Science.gov

Sample records for mixtures involving blowing

  1. Paternity testing that involves a DNA mixture.

    PubMed

    Mortera, Julia; Vecchiotti, Carla; Zoppis, Silvia; Merigioli, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Here we analyse a complex disputed paternity case, where the DNA of the putative father was extracted from his corpse that had been inhumed for over 20 years. This DNA was contaminated and appears to be a mixture of at least two individuals. Furthermore, the mother's DNA was not available. The DNA mixture was analysed so as to predict the most probable genotypes of each contributor. The major contributor's profile was then used to compute the likelihood ratio for paternity. We also show how to take into account a dropout allele and the possibility of mutation in paternity testing. PMID:27017109

  2. Blowing up the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond

    2006-10-01

    An occasional theme in science fiction involves blowing up a planet. In ``Star Wars,'' the Death Star blows up Alderan. In ``The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy,'' a Vorgon destructor fleet blows up Earth to make room for a cosmic bypass. So, as an exercise for upper division students, or the more advance first year calculus based physics students, the energy needed to disassemble Earth can be computed. Assuming that advanced scifi aliens get their energy from matter-antimatter interactions, students can then compute the amount of antimatter needed to accomplish the task.

  3. Analysis and computer tools for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, A.

    1992-05-01

    The objectives of this research, were to continue to further both the theoretical understanding of and the development of computer tools (algorithms) for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures. These objectives were divided into three interrelated major areas -- the mathematical analysis of the number of steady-state solutions to multistage separation processes, the numerical analysis of general, related fixed-point methods, and the development and implementation of computer tools for process simulation.

  4. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves an interaction between solar heating, thermal instability, atmospheric turbulence, wind strength, and surface threshold conditions. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convect...

  5. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves the interaction between the sun, wind, and earth. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the s...

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of mixtures involving ketones and aldehydes by a direct bubble pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Lachet, Véronique; Boutin, Anne

    2010-07-01

    Ketone and aldehyde molecules are involved in a large variety of industrial applications. Because they are mainly present mixed with other compounds, the prediction of phase equilibrium of mixtures involving these classes of molecules is of first interest particularly to design and optimize separation processes. The main goal of this work is to propose a transferable force field for ketones and aldehydes that allows accurate molecular simulations of not only pure compounds but also complex mixtures. The proposed force field is based on the anisotropic united-atoms AUA4 potential developed for hydrocarbons, and it introduces only one new atom, the carbonyl oxygen. The Lennard-Jones parameters of this oxygen atom have been adjusted on saturated thermodynamic properties of both acetone and acetaldehyde. To simulate mixtures, Monte Carlo simulations are carried out in a specific pseudoensemble which allows a direct calculation of the bubble pressure. For polar mixtures involved in this study, we show that this approach is an interesting alternative to classical calculations in the isothermal-isobaric Gibbs ensemble. The pressure-composition diagrams of polar + polar and polar + nonpolar binary mixtures are well reproduced. Mutual solubilities as well as azeotrope location, if present, are accurately predicted without any empirical binary interaction parameters or readjustment. Such result highlights the transferability of the proposed force field, which is an essential feature toward the simulation of complex oxygenated mixtures of industrial interest. PMID:20540589

  7. "The 400 Blows."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Frank

    1967-01-01

    Francois Truffaut's film classic, "The 400 Blows," can provide artistic material for English teachers who wish to design a unit on the individual and society, on alienation, or on growing up. In the film, a powerful image of the terrifying isolation that the adolescent, Doinel, experiences is presented through repeated camera shots of symbolic…

  8. Blow out preventer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, A.I.

    1980-06-10

    In oil and gas well pumping apparatus, a polish rod reciprocates through a stuffing box and connects to a submersible pump through a tubing string or the like. When servicing, it is desirable to close off the gas or oil pressure from below and hydraulic fluid is routed from a remote location to the blow out preventer. The blow out preventer consists of a cylindrical casing with a cap screw threadably engaged to the upper end thereof and containing a cylindrical spool or the like formed from elastomeric material having an annular channel around the outer perimeter which is operatively connected to the source of hydraulic fluid. When it is desired to close off the blow out preventer, hydraulic fluid is pumped under pressure to the channel thus forcing the center of the spool inwardly and clamping same around the polish rod thereby closing off the passageway around the polish rod. O rings surround the spool above and below the channel and assist in sealing. Upper and lower steps in the casing slope outwardly and away from one another to facilitate the return of the spool to the normal position when pressure is released.

  9. Thar She Blows! A Novel Method for DNA Collection from Cetacean Blow

    PubMed Central

    Frère, Céline H.; Krzyszczyk, Ewa; Patterson, Eric M.; Hunter, Sue; Ginsburg, Alison; Mann, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular tools are now widely used to address crucial management and conservation questions. To date, dart biopsying has been the most commonly used method for collecting genetic data from cetaceans; however, this method has some drawbacks. Dart biopsying is considered inappropriate for young animals and has recently come under scrutiny from ethical boards, conservationists, and the general public. Thus, identifying alternative genetic collection techniques for cetaceans remains a priority, especially for internationally protected species. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated whether blow-sampling, which involves collecting exhalations from the blowholes of cetaceans, could be developed as a new less invasive method for DNA collection. Our current methodology was developed using six bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, housed at the National Aquarium, Baltimore (USA), from which we were able to collect both blow and blood samples. For all six individuals, we found that their mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA profile taken from blow, matched their corresponding mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA profile collected from blood. This indicates that blow-sampling is a viable alternative method for DNA collection. Conclusion/Significance In this study, we show that blow-sampling provides a viable and less invasive method for collection of genetic data, even for small cetaceans. In contrast to dart biopsying, the advantage of this method is that it capitalizes on the natural breathing behaviour of dolphins and can be applied to even very young dolphins. Both biopsy and blow-sampling require close proximity of the boat, but blow-sampling can be achieved when dolphins voluntarily bow-ride and involves no harmful contact. PMID:20811619

  10. Regression mixture models of alcohol use and risky sexual behavior among criminally-involved adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schmiege, Sarah J; Levin, Michael E; Bryan, Angela D

    2009-12-01

    Adolescents involved with the criminal justice system engage in high levels of both risky sexual behavior and alcohol use. Yet a strong relationship between the two constructs has not been consistently observed, possibly due to heterogeneity in the data. Regression mixture models were estimated in the current study to address such potential heterogeneity. Criminally-involved adolescents (n = 409) were clustered into latent classes based on patterns of the regression of two measures of risky sexual behavior, condom use and frequency of intercourse, on alcohol use. A three-class solution emerged where alcohol use did not significantly predict either risky sex outcome for approximately 25% of the sample; alcohol use negatively predicted condom use and positively predicted frequency of intercourse for approximately 38% of participants; and alcohol use negatively predicted condom use but not frequency of intercourse for the remaining participants. These classes were then distinguished on the basis of five covariates previously found to influence either alcohol use, risky sexual behavior, or the relationship between the two: self-esteem, gender, participant age, relationship status, and impulsivity/sensation-seeking. High self-esteem, being female, being older, and being in a relationship predicted membership in the class with no observed relationship of alcohol use to risky sex, relative to the other classes. Implications of the present findings are discussed in terms of exploring different risky sex and alcohol use patterns within criminally involved adolescents, as well as understanding the effectiveness of interventions for subgroups of individuals. PMID:19459047

  11. A theory for lateral wing-tip blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, D.; Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of lateral blowing consists in utilizing thin jets of air, which are ejected in the spanwise direction from slots at the tips of straight and swept wings, or along the leading edges of delta wings, to generate aerodynamic forces without the assistance of deflecting solid surfaces. For weak intensities of blowing the so-generated forces could be used for roll and lateral control of aircraft. In this work a theory for this concept as applied to straight wings is presented, revealing the analytical relationship between blowing and aerodynamic forces. The approach is based on perturbing the span of an elliptically loaded wing. Scaling laws involving blowing intensity, aspect ratio, and angle of attack are derived and compared with experiments. It is concluded that this concept has potential as a novel roll and lateral control device.

  12. Phase diagram involving the mesomorphic behavior of binary mixture of sodium oleate and orthophosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaiah, T. N.; Sreepad, H. R.

    2015-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the binary mixture of two non-mesogenic compounds, viz. sodium oleate (Naol) and orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) which exhibits very interesting liquid crystalline smectic phases at large range of concentrations and temperature. The mixtures with concentrations ranging from 10% to 90% Naol in H3PO4 exhibit SmA, SmC, SmE and SmB phases, sequentially when the specimen is cooled from its isotropic phase. Physical properties, such as ultrasonic velocity, adiabatic compressibility and molar compressibility, show anomalous behavior at the isotropic to mesosphase transition.

  13. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  14. Analysis and computer tools for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures. Progress report, December 1, 1989--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, A.

    1992-05-01

    The objectives of this research, were to continue to further both the theoretical understanding of and the development of computer tools (algorithms) for separation processes involving nonideal mixtures. These objectives were divided into three interrelated major areas -- the mathematical analysis of the number of steady-state solutions to multistage separation processes, the numerical analysis of general, related fixed-point methods, and the development and implementation of computer tools for process simulation.

  15. Shooting method for solution of boundary-layer flows with massive blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, T.-M.; Nachtsheim, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A modified, bidirectional shooting method is presented for solving boundary-layer equations under conditions of massive blowing. Unlike the conventional shooting method, which is unstable when the blowing rate increases, the proposed method avoids the unstable direction and is capable of solving complex boundary-layer problems involving mass and energy balance on the surface.

  16. Lasing characteristics of gas mixtures involving UFG: Application to nuclear pumping of lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdeyen, J. T.; Eden, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Intense blue-green fluorescence from a structured band centered at lambda approximately 484 nm was observed from Ar, CF3I and NF3 gas mixtures excited by an electron beam. This emission was tentatively assigned to the E yields A transition of the iodine monofluoride (IF) molecule. The fluorescence efficiency of the IF(E yields A) band and the IF (E) state radiative lifetime were estimated to be approximately 6% and 15 ns, respectively. The emission band structure, the short IF(E) radiative lifetime and the Franck-Condon shift between the E and A states suggest that IF is an attractive candidate for a blue-green laser.

  17. 21 CFR 868.5220 - Blow bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blow bottle. 868.5220 Section 868.5220 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5220 Blow bottle. (a) Identification. A blow bottle is a device... into the device to move a column of water from one bottle to another. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5220 - Blow bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blow bottle. 868.5220 Section 868.5220 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5220 Blow bottle. (a) Identification. A blow bottle is a device... into the device to move a column of water from one bottle to another. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  20. 21 CFR 868.5220 - Blow bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blow bottle. 868.5220 Section 868.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5220 Blow bottle. (a) Identification. A blow bottle is a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5220 - Blow bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blow bottle. 868.5220 Section 868.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5220 Blow bottle. (a) Identification. A blow bottle is a...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5220 - Blow bottle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blow bottle. 868.5220 Section 868.5220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5220 Blow bottle. (a) Identification. A blow bottle is a...

  3. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  4. Preventing Blow up by Convective Terms in Dissipative PDE's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, Bilgesu; Kalantarov, Varga; Zelik, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact of the convective terms on the global solvability or finite time blow up of solutions of dissipative PDEs. We consider the model examples of 1D Burger's type equations, convective Cahn-Hilliard equation, generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation and KdV type equations. The following common scenario is established: adding sufficiently strong (in comparison with the destabilizing nonlinearity) convective terms to equation prevents the solutions from blowing up in a finite time and makes the considered system globally well-posed and dissipative and for weak enough convective terms the finite time blow up may occur similar to the case, when the equation does not involve convective term. This kind of result has been previously known for the case of Burger's type equations and has been strongly based on maximum principle. In contrast to this, our results are based on the weighted energy estimates which do not require the maximum principle for the considered problem.

  5. A Blowing Snow Model for Ice Shelf Rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. C.; Tremblay, L.; Macayeal, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Ice melange (a mixture of snow, marine ice, and ice talus) may play various roles in the rates of propagation of iceberg-calving rifts through Antarctic ice shelves. This modeling study examines the role of windblown snow in the formation and maintenance of ice melange in the "nascent rift" in the Ross Ice Shelf (78 08'S, 178 29'W). The rift axis is perpendicular to the regional wind direction, allowing us to employ a two-dimensional blowing snow model. The Piektuk-Tuvaq blowing snow model (Dery and Tremblay, 2004) adapted the Piektuk blowing snow model for use in sea ice environments by including parameterization for open-water leads within the sea ice. This version of the model was used to study the initial conditions of a freshly-opened rift, as the input of blowing snow into the seawater within the rift promotes marine ice formation by cooling and freshening the surface water. We adapted the Piektuk-Tuvaq model both for the local climatic conditions and to incorporate the geometry of the rift, which is 30m deep and 100m wide (far deeper than a lead). We present the evolution of the topography within the rift for two cases. The first is an ice melange composed exclusively of snow and marine ice, the second uses an initial topography including large chunks of ice talus.

  6. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  7. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  8. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  9. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  10. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  11. Blow molding of melt processible rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, W.R.; Stuart, R.E.; Myrick, R.E.

    1991-07-01

    This article discusses the advantages of making hollow rubber parts by blow molding thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) versus conventional rubber processing. It describes the various types of blow molding processes and it provides some insight into the rheological properties of melt processible rubber (MPR) and how MPR should be molded by each of these processes. A number of blow molded applications for MPR are also discussed.

  12. Blowing Circulation Control on a Seaplane Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. D.; Liu, P. Q.; Qu, Q. L.

    2011-09-01

    RANS simulations are presented for blowing circulation control on a seaplane airfoil. Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model and pressure-based coupled algorithm with second-order discretization were adopted to simulate the compressible flow. Both clear and simple flap configuration were simulated with blowing momentum coefficient Cμ = 0, 0.15 and 0.30. The results show that blowing near the airfoil trailing edge could enhance the Coanda effect, delay the flow separation, and increase the lift coefficient dramatically. The blowing circulation control is promising to apply to taking off and landing of an amphibious aircraft or seaplane.

  13. Blowing Polymer Bubbles in an Acoustic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    In new manufacturing process, small gas-filled polymer shells made by injecting gas directly into acoustically levitated prepolymer drops. New process allows sufficient time for precise control of shell geometry. Applications foreseen in fabrication of deuterium/tritium-filled fusion targets and in pharmaceutical coatings. New process also useful in glass blowing and blow molding.

  14. Blowing in the Wind Animations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These are two separate, side-by-side animations made from the same nine images the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took looking into the sky after 5:17 p.m. local time on Sol 8 (June 2, 2008), the eighth Martian day of the mission. The SSI was pointed almost straight up, toward the southwest. Zenith is near the top of the center frame.

    In the left animation, the images were stretched to enhance contrast. The right animation highlights variations between each image and the next. The variations are likely dust blown by winds passing through the SSI's field of view. The images suggest the dust is blowing from west to east.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  16. Treatment of Orbital Roof Blow-Up Fracture Using a Superior Blepharoplasty Incision.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kyoichi; Enomoto, Sayaka; Aoki, Tomoko

    2015-06-01

    In orbital roof blow-up fractures, reduction can be achieved easily using an approach from the anterior cranial fossa but the procedure is highly invasive. In contrast, an orbital approach using a superior blepharoplasty incision is minimally invasive. However, if bone fragments are adhered to the dura mater, there is a risk of dura mater injury when fragments are moved for reduction. In blow-in fractures, reduction is performed by pushing the bone fragments against the anterior cranial fossa. In contrast, the procedure is difficult for blow-up fractures because bone fragments must be pulled out into the orbit through the anterior cranial fossa. Orbital blow-up fractures are often associated with intracranial injuries and frequently treated by an approach from the anterior cranial fossa. There has not yet been a report that discusses whether reduction of bone fragments should be performed in blow-up fracture without intracranial injury. In this report, we describe two cases of orbital roof blow-up fracture that did not require treatment for intracranial injury and that were treated using an orbital approach. The treatment involved only the release of orbital fat entrapped between bone fragments and did not involve reduction. The treatment outcomes were good in both cases. PMID:25836594

  17. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  18. Blowing Snow Over the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, Ashwin; Eager, Rebecca; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of blowing snow over Antarctica have been limited greatly by the remoteness and harsh conditions of the region. Space-based observations are also of lesser value than elsewhere, given the similarities between ice clouds and snow-covered surfaces, both at infrared and visible wavelengths. It is only in recent years that routine ground-based observation programs have acquired sufficient data to overcome the gap in our understanding of surface blowing snow. In this paper, observations of blowing snow from visual observers' records as well as ground-based spectral and lidar programs at South Pole station are analyzed to obtain the first climatology of blowing snow over the Antarctic plateau. Occurrence frequencies, correlation with wind direction and speed, typical layer heights, as well as optical depths are determined. Blowing snow is seen in roughly one third of the visual observations and occurs under a narrow range of wind directions. The near-surface layers typically a few hundred meters thick emit radiances similar to those from thin clouds. Because blowing snow remains close to the surface and is frequently present, it will produce small biases in space-borne altimetry; these must be properly estimated and corrected.

  19. Augmentation of maneuver performance by spanwise blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A generalized wind tunnel model was tested to investigate new component concepts utilizing spanwise blowing to provide improved maneuver characteristics for advanced fighter aircraft. Primary emphasis was placed on high angle of attack performance, stability, and control at subsonic speeds. Spanwise blowing on a 44 deg swept trapezoidal wing resulted in leading edge vortex enhancement with subsequent large vortex-induced lift increments and drag polar improvements at the higher angles of attack. Small deflections of a leading edge flap delayed these lift and drag benefits to higher angles of attack. In addition, blowing was more effective at higher Mach numbers. Spanwise blowing in conjunction with a deflected trailing edge flap resulted in lift and drag benefits that exceeded the summation of the effects of each high lift device acting alone. Asymmetric blowing was an effective lateral control device at the higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing on the wing reduced horizontal tail loading and improved the lateral-directional stability characteristics of a wing-horizontal tail-vertical tail configuration.

  20. Identification of CFC and HCFC substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.H.; Tunkel, J.L.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-10-01

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identify chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. More than 100 chemicals have been identified and ranked as polyurethane foam blowing agent candidates. The systematic investigation involved the analysis of vapor thermal conductivity predictive models and utilizing this methodology to identify and screen potential new foam blowing agents. Collection of physical/chemical properties of the new candidates enabled an overall evaluation. Based on the vapor thermal conductivity, boiling point, and other important properties, the chemical compounds were ranked to identify the most promising new blowing agent candidates. To efficiently evaluate new foam blowing agents, the compounds were placed and evaluated in 14 groups based on chemical structure.

  1. Kinematic viscosities of binary and ternary liquid mixtures involving chloroform, 2-propanol, and 2-butanol at several temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sovilj, M.N.

    1995-09-01

    A knowledge of the viscosity of liquids and liquid mixtures is required for the solution of many engineering problems concerning heat transfer, mass transfer, and fluid flow. Experimental kinematic viscosity data are presented for chloroform + 2-propanol + 2-butanol and also for the three constituent binary mixtures at 20, 25, 30, and 35 C. The binary kinematic viscosities have been correlated by the empirical equation obtained by extension of the model of ideal kinematic viscosity of a liquid mixtures. Predicted data agree fairly well with the experimental observations. The ternary kinematic viscosities were fitted by correlations suggested by Al-Besharah et al., Vijayaraghavan et al., and Iulian et al. The best fit was obtained with the relation by Al-Besharah et al.

  2. Computational analysis of forebody tangential slot blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Agosta-Greenman, Roxana M.; Rizk, Yehia M.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the computational effort to analyze forebody tangential slot blowing is presented. Tangential slot blowing generates side force and yawing moment which may be used to control an aircraft flying at high-angle-of-attack. Two different geometries are used in the analysis: (1) The High Alpha Research Vehicle; and (2) a generic chined forebody. Computations using the isolated F/A-18 forebody are obtained at full-scale wind tunnel test conditions for direct comparison with available experimental data. The effects of over- and under-blowing on force and moment production are analyzed. Time-accurate solutions using the isolated forebody are obtained to study the force onset timelag of tangential slot blowing. Computations using the generic chined forebody are obtained at experimental wind tunnel conditions, and the results compared with available experimental data. This computational analysis compliments the experimental results and provides a detailed understanding of the effects of tangential slot blowing on the flow field about simple and complex geometries.

  3. Ground effects on USB configurations. [Upper Surface Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Recent investigations of ground effects on aerodynamic characteristics have been stimulated by the interest in powered-lift STOL airplanes. The ground effects on upper-surface-blowing (USB) configurations may involve change in both the circulation forces and the jet reaction forces. In this note, a theoretical method is proposed for predicting these effects. It is shown that the predicted results agree well with available experimental data. In particular, the wing-alone method is shown to be incapable of predicting the ground effects of USB configurations.

  4. Analysis of an energy recovery system for reformate-based PEM fuel cells involving a binary two-phase mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiding

    A comprehensive analysis on a novel energy recovery system for reformate-based proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems is presented. The energy recovery system includes a throttling valve, a heat exchanger, a compressor, and is coupled with a coolant loop for the fuel cell stack. The feed stock of the fuel reformer, which is primarily a mixture of water and fuel, is vaporized in the heat exchanger and is then compressed to a sufficiently high pressure before it is ducted into the fuel reformer. The analysis includes the throttling of two-phase fuel/water mixture and vaporization in the heat exchanger to obtain the temperature and pressure of the mixture at the inlet of the compressor. The results indicate that the power plant efficiency with the energy recovery system can be increased by more than 20% compared to that of a fuel cell power plant without the energy recovery system. Additionally, more than 25% of the waste heat generated by the fuel cell stack can be removed due to the energy recovery system, and the fuel burned for the fuel reforming purpose is reduced by more than 70%.

  5. Development of polyimide foams with blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of preparing a polyimide foam which includes the steps of: preparing, foaming, and curing a precursor containing at least one alkyl ester of 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid; a meta- or para-substituted aromatic diamine; a heterocyclic diamine; an aliphatic diamine; and a solid blowing agent. The blowing agent is added to said precursor in a concentration which is sufficient to effect at least one of the following attributes of the foam: cell size, proportion of open cells, cell density, and indentation load deflection.

  6. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF BLOWING ENGINE HOUSE, LOOKING NORTH; BOILER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF BLOWING ENGINE HOUSE, LOOKING NORTH; BOILER HOUSE ON LEFT; BLAST FURNACE, OVENS AND CASTING HOUSE BEYOND. - U.S. Steel Corporation, Clairton Works, Blast Furnace Blowing Engine Building, 400 State Street, Clairton, Allegheny County, PA

  7. 5. DETAIL VIEW LOOKING AT FLYWHEEL HUB OF BLOWING ENGINE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW LOOKING AT FLYWHEEL HUB OF BLOWING ENGINE. (THE MAN IS MR. FIELD CURRY). - U.S. Steel Corporation, Clairton Works, Blast Furnace Blowing Engine Building, 400 State Street, Clairton, Allegheny County, PA

  8. Nontraumatic orbital floor fracture after nose blowing.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Ranjit S; Shah, Akash D

    2016-03-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no history of trauma or prior surgery presented to the emergency department with headache and left eye pain after nose blowing. Noncontrast maxillofacial computed tomography examination revealed an orbital floor fracture that ultimately required surgical repair. There are nontraumatic causes of orbital blowout fractures, and imaging should be obtained irrespective of trauma history. PMID:26973725

  9. Nontraumatic orbital floor fracture after nose blowing

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Ranjit S.; Shah, Akash D.

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no history of trauma or prior surgery presented to the emergency department with headache and left eye pain after nose blowing. Noncontrast maxillofacial computed tomography examination revealed an orbital floor fracture that ultimately required surgical repair. There are nontraumatic causes of orbital blowout fractures, and imaging should be obtained irrespective of trauma history. PMID:26973725

  10. Dinural patterns of blowing sand and dust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex interaction between the sun, the atmosphere, and the sand surface. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the surface la...

  11. Drifting and blowing snow, measurements and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Mark

    2007-12-01

    Blowing snow is a frequent and significant winter weather event, and there is currently a need for more observations and measurements of blowing snow, especially in arctic and subarctic environments. A camera system has been developed to measure the size and velocity of blowing snow particles. A second camera system has been developed to measure the relative blowing snow density profile near the snow surface. These systems have been used, along with standard meteorological instruments and optical particle counters, during field campaigns at Franklin Bay, NWT, and at Churchill, MB. An electric field mill was also deployed at Franklin Bay. Results demonstrate that the particle diameters follow a Gamma distribution with 103 < d¯ < 172 mum below a height of 0.15 m and 120 < d¯ < 154 mum between 0.2 m and 1.1 m. Within the saltation layer, the mass density can be approximated by a power-law (rhos ∝ z -gamma) with an exponent of gamma ≈ 1.5 for z < 40 mm. Between 40 < z < 100 mm, in the lower suspension layer, the value of the exponent increases to a range of 1.5 < gamma < 8. At greater heights, z > 100 mm, the exponent approaches gamma ≈ l. The height of saltation shows a very weak dependence on the friction velocity, a strong dependence on temperature and relative humidity, and a weak dependence on snow age. Electric field strengths as high as 2000 V m-1 were measured at a height of 0.5 m. A model to determine electric field strength based on the distribution of blowing snow particles shows a weak agreement with measurements. Results suggest the charge is most likely generated due to either fragmentation or asymmetric rubbing, which are both strongly dependent on wind speed. Modelling studies with the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) and previous measurements of snow depth at Goose Bay, Hay River, the Beaufort Sea, Franklin Bay, and Resolute demonstrate that blowing snow sublimation can have a substantial effect on snow depth. Adding a blowing snow

  12. Whistle-Blowing Intentions of Prospective Teachers: Education Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gökçe, Asiye Toker

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whistle-blowing intentions of prospective teachers. Firstly, overall ethical awareness of the participants was examined, and then their underlying ethical reasons of whistle-blowing were investigated. Besides, impact on the intention to blow whistle to internal or external parties offering their job guarantee were searched.…

  13. Relationship between Whistle-Blowing and Job Satisfaction and Organizational Loyalty at Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gokce, Asiye Toker

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines whistle-blowing at schools in Turkey. Firstly, wrongdoings observed by teachers at schools, and their preference for reporting these were analyzed. Then, differences between the teachers, who blew whistle and the others who did not were examined according to the research variables. The study group involved 283 teachers. The…

  14. Some Aspects of the Interaction of Blowing Snow with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déry, Stephen J.; Taylor, Peter A.

    1996-10-01

    Several possible effects of blowing snow on the atmospheric boundary layer are investigated, mostly within the general framework of the Prairie Blowing Snow Model (PBSM). The processes of snow saltation and suspension are first described. Variations to the drift density profile are tested and the effects of stratification and density variation calculations are evaluated. Despite high density gradients of blowing snow, stratification effects on turbulence and the velocity profiles can generally be neglected. However, with saltating or suspended snow in a constant shear stress layer, part of the shear stress is carried by the particles. A highly simplified, single-phase approach, based on the density variation of the air-snow mixture coupled to a simple turbulent stress-strain relationship, is used to illustrate this. Sublimation rates in a column of blowing snow are calculated using the PBSM and results are compared with those obtained with a modified formulation which incorporates a spectrum of sublimating particles of varying sizes at each height in a steady-state surface boundary layer and different specifications of the ventilation velocity.

  15. Comparison between two models of cooling surfaces using blowing.

    PubMed

    Mathelin, L; Bataille, F; Lallemand, A

    2001-05-01

    To protect surfaces against high temperatures, the blowing through a porous material is studied. The geometry is that of a circular cylinder in cross-flow and the effectiveness of the blowing for the thermal protection is numerically investigated. Two models are developed for the blowing simulation and comparisons are made with experimental data obtained in a heated wind-tunnel. It is shown that the blowing strongly affects the dynamical and thermal profiles over the surface, thickening the boundary layers and decreasing the external transfer coefficients. It results in a lower viscous drag and thermal stress. The wall temperature dramatically decreases with blowing and the heat flux is also affected. PMID:11460652

  16. One-Dimensional Analysis Techniques for Pulsed Blowing Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Frank

    2005-11-01

    Pulsed blowing offers reductions in bleed air requirements for aircraft flow control. Efficient pulsed blowing systems require careful design to minimize bleed air use while distributing blowing to multiple locations. Pulsed blowing systems start with a steady flow supply and process it to generate a pulsatile flow. The fluid-acoustic dynamics of the system play an important role in overall effectiveness. One-dimensional analysis techniques that in the past have been applied to ventilation systems and internal combustion engines have been adapted to pulsed blowing. Pressure wave superposition and reflection are used with the governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy to determine particle velocities and pressures through the flow field. Simulations have been performed to find changes in the amplitude and wave shape as pulses are transmitted through a simple pulsed blowing system. A general-purpose code is being developed to simulate wave transmission and allow the determination of blowing system dynamic parameters.

  17. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Steady and Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamp, Alison M.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate the effect of steady and oscillatory (with zero net mass flux) blowing on cavity resonance is undertaken. The objective is to study the basic mechanisms of the control of cavity resonance. An actuator is designed and calibrated to generate either steady blowing or oscillatory blowing with A zero net mass flux. The results of the experiment show that both steady and oscillatory blowing are effective, and reduce the amplitude of the dominant resonant mode by 1OdB. The oscillatory blowing is however found to be more superior in that the same effectiveness could be accomplished with a momentum coefficient an order of magnitude smaller than for steady blowing. The experiment also confirms the results of previous computations that suggest the forcing frequency for oscillatory blowing must not be at harmonic frequencies of the cavity resonant modes.

  18. Blow-down and blow-in of Inland`s No. 7 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, J.; Quisenberry, P.; Carter, W.

    1995-12-01

    After extensive and detailed planning, a mini-reline of the 13.7 meter No. 7 Blast Furnace was executed in November 1993. The furnace lining had 18 million metric tons of production and the bosh, belly and lower stack lining were being maintained through a scheduled grouting practice. The mini-reline was planned for 33 days and the reline work included (a) replacing the bosh, belly and lower stack alumina lining with graphite brick, (b) gunning the middle and upper stack, (c) rebuilding the furnace top, stove burners and tapholes and (d) minor repairs to other auxiliary equipment. During this 33 day reline period the two 8 meter furnaces could only produce 40% of the normal production requirement, therefore the blow-down, quench, salamander tap and blow-in activities were critical to meeting the planned schedule. The planning of these activities was started in the spring of 1993 and included review of Inland`s past blow-down and blow-in performance as well as bench marking the performance of other large blast furnaces in North America, Japan and Europe. The development of the 1993 procedures focused on opportunities to accelerate the blow-down, quench, salamander tap and blow-in as well as having a clean hearth and stack which could also save time during the demolition phase of the reline. Any time that could be saved in these activities directly translated to an early start-up and more plantwide production. This paper will cover the successful planning and implementation of these activities which resulted in a 2 day reduction in the reline schedule, an accelerated production curve and an earlier than planned use of PCI during blow-in.

  19. Blow-in fracture of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Hong Sik

    2013-01-01

    We report 2 patients with blow-in fractures of the orbital floor caused by different mechanisms. In a 17-year-old boy, a sudden impact was given to the anterior maxillary wall and caused a depression fracture of a maxilla, yet the infraorbital rim remained intact. We think fragments of the orbital floor were forced into the orbit by a sudden increase in pressure in the maxillary sinus in this patient. In a 51-year-old man, the impact of a force was on the laterosuperior part of the zygoma, which pushed the zygoma medially. These 2 cases represent 2 different mechanisms of blow-in fractures of the orbital floor. PMID:24036789

  20. Falling liquid films with blowing and suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alice B.; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    2016-01-01

    Flow of a thin viscous film down a flat inclined plane becomes unstable to long wave interfacial fluctuations when the Reynolds number based on the mean film thickness becomes larger than a critical value (this value decreases as the angle of inclination with the horizontal increases, and in particular becomes zero when the plate is vertical). Control of these interfacial instabilities is relevant to a wide range of industrial applications including coating processes and heat or mass transfer systems. This study considers the effect of blowing and suction through the substrate in order to construct from first principles physically realistic models that can be used for detailed passive and active control studies of direct relevance to possible experiments. Two different long-wave, thin-film equations are derived to describe this system; these include the imposed blowing/suction as well as inertia, surface tension, gravity and viscosity. The case of spatially periodic blowing and suction is considered in detail and the bifurcation structure of forced steady states is explored numerically to predict that steady states cease to exist for sufficiently large suction speeds since the film locally thins to zero thickness giving way to dry patches on the substrate. The linear stability of the resulting nonuniform steady states is investigated for perturbations of arbitrary wavelengths, and any instabilities are followed into the fully nonlinear regime using time-dependent computations. The case of small amplitude blowing/suction is studied analytically both for steady states and their stability. Finally, the transition between travelling waves and non-uniform steady states is explored as the suction amplitude increases.

  1. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication. PMID:26541597

  2. Thermodynamic and Experimental Study of the Energetic Cost Involved in the Capture of Carbon Dioxide by Aqueous Mixtures of Commonly Used Primary and Tertiary Amines.

    PubMed

    Arcis, Hugues; Coulier, Yohann; Coxam, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The capture of carbon dioxide with chemical solvents is one solution to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources and thus tackle climate change. Recent research has been focused on optimizing new kinds of advanced absorbents including aqueous amine blends, but critical downsides such as the large energetic cost involved with the industrial process remain. To address this issue, a better understanding of the energetic interactions existing in solution is necessary. In this paper, we report direct experimental measurements of the energy cost involved in the solvation of CO2 in two aqueous amine blends at different temperatures. The chemical solvents were designed as aqueous mixtures of commonly used primary and tertiary amines to study the influence of the different chemical properties inferred by the amine class. We have also applied a thermodynamic model to represent the energetic effects that take place in solution during CO2 dissolution in these mixtures, where all parameters were taken from previous studies focused on single amine absorbents. The noteworthy agreement observed with the reported experimental heats of absorption and with literature vapor liquid equilibrium properties confirmed the relevance of the underlying molecular mechanisms considered in our model, and suggest that this model would prove useful to investigate CO2 dissolution in other amine blends. PMID:26630087

  3. Effectiveness of Micro-Blowing Technique in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Hwang, Danny P.; Wood, Jerry R.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of the micro-blowing technique (MBT) on the skin friction and total drag of a strut in a turbulent, strong adverse-pressure-gradient flow is assessed experimentally over a range of subsonic Mach numbers (0.3 less than M less than 0.7) and reduced blowing fractions (0 less than or equal to 2F/C (sub f,o) less than or equal to 1.75). The MBT-treated strut is situated along the centerline of a symmetric 2-D diffuser with a static pressure rise coefficient of 0.6. In agreement with presented theory and earlier experiments in zero-pressure-gradient flows, the effusion of blowing air reduces skin friction significantly (e.g., by 60% at reduced blowing fractions near 1.75). The total drag of the treated strut with blowing is significantly lower than that of the treated strut in the limit of zero-blowing; further, the total drag is reduced below that of the baseline (solid-plate) strut, provided that the reduced blowing fractions are sufficiently high. The micro-blowing air is, however, deficient in streamwise momentum and the blowing leads to increased boundary-layer and wake thicknesses and shape factors. Diffuser performance metrics and wake surveys are used to discuss the impact of various levels of micro-blowing on the aerodynamic blockage and loss.

  4. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  5. Reducing secondary losses by blowing cold air in a turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschel, W.

    1977-01-01

    Local blowing on the profile suction side of the turbine guide wheel blades can be effective in preventing the propagation of secondary flows that is, the transport of casing and hub boundary layers by pressure gradients. Some preliminary results on how the blowing should be accomplished in order to influence the secondary flows in the desired manner are given. The effectiveness of blowing is demonstrated. Blowing is also seen to be more effective than using boundary layer slots as far as diminishing losses in the rim zones is concerned.

  6. THIRD-GENERATION FOAM BLOWING AGENTS FOR FOAM INSULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of third-generation blowing agents for foam insulation. (NOTE: the search for third-generation foam blowing agents has led to the realization that, as the number of potential substitutes increases, new concerns, such as their potential to act a...

  7. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF BLOWING ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING NORTH; THREE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF BLOWING ENGINE HOUSE LOOKING NORTH; THREE TANKS AT RIGHT ADJACENT TO BUILDING ARE FOR SOFTENING BOILER WATER (LIME TREATMENT): TRUNCATED AND BOILER HOUSE, ONE OVEN AND ORE BRIDGE AT LEFT. - U.S. Steel Corporation, Clairton Works, Blast Furnace Blowing Engine Building, 400 State Street, Clairton, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 74. View of small steam tank used in 'blowing down' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. View of small steam tank used in 'blowing down' or cleaning boilers; in background can be seen the bottom of cylindrical water tank located in setback at southeast corner of blowing engine house. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Use of cooling tower blow down in ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, N; Singh, V; Panno, B; Wilcoxon, M

    2010-01-01

    Reducing water consumption in bioethanol production conserves an increasingly scarce natural resource, lowers production costs, and minimizes effluent management issues. The suitability of cooling tower blow down water for reuse in fermentation was investigated as a means to lower water consumption. Extensive chemical characterization of the blow down water revealed low concentrations of toxic elements and total dissolved solids. Fermentation carried out with cooling tower blow down water resulted in similar levels of ethanol and residual glucose as a control study using deionized water. The study noted good tolerance by yeast to the specific scale and corrosion inhibitors found in the cooling tower blow down water. This research indicates that, under appropriate conditions, reuse of blow down water from cooling towers in fermentation is feasible. PMID:21076211

  10. An Implicit Finite Difference Solution to the Viscous Radiating Shock Layer with Strong Blowing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    An implicit finite difference scheme is developed for the fully coupled solution of the viscous radiating stagnation line equations, including strong blowing. Solutions are presented for both air injection and carbon phenolic ablation products injection into air at conditions near the peak radiative heating point in an earth entry trajectory from interplanetary return missions. A detailed radiative transport code that accounts for the important radiative exchange processes for gaseous mixtures in local thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium is utilized.

  11. Upper surface blowing aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryle, D. M., Jr.; Braden, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance at cruise, and noise effects due to variations in nacelle and wing geometry and mode of operation are studied using small aircraft models that simulate upper surface blowing (USB). At cruise speeds ranging from Mach .50 to Mach .82, the key determinants of drag/thrust penalties are found to be nozzle aspect ratio, boattailing angle, and chordwise position; number of nacelles; and streamlined versus symmetric configuration. Recommendations are made for obtaining favorable cruise configurations. The acoustic studies, which concentrate on the noise created by the jet exhaust flow and its interaction with wing and flap surfaces, isolate several important sources of USB noise, including nozzle shape, exit velocity, and impingement angle; flow pathlength; and flap angle and radius of curvature. Suggestions for lessening noise due to trailing edge flow velocity, flow pathlength, and flow spreading are given, though compromises between some design options may be necessary.

  12. Method for the evaluation of stretch blow molding simulations with free blow trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Johannes; Stommel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Finite-Element (FE) simulations are a valuable tool to support the analysis and optimization of production processes. In order to achieve realistic simulation results, a consistent simulation set-up followed by an evaluation through experiments is crucial. Stretch Blow Molding (SBM) is a commonly applied forming method to produce thin walled bottles. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) preforms are biaxially stretched into a closed cavity to form a bottle. In this process the thermo-mechanical material behavior during forming greatly influences the performance of the end product and consequently plays a key role for a reliable process simulation. To ensure a realistic material representation in the simulation model, an adequate material model is calibrated with stress-strain curves from biaxial tests. Thin PET-sheets are stretched under defined temperatures and strain rates. These representative experiments include process simplifications regarding geometry, heating and deformation parameters. Therefore, an evaluation step subsequent to the simulation set-up is inevitable. This paper presents a method for extracting temperature dependent stress-strain-curves from experiments close to the production process which enables the crucial evaluation of a process simulation. In the SBM process, the wall thickness distribution of the bottle refers to the preform deformation over time but does not fully define the thermo-mechanical material behavior. In the presented method, PET-preforms receive thermal treatment with Infrared (IR)-heaters from an SBM-machine and are subsequently inflated into free air (free-blow-trial). An IR-camera is used to obtain the temperature distribution on the preform immediately before blowing. Two high speed cameras are synchronized with a pressure sensor to consequently calculate reliable stress-strain curves at any point on the preform surface. These data is finally compared to results from FE-simulations of the free blow trials.

  13. African Dust Blows over the Caribbean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Shuttle astronauts frequently track Saharan dust storms as they blow from north Africa across the Atlantic Ocean. Dust palls blowing from Africa take about a week to cross the Atlantic. Recently, researchers have linked Saharan dust to coral disease, allergic reactions in humans, and red tides. The top photograph, a classic image showing African dust over the Caribbean, was taken at a time when few scientists had considered the possibility. The image was taken by Space Shuttle astronauts on July 11, 1994 (STS065-75-47). This photograph looks southwest over the northern edge of a large trans-Atlantic dust plume that blew off the Sahara desert in Africa. In this view, Caicos Island in the Bahamas and the mountainous spines of Haiti are partly obscured by the dust. Closer to the foreground, (about 26 degrees north latitude), the skies are clear. The lower photograph (STS105-723-7) was taken by Space Shuttle astronauts while docked to the International Space Station on August 19, 2001. The spacecraft is over the Atlantic Ocean at roughly 45oN, 60oW. The astronauts were looking obliquely to the south; the boundaries of the dust plumes can be traced visually by the abrupt change from clear to hazy atmosphere-the hazy line marks the northern edge of the dust pall near the Caribbean. Images provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  14. Simulation of the Two Stages Stretch-Blow Molding Process: Infrared Heating and Blowing Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bordival, M.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Velay, V.

