ values. PMID:22405966

  3. Microfluidic mixer designed for performing single-molecule kinetics with confocal detection on timescales from milliseconds to minutes.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Bengt; Nettels, Daniel; Benke, Stephan; Clark, Jennifer; Weidner, Sascha; Hofmann, Hagen; Pfeil, Shawn H; Schuler, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Microfluidic mixing in combination with single-molecule spectroscopy allows the investigation of complex biomolecular processes under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we present a protocol for building, installing and operating microfluidic mixing devices optimized for this purpose. The mixer is fabricated by replica molding with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which allows the production of large numbers of devices at a low cost using a single microfabricated silicon mold. The design is based on hydrodynamic focusing combined with diffusive mixing and allows single-molecule kinetics to be recorded over five orders of magnitude in time, from 1 ms to ∼100 s. Owing to microfabricated particle filters incorporated in the inlet channels, the devices provide stable flow for many hours to days without channel blockage, which allows reliable collection of high-quality data. Modular design enables rapid exchange of samples and mixing devices, which are mounted in a specifically designed holder for use with a confocal microscopy detection system. Integrated Peltier elements provide temperature control from 4 to 37 °C. The protocol includes the fabrication of a silicon master, production of the microfluidic devices, instrumentation setup and data acquisition. Once a silicon master is available, devices can be produced and experiments started within ∼1 d of preparation. We demonstrate the performance of the system with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements of kinetics of protein folding and conformational changes. The dead time of 1 ms, as predicted from finite element calculations, was confirmed by the measurements. PMID:23845960

  4. Concurrent 2,4-D and triclopyr biomonitoring of backpack applicators, mixer/loader and field supervisor in forestry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Acevedo, Sandra; Chao, Yingfu; Chen, Zhenshan; Dinoff, Travis; Driver, Jeffrey; Ross, John; Williams, Ryan; Krieger, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two herbicides, 2,4-D and triclopyr esters (application ratio 1.6:1 acid equivalents) were applied as a tank mix by a crew of 8 backpack sprayer applicators, a mixer/loader, and a field supervisor. The crew was employed in a conifer release program in northern California during the summer of 2002. Biomonitoring (urine, 24 h) utilized 2,4-D and triclopyr (a.e.) as rapidly excreted exposure biomarkers. The absorbed dosages of 2,4-D and triclopyr were calculated based upon cotton whole body suits and biomonitoring. Dosages based upon accumulation of the herbicides on body suits averaged 42.6 μg (a.e.) 2,4-D/kg-d and 8.0 μg (a.e.) triclopyr/kg-d. Six consecutive days of concurrent urine collections showed that backpack applicators excreted an average of 11.0 μg (a.e.) 2,4-D/kg-d and 18.9 μg (a.e.) triclopyr/kg-d. Estimates based upon curve fitting were 17.1 and 29.3 μg (a.e.)/kg-d, respectively. Results suggest that passive dosimetry for 2,4-D consistently overestimated the dosage measured using biomonitoring by a factor of 2-3 fold, while for triclopyr, passive dosimetry underestimated the absorbed dose based on biomonitoring by a factor of 2-4 fold. PMID:21500074

  5. 0.8-5.2GHz Broad-Band SiGe-MMIC Quadrature Mixer for Software Defined Radio Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Keishi; Suematsu, Noriharu; Tsutsumi, Koji; Kanazawa, Gakushi; Sekine, Tomotsugu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Isota, Yoji

    For the next generation wireless terminals used in the software defined radio (SDR), multi-band / multi-mode transceivers and their MMIC are required which cover the wide RF frequency range from several hundreds MHz up to several GHz. In this paper, 0.8-5.2GHz broad-band SiGe-MMIC quadrature mixer (Q-MIX) for multi-band / multi-mode direct conversion receiver has been developed. By using a static type frequency divider as a 90 degrees local (LO) power divider, measured error vector magnitude (EVM) of less than 3.1% can be achieved in the cases of 0.8/2.1GHz W-CDMA and 5.2GHz wireless Local Area Network (LAN) (IEEE 802.11a) reception. This Q-MIX also shows broad-band characteristic for base-band signal and is applicable for 4G cellular. By using fabricated Q-MIX, a multi-band / multi-mode (1.9GHz (3rd generation cellular (W-CDMA)) / 5.2GHz (4th generation cellular (Multi-Carrier (MC)-CDMA))) receiver has been developed and it has firstly demonstrated the successful reception of motion picture via W-CDMA and MC-CDMA.

  6. Evaluation of dispersive mixing, extension rate and bubble size distribution using numerical simulation of a non-Newtonian fluid in a twin-screw mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Maureen L.

    Initially 3D FEM simulation of a simplified mixer was used to examine the effect of mixer configuration and operating conditions on dispersive mixing of a non-Newtonian fluid. Horizontal and vertical velocity magnitudes increased with increasing mixer speed, while maximum axial velocity and shear rate were greater with staggered paddles. In contrast, parallel paddles produced an area of efficient dispersive mixing between the center of the paddle and the barrel wall. This study was expanded to encompass the complete nine-paddle mixing section using power-law and Bird-Carreau fluid models. In the center of the mixer, simple shear flow was seen, corresponding with high [special character omitted]. Efficient dispersive mixing appeared near the barrel wall at all flow rates and near the barrel center with parallel paddles. Areas of backflow, improving fluid retention time, occurred with staggered paddles. The Bird-Carreau fluid showed greater influence of paddle motion under the same operating conditions due to the inelastic nature of the fluid. Shear-thinning behavior also resulted in greater maximum shear rate as shearing became easier with decreasing fluid viscosity. Shear rate distributions are frequently calculated, but extension rate calculations have not been made in a complex geometry since Debbaut and Crochet (1988) defined extension rate as the ratio of the third to the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. Extension rate was assumed to be negligible in most studies, but here extension rate is shown to be significant. It is possible to calculate maximum stable bubble diameter from capillary number if shear and extension rates in a flow field are known. Extension rate distributions were calculated for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. High extension and shear rates were found in the intermeshing region. Extension is the major influence on critical capillary number and maximum stable bubble diameter, but when extension rate values are low shear rate has

  7. Thermodynamic Vent System Test in a Low Earth Orbit Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A thermodynamic vent system for a cryogenic nitrogen tank was tested in a vacuum chamber simulating oxygen storage in low earth orbit. The nitrogen tank was surrounded by a cryo-shroud at -40 F. The tank was insulated with two layers of multi-layer insulation. Heat transfer into cryogenic tanks causes phase change and increases tank pressure which must be controlled. A thermodynamic vent system was used to control pressure as the location of vapor is unknown in low gravity and direct venting would be wasteful. The thermodynamic vent system consists of a Joule-Thomson valve and heat exchanger installed on the inlet side of the tank mixer-pump. The combination is used to extract thermal energy from the tank fluid, reducing temperature and ullage pressure. The system was sized so that the tank mixer-pump operated a small fraction of the time to limit motor heating. Initially the mixer used sub-cooled liquid to cool the liquid-vapor interface inducing condensation and pressure reduction. Later, the thermodynamic vent system was used. Pressure cycles were performed until steady-state operation was demonstrated. Three test runs were conducted at tank fills of 97, 80, and 63 percent. Each test was begun with a boil-off test to determine heat transfer into the tank. The lower tank fills had time averaged vent rates very close to steady-state boil-off rates showing the thermodynamic vent system was nearly as efficient as direct venting in normal gravity.