    2007-05-17

    In the Stretch-Blow Molding (SBM) process, the temperature distribution of the reheated perform affects drastically the blowing kinematic, the bottle thickness distribution, as well as the orientation induced by stretching. Consequently, mechanical and optical properties of the final bottle are closely related to heating conditions. In order to predict the 3D temperature distribution of a rotating preform, numerical software using control-volume method has been developed. Since PET behaves like a semi-transparent medium, the radiative flux absorption was computed using Beer Lambert law. In a second step, 2D axi-symmetric simulations of the SBM have been developed using the finite element package ABAQUS registered . Temperature profiles through the preform wall thickness and along its length were computed and applied as initial condition. Air pressure inside the preform was not considered as an input variable, but was automatically computed using a thermodynamic model. The heat transfer coefficient applied between the mold and the polymer was also measured. Finally, the G'sell law was used for modeling PET behavior. For both heating and blowing stage simulations, a good agreement has been observed with experimental measurements. This work is part of the European project ''APT{sub P}ACK'' (Advanced knowledge of Polymer deformation for Tomorrow's PACKaging)

  15. Simulation of the Two Stages Stretch-Blow Molding Process: Infrared Heating and Blowing Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordival, M.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Velay, V.

    2007-05-01

    In the Stretch-Blow Molding (SBM) process, the temperature distribution of the reheated perform affects drastically the blowing kinematic, the bottle thickness distribution, as well as the orientation induced by stretching. Consequently, mechanical and optical properties of the final bottle are closely related to heating conditions. In order to predict the 3D temperature distribution of a rotating preform, numerical software using control-volume method has been developed. Since PET behaves like a semi-transparent medium, the radiative flux absorption was computed using Beer Lambert law. In a second step, 2D axi-symmetric simulations of the SBM have been developed using the finite element package ABAQUS®. Temperature profiles through the preform wall thickness and along its length were computed and applied as initial condition. Air pressure inside the preform was not considered as an input variable, but was automatically computed using a thermodynamic model. The heat transfer coefficient applied between the mold and the polymer was also measured. Finally, the G'sell law was used for modeling PET behavior. For both heating and blowing stage simulations, a good agreement has been observed with experimental measurements. This work is part of the European project "APT_PACK" (Advanced knowledge of Polymer deformation for Tomorrow's PACKaging).

  16. Control of VR-7 Dynamic Stall by Strong Steady Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D.; McAlister, K. W.; Tso, J.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment was performed in a water tunnel on a Boeing-Vertol VR-7 airfoil to study the effects of tangential blowing over the upper surface. Blowing was applied at the quarter-chord location during sinusoidal pitching oscillations described by alpha = alpha(sub m) + 10 deg sin omega t. Results were obtained for a Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 5), mean angles of 10 and 15 deg, reduced frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 0.15, and blowing rates from C(sub mu) = 0.16 to 0.66. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching moment loads are reported, along with fluorescent-dye flow visualizations. Strong steady blowing was found to prevent the bursting of the leading-edge separation bubble at several test points. When this occurred, the lift was increased significantly, stall was averted, and the shape of the moment response showed a positive damping in pitch. In almost all cases, steady blowing reduced the hysteresis amplitudes present in the loads, but the benefits diminished as the reduced frequency and mean angle of oscillation increased. A limited number of pulsed blowing cases indicated that for low blowing rates, the greatest gains were achieved at F(sup +) = 0.9.

  17. Lift Enhancement Using Pulsed Blowing At Compressible Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hites, Michael; Nagib, Hassan; Sytsma, Brian; Wygnanski, Israel; Seifert, Avi; Bachar, Tomer

    1997-11-01

    Oscillatory wall-jets were introduced through spanwise slots along a NACA 0015 airfoil to establish lift augmentation by the unsteady forcing of the wall layer. Pressure coefficients, lift coefficients, and wake velocity profiles were measured for experiments where the oscillatory blowing momentum coefficient was held constant at various frequencies up to M=0.4. At high angles of attack, it was observed that lift coefficient increased by as much as 80% due to the pulsed blowing and that supercritical flow was detected near the leading edge. Measurements at low angles of attack with the flap set at 20^o (an aft loaded airfoil near cruise conditions) showed that low amplitude pulsed forcing from the flap provided a 27% increasing in lift while steady blowing from the flap reduced lift by as much as 15% even at blowing coefficients as high as 3.5%. Wake profiles showed that not only was the lift enhanced due to the oscillatory blowing, but the drag was reduced, demonstrating the effectiveness of pulsed blowing as a tool to increase lift and reduce drag, especially when compared to the relative ineffectiveness of steady blowing under similar conditions.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING QBOP FURNACE IN BLOW. OXYGEN AND NATURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING Q-BOP FURNACE IN BLOW. OXYGEN AND NATURAL GAS ARE BLOWN INTO THE FURNACE THROUGH THE TUYERES TO CHARGE 460,000 LBS. OF HOT METAL, 100,000 LBS. OF SCRAP WITH 30,000 LBS. OF LIME. BLOW TIME IS 16 MINUTES. THE TIME TO BLOW AND TAP THE FURNACES OF THE RESULTING 205,000 TONS OF STEEL AND SLAG IS 35 MINUTES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Q-Bop Furnace, North of Valley Road & West of Ensley, Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  19. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  20. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  1. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustable blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  2. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  3. Design of a subsonic airfoil with upstream blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, N. B.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    The problem is solved of designing a symmetric airfoil with upstream blowing opposite to subsonic irrotational steady flow of an inviscid incompressible fluid. The solution relies on Sedov’s idea of a stagnation region developing in the neighborhood of the stagnation point. An iterative solution process is developed, and examples of airfoils are constructed. The numerical results are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn about the effect of blowing parameters on the airfoil geometry and the resultant force acting on the airfoil.

  4. Spatial Scale for Modelling Blowing Snow on the Canadian Prairieis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Fang, X.

    2007-12-01

    Blowing snow transports and sometimes sublimates much of the seasonal snowfall in the Prairies of western Canada. Snow redistribution is an important feature of Prairie hydrology as deep snowdrifts provide a source of meltwater to replenish ponds and generate streamflow in this dry region. The spatial distribution of snow water equivalent in the spring is therefore of great interest for Prairie hydrology. A test of the appropriate spatial scale for modelling blowing snow redistribution and sublimation was conducted at St Denis National Wildlife Area in the rolling, internally drained prairie pothole region east of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. A LiDAR based DEM and LANDSAT based vegetation map were available for this region. A coupled complex windflow and blowing snow model was run with ~250,000 6 m x 6 m grid cells to produce spatially distributed estimates of seasonal blowing snow transport and sublimation. The calculation was then aggregated, using 7 landscape units that represented the major influences of surface roughness, topography and fetch on blowing snow transport and sublimation. Both the distributed and aggregated simulations described similar end of winter snow water equivalent with substantive redistribution of blowing snow from exposed sparsley vegetated sites across topographic drainage divides to the densely vegetated pothole wetlands. Both simulations also agreed well with snow survey observations. While the distributed calculations provide a fascinating and detailed visual image of the interaction of complex landscapes and blowing snow redistribution and sublimation, it is clear that blowing snow transport and sublimation calculations can be successfully aggregated to the spatial scale of the major landscape units in this environment.

  5. Polypropylenes foam consisting of thermally expandable microcapsule as blowing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeoung, Sun Kyung; Hwang, Ye Jin; Lee, Hyun Wook; Kwak, Sung Bok; Han, In-Soo; Ha, Jin Uk

    2016-03-01

    The structure of thermally expandable microcapsule (TEMs) is consisted of a thermoplastic shell which is filled with liquid hydrocarbon at core. The shell of TEMs becomes soft when the temperature is higher than boiling temperature of liquid hydrocarbon. The shell of TEMs is expanded under the high temperature because the inner pressure of TEMs is increased by vaporization of hydrocarbon core. Therefore, the TEMs are applicable for blowing agents and light weight fillers. In this research, we fabricated the polypropylene (PP) foam by using the TEMs and chemical blowing agents and compared to their physical properties. The density of the specimen was decreased when the contents of chemical blowing agents and TEMs were increased. In addition, the mechanical properties (i.e. tensile strength and impact strength) of specimens were deteriorated with increasing amount of chemical blowing agents and TEMs. However, PP foam produced with TEMs showed higher impact strength than the one with the chemical blowing agent. In order to clarify the dependence of impact strength of PP foam as the blowing agent, the morphology difference of the PP foams was investigated. Expanding properties of PP foams produced with TEMs was changed with TEMs content of PP foams. Processing conditions also influenced the mechanical properties of PP foam containing TEMs.

  6. Numerical study of delta wing leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, David; Tavella, Domingo; Roberts, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Spanwise and tangential leading edge blowing as a means of controlling the position and strength of the leading edge vortices are studied by numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The leading edge jet is simulated by defining a permeable boundary, corresponding to the jet slot, where suitable boundary conditions are implemented. Numerical results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that the use of spanwise leading edge blowing at moderate angle of attack magnifies the size and strength of the leading edge vortices, and moves the vortex cores outboard and upward. The increase in lift primarily comes from the greater nonlinear vortex lift. However, spanwise blowing causes earlier vortex breakdown, thus decreasing the stall angle. The effects of tangential blowing at low to moderate angles of attack tend to reduce the pressure peaks associated with leading edge vortices and to increase the suction peak around the leading edge, so that the integrated value of the surface pressure remains about the same. Tangential leading edge blowing in post-stall conditions is shown to re-establish vortical flow and delay vortex bursting, thus increasing C sub L sub max and stall angle.

  7. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Fonseca, Alicia; Liu, Wenqi; Fields, Andrew T; Pimsler, Meaghan L; Spindola, Aline F; Tarone, Aaron M; Crippen, Tawni L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Wood, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae that provide a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericata; this strain swarmed significantly and produced a strong odor that attracts blow flies. To identify the putative interkingdom signals for the bacterium and flies, we reasoned that as swarming is used by this bacterium to cover the food resource and requires bacterial signaling, the same bacterial signals used for swarming may be used to communicate with blow flies. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified six novel genes for swarming (ureR, fis, hybG, zapB, fadE and PROSTU_03490), then, confirming our hypothesis, we discovered that fly attractants, lactic acid, phenol, NaOH, KOH and ammonia, restore swarming for cells with the swarming mutations. Hence, compounds produced by the bacterium that attract flies also are utilized for swarming. In addition, bacteria with the swarming mutation rfaL attracted fewer blow flies and reduced the number of eggs laid by the flies. Therefore, we have identified several interkingdom signals between P. mirabilis and blow flies. PMID:22237540

  8. PLIF Visualization of Active Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Berry, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging was used to visualize the boundary layer flow on a 1/3-scale Hyper-X forebody model. The boundary layer was perturbed by blowing out of orifices normal to the model surface. Two blowing orifice configurations were used: a spanwise row of 17-holes spaced at 1/8 inch, with diameters of 0.020 inches and a single-hole orifice with a diameter of 0.010 inches. The purpose of the study was to visualize and identify laminar and turbulent structures in the boundary layer and to make comparisons with previous phosphor thermography measurements of surface heating. Jet penetration and its influence on the boundary layer development was also examined as was the effect of a compression corner on downstream boundary layer transition. Based upon the acquired PLIF images, it was determined that global surface heating measurements obtained using the phosphor thermography technique provide an incomplete indicator of transitional and turbulent behavior of the corresponding boundary layer flow. Additionally, the PLIF images show a significant contribution towards transition from instabilities originating from the underexpanded jets. For this experiment, a nitric oxide/nitrogen mixture was seeded through the orifices, with nitric oxide (NO) serving as the fluorescing gas. The experiment was performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  9. Understanding the bacterial communities of hard cheese with blowing defect.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Daniela; Puglisi, Edoardo; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2015-12-01

    The environment of hard cheese encourages bacterial synergies and competitions along the ripening process, which might lead in defects such as clostridial blowing. In this study, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), a quantitative Clostridium tyrobutyricum PCR and next-generation Illumina-based sequencing of 16S rRNA gene were applied to study 83 Grana Padano spoiled samples. The aim was to investigate the community of clostridia involved in spoilage, the ecological relationships with the other members of the cheese microbiota, and the effect of lysozyme. Three main genera were dominant in the analysed cheeses, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Clostridium, and the assignment at the species level was of 94.3% of 4,477,326 high quality sequences. C. tyrobutyricum and C. butyricum were the most prevalent clostridia. Hierarchical clustering based on the abundance of bacterial genera, revealed three main clusters: one characterized by the highest proportion of Clostridium, a second where Lactobacillus was predominant and the last, dominated by Streptococcus thermophilus. Ecological relationships among species were found: cheeses characterized by an high abundance of S. thermophilus and L. rhamnosus were spoiled by C. tyrobutyricum while, when L. delbrueckii was the most abundant Lactobacillus, C. butyricum was the dominant spoiling species. Lysozyme also shaped the bacterial community, reducing C. tyrobutyricum in favour of C. butyricum. Moreover, this preservative increased the proportion of L. delbrueckii and obligate heterofermentative lactobacilli and lowered L. helveticus and non-starter species, such as L. rhamnosus and L. casei. PMID:26338123

  10. SYMBIOTIC STAR BLOWS BUBBLES INTO SPACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A tempestuous relationship between an unlikely pair of stars may have created an oddly shaped, gaseous nebula that resembles an hourglass nestled within an hourglass. Images taken with Earth-based telescopes have shown the larger, hourglass-shaped nebula. But this picture, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, reveals a small, bright nebula embedded in the center of the larger one (close-up of nebula in inset). Astronomers have dubbed the entire nebula the 'Southern Crab Nebula' (He2-104), because, from ground-based telescopes, it looks like the body and legs of a crab. The nebula is several light-years long. The possible creators of these shapes cannot be seen at all in this Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image. It's a pair of aging stars buried in the glow of the tiny, central nebula. One of them is a red giant, a bloated star that is exhausting its nuclear fuel and is shedding its outer layers in a powerful stellar wind. Its companion is a hot, white dwarf, a stellar zombie of a burned-out star. This odd duo of a red giant and a white dwarf is called a symbiotic system. The red giant is also a Mira Variable, a pulsating red giant, that is far away from its partner. It could take as much as 100 years for the two to orbit around each other. Astronomers speculate that the interaction between these two stars may have sparked episodic outbursts of material, creating the gaseous bubbles that form the nebula. They interact by playing a celestial game of 'catch': as the red giant throws off its bulk in a powerful stellar wind, the white dwarf catches some of it. As a result, an accretion disk of material forms around the white dwarf and spirals onto its hot surface. Gas continues to build up on the surface until it sparks an eruption, blowing material into space. This explosive event may have happened twice in the 'Southern Crab.' Astronomers speculate that the hourglass-shaped nebulae represent two separate outbursts that occurred several thousand years apart

  11. An experimental study of massive blowing from a nosetip during Jovian entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    The fluid dynamic structure and stability of the boundary layer and shock layer ahead of a highly blowing heat shield in an environment simulating entry into the Jovian atmosphere were investigated. The experimental studies were conducted in the Calspan 96 in shock tunnel with a freestream of a H2/He mixture at Mach numbers above 10. Measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made on the porous model surface, and high-speed schlieren photography was used to examine the structure and stability of the shock layer. Results are presented which show how the heat transfer and shock layer stability vary for gases of different molecular weights for a range of Reynolds numbers and mass-addition rates.

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF CFC AND HCFC SUBSTITUTES FOR BLOWING POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identiry chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbon substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. The substantial ongoing effort is identifying third-generation blowing agets for polyurethane foams to repla...

  13. Blow-up behavior of positive solutions for a chemical fuel ignition device model

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yunfeng; Wu, Jianhua; Xu, Hong-Kun

    2014-04-15

    Blow-up behavior of positive solutions of a semi-linear parabolic system arising from thermal explosion, which subject to the homogenous Dirichlet boundary conditions, is investigated. In particular, sufficient conditions for the solutions to blow up are obtained.

  14. PLA fibers with antimicrobial properties developed by solution blow spinning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present work reports on the development and characterization of novel Poly(lactic acid) hybrid fibers with antimicrobial properties produced by solution blow spinning. This technique presents additional advantages over conventional electrospinning, such as reduced cost and higher rate of fiber p...

  15. 42. NORTHEAST VIEW OF BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 3, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. NORTHEAST VIEW OF BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 3, WITH FILTER CAKE HOSUE IN CENTER FOREGROUND, AND EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWER TO THE LEFT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  16. Seismotectonic implications of sand blows in the southern Mississippi Embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, R.T.; Hill, A.A.; Larsen, D.; Holzer, T.; Forman, S.L.; Noce, T.; Gardner, C.; Morat, J.

    2007-01-01

    We explore seismically-induced sand blows from the southern Mississippi Embayment and their implications in resolving the question of near or distal epicentral source region. This was accomplished using aerial photography, field excavations, and cone penetration tests. Our analysis shows that three sand blow fields exhibit a distinct chronology of strong ground motion for the southern embayment: (1) The Ashley County, Arkansas sand blow field, near the Arkansas/Louisiana state border, experienced four Holocene sand venting episodes; (2) to the north, the Desha County field experienced at least three episodes of liquefaction; and (3) the Lincoln-Jefferson Counties field experienced at least one episode. Cone penetration tests (CPT) conducted in and between the sand blow fields suggest that the fields may not be distal liquefaction associated with New Madrid seismic zone earthquakes but rather are likely associated with strong earthquakes on local faults. This conclusion is consistent with the differences in timing of the southern embayment sand venting episodes and those in the New Madrid seismic zone. These results suggest that active tectonism and strong seismicity in intraplate North America may not be localized at isolated weak spots, but rather widespread on fault systems that are favorably oriented for slip in the contemporary stress field. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  18. 39. SOUTHERN INTERIOR VIEW OF BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. SOUTHERN INTERIOR VIEW OF BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 2 WITH THE STEAM TURBINE BLADES OF AXIAL TURBOBLOWER No. 4. THE STATOR BLADES OF AXIAL TURBOBLOWER No. 4. THE STATOR BLADES AT THE COMPRESSOR END OF AXIAL TURBOBLOWER No. 4 ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  19. CR-39 track etching and blow-up method

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    This invention is a method of etching tracks in CR-39 foil to obtain uniformly sized tracks. The invention comprises a step of electrochemically etching the foil at a low frequency and a "blow-up" step of electrochemically etching the foil at a high frequency.

  20. Blow-Out Fracture due to a Hazel Stick Beat.

    PubMed

    Erbilen, Esin; Yuksel, Harun; Onder, H Ibrahim; Tunc, Murat; Kaya, Murat

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this case report is to demonstrate that blow-out fractures can occur not only by a classical trauma mechanism but also from the consequences of a stick beat. A 66-year-old male was admitted to our hospital complaining of a sudden swelling of his right eyelid after blowing his nose. In his medical history there was the report of a hazel stick beat the previous day. Upon ophthalmological examination, ecchymosis was observed in the right orbital region, and subcutaneous amphisema in addition to a dense subconjunctival hemorrhage were detected. Using computed tomography (CT), the intraorbital air density in the soft tissues and the right maxillary sinus wall fracture possessing fluid density compatible with hemorrhage was observed. The patient was treated conservatively with prednisolone and antibiotics. We conclude that a blow-out fracture may occur in patients who experience orbital trauma, even in cases of low-energy trauma. These patients may be symptomatic after an episode of hard nose-blowing. PMID:25610052

  1. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae which provides a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericat. This s...

  2. 67. View looking east up walkway between blowing engine house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. View looking east up walkway between blowing engine house at left and boilers at right showing base of stack for boilers No. 5 and 6. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Whistle-Blowing and the Code of Silence in Police Agencies: Policy and Structural Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Gary R.; Baldwin, J. Norman

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a study that investigates predictors of police willingness to blow the whistle and police frequency of blowing the whistle on seven forms of misconduct. It specifically investigates the capacity of nine policy and structural variables to predict whistle-blowing. The results indicate that two variables, a…

  4. HOLOCENE AND LATE PLEISTOCENE(? ) EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED SAND BLOWS IN COASTAL SOUTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obermeier, S.F.; Jacobson, R.B.; Powars, D.S.; Weems, R.E.; Hallbick, D.C.; Gohn, G.S.; Markewich, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    Multiple generations of prehistoric sand blows, interpreted as earthquake induced, have been discovered throughout coastal South Carolina. These sand blows extend far beyond 1886 earthquake induced sand blows, in sediments having approximately the same liquefaction susceptibility. The seismic source zone for the prehistoric sand blows is unknown. The different distributions of prehistoric and 1886 sand blows have two possible explanations: (1) moderate to strong earthquakes originated in different seismic source locations through time or (2) at least one earthquake much stronger than the 1886 event also originated from the same seismic source as the 1886 earthquake.

  5. Blow-by gas processing arrangement for automotive internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, N.; Arai, T.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a blow-by gas processing arrangement for an internal combustion engine, comprising: a cylinder block having a chamber for collecting a blow-by gas, a blow-by gas passage communicating with the chamber, and spaced journal walls for supporting a crankshaft; a relatively large oil mist separating passage defined in the cylinder block and laterally extending into one of the journal walls beyond the blow-by gas passage. The oil mist separates passage communicating with the blow-by gas passage for preliminary separating an oil mist from the blow-by gas supplied from the chamber; an oil separator communicating with the oil mist separates passage for separating an oil mist from the blow-by gas supplied from the oil mist separating passage; and a PCV valve is connected to the oil mist separator; and an intake manifold connected to the PCV valve.

  6. An assessment of upper surface blowing for the reduction of tilt rotor download

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faye, Robert E.; Felker, Fort F.; Light, Jeffrey S.

    1987-01-01

    A study evaluating the use of upper-surface blowing to reduce the wing download on a V-22 tilt rotor aircraft has been completed. The study assesses the penalties associated with the upper-surface blowing system (compressor weight, compressor power, etc.), and the reduction in wing download, for a wide range of blowing slot heights and blowing pressure ratios. Three wing configurations were investigated: blowing at both leading and trailing edges with no change in wing planform relative to the V-22 tilt rotor aircraft, blowing at both leading and trailing edges with a 25% reduction in wing chord, and blowing at the leading edge only with the flap deflected 75 deg. Predicted download is presented for all of these configurations, and is compared with the download of the baseline V-22 tilt rotor aircraft configuration. The optimum configuration had 15% less net download than the baseline V-22 configuration.

  7. Stator Loading Measurements Behind a Fan With Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of aircraft noise pollution around airports has become increasingly important as those areas have become more densely populated. Currently, the removal of older noisier aircraft from operation is reducing noise levels around airports; however, with air traffic projected to increase by about 5% over the next decade the number of commercial aircraft operating in the world is expected to be about 17,700 by the year 2007. To keep noise levels around airports from increasing as a result of traffic increases, it is important to investigate new methods of noise reduction. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of the effects that trailing edge blowing has on stator unsteady loading. This is done by presenting flowfield and stator loading data from experiments conducted with and without trailing edge blowing.

  8. Effect of Blowing on Boundary Layer of Scarf Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.

    2004-01-01

    When aircraft operate in stationary or low speed conditions, airflow into the engine accelerates around the inlet lip and pockets of turbulence that cause noise and vibration can be ingested. This problem has been encountered with engines equipped with the scarf inlet, both in full scale and in model tests, where the noise produced during the static test makes it difficult to assess the noise reduction performance of the scarf inlet. NASA Langley researchers have implemented boundary layer control in an attempt to reduce the influence of the flow nonuniformity in a 12-in. diameter model of a high bypass fan engine mounted in an anechoic chamber. Static pressures and boundary layer profiles were measured in the inlet and far field acoustic measurements were made to assess the effectiveness of the blowing treatment. The blowing system was found to lack the authority to overcome the inlet distortions. Methods to improve the implementation of boundary layer control to reduce inlet distortion are discussed.

  9. Intraguild predation influences oviposition behavior of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Galindo, Luciane A; Moral, Rafael A; Moretti, Thiago C; Godoy, Wesley A C; Demétrio, Clarice G B

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are able to identify larvae of an intraguild predator species in the substrate and avoid laying eggs there. Blow flies oviposited in traps with different treatments: substrate only and substrate with larvae of Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794), or Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann, 1830). Ch. megacephala, Ch. putoria, and Lucilia eximia (Wiedemann, 1819) avoided laying eggs in the trap containing Ch. albiceps larvae. Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius, 1775) did not oviposit differently in each substrate but had overall low abundance. The prevalence of species on corpses may be influenced by the ability of the species to detect the presence of other species, mainly predators. In this sense, intraguild predation may result in misinterpretations of a crime scene and should be considered when assessing the minimum postmortem interval. PMID:26888288

  10. Computational investigation of slot blowing for fuselage forebody flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Rizk, Yehia M.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a computational investigation of a tangential slot blowing concept for generating lateral control forces on an aircraft fuselage forebody. The effects of varying both the jet width and jet exit velocity for a fixed location slot are analyzed. This work is aimed at aiding researchers in designing future experimental and computational models of tangential slot blowing. The primary influence on the resulting side force of the forebody is seen to be the jet mass flow rate. This influence is sensitive to different combinations of slot widths and jet velocities over the range of variables considered. Both an actuator plane and an overset grid technique are used to model the tangential slot. The overset method successfully resolves the details of the actual slot geometry, extending the generality of the numerical method. The actuator plane concept predicts side forces similar to those produced by resolving the actual slot geometry.

  11. Lift augmentation via spanwise tip blowing - A numerical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a low aspect ratio wing with and without a spanwise directed jet issuing from the wing tip have been performed. The results show that the tip vortex is displaced outward and upward by the blowing. This gives rise to a local lift augmentation mechanism, vortex lift caused by the vortex core being above the wing, and a global mechanism, the reduction of induced velocities due to greater apparent spin.

  12. A theoretical investigation of over-wing-blowing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical method is established for determining the aerodynamic characteristics of over-wing-blowing configurations. The method accounts for both jet entrainment and jet interaction effects because of the differences in freestream and jet dynamic pressures and Mach numbers. The predicted lift increments agree well with available data. It is shown that the lift is underpredicted with entrainment effect alone when the jet is close to the wing surface.

  13. Modeling the Constitutive Behaviour of PET for Stretch Blow Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S. Y.; Menary, G.

    2011-05-01

    There are a substantial amount of constitutive models that have been developed to capture the finite deformation behavior of polymers for forming simulations. Most of these models have been used to capture the behavior in uniaxial and simultaneous biaxial modes of deformation. However, very few have attempted to model the sequential biaxial deformation behavior which is more appropriate for the stretch blow moulding process. The aim of this work is to develop a model for PET to successfully capture the sequential stress-strain behavior as a function of temperature and strain rate, thus making it suitable for use in simulations of stretch blow moulding. Biaxial test data has been generated at temperatures and strain rates appropriate for stretch blow moulding and a model developed by Buckley et al. has been implemented within the commercial finite element package Abaqus/Explicit. In parallel, an efficient automatic curve fitting procedure has been developed to enable the material parameters to be easily found from biaxial test data. The results show that the Buckley model can predict the stress response of equibiaxial deformation well, but cannot predict the sequential biaxial deformation.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations of blowing dust events in the Taklimakan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinghua; Shen, Shuanghe; Yang, Fan; He, Qing; Ali, Mamtimin; Huo, Wen; Liu, Xinchun

    2016-08-01

    The Taklimakan Desert is the source of most blowing dust events in China. However, previous studies of sandstorms in this region have not included data from the inner desert because of the difficulty in making observations in this area. In this study, the spatial and temporal variations of blowing dust events, including sandstorms and blowing sand, and its relations with climatic parameters in the Taklimakan Desert were analyzed using data from ten desert-edge meteorological stations during 1961 to 2010 and two inner-desert meteorological stations during 1988 to 1990, 1996 to 2010, and 1992 to 2010. The results identified two regions (Pishan-Hotan-Minfeng and Xiaotang-Tazhong) where blowing dust events occur on average more than 80 days per year. The regions with the highest occurrence of sandstorms, blowing sand, and blowing dust events were different, with sandstorms centered in the north of the desert (Xiaotang, 46.9 days), whereas the central location for blowing sand (Pishan, 86.4 days) and blowing dust events (Minfeng, 113.5 days) activity was located at the southwestern and southern edges of the desert, respectively. The occurrence of sandstorms generally decreased from 1961 to 2010, while the occurrence of blowing sand increased from 1961 to 1979 and then generally decreased. The temporal variation of blowing dust events was mainly affected by the occurrence of strong wind and daily temperature, with average correlation coefficients of 0.46 and -0.41 for these variables across the whole desert.

  15. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic effects of distributed spanwise blowing on a fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Hahne, D. E.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests at NASA Langley targeted at the performance and configurational characteristics of 0.1 and 0.13 scale model spanwise blowing (SWB) jet wing concepts are reported. The concept involves redirection of engine compressor bleed air to provide SWB at the fuselage-wing juncture near the wing leading edge. The tests covered the orientation of the outer panel nozzles, the effects of SWB operation on the performance of leading and trailing edge flaps and the effects of SWB on lateral stability. The trials were run at low speeds and angles of attack from 24-45 deg (landing). Both lift and longitudinal stability improved with the SWB, stall and leading edge vortex breakdown were delayed and performance increased with the SWB rate. Lateral stability was degraded below 20 deg angle of attack while instabilities were delayed above 20 deg due to roll damping.

  16. Uniqueness of boundary blow-up solutions on exterior domain of RN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei; Pang, Changci

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the existence and uniqueness of positive solutions of the degenerate logistic type elliptic equation where N[greater-or-equal, slanted]2, D[subset of]RN is a bounded domain with smooth boundary and a(x), b(x) are continuous functions on RN with b(x)[greater-or-equal, slanted]0, b(x)[not identical with]0. We show that under rather general conditions on a(x) and b(x) for large x, there exists a unique positive solution. Our results improve the corresponding ones in [W. Dong, Y. Du, Unbounded principal eigenfunctions and the logistic equation on RN, Bull. Austral. Math. Soc. 67 (2003) 413-427] and [Y. Du, L. Ma, Logistic type equations on RN by a squeezing method involving boundary blow-up solutions, J. London Math. Soc. (2) 64 (2001) 107-124].

  17. Postfeeding larval dispersal behavior of late season blow flies (calliphoridae) in Southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Chantal; Kyle, Christopher; Beresford, David V

    2014-09-01

    Postfeeding dispersal involves migration of larvae away from their food source in order to pupate. Puparia are difficult to find, yet are important for estimating PMI, and missing puparia during collection can result in inaccurate estimations. This study investigates the late season maggot dispersal patterns for blow flies at coyote carcasses in two habitats with an aim to improving puparia collection procedures. Puparia samples collected from various dispersal distances and directions tested the spatial distribution patterns of the various species using the variance/mean ratio (VMR). Lucilia illustris was the most common species to emerge, with a preferred minimum dispersal distance of more than 50.8 cm and an overall VMR value of 14.91, indicating this species had a clumped distribution pattern. These findings highlight that current collection procedures that use random sampling from under carcasses do not adequately account for the spatial distribution of larvae. PMID:24602116

  18. Blow-up properties in the parabolic problems with anisotropic nonstandard growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingchen; Yang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the parabolic problems with anisotropic nonstandard growth nonlinearities. We first give the existence and uniqueness of weak solutions in variable Sobolev spaces. Second, we use the energy methods to show the existence of blow-up solutions with negative or positive initial energy, respectively. Both the variable exponents and the coefficients make important roles in Fujita blow-up phenomena. Moreover, asymptotic properties of the blow-up solutions are determined.

  19. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  20. Low-Speed Fan Noise Reduction With Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Tweedt, Daniel L.; Fite, E. Brian; Envia, Edmane

    2002-01-01

    An experimental proof-of-concept test was conducted to demonstrate reduction of rotor-stator interaction noise through rotor-trailing edge blowing. The velocity deficit from the viscous wake of the rotor blades was reduced by injecting air into the wake from a trailing edge slot. Composite hollow rotor blades with internal flow passages were designed based on analytical codes modeling the internal flow. The hollow blade with interior guide vanes creates flow channels through which externally supplied air flows from the root of the blade to the trailing edge. The impact of the rotor wake-stator interaction on the acoustics was also predicted analytically. The Active Noise Control Fan, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, was used as the proof- of-concept test bed. In-duct mode and farfield directivity acoustic data were acquired at blowing rates (defined as mass supplied to trailing edge blowing system divided by fan mass flow) ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 percent. The first three blade passing frequency harmonics at fan rotational speeds of 1700 to 1900 rpm were analyzed. The acoustic tone power levels (PWL) in the inlet and exhaust were reduced 11.5 and -0.1, 7.2 and 11.4, 11.8 and 19.4 PWL dB, respectively. The farfield tone power levels at the first three harmonics were reduced 5.4, 10.6, and 12.4 dB PWL. At selected conditions, two-component hotwire and stator vane unsteady surface pressures were acquired. These measurements illustrate the physics behind the noise reduction.

  1. Modeling of Droplet Generation in a Top Blowing Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoff; Subagyo; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Li, Zushu

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of metal droplets ejected due to impinging gas jet on the surface of liquid metal is an important parameter for the understanding and for the modeling of the refining kinetics of reactions in slag-metal emulsion zone. In the present work, a numerical study has been carried out to critically examine the applicability of droplet generation rate correlation previously proposed by Subagyo et al. on the basis of dimensionless blowing number (N B). The blowing number was re-evaluated at the impingement point of jet with taking into account the temperature effect of change in density and velocity of the gas jet. The result obtained from the work shows that the modified blowing number N B,T at the furnace temperature of 1873 K (1600 °C) is approximately double in magnitude compared to N B calculated by Subagyo and co-workers. When N B,T has been employed to the Subagyo's empirical correlation for droplet generation, a wide mismatch is observed between the experimental data obtained from cold model and hot model experiments. The reason for this large deviation has been investigated in the current study, and a theoretical approach to estimate the droplet generation rate has been proposed. The suitability of the proposed model has been tested by numerically calculating the amount of metals in slag. The study shows that the weight of metals in emulsion falls in the range of 0 to 21 wt pct of hot metal weight when droplet generation rate has been calculated at ambient furnace temperature of 1873 K (1600 °C).

  2. Controlled vortical flow on delta wings through unsteady leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Roberts, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The vortical flow over a delta wing contributes an important part of the lift - the so called nonlinear lift. Controlling this vortical flow with its favorable influence would enhance aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack. Several previous studies have shown that control of the vortical flow field is possible through the use of blowing jets. The present experimental research studies vortical flow control by applying a new blowing scheme to the rounded leading edge of a delta wing; this blowing scheme is called Tangential Leading Edge Blowing (TLEB). Vortical flow response both to steady blowing and to unsteady blowing is investigated. It is found that TLEB can redevelop stable, strong vortices even in the post-stall angle of attack regime. Analysis of the steady data shows that the effect of leading edge blowing can be interpreted as an effective change in angle of attack. The examination of the fundamental time scales for vortical flow re-organization after the application of blowing for different initial states of the flow field is studied. Different time scales for flow re-organization are shown to depend upon the effective angle of attack. A faster response time can be achieved at angles of attack beyond stall by a suitable choice of the initial blowing momentum strength. Consequently, TLEB shows the potential of controlling the vortical flow over a wide range of angles of attack; i.e., in both for pre-stall and post-stall conditions.

  3. A One-Dimensional Global-Scaling Erosive Burning Model Informed by Blowing Wall Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    A derivation of turbulent flow parameters, combined with data from erosive burning test motors and blowing wall tests results in erosive burning model candidates useful in one-dimensional internal ballistics analysis capable of scaling across wide ranges of motor size. The real-time burn rate data comes from three test campaigns of subscale segmented solid rocket motors tested at two facilities. The flow theory admits the important effect of the blowing wall on the turbulent friction coefficient by using blowing wall data to determine the blowing wall friction coefficient. The erosive burning behavior of full-scale motors is now predicted more closely than with other recent models.

  4. Laminar free convection from a sphere with blowing and suction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Mingjer; Chen, Gahokuang )

    1987-05-01

    The effect of mass transfer on free convection from a vertical plate has been studied by Eichhorn (1960), Sparrow and Cess (1961), Merkin (1972), and Parikh (1974). Recently, Merkin (1975) gave an asymptotic series solution for two-dimensional bodies. Minkowycz and Sparrow (1979) studied a vertical cylinder in a natural convective flow. According to their conclusions, the heat transfer rate increases with suction and decreases with blowing. The present note is concerned with the study of the influence of Prandtl number and surface mass transfer on a steady, laminar, free convective flow over a sphere with nonuniform surface temperature or heat flux.

  5. Two blowing concepts for roll and lateral control of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, D. A.; Wood, N. J.; Lee, C. S.; Roberts, L.

    1986-01-01

    Two schemes to modulate aerodynamic forces for roll and lateral control of aircraft have been investigated. The first scheme, called the lateral blowing concept, consists of thin jets of air exiting spanwise, or at small angle with the spanwise direction, from slots at the tips of straight wings. For this scheme, in addition to experimental measurements, a theory was developed showing the analytical relationship between aerodynamic forces and jet and wing parameters. Experimental results confirmed the theoretically derived scaling laws. The second scheme, which was studied experimentally, is called the jet spoiler concept and consists of thin jets exiting normally to the wing surface from slots aligned with the spanwise direction.

  6. NSF FY 1987 budget dealt blow in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Although it passed through the congressional authorization process unscathed, the budget request for the National Science Foundation (NSF) for fiscal year (FY) 1987 was dealt a serious blow on July 23, 1986, when a House appropriations subcommittee recommended that nearly $146 million be cut from the agency's request for “research and related activities” (R&RA). The full House Appropriations Committee went on to endorse this recommendation on July 31.The committee report accompanying the House appropriation bill leaves the distribution of cuts within R&RA up to the discretion of the NSF director. The report does, however, protect the budget request for the ocean drilling program from a cut.

  7. Using Visual Range Data For Highway Operations In Blowing Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabler, Ronald D.

    1983-09-01

    This paper describes characteristics of visual range attenuation in blowing snow in rela-tion to motorist vision. Visual range V is related to wind speed U according to V = A U-5 with the A coefficient changing in response to snow availability. A lower limit for visual range is described with A = 1.1.108 m6.s-5 An operational monitoring system used on Interstate Highway 80 in Wyoming demonstrates how real-time computer analysis of photometric data can be used to determine the A value, interpret visual range in terms of vehicle operation, and provide automated traffic operations decisions.

  8. Implementation of a Blowing Boundary Condition in the LAURA Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard a.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary steps toward modeling a coupled ablation problem using a finite-volume Navier-Stokes code (LAURA) are presented in this paper. Implementation of a surface boundary condition with mass transfer (blowing) is described followed by verification and validation through comparisons with analytic results and experimental data. Application of the code to a carbon-nosetip ablation problem is demonstrated and the results are compared with previously published data. It is concluded that the code and coupled procedure are suitable to support further ablation analyses and studies.

  9. An implicit finite-difference solution to the viscous shock layer, including the effects of radiation and strong blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.; Smith, G. L.; Perkins, J. N.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference scheme is developed for the fully coupled solution of the viscous, radiating stagnation-streamline equations, including strong blowing. Solutions are presented for both air injection and injection of carbon-phenolic ablation products into air at conditions near the peak radiative heating point in an earth entry trajectory from interplanetary return missions. A detailed radiative-transport code that accounts for the important radiative exchange processes for gaseous mixtures in local thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium is utilized in the study. With minimum number of assumptions for the initially unknown parameters and profile distributions, convergent solutions to the full stagnation-line equations are rapidly obtained by a method of successive approximations. Damping of selected profiles is required to aid convergence of the solutions for massive blowing. It is shown that certain finite-difference approximations to the governing differential equations stabilize and improve the solutions. Detailed comparisons are made with the numerical results of previous investigations. Results of the present study indicate lower radiative heat fluxes at the wall for carbonphenolic ablation than previously predicted.

  10. Genomic approach to studying nutritional requirements of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and other Clostridia causing late blowing defects.

    PubMed

    Storari, Michelangelo; Kulli, Sandra; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bruggmann, Rémy; Berthoud, Hélène; Arias-Roth, Emmanuelle

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is the main microorganism responsible for the late blowing defect in hard and semi-hard cheeses, causing considerable economic losses to the cheese industry. Deeper knowledge of the metabolic requirements of this microorganism can lead to the development of more effective control approaches. In this work, the amino acids and B vitamins essential for sustaining the growth of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated using a genomic approach. As the first step, the genomes of four C. tyrobutyricum strains were analyzed for the presence of genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids and B vitamins. Metabolic pathways could be reconstructed for all amino acids and B vitamins with the exception of biotin (vitamin B7) and folate (vitamin B9). The biotin pathway was missing the enzyme amino-7-oxononanoate synthase that catalyzes the condensation of pimeloyl-ACP and l-alanine to 8-amino-7-oxononanoate. In the folate pathway, the missing genes were those coding for para-aminobenzoate synthase and aminodeoxychorismate lyase enzymes. These enzymes are responsible for the conversion of chorismate into para-aminobenzoate (PABA). Two C. tyrobutyircum strains whose genome was analyzed in silico as well as other 10 strains isolated from cheese were tested in liquid media to confirm these observations. 11 strains showed growth in a defined liquid medium containing biotin and PABA after 6-8 days of incubation. No strain showed growth when only one or none of these compounds were added, confirming the observations obtained in silico. Furthermore, the genome analysis was extended to genomes of single strains of other Clostridium species potentially causing late blowing, namely Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium butyricum. Only the biotin biosynthesis pathway was incomplete for C. butyricum and C. beijerincki. In contrast, C. sporogenes showed missing enzymes in biosynthesis pathways of several amino acids as well

  11. Adaptive Suction and Blowing for Twin-Tail Buffet Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Yang, Zhi

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive active flow control for twin-tail buffet alleviation is investigated. The concept behind this technique is to place control ports on the tail outer and inner surfaces with flow suction or blowing applied through these ports in order to minimize the pressure difference across the tail. The suction or blowing volume flow rate from each port is proportional to the pressure difference across the tail at this location. A parametric study of the effects of the number and location of these ports on the buffet response is carried out. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. This complex multidisciplinary problem is solved sequentially using three sets of equations for the fluid flow, aeroelastic response and grid deformation, using a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The computational model is pitched at 30 deg angle of attack. The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. The model is investigated for the inboard position of the twin tails, which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% of the wing span. Comparison of the time history and power spectral density responses of the tails for various distributions of the control ports are presented and discussed.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Reheat Stretch Blow Molding of PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Dwarak; Dupaix, Rebecca B.