  8. System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Truitt, R.W.; Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O.

    1994-08-24

    This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

  9. Tests of alternative reductants in the second uranium purification cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.

    1980-05-01

    Miniature mixer-settler tests of the second uranium purification cycle show that plutonium cannot be removed by hydroxylamine-hydrazine (NH/sub 2/OH-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/) because the acidity is too high, or by 2,5-di-t-pentylhydroquinone because HNO/sub 3/ oxidizes the hydroquinone. Plutonium can be removed satisfactorily when U(IV)-hydrazine is used as the reductant.

  10. Waste receiving and processing module 2A mixing tests status report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.R.; Hull, K.J.

    1994-11-18

    The purpose of this report is to document the Phase II test conditions, observations, and results of this work. This report provides additional mixing performance test data and rheologic data that provide further indications that there are clear and distinct advantages in the preliminary choice of high-shear mixing alone, and high-shear dispersion in combination with, or followed by, a low-speed type mixer/stirrer for WRAP 2A facility design. Another objective was to determine if significant scale-up problems might exist in the various mix and mixer designs. In the later Phase 2 tests the test material quantities were significantly larger than in the Phase 1 tests.

  11. Chlorhexidine-calcium phosphate nanoparticles - Polymer mixer based wound healing cream and their applications.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Kaliyaperumal; Monisha, P; Srinivasan, M; Swathi, D; Raman, M; Dhinakar Raj, G

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we developed a wound healing cream composed of two different polymers, namely chitosan and gelatin with chlorhexidine along with calcium phosphate nanoparticles. The physicochemical properties of the prepared cream were investigated based on SEM, EDX, Raman, FTIR and the results indicated that the cream contained gelatin, chitosan, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and chlorhexidine. The maximum swelling ratio studies indicated that the ratio was around of 52±2.2 at pH7.4 and the value was increased in acidic and alkaline pH. The antimicrobial activity was tested against bacteria and the results indicated that, both chlorhexidine and the hybrid cream devoid of chlorhexidine exhibited antimicrobial activity but the chlorhexidine impregnated cream showed three fold higher antimicrobial activity than without chlorhexidine. In vivo wound healing promoting activities of hybrid cream containing 0.4mg/L chlorhexidine were evaluated on surgically induced dermal wounds in mice. The results indicated that the cream with incorporated chlorhexidine significantly enhanced healing compared with the control samples. For the field validations, the veterinary clinical animals were treated with the cream and showed enhanced healing capacity. In conclusion, a simple and efficient method for design of a novel wound healing cream has been developed for veterinary applications. PMID:27287150

  12. High-sweeping-speed optically synchronized dual-channel terahertz-signal generator for driving a superconducting tunneling mixer and its application to active gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyoung-Hwan; Shimizu, Naofumi; Kohjiro, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Wakatsuki, Atsushi; Kukutsu, Naoya; Kado, Yuichi

    2009-10-12

    We propose a high-sweeping-speed optically synchronized dual-channel terahertz (THz) signal generator for an active gas-sensing system with a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer. The generator can sweep a frequency range from 200 to 500 GHz at a speed of 375 GHz/s and a frequency resolution of 500 MHz. With the developed gas-sensing system, a gas-absorption-line measurement was successfully carried out with N(2)O gas in that frequency range. PMID:20372575

  13. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Component Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes and summarizes elements of the High Speed Research (HSR) Low Emissions Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) flame tube combustor test program. This test program was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center circa 1992. The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the RQL combustor concept for High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) applications with the goal of achieving NOx emission index levels of 5 g/kg-fuel at representative HSCT supersonic cruise conditions. The specific objectives of the tests reported herein were to investigate component performance of the RQL combustor concept for use in the evolution of ultra-low NOx combustor design tools. Test results indicated that the RQL combustor emissions and performance at simulated supersonic cruise conditions were predominantly sensitive to the quick mixer subcomponent performance and not sensitive to fuel injector performance. Test results also indicated the mixing section configuration employing a single row of circular holes was the lowest NOx mixer tested probably due to the initial fast mixing characteristics of this mixing section. However, other quick mix orifice configurations such as the slanted slot mixer produced substantially lower levels of carbon monoxide emissions most likely due to the enhanced circumferential dispersion of the air addition. Test results also suggested that an optimum momentum-flux ratio exists for a given quick mix configuration. This would cause undesirable jet under- or over-penetration for test conditions with momentum-flux ratios below or above the optimum value. Tests conducted to assess the effect of quick mix flow area indicated that reduction in the quick mix flow area produced lower NOx emissions at reduced residence time, but this had no effect on NOx emissions measured at similar residence time for the configurations tested.

  14. NASA VCE test bed engine aerodynamic performance characteristics and test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, M. W.; Allen, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Core Driven Fan Stage (CDFS) Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) has been identified as a leading candidate for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. A scale demonstrator version of this engine has been designed and tested. This testbed engine features a split fan with double bypass capability, variable forward and aft mixers, and a variable area low pressure turbine nozzle to permit exploration and optimization of the cycle in both single and double bypass modes. This paper presents the aerodynamic performance characteristics and experimental results obtained from both the core engine and full engine tests.

  15. Two-dimensional materials for novel electronic applications: The graphene mixer and TaS2 hyper-FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, Matthew J.

    iii Abstract First successfully isolated in 2004, graphene is a two-dimensional crystal comprised of a one-atom thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. Initial demonstrations of the exceptional material and electronic properties of graphene sparked a period of accelerated research and investigation into two-dimensional material systems and the unique properties they offer. During this period, there have been continuous breakthroughs with regard to isolation, growth, and characterization of two-dimensional systems, enabling the number of known two-dimensional and layered materials to rapidly expand. As the number of two-dimensional and layered material systems investigated increases, so too does the number of potential applications. Currently, there exist several fundamental questions as to the role these materials might play in future electronic applications. As an example, graphene has been suggested for use as the channel material in high frequency transistors due to its exceptionally high carrier mobility, but also as an interconnect for integrated circuits due to its excellent thermal properties and ability to support very high current densities. Furthermore, there exist several fundamental challenges to implementing graphene and other two dimensional materials in many of the proposed applications. For the case of graphene this includes high contact resistivities and the inability to control edge morphology in highly scaled geometries. This dissertation focuses specifically on the two-dimensional materials of graphene and tantalum di-sulfide in an attempt to elucidate some of the potential applications and challenges facing these two materials. It addresses several issues related to the development of a graphene based transistor for use in high frequency applications and the optimization of the graphene based transistor for mixing applications, including an analysis of graphene mixer design and the use of graphene nano-ribbon geometries to

  16. A novel microfluidic mixer-based approach for determining inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in chlorine solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boce; Luo, Yaguang; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Qin; Millner, Patricia D

    2015-08-01

    Determination of the minimum free chlorine concentration needed to prevent pathogen survival/cross-contamination during produce washing is essential for the development of science-based food safety regulations and practices. Although the trend of chlorine concentration-contact time on pathogen inactivation is generally understood, specific information on chlorine and the kinetics of pathogen inactivation at less than 1.00 s is urgently needed by the produce processing industry. However, conventional approaches to obtain this critical data have been unable to adequately measure very rapid responses. This paper reports our development, fabrication, and test of a novel microfluidic device, and its application to obtain the necessary data on pathogen inactivation by free chlorine in produce wash solution in times as short as 0.10 s. A novel microfluidic mixer with the capability to accurately determine the reaction time and control the chlorine concentration was designed with three inlets for bacterial, chlorine and dechlorinating solutions, and one outlet for effluent collection. The master mold was fabricated on a silicon wafer with microchannels via photopolymerization. Polydimethylsiloxane replicas with patterned microchannels were prototyped via soft lithography. The replicas were further assembled into the micromixer on glass via O2 plasma treatment, and the inlets were connected to a syringe pump for solution delivery. To determine the kinetics of free chlorine on pathogen inactivation, chlorine solutions of varying concentrations were first pumped into the micromixer, together with the addition of bacterial suspension of Escherichia coli O157:H7 through a separate inlet. This was followed by injection of dechlorinating solution to stop the chlorine-pathogen reaction. The effluent was collected and the surviving bacteria cells were enumerated using a modified 'Most Probable Number' method. Free chlorine concentration was determined using a standard colorimetric

  17. Rapid three-dimensional microfluidic mixer for high viscosity solutions to unravel earlier folding kinetics of G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Peng; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Rapid mixing of highly viscous solutions is a great challenge, which helps to analyze the reaction kinetics in viscous liquid phase, particularly to discover the folding kinetics of macromolecules under molecular crowding conditions mimicking the conditions inside cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel microfluidic mixer based on Dean flows with three-dimensional (3D) microchannel configuration for fast mixing of high-viscosity fluids. The main structure contained three consecutive subunits, each consisting of a "U"-type channel followed by a chamber with different width and height. Thus, the two solutions injected from the two inlets would undergo a mixing in the first "U"-type channel due to the Dean flow effect, and simultaneous vortices expansions in both horizontal and vertical directions in the following chamber. Numerical simulations and experimental characterizations confirmed that the micromixer could achieve a mixing time of 122.4μs for solutions with viscosities about 33.6 times that of pure water. It was the fastest micromixer for high viscosity solutions compared with previous reports. With this highly efficient 3D microfluidic mixer, we further characterized the early folding kinetics of human telomere G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions, and unravelled a new folding process within 550μs. PMID:26717836

  18. Variable mixer propulsion cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundell, D. J.; Mchugh, D. P.; Foster, T.; Brown, R. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A design technique, method and apparatus are delineated for controlling the bypass gas stream pressure and varying the bypass ratio of a mixed flow gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved performance. The disclosed embodiments each include a mixing device for combining the core and bypass gas streams. The variable area mixing device permits the static pressures of the core and bypass streams to be balanced prior to mixing at widely varying bypass stream pressure levels. The mixed flow gas turbine engine therefore operates efficiently over a wide range of bypass ratios and the dynamic pressure of the bypass stream is maintained at a level which will keep the engine inlet airflow matched to an optimum design level throughout a wide range of engine thrust settings.

  19. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  20. GMAG Jobs Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This event is open to the members of the magnetism community, especially postdocs and students, who are interested in jobs in industry, national labs, and academia, or have a job opportunity to offer. Refreshments will be served

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT, PERFORMANCE OF INDUCTION MIXERS FOR DISINFECTION OF WET WEATHER FLOWS, US FILTER/STRANCO PRODUCTS WATER CHAMP R F SERIES CHEMICAL INDUCTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wet-Weather Flow Technologies Pilot of the EPA's Technology Verification (ETV) Program under a partnership with NSF International has verified the performawnce of the USFilter/Stranco Products chemical induction mixer used for disinfection of wet-weather flows. The USFilter t...

  2. The beta-sheet to alpha-helix transition of beta-lactoglobulin monitored in real time with a microfabricated IR mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Ekkehard; Darton, Nick; Gerwert, Klaus; Austin, Robert

    2001-03-01

    The helix to sheet transition of proteins, a crucial step in amylogenic diseases, is investigated with a new diffusional IR mixer using time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy capable of 400 microsecond time resolution. We show that the beta to alpha transition of beta-lactoglobulin proceeds via a compact molten globule b-sheet intermediate with an unusually short lifetime of 7 ms. Because the protein does not have to unfold for the beta-sheet to alpha-helix transition the energy barrier seems to be unexpectedly low. The rough energy landscape of a protein includes not only the steep free energy funnel that guides the unfolded protein into its compact native state

  3. Full scale technology demonstration of a modern counterrotating unducted fan engine concept: Component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The UDF trademark (Unducted Fan) engine is a new aircraft engine concept based on an ungeared, counterrotating, unducted, ultra-high-bypass turbofan configuration. This engine is being developed to provide a high thrust-to-weight ratio powerplant with exceptional fuel efficiency for subsonic aircraft application. This report covers the testing of pertinent components of this engine such as the fan blades, control and actuation system, turbine blades and spools, seals, and mixer frame.