    2004-06-01

    Poly (ethylene terephthalate) or PET is a polymer used as a packaging material for consumer products such as beverages, food or other liquids, and in other applications including drawn fibers and stretched films. Key features that make it widely used are its transparency, dimensional stability, gas impermeability, impact resistance, and high stiffness and strength in certain preferential directions. These commercially useful properties arise from the fact that PET crystallizes upon deformation above the glass transition temperature. Additionally, this strain-induced crystallization causes the deformation behavior of PET to be highly sensitive to processing conditions. It is thus crucial for engineers to be able to predict its performance at various process temperatures, strain rates and strain states so as to optimize the manufacturing process. In addressing these issues; a finite element analysis of the reheat blow molding process with PET has been carried out using ABAQUS. The simulation employed a constitutive model for PET developed by Dupaix and Boyce et al.. The model includes the combined effects of molecular orientation and strain-induced crystallization on strain hardening when the material is deformed above the glass transition temperature. The simulated bottles were also compared with actual blow molded bottles to evaluate the validity of the simulation.

  13. Coupling dynamic blow down and pool evaporation model for LNG.

    PubMed

    Woodward, John L

    2007-02-20

    Treating the dynamic effects of accidental discharges of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is important for realistic predictions of pool radius. Two phenomena have important influence on pool spread dynamics, time-varying discharge (blow down) and pool ignition. Time-varying discharge occurs because a punctured LNG tanker or storage tank drains with a decreasing liquid head and decreasing head-space pressure. Pool ignition increases the evaporation rate of a pool and consequently decreases the ultimate pool area. This paper describes an approach to treat these phenomena in a dynamic pool evaporation model. The pool evaporation model developed here has two separate regimes. Early in the spill, momentum forces dominate and the pool spreads independently of pool evaporation rate and the corresponding heat transfer rate. After the average pool depth drops below a minimum value, momentum forces are largely dissipated and the thin edges of the pool completely evaporate, so pool area is established by the heat transfer rate. The maximum extent of a burning pool is predicted to be significantly less than that of an unignited pool because the duration of the first regime is reduced by higher heat transfer rates. The maximum extent of an LNG pool is predicted to be larger upon accounting for blow down compared with using a constant average discharge rate. However, the maximum pool extent occurs only momentarily before retreating. PMID:17184912

  14. Gas Blowing: Mass Transfer in Gas and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Øyvind Sunde; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Metallurgical routes for solar grade silicon production are being developed as alternatives to chemical processes for their potential to achieve cost reductions, increased production volume, and reduced environmental and safety concerns. An important challenge in the development of metallurgical routes relates to the higher impurity concentrations in the silicon product, particularly for boron and other elements that are not efficiently segregated in solidification techniques. The reactive gas refining process is studied for its potential to remove boron below the solar grade silicon target concentration in a single step by blowing steam and hydrogen gas jets onto the melt surface. Boron in a silicon melt is extracted to HBO gas in parallel to active oxidation of silicon. The literature is not unified regarding the rate determining step in this process. Relevant theories and equations for gas blowing in induction furnaces are combined and used to explain mass transfer in experiments. Mass transfer in the melt and gas is investigated by comparing resistance and induction heating of the melt, and varying gas flow rate, crucible diameter, diameter of the gas lance, and the position of the gas lance above the melt surface. The rate of boron removal is found to increase with increasing gas flow rate and crucible diameter. A relatively high fraction of the reactive gas is utilized in the process, and supply of steam in the bulk gas is the only identified rate determining step.

  15. Optimal determination of soot-blowing and condenser cleaning schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Alag, S.; Chatterjee, J.; Jeyarasasingam, K.; Jain, P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors describe an approach for determining the optimal schedule for soot-blowing and condenser cleaning in a power plant. The soot blower optimizer minimizes a configurable optimization function consisting of loss due to degraded operation, increased emissions, and permanent damage to the component. It used deposition factor, an integral term that is dependent on the history of the plant operation since the last soot blowing and is a non-linear function of parameters that lead to an accumulation of soot on the component. The condenser cleaning optimization process is formulated into a dynamic programming formulation where a decision is made between carrying out a short, long, or no cleaning. Their implementation has several advantages over previous approaches, due to access to an enhanced plant model that enables one to carry out detailed what-if analysis, estimation of missing measurements, availability of a plant equipment performance diagnosis system, the use of emissions in analysis, analysis of all plant components in unison, and access to plant operation history.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Film Cooling at High Blowing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Heidmann, James; Ameri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is used in the analysis of a film cooling jet in crossflow. Predictions of film effectiveness are compared with experimental results for a circular jet at blowing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.0. Film effectiveness is a surface quantity which alone is insufficient in understanding the source and finding a remedy for shortcomings of the numerical model. Therefore, in addition, comparisons are made to flow field measurements of temperature along the jet centerline. These comparisons show that the CFD model is accurately predicting the extent and trajectory of the film cooling jet; however, there is a lack of agreement in the near-wall region downstream of the film hole. The effects of main stream turbulence conditions, boundary layer thickness, turbulence modeling, and numerical artificial dissipation are evaluated and found to have an insufficient impact in the wake region of separated films (i.e. cannot account for the discrepancy between measured and predicted centerline fluid temperatures). Analyses of low and moderate blowing ratio cases are carried out and results are in good agreement with data.

  17. Ratio of nose blow results to intakes during the decommissioning of a facility at Dounreay.

    PubMed

    Spencer, David; Bull, Richard K; White, Simon

    2007-01-01

    During the decommissioning of a large glove box facility at Dounreay, in addition to engineering and administration controls, workers wore pressurised suits to minimise their intake of radionuclides. The workers provided nose blows after each suited operation to provide an indication of the effectiveness of protective measures. The nose blows were also used as indicators of radiological significant intakes. This paper examines the distribution of ratios of nose blow to assessed intake. A geometric mean and variance of the ratio of nose blows to intakes have been derived. The nose blows were provided over a period of 2 y and the alpha-emitting nuclides present are 239Pu, 241Am and 238Pu. Twenty-two nose blow results each with follow-up urine and faecal results are included in the study. The effectiveness of nose blows as an indicator of radiological conditions and as a trigger for the investigation of significant doses is considered. The ratio between assessed intake and nose blow result was shown to be very large. PMID:18223182

  18. Awareness and Ethical Orientation of Alternatively Certified Prospective Teachers to Intention for Whistle Blowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toker Gokce, Asiye

    2013-01-01

    This study inquires whistle blowing intentions of alternatively certified prospective teachers, investigating their moral reasoning to blow the whistle. Specifically three hypotheses were tested: Overall ethical awareness of the alternatively certified prospective teachers is high; the participants will identify reasons related to philosophical…

  19. Stokes' problem with cross-flow-simple example of transient boundary-layer blow-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.-C.

    Some fundamental understanding of the blow-off (i.e., the disappearance of wall shear) of a transient, laminar boundary layer by a strong cross-flow is gained by extending the classical Stokes' first problem to include blowing (and suction). It is found, by asymptotic studies as well as detailed numerical display of exact solutions for a variety of situations (including a similarity solution where the cross-flow varies inversely with the square root of time) that there are, in general, three stages clearly discernible when blowing is present: (1) pre-blow-off stage during which the influence of the cross-flow has not shown up yet; (2) blow-off stage during which the boundary layer exhibits a zero slope in its velocity profile, and the blow-off begins; and (3) post-blow-off stage during which a wave front is seen to ride with the cross-flow, carrying with it a rather rapid change of motion of the wall to the rest-state before it, while the blow-off at the wall is sustained. Furthermore, for very large Reynolds numbers, the front in the third stage becomes very sharp, and the accompanying change very sudden. In contrast, in the case of suction, the boundary layer is seen to stick to the wall, in a more exaggerated manner; and the situation approaches a steady limit for large times.

  20. A Study of Pulsed Blowing Effect on Flow Separation over Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yankui; Zhou, Ping; Li, Qian

    2015-11-01

    With the development of the modern aircraft, such as tailless flying configuration, traditional flaps are also the main control surfaces for flight controlling. However, the efficiency of the flap is not only descent quickly due to flow separation over itself under higher deflection angle of flap, but also is evidently influenced by the flow coming down from the upstream wing. A novel flow control technique to improve the flow separation over the flap by pulsed blowing is investigated in this paper by wind tunnel test under Reynolds number of 0.6* 10E6 2.4* 10E6. To begin with, the control performance for flow separation over the flap is very sensitive to the blowing position and direction and the flow separation can be recovered by the pulsed blowing evidently. Secondly, the pulsed blowing efficiency is 30% higher than that of continuous blowing with the same consumption. In addition, the pulsed blowing efficiency increases quickly with the increasing of pulsed blowing frequency and keep constant gradually when the pulsed blowing Stroul number is bigger than 0.6. National Natural Science Foundation of China (11272035).

  1. Flow visualization studies of blowing from the tip of a swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeannette W.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow visualization studies of blowing from the tip of a swept wing were conducted in the Langley 16- by 24-inch water tunnel. Four wing tips, each with two independent blowing slots, were tested. The two slots were located one behind the other in the chordwise direction. The wing tips were designed to vary systematically the jet length, the jet in-plane exhaust direction (sweep), and the jet out-of-plane exhaust direction (anhedral). Each blowing slot was tested separately at two angles of attack and at four ratios of jet to free stream velocity ratios. Limited tests were conducted with blowing from both slots simultaneously. Blowing from the tip inhibited inboard spanwise flow on the upper wing surface near the tip. The jet path moved farther away from the tip with increasing jet to free stream velocity ratio and moved closer to the tip with increasing angle of attack.

  2. Analysis of Tangential Slot Blowing on F/A-18 Isolated Forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Rizk, Yehia M.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of significant side forces and yawing moments on an F/A-18 fuselage through tangential slot blowing is analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The effects of freestream Mach number, jet exit conditions, jet length, and jet location are studied. The effects of over- and underblowing on force and moment production are analyzed. Non-time-accurate solutions are obtained to determine the steady-state side forces, yawing moments, and surface pressure distributions generated by tangential slot blowing. Time-accurate solutions are obtained to study the force onset time lag of tangential slot blowing. Comparison with available experimental data from full-scale wind-tunnel and subscale wind-tunnel tests are made. This computational analysis complements the experimental results and provides a detailed understanding of the effects of tangential slot blowing on the flowfield about the isolated F/A-18 forebody. Additionally, it extends the slot-blowing database to transonic maneuvering Mach numbers.

  3. Tangential blowing for control of strong normal shock - Boundary layer interactions on inlet ramps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendemann, M. F.; Sanders, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The use of tangential blowing from a row of holes in an aft facing step is found to provide good control of the ramp boundary layer, normal shock interaction on a fixed geometry inlet over a wide range of inlet mass flow ratios. Ramp Mach numbers of 1.36 and 1.96 are investigated. The blowing geometry is found to have a significant effect on system performance at the highest Mach number. The use of high-temperature air in the blowing system, however, has only a slight effect on performance. The required blowing rates are significantly high for the most severe test conditions. In addition, the required blowing coefficient is found to be proportional to the normal shock pressure rise.

  4. Whistle-blowing as a form of advocacy: guidelines for the practitioner and organization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Annette D; Latting, Jean Kantambu

    2004-04-01

    Advocacy has been an inherent component of social work since the mid-1800s. The NASW Code of Ethics explicitly promotes advocacy as an ethical stance against inhumane conditions. Whistle-blowing, on the other hand, occurs mostly in the business and public administration disciplines and is relatively unknown in the social work profession. Using facts from composite cases of whistle-blowing incidents, the purpose of this article is to review the social work profession's current stance on advocacy to protect clients' rights, define and describe theoretical and practical knowledge about whistle-blowing based on a literature review, explain whistle-blowing as a special form of advocacy, and offer guidance to potential whistle-blowers and their organizations on how to handle situations in which whistle-blowing is likely to be considered an option. PMID:15124962

  5. A Basic Study on Countermeasure Against Aerodynamic Force Acting on Train Running Inside Tunnel Using Air Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Nakade, Koji

    A basic study of flow controls using air blowing was conducted to reduce unsteady aerodynamic force acting on trains running in tunnels. An air blowing device is installed around a model car in a wind tunnel. Steady and periodic blowings are examined utilizing electromagnetic valves. Pressure fluctuations are measured and the aerodynamic force acting on the car is estimated. The results are as follows: a) The air blowing allows reducing the unsteady aerodynamic force. b) It is effective to blow air horizontally at the lower side of the car facing the tunnel wall. c) The reduction rate of the unsteady aerodynamic force relates to the rate of momentum of the blowing to that of the uniform flow. d) The periodic blowing with the same frequency as the unsteady aerodynamic force reduces the aerodynamic force in a manner similar to the steady blowing.

  6. 22. Blow Down Valve for Unit 1, view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Blow Down Valve for Unit 1, view to the southwest. This valve allows the water in the draft chest to be lowered (i.e., 'blown down') so that the unit can be motored (i.e., run like an electric motor rather than an electric power generator). The valve is operated by pressure from the instrument air system (part of which is visible in photograph MT-105-A-17 above), but the unit draws on the station air system (see photograph MT-105-A-24 below) to lower the water in the draft chest. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  7. Upper-surface-blowing flow-turning performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeman, W. C., Jr.; Phelps, A. E., III

    1976-01-01

    Jet exhaust flow-turning characteristics were determined for systematic variations in upper-surface blowing exhaust nozzles and trailing-edge flap configuration variables from experimental wind-off (static) flow studies. For conditions with parallel flow exhausting from the nozzle, jet height (as indicated by nozzle exit height) and flap radius were found to be the most important parameters relating to flow turning. Nonparallel flow from the nozzle, as obtained from an internal roof angle and/or side spread angle, had a large favorable effect on flow turning. Comparisons made between static turning results and wind tunnel aerodynamic studies of identical configurations indicated that static flow-turning results can be indicative of wind-on powered lift performance for both good and poor nozzle-flap combinations but, for marginal designs, can lead to overly optimistic assessment of powered lift potential.

  8. Blow-down analysis of helium from a cryogenic dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, H. J.; Zhang, Q. Q.; Rhee, M.; Figueroa, O.

    NASA is currently developing Space Shuttle-based refilling of helium using superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT). All the critical components of SHOOT need to be developed through ground-based tests. The helium dewar is one of these components. The Dewar consists of a vacuum vessel enclosing a superinsulated tank. The space between the vacuum vessel and the liquid tank is considered a common vacuum space. In the event that the vacuum is lost, the heat transfers to the dewar and the pressure inside the dewar increases rapidly, resulting in rupture of the dewar due to excessive pressure. Therefore, an emergency vent line is required for release of helium to prevent the dewar from rupturing. The study describes a numerical model for blow-down analysis in an emergency. This qualifies the design of the emergency vent line to be adequate for the assumed heat loads to the helium dewar.

  9. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  10. Blow-up and control of marginally separated boundary layers.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stefan; Kluwick, Alfred

    2005-05-15

    Interactive solutions for steady two-dimensional laminar marginally separated boundary layers are known to exist up to a critical value Gamma(c) of the controlling parameter (e.g. the angle of attack of a slender airfoil) Gamma only. Here, we investigate three-dimensional unsteady perturbations of such boundary layers, assuming that the basic flow is almost critical, i.e. in the limit Gamma(c)-Gamma-->0. It is then shown that the interactive equations governing such perturbations simplify significantly, allowing, among others, a systematic study of the blow-up phenomenon observed in earlier investigations and the optimization of devices used in boundary-layer control. PMID:16105768

  11. Soot blower using fuel gas as blowing medium

    DOEpatents

    Tanca, Michael C.

    1982-01-01

    A soot blower assembly (10) for use in combination with a coal gasifier (14). The soot blower assembly is adapted for use in the hot combustible product gas generated in the gasifier as the blowing medium. The soot blower lance (20) and the drive means (30) by which it is moved into and out of the gasifier is housed in a gas tight enclosure (40) which completely surrounds the combination. The interior of the enclosure (40) is pressurized by an inert gas to a pressure level higher than that present in the gasifier so that any combustible product gas leaking from the soot blower lance (20) is forced into the gasifier rather than accumulating within the enclosure.

  12. Skin Friction Reduction by Micro-Blowing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for reducing skin friction of an object in relative motion to a fluid. A skin forming a boundary between the object and the fluid, the skin having holes through which micro-blowing of air is blown and a transmitting mechanism for transmitting air through the skin. The skin has an inner layer and an outer layer. the inner layer being a low permeable porous sheet, the outer layer being a plate having high aspect ratio high porosity. and small holes. The system may further include a suction apparatus for suctioning air from the outer layer. The method includes the steps of transmitting air through the inner layer and passing the air transmitted through the inner layer to the outer layer. The method may further include the step of bleeding air off the outer layer using the suction apparatus.

  13. Wagon loads of sand blows in White County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Bilham, R.; Mueller, K.; Stephenson, W.; Williams, R.; Odum, J.

    2005-01-01

    Several anecdotal accounts provide compelling evidence that liquefaction occurred at several sites in Illinois during the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence, as much as 250 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). At one Wabash Valley location, sand blows are still evident near Big Prairie, Illinois, a location described in a particularly detailed and precise historic account. This account includes descriptions of substantial liquefaction (sand blows) as well as a two-mile-long east-west-trending "crack" along which two feet of south-side-down displacement occurred. An offset can no longer be seen at this location, which has been extensively farmed and plowed for decades. Field reconnaissance verifies many of the details provided in the account, however. We conducted a seismic-reflection experiment at this location and observed a modest offset in the Paleozoic strata at this location. The offset is opposite to that described in the historic account, consistent with the hypothesis that large midcontinent earthquakes occur on faults reactivated in a Holocene stress regime different from the one in which they were formed. Only two explanations can account for these observations: Either large NMSZ events triggered substantial liquefaction at distances greater than hitherto realized, or at least one large "New Madrid" event occurred significantly north of the NMSZ. We explore these possibilities and conclude that, while neither one can be ruled out, several disparate lines of evidence suggest that the 23 January 1812 "New Madrid mainshock" occurred in White County, Illinois, near the location of the mb 5.5 1968 southern Illinois earthquake and recent microearthquake activity.

  14. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    The noise produced by the low bypass ratio turbofan engines used to power fighter aircraft is a problem for communities near military bases and for personnel working in close proximity to the aircraft. For example, carrier deck personnel are subject to noise exposure that can result in Noise-Induced Hearing Loss which in-turn results in over a billion dollars of disability payments by the Veterans Administration. Several methods have been proposed to reduce the jet noise at the source. These methods include microjet injection of air or water downstream of the jet exit, chevrons, and corrugated nozzle inserts. The last method involves the insertion of corrugated seals into the diverging section of a military-style convergent-divergent jet nozzle (to replace the existing seals). This has been shown to reduce both the broadband shock-associated noise as well as the mixing noise in the peak noise radiation direction. However, the original inserts were designed to be effective for a take-off condition where the jet is over-expanded. The nozzle performance would be expected to degrade at other conditions, such as in cruise at altitude. A new method has been proposed to achieve the same effects as corrugated seals, but using fluidic inserts. This involves injection of air, at relatively low pressures and total mass flow rates, into the diverging section of the nozzle. These fluidic inserts" deflect the flow in the same way as the mechanical inserts. The fluidic inserts represent an active control method, since the injectors can be modified or turned off depending on the jet operating conditions. Noise reductions in the peak noise direction of 5 to 6 dB have been achieved and broadband shock-associated noise is effectively suppressed. There are multiple parameters to be considered in the design of the fluidic inserts. This includes the number and location of the injectors and the pressures and mass flow rates to be used. These could be optimized on an ad hoc basis with

  15. Suppression of Dynamic Stall by Steady and Pulsed Upper-Surface Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D.; McAlister, K. W.; Tso, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Boeing-Vertol VR-7 airfoil was experimentally studied with steady and pulsed upper-surface blowing for sinusoidal pitching oscillations described by alpha = alpha(sub m) + 10 deg sin(omega t). The tests were conducted in the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate's Water Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The experiment was performed at a Reynolds number of 100,000. Pitch oscillations with alpha(sub m) = 10 deg and 15 deg and with reduced frequencies ranging from k = 0.005 to 0.15 were examined. Blowing conditions ranged from C(sub mu) = 0.03 to 0.66 and F(+) = 0 to 3. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching-moment loads were measured, and fluorescent-dye flow visualizations were obtained. Steady, upper-surface blowing was found to be capable of trapping a separation bubble near the leading edge during a portion of the airfoil's upward rotation. When this occurred, the lift was increased significantly and stall was averted. In all cases, steady blowing reduced the hysteresis amplitudes present in the loads and produced a large thrust force. The benefits of steady blowing diminished as the reduced frequency and mean angle of oscillation increased. Pulsed blowing showed only marginal benefits for the conditions tested. The greatest gains from pulsed blowing were achieved at F(+) = 0.9.

  16. Effect of blowing agents on the oxidation resistance of carbon foams prepared from molten sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimman, R.; Prabhakaran, K.

    2013-06-01

    We have prepared low density carbon foams from molten sucrose using aluminium nitrate and boric acid blowing agents. A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of the carbon foams prepared using the two blowing agents are reported in the present paper. Oxidation of the carbon foams was evaluated under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions in air atmosphere using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). We have observed that the alumina produced from the aluminium nitrate blowing agent acts as a catalyst whereas the boron produced from boric acid inhibits the oxidation of the carbon foams. The oxidation resistance of carbon foams increases with boron concentration. The oxidation onset temperature for the carbon foams prepared using boric acid blowing agent was nearly 60°C higher than that prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent. Carbon foams prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent undergoes complete oxidation at temperature less than 700°C. Whereas that prepared using boric acid blowing agent leave ˜ 50 wt.% residue at 900°C. Further evidence is provided by the kinetic analysis of the TGA using Coats-Redfern (CR) equation.

  17. Turbulent boundary layer control at moderate Reynolds numbers by means of uniform blowing/suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kametani, Yukinori; Fukagata, Koji; Orlu, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    The effect of uniform blowing or suction from the wall on a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer has been studied in order to use them ultimately for flow control on the surface of high-speed vehicles. In the present study, a series of large eddy simulations is performed to investigate the effects of uniform blowing/suction on the skin friction drag as well as the scale of turbulent structures at moderate Reynolds numbers up to Reθ = 2500, based on free-stream velocity, U∞, and momentum thickness, θ. The amplitude of blowing or suction is fixed to 0.1% of U∞with different streamwise ranges of the control region. While the Reynolds shear and normal stresses and their spectral energy distributions are increased by blowing and decreased by suction, in particular, in the outer region, the FIK identity reveals that drag reduction (DR) or enhancement (DE) are mainly linked to changes in the spatial development of the mean wall-normal convection term rather than the contribution from the Reynolds shear stress. Despite the weak amplitude of the control, over 10% of DR and DE are achieved by blowing and suction, respectively. In case of blowing, the mean DR rate increases as the blowing region extends because the local reduction rate grows in the streamwise direction. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (No. 25420129), Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellow (No. 24-3450), the Knut an Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  18. Foam injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers: Blowing agents, foaming process and characterization of structural foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, S.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer foams play an important role caused by the steadily increasing demand to light weight design. In case of soft polymers, like thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), the haptic feeling of the surface is affected by the inner foam structure. Foam injection molding of TPEs leads to so called structural foam, consisting of two compact skin layers and a cellular core. The properties of soft structural foams like soft-touch, elastic and plastic behavior are affected by the resulting foam structure, e.g. thickness of the compact skins and the foam core or density. This inner structure can considerably be influenced by different processing parameters and the chosen blowing agent. This paper is focused on the selection and characterization of suitable blowing agents for foam injection molding of a TPE-blend. The aim was a high density reduction and a decent inner structure. Therefore DSC and TGA measurements were performed on different blowing agents to find out which one is appropriate for the used TPE. Moreover a new analyzing method for the description of processing characteristics by temperature dependent expansion measurements was developed. After choosing suitable blowing agents structural foams were molded with different types of blowing agents and combinations and with the breathing mold technology in order to get lower densities. The foam structure was analyzed to show the influence of the different blowing agents and combinations. Finally compression tests were performed to estimate the influence of the used blowing agent and the density reduction on the compression modulus.

  19. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  20. Roll-yaw control at high angle of attack by forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, N.; Rock, S. M.; Celik, Z. Z.; Roberts, L.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using forebody tangential blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model is experimentally demonstrated. An unsteady model of the aerodynamics is developed based on the fundamental physics of the flow. Data from dynamic experiments is used to validate the aerodynamic model. A unique apparatus is designed and built that allows the wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom, roll and yaw. Dynamic experiments conducted at 45 degrees angle of attack reveal the system to be unstable. The natural motion is divergent. The aerodynamic model is incorporated into the equations of motion of the system and used for the design of closed loop control laws that make the system stable. These laws are proven through dynamic experiments in the wind tunnel using blowing as the only actuator. It is shown that asymmetric blowing is a highly non-linear effector that can be linearized by superimposing symmetric blowing. The effects of forebody tangential blowing and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure are determined through flow visualization experiments. The transient response of roll and yaw moments to a step input blowing are determined. Differences on the roll and yaw moment dependence on blowing are explained based on the physics of the phenomena.

  1. Roll-Yaw control at high angle of attack by forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, N.; Rock, S. M.; Celik, Z. Z.; Roberts, L.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using forebody tangential blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model is experimentally demonstrated. An unsteady model of the aerodynamics is developed based on the fundamental physics of the flow. Data from dynamic experiments is used to validate the aerodynamic model. A unique apparatus is designed and built that allows the wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom, roll and yaw. Dynamic experiments conducted at 45 degrees angle of attack reveal the system to be unstable. The natural motion is divergent. The aerodynamic model is incorporated into the equations of motion of the system and used for the design of closed loop control laws that make the system stable. These laws are proven through dynamic experiments in the wind tunnel using blowing as the only actuator. It is shown that asymmetric blowing is a highly non-linear effector that can be linearized by superimposing symmetric blowing. The effects of forebody tangential blowing and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure are determined through flow visualization experiments. The transient response of roll and yaw moments to a step input blowing are determined. Differences on the roll and yaw moment dependence on blowing are explained based on the physics of the phenomena.

  2. Numerical study of the trailing vortex of a wing with wing-tip blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hock-Bin

    1994-01-01

    Trailing vortices generated by lifting surfaces such as helicopter rotor blades, ship propellers, fixed wings, and canard control surfaces are known to be the source of noise, vibration, cavitation, degradation of performance, and other hazardous problems. Controlling these vortices is, therefore, of practical interest. The formation and behavior of the trailing vortices are studied in the present research. In addition, wing-tip blowing concepts employing axial blowing and spanwise blowing are studied to determine their effectiveness in controlling these vortices and their effects on the performance of the wing. The 3D, unsteady, thin-layer compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a time-accurate, implicit, finite difference scheme that employs LU-ADI factorization. The wing-tip blowing is simulated using the actuator plane concept, thereby, not requiring resolution of the jet slot geometry. Furthermore, the solution blanking feature of the chimera scheme is used to simplify the parametric study procedure for the wing-tip blowing. Computed results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that axial wing-tip blowing, although delaying the rolling-up of the trailing vortices and the near-field behavior of the flowfield, does not dissipate the circulation strength of the trailing vortex farther downstream. Spanwise wing-tip blowing has the effect of displacing the trailing vortices outboard and upward. The increased 'wing-span' due to the spanwise wing-tip blowing has the effect of lift augmentation on the wing and the strengthening of the trailing vortices. Secondary trailing vortices are created at high spanwise wing-tip blowing intensities.

  3. Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere `blow-off'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere ‘blow-off’ hi-res Size hi-res: 1096 kb Credits: ESA/Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere ‘blow-off’ This artist’s impression shows an extended ellipsoidal envelope - the shape of a rugby-ball - of oxygen and carbon discovered around the well-known extrasolar planet HD 209458b. An international team of astronomers led by Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) observed the first signs of oxygen and carbon in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our Solar System for the first time using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The atoms of carbon and oxygen are swept up from the lower atmosphere with the flow of escaping atmospheric atomic hydrogen - like dust in a supersonic whirlwind - in a process called atmospheric ‘blow off’. Oxygen and carbon have been detected in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our Solar System for the first time. Scientists using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed the famous extrasolar planet HD 209458b passing in front of its parent star, and found oxygen and carbon surrounding the planet in an extended ellipsoidal envelope - the shape of a rugby-ball. These atoms are swept up from the lower atmosphere with the flow of the escaping atmospheric atomic hydrogen, like dust in a supersonic whirlwind. The team led by Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) reports this discovery in a forthcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters. The planet, called HD 209458b, may sound familiar. It is already an extrasolar planet with an astounding list of firsts: the first extrasolar planet discovered transiting its sun, the first with an atmosphere, the first observed to have an evaporating hydrogen atmosphere (in 2003 by the same team of scientists) and now the first to have an atmosphere containing oxygen and carbon. Furthermore

  4. Stable Self-Similar Blow-Up Dynamics for Slightly {L^2}-Supercritical Generalized KDV Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider the slightly {L^2}-supercritical gKdV equations {partial_t u+(u_{xx}+u|u|^{p-1})_x=0}, with the nonlinearity {5 < p < 5+\\varepsilon} and {0 < \\varepsilon≪ 1}. We will prove the existence and stability of a blow-up dynamics with self-similar blow-up rate in the energy space {H^1} and give a specific description of the formation of the singularity near the blow-up time.

  5. On the blow-up solutions for the nonlinear fractional Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shihui

    2016-07-01

    This paper is dedicated to the blow-up solutions for the nonlinear fractional Schrödinger equation arising from pseudorelativistic Boson stars. First, we compute the best constant of a gG-N inequality by the profile decomposition theory and variational arguments. Then, we find the sharp threshold mass of the existence of finite-time blow-up solutions. Finally, we study the dynamical properties of finite-time blow-up solutions around the sharp threshold mass by giving a refined compactness lemma.

  6. An experimental investigation of leading-edge vortex augmentation by blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, R. G.; Wray, W. O.; Smith, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the effects of over-the-wing blowing as a means of augmenting the leading-edge vortex flow of several pointed-tip, sharp-edged planforms. Arrow, delta, and diamond wings with leading-edge sweeps of 30 and 45 degrees were mounted on a body-of-revolution fuselage and tested in a low-speed wind tunnel at a Mach number of 0.2. Nozzle location data, pitch data, and flow-visualization pictures were obtained for a range of blowing rates. Results show pronounced increases in vortex lift due to the blowing.

  7. Flap noise measurements for STOL configurations using external upper surface blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Reshotko, M.; Olsen, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Screening tests of upper surface blowing on externally blown flaps configurations were conducted. Noise and turning effectiveness data were obtained with small-scale, engine-over-the-wing models. One large model was tested to determine scale effects. Nozzle types included circular, slot, D-shaped, and multilobed. Tests were made with and without flow attachment devices. For STOL applications the particular multilobed mixer and the D-shaped nozzles tested were found to offer little or no noise advantage over the round convergent nozzle. High aspect ratio slot nozzles provided the quietest configurations. In general, upper surface blowing was quieter than lower surface blowing for equivalent EBF models.

  8. Glass Blowing -- Try It, You'll Like It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilavore, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the basics of scientific glassblowing, including equipment needed, lighting a hand torch (which uses a gas and oxygen mixture), and cutting tubing. Also discusses preparation of butt joints, tee joints, and bends. Photographs illustrating various techniques are provided. (JN)

  9. Numerical and experimental study of blowing jet on a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobonea, A.; Pricop, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    Active manipulation of separated flows over airfoils at moderate and high angles of attack in order to improve efficiency or performance has been the focus of a number of numerical and experimental investigations for many years. One of the main methods used in active flow control is the usage of blowing devices with constant and pulsed blowing. Through CFD simulation over a 2D high-lift airfoil, this study is trying to highlight the impact of pulsed blowing over its aerodynamic characteristics. The available wind tunnel data from INCAS low speed facility are also beneficial for the validation of the numerical analysis. This study intends to analyze the impact of the blowing jet velocity and slot geometry on the efficiency of an active flow control.

  10. On lower bounds for possible blow-up solutions to the periodic Navier-Stokes equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cortissoz, Jean C. Montero, Julio A. Pinilla, Carlos E.

    2014-03-15

    We show a new lower bound on the H{sup .3/2} (T{sup 3}) norm of a possible blow-up solution to the Navier-Stokes equation, and also comment on the extension of this result to the whole space. This estimate can be seen as a natural limiting result for Leray's blow-up estimates in L{sup p}(R{sup 3}), 3 < p < ∞. We also show a lower bound on the blow-up rate of a possible blow-up solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in H{sup .5/2} (T{sup 3}), and give the corresponding extension to the case of the whole space.

  11. Generating Soap Bubbles by Blowing on Soap Films.

    PubMed

    Salkin, Louis; Schmit, Alexandre; Panizza, Pascal; Courbin, Laurent

    2016-02-19

    Making soap bubbles by blowing air on a soap film is an enjoyable activity, yet a poorly understood phenomenon. Working either with circular bubble wands or long-lived vertical soap films having an adjustable steady state thickness, we investigate the formation of such bubbles when a gas is blown through a nozzle onto a film. We vary film size, nozzle radius, space between the film and nozzle, and gas density, and we measure the gas velocity threshold above which bubbles are formed. The response is sensitive to containment, i.e., the ratio between film and jet sizes, and dissipation in the turbulent gas jet, which is a function of the distance from the film to the nozzle. We rationalize the observed four different regimes by comparing the dynamic pressure exerted by the jet on the film and the Laplace pressure needed to create the curved surface of a bubble. This simple model allows us to account for the interplay between hydrodynamic, physicochemical, and geometrical factors. PMID:26943558

  12. Flutter Stability Verified for the Trailing Edge Blowing Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    The TURBO-AE aeroelastic code has been used to verify the flutter stability of the trailing edge blowing (TEB) fan, which is a unique technology demonstrator being designed and fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center for testing in Glenn s 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Air can be blown out of slots near the trailing edges of the TEB fan blades to fill in the wakes downstream of the rotating blades, which reduces the rotor-stator interaction (tone) noise caused by the interaction of wakes with the downstream stators. The TEB fan will demonstrate a 1.6-EPNdB reduction in tone noise through wake filling. Furthermore, the reduced blade-row interaction will decrease the possibility of forced-response vibrations and enable closer spacing of blade rows, thus reducing engine length and weight. The detailed aeroelastic analysis capability of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes TURBO-AE code was used to check the TEB fan rotor blades for flutter stability. Flutter calculations were first performed with no TEB flow; then select calculations were repeated with TEB flow turned on.

  13. High speed aerodynamics of upper surface blowing aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Larry D.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the high speed aerodynamics of Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations has been conducted to accurately define the magnitude and causes of the powered configuration cruise drag. A highly instrumented wind tunnel model of a realistic USB configuration was used which permitted parametric variations in the number and spanwise location of the nacelles and was powered with two turbofan engine simulators. The tests conducted in the Ames 14 Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel examined 10 different configurations at Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.775, fan nozzle pressure ratios from 1.1 to 2.1 and angles of attack from -4 to 6 degrees. Measured force data is presented which indicates the cruise drag penalty associated with each configuration and surface pressure contour plots are used to illustrate the underlying flowfield physics. It was found that all of the tested configurations suffered from a severe drag penalty which increased with freestream Mach number, power setting and angle of attack and was associated with the presence of strong shocks and regions of separated flow in the wing/nacelle junction regions.

  14. Landauer's blow-torch effect in systems with entropic potential.

    PubMed

    Das, Moupriya; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    We consider local heating of a part of a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure of a varying cross section confining a system of overdamped Brownian particles. Since varying cross section in higher dimension results in an entropic potential in lower dimension, local heating alters the relative stability of the entropic states. We show that this blow-torch effect modifies the entropic potential in a significant way so that the resultant effective entropic potential carries both the features of variation of width of the confinement and variation of temperature along the direction of transport. The reduced probability distribution along the direction of transport calculated by full numerical simulations in two dimensions agrees well with our analytical findings. The extent of population transfer in the steady state quantified in terms of the integrated probability of residence of the particles in either of the two lobes exhibits interesting variation with the mean position of the heated region. Our study reveals that heating around two particular zones of a given lobe maximizes population transfer to the other. PMID:26651672

  15. Landauer's blow-torch effect in systems with entropic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Moupriya; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    We consider local heating of a part of a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure of a varying cross section confining a system of overdamped Brownian particles. Since varying cross section in higher dimension results in an entropic potential in lower dimension, local heating alters the relative stability of the entropic states. We show that this blow-torch effect modifies the entropic potential in a significant way so that the resultant effective entropic potential carries both the features of variation of width of the confinement and variation of temperature along the direction of transport. The reduced probability distribution along the direction of transport calculated by full numerical simulations in two dimensions agrees well with our analytical findings. The extent of population transfer in the steady state quantified in terms of the integrated probability of residence of the particles in either of the two lobes exhibits interesting variation with the mean position of the heated region. Our study reveals that heating around two particular zones of a given lobe maximizes population transfer to the other.

  16. Generating Soap Bubbles by Blowing on Soap Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkin, Louis; Schmit, Alexandre; Panizza, Pascal; Courbin, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Making soap bubbles by blowing air on a soap film is an enjoyable activity, yet a poorly understood phenomenon. Working either with circular bubble wands or long-lived vertical soap films having an adjustable steady state thickness, we investigate the formation of such bubbles when a gas is blown through a nozzle onto a film. We vary film size, nozzle radius, space between the film and nozzle, and gas density, and we measure the gas velocity threshold above which bubbles are formed. The response is sensitive to containment, i.e., the ratio between film and jet sizes, and dissipation in the turbulent gas jet, which is a function of the distance from the film to the nozzle. We rationalize the observed four different regimes by comparing the dynamic pressure exerted by the jet on the film and the Laplace pressure needed to create the curved surface of a bubble. This simple model allows us to account for the interplay between hydrodynamic, physicochemical, and geometrical factors.

  17. Laser Blow Off and Impurity Entrainment in CSDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Jordan James; Thakur, Saikat; Tynan, George

    2015-11-01

    Material migration in tokamaks is especially important when considering the lifetime of plasma facing components. However, the flow geometry in the scrape off layer can be complex and diagnostic access is limited. To study the impurity transport in a simple geometry, a laser blow off apparatus was installed on the Controlled Shear Decorelation eXperiment (a 3m long linear helicon source operated plasma machine with an electron temperature of 4 eV and density of 1013 per cm3). The parallel velocity and diffusion coefficients for the impurity are determined by modeling the impurity injection with the 1-D advection-diffusion equation. The parallel velocity of the impurity cloud found with the model agrees very well with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the parallel plasma ion velocity. This indicates that the bismuth impurities are fully entrained in the plasma, which is consistent with classical collisional theories. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Award Number DE-FG02-07ER54912.

  18. An experimental investigation of delta wing vortex flow with and without external jet blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanski, Kenneth P.; Ng, T. Terry; Nelson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    A visual and quantitative study of the vortex flow field over a 70-deg delta wing with an external jet blowing parallel to and at the leading edge was conducted. In the experiment, the vortex core was visually marked with TiCl4, and LDA was used to measure the velocity parallel and normal to the wing surface. It is found that jet blowing moved vortex breakdown farther downstream from its natural position and influenced the breakdown characteristics.

  19. Blowout fracture of the orbital floor secondary to vigorous nose blowing.

    PubMed

    Halpenny, D; Corbally, C; Torreggiani, W

    2012-01-01

    Orbital floor fracture due to vigorous nose blowing in the absence of mechanical trauma is rare, only four cases having previously been reported. In each of these cases, predisposing factors have been identified; preceding URTI in three and a history of sino-nasal surgery in the fourth case. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who developed a maxillary sinus fracture and orbital emphysema after blowing her nose. PMID:23008887

  20. Control of Flow Structure on Low Swept Delta Wing with Steady Leading Edge Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Ilhan; Zharfa, Mohammadreza; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    Interest in unmanned combat air vehicles (UCAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) has stimulated investigation of the flow structure, as well as its control, on delta wings having low and moderate values of sweep angle. In the present study, the flow structure is characterized on a delta wing of low sweep 35-degree angle, which is subjected to steady leading edge blowing. The techniques of laser illuminated smoke visualization, laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), and surface pressure measurements are employed to investigate the steady and unsteady nature of the flow structure on delta wing, in relation to the dimensionless magnitude of the blowing coefficient. Using statistics and spectral analysis, unsteadiness of the flow structure is studied in detail. Different injection locations are utilized to apply different blowing patterns in order to identify the most efficient control, which provides the upmost change in the flow structure with the minimum energy input. The study aims to find the optimum flow control strategy to delay or to prevent the stall and possibly to reduce the buffeting on the wing surface. Since the blowing set-up is computer controlled, the unsteady blowing patterns compared to the present steady blowing patterns will be studied next. This project was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (Project Number: 3501 111M732).