  4. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasibility of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Vasalos, I.A.; Tatterson, D.F.; Furlong, M.W.; Kowalski, T.L.; So, B.Y.C. )

    1992-06-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process was successfully tested in a 1.5 tons/day retort. A pilot plant previously used for catalytic cracking studies was modified for this purpose. The successful conversion of the existing pilot plant to a retort and the remarkably smooth startup and operation were attributed to the concurrent construction and operation of a full-scale cold flow model to test the design of solid feeders and a unique injector/mixer. Operation of the cold flow model over the range of anticipated pilot plant operating conditions provided pressure drop and solids hold data for the mixer. The process was based on rapid heating of small oil shale particles with a hot heat carrier. key to the process was the design of a mixer, of proprietary geometry, which effects rapid interparticle heat transfer, substantial retorting of oil shale, and rapid removal of the hydrocarbon vapors. Several tests were carried out showing that shale oil yields up to 110% of Fisher assay are feasible by using this unique process scheme. In this paper, data are presented showing the application of cold flow results in the interpretation of pilot plant data such as gas and liquid yields.

  5. Design and demonstration of ultra-fast W-band photonic transmitter-mixer and detectors for 25 Gbits/sec error-free wireless linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-Wei; Shi, Jin-Wei; Tsai, Hsuan-Ju; Wun, Jhih-Min; Kuo, Fong-Ming; Hesler, Jeffery; Crowe, Thomas W; Bowers, John E

    2012-09-10

    A 25 Gbits/s error-free on-off-keying (OOK) wireless link between an ultra high-speed W-band photonic transmitter-mixer (PTM) and a fast W-band envelope detector is demonstrated. At the transmission end, the high-speed PTM is developed with an active near-ballistic uni-traveling carrier photodiode (NBUTC-PD) integrated with broadband front-end circuitry via the flip-chip bonding technique. Compared to our previous work, the wireless data rate is significantly increased through the improvement on the bandwidth of the front-end circuitry together with the reduction of the intermediate-frequency (IF) driving voltage of the active NBUTC-PD. The demonstrated PTM has a record-wide IF modulation (DC-25 GHz) and optical-to-electrical fractional bandwidths (68-128 GHz, ~67%). At the receiver end, the demodulation is realized with an ultra-fast W-band envelope detector built with a zero-bias Schottky barrier diode with a record wide video bandwidth (37 GHz) and excellent sensitivity. The demonstrated PTM is expected to find applications in multi-gigabit short-range wireless communication. PMID:23037246

  6. Altitude test of several afterburner configurations on a turbofan engine with a hydrogen heater to simulate an elevated turbine discharge temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R. L.; Cullom, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    A performance test of several experimental afterburner configurations was conducted with a mixed-flow turbofan engine in an altitude facility. The simulated flight conditions were for Mach 1.4 at two altitudes, 12,190 and 14,630 meters. Turbine discharge temperatures of 889 and 1056 K were used. A production afterburner was tested for comparison. The research afterburners included partial forced mixers with V-gutter flameholders, a carburetted V-gutter flameholder, and a triple ring V-gutter flameholder with four swirl-can fuel mixers. Fuel injection variations were included. Performance data shown include augmented thrust ratio, thrust specific fuel consumption, combustion efficiency, and total pressure drop across the afterburner.

  7. Testing the Effects of Helium Pressurant on Thermodynamic Vent System Performance with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.; Tucker, S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the development of a zero gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of helium pressurant on the performance of a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). Fourteen days of testing was performed in August - September 2005, with an ambient heat leak of about 70-80 watts and tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. The TVS successfully controlled the tank pressure within a +/- 3.45 kPa (+/- 0.5 psi) band with various helium concentration levels in the ullage. Relative to pressure control with an "all hydrogen" ullage, the helium presence resulted in 10 to 30 per cent longer pressure reduction durations, depending on the fill level, during the mixing/venting phase of the control cycle. Additionally, the automated control cycle was based on mixing alone for pressure reduction until the pressure versus time slope became positive, at which time the Joule-Thomson vent was opened. Testing was also conducted to evaluate thermodynamic venting without the mixer operating, first with liquid then with vapor at the recirculation line inlet. Although ullage stratification was present, the ullage pressure was successfully controlled without the mixer operating. Thus, if vapor surrounded the pump inlet in a reduced gravity situation, the ullage pressure can still be controlled by venting through the TVS Joule Thomson valve and heat exchanger. It was evident that the spray bar configuration, which extends almost the entire length of the tank, enabled significant thermal energy removal from the ullage even without the mixer operating. Details regarding the test setup and procedures are presented in the paper. 1

  8. High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Smith, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA High-Speed Research program developed the High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) program to demonstrate satisfactory interaction between the jet noise suppressor and high-lift system of a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration at takeoff, climb, approach and landing conditions. One scheme for reducing jet exhaust noise generated by an HSCT is the use of a mixer-ejector system which would entrain large quantities of ambient air into the nozzle exhaust flow through secondary inlets in order to cool and slow the jet exhaust before it exits the nozzle. The effectiveness of such a noise suppression device must be evaluated in the presence of an HSCT wing high-lift system before definitive assessments can be made concerning its acoustic performance. In addition, these noise suppressors must provide the required acoustic attenuation while not degrading the thrust efficiency of the propulsion system or the aerodynamic performance of the high-lift devices on the wing. Therefore, the main objective of the HEAT program is to demonstrate these technologies and understand their interactions on a large-scale HSCT model. The HEAT program is a collaborative effort between NASA-Ames, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Douglas Aircraft Corp., Lockheed-Georgia, General Electric and NASA - Lewis. The suppressor nozzles used in the tests were Generation 1 2-D mixer-ejector nozzles made by General Electric. The model used was a 13.5%-scale semi-span model of a Boeing Reference H configuration.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) driven droplet mixer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Miles, Robin R.

    2004-05-11

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system mixes a first substance and a second substance. A first substrate section includes a first flow channel and a first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the first flow channel. A second substrate section includes a second flow channel and a second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the second flow channel. A third substrate section includes a third flow channel and a third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the third flow channel. A magnetic section and a control section are operatively connected to the spaced electrodes. The first substrate section, the second substrate section, the third substrate section, the first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the magnetic section, and the control section are operated to move the first substance through the first flow channel, the second substance through the second flow channel, and both the first substance and the second substance into the third flow channel where they are mixed.

  10. Electrokinetic micro-fluid mixer

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for efficiently and rapidly mixing liquids in a system operating in the creeping flow regime such as would be encountered in capillary-based systems. By applying an electric field to each liquid, the present invention is capable of mixing together fluid streams in capillary-based systems, where mechanical or turbulent stirring cannot be used, to produce a homogeneous liquid.

  11. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  12. Monolithic microfluidic concentrators and mixers

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M.; Svec, Frantisek; Yu, Cong; Rohr, Thomas

    2005-05-03

    Microfluidic devices comprising porous monolithic polymer for concentration, extraction or mixing of fluids. A method for in situ preparation of monolithic polymers by in situ initiated polymerization of polymer precursors within microchannels of a microfluidic device and their use for solid phase extraction (SPE), preconcentration, concentration and mixing.

  13. TEST PLAN CHARACTERIZATION OF JET FORCES UPON WASTE TANK COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in double-shell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. This test plan describes scaled experiments designed to characterize the velocity profiles of a near floor jet and to quantify the impact farces and drag coefficients of three tank components: radiation dry well, airlift circulator, and steam coil. The experiments will be conducted in water, at approximately 1/6-scale, using one stationary nozzle to simulate the jet. To measure and confirm the velocity profile of the free, submerged jet, the horizontal and vertical velocity profiles will be measured at several distances from the nozzle. The profile will also be measured after the jet impinges upon the tank floor to determine the·extent of the change in the profile caused by impingement. The jet forces upon the test articles will be measured at a maximum of four velocities and a variety of test article orientations. Each orientation will represent a unique position of the test article relative to the jet and the tank floor. In addition, the steam coil will be tested in three rotational orientations because it is not symmetric. The highest jet velocity will be selected so that the Reynolds number of the test article in the model will match that of the prototype when operating at design conditions. The forces measured upon the model components will be used to calculate the force on the prototype components using geometric scaling factors. In addition, the model force measurements will be used to calculate the component's drag coefficient as a function of the component Reynolds number.

  14. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  15. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  16. Dewatering Treatment Scale-up Testing Results of Hanford Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, A.R.; May, T.H.; Bryan, W.E.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process. (authors)

  17. DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-01-23

    This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

  18. ELAWD GROUT HOPPER MOCK-UP TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Pickenheim, B.; Hansen, E.; Leishear, R.; Marzolf, A.; Reigel, M.

    2011-10-27

    A 10-inch READCO mixer is used for mixing the premix (45 (wt%) fly ash, 45 wt% slag, and 10 wt% portland cement) with salt solution in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The Saltstone grout free falls into the grout hopper which feeds the suction line leading to the Watson SPX 100 duplex hose pump. The Watson SPX 100 pumps the grout through approximately 1500 feet of piping prior to being discharged into the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The existing grout hopper has been identified by the Saltstone Enhanced Low Activity Waste Disposal (ELAWD) project for re-design. The current nominal working volume of this hopper is 12 gallons and does not permit handling an inadvertent addition of excess dry feeds. Saltstone Engineering has proposed a new hopper tank that will have a nominal working volume of 300 gallons and is agitated with a mechanical agitator. The larger volume hopper is designed to handle variability in the output of the READCO mixer and process upsets without entering set back during processing. The objectives of this task involve scaling the proposed hopper design and testing the scaled hopper for the following processing issues: (1) The effect of agitation on radar measurement. Formation of a vortex may affect the ability to accurately measure the tank level. The agitator was run at varying speeds and with varying grout viscosities to determine what parameters cause vortex formation and whether measurement accuracy is affected. (2) A dry feeds over addition. Engineering Calculating X-ESR-Z-00017 1 showed that an additional 300 pounds of dry premix added to a 300 gallon working volume would lower the water to premix ratio (W/P) from the nominal 0.60 to 0.53 based on a Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant. A grout with a W/P of 0.53 represents the upper bound of grout rheology that could be processed at the facility. A scaled amount of dry feeds will be added into the hopper to verify that this is a recoverable situation

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility hot test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    Prior to initial operation with radioactive feed or ``hot`` operation, the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal (LET&D) Facility underwent extensive testing. This report provides a detailed description and analysis of this testing. Testing has determined that LET&D is capable of processing radioactive solutions between the design flowrates of 275 gph to 550 gph. Modifications made to prevent condensation on the off-gas HEPA filters, to the process vacuum control, bottoms cooler rupture disks, and feed control system operation were successful. Unfortunately, two mixers failed prior to ``hot`` testing due to manufacturer`s error which limited operation of the PEW Evaporator System and sampling was not able to prove that design removal efficiencies for Mercury, Cadmium, Plutonium, and Non-Volatile Radionuclides.

  20. Chlamydia Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amplification Test (NAAT); Chlamydia trachomatis Culture; Chlamydia trachomatis DNA Probe Related tests: Gonorrhea Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  1. What State Tests Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Glenn W.

    What the Illinois Goal Assessment Program (IGAP) test actually tests and the consequences of these tests for funding decisions were studied with a random sample of 100 school districts in the Cook County suburbs of Chicago. Eighth-grade IGAP scores for reading were obtained from the state report card, a document prepared by each school district…

  2. Gonorrhea Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gonorrhoeae Culture; Neisseria gonorrhoeae Gram Stain; Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA Probe Related tests: Chlamydia Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  3. Results of an Advanced Development Zero Boil-Off Cryogenic Propellant Storage Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David

    2004-01-01

    A zero boil-off (ZBO) cryogenic propellant storage concept was recently tested in a thermally relevant low-earth orbit environment, an important development in the effort to apply this concept to flight projects. Previous efforts documented the benefits of ZBO for launch vehicle upper stages in a low-earth orbit (LEO). Central to that analysis is a ZBO Cryogenic Analysis Tool that estimates the performance of each component and the ZBO system. This test is essential to the validation of that tool, and was the first flight representative configuration tested in a thermally representative environment. The test article was comprised of a spherical 1.4 m diameter insulated propellant tank, with a submerged mixer, a cryogenic heat pipe, flight design cryocooler, and a radiator. All were enclosed in a thermal shroud and inserted into and tested in a vacuum chamber that simulated an LEO thermal environment. Thermal and pressure control tests were performed at sub-critical LN2 temperatures and approximately 2 atmospheres pressure. The cold side of the ZBO system performed well. In particular, the heat pipe performed better than expected, which suggests that the cryocooler could be located further from the tank than anticipated, i.e. on a spacecraft bus, while maintaining the desired efficiency. Also, the mixer added less heat than expected. The tank heating rate through the insulation was higher than expected; also the temperatures on the cryocooler hot side were higher than planned. This precluded the cryocooler from eliminating the boil-off. The results show the cryocooler was successful at removing 6.8 W of heat at approximately 75 K and 150 W of input power, with a heat rejection temperature of 311 K. The data generated on the ZBO components is essential for the upgrade of the ZBO Cryogenic Analysis Tool to more accurately apply the concept to future missions.