  1. Fledging success is a poor indicator of the effects of bird blow flies on ovenbird survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Streby, Henry M.; Peterson, Sean M.; Kapfer, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Infestations of bird blow flies (Protocalliphora spp. and Trypocalliphora braueri) have various negative effects on the condition of nestling birds. In the absence of other stressors such as inclement weather, however, infestation alone rarely reduces fledging success. Previous studies have documented effects of blow flies on nestling condition and fledging success. Without information regarding fledgling survival, the full effect of blow-fly infestation remains unclear. To fully investigate the effect of blow-fly infestation on reproductive success of the Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), we monitored infested and non-infested nests and monitored fledglings from each by using radio telemetry. Blow flies did not affect birds during the nestling period, as brood size, mean nestling mass, fledging success, and time to fledging in infested and non-infested nests were no different. Fledgling survival and minimum distance traveled the first day after fledging, however, were significantly lower for infected fledglings than for those that were not infected. We conclude that the stress of the early fledgling period combined with recent or concurrent blow-fly infection increases mortality in young Oven-birds. Our results demonstrate the importance of including the post-fledging period in investigations of the effects of ectoparasitic infestations on birds.

  2. First Satellite-detected Perturbations of Outgoing Longwave Radiation Associated with Blowing Snow Events over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Palm, Stephen P.; Marshak, Alexander; Wu, Dong L.; Yu, Hongbin; Fu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We present the first satellite-detected perturbations of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) associated with blowing snow events over the Antarctic ice sheet using data from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System. Significant cloud-free OLR differences are observed between the clear and blowing snow sky, with the sign andmagnitude depending on season and time of the day. During nighttime, OLRs are usually larger when blowing snow is present; the average difference in OLRs between without and with blowing snow over the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is about 5.2 W/m2 for the winter months of 2009. During daytime, in contrast, the OLR perturbation is usually smaller or even has the opposite sign. The observed seasonal variations and day-night differences in the OLR perturbation are consistent with theoretical calculations of the influence of blowing snow on OLR. Detailed atmospheric profiles are needed to quantify the radiative effect of blowing snow from the satellite observations.

  3. Two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic analysis of blow-by in a coaxial plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, J. T.; Thio, Y. C. F.; Wu, S. T.

    2006-05-01

    When the driving magnetic pressure profile is unbalanced by the plasma density profile in a coaxial plasma accelerator, a portion of the plasma and associated current sheet may "blow by" the remaining bulk of the plasma. The fast moving plasma creates a significant back electromotive force, draining energy otherwise available for acceleration. The onset of blow-by for an unmagnetized plasma of finite length in a straight coaxial plasma accelerator was studied by exploring systematically the effects of the initial density profile, driving current, plasma temperature, inductance gradient, and electrode radii scale size on the blow-by time. In order to avoid the onset of blow-by, the principal acceleration phase needs to be less than the characteristic blow-by time, which is a function of electrode geometry, plasma conditions, and circuit parameters. For an initially uniform density profile, the total impulse at blow-by time is proportional to the current, plasma mass, jet length, and reciprocal of the electrode radius ratio.

  4. Study on the conditions necessary for blowing snow to occur in which multiple meteorological elements are considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, S.; Takechi, H.; Kokubu, T.; Harada, Y.; Matsuzawa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Elucidation of the conditions under which blowing snow occurs is important not only in mitigating snowstorm-related disasters but also in discussing the mass balance of water. The major factor for the occurrence of blowing snow is strong winds. However, the conditions that cause blowing snow are complicated, because temperature, the condition of the snow surface, and the presence or absence of falling snow affect blowing snow occurrence. We created a formula for determining the conditions under which blowing snow will occur, based on multiple meteorological elements. In this presentation, we report the results of analysis on the occurrence conditions of blowing snow without concurrent falling snow. The observation data used in the analysis were obtained in Hokkaido, northern Japan, from December 2012 to April 2013. The observed items were air temperature, wind velocity, intensity of solar radiation, snow depth and the mass flux of blowing snow particles. In addition to the above, videos were taken to determine the presence of blowing snow. After the blowing snow events were extracted, each meteorological element was compared with the frequency of blowing snow occurrence. The analysis found that the frequency tended to be low when 12 or more hours had passed after a snowfall event or when the maximum air temperature exceeded 2 °C. It is thought that the snow particles sinter together and the surface of the snow pack hardens, and that such sintering makes it difficult for the particles fly off from the snow surface. It was shown that the frequency of blowing snow occurrence is high when large amounts of fresh snow are on the ground. Based on the above examinations, a formula for determining the occurrence of blowing snow was created using the discriminate analysis method. An accuracy verification test found the formula to have a hit ratio of 92.3%. The verification test showed the formula to be useful in determining the occurrence of blowing snow.

  5. Hydrodynamic gas mixture separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyarov, A.A.

    1982-02-10

    The separation of gas mixtures is the basis of many chemical, petrochemical, and gas processes. Classical separation methods (absorption, adsorption, condensation, and freezing) require cumbersome and complex equipment. No adequate solution is provided by the cheapening and simplification of gas-processing apparatus and separation methods by hydration and diffusion. For example, an apparatus for extracting helium from natural gas by diffusion has a throughput of gas containing 0.45% helium of 117,000 m/sup 3//h and in the first stage has teflon membranes working at a pressure difference of 63.3x10/sup 5/ Pa of area 79,000 m/sup 2/, and the specific cost of the apparatus was 8500 dollars per m/sup 3//h of helium. Therefore, vigorous studies are being conducted on new ways of efficient separation of gas mixtures that are cheaper and simpler. Here we consider a novel method of physically essentially reversible separation of gas mixtures, which involves some features of single-phase supersonic flows.

  6. Airborne contamination during blow-fill-seal pharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Whyte, W; Matheis, W; Dean-Netcher, M; Edwards, A

    1998-01-01

    The routes of airborne contamination, during Blow-Fill-Seal (BFS) production, were studied using tracer gas, particles and bacteria. The prevention of airborne contamination, by the air shower at the point of fill, was effective (> 99.2% efficient). However, microbe-carrying particles could gain access, by deposition or air exchange, when the containers were cut open and before they shuttled under the protection of the air shower. The use of SF6 tracer gas demonstrated that when the air shower was not on, 50% of the air within the containers came from the area round the machine. When the air shower was switched on, only about 5% of the air came from the surroundings. Airborne microbial contamination of containers is in proportion to: the number of airborne microbes around the machine, the time the container is open, the neck area and the amount of air left within the container. The likely microbial contamination rate can be calculated from a model incorporating these variables. Microbial contamination of containers during BFS manufacturing is normally very low, but by increasing the naturally occurring bacteria in the air of the production rooms by about 100-fold, it was possible to verify the accuracy of this model. The contamination model agrees well with the observation that microbial contamination levels of between 1 in 10(5) and in 10(7) will be found when small containers (< 10 ml) are filled in conventionally ventilated rooms. To achieve similar contamination rates when filling of larger bottles, it is likely that unidirectional flow, or barrier technology will be required. PMID:9691671

  7. Blow collection as a non-invasive method for measuring cortisol in the beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Laura A; Spoon, Tracey R; Goertz, Caroline E C; Hobbs, Roderick C; Romano, Tracy A

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive sampling techniques are increasingly being used to monitor glucocorticoids, such as cortisol, as indicators of stressor load and fitness in zoo and wildlife conservation, research and medicine. For cetaceans, exhaled breath condensate (blow) provides a unique sampling matrix for such purposes. The purpose of this work was to develop an appropriate collection methodology and validate the use of a commercially available EIA for measuring cortisol in blow samples collected from belugas (Delphinapterus leucas). Nitex membrane stretched over a petri dish provided the optimal method for collecting blow. A commercially available cortisol EIA for measuring human cortisol (detection limit 35 pg ml-1) was adapted and validated for beluga cortisol using tests of parallelism, accuracy and recovery. Blow samples were collected from aquarium belugas during monthly health checks and during out of water examination, as well as from wild belugas. Two aquarium belugas showed increased blow cortisol between baseline samples and 30 minutes out of water (Baseline, 0.21 and 0.04 µg dl-1; 30 minutes, 0.95 and 0.14 µg dl-1). Six wild belugas also showed increases in blow cortisol between pre and post 1.5 hour examination (Pre 0.03, 0.23, 0.13, 0.19, 0.13, 0.04 µg dl-1, Post 0.60, 0.31, 0.36, 0.24, 0.14, 0.16 µg dl-1). Though this methodology needs further investigation, this study suggests that blow sampling is a good candidate for non-invasive monitoring of cortisol in belugas. It can be collected from both wild and aquarium animals efficiently for the purposes of health monitoring and research, and may ultimately be useful in obtaining data on wild populations, including endangered species, which are difficult to handle directly. PMID:25464121

  8. Computational analysis of forebody tangential slot blowing on the high alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken

    1995-01-01

    A numerical analysis of forebody tangential slot blowing as a means of generating side force and yawing moment is conducted using an aircraft geometry. The Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a partially flux-split, approximately-factored algorithm. An algebraic turbulence model is used to determine the turbulent eddy viscosity values. Solutions are obtained using both patched and overset grid systems. In the patched grid model, and actuator plane is used to introduce jet variables into the flow field. The overset grid model is used to model the physical slot geometry and facilitate modeling of the full aircraft configuration. A slot optimization study indicates that a short slot located close to the nose of the aircraft provided the most side force and yawing moment per unit blowing coefficient. Comparison of computed surface pressure with that obtained in full-scale wind tunnel tests produce good agreement, indicating the numerical method and grid system used in the study are valid. Full aircraft computations resolve the changes in vortex burst point due to blowing. A time-accurate full-aircraft solution shows the effect of blowing on the changes in the frequency of the aerodynamic loads over the vertical tails. A study of the effects of freestream Mach number and various jet parameters indicates blowing remains effective through the transonic Mach range. An investigation of the force onset time lag associated with forebody blowing shows the lag to be minimal. The knowledge obtained in this study may be applied to the design of a forebody tangential slot blowing system for use on flight aircraft.

  9. Identification of CFC and HCFC substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. Report for September 1993-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.H.; Tunkel, J.L.; Hendriks, R.V.

    1996-04-01

    The paper gives results of a systematic search to identify additional candidates as third-generation blowing agents, chemical compounds that are not stratospheric ozone depleters that can be used as substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents in rigid polyurethane foam insulating materials. To identify the most promising substitutes, potential third-generation blowing agents were ranked using a methodology developed for this project.

  10. Simulation on Decarburization and Inclusion Removal Process in the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) Process with Ladle Bottom Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Dian-Qiao; Zheng, Jin-Xing; Wang, Kai; Wang, Ping; Liang, Ru-Quan; Liu, Hai-Tao; Lei, Hong; He, Ji-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    To enhance the refining efficiency of the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) process, the ladle bottom blowing was employed in RH degasser and a numerical method was employed to investigate the decarburization and inclusion removal in RH with ladle bottom blowing. The results showed that the decarburization rate in RH with ladle bottom blowing is greater than that in traditional RH. The larger mass fraction of carbon at the recirculation zone under up snorkel disappears because of the gas bubbles from ladle bottom blowing in an RH degasser. For RH with ladle bottom blowing, the decarburization at argon bubble surface accounts for the majority of the removed carbon, and it is approximately two times greater than that in the inner site of the vacuum chamber. Besides, the inclusion removal rate in RH with ladle bottom blowing is greater than that in traditional RH, and the maximum inclusion characteristic radius is much less in RH with ladle bottom blowing than that in traditional RH. Besides, the accumulation of inclusions in ladle between sidewall and up snorkel and the recirculation zone under up snorkel, which can be found in traditional RH, disappears in RH with ladle bottom blowing. For RH with ladle bottom blowing, the average number density of inclusions decreases more drastically than that in traditional RH and the average terminal number density of inclusions is much smaller than that in traditional RH.

  11. Numerical study of blow-up and dispersive shocks in solutions to generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Peter, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed numerical study of solutions to general Korteweg-de Vries equations with critical and supercritical nonlinearity, both in the context of dispersive shocks and blow-up. We study the stability of solitons and show that they are unstable against being radiated away and blow-up. In the L2 critical case, the blow-up mechanism by Martel, Merle and Raphaël can be numerically identified. In the limit of small dispersion, it is shown that a dispersive shock always appears before an eventual blow-up. In the latter case, always the first soliton to appear will blow up. It is shown that the same type of blow-up as for the perturbations of the soliton can be observed which indicates that the theory by Martel, Merle and Raphaël is also applicable to initial data with a mass much larger than the soliton mass. We study the scaling of the blow-up time t∗ in dependence of the small dispersion parameter ɛ and find an exponential dependence t∗(ɛ) and that there is a minimal blow-up time t0∗ greater than the critical time of the corresponding Hopf solution for ɛ → 0. To study the cases with blow-up in detail, we apply the first dynamic rescaling for generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations. This allows to identify the type of the singularity.

  12. A consideration on the electric field formed by blowing snow particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, Satoshi; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    Fluctuations of the atmospheric electric field strength have been reported during blowing snow events. A primary factor of this phenomenon is the electrification of the blowing snow particles. Electric force applied to the blowing snow particles may be a contributing factor in the formation of snow drifts and snow cornices and changing particles' trajectory motion. These can cause natural disaster such as an avalanche and visibility deterioration. Therefore, charging phenomenon of the blowing snow particles is an important issue in terms of not only precise understanding of the particle motion but disaster prevention. The purpose of this study was to clarify the fluctuation characteristics of the electric field. In previous studies, some numerical models have been proposed; however, these models did not consider the dependency of the particle charges on the particle diameter or the height dependency of the horizontal mass flux. Taking into account those dependencies, we estimated the vertical electric field distribution. In this study, an experimental equation (Omiya et al., 2011), which can estimate the individual particle charge from the particle diameter and the air temperature, was used. In addition, the approximation equations of the vertical distribution of wind speed, the horizontal mass flux, and the average particle diameter were also used. A hot-wire anemometer was used to measure the wind speed. A snow particle counter (SPC) was used to measure the horizontal mass flux and the particle diameter distribution. This experiment was conducted in a cold wind tunnel (Ice and Snow Research Center, NIED, JAPAN) at an air temperature of -10 degree Celsius. In this calculation, for simplicity, some assumptions were considered; 1) The particle diameter and the particle number density are horizontally constant and uniform. (The electric field formed by the blowing snow particles is uniform horizontally.) 2) All the blowing snow particles are electrified negatively

  13. Two persistent organic pollutants which act through different xenosensors (alpha-endosulfan and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) interact in a mixture and downregulate multiple genes involved in human hepatocyte lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ambolet-Camoit, Ariane; Ottolenghi, Chris; Leblanc, Alix; Kim, Min Ji; Letourneur, Franck; Jacques, Sébastien; Cagnard, Nicolas; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine

    2015-09-01

    Individuals, typically, are exposed to mixtures of environmental xenobiotics affecting multiple organs and acting through different xenosensors and pathways in species and cell-type specific manners. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and α-endosulfan are Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and endocrine disruptors which act through different xenosensors and accumulate in the liver. Our objective in this HEALS study was to investigate the effects of the mixture of these POPs on gene expression in a human-derived hepatocyte cell line, HepaRG. We found that, in spite of having largely uncorrelated effects, TCDD and α-endosulfan, when mixed, alter the expression of genes. The combined effects of the mixture of the POPs significantly altered the expression of 100 genes (42 up- and 58 down-regulated) whereas the same concentration of either POP alone did not alter significantly the expression of these genes. For 32 other genes, selective inhibitory crosstalk between TCDD and α-endosulfan was observed. One of the POPs inhibited the effect, on gene expression, of the other in the mixture although, when used alone, that POP did not affect expression. The expression of another 82 genes was significantly altered (up- or down-regulated) by a single POP. The addition of the second POP either increased, in the same direction, the effect on gene expression or had no further effect. At low concentrations (0.2 nM TCDD and 1 μM α-endosulfan), the POPs still had significant effects and the levels of expression of the corresponding proteins were found to be affected for some genes. Particularly striking was the 80-90% inhibition, by the mixture, of the expression of a number of genes of several hepatic intermediary metabolic pathways (glycerolipid metabolism, FXR/RXR activation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, retinoid and bile acid biosynthesis), whereas each pollutant alone had only a moderate effect. PMID:26159488

  14. Super-Eddington Atmospheres That Do Not Blow Away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2001-04-01

    We show that magnetized, radiation-dominated atmospheres can support steady state patterns of density inhomogeneity that enable them to radiate at far above the Eddington limit without suffering mass loss. The inhomogeneities consist of periodic shock fronts bounding narrow, high-density regions, interspersed with much broader regions of low density. The flow of radiation avoids the dense regions, which are therefore weighed down by gravity, while gas in the low-density regions is slammed upward into the shock fronts by radiation force. As the wave pattern moves through the atmosphere, each parcel of matter alternately experiences upward and downward forces, which balance on average. We calculate the density structure and phase speed of the wave pattern and relate these to the density contrast and the factor by which the net radiation flux exceeds the Eddington limit. The presence of a magnetic field is essential for the existence of these flows since magnetic tension shares the competing forces between regions of different densities, preventing the atmosphere from blowing apart. There appears to be a broad family of modes propagating in arbitrary directions with respect to the direction of the mean magnetic field and exhibiting a range of density contrasts. While the transition from low to high density occurs through a strong shock, the gas must pass through a slow magnetosonic critical point in order to return to the low-density state. The flux of radiation escaping from the atmosphere exceeds the Eddington limit by a factor of order the square root of the ratio between maximum and minimum density. In principle, this factor can be as large as the ratio of magnetic pressure to mean gas pressure. Although the magnetic pressure must be large compared to the mean gas pressure in order to support a large density contrast, it need not be large compared to the radiation pressure. These highly inhomogeneous flows could represent the nonlinear development of the ``photon

  15. Current concepts on the management of orbital blow-out fractures.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, L

    1982-09-01

    Surgical versus nonsurgical treatment of orbital blow-out fractures has been controversial in the past. In the 1950s it was advocated that all blow-out fractures be treated surgically based on the conception that extraocular muscles were blown out and trapped in the fracture hole, causing double vision and enophthalmos. Gradually, however, a shift to a more conservative approach occurred, probably because of the complications of surgery, the disappointing results in improvement of motility and enophthalmos, and the growing evidence of spontaneous improvement of double vision. This article analyzes the literature chronologically and blends this analysis with the results of a new anatomical approach to the human orbit. New theories on the mechanism of blow-out fractures are postulated. No longer is entrapment of muslces in a blow-out fracture held responsible for the severe motility problems; rather it is viewed as caused by a dysfunction of the entire motility apparatus in the fracture region. Consequently, conventional surgical treatment, repairing the orbital floor only, seems to have lost its theoretical foundation and a conservative approach is advocated until microsurgical techniques become more readily avaliable to treat the sequelae of blow-out fractures at their origin. PMID:7137815

  16. Laminar and turbulent flows over spherically blunted cone and hyperboloid with massive surface blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Twari, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical solutions are presented for the flow over a spherically blunted cone and hyperboloid with massive surface blowing. Time-dependent viscous shock-layer equations are used to describe the flow field. The boundary conditions on the body surface include a prescribed blowing-rate distribution. The governing equations are solved by a time-asymptotic finite-difference method. Results presented here are only for a perfect gas-type flow at zero angle of attack. Both laminar and turbulent flow solutions are obtained. It is found that the effect of the surface blowing on the laminar flow field is to smooth out the curvature discontinuity at the sphere-cone juncture point, which results in a positive pressure gradient over the body. The shock slope increases on the downstream portion of the body as the surface blowing rate is increased. The turbulent flow with surface blowing is found to redevelop a boundary-layer-like region near the surface. The effects of this boundary-layer region on the flow field and heating rates are discussed.

  17. Scattering and sequestering of blow-up moduli in local string models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2011-12-01

    We study the scattering and sequestering of blow-up fields - either local to or distant from a visible matter sector - through a CFT computation of the dependence of physical Yukawa couplings on the blow-up moduli. For a visible sector of D3-branes on orbifold singularities we compute the disk correlator left< {tau_s^{{(1)}}tau_s^{{(2)}}...tau_s^{{(n)}}ψ ψ φ } rightrangle between orbifold blow-up moduli and matter Yukawa couplings. For n = 1 we determine the full quantum and classical correlator. This result has the correct factorisation onto lower 3-point functions and also passes numerous other consistency checks. For n > 1 we show that the structure of picture-changing applied to the twist operators establishes the sequestering of distant blow-up moduli at disk level to all orders in α'. We explain how these results are relevant to suppressing soft terms to scales parametrically below the gravitino mass. By giving vevs to the blow-up fields we can move into the smooth limit and thereby derive CFT results for the smooth Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yaus that appear in the Large Volume Scenario.

  18. Computational analysis of forebody tangential slot blowing on the high alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Current and future fighter aircraft can maneuver in the high-angle-of-attack flight regime while flying at low subsonic and transonic freestream Mach numbers. However, at any flight speed, the ability of the vertical tails to generate yawing moment is limited in high-angle-of-attack flight. Thus, any system designed to provide the pilot with additional side force and yawing moment must work in both low subsonic and transonic flight. However, previous investigations of the effectiveness of forebody tangential slot blowing in generating the desired control forces and moments have been limited to the low subsonic freestream flow regime. In order to investigate the effectiveness of tangential slot blowing in transonic flight, a computational fluid dynamics analysis was carried out during the grant period. Computational solutions were obtained at three different freestream Mach numbers and at various jet mass flow ratios. All results were obtained using the isolated F/A-18 forebody grid geometry at 30.3 degrees angle of attack. One goal of the research was to determine the effect of freestream Mach number on the effectiveness of forebody tangential slot blowing in generating yawing moment. The second part of the research studied the force onset time lag associated with blowing. The time required for the yawing moment to reach a steady-state value from the onset of blowing may have an impact on the implementation of a pneumatic system on a flight vehicle.

  19. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  20. Free-Flight Evaluation of Forebody Blowing for Yaw Control at High Angels of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiddy, Jason

    1995-01-01

    Forebody blowing is a concept developed to provide yaw control for aircraft flying at high angles of attack where a conventional rudder becomes ineffective. The basic concept is fairly simple. A small jet of air is forced out of the nose of the aircraft. This jet causes a repositioning of the forebody vortices in an asymmetrical fashion. The asymmetric forebody vortex flows develop a side force on the forebody which results in substantial yawing moments at high angles of attack. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of forebody blowing as a control device through free-flight evaluation. This unique type of testing was performed at the NASA-Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel. From these tests, it could then be shown that forebody blowing is an effective method of maintaining yaw control at high angles of attack.

  1. Performance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with blowing boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, A. L.; Williams, R. C.; Potonides, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    A scale model of a V/STOL tilt nacelle fitted to a 0.508 m single stage fan was tested in the NASA Lewis 9x15 ft low speed wind tunnel to determine the effect of diffuser blowing on the inlet aerodynamics and aeromechanical performance. The test was conducted over a range of freestream speeds (up to 120 knots) and angles of attack (up to 120 deg). Diffuser blowing had a beneficial affect on all performance parameters. The angle of attack range for separation free flow substantially increased, and the fan face distortion significantly reduced with a corresponding increase in total pressure recovery. Discrete narrow band blade stress peaks which were common to the nonblowing (baseline) configuration were eradicated with diffuser blowing.

  2. Effects of wall suction/blowing on two-dimensional flow past a confined square cylinder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Yanqun; Li, Lang; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    A numerical simulation is conducted to study the laminar flow past a square cylinder confined in a channel (the ratio of side length of the square to channel width is fixed at 1/4) subjected to a locally uniform blowing/suction speed placed at the top and bottom channel walls. Governing equations with boundary conditions are resolved using a finite volume method in pressure-velocity formulation. The flow patterns relevant to the critical spacing values are investigated. Numerical results show that wall blowing has a stabilizing effect on the flow, and the corresponding critical Reynolds number increases monotonically with increasing blowing velocity. Remarkably, steady asymmetric solutions and hysteretic mode transitions exist in a certain range of parameters (Reynolds number and suction speed) in the case of suction. PMID:27462481

  3. Performance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with blowing boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, A. L.; Williams, R. C.; Potonides, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    A scale model of a V/STOL tilt nacelle fitted to a 0.508 m single stage fan was tested in the NASA Lewis low speed wind tunnel to determine the effect of diffuser blowing on the inlet aerodynamics and aeromechanical performance. The test was conducted over a range of freestream speeds (up to 120 knots) and angles-of attack (up to 120 deg). In general, diffuser blowing had a beneficial affect on all performance parameters. The angle-of-attack range for a separation-free flow substantially increased, and the fan face distortion reduced with a corresponding increase in total pressure recovery. Discrete narrow band blade stress peaks which were common to the nonblowing (baseline) configuration were eradicated with diffuser blowing.

  4. On the shape of blow-up solutions to a mean field equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Daniele; Montefusco, Eugenio

    2006-03-01

    We analyse the structure of non-radial N-point blow up solutions sequences for the Liouville type equation on the two-dimensional unit disc, \\[ \\begin{equation*}\\fl -\\Delta u(x)=\\lambda \\displaystyle{\\frac{|x|^{2\\alpha}\\exp({u(x)})}{\\int_{D}|x|^{2\\alpha}\\exp({u(x)}) \\,\\rmd x}}\\quad in\\ D,\\tqs u(x)=0\\quad on\\ D.\\end{equation*} \\] In the case N = 1, 2, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of blow up solutions and, in the spirit of Chen and Lin (2001 Ann. Inst. H. Poincaré. Anal. Non Linéare 18 271), prove their axial symmetry with respect to the diameter joining the maximum points. Finally, we prove that a non-radial one point blow up solution exists only if λ - 8π > 0.

  5. Helicopter blade tip vortex modifications in hover using piezoelectrically modulated blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilescu, Roxana

    Aeroacoustic investigations regarding different types of helicopter noise have indicated that the most annoying noise is caused by impulsive blade surface pressure changes in descent or forward flight conditions. Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) is one of the main phenomena producing significant impulsive noise by the unsteady fluctuation in blade loading due to the rapid change of induced velocity field during interaction with vortices shed from previous blades. The tip vortex core structure and the blade vortex miss distance were identified as having a primary influence on BVI. In this thesis, piezoelectrically modulated and/or vectored blowing at the rotor blade tip is theoretically investigated as an active technique for modifying the structure of the tip vortex core as well as for increasing blade vortex miss distance. The mechanisms of formation and convection of rotor blade tip vortices up to and beyond 360 degrees wake age are described based on the CFD results for the baseline cases of a hovering rotor with rounded and square tips. A methodology combining electromechanical and CFD modeling is developed and applied to the study of a piezoelectrically modulated and vectored blowing two-dimensional wing section. The thesis is focused on the CFD analysis of rotor flow with modulated tangential blowing over a rounded blade tip, and with steady mid-plane blade tip blowing, respectively. Computational results characterizing the far-wake flow indicate that for steady tangential blowing the miss distance can be doubled compared to the baseline case, which may lead to a significant reduction in BVI noise level if this trend shown in hover can be replicated in low speed forward flight. Moreover, near-wake flow analysis show that through modulated blowing a higher dissipation of vorticity can be obtained.

  6. Reduction of Unsteady STATOR-ROTOR Interaction Using Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEITCH, THOMAS A.; SAUNDERS, C. A.; NG, W. F.

    2000-08-01

    An aeroacoustic investigation was performed to assess the effects of adding mass flow at the trailing edges of stators upstream of an aircraft engine simulator. By using trailing edge blowing to minimize the shed wakes of the stators, the flow into the rotor was made more uniform, hence reducing the unsteady stator-rotor interaction. In these experiments, a reduced number of stators (four) was used in a 1/14 scale model inlet which was coupled to a 4·1in (10·4 cm) turbofan engine simulator. Steady state measurements of the aerodynamic flow field and acoustic far field were made in order to evaluate the aeroacoustic performance at three simulator speeds: 30k, 50k, and 70kr.p.m. The lowest test speed (30k r.p.m.) showed a noise reduction as large as 8·9dB in the blade passing tone. At 50k and 70kr.p.m., the reduction in blade passing tone was 5·5 and 2·6dB respectively. In addition, trailing edge blowing reduced the overall sound pressure level in every case. Aerodynamic measurements showed that fan face distortion was significantly reduced due to trailing edge blowing. The addition of trailing edge blowing from the four upstream stators did not change the operating point of the fan, and the mass flow added by the blowing was less than 1% of the fan mass flow rate. The results of these experiments clearly demonstrate that blowing from the trailing edges of the stators is effective in reducing unsteady stator-rotor interaction and the subsequent forward radiated noise.

  7. Evaluation of the Surface Roughness using AE method with Air Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, T.; Takata, S.; Hino, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to find the development for the evaluation of the surface roughness by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method with air blowing. We paid attention to the AE wave due to air blowing on the specimen plate with different surface roughness. The relationship between the AE wave and surface roughness of specimen plates was investigated. As the result, there is large and continuous difference in the Root Mean Square (RMS) value of their AE waveform. The RMS value decreases by increasing of the surface roughness of specimen plates. It suggested that this characteristic has the possibility to establish a new method of nondestructive surface roughness testing.

  8. Aerodynamic analysis of VTOL inlets and definition of a short, blowing-lip inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syberg, J.; Jones, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results indicated that, without boundary layer control, either a very long inlet or an inlet with a very high contraction ratio lip will be required to meet the stringent design requirements. It is shown that active boundary layer control is an effective means of preventing separation and that a significant reduction in inlet size can be achieved by removing only a small amount of bleed in the throat region of the inlet. A short, blowing-lip model was designed and fabricated. This model features an adjustable, blowing slot located near the hilite on the windward side of the inlet.

  9. On the sublimation of blowing snow and of snow in canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. A.; Simon, K.; Gordon, M.; Weng, W.

    2003-04-01

    Tests have been made within the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) of various parameterizations of sublimation of blowing snow, and tested in the context of data from weather stations (Goose Bay and Resolute) in northern Canada. We will focus on parameterization schemes based on results obtained with the PIEKTUK model of blowing snow. In addition we will present preliminary results concerning the parameterization of sublimation of snow caught in tree canopies, using schemes similar to those for evaporation from wet canopies. This is considered to be a major factor in the water budgets of forested areas in northern Canada.

  10. Noise Benefits of Rotor Trailing Edge Blowing for a Model Turbofan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Fite, E. Brian; Podboy, Gary G.

    2007-01-01

    An advanced model turbofan was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) to explore far field acoustic effects associated with rotor Trailing-Edge-Blowing (TEB) for a modern, 1.294 stage pressure ratio turbofan model. The TEB rotor (Fan9) was designed to be aerodynamically similar to the previously tested Fan1, and used the same stator and nacelle hardware. Fan9 was designed with trailing edge blowing slots using an external air supply directed through the rotor hub. The TEB flow was heated to approximate the average fan exit temperature at each fan test speed. Rotor root blockage inserts were used to block TEB to all but the outer 40 and 20% span in addition to full-span blowing. A configuration with full-span TEB on alternate rotor blades was also tested. Far field acoustic data were taken at takeoff/approach conditions at 0.10 tunnel Mach. Far-field acoustic results showed that full-span blowing near 2.0% of the total flow could reduce the overall sound power level by about 2 dB. This noise reduction was observed in both the rotor-stator interaction tones and for the spectral broadband noise levels. Blowing only the outer span region was not very effective for lowering noise, and actually increased the far field noise level in some instances. Full-span blowing of alternate blades at 1.0% of the overall flow rate (equivalent to full-span blowing of all blades at 2.0% flow) showed a more modest noise decrease relative to full-span blowing of all blades. Detailed hot film measurements of the TEB rotor wake at 2.0% flow showed that TEB was not every effective for filling in the wake defect at approach fan speed toward the tip region, but did result in overfilling the wake toward the hub. Downstream turbulence measurements supported this finding, and support the observed reduction in spectral broadband noise.

  11. Investigations on the processing of solid silicon rubber in blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Funk, A.; Windeck, C.

    2015-05-01

    Complex hollow parts made of thermoplastics are often produced in the extrusion blow moulding process. This cost-efficient production technique with a high reproducibility, a high degree of automation and short cycle times has not been adapted for rubber processing until now. Current research activities at IKV focus on the processing of silicone rubber in extrusion blow moulding with an adapted processing and rapid cross-linking systems. The blow moulding process allows an automated and effective production of complex hollow parts made of solid silicone rubber in one step. The use of expensive core techniques, which lead to comparatively high reject rates in injection moulding, is not necessary. Expensive and time-consuming assembly steps can be reduced. This substantially increases the efficiency of the process. A systematic material selection of different solid silicone rubber compounds and cross-linking systems for the extrusion blow moulding process is a major focus of investigation. In this context, the term blow mouldability of polymers is defined and the suitability of solid silicone rubbers in combination with cross-linking systems for the blow moulding process is analysed. Characteristic mechanical and physical properties allow the identification of suitable material systems and give advice for the implementation of the new process. Extrusion blow moulding of solid silicone rubber is a new and innovative manufacturing concept to produce elastomeric hollow parts. Influences on the forming process are not known for silicone rubber yet. Therefore, to obtain a detailed process description is another focus of the research project. This includes the forming process, the processing and the influences of the material and the curing reaction on the processing. In the first instance, the investigation and description of the forming process as well as the detailed analysis of the processing parameters, such as curing time, mould temperature, wall thickness of the

  12. Blow-up conditions for two dimensional modified Euler-Poisson equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongki

    2016-09-01

    The multi-dimensional Euler-Poisson system describes the dynamic behavior of many important physical flows, yet as a hyperbolic system its solution can blow-up for some initial configurations. This article strives to advance our understanding on the critical threshold phenomena through the study of a two-dimensional modified Euler-Poisson system with a modified Riesz transform where the singularity at the origin is removed. We identify upper-thresholds for finite time blow-up of solutions for the modified Euler-Poisson equations with attractive/repulsive forcing.

  13. Deciding which chemical mixtures risk assessment methods work best for what mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Teuschler, Linda K.

    2007-09-01

    The most commonly used chemical mixtures risk assessment methods involve simple notions of additivity and toxicological similarity. Newer methods are emerging in response to the complexities of chemical mixture exposures and effects. Factors based on both science and policy drive decisions regarding whether to conduct a chemical mixtures risk assessment and, if so, which methods to employ. Scientific considerations are based on positive evidence of joint toxic action, elevated human exposure conditions or the potential for significant impacts on human health. Policy issues include legislative drivers that may mandate action even though adequate toxicity data on a specific mixture may not be available and risk assessment goals that impact the choice of risk assessment method to obtain the amount of health protection desired. This paper discusses three important concepts used to choose among available approaches for conducting a chemical mixtures risk assessment: (1) additive joint toxic action of mixture components; (2) toxicological interactions of mixture components; and (3) chemical composition of complex mixtures. It is proposed that scientific support for basic assumptions used in chemical mixtures risk assessment should be developed by expert panels, risk assessment methods experts, and laboratory toxicologists. This is imperative to further develop and refine quantitative methods and provide guidance on their appropriate applications. Risk assessors need scientific support for chemical mixtures risk assessment methods in the form of toxicological data on joint toxic action for high priority mixtures, statistical methods for analyzing dose-response for mixtures, and toxicological and statistical criteria for determining sufficient similarity of complex mixtures.

  14. Huge "Superbubble" of Gas Blowing Out of Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    out of the plane has to have been unusually violent," he added. The scientists speculate that the gas may be blown outward by the strong stellar winds and supernova explosions from numerous massive young stars in a cluster. "One theoretical model shows that young stars could power an outflow that matches what we see very closely," Pidopryhora said. According to that model, the superbubble probably is 10-30 million years old. "Finding this superbubble practically in our back yard is quite exciting, because these superbubbles are very important factors in how galaxies evolve," Lockman said. Superbubbles, powered by supernova explosions and young stellar winds, control the way heavy elements, produced only in the cores of stars, are distributed throughout the galaxy, the scientists said. Those heavy elements are then incorporated into the next generation of stars -- and planets -- to form. "The formation of our own Sun and planets probably was heavily influenced, if not triggered, by a nearby supernova explosion," Lockman said. In addition, if the outflow from superbubbles is energetic enough, it could blow the gas into intergalactic space, never to return to the galaxy. "This would shut down the formation of new stars in the galaxy," Pidopryhora explained. The Green Bank Telescope, dedicated in 2000, is the largest fully-steerable radio telescope in the world, with more than two acres of collecting area in its giant dish. Located within the National Radio Quiet Zone in West Virginia, the GBT provides extraordinary sensitivity for observing faint radio-emitting objects in the distant Universe. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  15. How to Blow a Bubble in a Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    outflow from a startburst concentrated near the nuclei. Either of these outflows could blow a bubble as it first interacts with the interstellar medium.The authors show that the first category is disfavored based on observational and energetics arguments. In addition, the western-most nucleus and the bubble both align exactly with the axis of the large-scale outflows of the galaxy. Unlikely to be due to chance, this alignment is strong support in favor of the second category.Thus, its probable that the bubble is blown by an outflow that originates from the inner ~100pc around one of the nuclei, either due to a jet or a starburst wind. Further observations should be able to differentiate between these two mechanisms.CitationKelly E. Lockhart et al 2015 ApJ 810 149. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/149

  16. Research and Analysis on the Physical and Chemical Properties of Molten Bath with Bottom-Blowing in EAF Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guangsheng; Zhu, Rong; Dong, Kai; Ma, Guohong; Cheng, Ting

    2016-06-01

    Bottom-blowing technology is widely adopted in electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking to promote the molten bath fluid flow, accelerate the metallurgical reaction, and improve the quality of molten steel. In this study, a water model experiment and a computational fluid dynamics model were established to investigate the effects of bottom-blowing gas flow rate on the fluid flow characteristics in the EAF molten bath. The results show that the interaction among the bottom-blowing gas streams influences the molten bath flow field, and increasing the bottom-blowing gas flow rate can accelerate the fluid flow and decrease the volume of the dead zone. Based on industrial application research, the physical and chemical properties of the molten bath with bottom-blowing were analyzed. Compared with traditional melting conditions without bottom-blowing, bottom-blowing technology demonstrates obvious advantages in promoting the heat transfer and metallurgical reactions in the molten bath. With the bottom-blowing arrangement, the dephosphorization and decarburization rates are accelerated, the contents of FeO and T. Fe in endpoint slag are decreased, and the endpoint carbon-oxygen equilibrium of molten steel is improved.

  17. Experimental investigation of tangential blowing for control of the strong shock boundary layer interaction on inlet ramps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendemann, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    A 0.165-scale isolated inlet model was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8-ft by 6-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Ramp boundary layer control was provided by tangential blowing from a row of holes in an aft-facing step set into the ramp surface. Testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.36 to 1.96 using both cold and heated air in the blowing system. Stable inlet flow was achieved at all Mach numbers. Blowing hole geometry was found to be significant at 1.96M. Blowing air temperature was found to have only a small effect on system performance. High blowing levels were required at the most severe test conditions.

  18. EVALUATION OF HFC 245CA AND HFC 236EA AS FOAM BLOWING AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a limited evaluation of the developmental hydrofluorocarbons (HFCS) 245ca and 236ea as blowing agents in urethane-based insulation. hese materials were selected from screening tests of 37 C2, C3, and C4 isomers based on physical properties, atmospheric ...

  19. On the Blow-up Criterion of 3D-NSE in Sobolev-Gevrey Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benameur, Jamel; Jlali, Lotfi

    2016-05-01

    In Benameur (Methods Appl 103:87-97, 2014), Benameur proved a blow-up result of the non regular solution of (NSE) in the Sobolev-Gevrey spaces. In this paper we improve this result, precisely we give an exponential type explosion in Sobolev-Gevrey spaces with less regularity on the initial condition. Fourier analysis and standard techniques are used.

  20. Compressed Air System Modifications Improve Efficiency at a Plastics Blow Molding Plant (Southeastern Container Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the plastics blow molding plant project.

  1. A Paradigm for Operant Conditioning in Blow Flies ("Phormia Terrae Novae" Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Michel B. C.; Disma, Gerald; Abramson, Charles I.

    2010-01-01

    An operant conditioning situation for the blow fly ("Protophormia terrae novae") is described. Individual flies are trained to enter and reenter a hole as the operant response. Only a few sessions of contingent reinforcement are required to increase response rates. When the response is no longer followed by food, the rate of entering the hole…

  2. A Molecular Key for the Identification of Blow Flies in Southeastern Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The identification of blow flies (Calliphoridae) (typically the first colonizers of cadavers) is difficult, especially in the earlier instars because of their small size, similarity and simplicity in external morphology. We consider how taxonomic keys based on molecular genetic data facilitate accur...

  3. Laboratory colonization of the blow flies, Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chrysomya rufifacies is a blow fly commonly found in corpses at crime scene investigations. This study was designed to develop laboratory colonization methods for Ch. rufifacies and utilize Chrysomya megacephala as its larval food source. Both fly species were collected in the wild and easily colon...

  4. A computer program to calculate radiating viscous stagnation streamline flow with strong blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Garrett, L. B.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program (program LEE) has been developed to calculate the fully coupled solution of the radiating viscous stagnation streamline flow with strong blowing. The report describes the digital computer program, including FORTRAN IV listing, flow charts, instructions for the user, and a test case with input and output. Program LEE is available through COSMIC.