  4. Testing the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The author, an English professor, shares his experience in retaking the Graduate Record Examination in English literature, 25 years after he entered graduate school at the University of Virginia. He took the practice test instead of the "real" test, for a number of reasons. He wanted to be able to look over the questions afterward; to see what…

  5. Test Architecture, Test Retrofit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

  6. An integrated practical implementation of continuous aqueous two-phase systems for the recovery of human IgG: From the microdevice to a multistage bench-scale mixer-settler device.

    PubMed

    Espitia-Saloma, Edith; Vâzquez-Villegas, Patricia; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Aguilar, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) are a liquid-liquid extraction technology with clear process benefits; however, its lack of industrial embracement is still a challenge to overcome. Antibodies are a potential product to be recovered by ATPS in a commercial context. The objective of this work is to present a more integral approach of the different isolated strategies that have arisen in order to enable a practical, generic implementation of ATPS, using human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as experimental model. A microfluidic device is used for ATPS parameters preselection for product recovery. ATPS were continuously operated in a mixer-settler device in one stage, multistage and multistage with recirculation configuration. Single-stage pure IgG extraction with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350-phophates ATPS within continuous operation allowed a 65% recovery. Further implementation of a multistage platform promoted a higher particle partitioning reaching a 90% recovery. The processing of IgG from a cell supernatant culture harvest in a multistage system with top phase recirculation resulted in 78% IgG recovery in bottom phase. This work conjugates three not widely spread methodologies for ATPS: microfluidics, continuous and multistage operation. PMID:26848821

  7. The Brain As a Mixer, I. Preliminary Literature Review: Auditory Integration. Studies in Language and Language Behavior, Progress Report Number VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmel, Melvyn I.; And Others

    Methods to evaluate central hearing deficiencies and to localize brain damage are reviewed beginning with Bocca who showed that patients with temporal lobe tumors made significantly lower discrimination scores in the ear opposite the tumor when speech signals were distorted. Tests were devised to attempt to pinpoint brain damage on the basis of…

  8. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; ...

  9. Pilot-scale decontamination solution test results HGTP-93-0702-02

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Allen, R.P.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1993-05-01

    Decontamination solution testing constitutes a task of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The HGTP provides technical support to the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Grout Disposal Program. Cementitious grout has been identified as the waste form for low-level radioactive waste. Grout processing equipment, including mixers, pumps, and piping, will require periodic maintenance. Decontamination of components is needed to reduce radiation dose to maintenance workers. The purpose of this work was to develop and test methods for decontaminating grout processing equipment. The proposed method of decontamination is to use a mild chemical solution, such as a 6 N citric acid to dissolve the grout. The method should effectively remove grout without causing degradation of grout processing equipment.

  10. Schirmer test

    MedlinePlus

    Tear test; Tearing test; Dry eye test; Basal secretion test; Sjögren - Schirmer; Schirmer's test ... used when the eye doctor suspects you have dry eye. Symptoms include dryness of the eyes or excessive ...

  11. Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Prenatal tests Prenatal tests E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... if you’re feeling fine. What are prenatal tests? Prenatal tests are medical tests you get during ...

  12. Pinworm test

    MedlinePlus

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... to determine if there are eggs. The tape test may need to be done on 3 separate ...

  13. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  14. Predictive Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary care providers Specialists Getting covered Research Basic science research Research in people ... screening Diagnostic testing Direct-to-consumer genetic testing Newborn screening Pharmacogenomic testing ...

  15. Coombs test

    MedlinePlus

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are two types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  16. VDRL test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The VDRL test is a screening test for syphilis. It measures substances (proteins), called antibodies, that your ... come in contact with the bacteria that cause syphilis. How the Test is Performed The test is ...

  17. Coombs test

    MedlinePlus

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test; Anemia - hemolytic ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are 2 types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The direct ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  18. Trichomonas Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginalis by Amplified Detection; Trichomonas vaginalis by Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA) Related tests: Pap Smear , Chlamydia Testing , ... and men. Other methods. These include the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test and a test that detects ...

  19. CFD simulation and experimental analysis of erosion in a slurry tank test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimian, Mehdi; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Erosion occurring in equipment dealing with liquid-solid mixtures such as pipeline parts, slurry pumps, liquid-solid stirred reactors and slurry mixers in various industrial applications results in operational failure and economic costs. A slurry erosion tank test rig is designed and was built to investigate the erosion rates of materials and the influencing parameters such as flow velocity and turbulence, flow angle, solid particle concentration, particles size distribution, hardness and target material properties on the material loss and erosion profiles. In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool is used to simulate the erosion rate of sample plates in the liquid-solid slurry mixture in a cylindrical tank. The predictions were made in a steady state and also transient manner, applying the flow at the room temperature and using water and sand as liquid and solid phases, respectively. The multiple reference frame method (MRF) is applied to simulate the flow behavior and liquid-solid interactions in the slurry tank test rig. The MRF method is used since it is less demanding than sliding mesh method (SM) and gives satisfactory results. The computational domain is divided into three regions: a rotational or MRF zone containing the mixer, a rotational zone (MRF) containing the erosion plates and a static zone (outer liquid zone). It is observed that changing the MRF zone diameter and height causes a very low impact on the results. The simulated results were obtained for two kinds of hard metals namely stainless steel and ST-50 under some various operating conditions and are found in good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Research in millimeter wave techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Subharmonically pumped mixers were ascended and tested. A computerized version of the automatic noise figure measurement system was developed. Impedance matching techniques suitable for these types of mixers were investigated. Narrow and broadband (one octave) matching networks for the subharmonic mixers were designed. The automatic mixer noise figure test facility was completed. Subharmonic mixers and the systems that use them at 183 and 220 GHz were evaluated and characterized.

  1. Test Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedrick, Wanda B., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    There's accountability and then there's the testing craze an iatrogenic practice that undermines real learning. Hedrick documents the negative effects of testing, giving teachers another weapon in their arsenal against mindless preparation for high-stakes tests.

  2. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Thyroid Tests Page Content On this page: What is the ... Top ] Why do health care providers perform thyroid tests? Health care providers perform thyroid tests to assess ...

  3. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests measure a specific functioning ability and may not accurately ... any intelligence test may be culturally biased. The more widely ...

  4. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  5. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  6. Pap Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pap Test Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1454x1326 View Download Large: 2908x2652 View Download Title: Pap Test Description: Pap test; drawing shows a side ...

  7. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    IQ (intelligence quotient) testing is a series of exams used to determine your general intelligence in relation ... Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests ...