  5. Current state and prospects of researches on the control of turbulent boundary layer by air blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the analytical review of the current state of the investigations and development trends on the problem of turbulent friction and aerodynamic drag reduction in simple model configurations, which is among key ones in modern aeromechanics. Under consideration is the modern fast progressing method of the turbulent flow control by air- and other gases (micro)blowing through a permeable surface, which is utilized in incompressible and compressible turbulent boundary layers. Several computational results to understand the essential flow physics are also included. The problem of simulation of the flow over a perforated wall where some ambiguities, in particular, at the permeable/impermeable boundary being still remained is discussed. Special attention is paid to the analysis of most important experimental and numerical results obtained with the air blowing through a finely-perforated surface, analysis of the physical peculiarities and regularities of the flow with the blowing, probability to describe the properties of such a flow within simple approach frameworks, evaluation of the efficiency of this control method, as well as the trends and opportunities of this method progress in view of state-of-the-art achievements. Although this technology has a penalty for developing the effective turbulent-flow control method, some modifications of the air blowing are an attractive alternative for real applications.

  6. Whistle-Blowing as a Form of Advocacy: Guidelines for the Practitioner and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Annette D.; Latting, Jean Kantambu

    2004-01-01

    Advocacy has been an inherent component of social work since the mid-1800s. The NASW Code of Ethics explicitly promotes advocacy as an ethical stance against inhumane conditions. Whistle-blowing, on the other hand, occurs mostly in the business and public administration disciplines and is relatively unknown in the social work profession. Using…

  7. What Actions Can Be Taken to Increase Whistle-Blowing in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardi, Richard A.; Landry, Alexandra C.; Landry, Erynne E.; Buonafede, Mitchell R.; Berardi, Marissa E.

    2016-01-01

    This study surveyed undergraduate business students on various issues concerning the potential of students whistle-blowing when they observe other students cheating. Developing the courage of one's conviction in our accounting students is important to accounting educators as we are also emphasizing traits such as integrity, skepticism, and…

  8. DNS on control of laminar-turbulent transition in channel flow with suction and blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Murase, Takeo; Floryan, J. M.

    1992-11-01

    Numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent transition in channel flow with spatially periodic suction/blowing from its channel walls is conducted with a spectral method based on the Fourier spectral method. Reynolds number is fixed on a subcritical value, 5,000, and the influence of both amplitude and wave number of the suction/blowing on the transition is investigated. When the amplitude is small, the transition does not occur because the suction/blowing gives only a slight effect to the basic flow and the resulted flow remains stable to all three-dimensional small disturbances. On the other hand, when the amplitude is a large value, the transition occurs in a finite time, and finally it is obtained instantaneously with a huge value of the amplitude. It is found that the suction/blowing makes the separation ridges on the wall, which may simulate a wall roughness. The transition times are obtained for the moderately large amplitudes and wave numbers, obey nearly a minus two power law dependence on the ratio of amplitude to wave number.

  9. An experimental investigation of the effect of upper surface blowing on dynamic stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, Jin

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of upper surface blowing on dynamic stall was conducted. Progress made during the period from Jun. to Dec. 1993 is summarized. Topics covered include VR-7 wing model, pulse valve, and wing/load cell junction.

  10. A test of Automatic Blowing snow Station (ABS) in the French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yoichi; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Nishimura, Kouichi; Bellot, Hervé; Fontaine, Firmin

    2015-04-01

    Blowing snow is a significant factor to estimate snow distribution in alpine, Arctic and Antarctic regions. The Snow Particle Counter (SPC) is well used for mass flux measurement of the blowing snow, however, the SPC deployment is not always possible for automatic observation under harsh conditions. Recently Automatic Blowing snow Station (ABS), which is a simpler device than the SPC, have been developed in Japan. We installed the ABS system with the SPCs at the Lac Blanc Pass in the French Alps (2700 m a.s.l.) to examine the relationship between the ABS output and snow particle mass flux. The ABS worked well, without problems, for the entire 4-month period in the winter 2014. The ABS output was converted to mass flux using wind-dependent power function which obtained from calibration procedure in a cold wind-tunnel. The mass flux obtained from the ABS showed a good agreement with the SPC, particularly around the peak of blowing snow event. Based on tests under controlled (cold wind-tunnel) and field conditions, we conclude that the ABS is suitable for practical use.

  11. Academic Misconduct: A Goals-Plans-Action Approach to Peer Confrontation and Whistle-Blowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henningsen, Mary Lynn Miller; Valde, Kathleen S.; Denbow, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Academic misconduct is a serious, pervasive, communication phenomenon on college campuses. In this study, the goals-plans-action model (Dillard, 1990) was used as a theoretical framework to investigate peer confrontation of cheating and whistle-blowing to a course instructor. In an experiment, participants were asked to respond to measures of…

  12. The American Economy: A Fuse About to Blow? Fundamentals of Free Enterprise, No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Fletcher National Bank and Trust Co., Indianapolis, IN.

    Designed for high school economics students as a public service project of the American Fletcher National Bank, the booklet examines the heavy burdens placed on our political-economic system and compares our economy to an overloaded electrical system about to "blow a fuse." In the last two decades, America has become a self-indulgent society which…

  13. Microstructural evolution of PET under stretching and during stretch blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Martine; Billon, Noëlle

    2007-04-01

    Strain induced crystallisation of PET designed for stretch blow molding is studied combining well-controlled tensile tests and free blowing on a stretch blow prototype. Microstructure evolution is followed by WAXS and SAXS. Observations on blown parts clearly show that the microstructure can differ along the bottle and from processing conditions to another. Difference can be observed on crystalline orientation, periodic arrangement at the level of lamellae and long period. Range of long period, 8.5 to 13 nm is in agreement with literature. In certain case lamellar organisation disappears. Despite of high level of strain and evidence for strain hardening to occur during blowing no perfect crystalline pattern is observed, except in very thick zones. Interrupted tensile tests followed by quenching demonstrates that strain hardening is not correlated to prefect crystallisation. Microstructure clearly depends on the three parameters: temperature, strain rate and strain. It is concluded that strain hardening is mainly controlled by first stages of crystallisation and that actual crystallisation occurs during a following relaxation step. This later is then highly dependent upon cooling step.

  14. The hot blow forming of AZ31 Mg sheet: Formability assessment and application development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jon T.; Krajewski, Paul E.; Verma, Ravi

    2008-11-01

    The hot blow forming of magnesium sheet offers significant opportunity for forming complex, lightweight parts for automotive applications. This paper characterizes the elevated-temperature formability of AZ31 magnesium sheet materials and the effect of processing conditions on the performance of these materials. In addition, magnesium sheet application development at General Motors Corporation is reviewed.

  15. Experimental results of the control of a vortical flow by tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, N. J.; Roberts, L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test to investigate the controlling effects of tangential, leading edge blowing on the vortical flow over a delta wing are given. Blowing is used to directly control the crossflow separation points at the rounded leading edge and hence, the trajectory of the feeding sheet and the location of the vortex. Experiments were conducted for both co-flowing and counter-flowing configurations over a range of angles of attack from 0 to 90 degrees. Results in the form of pressure distributions, overall force coefficients and flow mappings were obtained. The emphasis is on data presentation rather than detailed analysis. The initial results indicate that the co-flowing configuration was capable of extending the regime of stable, controlled vortical flow over the upper surface by approximately 30 degrees angle of attack for modest blowing requirements. Increases in maximum normal force coefficient of approximately 30% were achieved and significant rolling moments produced at angles of attack from 30 to 60 degrees. The counter-flowing configuration indicated only minor lift augmentation with the exception of an isolated occurrence at 20 degrees angle of attack. At that condition, with very weak blowing, a lift augmentation of approximately 20 was measured.

  16. BEARDSLEY AND PIPER (B&P) CORE BLOWING MACHINE. VIRGINIA BLAKELY MANUALLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BEARDSLEY AND PIPER (B&P) CORE BLOWING MACHINE. VIRGINIA BLAKELY MANUALLY FILLING SAND MAGAZINE THAT WILL ROTATE WITH THE CORE BOX, FILLING IT UNDER PRESSURE SIMILAR TO THE CORE MACHINE IN THE BACKGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Solution blow spun Poly(lactic acid)/Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanofibers with antimicrobial properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and tetracycline hydrochloride (THC) were solution blow spun from two different solvents, chloroform/acetone (CA, 80:20 v/v) and 2,2,2-triflouroethanol (TFE). The diameter distribution, chemical, thermal, thermal stab...

  18. Orbital blow-out fractures: correlation of preoperative computed tomography and postoperative ocular motility.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G J; Garcia, G H; Logani, S C; Murphy, M L; Sheth, B P; Seth, A K

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Although the management of orbital blow-out fractures was controversial for many years, refined imaging with computed tomography (CT) helped to narrow the poles of the debate. Many orbital surgeons currently recommend repair if fracture size portends late enophthalmos, or if diplopia has not substantially resolved within 2 weeks of the injury. While volumetric considerations have been generally well-served by this approach, ocular motility outcomes have been less than ideal. In one series, almost 50% of patients had residual diplopia 6 months after surgery. A fine network of fibrous septa that functionally unites the periosteum of the orbital floor, the inferior fibrofatty tissues, and the sheaths of the inferior rectus and oblique muscles was demonstrated by Koornneef. Entrapment between bone fragments of any of the components of this anatomic unit can limit ocular motility. Based on the pathogenesis of blow-out fractures, in which the fibrofatty-muscular complex is driven to varying degrees between bone fragments, some measure of soft tissue damage might be anticipated. Subsequent intrinsic fibrosis and contraction can tether globe movement, despite complete reduction of herniated orbital tissue from the fracture site. We postulated that the extent of this soft tissue damage might be estimated from preoperative imaging studies. METHODS: Study criteria included: retrievable coronal CT scans; fractures of the orbital floor without rim involvement, with or without extension into the medial wall; preoperative diplopia; surgical repair by a single surgeon; complete release of entrapped tissues; and postoperative ocular motility outcomes documented with binocular visual fields (BVFs). Thirty patients met all criteria. The CT scans and BVFs were assessed by different examiners among the authors. Fractures were classified into 3 general categories and 2 subtypes to reflect the severity of soft tissue damage within each category. "Trap-door" injuries

  19. Properties of flow near a side-wall of a circular cylinder with tangential blowing - Effects of slot shape at cylinder-side-wall juncture and angular location of a blowing slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waka, R.; Yoshino, F.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-06-01

    An experiment was carried out to understand effects of the slot shape at the cylinder-side-wall juncture and the angular location of a blowing slot on the spanwise distributions of various characteristic values near the side-wall of a circular cylinder with tangential blowing. The range of the side-wall effects and the characteristic values near the side-wall are much influenced by the slot shape and the location of the slot. When the slot shaped like a knife edge, termed 'Edge', is used, the range of the side-wall effects becomes narrower as the angular location of the blowing slot is farther downstream.

  20. The Effects of Blowing Over Various Trailing-edge Flaps on an NACA 0006 Airfoil Section, Comparisons with Various Types of Flaps on other Airfoil Sections, and an Analysis of Flow and Power Relationships for Blowing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dods, J. B., Jr.; Watson, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of a two-dimensional investigation conducted to determine the effect of blowing over various types of trailing-edge flaps on a wing having the NACA 0006 airfoil section and a drooped-nose flap. The position and profile of the trailing-edge flap, the nozzle height, and the location of the flap with respect to the nozzle were found to be important variables. Data from many investigations were used to make an evaluation of the effects of blowing on lift. An analysis was made of flow and power relationships for blowing systems.

  1. Experiments in Aircraft Roll-Yaw Control using Forebody Tangential Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    1997-01-01

    Advantages of flight at high angles of attack include increased maneuverability and lift capabilities. These are beneficial not only for fighter aircraft, but also for future supersonic and hypersonic transport aircraft during take-off and landing. At high angles of attack the aerodynamics of the vehicle are dominated by separation, vortex shedding and possibly vortex breakdown. These phenomena severely compromise the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. As a result, controlled flight at high angles of attack is not feasible for current aircraft configurations. Alternate means to augment the control of the vehicle at these flight regimes are therefore necessary. The present work investigates the augmentation of an aircraft flight control system by the injection of a thin sheet of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle. This method, known as Forebody Tangential Blowing (FTB), has been proposed as an effective means of increasing the controllability of aircraft at high angles of attack. The idea is based on the fact that a small amount of air is sufficient to change the separation lines on the forebody. As a consequence, the strength and position of the vortices are altered causing a change on the aerodynamic loads. Although a very effective actuator, forebody tangential blowing is also highly non-linear which makes its use for aircraft control very difficult. In this work, the feasibility of using FTB to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model was demonstrated both through simulations and experimentally. The wind tunnel model used in the experiments consists of a wing-body configuration incorporating a delta wing with 70-degree sweep angle and a cone-cylinder fuselage. The model is equipped with forebody slots through which blowing is applied. There are no movable control surfaces, therefore blowing is the only form of actuation. Experiments were conducted at a nominal angle of attack of 45 degrees. A unique apparatus that constrains

  2. Blow-up of solutions of non-linear equations of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili and Zakharov-Kuznetsov types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpusov, M. O.; Sveshnikov, A. G.; Yushkov, E. V.

    2014-06-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation are important in physical applications. We obtain sufficient conditions for finite-time blow-up of solutions of these equations in bounded and unbounded domains. We describe how the initial data influence the blow-up time. To do this, we use the non-linear capacity method suggested by Pokhozhaev and Mitidieri and combine it with the method of test functions, which was developed in joint papers with Galaktionov. Note that our results are the first blow-up results for many equations in this class.

  3. Chinese Herbal Mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid, Induces G2/M Cycle Arrest and Radiosensitivity in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells through Mechanisms Involving DNMT1 and Rad51 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Yang, Chia-Ming; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chia-Lun; Lee, Hsin-Lun; Lai, I-Chun; Chuang, Shuang-En

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese herbal mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid (THL), has been proven to suppress the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells and is currently regarded as a complementary medicine for the treatment of cancer. Our previous study using acute promyelocytic leukemia cells uncovered its effect on the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) which is often overexpressed in cancer cells resulting in the repression of tumor suppressors via hypermethylation. Herein, we explored the effects of THL in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that also demonstrate elevated DNMT1. The results show that THL dose-dependently downregulated DNMT1 accompanied by the induction of tumor suppressors such as p21 and p15. THL arrested cell cycle in G2/M phase and decreased the protein levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, phospho-pRb, and AKT. DNMT1 inhibition was previously reported to exert a radiosensitizing effect in cancer cells through the repression of DNA repair. We found that THL enhanced radiation-induced clonogenic cell death in MCF-7 cells and decreased the level of DNA double-strand break repair protein, Rad51. Our observations may be the result of DNMT1 downregulation. Due to the fact that DNMT1 inhibition is now a mainstream strategy for anticancer therapy, further clinical trials of THL to confirm its clinical efficacy are warranted. PMID:27525019

  4. Single-stage evaluation of highly-loaded high-Mach-number compressor stages 5. Data and performance of baseline, corner-blow wall suction and combined corner blow wall suction stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikkanen, J. P.; Brooky, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A single-stage compressor with a rotor tip speed of 1600 ft/sec and a 0.5 hub tip ratio was used to investigate the effects of several stator endwall treatment methods on stage range and performance. These endwall treatment methods consisted of stator corner-blow, annular wall suction upstream of stator leading edge, and combined corner-blow and annular wall suction. The overall stage performance with corner blow was essentially the same as the baseline performance. The performance for the annular wall suction and the combined corner-blow and wall suction showed a reduction in peak efficiency of 2.5 percentage points compared to the baseline data.

  5. A Comparison Study of the Oxygen-Rich Side Blow Furnace and the Oxygen-Rich Bottom Blow Furnace for Liquid High Lead Slag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Hao, Zhandong; Yang, Tianzu; Liu, Weifeng; Zhang, Duchao; Zhang, Li; Bin, Shu; Bin, Wanda

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the characteristics of the oxygen-rich side blow furnace (OSBF) and the oxygen-rich bottom blow furnace (OBBF) as the reductive smelting reactor for molten high lead slag. The slags were collected from different sampling points of these furnaces during a regular high lead slag reduction process and analyzed. It is disclosed that lead content of the melt in the OSBF shows dramatic fluctuations, while melt from different sampling points of the furnace behave similarly, exhibiting the characteristics of batch reactor. An obvious axial lead content gradient is detected in the OBBF, showing the characteristics of a plug flow reactor. The industrial performances of these furnaces are also compared. The results indicate that 1.38% higher lead recovery can be achieved by using the OSBF instead of the OBBF. Unit energy consumptions of the OBBF-OSBF and OBBF-OBBF processes can be reduced to 230 kgce/ t crude lead, which is 70 kgce/ t crude lead less than that of the tradition Shuikoushan (SKS) process.

  6. Importance of back blow maneuvers in a 6 month old patient with sudden upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Duman, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Foreign body aspiration in children under four years old is one of the most frequently observed reasons for accident related deaths. It is more common in this age group due to inadequate swallowing functions and exploration of objects with the mouth. The most frequently encountered foreign bodies are food and toy parts. Life threatening complete laryngeal obstruction is rarely observed. Dyspnea, hypersalivation, cough and cyanosis can be seen. The basic and life-saving treatment approach is complete removal of foreign body maneuvers in the sudden onset of total obstruction. Here we report a six-month old male, who ingested a foreign body and was treated with back blow maneuvers successfully. In this case we emphasized the importance of back blow maneuvers. PMID:27239623

  7. Effect of a simulated engine jet blowing above an arrow wing at Mach 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.; Hayes, C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of a gas jet simulating a turbojet engine exhaust blowing above a cambered and twisted arrow wing were investigated. Tests were conducted in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at a Mach number of 2.0. Nozzle pressure ratios from 1 to 64 were tested with both helium and air used as jet gases. The tests were conducted at angles of attack from -2 deg to 8 deg at a Reynolds number of 9,840,000 per meter. Only the forces and moments on the wing were measured. Results of the investigation indicated that the jet blowing over the wing caused reductions in maximum lift-drag ratio of about 4 percent for helium and 6 percent for air at their respective design nozzle pressure ratios, relative to jet-off data. Moderate changes in the longitudinal, vertical, or angular positions of the jet relative to the wing had little effect on the wing aerodynamic characteristics.

  8. Three-dimensional Simulation on Parison Shape at Pinch-off Stage in Extrusion Blow Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Shuichi; Fukuzawa, Youhei; Iemoto, Yoshiyuki; Kawachi, Ryuichi; Tomiyama, Hideki

    In this study the parison shape at the pinch-off stage in extrusion blow molding was theoretically predicted by non-isothermal and purely-viscous non-Newtonian flow simulation using a finite element method. In this simulation, the angle of knife edge θ, the depth d and the length l of compression land of a blow molding mold were changed. The results obtained are as follows; The parison thickness at the bottom increases as the angle of knife edge and the depth of compression land decreases, but is almost independent of the length of compression land. The parison temperature on the parison inner surface near the pinch-off knife decreases as the angle of knife edge and the depth of compression land increases. The parison thickness at the bottom decreases as the mold closing time is shortend.

  9. Investigation of trailing-edge-flap, spanwise-blowing concepts on an advanced fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W., Jr.; Quinto, P. F.; Banks, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of spanwise blowing on the trailing edge flap of an advanced fighter aircraft configuration were determined in the 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel. A series of tests were conducted with variations in spanwise-blowing vector angle, nozzle exit area, nozzle location, thrust coefficient, and flap deflection in order to determine a superior configuration for both an underwing cascade concept and an overwing port concept. This screening phase of the testing was conducted at a nominal approach angle of attack from 12 deg to 16 deg; and then the superior configurations were tested over a more complete angle of attack range from 0 deg to 20 deg at tunnel free stream dynamic pressures from 20 to 40 lbf/sq ft at thrust coefficients from 0 to 2.

  10. Critical air/water blow-down in safety valves at low qualities.

    PubMed

    Moncalvo, D; Friedel, L

    2011-02-28

    Critical air/water blow-downs in safety valves for qualities from 0.01 to 0.113 and mass flow rates from 1.5 up to 4.3 kg/s have been observed in our test facility. These critical blow-downs are characterized by a large void fraction and by an intense mixing of the phases both in the valve body and in the outlet pipe. A qualitative estimation of the flow pattern in the outlet pipe using the map of Taitel and Dukler suggests that these air/water flows are intermittent flows--presumably slug flows--evolving to annular flows for qualities above 0.1. Intermittent flows are also predicted for critical air/water and air/glycerine flows taken from the literature for the same safety valve at slightly larger relieving pressures. PMID:21227579

  11. Hosing instability in the blow-out regime for plasma-wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Lu, W; Zhou, M; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Deng, S; Oz, E; Katsouleas, T; Hogan, M J; Blumenfeld, I; Decker, F J; Ischebeck, R; Iverson, R H; Kirby, N A; Walz, D

    2007-12-21

    The electron hosing instability in the blow-out regime of plasma-wakefield acceleration is investigated using a linear perturbation theory about the electron blow-out trajectory in Lu et al. [in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 165002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.165002]. The growth of the instability is found to be affected by the beam parameters unlike in the standard theory Whittum et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 991 (1991)10.1103/PhysRevLett.67.991] which is strictly valid for preformed channels. Particle-in-cell simulations agree with this new theory, which predicts less hosing growth than found by the hosing theory of Whittum et al. PMID:18233526

  12. An electrostatic charge measurement of blowing snow particles focusing on collision frequency to the snow surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, S.; Sato, A.

    2010-12-01

    Blowing snow particles are known to have an electrostatic charge. This charge may be a contributing factor in the formation of snow drifts and snow cornices and changing of the trajectory of blowing snow particles. These formations and phenomena can cause natural disaster such as an avalanche and a visibility deterioration, and obstruct transportation during winter season. Therefore, charging phenomenon of the blowing snow particles is an important issue in terms of not only precise understanding of the particle motion but disaster prevention. The primary factor of charge accumulation to the blowing snow particles is thought to be due to “saltation” of them. The “saltation” is one of movement forms of blowing snow: when the snow particles are transported by the wind, they repeat frictional collisions with the snow surface. In previous studies, charge-to-mass ratios measured in the field were approximately -50 to -10 μC/kg, and in the wind tunnel were approximately -0.8 to -0.1 μC/kg. While there were qualitatively consistent in sign, negative, there were huge gaps quantitatively between them. One reason of those gaps is speculated to be due to differences in fetch. In other words, the difference of the collision frequency of snow particles to the snow surface has caused the gaps. But it is merely a suggestion and that has not been confirmed. The purpose of this experiment is to measure the charge of blowing snow particles focusing on the collision frequency and clarify the relationship between them. Experiments were carried out in the cryogenic wind tunnel of Snow and Ice Research Center (NIED, JAPAN). A Faraday cage and an electrometer were used to measure the charge of snow particles. These experiments were conducted over the hard snow surface condition to prevent the erosion of the snow surface and the generation of new snow particles from the surface. The collision frequency of particle was controlled by changing the wind velocity (4.5 to 7 m/s) under

  13. Analysis of a fixed-pitch X-wing rotor employing lower surface blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Rogers, Ernest O.

    1987-01-01

    Lower surface blowing (LSB) is investigated as an alternative to the variable blade pitch requirement for the X-wing Circulation Control (CC) rotor concept. Addition trailing edge blowing slots on the lower surfaces of CC airfoils provide a bidirectional lift capability that effectively doubles the control range. The operational requirements of this rotor system are detailed and compared to the projected performance attributes of LSB airfoils. Analysis shows that, aerodynamically, LSB supplies a fixed pitch rotor system with the equivalent lift efficiency and rotor control of present CC rotor designs that employ variable blade pitch. Aerodynamic demands of bidirectional lift production are predicted to be within the capabilities of current CC airfoil design methodology. Emphasis in this analysis is given to the high speed rotary wing flight regime unique to stoppable rotor aircraft. The impact of a fixed pitch restriction in hover and low speed flight is briefly discussed.

  14. Identities for Generalized Appell Functions and the Blow-up Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringmann, Kathrin; Manschot, Jan; Rolen, Larry

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we prove identities for a class of generalized Appell functions which are based on the {A_2} root lattice. The identities are reminiscent of periodicity relations for the classical Appell function and are proven using only analytical properties of the functions. Moreover, they are a consequence of the blow-up formula for generating functions of invariants of moduli spaces of semi-stable sheaves of rank 3 on rational surfaces. Our proof confirms that in the latter context, different routes to compute the generating function (using the blow-up formula and wall-crossing) do arrive at identical q-series. The proof also gives a clear procedure on how to prove analogous identities for generalized Appell functions appearing in generating functions for sheaves with rank {r>3}.

  15. Analysis of nonlinear noisy integrate & fire neuron models: blow-up and steady states

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Noisy Leaky Integrate and Fire (NNLIF) models for neurons networks can be written as Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations on the probability density of neurons, the main parameters in the model being the connectivity of the network and the noise. We analyse several aspects of the NNLIF model: the number of steady states, a priori estimates, blow-up issues and convergence toward equilibrium in the linear case. In particular, for excitatory networks, blow-up always occurs for initial data concentrated close to the firing potential. These results show how critical is the balance between noise and excitatory/inhibitory interactions to the connectivity parameter. AMS Subject Classification: 35K60, 82C31, 92B20. PMID:22657097

  16. Numerical study of the effect of tangential leading edge blowing on delta wing vortical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, David T.; Tavella, Domingo A.; Roberts, Leonard; Fujii, Kozo

    1989-01-01

    A numerical simulation of tangential blowing along the leading edge of a delta wing is analyzed as a means of controlling the position and strength of the leading-edge vortices. The computation is done by numerical solutions of the three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that the use of tangential leading-edge blowing at low to moderate angles of attack tends to reduce the pressure peaks associated with leading-edge vortices and to increase the suction peak around the leading edge, such that the integrated value of the surface pressure remains about the same.

  17. Blow-up rate estimates for the solutions of the bosonic Boltzmann-Nordheim equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, J.; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we study the behavior of a class of mild solutions of the homogeneous and isotropic bosonic Boltzmann-Nordheim equation near the blow-up. We obtain some estimates on the blow-up rate of the solutions and prove that, as long as a solution is bounded above by the critical singularity /1 x (the equilibrium solutions behave like this power law near the origin), it remains bounded in the uniform norm. In Sec. III of the paper, we prove a local existence result for a class of measure-valued mild solutions, which is of independent interest and which allows us to solve the Boltzmann-Nordheim equation for some classes of unbounded densities.

  18. Simulation on the Effect of Bottle Wall Thickness Distribution using Blow Moulding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraya, S.; Azman, M. D.; Fatchurrohman, N.; Jaafar, A. A.; Yusoff, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study are to assess the deformation behavior of a polymeric material during a blow moulding process. Transient computations of two dimensional model of a PP bottle were performed using ANSYS Polyflow computer code to predict the wall thickness distribution at four different parison's diameter; 8mm, 10mm, 18mm, and 20mm. Effects on the final wall thickness diameter and time step are studied. The simulated data shows that the inflation performance degrades with increasing parison diameter. It is concluded that the blow moulding process using 10mm parison successfully meet the product processing requirements. Factors that contribute to the variation in deformation behaviour of the plastic during the manufacturing process are discussed.

  19. Experimental Evaluation of the Penalty Associated With Micro-Blowing for Reducing Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Biesiadny, Tom J.

    1997-01-01

    A micro-blowing technique (MBT) experiment was conducted in the Advanced Nozzle and Engine Components Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the pressure-drag penalty associated with the MBT and to provide additional information about the porous plates used for micro-blowing. The results showed that 1 of 12 plates tested could reduce the total drag (skin-friction drag plus pressure drag) below a solid flat plate value. The results of this experiment and prior data showed that a total drag reduction below a solid flat plate value was possible. More tests are needed to find an optimal MBT skin and to find a technique to reduce pressure drag.

  20. Heat transfer in the neighborhood of the critical point or line in the presence of hydrogen blowing and combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Botin, A.V.; Provotorov, V.P.; Stepanov, E.A.

    1995-11-01

    The results of numerical calculations of the thin viscous shock layer equations are presented. The dependence of the heat exchange on the generalized blowing parameter, which depends on the blown gas flow rate and the Reynolds number, is obtained.

  1. The exact asymptotic behavior of boundary blow-up solutions to infinity Laplacian equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Haitao

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of viscosity solutions to boundary blow-up elliptic problem {Δ_{∞}u=b(x)f(u), xinΩ, u|_{partialΩ}=+∞,} where {Ω} is a bounded domain with C 2-boundary in {{R}N}, {bin C(bar{Ω})} is positive in {Ω}, which may be vanishing on the boundary, {fin C1([0, ∞))} is regularly varying or is rapidly varying at infinity.

  2. Blow-off momentum from melt and vapor in nuclear deflection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howley, Kirsten; Managan, Robert; Wasem, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    For Earth-impacting objects that are large in size or have short warning times nuclear explosives are an effective threat mitigation response. Nuclear-based deflection works by means of conservation of momentum: as material is heated by incoming photons and neutrons it is ejected from the body which imparts momentum to the remaining mass of the asteroid. Predicting the complete response of a particular object is difficult, since the ejecta size and velocity distributions rely heavily on the unknown, complicated internal structure of the body. However, lower bounds on the blow-off momentum can be estimated using the melted and vaporized surface material. In this paper, we model the response of a one-dimensional SiO2 surface to monoenergetic soft X-ray, hard X-ray and neutron sources using Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian radiation/hydrodynamic simulations. Errors in the blow-off momentum due to our hydrodynamic mesh resolution are quantified and inform zone sizing that balances numerical discretization error with computational efficiency. We explore deposited energy densities ranging from 1.1 to 200 times the melt energy density for SiO2, and develop an approximate relation that gives the mesh resolution needed for a desired percent error in the blow-off momentum as a function of deposited energy density and melt depth. Using these mesh constraints, the response of our one-dimensional SiO2 surface to the energy sources is simulated, and lower bounds are placed on the melt/vapor blow-off momentum as a function of deposited energy density and source energy type.

  3. Effect of jenny milk addition on the inhibition of late blowing in semihard cheese.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Paolino, R; Valentini, V; Musto, M; Ricciardi, A; Adduci, F; D'Adamo, C; Pecora, G; Freschi, P

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of late blowing defects in cheese produces negative effects on the quality and commercial value of the product. In this work, we verified whether the addition of raw jenny milk to bulk cow milk reduced the late blowing defects in semihard cheeses. During cheesemaking, different aliquots of jenny milk were poured into 2 groups of 4 vats, each containing a fixed amount of cow milk. A group of cheeses was created by deliberately contaminating the 4 vats with approximately 3 log10 cfu/mL milk of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CLST01. The other 4 vats, which were not contaminated, were used for a second group of cheeses. After 120 d of ripening, some physical, chemical, and microbiological parameters were evaluated on the obtained semihard cheeses. Differences in sensory properties among cheeses belonging to the uncontaminated group were evaluated by 80 regular consumers of cheese. Our results showed that the increasing addition of jenny milk to cow milk led to a reduction of pH and total bacterial count in both cheese groups, as well as C. tyrobutyricum spores that either grew naturally or artificially inoculated. We observed a progressive reduction of the occurrence of late blowing defects in cheese as consequence of the increasing addition of jenny milk during cheese making. Moreover, the addition of jenny milk did not affect the acceptability of the product, as consumers found no difference among cheeses concerning sensorial aspects. In conclusion, the important antimicrobial activity of lysozyme contained in jenny milk has been confirmed in the current research. It is recommend for use as a possible and viable alternative to egg lysozyme for controlling late blowing defects in cheese. PMID:26074234

  4. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Measurements with Variable Blowing Rates Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of mean and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer with variable rates of mass injection (blowing) of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. The NO2 was seeded into the flow from a slot located 29.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. The top surface of the wedge was oriented at a 20 degree angle in the Mach 10 flow, yielding an edge Mach number of approximately 4.2. The streamwise velocity profiles and streamwise fluctuating velocity component profiles were obtained using a three-laser NO2->NO photolysis molecular tagging velocimetry method. Observed trends in the mean streamwise velocity profiles and profiles of the fluctuating component of streamwise velocity as functions of the blowing rate are described. An effort is made to distinguish between the effect of blowing rate and wall temperature on the measured profiles. An analysis of the mean velocity profiles for a constant blowing rate is presented to determine the uncertainty in the measurement for different probe laser delay settings. Measurements of streamwise velocity were made to within approximately 120 gm of the model surface. The streamwise spatial resolution in this experiment ranged from 0.6 mm to 2.6 mm. An improvement in the spatial precision of the measurement technique has been made, with spatial uncertainties reduced by about a factor of 2 compared to previous measurements. For the quiescent flow calibration measurements presented, uncertainties as low as 2 m/s are obtained at 95% confidence for long delay times (25 gs). For the velocity measurements obtained with the wind tunnel operating, average single-shot uncertainties of less than 44 m/s are obtained at 95% confidence with a probe laser delay setting of 1 gs. The measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  5. LES-based characterization of a suction and oscillatory blowing fluidic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a novel fluidic actuator using steady suction and oscillatory blowing was developed for control of turbulent flows. The suction and oscillatory blowing (SaOB) actuator combines steady suction and pulsed oscillatory blowing into a single device. The actuation is based upon a self-sustained mechanism of confined jets and does not require any moving parts. The control output is determined by a pressure source and the geometric details, and no additional input is needed. While its basic mechanisms have been investigated to some extent, detailed characteristics of internal turbulent flows are not well understood. In this study, internal flows of the SaOB actuator are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). Flow characteristics within the actuator are described in detail for a better understanding of the physical mechanisms and improving the actuator design. LES predicts the self-sustained oscillations of the turbulent jet. Switching frequency, maximum velocity at the actuator outlets, and wall pressure distribution are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computational results are used to develop simplified boundary conditions for numerical experiments of active flow control. Supported by the Boeing company.

  6. Blowing snow at D17, Adélie Land, Antarctica: atmospheric moisture issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, H.; Genthon, C.; Trouvilliez, A.; Brun, C.; Amory, C.

    2014-06-01

    Three years of blowing snow and meteorological observations have been collected along a 7 m mast at site D17 in coastal Adélie Land, Antarctica. This is a region particularly exposed to katabatic winds. The atmospheric surface layer is often close to saturation because of the sublimation of the airborne snow particles. A systematic dry bias results in atmospheric models that ignore blowing snow and its moistening effects, and in meteorological analyses that use such model. The Crocus snow-pack model, including a parameterization for the erosion of surface snow by wind, reproduces the observed march of snow accumulation and ablation if the observed meteorology is used as input. Because of subsaturation, a 2.5 fold increase in surface sublimation is obtained if analyzed surface air meteorology is used. The sublimation obtained in the Crocus model poorly agrees with the moisture fluxes evaluated using the profile method along the mast. Moisture gradients are very weak, particularly when blowing snow saturates the air, to a point where measurement accuracy is an issue. Using the profile method, the measurement uncertainties are strongly amplified in case of strong wind. In such conditions, a single level bulk parameterization with surface energy balance closure as in the Crocus model is preferred. At D17, more than half of the total snow fall is removed by erosion and sublimation, both at the surface and, mainly, of airborne snow particles.

  7. Broadband Noise Reduction of a Low-Speed Fan Noise Using Trailing Edge Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental proof-of-concept test was conducted to demonstrate reduction of rotor-stator interaction noise through the use of rotor-trailing edge blowing. The velocity deficit from the viscous wake of the rotor blades was reduced by injecting air into the wake from a continuous trailing edge slot. Hollow blades with interior guide vanes create flow channels through which externally supplied air flows from the blade root to the trailing edge. A previous paper documented the substantial tonal reductions of this Trailing Edge Rotor Blowing (TERB) fan. This report documents the broadband characteristics of TERB. The Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF), located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, was used as the proof-of-concept test bed. Two-component hotwire data behind the rotor, unsteady surface pressures on the stator vane, and farfield directivity acoustic data were acquired at blowing rates of 1.1, 1.5, and 1.8 percent of the total fan mass flow. The results indicate a substantial reduction in the rotor wake turbulent velocity and in the stator vane unsteady surface pressures. Based on the physics of the noise generation, these indirect measurements indicate the prospect of broadband noise reduction. However, since the broadband noise generated by the ANCF is rotor-dominated, any change in the rotor-stator interaction broadband noise levels is barely distinguishable in the farfield measurements.

  8. Power loss minimizing blowing and suction profiles for drag reduction on a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Pritam; Shukla, Ratnesh

    2015-11-01

    Active and passive flow control strategies that facilitate drag reduction at low energetic costs are of considerable fundamental and practical relevance. Here, we investigate the efficacy of a zero net mass transpiration blowing and suction flow control strategy based on intake and expulsion of fluid from the boundary of a circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross flow of a viscous incompressible fluid. We find this control strategy to be most effective when the blowing and suction profile is such that the fluid intake and expulsion occur over upstream and downstream portions of the circular cylinder, respectively. With increasingly strong intake and expulsion, the vorticity production at the cylinder surface diminishes significantly and the unsteady vortex shedding is suppressed entirely. We find that for sufficiently strong blowing and suction strengths the net power consumption attains a minimum for a significantly reduced net drag force. At a Reynolds number of 1000 the drag is reduced by a factor of over 15 from its base value for a stationary cylinder with zero mass transpiration. We show that a self-propelling state with zero drag force is achieved for a configuration that corresponds to an irrotational flow with vanishing tangential but finite normal surface velocity.

  9. Interaction of Suction and Pulsed Blowing with a Laminar Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Avraham; Marom, Liad

    2015-11-01

    The presentation will describe a fundamental study of active flow control (AFC) using the steady suction and oscillatory blowing actuator (SaOB), identifying its effects on a laminar boundary layer. Recent experiments showed this effective and efficient actuator as a drag reduction device .......[e.g., Wilson et al., AIAA J, 2013]. However, improved fundamental understanding of the boundary layer (BL) interaction with suction and oscillatory blowing and the combination of these two effects in close proximity is desired. The current experiment, performed in a laminar flow, will result in improved efficiency of the actuator and will enable development of a reliable predictive capability of this flow control method. The interaction with a laminar BL is crucial for the project due to the lack of interaction with the random turbulence, the thicker BL and lower skin-friction that enables greater effect of the controlled BL. Furthermore, fundamental interaction principles could be easier to identify and understand in laminar flows, where critical trends will not be masked by turbulence, and the averaging process will better represent the time dependent flow. The results demonstrate that while the oscillatory blowing is robust and has a strong effect on the flow evolution, the steady suction introduced upstream has a crucial role in the efficient operation of the AFC system.

  10. Experimental study on sulfur removal from ladle furnace refining slag in hot state by blowing air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-hua; Lin, Lu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    In view of the present problem of sulfur enrichment in the metallurgical recycling process of ladle furnace (LF) refining slag, a simple and efficient method of removing sulfur from this slag was proposed. The proposed method is compatible with current steelmaking processes. Sulfur removal from LF refining slag for SPHC steel (manufactured at a certain steel plant in China) by blowing air in the hot state was studied by using hot-state experiments in a laboratory. The FactSage software, a carbon/sulfur analyzer, and scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to test and analyze the sulfur removal effect and to investigate factors influencing sulfur removal rate. The results show that sulfur ions in LF refining slag can be oxidized into SO2 by O2 at high temperature by blowing air into molten slag; SO2 production was observed to reach a maximum with a small amount of blown O2 when the temperature exceeded 1350°C. At 1370°C and 1400°C, experimental LF refining slag is in the liquid state and exhibits good fluidity; under these conditions, the sulfur removal effect by blowing air is greater than 90wt% after 60 min. High temperature and large air flow rate are beneficial for removing sulfur from LF refining slag; compared with air flow rate, temperature has a greater strongly influences on the sulfur removal.

  11. Blow-up problems for the heat equation with a local nonlinear Neumann boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Zhengfang

    2016-09-01

    This paper estimates the blow-up time for the heat equation ut = Δu with a local nonlinear Neumann boundary condition: The normal derivative ∂ u / ∂ n =uq on Γ1, one piece of the boundary, while on the rest part of the boundary, ∂ u / ∂ n = 0. The motivation of the study is the partial damage to the insulation on the surface of space shuttles caused by high speed flying subjects. We show the finite time blow-up of the solution and estimate both upper and lower bounds of the blow-up time in terms of the area of Γ1. In many other work, they need the convexity of the domain Ω and only consider the problem with Γ1 = ∂ Ω. In this paper, we remove the convexity condition and only require ∂Ω to be C2. In addition, we deal with the local nonlinearity, namely Γ1 can be just part of ∂Ω.

  12. Beyond blow-up in excitatory integrate and fire neuronal networks: Refractory period and spontaneous activity.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, María J; Perthame, Benoît

    2014-06-01

    The Network Noisy Leaky Integrate and Fire equation is among the simplest model allowing for a self-consistent description of neural networks and gives a rule to determine the probability to find a neuron at the potential v. However, its mathematical structure is still poorly understood and, concerning its solutions, very few results are available. In the midst of them, a recent result shows blow-up in finite time for fully excitatory networks. The intuitive explanation is that each firing neuron induces a discharge of the others; thus increases the activity and consequently the discharge rate of the full network. In order to better understand the details of the phenomena and show that the equation is more complex and fruitful than expected, we analyze further the model. We extend the finite time blow-up result to the case when neurons, after firing, enter a refractory state for a given period of time. We also show that spontaneous activity may occur when, additionally, randomness is included on the firing potential VF in regimes where blow-up occurs for a fixed value of VF. PMID:24533963

  13. Evaluation of HFC 245ca and HFC 236ea as foam blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, Jon; Macarthur, Doug; Kollie, Tom; Graves, Ron; Liu, Matthew; Hendriks, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 141b has been selected as the interim blowing agent for use in urethane insulations on NASA's Space Shuttle External Tank. Due to the expected limited commercial lifetime of this material, research efforts at the NASA Thermal Protection Systems Materials Research Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center are now being devoted to the identification and development of alternatives with zero ozone depletion potential. Physical blowing agents identified to date have included hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and more predominantly, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). The majority of the HFC evaluations in industry have focused on the more readily available, low boiling candidates such as HFC 134a. Higher boiling HFC candidates that could be handled at ambient conditions and use current processing equipment would be more desirable. This paper will describe results from a research program of two such candidate HFC's performed as a cooperative effort between Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The purpose of this effort was to perform a cursory evaluation of the developmental HFC's 245ca and 236ea as blowing agents in urethane based insulations. These two materials were selected from screening tests of 37 C2, C3, and C4 isomers based on physical properties, atmospheric lifetime, flammability, estimated toxicity, difficulty of synthesis, suitability for dual use as a refrigerant, and other factors. Solubility of the two materials in typical foam components was tested, pour foaming trials were performed, and preliminary data were gathered regarding foam insulation performance.