  8. Initial ACTR retrieval technology evaluation test material recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.

    1996-04-01

    Millions of gallons of radiaoctive waste are contained in underground storage tanks at Hanford (SE Washington). Techniques for retrieving much of this waste from the storage tanks have been developed. Current baseline approach is to use sluice jets for single-shell tanks and mixer pumps for double-shell tanks. The Acquire Commercial Technology for Retrieval (ACTR) effort was initiated to identify potential improvements in or alternatives to the baseline waste retrieval methods. Communications with a variety of vendors are underway to identify improved methods that can be implemented at Hanford with little or no additional development. Commercially available retrieval methods will be evaluated by a combination of testing and system-level cost estimation. Current progress toward developing waste simulants for testing ACTR candidate methods is reported; the simulants are designed to model 4 different types of tank waste. Simulant recipes are given for wet sludge, hardpan/dried sludge,hard saltcake, and soft saltcake. Comparisons of the waste and simulant properties are documented in this report.

  9. Experience and Operational Improvements, Mixer Pump Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Mullen, O Dennis; Kellogg, Michael I.

    2002-03-20

    Millions of gallons of radioactive waste are stored in large underground tanks at DOE sites. The waste is made up of settled solids, in sludge form, at the bottom of the tank and a layer of supernatant liquid on top of it. It is necessary to mix the solids in the sludge layer with the supernatant liquid to facilitate their removal from the storage tanks for remediation. Our goal is to improve the mobilization of the settled solids by optimizing mixing with the supernatant liquid and preserving the mobility of the solids. This report investigates whether time-phase separation between pump head oscillations affects overall sludge mobilization. If a mixing jet from one pump happens to follow temporarily the path of the lead mixing jet, it may be possible to prevent or slow down the resettling of the heavy solid particles, maintaining them in suspension. If a retrieval pump were operating at the same time, it could facilitate removal of such particles. Preliminary experiments were carried out to observe whether time-phase separation has some influence on the overall mobilization. A brief account is presented of the successful mobilization and removal of most of the radioactive waste from Tank D8-2 at the West Valley Demonstration Project using time-phase separation techniques.

  10. A mixer design for the pigtail braid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, B. J.; Cox, S. M.

    2008-01-01

    The stirring of a body of viscous fluid using multiple stirring rods is known to be particularly effective when the rods trace out a path corresponding to a nontrivial mathematical braid. The optimal braid is the so-called "pigtail braid", in which three stirring rods execute the usual "over-under" motion associated with braiding (plaiting) hair. We show how to achieve this optimal braiding motion straightforwardly: one stirring rod is driven in a figure-of-eight motion, while the other two rods are baffles, which rotate episodically about their common centre. We also explore the extent to which the physical baffles may be replaced by flow structures (such as periodic islands).

  11. 7 CFR 58.515 - Mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION,...

  12. Suspension flow: do particles act as mixers?

    PubMed

    Boschan, A; Aguirre, M A; Gauthier, G

    2015-05-01

    Recently, Roht et al. [J. Contam. Hydrol., 2013, 145, 10-16] observed that the presence of suspended non-Brownian macroscopic particles decreased the dispersivity of a passive solute, for a pressure-driven flow in a narrow parallel-plate channel at low Reynolds numbers. This result contradicts the idea that the streamline distortion caused by the random diffusive motion of the particles increases the dispersion and mixing of the solute. Therefore, to estimate the influence of this motion on the dispersivity of the solute, and investigate the origin of the reported decrease, we experimentally studied the probability density function (pdf) of the particle velocities, and spatio-temporal correlations, in the same experimental configuration. We observed that, as the mean suspension velocity exceeds a critical value, the pdf of the streamwise velocity of the particles markedly changes from a symmetric distribution to an asymmetric one strongly skewed to high velocities and with a peak of the most probable velocity close to the maximum velocity. The latter observations and the analysis of the suspension microstructure indicate that the observed decrease in the dispersivity of the solute is due to particle migration to the mid-plane of the channel, and consequent flattening of the velocity profile. Moreover, we estimated the contribution of particle diffusive motion to the solute dispersivity to be three orders of magnitude smaller than the reported decrease, and thus negligible. Solute dispersion is then much more affected by how particles modify the flow velocity profile across the channel than by their random diffusive motion. PMID:25809584

  13. Testing Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Trace Laboratories is an independent testing laboratory specializing in testing printed circuit boards, automotive products and military hardware. Technical information from NASA Tech Briefs and two subsequent JPL Technical Support packages have assisted Trace in testing surface insulation resistance on printed circuit board materials. Testing time was reduced and customer service was improved because of Jet Propulsion Laboratory technical support packages.

  14. RSV Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be ... this page helpful? Formal name: Respiratory Syncytial Virus Related tests: Influenza Tests , Pertussis Tests , Strep Test , Mycoplasma At ...

  15. Certification Testing

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Wind turbine certification is becoming increasingly important for companies competing in the international marketplace. In support of the U.S. wind energy industry, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) now offers testing services at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) that lead to wind turbine certification. This document describes available testing capabilities offered at NWTC. Performance testing, Noise emissions testing, blade structural testing are discussed. Efforts to integrate turbine design and certification are presented.

  16. Workplace Testing: Who's Testing Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Eric Rolfe

    1989-01-01

    A survey conducted by the American Management Association on workplace-testing policies included questions about drug testing, polygraphs, and testing for the human immunodeficiency virus. The survey found that testing increased from 21 percent in 1986 to 37 percent in 1987 and 48 percent in the 1988 survey. (JOW)

  17. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lee, Kearn P.; Kelly, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  18. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2013-09-18

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  19. Net Test

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-09-01

    Nettest is a secure, real-time network utility. The nettest framework is designed to incorporate existing and new network tests, and be run as a daemon or an interactive process. Requests for network tests are received via a SSL connection or the user interface and are authorized using a ACL list (in the future authorization using Akenti will also be supported). For tests that require coordination between the two ends of the test, Nettest establishes anmore » SSL connection to accomplish this coordination. A test between two remote computers can be requested via the user interlace if the Nettest daemon is running on both remote machines and the user is authorized. Authorization for the test is through a chain of trust estabtished by the nettest daemons. Nettest is responsible for determining if the test request is authorized, but it does nothing further to secure the test once the test is running. Currently the Nettest framework incorporates lperf-vl.2, a simple ping type test, and a tuned TCP test that uses a given required throughput and ping results to determine the round trip time to set a buffer size (based on the delay bandwidth product) and then performs an iperf TCP throughput test. Additional network test tools can be integrated into the Nettest framework in the future.« less

  20. Pertussis Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Whooping Cough Tests Formal name: Bordetella pertussis Culture; Bordetella pertussis by PCR; Bordetella pertussis Antibodies (IgA, ... outbreak, at least one case be confirmed using culture. Culture – this test was the "gold standard" for ...