  14. The effect of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on the size and weight of mangos (Mangifera indica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Naqqash, Muhammad Nadir; Saeed, Qamar; Ghouri, Fozia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pollination has a great effect on the yield of fruit trees. Blow flies are considered as an effective pollinator compared to hand pollination in fruit orchards. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of different pollination methods in mango orchards. Methodology: The impact of pollination on quantity and quality of mango yield by blow flies was estimated by using three treatments, i.e., open pollinated trees, trees were covered by a net in the presence of blow flies for pollination, and trees were covered with a net but without insects. Results: The maximum number of flowers was recorded in irregular types of inflorescence, i.e., 434.80 flowers/inflorescence. Fruit setting (bud) was higher in open pollinated mango trees (i.e. 37.00/inflorescence) than enclosed pollination by blow flies (i.e. 22.34/inflorescence). The size of the mango fruit was the highest (5.06 mm) in open pollinated tree than those pollinated by blow flies (3.93 mm) and followed by without any pollinator (3.18 mm) at marble stage. We found that the maximum weight of mango fruit (201.19 g) was in open pollinated trees. Discussion: The results demonstrated that blow flies can be used as effective mango pollinators along with other flies and bees. The blow flies have shown a positive impact on the quality and quantity of mango. This study will be helpful in future and also applicable at farm level to use blow flies as pollinators that are cheap and easy to rear. PMID:27441107

  15. On the blow-up rate of large solutions for a porous media logistic equation on radial domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Peng

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we establish the exact blow-up rate of the large solutions of a porous media logistic equation. We consider the carrying capacity function with a general decay rate at the boundary instead of the usual cases when it can be approximated by a distant function. Obtaining the accurate blow-up rate allows us to establish the uniqueness result. Our result covers all previous results on the ball domain and can be further adapted in a more general domain.

  16. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  17. The Effects of Bottom Blowing Gas Flow Rate Distribution During the Steelmaking Converter Process on Mixing Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Hao; Lai, Po-Han; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Liu, Yung-Chang; Lin, Chi-Cheng; Lu, Muh-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Featuring the advantages of top-blown and bottom-blown oxygen converters, top and bottom combined blown converters are mainstream devices used in steelmaking converter. This study adopted the FLUENT software to develop a numerical model that simulates 3D multiphase flows of gas (air and argon), liquid steel, and slag. Ten numerical experiments were conducted to analyze the effects that the bottom blowing gas flow rate distribution patterns (uniform, linear fixed total flow rate, linear fixed maximal flow rate, and V-type) and bottom blowing gas flow distribution gradients of combined blown converters exert on slag surface stirring heights, flow field patterns, simulation system dynamic pressures, mixing time, and liquid steel-slag interface velocity. The simulation results indicated that the mixing efficiency was highest for the linear fixed total flow rate, followed by the linear fixed maximal flow rate, V-type, and uniform patterns. The bottom blowing gas flow rate distribution exhibited linear patterns and large gradients, and high bottom blowing total flow rates increased the mixing efficiency substantially. In addition, the results suggested that even when bottom blowing total flow rate was reduced, adopting effective bottom blowing gas flow rate distribution patterns and gradients could improve the mixing efficiency.

  18. Satellite Observations of Blowing Snow in and Around Antarctica: Implications for Ice Sheet Mass Balance and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, S. P.; Yang, Y.; Marshak, A.

    2014-12-01

    Blowing snow in the polar regions is known to be important for a variety of reasons including ice sheet mass balance, atmospheric water vapor transport, interpretation of paleoclimate records and atmospheric chemistry. Over Antarctica, persistent katabatic winds produce extreme blowing snow events often covering 100,000 square kilometers or more and reaching heights of 300-400 meters. New techniques of blowing snow detection using active and passive satellite data are providing a new understanding of the frequency, magnitude and spatial coverage of blowing snow over and around the Antarctic continent. Current research is utilizing these methods to obtain a nearly 10 year climatology of blowing snow events over Antarctica and estimate the amount of mass being blown off the continent and sublimated into the atmosphere on an annual basis. In addition, recent research indicates that blowing snow over sea ice may be important in the process of transporting seal salt aerosol into the atmosphere where it is implicated in the production of bromine compounds that strongly influence many aspects of tropospheric chemistry.

  19. Assessment of Potential Aerodynamic Benefits from Spanwise Blowing at the Wing Tip. Ph.D. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond Edward

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive set of experimental and analytical investigations have been conducted to assess the potential aerodynamic benefits from spanwise blowing at the tip of a moderate aspect ratio, swept wing. An analytical model has been developed to simulate a jet exhausting from the wing tip. An experimental study of a subsonic jet exhausting from the wing tip was conducted to investigate the effect of spanwise blowing from the tip on the aerodynamic characteristics of a moderate aspect ratio, swept wing. Wing force and moment data and surface pressure data were measured at Mach numbers up to 0.72. Results indicate that small amounts of blowing from small jets increase the lift curve slope a small amount, but have no effect on drag. Larger amounts of blowing from longer jets blowing increases lift near the tip and reduce drag at low Mach numbers. These benefits decrease with increasing Mach number, and vanish at Mach 0.5. A Navier-Stokes solver with modified boundary conditions at the tip was used to extrapolate the results to a Mach number of 0.72. With current technology and conventional wing shapes, spanwise blowing at the wing tip does not appear to be a practical means of reducing drag of moderate aspect ratio wings at high subsonic Mach numbers.

  20. Navier-Stokes Computations of a Wing-Flap Model With Blowing Normal to the Flap Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of a generic wing with a half span flap shows the mean flow effects of several blown flap configurations. The effort compares and contrasts the thin-layer, Reynolds averaged, Navier-Stokes solutions of a baseline wing-flap configuration with configurations that have blowing normal to the flap surface through small slits near the flap side edge. Vorticity contours reveal a dual vortex structure at the flap side edge for all cases. The dual vortex merges into a single vortex at approximately the mid-flap chord location. Upper surface blowing reduces the strength of the merged vortex and moves the vortex away from the upper edge. Lower surface blowing thickens the lower shear layer and weakens the merged vortex, but not as much as upper surface blowing. Side surface blowing forces the lower surface vortex farther outboard of the flap edge by effectively increasing the aerodynamic span of the flap. It is seen that there is no global aerodynamic penalty or benefit from the particular blowing configurations examined.

  1. Study of potential aerodynamic benefits from spanwise blowing at wingtip. Ph.D. Thesis - George Washington Univ., 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    Comprehensive experimental and analytical studies have been conducted to assess the potential aerodynamic benefits from spanwise blowing at the tip of a moderate-aspect-ratio swept wing. Previous studies on low-aspect-ratio wings indicated that blowing from the wingtip can diffuse the tip vortex and displace it outward. The diffused and displaced vortex will induce a smaller downwash at the wing, and consequently the wing will have increased lift and decreased induced drag at a given angle of attack. Results from the present investigation indicated that blowing from jets with a short chord had little effect on lift or drag, but blowing from jets with a longer chord increased lift near the tip and reduced drag at low Mach numbers. A Navier-Stokes solver with modified boundary conditions at the tip was used to extrapolate the results to a Mach number of 0.72. Calculations indicated that lift and drag increase with increasing jet momentum coefficient. Because the momentum of the jet is typically greater than the reduction in the wing drag and the increase in the wing lift due to spanwise blowing is small, spanwise blowing at the wingtip does not appear to be a practical means of improving the aerodynamic efficiency of moderate-aspectratio swept wings at high subsonic Mach numbers.

  2. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  3. Experiments in aircraft roll-yaw control using forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    Flight at high angles of attack can provide improved maneuverability for fighter aircraft and increased lift capabilities for future supersonic and hypersonic transport aircraft during take-off and landing. At high angles of attack the aerodynamics of the vehicle are dominated by separation, vortex shedding and breakdown, which compromise the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. As a result, controlled flight at high angles of attack is not feasible for current aircraft configurations. Alternate means to augment the control of the vehicle at these flight regimes are therefore necessary. In this work, the feasibility of using Forebody Tangential Blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model at high angles of attack is demonstrated. The method consists of injecting a thin sheet of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle to change the separation lines over the forebody and alter the aerodynamic loads. A unique model was developed that describes the unsteady aerodynamic moments generated by both vehicle motion and the applied blowing. This aerodynamic model is sufficiently detailed to predict transient motion of the wind-tunnel model, and is simple enough to be suitable for control logic design and implementation. Successful closed-loop control was demonstrated experimentally for a delta wing body model with a cone-cylinder fuselage. Experiments were performed at 45 degrees nominal angle of attack. At this condition, the natural motion of the system is divergent. A discrete vortex method was developed to help understand the main physics of the flow. The method correctly captures the interactions between forebody and wing vortices. Moreover, the trends in static loads and flow structure are correctly represented. Flow visualization results revealed the vortical structure of the flow to be asymmetric even for symmetric flight conditions. The effects of blowing, roll and yaw angles on the flow structure were determined. It was shown that

  4. FE-Analysis of Stretch-Blow Moulded Bottles Using an Integrative Process Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, C.; Michaeli, W.; Rasche, S.

    2011-05-01

    The two-stage stretch-blow moulding process has been established for the large scale production of high quality PET containers with excellent mechanical and optical properties. The total production costs of a bottle are significantly caused by the material costs. Due to this dominant share of the bottle material, the PET industry is interested in reducing the total production costs by an optimised material efficiency. However, a reduced material inventory means decreasing wall thicknesses and therewith a reduction of the bottle properties (e.g. mechanical properties, barrier properties). Therefore, there is often a trade-off between a minimal bottle weight and adequate properties of the bottle. In order to achieve the objectives Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) techniques can assist the designer of new stretch-blow moulded containers. Hence, tools such as the process simulation and the structural analysis have become important in the blow moulding sector. The Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, has developed an integrative three-dimensional process simulation which models the complete path of a preform through a stretch-blow moulding machine. At first, the reheating of the preform is calculated by a thermal simulation. Afterwards, the inflation of the preform to a bottle is calculated by finite element analysis (FEA). The results of this step are e.g. the local wall thickness distribution and the local biaxial stretch ratios. Not only the material distribution but also the material properties that result from the deformation history of the polymer have significant influence on the bottle properties. Therefore, a correlation between the material properties and stretch ratios is considered in an integrative simulation approach developed at IKV. The results of the process simulation (wall thickness, stretch ratios) are transferred to a further simulation program and mapped on the bottles FE mesh. This approach allows a local

  5. The transient roll moment response due to forebody tangential blowing at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Jonathan Kwokching

    The sustained ability for controlled flight at high angles of attack is desirable for future aircraft. For combat aircraft, enhancing maneuverability is important to increasing its survivability. For future supersonic commercial aircraft, an increase in lift at high angles of attack leads to improved performance during take-offs and landing, and a reduction in noise pollution. However, nonlinear and unsteady phenomena, such as flow separation and vortex shedding dominate the aerodynamics in the high angle of attack regime. These phenomena cause the onset of lateral loads and decrease the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. For conventional aircraft, controlled flight at high angle of attack is difficult or unfeasible without augmented means of control and a good understanding of their impact on vehicle characteristics and dynamics. The injection of thin sheets of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle has been found to be an extremely promising method for augmenting the control of a flight vehicle at high angles of attack. Forebody Tangential Blowing (FTB) allows the flow structure to be altered in a rational manner and increase the controllability of the vehicle under these flight conditions. The feasibility of using FTB to control the roll-yaw motion of flight vehicles has been demonstrated. Existing knowledge of FTB's nonlinear impact on the aerodynamic moment responses is limited. Currently available dynamic models predict the general trends in the behavior but do not capture important transient effects that dominate the responses when small amounts of blowing is used. These transients can be large in comparison to the steady-state values. This thesis summarizes the experimental and theoretical results of an investigation into the transient effects of Forebody Tangential Blowing. The relationship between the aerodynamic roll moment, vortical flowfield, and blowing strength is examined to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics of

  6. A Proof of Concept Experiment for Reducing Skin Friction by Using a Micro-Blowing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1996-01-01

    A proof of concept experiment for reducing skin friction has been conducted in the Advanced Nozzle and Engine Components Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. In this unique concept, called the micro-blowing technique (MBT), an extremely small amount of air was blown vertically through very small holes to reduce the surface roughness and to control the gradient of the flow velocity profile on the surface thereby reducing skin friction. Research revealed that the skin was the most important factor to make this concept achievable. The proposed skin consisted of two layers. The inner layer was a low permeable porous skin for distributing the blowing air evenly while the outer layer with small holes controlled the vertical or nearly vertical blowing air. Preliminary experimental results showed that the MBT has the potential of a very large reduction in skin friction below the skin friction of a nonporous plain flat plate. Of the skins tested, three have been identified as the MBT skins. They provided very low unblown skin friction such that a large skin friction reduction, below a flat plate value, was achieved with very small amounts of blowing air. The reduction in skin friction of 55 percent was achieved at the Mach number of 0.3 for the exhaust pressure of 0.85 atm, and 60 percent reduction was obtained for the exhaust pressure of 0.24 atm (corresponding to 10 700-m altitude) at the same Mach number. A significant reduction in skin friction of over 25 percent was achieved for the exhaust pressure of 0.24 atm at the Mach number of 0.7. This implied that the MBT could be applied to a wide range of flight conditions. It is also believed that additional 10 percent reduction could be obtained by eliminating the gap between the inner layer and the outer layer. The aspect ratio of the vertical small holes for the outer layer of the MBT skin should be larger than 4 based on the preliminary conclusion from this test. Many experiments are needed to find out the

  7. Remarking on a blackened eye: Persifor Frazer's blow-by-blow account of a fistfight with his dear friend Edward Drinker Cope.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Edward Drinker Cope, a brilliant and prolific American naturalist, was notoriously combative. His infamous feud with Yale paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh, which played out publicly on the front pages of the New York Herald, was one of the worst scandals of nineteenth-century American science. Cope did not fight exclusively with his pen, however. In 1888, for example, he traded blows with his close friend Persifor Frazer over a matter of honor at the entrance of Philadelphia's hallowed Philosophical Hall, just as a meeting of the American Philosophical Society was getting under way. A six-page letter, handwritten by Persifor Frazer and housed in the Frazer Family Papers at the University of Pennsylvania, details the circumstances of their quarrel. An annotated transcription of Frazer's letter appears here. PMID:26336804

  8. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  9. Kinematic separation of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldshtik, M.; Husain, H.S.; Hussain, F. )

    1992-06-15

    A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of components in an initially uniform fluid mixture is found experimentally. A qualitative explanation of the effect is proposed in terms of nonparallel streamlines in the medium.

  10. Assessing exposures to inhaled complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Leaderer, B P; Lioy, P J; Spengler, J D

    1993-01-01

    In the course of daily activities, individuals spend varying amounts of time in different spaces where they are exposed to a complex mixture of gas, vapor, and particulate contaminants. The term complex is used in this paper to refer to binary mixtures as well as truly complex mixtures of three or more constituents. The diversity of the environments where pollution may occur, the number of pollutants that may be present, and the nature of the activity in the environment combine to pose a challenge to investigators of the health effects of air pollutants. This article discusses several methods of measuring or assessing exposure to complex mixture air contaminants that include time-activity assessments, personal monitoring, biomarkers of exposure, and microenvironmental models that can be employed singly or in combination in a protocol for exposure assessment. The use of nested designs, involving more intensive data collection from samples or subjects, is also considered. PMID:8206025

  11. Thermo-mechanical simulation of liquid-supported stretch blow molding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, J.; Stommel, M.

    2015-05-22

    Stretch blow molding is the well-established plastics forming method to produce Polyehtylene therephtalate (PET) bottles. An injection molded preform is heated up above the PET glass transition temperature (Tg∼85°C) and subsequently inflated by pressurized air into a closed cavity. In the follow-up filling process, the resulting bottle is filled with the final product. A recently developed modification of the process combines the blowing and filling stages by directly using the final liquid product to inflate the preform. In a previously published paper, a mechanical simulation and successful evaluation of this liquid-driven stretch blow molding process was presented. In this way, a realistic process parameter dependent simulation of the preform deformation throughout the forming process was enabled, whereas the preform temperature evolution during forming was neglected. However, the formability of the preform is highly reduced when the temperature sinks below Tg during forming. Experimental investigations show temperature-induced failure cases due to the fast heat transfer between hot preform and cold liquid. Therefore, in this paper, a process dependent simulation of the temperature evolution during processing to avoid preform failure is presented. For this purpose, the previously developed mechanical model is used to extract the time dependent thickness evolution. This information serves as input for the heat transfer simulation. The required material parameters are calibrated from preform cooling experiments recorded with an infrared-camera. Furthermore, the high deformation ratios during processing lead to strain induced crystallization. This exothermal reaction is included into the simulation by extracting data from preform measurements at different stages of deformation via Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Finally, the thermal simulation model is evaluated by free forming experiments, recorded by a high-speed infrared camera.

  12. Thermo-mechanical simulation of liquid-supported stretch blow molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, J.; Stommel, M.

    2015-05-01

    Stretch blow molding is the well-established plastics forming method to produce Polyehtylene therephtalate (PET) bottles. An injection molded preform is heated up above the PET glass transition temperature (Tg˜85°C) and subsequently inflated by pressurized air into a closed cavity. In the follow-up filling process, the resulting bottle is filled with the final product. A recently developed modification of the process combines the blowing and filling stages by directly using the final liquid product to inflate the preform. In a previously published paper, a mechanical simulation and successful evaluation of this liquid-driven stretch blow molding process was presented. In this way, a realistic process parameter dependent simulation of the preform deformation throughout the forming process was enabled, whereas the preform temperature evolution during forming was neglected. However, the formability of the preform is highly reduced when the temperature sinks below Tg during forming. Experimental investigations show temperature-induced failure cases due to the fast heat transfer between hot preform and cold liquid. Therefore, in this paper, a process dependent simulation of the temperature evolution during processing to avoid preform failure is presented. For this purpose, the previously developed mechanical model is used to extract the time dependent thickness evolution. This information serves as input for the heat transfer simulation. The required material parameters are calibrated from preform cooling experiments recorded with an infrared-camera. Furthermore, the high deformation ratios during processing lead to strain induced crystallization. This exothermal reaction is included into the simulation by extracting data from preform measurements at different stages of deformation via Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Finally, the thermal simulation model is evaluated by free forming experiments, recorded by a high-speed infrared camera.

  13. Pyroclastic current dynamic pressure from aerodynamics of tree or pole blow-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; Voight, B.

    2000-07-01

    The common occurrence of tree and pole blow-down from pyroclastic currents provides an opportunity to estimate properties of the currents. Blow-down may occur by uprooting (root zone rupture), or flexure or shear at some point on the object. If trees are delimbed before blow-down, each tree or pole can be simulated by a cylinder perpendicular to the current. The force acting on a cylinder is a function of flow dynamic pressure, cylinder geometry, and drag coefficient. Treated as a cantilever of circular cross-section, the strength for the appropriate failure mode (rupture, uprooting or flexure) can then be used to estimate the minimum necessary current dynamic pressure. In some cases, larger or stronger standing objects can provide upper bounds on the dynamic pressure. This analysis was treated in two ways: (1) assuming that the current properties are vertically constant; and (2) allowing current velocity and density to vary vertically according to established models for turbulent boundary layers and stratified flow. The two methods produced similar results for dynamic pressure. The second, along with a method to approximate average whole-current density, offers a means to estimate average velocity and density over the height of the failed objects. The method is applied to several example cases, including Unzen, Mount St. Helens, Lamington, and Merapi volcanoes. Our results compare reasonably well with independent estimates. For several cases, we found that it is possible to use the dynamic pressure equations developed for vertically uniform flow, along with the average cloud density multiplied by a factor of 2-5, to determine average velocity over the height of the failed object.

  14. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-07-15

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  15. Sea-floor methane blow-out and global firestorm at the K-T boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Max, M.D.; Dillon, William P.; Nishimura, C.; Hurdle, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    A previously unsuspected source of fuel for the global firestorm recorded by soot in the Cretaceous-Tertiary impact layer may have resided in methane gas associated with gas hydrate in the end-Cretaceous seafloor. End-Cretaceous impact-generated shock and megawaves would have had the potential to initiate worldwide oceanic methane gas blow-outs from these deposits. The methane would likely have ignited and incompletely combusted. This large burst of methane would have been followed by longer-term methane release as a part of a positive thermal feedback in the disturbed ocean-atmosphere system.

  16. A wing-jet interaction theory for USB configurations. [Upper Surface Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction between the wing and an inviscid upper-surface blowing (USB) thick jet with Mach number nonuniformity is treated within the framework of a linear inviscid subsonic compressible flow theory. A two-vortex-sheet model for the jet surface is used to represent the induced flowfields inside and outside the jet. Comparison of the predicted results with experimental data shows good agreement in lift, induced drag, and pitching moment. It is shown that the thin jet flap theory is inadequate for USB configurations with thick jet.

  17. A numerical study of transition control by periodic suction-blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of active control of transition by periodic suction-blowing is investigated via direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The time-evolution of finite-amplitude disturbances in plane channel flow is compared in detail with and without control. The analysis indicates that, for relatively small three dimensional amplitudes, a two dimensional control effectively reduces disturbance growth rates even for linearly unstable Reynolds numbers. After the flow goes through secondary instability, three dimensional control seems necessary to stabilize the flow. An investigation of the temperature field suggests that passive temperature contamination is operative to reflect the flow dynamics during transition.

  18. On the Blow Up and Condensation of Supercritical Solutions of the Nordheim Equation for Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, M.; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we prove that the solutions of the isotropic, spatially homogeneous Nordheim equation for bosons with bounded initial data blow up in finite time in the L ∞ norm if the values of the energy and particle density are in the range of values where the corresponding equilibria contain a Dirac mass. We also prove that, in the weak solutions, whose initial data are measures with values of particle and energy densities satisfying the previous condition, a Dirac measure at the origin forms in finite time.

  19. Trailing Edge Blowing on a Two-Dimensional Six-Percent Thick Elliptical Circulation Control Airfoil Up to Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.; Anders, Scott G.; Johnson, Stuart K.; Florance, Jennifer P.; Keller, Donald F.

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) on a six percent thick slightly cambered elliptical circulation control airfoil with both upper and lower surface blowing capability. Parametric evaluations of jet slot heights and Coanda surface shapes were conducted at momentum coefficients (Cm) from 0.0 to 0.12. Test data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.8, and 0.84 at Reynolds numbers per foot of 2.43 x 105 to 1.05 x 106. For a transonic condition, (Mach = 0.8 at alpha = 3 degrees), it was generally found the smaller slot and larger Coanda surface combination was overall more effective than other slot/Coanda surface combinations. Lower surface blowing was not as effective as the upper surface blowing over the same range of momentum coefficients. No appreciable Coanda surface, slot height, or slot blowing position preference was indicated transonically with the dual slot blowing.

  20. Measurement Of Thermal Contact Resistance Between The Mold And The Polymer For The Stretch-blow Molding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordival, M.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Coment, E.

    2007-04-01

    In the stretch-blow molding process, the heat transfer between the polymer and the mold is of prime interest. Although the time of contact is very short (typically around 0.5 s), the heat transfer affects the mechanical properties of the bottle, and the quality of final parts. In order to model heat transfers at the interface, a classical approach — generally adopted in numerical softwares — is to impose the heat flux density boundary condition thanks to a parameter called Thermal Contact Resistance (TCR). This paper focuses on describing the experimental method developed in order to measure evolution of this thermal parameter (TCR) versus time, as well as results obtained on the CROMeP blowing machine. In this study, a mold has been instrumented with two different sensors. The first probe allows to estimate the heat flux density and temperature at the mold surface temperature, using a linear inverse heat condution problem (Function Specification Method). The second device is used to measure the surface temperature of the PET during the blowing. This measurement is non intrusive, and can be applied within an industrial environment during the blowing step. In addition, air pressure inside the preform is also measured during the blowing. This work is part of the European project "APT_PACK" (Advanced knowledge of Polymer deformation for Tomorrow's PACKaging).

  1. A Numerical Study of Anti-Vortex Film Cooling Designs at High Blowing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    2008-01-01

    A concept for mitigating the adverse effects of jet vorticity and liftoff at high blowing ratios for turbine film cooling flows has been developed and studied at NASA Glenn Research Center. This "anti-vortex" film cooling concept proposes the addition of two branched holes from each primary hole in order to produce a vorticity counter to the detrimental kidney vortices from the main jet. These vortices typically entrain hot freestream gas and are associated with jet separation from the turbine blade surface. The anti-vortex design is unique in that it requires only easily machinable round holes, unlike shaped film cooling holes and other advanced concepts. The anti-vortex film cooling hole concept has been modeled computationally for a single row of 30deg angled holes on a flat surface using the 3D Navier-Stokes solver Glenn-HT. A modification of the anti-vortex concept whereby the branched holes exit adjacent to the main hole has been studied computationally for blowing ratios of 1.0 and 2.0 and at density ratios of 1.0 and 2.0. This modified concept was selected because it has shown the most promise in recent experimental studies. The computational results show that the modified design improves the film cooling effectiveness relative to the round hole baseline and previous anti-vortex cases, in confirmation of the experimental studies.

  2. Foam injection molding of poly(lactic acid) with physical blowing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantani, R.; Sorrentino, A.; Volpe, V.; Titomanlio, G.

    2014-05-01

    Foam injection molding uses environmental friendly blowing agents under high pressure and temperature to produce parts having a cellular core and a compact solid skin (the so-called "structural foam"). The addition of a supercritical gas reduces the part weight and at the same time improves some physical properties of the material through the promotion of a faster crystallization; it also leads to the reduction of both the viscosity and the glass transition temperature of the polymer melt, which therefore can be injection molded adopting lower temperatures and pressures. These aspects are of extreme interest for biodegradable polymers, which often present a very narrow processing window, with the suitable processing temperatures close to the degradation conditions. In this work, foam injection molding was carried out by an instrumented molding machine, able to measure the pressure evolution in different positions along the flow-path. The material adopted was a biodegradable polymer, namely the Poly(lactic acid), PLA. The effect of a physical blowing agent (PBA) on the viscosity was measured. The density reduction and the morphology of parts obtained by different molding conditions was assessed.

  3. Biomechanical investigation of the supraorbital arch - a transient FEA study on the impact of physical blows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As fractures of the supraorbital region are far less common than midfacial or orbital fractures, a study was initiated to investigate whether fist blows could lead to fractures similar to those often seen in the midface. Methods A detailed skull model and an impactor resembling a fist were created and a fist blow to the supraorbital region was simulated. A transient finite element analysis was carried out to calculate von Mises stresses, peak force, and impact time. Results Within the contact zone of skull and impactor critical stress values could be seen which lay at the lower yield border for potential fractures. A second much lower stress zone was depicted in the anterior-medial orbital roof. Conclusions In this simulation a fist punch, which could generate distinct fractures in the midface and naso-ethmoid-orbital region, would only reach the limits of a small fracture in the supraorbital region. The reason is seen in the strong bony architecture. Much higher forces are needed to create severe trauma in the upper face which is supported by clinical findings. Finite element analysis is the method of choice to investigate the impact of trauma on the human skeleton. PMID:24745339

  4. Sea salt aerosol from blowing snow on sea ice - modeling vs observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Frey, Markus; Norris, Sarah; Brooks, Ian; Anderson, Philip; Jones, Anna; wolff, Eric; Legrand, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Blowing snow over sea ice, through a subsequent sublimation process of salt-containing blown snow particles, has been hypothesized as a significant sea salt aerosol (SSA) source in high latitudes. This mechanism has been strongly supported by a winter cruise in the Weddell Sea (during June-August 2013). The newly collected data, including both physical and chemical components, provide a unique way to test and validate the parameterisation used for describing the SSA production from blowing snow events. With updates to some key parameters such as snow salinity in a global Chemistry-transport model pTOMCAT, simulated SSA concentrations can be well compared with measured SSA data. In this presentation, I will report modeled SSA number density against collected data on board of Polarstern ship during the Weddell Sea cruise, as well as modeled SSA massive concentrations against those measured at both coastal sites such as Alert in the North and Dumont d'Urville (DDU) in the South and central Antarctic sites such as Concordia and Kohnen stations. Model experiments indicated that open ocean-sourced SSA could not explain the observed winter SSA peaks seen in most polar sites, while with sea ice-sourced SSA in the model, the winter peaks can be well improved indicating the importance of sea ice-sourced SSA as a significant contributor to the salts (Na+, Cl-) recorded in the ice core.

  5. Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents for foam insulation of launch vehicle cryogenic propellant tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, L. ); Bzik, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on two polyurethane spray-on foam insulations (SOFI) that were evaluated with five hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents each (HCFC-141b, HCFC-123, and three blends). Foams were evaluated by measuring bond and flatwise tension strengths at four temperatures, compression at ambient temperature, and substrate strain compatibility at liquid helium temperature. Additionally, foams were characterized for density, closed-cell content, oxygen index, and ablation under radiant heating. Compression strengths of RDB-1-152 (polyether polyol) exceeded those of SS-1825 SOFI (polyester/polyether blend). Highest compression and tensile strengths were for foams sprayed with HCFC-141b and strengths decreased with increasing HCFC-123 content in the blowing agent. No foam failures occurred adhesively at the aluminum substrate, but a high incidence of premature failures occurred in the knitline between successive spray layers. Process optimization studies will be conducted with the two best SOFI systems, RDB-1-152/HCFC-141b and RDB-1-152/30% HCFC-123; 70 % HCFC-141b.

  6. Blow-out protector and fire control system for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Caraway, M.F.; Caraway, B.L.

    1987-10-06

    A blow-out protector is described for an oil well comprising a housing having a vertical passageway therethrough for a Kelly. The housing has a lower end adapter flange to be connected to a well casing, an elastomeric body having an opening for the Kelly and carried on the Kelly for providing sealing contact with the Kelly and housing passageway, a catch ring secured to the Kelly and having a surface defined by a given diameter, a compressor ring plate positioned below the elastomeric body on the Kelly, means on an interior of the housing having a given diameter and preventing the compressor ring plate from falling down and yet providing engagement with the surface of the catch ring, the compressor ring plate having a hole for passage of the Kelly drive-mechanism for the drill pipe, the catch ring on the Kelly positioned below the compressor plate. The diameter of the catch ring is smaller than the diameter of the interior means on the housing so that when the Kelly is pulled up the catch ring will contact and force the compressor ring plate against the elastomeric body and force the elastomeric body into tight contact with both the Kelly and the housing thus sealing the space between the Kelly and the housing against a blow-out.

  7. Aerodynamic drag reduction of a simplified squareback vehicle using steady blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlewood, R. P.; Passmore, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    A large contribution to the aerodynamic drag of a vehicle arises from the failure to fully recover pressure in the wake region, especially on squareback configurations. A degree of base pressure recovery can be achieved through careful shape optimisation, but the freedom of an automotive aerodynamicist to implement significant shape changes is limited by a variety of additional factors such styling, ergonomics and loading capacity. Active flow control technologies present the potential to create flow field modifications without the need for external shape changes and have received much attention in previous years within the aeronautical industry and, more recently, within the automotive industry. In this work the influence of steady blowing applied at a variety of angles on the roof trailing edge of a simplified ¼ scale squareback style vehicle has been investigated. Hot-wire anemometry, force balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and PIV have been used to investigate the effects of the steady blowing on the vehicle wake structures and the resulting body forces. The energy consumption of the steady jet is calculated and is used to deduce an aerodynamic drag power change. Results show that overall gains can be achieved; however, the large mass flow rate required restricts the applicability of the technique to road vehicles. Means by which the mass flow rate requirements of the jet may be reduced are discussed and suggestions for further work put forward.

  8. Antimicrobial Poly(lactic acid)-Based Nanofibres Developed by Solution Blow Spinning.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Du, Wen-Xian; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Williams, Tina G; Wood, Delilah F; Imam, Syed H; Orts, William J; Lopez-Rubio, Amparo; Lagaron, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports on the development of hybrid poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibres loaded with highly crystalline bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers (BCNW) by the novel solution blow spinning method. Furthermore, fibres with antimicrobial properties were generated by incorporating carvacrol and THC as antimicrobial agents and the biocide effect against Listeria monocytogenes was studied. Initially, PLA blow spun fibres containing BCNW were optimized in terms of morphology and thermal properties. The addition of BCNW was seen to significantly increase the viscosity and surface tension of solutions, restricting the capacity to form fibres for concentrations greater than 30 wt.-% BCNW. 15 wt.-% BCNW was selected as the optimum nanofiller loading as it led to the most uniform fibres morphology, with BCNW homogeneously distributed along the fibres' axis. Subsequently, carvacrol and THC were incorporated into the fibres to confer them with antimicrobial properties, although the hydrophobic PLA matrix did not provide an efficient release of the antimicrobials. Thus, hydrophilic substances were added in order to trigger the antimicrobials release through water sorption mechanisms. The addition of the BCNW filler was not seen to significantly increase the antimicrobial capacity of the fibres by itself and, hence, gelatin was added to help promoting further the hydrophylicity and biocide performance of the fibres. Nevertheless, for the more hydrophilic THC, the biocide capacity of the fibres with gelatin was accentuated further by the presence of the BCNW. PMID:26328414

  9. Pattern injuries from blows with the muzzle end of a handgun.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Vogt, S; Pircher, R; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Pistols, revolvers and blank guns are not only used to discharge cartridges, but also for hits to the victim. In such cases, the blows preferably affect the head and/or the interposed hands protecting the body. The impact is mostly exerted either by the grip of a pistol or the butt of a revolver. In vigorous thrusts inflicted with the muzzle end of the weapon, the edge of the barrel may produce circular punch lesions with central skin flaps roughly corresponding to the bore. As in other kinds of pistol-whipping, the scalp wounds may be associated with fractures of the skull and even with brain contusions. Using the example of a homicide committed by pistol-whipping, the morphological features of blunt injuries from a handgun's muzzle are presented. The characteristic wound pattern found on the victim's head could be reproduced experimentally by forceful blows to the forehead of a slaughtered pig. In the case presented, the dominant hand of the perpetrator showed friction blisters due to prolonged striking with an unhandy tool in the form of a pistol. PMID:26490008

  10. Response of an artificially blown clarinet to different blowing pressure profiles.

    PubMed

    Bergeot, Baptiste; Almeida, André; Gazengel, Bruno; Vergez, Christophe; Ferrand, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Using an artificial mouth with an accurate pressure control, the onset of the pressure oscillations inside the mouthpiece of a simplified clarinet is studied experimentally. Two time profiles are used for the blowing pressure: in a first set of experiments the pressure is increased at constant rates, then decreased at the same rate. In a second set of experiments the pressure rises at a constant rate and is then kept constant for an arbitrary period of time. In both cases the experiments are repeated for different increase rates. Numerical simulations using a simplified clarinet model blown with a constantly increasing mouth pressure are compared to the oscillating pressure obtained inside the mouthpiece. Both show that the beginning of the oscillations appears at a higher pressure values than the theoretical static threshold pressure, a manifestation of bifurcation delay. Experiments performed using an interrupted increase in mouth pressure show that the beginning of the oscillation occurs close to the stop in the increase of the pressure. Experimental results also highlight that the speed of the onset transient of the sound is roughly the same, independently of the duration of the increase phase of the blowing pressure. PMID:24437788

  11. Response of an artificially blown clarinet to different blowing pressure profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeot, Baptiste; Almeida, André; Gazengel, Bruno; Vergez, Christophe; Ferrand, Didier

    Using an artificial mouth with an accurate pressure control, the onset of the pressure oscillations inside the mouthpiece of a simplified clarinet is studied experimentally. Two time profiles are used for the blowing pressure: in a first set of experiments the pressure is increased at constant rates, then decreased at the same rate. In a second set of experiments the pressure rises at a constant rate and is then kept constant for an arbitrary period of time. In both cases the experiments are repeated for different increase rates. Numerical simulations using a simplified clarinet model blown with a constantly increasing mouth pressure are compared to the oscillating pressure obtained inside the mouthpiece. Both show that the beginning of the oscillations appears at a higher pressure values than the theoretical static threshold pressure, a manifestation of bifurcation delay. Experiments performed using an interrupted increase in mouth pressure show that the beginning of the oscillation occurs close to the stop in the increase of the pressure. Experimental results also highlight that the speed of the onset transient of the sound is roughly the same, independently of the duration of the increase phase of the blowing pressure.

  12. Micro Blowing Simulations Using a Coupled Finite-Volume Lattice-Boltzman n L ES Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Feiz, H.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional large-eddy simulations (LES) of single and multiple jet-in-cross-flow (JICF) are conducted using the 19-bit Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) method coupled with a conventional finite-volume (FV) scheme. In this coupled LBE-FV approach, the LBE-LES is employed to simulate the flow inside the jet nozzles while the FV-LES is used to simulate the crossflow. The key application area is the use of this technique is to study the micro blowing technique (MBT) for drag control similar to the recent experiments at NASA/GRC. It is necessary to resolve the flow inside the micro-blowing and suction holes with high resolution without being restricted by the FV time-step restriction. The coupled LBE-FV-LES approach achieves this objectives in a computationally efficient manner. A single jet in crossflow case is used for validation purpose and the results are compared with experimental data and full LBE-LES simulation. Good agreement with data is obtained. Subsequently, MBT over a flat plate with porosity of 25% is simulated using 9 jets in a compressible cross flow at a Mach number of 0.4. It is shown that MBT suppresses the near-wall vortices and reduces the skin friction by up to 50 percent. This is in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-08-15

    We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7 mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ← 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ← 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

  14. Blow-up in multidimensional aggregation equations with mildly singular interaction kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.; Carrillo, José A.; Laurent, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    We consider the multidimensional aggregation equation ut - ∇· (u∇K * u) = 0 in which the radially symmetric attractive interaction kernel has a mild singularity at the origin (Lipschitz or better). In the case of bounded initial data, finite time singularity has been proved for kernels with a Lipschitz point at the origin (Bertozzi and Laurent 2007 Commun. Math. Sci. 274 717-35), whereas for C2 kernels there is no finite-time blow-up. We prove, under mild monotonicity assumptions on the kernel K, that the Osgood condition for well-posedness of the ODE characteristics determines global in time well-posedness of the PDE with compactly supported bounded nonnegative initial data. When the Osgood condition is violated, we present a new proof of finite time blow-up that extends previous results, requiring radially symmetric data, to general bounded, compactly supported nonnegative initial data without symmetry. We also present a new analysis of radially symmetric solutions under less strict monotonicity conditions. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of similarity solutions for the case K(x) = |x| and some open problems. This paper is published as part of a collection in honour of Todd Dupont's 65th birthday.

  15. Relationship inference based on DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navreet; Bouzga, Mariam M; Dørum, Guro; Egeland, Thore

    2016-03-01

    Today, there exists a number of tools for solving kinship cases. But what happens when information comes from a mixture? DNA mixtures are in general rarely seen in kinship cases, but in a case presented to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, sample DNA was obtained after a rape case that resulted in an unwanted pregnancy and abortion. The only available DNA from the fetus came in form of a mixture with the mother, and it was of interest to find the father of the fetus. The mother (the victim), however, refused to give her reference data and so commonly used methods for paternity testing were no longer applicable. As this case illustrates, kinship cases involving mixtures and missing reference profiles do occur and make the use of existing methods rather inconvenient. We here present statistical methods that may handle general relationship inference based on DNA mixtures. The basic idea is that likelihood calculations for mixtures can be decomposed into a series of kinship problems. This formulation of the problem facilitates the use of kinship software. We present the freely available R package relMix which extends on the R version of Familias. Complicating factors like mutations, silent alleles, and θ-correction are then easily handled for quite general family relationships, and are included in the statistical methods we develop in this paper. The methods and their implementations are exemplified on the data from the rape case. PMID:26541994

  16. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  17. MIXTURES FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have been conducted to address questions concerning the toxicity of "real world" mixtures of DBPs. These studies, which used either concentrates of drinking water or humic acid preparations treated with various disinfectants, were largely negative and had a nu...

  18. Effects of spanwise blowing on the surface pressure distribution and vortex-lift characteristics of a trapezoidal wing-strake configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Erickson, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of spanwise blowing on the surface pressures of a 44 deg swept trapezoidal wing-strake configuration were measured. Wind tunnel data were obtained at a free stream Mach number of 0.26 for a range of model angle of attack, jet thrust coefficient, and nozzle chordwise location. Results showed that spanwise blowing delayed the leading edge vortex breakdown to larger span distances and increased the lifting pressures. Vortex lift was achieved at span stations immediately outboard of the strake-wing junction with no blowing, but spanwise blowing was necessary to achieve vortex lift at increased span distances. Blowing on the wing in the presence of the strake was not as effective as blowing on the wing alone. Spanwise blowing increased lift throughout the angle-of-attack range, improved the drag polars, and extended the linear pitching moment to higher values of lift. The leading edge suction analogy can be used to estimate the effects of spanwise blowing on the aerodynamic characteristics.

  19. Removal of Boron in Silicon by H2-H2O Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Andersson, Stefan; Nordstrand, Erlend; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-08-01

    The removal of boron in pure silicon by gas mixtures has been examined in the laboratory. Water-vapor-saturated hydrogen was used to remove boron doped in electronic-grade silicon in a vacuum frequency furnace. Boron concentrations in silicon were reduced from 52 ppm initially to 0.7 ppm and 3.4 ppm at 1450°C and 1500°C, respectively, after blowing a H2-3.2%H2O gas mixture for 180 min. The experimental results indicate that the boron removal as a function of gas-blowing time follows the law of exponential decay. After 99% of the boron is removed, approximately 90% of the silicon can be recovered. In order to better understand the gaseous refining mechanism, the quantum chemical coupled cluster with single and double excitations and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations method was used to accurately predict the enthalpy and entropy of formation of the HBO molecule. A simple refining model was then used to describe the boron refining process. This model can be used to optimize the refining efficiency.

  20. Effects of spanwise blowing on the pressure field and vortex-lift characteristics of a 44 deg swept trapezoidal wing. [wind tunnel stability tests - aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-tunnel data were obtained at a free-stream Mach number of 0.26 for a range of model angle of attack, jet thrust coefficient, and jet location. Results of this study show that the sectional effects to spanwise blowing are strongly dependent on angle of attack, jet thrust coefficient, and span location; the largest effects occur at the highest angles of attack and thrust coefficients and on the inboard portion of the wing. Full vortex lift was achieved at the inboard span station with a small blowing rate, but successively higher blowing rates were necessary to achieve full vortex lift at increased span distances. It is shown that spanwise blowing increases lift throughout the angle-of-attack range, delays wing stall to higher angles of attack, and improves the induced-drag polars. The leading-edge suction analogy can be used to estimate the section and total lifts resulting from spanwise blowing.

  1. Bromine release from blowing snow and its impact on tropospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Paul; Yang, Xin; Abraham, N. Luke; Archibald, Alexander; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, significant depletion of boundary layer ozone (ozone depletion events, ODEs) has been observed in both Arctic and Antarctic spring. ODEs are attributed to catalytic destruction by bromine radicals (Br plus BrO), especially during bromine explosion events (BEs), when high concentrations of BrO periodically occur. The source of bromine and the mechanism that sustains the high BrO levels are still the subject of study. Recent work by Pratt et al. (2013) posits Br2 production within saline snow and sea ice which leads to sudden ODEs. Previously, Yang et al. (2008) suggested snow could provide a source of (depleted) sea-salt aerosol if wicked from the surface of ice. They suggest that rapid depletion of bromide from the aerosol will constitute a source of photochemical Bry. Given the large sea ice extent in polar regions, this may constitute a significant source of sea salt and bromine in the polar lower atmosphere. While bromine release from blowing snow is perhaps less likely to trigger sudden ODEs, it may make a contribution to regional scale processes affecting ozone levels. Currently, the model parameterisations of Yang et al. assumes that rapid release of bromine occurs from fresh snow on sea ice during periods of strong wind. The parameterisation depends on an assumed sea-salt aerosol distribution generated via sublimation of the snow above the boundary layer, as well as taking into account the salinity of the snow. In this work, we draw on recent measurements by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey during a cruise aboard the Polarstern in the southern oceans. This has provided an extensive set of measurements of the chemical and physical characteristics of blowing snow over sea ice, and of the aerosol associated with it. Based on the observations, we have developed an improved parameterisation of the release of bromine from blowing snow. The paper presents results from the simulation performed using the United Kingdom Chemistry

  2. Use of Chromatography Techniques to Separate a Mixture of Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, W.

    1976-01-01

    Explains the separation of the constituents of mixtures on one piece of chromatography paper. The example presented involves a vitamin C tablet, a disprin tablet, and a glucose tablet. Outlined are two methods for separating the constituents. (GS)

  3. One- and multi-component theories of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, F.H.

    1993-07-01

    We describe one-component statistical mechanical theories and van der Waal`s effective one-component mixture model. We then show how to apply them to mixtures (containing CO{sub 2}) to extract reliable unlike-pair potential involving CO{sub 2} molecules as well as their dissociation products. A more fundamental approach will require the development of a perturbation or variational theory of mixtures based on a non-additive hard-sphere mixture reference system. Recent progresses made in this direction by means of an integral equation and computer simulations is described.

  4. Whistle-blowing and workplace culture in older peoples' care: qualitative insights from the healthcare and social care workforce.

    PubMed

    Jones, Aled; Kelly, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Inquiries in the UK into mistreatment of older people by healthcare employees over the last 30 years have focused on introducing or supporting employee whistle-blowing. Although whistle-blowers have made an important contribution to patient safety it remains a controversial activity. The fate of whistle-blowers is bleak, often resulting in personal and professional sacrifices. Here we draw on the views of healthcare and social care employees working with older people to explore perceptions of whistle-blowing as well as alternative strategies that may be used to raise concerns about the mistreatment of patients by co-workers. Whistle-blowing was perceived as a negative term. Managers said they promoted open cultures underpinned by regular team meetings and an open-door ethos. Others described workplace norms that were somewhat at odds with these open culture ideals. Whistle-blowing was considered risky, and this led to staff creating informal channels through which to raise concerns. Those who witnessed wrongdoing were aware that support was available from external agencies but preferred local solutions and drew upon personal ethics rather than regulatory edicts to shape their responses. We argue that the importance of workplace relationships and informal channels for raising concerns should be better understood to help prevent the mistreatment of vulnerable groups. PMID:24717014

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of solution blow spun poly(lactic acid)/ polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers loaded with Copaiba (Copaifera sp.) oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study poly(lactic acid)(PLA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) micro and nanofibers mats loaded with copaiba (Copaifera sp.) oil were produced by solution blow spinning (SBS). The copaiba (Copaifera sp.) oil was characterized by gas chromatography (GC). Neat PLA and four PLA/ PVP blends contain...

  6. Global existence and blow-up for weakly coupled degenerate and singular parabolic equations with localized source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Mu, Chunlai

    2011-02-01

    This paper deals with the following weakly coupled degenerate and singular parabolic equations with localized source u_t-(x^α u_x)_x=u^m(x_0(t),t)v^n(x_0(t),t),quad v_t-(x^β v_x)_x=v^p(x_0(t),t)u^q(x_0(t),t) in (0, a) × (0, T) with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions, where {x_0(t):{R}^+→(0,a)} is Hölder continuous. T ≤ ∞, a > 0 be constants, m, n, p, q are positive real numbers and {α,βin[0,2)}. The existence of a unique classical non-negative solution is established and the sufficient conditions for the solution that exists globally or blows up in finite time are obtained. Furthermore, under certain conditions, it is proved that the blow-up set of the blowing-up solution is any closed subset of the interval (0, a). Furthermore, we also obtain the blow-up rate under the condition α = β.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of a compressible turbulent channel flow with uniform blowing and suction through isothermal walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kametani, Yukinori; Fukagata, Koji

    2014-11-01

    High-speed transports such as aircrafts and bullet trains support human activity in the modern society. In such applications, the turbulent friction drag is the major contributor to the energy loss. Kametani and Fukagata (J. Fluid Mech., 2011) investigated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS) the drag reduction effect by blowing and the turbulence stabilization effect by suction in an incompressible spatially developing turbulent boundary layer, and quantitatively discussed different contributions to those effects. In this study, DNS of a compressible turbulent channel with uniform blowing and suction through the isothermal walls is performed. The Reynolds number based on the bulk mass flow rate, the viscosity on the wall and the channel half width is set to be 3000. The bulk Mach number is set to be 0.8 and 1.5 to compare the results in subsonic and supersonic cases. The drag reduction (enhancement) effect was confirmed on the blowing (suction) wall. As the Mach number increases, however, the control efficiency of blowing is found to be deteriorated because of the increased density near the wall. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  8. "The Mighty, Blowing Wind Always Rests in Ethereal Space": The Role of Teachers in New Learning Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Muthu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the possibilities of applying the "mighty, blowing wind resting in ethereal space" metaphor explicated in the ancient Indian philosophical treatise of "Bhagavad Gita" as an analogical representation of the functional characteristics of new pedagogies. Of pertinent attributional focus is the analysis of the complexities…

  9. DNS on control of laminar-turbulent transition in a channel flow with a periodic suction and blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Murase, Takeo; Floryan, J. M.

    Numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent transition in a channel flow with a spatially periodic suction/blowing on the channel walls is conducted with a spectral method based on the Fourier spectral method. The Reynolds number is fixed on a subcritical value of 5000 and the influence of both amplitude and wave number of the suction/blowing on the transition is investigated. When the amplitude is small, the transition does not occur because the suction/blowing has only a slight effect to the basic flow and the resulting flow remains stable to all 3D small disturbances. On the other hand, when the amplitude has a large value the transition occurs in a finite time and is obtained instantaneously with a huge value of the amplitude. It is found that the suction/blowing makes the separation ridges on the wall, perhaps simulating the wall roughness. The transition times are obtained for moderately large amplitudes and wave numbers and they show nearly a -2 power law dependence of the ratio of amplitude to wave number.

  10. Production of three-dimensional, spatially stimulated disturbance waves by periodic blowing and suction in a plate boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konzelmann, U.; Rist, U.; Fasel, H.

    An attempt has been made to study disturbance waves by numerically simulating temporally periodic blowing and suction through a hole in a plate. Modified mixed spectral and difference methods were used, and the resulting vortex strength components are shown. With a few modifications, the procedure can be used for realistic simulation of active boundary layer influences.

  11. Development of the Variable Atmosphere Testing Facility for Blow-Down Analysis of the Mars Hopper Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan D. Jerred; Robert C. O'Brien; Steven D. Howe; James E. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Recent developments at the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) on a Martian exploration probe have lead to the assembly of a multi-functional variable atmosphere testing facility (VATF). The VATF has been assembled to perform transient blow-down analysis of a radioisotope thermal rocket (RTR) concept that has been proposed for the Mars Hopper; a long-lived, long-ranged mobile platform for the Martian surface. This study discusses the current state of the VATF as well as recent blow-down testing performed on a laboratory-scale prototype of the Mars Hopper. The VATF allows for the simulation of Mars ambient conditions within the pressure vessel as well as to safely perform blow-down tests through the prototype using CO2 gas; the proposed propellant for the Mars Hopper. Empirical data gathered will lead to a better understanding of CO2 behavior and will provide validation of simulation models. Additionally, the potential of the VATF to test varying propulsion system designs has been recognized. In addition to being able to simulate varying atmospheres and blow-down gases for the RTR, it can be fitted to perform high temperature hydrogen testing of fuel elements for nuclear thermal propulsion.

  12. Combustion of Gaseous Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchene, R

    1932-01-01

    This report not only presents matters of practical importance in the classification of engine fuels, for which other means have proved inadequate, but also makes a few suggestions. It confirms the results of Withrow and Boyd which localize the explosive wave in the last portions of the mixture burned. This being the case, it may be assumed that the greater the normal combustion, the less the energy developed in the explosive form. In order to combat the detonation, it is therefore necessary to try to render the normal combustion swift and complete, as produced in carbureted mixtures containing benzene (benzol), in which the flame propagation, beginning at the spark, yields a progressive and pronounced darkening on the photographic film.

  13. Advances in Pneumatic-Controlled High-Lift Systems Through Pulsed Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Englar, Robet J.

    2003-01-01

    Circulation Control technologies have been around for 65 years, and have been successfully demonstrated in laboratories and flight vehicles alike. Yet there are few production aircraft flying today that implement these advances. Circulation Control techniques may have been overlooked due to perceived unfavorable trade offs of mass flow, pitching moment, cruise drag, noise, etc. Improvements in certain aspects of Circulation Control technology are the focus of this paper. This report will describe airfoil and blown high lift concepts that also address cruise drag reduction and reductions in mass flow through the use of pulsed pneumatic blowing on a Coanda surface. Pulsed concepts demonstrate significant reductions in mass flow requirements for Circulation Control, as well as cruise drag concepts that equal or exceed conventional airfoil systems.

  14. Effect of polymer/clay composition on processability of polylactide nanocomposites by film blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, E.; Galdi, M. R.; D'Arienzo, L.; Di Maio, L.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-01

    The blown extrusion of poly(lactic acid) presents several challenges mainly due to its poor elongation properties. This work deals on the possibility to enhance the processabiliy of PLA by film blowing by functionalizing the polymer with nanosilicates. In particular, two types of polylactic acid (PLA 4032D and PLA 4042D) and different types of filler, selected from montmorillonites (Cloisite 30B) and bentonites (Nanofil SE3010) families, were used to prepare the hybrid systems by using a twin-screw extruder. The interaction between the polymer and the clay was evaluated by FTIR analysis and correlated to the structure of the obtained nanocomposites in terms of clay dispersion. All the samples were then submitted to rheological measurements both in shear and elongational mode.

  15. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  16. Self Induced Buoyant Blow Off in Upward Flame Spread on Thin Solid Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Michael C.; T'ien, James S.; Muff, Derek E.; Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.

    2013-01-01

    Upward flame spread experiments were conducted on a thin fabric cloth consisting of 75% cotton and 25% fiberglass. The sample is sandwiched symmetrically with stainless steel plates with the exposed width varying between 2 to 8.8 cm from test to test and >1.5m tall. The bottom edge was ignited resulting in a symmetric two sided flame. For the narrower samples (. 5cm), two sided flame growth would proceed until reaching some limiting value (15-30 cm depending on sample width). Fluctuation or instability of the flame base on one side would initially become visible and then the flame base would retreat downstream and cause extinguishment on one side. Detailed examination of the still images shows that the fuel continues to vaporize from the extinguished side due to the thermally thin nature of the fuel. But, due to the remaining inert fiberglass mesh, which acts as a flashback arrestor, the extinguished side was not able to be reignited by the remaining flame. The remaining flame would then shrink in length due to the reduced heat transfer to the solid to a shorter length. The one-sided flame will spread stably with a constant speed and a constant flame length to the end of the sample. A constant length flame implies that the pyrolysis front and the burnt out fronts move at the same speed. For the wider samples (. 7cm), no one-sided extinction is observed. Two-sided flames spread all the way to the top of the sample. For these wider widths, the flames are still growing and have not reached their limiting length if it exists. Care was taken to minimize the amount of non-symmetries in the experimental configuration. Repeated tests show that blow-off can occur on either side of the sample. The flame growth is observed to be very symmetric during the growth phase and grew to significant length (>10cm) before extinction of the flame on one side. Our proposed explanation of this unusual phenomenon (i.e. stronger two ]sided flame cannot exist but weaker one-sided flame can

  17. Development of CFD Software To Support the Engineering of Lost Foam Pattern Blowing and Steaming

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kenneth A. Williams; Dr. Dale M. Snider

    2003-02-04

    This CFD Project has led to a new commercial software package (Arena-flow-eps) for advanced engineering of lost foam pattern formation. Specifically, the new software models all fluid/particle/thermal phenomena during both the bead-blowing and the pattern-fusing cycles--within a single, integrated computational tool. Engineering analysis with Arena-flow-eps will enable foundries to now obtain desirable foam pattern characteristics in a reliable (consistent) manner, aided by an understanding of the fundamental fluid/thermal physics of the process. This will lead to significant reductions in casting scrap and energy usage, as well as enable future castings to satisfy stringent requirements on high-power-density and low-emissions in tomorrow's automotive and watercraft engines.

  18. Environmental Conditions Influence Allometric Patterns in the Blow Fly, Chrysomya albiceps

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, M Battán; Peretti, Av

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study variations in allometry of body characters in females and males of two populations of blow flies, Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), under different environmental conditions to establish patterns of morphological variation. Body size of both males and females in the experimental population was significantly higher than in the individuals of the natural population, indicating an important influence of food on body size. All genitalic and non-genitalic characters in males and females of the two populations showed a trend towards negative allometry rather than isometry. Allometric patterns were modified in both sexes and between populations. The data show generally larger allometric slopes in females than in males. We confirmed that the environmental conditions have an important effect on allometric patterns and body size. PMID:22224467

  19. Effects of geometry and jet velocity on noise associated with an upper-surface-blowing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Yu, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The noise characteristics associated with various upper surface blowing configurations were investigated using a small model consisting of a plate and flap assembly (simulated wing with flap) attached to a rectangular nozzle. Nozzle aspect ratio, flow-run length, and flap-deflection angle were the experimental parameters studied. Three nozzle-exit velocities were used. The normalized noise spectra obtained for different nozzle aspect ratios proved to be similar in terms of Strouhal number based on jet velocity and flow-run length. Consequently, the need for knowing local flow velocity and length scales (for example, at the flap trailing edge) as required in some of the existing noise prediction schemes is eliminated. Data are compared with results computed from three different noise prediction schemes, and the validity of each scheme is assessed. A simple method is proposed to evaluate the frequency dependence of acoustic shielding obtained with the simulated wing flap.

  20. Upper-surface blowing nacelle design study for a swept wing airplane at cruise conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillette, W. B.; Mohn, L. W.; Ridley, H. G.; Nark, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study was made to design two types of overwing nacelles for an existing wing-body at a design condition of Mach = 0.8 and C sub L = 0.2. Internal and external surface contours were developed for nacelles having either a D-shaped nozzle or a high-aspect-ratio nozzle for upper-surface blowing in the powered-lift mode of operation. The goal of the design was the development of external nacelle lines that would minimize high-speed aerodynamic interference effects. Each nacelle type was designed for both two- and four-engine airplanes using an iterative process of aerodynamic potential flow analysis. Incremental nacelle drag estimates were made for flow-through wind tunnel models of each configuration.

  1. Transcriptional responses to complex mixtures: a review.

    PubMed

    Sen, Banalata; Mahadevan, Brinda; DeMarini, David M

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of people to hazardous compounds is primarily through complex environmental mixtures, those that occur through media such as air, soil, water, food, cigarette smoke, and combustion emissions. Microarray technology offers the ability to query the entire genome after exposure to such an array of compounds, permitting a characterization of the biological effects of such exposures. This review summarizes the published literature on the transcriptional profiles resulting from exposure of cells or organisms to complex environmental mixtures such as cigarette smoke, diesel emissions, urban air, motorcycle exhaust, carbon black, jet fuel, and metal ore and fumes. The majority of the mixtures generally up-regulate gene expression, with heme oxygenase 1 and CYP1A1 being up-regulated by all of the mixtures. Most of the mixtures altered the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response (OH-1, metallothioneins), immune/inflammation response (IL-1b, protein kinase), xenobiotic metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP1B1), coagulation and fibrinolysis (plasminogen activator/inhibitor), proto-oncogenes (FUS1, JUN), heat-shock response (HSP60, HSP70), DNA repair (PCNA, GADD45), structural unit of condensed DNA (Crf15Orf16, DUSP 15), and extracellular matrix degradation (MMP1, 8, 9, 11, 12). Genes involved in aldehyde metabolism, such as ALDH3, appeared to be uniquely modulated by cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke-exposed populations have been successfully distinguished from control nonexposed populations based on the expression pattern of a subset of genes, thereby demonstrating the utility of this approach in identifying biomarkers of exposure and susceptibility. The analysis of gene-expression data at the pathway and functional level, along with a systems biology approach, will provide a more comprehensive insight into the biological effects of complex mixtures and will improve risk assessment of the same. We suggest critical components of study design and reporting that will

  2. Simulative design and process optimization of the two-stage stretch-blow molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Rasche, S.; Windeck, C.

    2015-05-01

    The total production costs of PET bottles are significantly affected by the costs of raw material. Approximately 70 % of the total costs are spent for the raw material. Therefore, stretch-blow molding industry intends to reduce the total production costs by an optimized material efficiency. However, there is often a trade-off between an optimized material efficiency and required product properties. Due to a multitude of complex boundary conditions, the design process of new stretch-blow molded products is still a challenging task and is often based on empirical knowledge. Application of current CAE-tools supports the design process by reducing development time and costs. This paper describes an approach to determine optimized preform geometry and corresponding process parameters iteratively. The wall thickness distribution and the local stretch ratios of the blown bottle are calculated in a three-dimensional process simulation. Thereby, the wall thickness distribution is correlated with an objective function and preform geometry as well as process parameters are varied by an optimization algorithm. Taking into account the correlation between material usage, process history and resulting product properties, integrative coupled simulation steps, e.g. structural analyses or barrier simulations, are performed. The approach is applied on a 0.5 liter PET bottle of Krones AG, Neutraubling, Germany. The investigations point out that the design process can be supported by applying this simulative optimization approach. In an optimization study the total bottle weight is reduced from 18.5 g to 15.5 g. The validation of the computed results is in progress.

  3. Pneumatic colon injury following high pressure blow gun dust cleaner spray to the perineum

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Edgar D.; Chiu, Yin-I.; Shan, Yan-Shen; Ong, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A pneumatic tool or air tool such as blow gun dust cleaner is a tool driven by compressed air and spraying of the perineum can insufflate the colon due to its high pressure and high flow rate. Presentation of case We present a case of 4 year old boy who developed sudden onset of tense abdominal distention and developed peritonitis. Patient’s family initially denied a history of trauma. Radiologic examination showed pneumoperitoneum and colon dilatation. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a tension pneumoperitoneum, bloody ascitic fluid, multiple site of ecchymosis and serosal tear of the colon and a minute perforation of transverse colon. Postoperative reinvestigation revealed that the patient’s perineum was sprayed, using blow gun dust cleaner. Discussion Air from pneumatic tools produces column of air at pressure of 3.5–8.8 kg/cm2 and pressure greater than the resting anal pressure of 0.109 kg/cm2 force air to enter the colon when the perineum is sprayed. Different degree of colon injury results when airflow is greater than 1.46 L/m, and/or intraluminal pressure greater than 0.109 kg/cm2. In most children, initial anxiety to tell the truth result in difficulty to obtain good history. Conclusion Spraying of the perianal with excessive pneumatic force of greater than the resting anal pressure and high air flow rate causes multiple site colon injury and tension pneumoperitoneum due to colon perforation. Parent should be caution in children playing with high pressure pneumatic tool, and the importance of history is emphases for early correct diagnosis. PMID:25544492

  4. Simulative design and process optimization of the two-stage stretch-blow molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Ch.; Rasche, S.; Windeck, C.

    2015-05-22

    The total production costs of PET bottles are significantly affected by the costs of raw material. Approximately 70 % of the total costs are spent for the raw material. Therefore, stretch-blow molding industry intends to reduce the total production costs by an optimized material efficiency. However, there is often a trade-off between an optimized material efficiency and required product properties. Due to a multitude of complex boundary conditions, the design process of new stretch-blow molded products is still a challenging task and is often based on empirical knowledge. Application of current CAE-tools supports the design process by reducing development time and costs. This paper describes an approach to determine optimized preform geometry and corresponding process parameters iteratively. The wall thickness distribution and the local stretch ratios of the blown bottle are calculated in a three-dimensional process simulation. Thereby, the wall thickness distribution is correlated with an objective function and preform geometry as well as process parameters are varied by an optimization algorithm. Taking into account the correlation between material usage, process history and resulting product properties, integrative coupled simulation steps, e.g. structural analyses or barrier simulations, are performed. The approach is applied on a 0.5 liter PET bottle of Krones AG, Neutraubling, Germany. The investigations point out that the design process can be supported by applying this simulative optimization approach. In an optimization study the total bottle weight is reduced from 18.5 g to 15.5 g. The validation of the computed results is in progress.

  5. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

    2005-12-01

    Our goal in this study is to utilize novel anionic clay sorbents for treating and reclaiming/reusing power-plant effluents, in particular, boiler blow-down waters containing heavy metals, such as As and Se. Developing and using novel materials for such application is dictated by the challenge posed by reclaiming and recycling these too-clean-to-clean effluent streams, generated during electricity production, whose contaminant levels are in the ppm/ppb (or even less) trace levels. During the study model blow-down streams have been treated in batch experiments. Adsorption isotherms as a function of pH/temperature have been established for both As and Se. Adsorption rates have also measured as a function of concentration, temperature, pH, and space time. For both the equilibrium and rate measurements, we have studied the As/Se interaction, and competition from background anions. A homogeneous surface diffusion model is used to describe the experimental kinetic data. The estimated diffusivity values are shown to depend on the particle size. On the other hand, a model taking into account the polycrystalline nature of these adsorbent particles, and the presence of an intercrystallite porous region predicts correctly that the surface diffusivity is particle size independent. A mathematical model to describe flow experiments in packed-beds has also been developed during phase I of this project. The goal is to validate this model with flow experiments in packed-beds during the phase II of this project, to determine the adsorption capacity under flow conditions, and to compare it with the capacity estimated from the adsorption isotherms determined from the batch studies.

  6. Development and Qualification of Alternate Blowing Agents for Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Charles W.; Cavalaris, James G.

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace industry has a long history of using low density polyurethane and polyurethane-modified isocyanurate foam systems as lightweight, low cost, easily processed cryogenic Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for ascent vehicles. The Thermal Protection System of the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) is required so that quality liquid cryogenic propellant can be supplied to the Orbiter main engines and to protect the metal structure of the tanks from becoming too hot from aerodynamic heating, hence preventing premature break-up of the tank. These foams are all blown with CFC-1 I blowing agent which has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an ozone depleting substance. CFCs will not be manufactured after 1995, Consequently, alternate blowing agent substances must be identified and implemented to assure continued ET manufacture and delivery. This paper describes the various testing performed to select and qualify HCFC-1 41 b as a near term drop-in replacement for CFC-11. Although originally intended to be a one for one substitution in the formulation, several technical issues were identified regarding material performance and processability which required both formulation changes and special processing considerations to overcome. In order to evaluate these material changes, each material was subjected to various tests to qualify them to meet the various loads imposed on them during long term storage, pre-launch operations, launch, separation and re-entry. Each material was tested for structural, thermal, aeroshear, and stress/strain loads for the various flight environments each encounters. Details of the development and qualification program and the resolution of specific problems are discussed in this paper.

  7. An Improvised “Blow Glove” Device Produces Similar PEP Values to a Commercial PEP Device: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Yaakov; Wiser, Itay; Farber, Nimrod; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Winkler, Eyal; Kazula-Halabi, Tamar; Haik, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Postoperative positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy promotes increased lung volume, secretion clearance, and improved oxygenation. Several commercial devices exist that produce recommended PEP values (10–20 cmH2O) when the patient breathes through a fixed orifice resistor. It was hypothesized that an inexpensive, improvised “blow glove” device would produce similar PEP values over a wider range of expiration volumes and flow rates. Methods: PEP for different expiration volumes (400–2000 mL) and expiratory flow rates (10–80 L/min) was compared between a commercial PEP device (Resistex, Mercury Medical, Clearwater, FL) and an improvised “blow glove” device, recorded by a Vela ventilator (CareFusion, San Diego, CA). Dynamics in positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) values were evaluated following five consecutive expirations. The “blow glove” device was evaluated using various glove compositions and sizes. Results: The improvised “blow glove” device produced a significantly higher rate of PEP values in the recommended range than the Resistex device (88.9% vs. 20%, p<0.0001). No significant difference was observed between small and large glove sizes (88.9% vs. 82.9%, p>0.05), but the powdered latex glove showed a significantly higher rate of PEP values in the recommended range than the powder-free latex glove (88.9% vs. 44.4%, p<0.001). Conclusions: A “blow glove” PEP device using a powdered latex glove produces PEP values in the recommended range over a wider spectrum of expiratory flow rates and expiration volumes than a commercial PEP device. PMID:25125786

  8. Oxidative transformation of phenols in aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Sannino, F; Rao, M A; Bollag, J M

    2003-07-01

    The transformation by an oxidoreductase (a laccase from Rhus vernificera) of a mixture of four phenols (catechol, methylcatechol, m-tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol) that simulates a typical wastewater derived from an olive oil factory was investigated. Results achieved in this study confirm that laccase-mediated transformation of phenols depends on the nature and the initial concentration of the involved phenol, the time course of the reaction, and mainly, on the complexity of the phenolic incubation mixture. Actually, the four phenols each have a completely different response to enzyme action both in terms of quantitative and kinetic transformation. For example, after 24-h incubation, methylcatechol was completely removed, whereas 30% of untransformed hydroxytyrosol and catechol and more than 65% of m-tyrosol were still present in the reaction mixture. A reduction of enzyme activity occurred for all phenols after enzymatic oxidation. No correspondence between phenol transformation and disappearance of enzymatic activity was observed, thus suggesting that different mechanisms are probably involved in the laccase-mediated transformation of the four phenols. The behavior of phenols became more complex when an increasing number of phenols was present in the reaction mixture, and even more so when different concentrations of phenols were used. Competitive effects may arise when more than one phenol is present in the reaction solution and interacts with the enzyme. PMID:14509708

  9. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and…

  10. Euthanasia, assisted suicide, and cessation of life support: Japan's policy, law, and an analysis of whistle blowing in two recent mercy killing cases.

    PubMed

    Akabayashi, Akira

    2002-08-01

    Issues pertaining to euthanasia, assisted suicide, and cessation of life support continue to be a subject of worldwide interest. Euthanasia- particularly "active" euthanasia- is not considered legally or socially acceptable in most countries. In Japan, the first judgment of a case involving euthanasia took place in 1949. Since then there have been another five cases that reached the point of sentencing in 1990. All six cases were examples of so called "active euthanasia", in which the termination of life was performed by family members. However, the focus of discussion has been changed dramatically in recent years, owing to two prominent cases of mercy killing in 1995 (Yokohama) and 1996 (Kyoto), respectively. Medical doctors were involved in both of these cases, and euthanasia moved from being a theoretical problem to a practical dilemma. These cases also drew attention to the fact that assisted suicide could be distinguished from euthanasia. The first part of this paper will summarize the current status of euthanasia and the cessation of life support in Japan, focusing on its historical background and policy. The second part will briefly sketch the characteristics of Japanese law and then will examine the two recent cases of mercy killing mentioned above to try and determine the roles of whistle blowing in the medical practice arena, with particular reference to Japanese culture. This analysis is a challenge to elucidate how ethics and the law interact, and influence medical practice in a specific cultural context. PMID:12188460

  11. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  12. The importance of SAR wavelength in penetrating blow sand in Northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; Breed, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Multifrequency and polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) images of a sand streak in northern Arizona demonstrate the ability of C- (6-cm wavelength), L- (24 cm), and P-band (68 cm) radar signals to backscatter, respectively, from increasingly greater depths reaching 2 m or more in active blow sand. The studied sand streak, located on a salient of Ward Terrace at lat 35??48.4'N and long 111??15.0'W, is sourced in the normally dry Little Colorado River channel and migrates northeastward toward the Moenkopi Plateau Scarp. The sand streak is 'radar dark' compared to the 'radar-bright' surface of Ward Terrace on all C-band images. It is, however, penetrated completely at P-band and is invisible on these images. The sand streak is recognizable on the LHH image but is poorly defined on the LHV image. High resolution AIRSAR images constitute the primary data set analyzed; in addition, a C-band radar image acquired by the European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite is also presented. The spaceborne image data confirms the results of the aircraft data at C-band.Multifrequency and polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) images of a sand streak in northern Arizona demonstrate the ability of C- (6-cm wavelength), L- (24 cm), and P-band (68 cm) radar signals to backscatter, respectively, from increasingly greater depths reaching 2 m or more in active blow sand. The studied sand streak, located on a salient of Ward Terrace at lat 35??48.4???N and long 111??15.0???W, is sourced in the normally dry Little Colorado River channel and migrates northeastward toward the Moenkopi Plateau Scarp. The sand streak is `radar dark' compared to the `radar-bright' surface of Ward Terrace on all C-band images. It is, however, penetrated completely at P-band and is invisible on these images. The sand streak is recognizable on the LHH image but is poorly defined on the LHV image. High resolution AIRSAR images constitute the primary data set analyzed; in addition, a C

  13. Blow-up of weak solutions to a chemotaxis system under influence of an external chemoattractant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    We study nonnnegative radially symmetric solutions of the parabolic–elliptic Keller–Segel whole space system {ut=Δu‑∇ṡ(u∇v), x∈Rn,t>0,0=Δv+u+f(x), x∈Rn,t>0,u(x,0)=u0(x), x∈Rn, with prototypical external signal production f(x):={f0|x|‑α,if |x|⩽R‑ρ,0,if |x|⩾R+ρ, for R\\in (0,1) and ρ \\in ≤ft(0,\\frac{R}{2}\\right) , which is still integrable but not of class {{L}\\frac{n{2}+{δ0}}}≤ft({{{R}}n}\\right) for some {δ0}\\in ≤ft[0,1\\right) . For corresponding parabolic-parabolic Neumann-type boundary-value problems in bounded domains Ω , where f\\in {{L}\\frac{n{2}+{δ0}}}(Ω ){\\cap}{{C}α}(Ω ) for some {δ0}\\in (0,1) and α \\in (0,1) , it is known that the system does not emit blow-up solutions if the quantities \\parallel {{u}0}{{\\parallel}{{L\\frac{n{2}+{δ0}}}(Ω )}},\\parallel f{{\\parallel}{{L\\frac{n{2}+{δ0}}}(Ω )}} and \\parallel {{v}0}{{\\parallel}{{Lθ}(Ω )}} , for some θ >n , are all bounded by some \\varepsilon >0 small enough. We will show that whenever {{f}0}>\\frac{2n}α(n-2)(n-α ) and {{u}0}\\equiv {{c}0}>0 in \\overline{{{B}1}(0)} , a measure-valued global-in-time weak solution to the system above can be constructed which blows up immediately. Since these conditions are independent of R\\in (0,1) and c 0  >  0, we obtain a strong indication that in fact {δ0}=0 is critical for the existence of global bounded solutions under a smallness conditions as described above.

  14. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  15. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  16. Stabilizer for fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Moriyama, N.; Yamamura, M.

    1981-02-24

    A stabilizer for fuel mixtures of finely divided coal and fuel oil is composed of an active ingredient, a non-ionic surface active agent consisting of a block copolymer represented by the following general formula (I): R/sub 1/O-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)l-(C/sub 3/H/sup 6/O)m-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)n-R/sub 2/ (I) wherein r/sub 1/ and r/sub 2/ stand for a hydrogen atom or an alklyl group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms, the mole number (L+n) of added ethylene oxide is in the range of from 30 to 300, the mole number (M) of added propylene oxide is in the range of from 15 to 80, and the content of ethylene oxide in the whole molecule is 40 to 85% by weight.

  17. Effects of bulk flow pulsations on film cooling from different length injection holes at different blowing ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, H.J.; Lee, J.S.; Ligrani, P.M.

    1999-07-01

    Bulk flow pulsations in the form of sinusoidal variations of velocity and static pressure at injectant Strouhal numbers from 0.8 to 10.0 are investigated as they affect film cooling from a single row of simple angle holes. Similar flow variations are produced by potential flow interactions and passing shock waves near turbine surfaces in gas turbine engines. Time-averaged temperature distributions, phase-averaged temperature distributions, adiabatic film cooling effectiveness values, and iso-energetic Stranton numbers show that important alterations to film cooling protection occur as pulsation frequency, coolant Strouhal number, blowing ratio, and nondimensional injection hole length are changed. Overall, the pulsations affect film performance and behavior more significantly both as L/D decreases, and as blowing ratio decreases.

  18. Mixtures with relatives and linked markers.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Guro; Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Egeland, Thore

    2016-05-01

    Mixture DNA profiles commonly appear in forensic genetics, and a large number of statistical methods and software are available for such cases. However, most of the literature concerns mixtures where the contributors are assumed unrelated and the genetic markers are unlinked. In this paper, we consider mixtures of linked markers and related contributors. If no relationships are involved, linkage can be ignored. While unlinked markers can be treated independently, linkage introduces dependencies. The use of linked markers presents statistical and computational challenges, but may also lead to a considerable increase in power since the number of markers available is much larger if we do not require the markers to be unlinked. In addition, some cases that cannot be solved with an unlimited number of unlinked autosomal markers can be solved with linked markers. We focus on two special cases of linked markers: pairs of linked autosomal markers and X-chromosomal markers. A framework is presented for calculation of likelihood ratios for mixtures with general relationships and with linkage between any number of markers. Finally, we explore the effect of linkage disequilibrium, also called allelic association, on the likelihood ratio. PMID:26614310

  19. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  20. Extrusion foaming of thermoplastic cellulose acetate from renewable resources using a two-component physical blowing agent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Windeck, C.; Hendriks, S.; Zepnik, S.; Wodke, T.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic cellulose acetate (CA) is a bio-based polymer with optical, mechanical and thermal properties comparable to those of polystyrene (PS). The substitution of the predominant petrol-based PS in applications like foamed food trays can lead to a more sustainable economic practice. However, CA is also suitable for more durable applications as the biodegradability rate can be controlled by adjusting the degree of substitutions. The extrusion foaming of CA still has to overcome certain challenges. CA is highly hydrophilic and can suffer from hydrolytic degradation if not dried properly. Therefore, the influence of residual moisture on the melt viscosity is rather high. Beyond, the surface quality of foam CA sheets is below those of PS due to the particular foaming behaviour. This paper presents results of a recent study on extrusion foamed CA, using a two-component physical blowing agent system compromising HFO 1234ze as blowing agent and organic solvents as co-propellant. Samples with different co-propellants are processed on a laboratory single screw extruder at IKV. Morphology and surface topography are investigated with respect to the blowing agent composition and the die pressure. In addition, relationships between foam density, foam morphology and the propellants are analysed. The choice of the co-propellant has a significant influence on melt-strength, foaming behaviour and the possible blow-up ratio of the sheet. Furthermore, a positive influence of the co-propellant on the surface quality can be observed. In addition, the focus is laid on the effect of external contact cooling of the foamed sheets after the die exit.

  1. Some ultrastructural superficial changes in house fly (Diptera: Muscidae) and blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae induced by eucalyptol oil.

    PubMed

    Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Sukontason, Kom; Boonchu, Noppawan; Piangjai, Somsak

    2004-01-01

    The ultrastructural superficial changes in third instar house fly (Musca domestica) and blow fly (Chrysomya megacephala) induced by eucalyptol oil were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Dipped in 0.902 g/ml eucalyptol for 30 sec, the larvae integument of both species showed significant aberrant appearance of the body surface, particularly swelling integument, bleb formation, partial breach and deformation of spines. PMID:15517029

  2. Use of an Amino Acid Mixture in Treatment of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Bentovim, A.; Clayton, Barbara E.; Francis, Dorothy E. M.; Shepherd, Jean; Wolff, O. H.

    1970-01-01

    Twelve children with phenylketonuria diagnosed and treated from the first few weeks of life were grouped into pairs. Before the trial all of them were receiving a commercial preparation containing a protein hydrolysate low in phenylalanine (Cymogran, Allen and Hanburys Ltd.) as a substitute for natural protein. One of each pair was given an amino acid mixture instead of Cymogran for about 6 months. Use of the mixture involved considerable modification of the diet, and in particular the inclusion of greater amounts of phenylalanine-free foods. All six accepted the new mixture without difficulty, food problems were greatly reduced, parents welcomed the new preparation, and the quality of family life improved. Normal growth was maintained and with a mixture of l amino acids the plasma and urinary amino acid levels were normal. Further studies are needed before the mixture can be recommended for children under 20 months of age. PMID:5477678

  3. Blowing Snow - A Major Source of Aerosol in the Polar Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnajs, L.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Giordano, M.; Davis, S. M.; Deshler, T.; Johnson, A.; Goetz, J. D.; Mukherjee, A. D.; Slater, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sea salt aerosol is the dominant aerosol component in unpolluted Polar Regions, particularly in the sea ice zone. In the lower latitude liquid ocean, wave action and bubble bursting is thought to be the main mechanism for sea salt aerosol production. However there is growing evidence that in the Polar Regions, particularly near sea ice, that the sublimation of wind lofted salty snow may be a dominant source of sea salt aerosol. An extensive set of aerosol sizing and compositional measurements was made at sea ice location near Ross Island, Antarctica during two field measurement campaigns - a summer campaign in 2014 and late winter campaign in 2015. Sizing measurements from both open and closed path aerosol instruments, and compositional measurements from an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer suggest that there is a significant enhancement in both super and sub micron aerosol associated with high wind events and blowing snow in the boundary layer. While the composition of this aerosol indicates that it is primarily of marine origin, the ratios of the major sea salt ions suggest that processing in the snow pack significantly modifies the aerosol. This alternate sea salt aerosol production mechanism could have significant impact on the modeling of tropospheric halogen chemistry and on the interpretation of sea salt-based proxies in the ice core record.

  4. Blow-up of Critical Besov Norms at a Potential Navier-Stokes Singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Isabelle; Koch, Gabriel S.; Planchon, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    We prove that if an initial datum to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in any critical Besov space {dot B^{-1+ 3/p}_{p,q}({R}3)}, with {3 < p, q < ∞}, gives rise to a strong solution with a singularity at a finite time {T > 0}, then the norm of the solution in that Besov space becomes unbounded at time T. This result, which treats all critical Besov spaces where local existence is known, generalizes the result of Escauriaza et al. (Uspekhi Mat Nauk 58(2(350)):3-44, 2003) concerning suitable weak solutions blowing up in {L3({R}3)}. Our proof uses profile decompositions and is based on our previous work (Gallagher et al., Math. Ann. 355(4):1527-1559, 2013), which provided an alternative proof of the {L3({R}3)} result. For very large values of p, an iterative method, which may be of independent interest, enables us to use some techniques from the {L3({R}3)} setting.