  1. HPV Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test for wider range of HPV types. 2009 Mar 13. US Food and Drug Administration. Available online ... approves two DNA tests to detect HPV. 2009 Mar 17. Infectious Disease News. Available online at http:// ...

  2. Bilirubin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test in conjunction with other laboratory tests ( alkaline phosphatase , aspartate aminotransferase , alanine aminotransferase ) when someone shows signs ... Gilbert syndrome, due to low levels of the enzyme that produces conjugated bilirubin If conjugated (direct) bilirubin ...

  3. Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests are considered routine — that is, almost all pregnant women receiving prenatal care get them. They include things like checking urine levels for protein, sugar, or signs of infection. Other non- routine tests are recommended only for ...

  4. Tensilon test

    MedlinePlus

    ... dummy medicine (inactive placebo) is given during this test. The health care provider gives the medicine through one of your ... fainting or breathing failure. This is why the test is done by a health care provider in a medical setting.

  5. Procalcitonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests: C-Reactive Protein , Complete Blood Count , Blood Culture , CSF Analysis ... test is relatively new, but its utilization is increasing. Recent studies have shown that it has promise in helping ...

  6. Kidney Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney tests check to see how well your kidneys are working. They include blood, urine, and imaging tests. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs ...

  7. Malnutrition Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Malnutrition Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | Symptoms | Tests | Treatment | Related Pages Tests Malnutrition will often be noticeable to the doctor's trained ...

  8. Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... insipidus , and hypothyroidism . Edema can result in a false-negative result. The sweat chloride test should only ... kind of testing. Otherwise, problems in accuracy, including false negatives due to poor collection technique, can arise. ^ ...

  9. Magnesium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mg; Mag Formal name: Magnesium Related tests: Calcium , Potassium , Phosphorus , PTH , Vitamin D At a Glance Test ... can, over time, cause persistently low calcium and potassium levels, it may be checked to help diagnose ...

  10. Tensilon test

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis-tensilon ... Tensilon tests to help tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other conditions. ... The test helps: Diagnose myasthenia gravis Tell the difference between ... conditions Monitor treatment with oral anticholinesterase ...

  11. Electrolytes Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... include other tests such as BUN , creatinine , and glucose . Electrolyte measurements may be used to help investigate conditions that cause electrolyte imbalances such as dehydration , kidney disease , lung diseases , or heart conditions . Repeat testing may then ...

  12. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pituitary decreases TSH production. [ Top ] Why do health care providers perform thyroid tests? Health care providers perform ... Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism . [ Top ] What blood tests do health care providers use to check a person’s thyroid function? ...

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  14. Pap test

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have for cervical cancer. For minor cell changes, doctors will recommend another Pap test in 6 to 12 months. Follow-up testing may include: Colposcopy-directed biopsy An HPV test to check for the presence of the HPV virus types most likely to cause cancer

  15. Schilling test

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin B12 absorption test ... This test may be done in four different stages to find the cause of a low vitamin B12 level. ... can absorb vitamin B12. Stage II of the test can tell whether a low vitamin B12 level ...

  16. Allergy Testing.

    PubMed

    Tourlas, Konstantinos; Burman, Deepa

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases are common in outpatient primary care. Allergy testing can guide management to determine allergy as a cause of symptoms and target therapeutic interventions. This article provides a review of common methods of allergy testing available so that physicians may counsel and refer patients appropriately. Immediate-type hypersensitivity skin tests can be used for airborne allergens, foods, insect stings, and penicillin. Radioallergosorbent testing can be used to evaluate immediate-type hypersensitivity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity or patch-type skin tests are used in patients with suspected contact dermatitis. PMID:27545728

  17. Design of a Mach-3 Nozzle for TBCC Testing in the NASA LaRC 8-ft High Temperature Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, Richard L., Jr.; Norris, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    A new nozzle is being constructed for the NASA Langley Research Center 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel. The axisymmetric nozzle was designed with a Mach-3 exit flow for testing Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle engines at a Mach number in the vicinity of the transition from turbojet to ramjet operation. The nozzle contour was designed using the NASA Langley IMOCND computer program which solves the potential equation using the classical method of characteristics. To include viscous effects, the design procedure iterated the MOC contour generation with CFD Navier-Stokes calculations, adjusting MOC input parameters until target nozzle-exit conditions were achieved in the Navier-Stokes calculations. The design process was complicated by a requirement to use the final 29.5 inches of an existing 54.5-inch exit-diameter Mach-5 nozzle contour. This was accomplished by generating a Mach-3 contour that matched the radius of the Mach-5 contour at the match point and using a 3rd order polynomial to create a smooth transition between the two contours. During the final evaluation of the design it was realized that the throat diameter is more than half that of the upstream mixing chamber. This led to the concern that large vortical structures generated in the mixer would persist downstream, affecting nozzle-exit flow. This concern was addressed by analyzing the results of three-dimensional, viscous, numerical simulations of the entire flowfield, from the exit of the facility combustor to the nozzle exit. An analysis of the solution indicated that large scale structures do not pass through the throat and that both the total temperature and species (CO2) are well mixed in the mixer, providing uniform flow to the nozzle and subsequently the test cabin.

  18. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  19. Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

  20. Fiscal year 1994 1/25-scale sludge mobilization testing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Gates, C.M.; Hymas, C.R.; Sprecher, M.A.; Morter, N.J.

    1995-07-01

    There are 28 one-million-gallon double-shell radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Reservation in southeastern Washington State. The waste in these tanks was generated during processing of nuclear materials. Solids-laden slurries were placed into many of the tanks. Over time, the waste solids have settled to form a layer of sludge in the bottom of these tanks. The sludge layer thickness varies from tank to tank with some having only a few centimeters or no sludge up to some tanks which have about 4.5 m (15 ft) of sludge. It is planned that the waste will be removed from these tanks as part of the overall Hanford site cleanup efforts. Jet mixer pumps are to be placed into the tanks to stir up (mobilize) the sludge and form a uniform slurry suitable for pumping to downstream processing facilities. These mixer pumps use powerful jets of tank fluid directed horizontally out of two, diametrically opposed nozzles near the tank bottom. These fluid jets impinge upon the sludge and stir it up. The amount of sludge mobilized by the mixer pump jets depends not only on the jet properties, but also on the ability of the sludge to resist the jets. It is the goal of the work described in this document to develop the ability to predict how much sludge will be mobilized by the mixer pumps based on the size and velocity of the mixer pump jets and the physical and chemical properties of the tank sludge.