  5. A transgenic embryonic sexing system for the Australian sheep blow fly Lucilia cuprina

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Scott, Maxwell J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic approaches, including the sterile insect technique (SIT), have previously been considered for control of the Australian sheep blow fly Lucilia cuprina, a major pest of sheep. In an SIT program, females consume 50% of the diet but are ineffective as control agents and compete with females in the field for mating with sterile males, thereby decreasing the efficiency of the program. Consequently, transgenic sexing strains of L. cuprina were developed that produce 100% males when raised on diet that lacks tetracycline. However, as females die mostly at the pupal stage, rearing costs would not be significantly reduced. Here we report the development of transgenic embryonic sexing strains of L. cuprina. In these strains, the Lsbnk cellularization gene promoter drives high levels of expression of the tetracycline transactivator (tTA) in the early embryo. In the absence of tetracycline, tTA activates expression of the Lshid proapoptotic gene, leading to death of the embryo. Sex-specific RNA splicing of Lshid transcripts ensures that only female embryos die. Embryonic sexing strains were also made by combining the Lsbnk-tTA and tetO-Lshid components into a single gene construct, which will facilitate transfer of the technology to other major calliphorid livestock pests. PMID:26537204

  6. Prevention of late blowing defect by reuterin produced in cheese by a Lactobacillus reuteri adjunct.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Ávila, Marta; Gaya, Pilar; Garde, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    In this study, reuterin-producing Lactobacillus reuteri INIA P572 was added to cheese as an adjunct culture together with 50 or 100 mM glycerol (required for reuterin production), with the aim of controlling Clostridium tyrobutyricum CECT 4011 growth and preventing the late blowing defect (LBD) of cheese caused by this strain. L. reuteri survived cheese manufacture and produced reuterin in situ, detected at 6 and 24 h. However, the produced reuterin was enough to inhibit the growth of Clostridium, showing undetectable spore counts from day 30 onward and, therefore, to prevent cheese LBD during ripening (60 d, 14 °C). The acidification of these cheeses was not affected, although from day 14 they showed significantly lower lactococci counts than cheese made only with the starter (control cheese). Cheeses with LBD showed lower levels of lactic acid than control cheese and the formation of propionic and butyric acids, but cheeses with reuterin showed the same organic acids profile than control cheese. The cheese made with L. reuteri and 100 mM glycerol showed a light pink colour, not observed in the cheese made with L. reuteri and 50 mM glycerol. These results demonstrated a potent anti-clostridial activity of reuterin produced in an actual food product like cheese, and proved to be a novel approach to prevent LBD of cheese. PMID:24929721

  7. Transgenerational Effects of Heavy Metal Pollution on Immune Defense of the Blow Fly Protophormia terraenovae

    PubMed Central

    Pölkki, Mari; Kangassalo, Katariina; Rantala, Markus J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently environmental conditions during early parental development have been found to have transgenerational effects on immunity and other condition-dependent traits. However, potential transgenerational effects of heavy metal pollution have not previously been studied. Here we show that direct exposure to heavy metal (copper) upregulates the immune system of the blow fly, Protophormia terraenovae, reared in copper contaminated food. In the second experiment, to test transgenerational effects of heavy metal, the parental generation of the P. terraenovae was reared in food supplemented with copper, and the immunocompetence of their offspring, reared on uncontaminated food, was measured. Copper concentration used in this study was, in the preliminary test, found to have no effect on mortality of the flies. Immunity was tested on the imago stage by measuring encapsulation response against an artificial antigen, nylon monofilament. We found that exposure to copper during the parental development stages through the larval diet resulted in immune responses that were still apparent in the next generation that was not exposed to the heavy metal. We found that individuals reared on copper-contaminated food developed more slowly compared with those reared on uncontaminated food. The treatment groups did not differ in their dry body mass. However, parental exposure to copper did not have an effect on the development time or body mass of their offspring. Our study suggests that heavy metal pollution has positive feedback effect on encapsulation response through generations which multiplies the harmful effects of heavy metal pollution in following generations. PMID:22719959

  8. Blow Up Exponents and Deviations from Ideal Taylor Cone Shapes in Ultrathin Liquid Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertson, Theodore G.; Troian, Sandra

    We employ a finite element, moving mesh model to investigate the axisymmetric flow of an ultrathin liquid metal film overlay by a thin vacuum layer confined between two circular disks held at a constant potential difference close to field evaporation values. Within nanoseconds, a small Gaussian protrusion centered about the origin evolves into a sharpened cusp elongated by Maxwell stresses and rounded by capillary stresses. Previous analytic studies and numerical simulations based on marker and cell techniques have uncovered a self-similar regime in time where the opposing stresses and kinetic energy exhibit blow up behavior with a characteristic exponent of - 2/3, and cusp shapes that deviate from the ideal Taylor cone angle. Our simulations consistently yield exponents in the range -3/4 to -4/5, with values that depend sensitively on the choice of blowup time. We also find that deviations from the ideal Taylor cone angle become significant all along the film interface as the Gaussian amplitude increases beyond fractions of a micron. TGA gratefully acknowledges support from a NASA Science and Technology fellowship.

  9. The characteristics of turbulent surface flow in planar channel with imposed wall blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Y.; Lee, C.

    2011-10-01

    A recent study for cold flow development in an idealized hybrid rocket motor showed that energy spectra of streamwise velocity in the vicinity of the wall exhibited a peculiar local peak at a certain frequency. It is believed that the occurrence of this particular frequency, or time scale, is a direct consequence of flow modification resulting from the interaction of the main oxidizer flow with wall blowing during the process of regression. If external disturbances resulting from white noise or modified injector geometry are imposed on this hybrid system, a sudden amplification of flow instability may be realized in the form of violent oscillation. In this study, a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique was used to investigate the response of the flow in the vicinity of the propellant surface to the external forcing applied to the flow field. Results showed that both concentrated and distributed momentum forcings used in the present study did not lead to a sudden growth of instability or disastrous oscillation. However, the pressure field is thought to be more sensitive to the external forcing and exhibits relatively larger oscillations.

  10. Role of fluid density in shaping eruption currents driven by frontal particle blow-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, C. S.; Turnbull, B.; Louge, M. Y.

    2012-06-01

    We study the role of suspension density in eruption currents, a regime of gravity-driven flow that is sustained by massive, localized blow-out of particles acting as a steady source of heavier fluid injected into a uniform flow at high Reynolds number. Inspired by the potential flow solution of Saffman and Yuen ["Finite-amplitude interfacial waves in the presence of a current," J. Fluid Mech. 123, 459-476 (1982), 10.1017/S0022112082003152], we show that the relative density difference between the two fluids swells the size of the current's head without changing its shape, while inducing a velocity jump at the interface. We test this inviscid theory against inviscid and large-eddy-simulations. We also conduct experiments in a water flume, where a line source of fluorescent brines of various densities is injected in a cross-stream and visualized with a narrow sheet of light. Simulations and experiments reveal that, with isotropic velocity distribution on a finite source, eruption currents expand further and develop interface oscillations, but the inviscid theory still captures relative swelling induced by density. We compare predictions to the static pressure data of McElwaine and Turnbull ["Air pressure data from the Vallee de la Sionne avalanches of 2004," J. Geophys. Res. 110, F03010, doi:, 10.1029/2004JF000237 (2005)] in powder snow avalanches.

  11. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Martian Aeolian and Mass Wasting Processes: Blowing and Flowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session Martian Aeolian and Mass Wasting Processes: BLowing and Flowing included the following topics: 1) Three Decades of Martian Surface Changes; 2) Thermophysical Properties of Isidis Basin, Mars; 3) Intracrater Material in Eastern Arabia Terra: THEMIS, MOC, and MOLA Analysis of Wind-blown Deposits and Possible High-Inertia Source Material; 4) Thermal Properties of Sand from TES and THEMIS: Do Martian Dunes Make a Good Control for Thermal Inertia Calculations? 5) A Comparative Analysis of Barchan Dunes in the Intra-Crater Dune Fields and the North Polar Sand Sea; 6) Diluvial Dunes in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Morphology, Modeling and Implications; 7) Surface Profiling of Natural Dust Devils; 8) Martian Dust Devil Tracks: Inferred Directions of Movement; 9) Numerical Simulations of Anastomosing Slope Streaks on Mars; 10) Young Fans in an Equatorial Crater in Xanthe Terra, Mars; 11) Large Well-exposed Alluvual Fans in Deep Late-Noachian Craters; 12) New Evidence for the Formation of Large Landslides on Mars; and 13) What Can We Learn from the Ages of Valles Marineris Landslides on Martian Impact History?

  12. How are soap bubbles blown? Fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Lambert, Lori; Sherman, Erica; Wei, Timothy; Ryu, Sangjin

    2013-11-01

    Soap bubbles are a common interfacial fluid dynamics phenomenon having a long history of delighting not only children and artists but also scientists. In contrast to the dynamics of liquid droplets in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, the dynamics of soap bubbles has not been well documented. This is possibly because studying soap bubbles is more challenging due to there existing two gas-liquid interfaces. Having the thin-film interface seems to alter the characteristics of the bubble/drop creation process since the interface has limiting factors such as thickness. Thus, the main objective of this study is to determine how the thin-film interface differentiates soap bubbles from gas bubbles and liquid drops. To investigate the creation process of soap bubbles, we constructed an experimental model consisting of air jet flow and a soap film, which consistently replicates the conditions that a human produces when blowing soap bubbles, and examined the interaction between the jet and the soap film using the high-speed videography and the particle image velocimetry.

  13. A potential flight evaluation of an upper-surface-blowing/circulation-control-wing concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, Dennis W.; Eppel, Joseph C.

    1987-01-01

    The technology data base for powered lift aircraft design has advanced over the last 15 years. NASA's Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) has provided a flight verification of upper surface blowing (USB) technology. The A-6 Circulation Control Wing flight demonstration aricraft has provide data for circulation control wing (CCW) technology. Recent small scale wind tunnel model tests and full scale static flow turning test have shown the potential of combining USB with CCW technology. A flight research program is deemed necessary to fully explore the performance and control aspects of CCW jet substitution for the mechanical USB Coanda flap. The required hardware design would also address questions about the development of flight weight ducts and CCW jets and the engine bleed-air capabilities vs requirements. NASA's QSRA would be an optimum flight research vehicle for modification to the USB/CCW configuration. The existing QSRA data base, the design simplicity of the QSRA wing trailing edge controls, availability of engine bleed-air, and the low risk, low cost potential of the suggested program is discussed.

  14. Theoretical aerodynamics of upper-surface-blowing jet-wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A linear, inviscid subsonic compressible flow theory is formulated to treat the aerodynamic interaction between the wing and an inviscid upper-surface-blowing (USB) thick jet with Mach number nonuniformity. The predicted results show reasonably good agreement with some available lift and induced-drag data. It was also shown that the thin-jet-flap theory is inadequate for the USB configurations with thick jet. Additional theoretical results show that the lift and induced drag were reduced by increasing jet temperature and increased by increasing jet Mach number. Reducing jet aspect ratio, while holding jet area constant, caused reductions in lift, induced drag, and pitching moment at a given angle of attack but with a minimal change in the curve of lift coefficient against induced-drag coefficient. The jet-deflection effect was shown to be beneficial to cruise performance. The aerodynamic center was shifted forward by adding power or jet-deflection angle. Moving the jet away from the wing surface resulted in rapid changes in lift and induced drag. Reducing the wing span of a rectangular wing by half decreased the jet-circulation lift by only 24 percent at a thrust coefficient of 2.

  15. Recent activities on CCMHD power generation studies with Fuji-1 blow-down facility

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Y.; Okamura, T.; Yoshikawa, K.

    1995-12-31

    Recent activities on experimental studies with closed cycle MBD {open_quotes}Fuji-1{open_quotes} blow-down facility at Tokyo Institute of Technology are presented. A new disk generator ( Disk-F4 ) has been installed and a new seed injection system has been introduced from IVTAN (Institute of High Temperature in Russia) in 1994.The design concept of the new generator channel is focused mainly on the reliability of high power generation. The Mach number at the generator inlet and the thermal input are increased up to {approximately}2.8 and {approximately}3.0 MW, respectively. In the new seeding system, a melted seed material is pushed by a piston dozator, instead of gas-pressure-driven in the previous system. The controllability of seed fraction is markedly improved, and the large fluctuation as has been observed previously is diminished, although the spatial non-uniformity of seed fraction which could occur in the all previous experiments is observed. In the power generation experiments with the new components, the maximum power output of 502 kW and the enthalpy extraction ratio of 16.7% have been obtained. These values at the present stage are lower than the maximum values previously achieved in the facility. However, the reliable high power generation can be expected for the new generator.

  16. [Superparamagnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles "Blow up" Spatial Ordering of Double-stranded DNA Molecules].

    PubMed

    Yevdokimov, Yu M; Pershina, A G; Salyanov, V I; Magaeva, A A; Popenko, V I; Shtykova, E V; Dadinova, L A; Skuridin, S G

    2015-01-01

    The formation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules, handled by positively charged superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, as well as action of these nanoparticles on DNA dispersion, are considered. The binding of magnetic nanoparticles to the linear double-stranded DNA in solution of high ionic strength (0.3 M NaCl) and subsequent phase exclusion of these complexes from polyethylene glycol-containing solutions lead to their inability to form dispersions, whose particles do possess the spatially twisted arrangement of neighboring double-stranded DNA molecules. The action of magnetic nanoparticles on DNA dispersion (one magnetic nanoparticle per one double-stranded DNA molecule) results in such "perturbation" of DNA structure at sites of magnetic nanoparticles binding that the regular spatial structure of DNA dispersion particles "blows up"; this process is accompanied by disappearance of both abnormal optical activity and characteristic Bragg maximum on the small-angle X-ray scattering curve. Allowing with the fact that the physicochemical properties of the DNA liquid-crystalline dispersion particles reflect features of spatial organization of these molecules in chromosomes of primitive organisms, it is possible, that the found effect can have the relevant biological consequences. PMID:26349206

  17. The Blow Up Method for Brakke Flows: Networks Near Triple Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Yoshihiro; Wickramasekera, Neshan

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a parabolic blow-up method to study the asymptotic behavior of a Brakke flow of planar networks (that is a 1-dimensional Brakke flow in a two dimensional region) weakly close in a space-time region to a static multiplicity 1 triple junction J. We show that such a network flow is regular in a smaller space-time region, in the sense that it consists of three curves coming smoothly together at a single point at 120{^{circ}} angles, staying smoothly close to J and moving smoothly. Using this result and White's stratification theorem, we deduce that whenever a Brakke flow of networks in a space-time region {{mathcal {R}}} has no static tangent flow with density {{≥q}2}, there exists a closed subset {{Σ subset {mathcal {R}}}} of parabolic Hausdorff dimension at most 1 such that the flow is classical in {{mathcal {R}}backslashΣ}, that is near every point in {{mathcal {R}}backslashΣ}, the flow, if non-empty, consists of either an embedded curve moving smoothly or three embedded curves meeting smoothly at a single point at 120{^{circ}} angles and moving smoothly. In particular, such a flow is classical at all times except for a closed set of times of ordinary Hausdorff dimension at most {1/2}.

  18. A transgenic embryonic sexing system for the Australian sheep blow fly Lucilia cuprina.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Scott, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic approaches, including the sterile insect technique (SIT), have previously been considered for control of the Australian sheep blow fly Lucilia cuprina, a major pest of sheep. In an SIT program, females consume 50% of the diet but are ineffective as control agents and compete with females in the field for mating with sterile males, thereby decreasing the efficiency of the program. Consequently, transgenic sexing strains of L. cuprina were developed that produce 100% males when raised on diet that lacks tetracycline. However, as females die mostly at the pupal stage, rearing costs would not be significantly reduced. Here we report the development of transgenic embryonic sexing strains of L. cuprina. In these strains, the Lsbnk cellularization gene promoter drives high levels of expression of the tetracycline transactivator (tTA) in the early embryo. In the absence of tetracycline, tTA activates expression of the Lshid proapoptotic gene, leading to death of the embryo. Sex-specific RNA splicing of Lshid transcripts ensures that only female embryos die. Embryonic sexing strains were also made by combining the Lsbnk-tTA and tetO-Lshid components into a single gene construct, which will facilitate transfer of the technology to other major calliphorid livestock pests. PMID:26537204

  19. Optical measurement and modelling of parison sag and swell in blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béreaux, Yves; Charmeau, Jean-Yves; Balcaen, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Blow moulding is a process whereby a cylindrical parison is extruded first, then pinched between the two halves of a mould and, finally, blown into the product. Parison size and shape result from complex interactions between mandrel and die geometries, processing parameters and viscoelastic properties of the polymeric material. Moreover, parison size changes with time due to sag. An innovative, contactless and online measurement technique of the parison is shown to be an effective tool to measure precisely parison diameter and thickness and to capture dimensional changes with time. This technique employs laser lighting of the parison and hinges on the refractive properties of molten polymer. Images taken with a digital camera are processed to give a precise measurement of diameter and thickness, at different time step during extrusion. Thus, parison swell and sag have been recorded for a commercial HDPE. Influence of processing parameters such as the rotational screw speed or die gap width can be brought forward. Thickness swell is found to possess a different behaviour from diameter swell. Swell is a purely viscoelastic phenomenon, therefore requiring a numerical modelling with an integral viscoelastic constitutive equation. On the other hand, sag has been measured and could be modelled from a Newtonian perspective using one dimensional convected coordinates. A sagging susceptibility coefficient of the polymer is deduced.

  20. Dynamics of laser-blow-off induced Li plume in confined geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai

    2013-08-15

    Dynamics of Li plasma plume created by laser-blow-off technique in air ambient is reported. Plasma plume dynamics and its optical emission are investigated in planar and confined geometries using time resolved shadowgraph imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Significant differences in the plasma characteristics in confined geometry are quantitatively investigated by comparing the plasma parameters (temperature and density) in free expansion and confined geometry configurations. Dynamics and physical parameters of the primary as well as the reflected shock waves (in confined geometry) and their interactions with expanding plasma are briefly addressed. A large enhancement in the emission intensities of Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}← 3d {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,5/2}) and 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}← 2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}) is correlated with the shock wave dynamics in the two geometries. Strong self reversal in the neutral emission infers an increase in the population density of neutrals within the confined plasma plume.

  1. Dead-blow hammer design applied to a calibration target mechanism to dampen excessive rebound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Brian Y.

    1991-01-01

    An existing rotary electromagnetic driver was specified to be used to deploy and restow a blackbody calibration target inside of a spacecraft infrared science instrument. However, this target was much more massive than any other previously inherited design applications. The target experienced unacceptable bounce when reaching its stops. Without any design modification, the momentum generated by the driver caused the target to bounce back to its starting position. Initially, elastomeric dampers were used between the driver and the target. However, this design could not prevent the bounce, and it compromised the positional accuracy of the calibration target. A design that successfully met all the requirements incorporated a sealed pocket 85 percent full of 0.75 mm diameter stainless steel balls in the back of the target to provide the effect of a dead-blow hammer. The energy dissipation resulting from the collision of balls in the pocket successfully dampened the excess momentum generated during the target deployment. The disastrous effects of new requirements on a design with a successful flight history, the modifications that were necessary to make the device work, and the tests performed to verify its functionality are described.

  2. Extended advance of continuous miner successfully ventilated with a scrubber in a blowing section

    SciTech Connect

    Volkwein, J.C.; Thimons, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Underground testing was carried out by Ingersoll-Rand, Inc., under contract to the Bureau of Mines to determine the effectiveness of a machine-mounted scrubber system for ventilating the face during an extended advance. A continuous miner equipped with an integral flooded-bed dust scrubber system was instrumented with methanometers and Real-time Aerosol Monitor (RAM) dust monitors. Methane and respirable dust data were collected at brattice setbacks of 7.5 m (current operating distance), 10.5 m, and 15 m (blowing ventilation) during production shifts. Results showed that a suitable machine-mounted scrubber system can adequately ventilate the face at brattice setbacks up to 15 m. No deterioration in ventilation performance was observed as brattice setbacks were increased from 7.5 m to 15 m. The scrubber system effectively controlled face methane levels at large setbacks, though respirable dust levels increased as much as 33 pct at the operator's cab at setbacks greater than 7.5 m.

  3. Static investigation of the circulation control wing/upper surface blowing concept applied to the quiet short haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.; Jaynes, D. N.; Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Full scale static investigations were conducted on the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) to determine the thrust deflecting capabilities of the circulation control wing/upper surface blowing (CCW/USB) concept. This scheme, which combines favorable characteristics of both the A-6/CCW and QSRA, employs the flow entrainment properties of CCW to pneumatically deflect engine thrust in lieu of the mechanical USB flap system. Results show that the no moving parts blown system produced static thrust deflections in the range of 40 deg to 97 deg (depending on thrust level) with a CCW pressure of 208,900 Pa (30.3 psig). In addition, the ability to vary horizontal forces from thrust to drag while maintaining a constant vertical (or lift) value was demonstrated by varying the blowing pressure. The versatility of the CCW/USB system, if applied to a STOL aircraft, was confirmed, where rapid conversion from a high drag approach mode to a thrust recovering waveoff or takeoff configuration could be achieved by nearly instantaneous blowing pressure variation.

  4. The effect of blowing pressure, lip force and tonguing on transients: A study using a clarinet-playing machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Weicong; Almeida, André; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2016-08-01

    Wind instrument players control the initial and final transients of notes using breath, lips, and tonguing. This paper uses a clarinet-playing machine and high-speed camera to investigate how blowing pressure, lip force, and tonguing parameters affect transients. After tongue release, the reed quickly comes to rest, losing its mechanical energy. However, the changing aperture past the reed rapidly changes the airflow. For pressure above the oscillation threshold, successive interactions between reflections of this pulse of airflow and the reed produce an exponential increase in the sound. The rates r of exponential increase in the fundamental of the sound range from several tens to several hundreds of dB s(-1), as functions of blowing pressure and lip force. Because the reed's initial mechanical energy is lost, tongue force and acceleration have little effect on r. However, larger tongue force and acceleration produce more rapid changes in flow, which start notes sooner after tongue release. Further, large tongue force increases the third harmonic during the transient. There is a hysteresis region on the (pressure, lip force) plane where regenerative oscillation is not produced spontaneously by increasing blowing pressure only. Here, tongue action can initiate sustained notes at low pressure. PMID:27586739

  5. Ground Penetrating Radar imaging of two large sand blow craters related to the 2001 Bhuj earthquake, Kachchh, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, D. M.; Goyal, B.; Patidar, A. K.; Mulchandani, N.; Thakkar, M. G.; Chamyal, L. S.

    2006-10-01

    The 2001 Bhuj earthquake (Mw 7.7) formed several medium to large sand blow craters due to extensive liquefaction of the sediments comprising the Banni plain and Great Rann of Kachchh. We investigated two large closely spaced sand blow craters of different morphologies using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) with a view to understand the subsurface deformation, identify the vents and source of the vented sediments. The study comprises velocity surveys, GPR surveys using 200 MHz antennae along three selected transects that is supplemented by data from two trenches excavated. The GPR was able to provide good data on stratigraphy and deformation up to a depth of 6.5 m with good resolution. The GPR successfully imaged the subsurface characteristics of the craters based on the contrasting lithologies of the host sediments and the sediments emplaced in the craters. The GPR also detected three vertical vents of ˜ 1 m width continuing throughout the profile which are reflected as high amplitude vertical events. We conclude that the large sand blows during the 2001 Bhuj earthquake were produced due to liquefaction of sediments in the subsurface at > 6.5 m depth and that the clay-rich sediments of the Banni plain have behaved as the fine grained cap over it. The present study provides a modern analogue for comparing the liquefaction features of past great earthquakes (for example, the 1819 earthquake) that have occurred in the Kachchh region to understand the phenomena of liquefaction.

  6. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading-and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements of the 11 % scale full-span AMELIA CESTOL model with leading- and trailing-edge slot blowing circulation control (CCW) wing were obtained during a recent test in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 40- by 80-Ft. Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, Sound levels and spectra were acquired with seven in-flow microphones and a 48-element phased microphone array for a variety of vehicle configurations, CCW slot flow rates, and forward speeds, Corrections to the measurements and processing are in progress, however the data from selected configurations presented in this report confirm good measurement quality and dynamic range over the test conditions, Array beamform maps at 40 kts tunnel speed show that the trailing edge flap source is dominant for most frequencies at flap angles of 0deg and 60deg, The overall sound level for the 60deg flap was similar to the 0deg flap for most slot blowing rates forward of 90deg incidence, but was louder by up to 6 dB for downstream angles, At 100 kts, the in-flow microphone levels were louder than the sensor self-noise for the higher blowing rates, while passive and active background noise suppression methods for the microphone array revealed source levels as much as 20 dB lower than observed with the in-flow microphones,

  7. The role of blowing snow in the activation of bromine over first-year Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb-Lappen, R. M.; Obbard, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    It is well known that during polar springtime halide sea salt ions, in particular Br-, are photochemically activated into reactive halogen species (e.g., Br and BrO), where they break down tropospheric ozone. This research investigated the role of blowing snow in transporting salts from the sea ice/snow surface into reactive bromine species in the air. At two different locations over first-year ice in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, collection baskets captured blowing snow at different heights. In addition, sea ice cores and surface snow samples were collected throughout the month-long campaign. Over this time, sea ice and surface snow Br- / Cl- mass ratios remained constant and equivalent to seawater, and only in lofted snow did bromide become depleted relative to chloride. This suggests that replenishment of bromide in the snowpack occurs faster than bromine activation in mid-strength wind conditions (approximately 10 m s-1) or that blowing snow represents only a small portion of the surface snowpack. Additionally, lofted snow was found to be depleted in sulfate and enriched in nitrate relative to surface snow.

  8. Effects of Segmented Slot Blowing at the Leading Edge of a Finite Span Cavity in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Benjamin; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Cattafesta, Louis; Taira, Kunihiko

    2015-11-01

    In this investigation, the effects of employing segmented slot blowing at the leading edge of a finite span cavity in Mach 1.4 flow are studied. The rectangular cavity under consideration has a length to depth ratio of 6 and width to depth ratio of 2 with an approaching turbulent boundary layer. Qualitative surface flow visualization results reveal changes in the flow characteristics due to the introduction of the sidewalls and multiple slot blowing configurations, as has been previously shown. Quantitatively, unsteady surface pressure measurements and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were utilized to characterize the mechanisms for suppressing surface pressure fluctuations in a three-dimensional flow field. Joint time-frequency analysis using wavelet transformations highlight changes in the tonal and broadband surface pressure fluctuations as a function of time with the different slot configurations. PIV data results from the baseline finite span case were compared with the slot blowing cases to illustrate their effects on the mean flow field properties in the shear layer and recirculation region. Finally, the finite span cavity experimental results are compared with previously acquired data for the full span cavity case to gain some insight into the flow field modifications as the cavity span is altered.

  9. Flow visualization study of spanwise blowing applied to the F-4 fighter aircraft configuration. [water tunnel test using a 1/48-scale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Water tunnel studies were performed to define the changes that occur in vortex flow fields above the wing due to spanwise blowing over the inboard and outboard wing panels and over the trailing-edge flaps. Flow visualization photographs were obtained for angles of attack up to 30 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The sensitivity of the vortex flows to changes in flap deflection angle, nozzle position, and jet momentum coefficient was determined. Deflection of the leading edge flap delayed flow separation and the formation of the wing vortex to higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing delayed the breakdown of the wing vortex to farther outboard and to higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing over the trailing edge flap entrained flow downward, producing a lift increase over a wide range of angles of attack. The sweep angle of the windward wing was effectively reduced in sideslip. This decreased the stability of the wing vortex, and it burst farther inboard. Reduced wing sweep required a higher blowing rate to maintain a stable vortex. A vortex could be stabilized on the outboard wing panel when an outboard blowing nozzle was used. Blowing from both an inboard and an outboard nozzle was found to have a favorable interaction.

  10. A feasibility study for transportable 241Am-in-lung and 241Am-in-nose-blow monitoring systems for use following a weapons accident.

    PubMed

    Youngman, M J; Etherington, G; Smith, J R H

    2003-01-01

    In a nuclear weapon accident involving fire or conventional explosion, most of the radiation dose received by people in the immediate vicinity would result from inhalation of 239Pu. This is accompanied by the nuclide 241Am, which is much easier to determine by external counting because of the 60 keV gamma ray emission. In the event of an accident, a priority would be to identify any people who have had intakes of 239Pu which were so large that decorporation therapy should be considered. Direct measurement of lung content provides the most rapid and convenient method for assessing intakes by inhalation. A transportable system has been considered as this could be deployed close to the site of the accident and would allow rapid measurements to be made. The feasibility of a transportable 241Am-in-nose-blow and nasal swab measurement system has also been considered. This would be used to help select people for 241Am-in-lung measurements. PMID:14527011

  11. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-01-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9860895

  12. Mixture design and multivariate analysis in mixture research.

    PubMed

    Eide, I; Johnsen, H G

    1998-12-01

    Mixture design has been used to identify possible interactions between mutagens in a mixture. In this paper the use of mixture design in multidimensional isobolographic studies is introduced. Mutagenicity of individual nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was evaluated is an organic extract of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). After replacing DCM with dimethyl sulfoxide, the extract was spiked with three individual nitro-PAH: 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. The nitro-PAH were added separately and in various combinations to the extract to determine the effects of each variable and to identify possible interactions between the individual nitro-PAH and between the nitro-PAH and the extract. The composition of the mixtures was determined by mixture design (linear axial normal) with four variables (the DEP extract and the three nitro-PAH, giving 8 different mixtures plus a triplicate centerpoint, i.e., a total of 11. The design supports a model with linear and interaction (product) terms. Two different approaches were used: traditional mixture design within a well-defined range on the linear part of the dose-response curves and an isobolographic mixture design with equipotent doses of each variable. The mixtures were tested for mutagenicity in the Ames assay using the TA98 strain of Salmonella typhimurium. The data were analyzed with projections to latent structures (PLS). The three individual nitro-PAH and the DEP extract acted additively in the Ames test. The use of mixture design either within a well-defined range of the linear part on the dose-response curve or with equipotent doses saves experiments and reduces the possibility of false interaction terms in situations with dose additivity or response additivity. PMID:9860895

  13. GUIDANCE FOR CONDUCTING HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    While some potential environmental hazards involve significant exposure to only a single compound, most instances of environmental contamination involve concurrent or sequential exposures to a mixture of compounds that may induce similar or dissimilar effects over exposure period...

  14. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  15. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  16. Thermobaric investigation of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An examination of the dynamics of gas emission during the heating in vacuo of different grades of Donbass coal included a study of binary and ternary mixtures of these coals. Discrete gas emission was established at temperatures depending principally on the ratio of coals within the mixtures. The data obtained could be used as a basis for commercial processes.

  17. Latent classiness and other mixtures.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves' role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  18. Latent Classiness and Other Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to laud Lindon Eaves’ role in the development of mixture modeling in genetic studies. The specification of models for mixture distributions was very much in its infancy when Professor Eaves implemented it in his own FORTRAN programs, and extended it to data collected from relatives such as twins. It was his collaboration with the author of this article which led to the first implementation of mixture distribution modeling in a general-purpose structural equation modeling program, Mx, resulting in a 1996 article on linkage analysis in Behavior Genetics. Today, the popularity of these methods continues to grow, encompassing methods for genetic association, latent class analysis, growth curve mixture modeling, factor mixture modeling, regime switching, marginal maximum likelihood, genotype by environment interaction, variance component twin modeling in the absence of zygosity information, and many others. This primarily historical article concludes with some consideration of some possible future developments. PMID:24477932

  19. The technical viability of alternative blowing agents in polyisocyanurate roof insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Linkous, R.L.; Wendt, R.L.; Graves, R.S. ); Smith, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a progress report on field thermal performance measurements on a set of private industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate laminate board stock foams blown with CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-141b, 50/50, and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b. These boards have been observed for almost 300 days of roof field exposure in East Tennessee. The field data are used to derive an empirical model which can be used to predict effective diffusion coefficients for the air components into the foam cells. These diffusion coefficients are compared with those developed from steady state laboratory measurements of thin sliced samples from the same batch of experimental boards. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-141b under a black and under a white membrane are reported. The aging of the HCFC-141b blown foam under the white membrane occurred more slowly during cold weather, but accelerated after the winter season, resulting in no significant resistivity difference after 280 days of exposure from September 1989 until May 1990. The field data analysis suggests that the percent increase in k over that of the foam blown with CFC-11 is, after one year of aging, 5.5% for HCFC-123 and 11.7% for HCFC-141b. This leads to the same ordering as derived from the laboratory thin-slicing analysis report in Part 3 of this session. Additional plans are described for further thermal and mechanical property measurements to be conducted on two ORNL roof field testers. After the first year of this three-year study, there has been no indication that thermal performance differences are serious enough to suggest that any or all of the HCFC alternate blowing agents would not be technically viable in polyisocyanurate roof insulations. 5 refs., 19 figs.

  20. A mechanism for mitigation of blade-vortex interaction using leading edge blowing flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Chris; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a vortical unsteady flow with structures is often encountered in engineering applications. Such flow structure interactions (FSI) can be responsible for generating significant loads and can have many detrimental structural and acoustic side effects, such as structural fatigue, radiated noise and even catastrophic results. Amongst the different types of FSI, the parallel blade-vortex interaction (BVI) is the most common, often encountered in helicopters and propulsors. In this work, we report on the implementation of leading edge blowing (LEB) active flow control for successfully minimizing the parallel BVI. Our results show reduction of the airfoil vibrations up to 38% based on the root-mean-square of the vibration velocity amplitude. This technique is based on displacing an incident vortex using a jet issued from the leading edge of a sharp airfoil effectively increasing the stand-off distance of the vortex from the body. The effectiveness of the method was experimentally analyzed using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV) recorded at an 800 Hz rate, which is sufficient to resolve the spatio-temporal dynamics of the flow field and it was combined with simultaneous accelerometer measurements of the airfoil, which was free to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the freestream. Analysis of the flow field spectra and a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) of the TRDPIV data of the temporally resolved planar flow fields indicate that the LEB effectively modified the flow field surrounding the airfoil and increased the convecting vortices stand-off distance for over half of the airfoil chord length. It is shown that LEB also causes a redistribution of the flow field spectral energy over a larger range of frequencies.

  1. Investigation of pulsed light for terminal sterilization of WFI filled blow/fill/seal polyethylene containers.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J; Burgess, D; Leo, F

    1997-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the ability of pulsed light to sterilize water for injection in blow/fill/seal polyethylene containers. Pulsed light uses intense, short duration flashes of broad spectrum white light to produce high levels of microbial kill. In a first phase of testing, containers of 0.5, 5, 15, and 120 mL nominal volume were inoculated with Bacillus pumilus endospores, Bacillus subtilus variety niger strain globigii endospores, Bacillus stearothermophilus endospores, and Aspergillus niger conidiospores. Approximately 10(6) colony forming units of each test spore were individually inoculated into 22 replicate containers of each sample volume. Two of these containers served as inoculation recovery controls, and 10 were treated using each of two pulsed light exposure methods: single-sided treatment, or treatment within a reflective cavity. Both treatments employed flashes of intense broad spectrum pulsed light delivered at one flash per second. Cavity treatment used 10 flashes to treat each container within a reflective cavity containing a single lamp. Cavity treatment yielded no recoverable survivors for any of the challenge spores from the contents of any of the 160 total samples. Single-sided treatment used 20 approximately 1-J/cm2 flashes from a single lamp-reflector projecting onto one side of the container. Single-sided treatment yielded no recoverable survivors from the contents of the containers for any of the bacterial endospores tested, but Aspergillus niger survival was detected in 4 of the 40 single-side treated samples. A second phase of tests examined the pulsed light inactivation of Bacillus pumilus spores for a range of inoculation levels. High levels of Bacillus pumilus spore kill were obtained using only a few cavity flashes. The results show that pulsed light can provide high levels of microbial lethality and possesses potential for use as a terminal sterilization method for water for injection in filled, sealed polyethylene

  2. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Large-Scale Unswept Wing-Body-Tail Configuration with Blowing Applied Over the Flap and Wind Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, H. Clyde; Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the effects of a blowing boundary-layer-control lift-augmentation system on the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale model of a fighter-type airplane. The wing was unswept at the 70-percent- chord station, had an aspect ratio of 2.86, a taper ratio of 0.40, and 4-percent-thick biconvex airfoil sections parallel to the plane of symmetry. The tests were conducted over a range of angles of attack from approximately -4 deg to 23 deg for a Reynolds number of approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 6) which corresponds to a Mach number of 0.08. Blowing rates were normally restricted to values just sufficient to control air-flow separation. The results of this investigation showed that wing leading-edge blowing in combination with large values of wing leading-edge-flap deflection was a very effective leading-edge flow-control device for wings having highly loaded trailing-edge flaps. With leading-edge blowing there was no hysteresis of the lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics upon recovery from stall. End plates were found to improve the lift and drag characteristics of the test configuration in the moderate angle-of-attack range, and blockage to one-quarter of the blowing-slot area was not detrimental to the aerodynamic characteristics. Blowing boundary-layer control resulted in a considerably reduced landing speed and reduced landing and take-off distances. The ailerons were very effective lateral-control devices when used with blowing flaps.

  3. Familial searching on DNA mixtures with dropout.

    PubMed

    Slooten, K

    2016-05-01

    Familial searching, the act of searching a database for a relative of an unknown individual whose DNA profile has been obtained, is usually restricted to cases where the DNA profile of that person has been unambiguously determined. Therefore, it is normally applied only with a good quality single source profile as starting point. In this article we investigate the performance of the method if applied to mixtures with and without allelic dropout, when likelihood ratios are computed with a semi-continuous (binary) model. We show that mixtures with dropout do not necessarily perform worse than mixtures without, especially if some separation between the donors is possible due to their different dropout probabilities. The familial searching true and false positive rates of mixed profiles on 15 loci are in some cases better than those of single source profiles on 10 loci. Thus, the information loss due to the fact that the person of interest's DNA has been mixed with that of other, and is affected by dropout, can be less than the loss of information corresponding to having 5 fewer loci available for a single source trace. Profiles typed on 10 autosomal loci are often involved in familial searching casework since many databases, including the Dutch one, in part consist of such profiles. Therefore, from this point of view, there seems to be no objection to extend familial searching to mixed or degraded profiles. PMID:26905597

  4. The study of poly(L-lactide) grafted silica nanoparticles on the film blowing of poly(L-lactide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Mingbo

    2015-05-01

    PLA nanocomposites are prepared by us, and to better develop the function of silica nanoparticle, the surface of silica nanoparticles are modified by introducing PLA chains via "grafting to" method in our research. According to the results of 1H NMR and TGA, it shows that the PLA grafted Silica nanoparticles are successfully synthesized by controlling the reaction condition, and the molecular weight of the grafted PLA chains is relatively as high as 22 400 g/mol. PLA Nanocomposites with modified nanoparticles are prepared using a convenient melt blending method to guarantee well-distribution of the particles. The well-dispersion state of silica nanospheres is confirmed by Scan Electrical Micrograph (SEM) technology. From the dynamic shear rheology tests, the strain and time sweep both reveal that stability networks are formed in these nanocomposites. And the frequency sweep shows that the nanoparticles with long grafted chains dramatically enhanced the storage and viscosity of the pure PLA. The rheology testing suggests that strong particle-matrix interactions between molecularly/nano-level dispersed grafted silica and PLA chains formed; and the elongational viscosity of PLA has been markedly improved with the addition of the nanoparticle. The effect of modified nanoparticles on the thermal properties of PLA has also been studied by us using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). It reveals that the crystallization rate of PLA has been improved as the long grafted chains play as the nucleation sites for PLA. Finally based on these rheology and crystallization researches, the nanocomposites are used to prepare PLA blowing films. Compared to pure PLA and PLA/unmodified silica nanocomposites, the results show that the stability of the film blowing has been greatly improved and the blow-up ratio has been increased with the addition of PLA grafted nanoparticles. The modified nanoparticles hold significant candidates to improve the thermal stability and the

  5. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  6. Large-scale static investigation of circulation-control-wing concepts applied to upper surface-blowing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shovlin, M. D.; Englar, R. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a circulation control to deflect turbofan engine thrust beyond 90 deg. has been proven in full-scale static ground tests of the circulation-control-wing/upper-surface-blowing (CCW/USB) concept. This powered high-lift system employs a circular, blown trailing edge to replace the USB mechanical flaps to entrain engine-exhaust flow, and to obtain both a vertical-thrust component and an augmented circulation lift for short takeoff and landing (STOL) applications. Previous tests (Phase 1), done in 1982, of a basic configuration installed on the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft confirmed these CCW/USB systems capabilities. A second phase (Phase 2) of full-scale, static, thrust-deflection investigations has reconfirmed the ability to deflect engine thrust from 40 to 102 deg., depending on thrust level. Five new configurations were evaluated and performance improvements noted for those configurations with larger blown span, fences or favorable engine interactions, smaller slot height, and larger radii with less than 180 deg. of CCW surface arc. In general, a 90 deg. circular arc with a smaller slot height provided the best performance, demonstrating that adequate thrust turning can be produced by a trailing-edge shape which may have minimal cruise-performance penalty. Thrust deflections were achieved at considerably lower blowing momentum than was required for the baseline case of Phase 1. Improved performance and versatility were thus confirmed for the CCW/USB system applied to STOL aircraft, where the potential for developing a non-moving-parts pneumatic thrust deflector to rapidly vary horizontal force from thrust to drag, while maintaining constant vertical force, appears quite promising. The conversion from high-lift to lower-drag cruise mode by merely terminating the blowing provides an effective STOL aircraft system.

  7. Blow-spun chitosan/PEG/PLGA nanofibers as a novel tissue engineering scaffold with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Bienek, Diane R; Hoffman, Kathleen M; Tutak, Wojtek

    2016-09-01

    Blow spinning is continuing to gain attention in tissue engineering, as the resultant nanofibrous structures can be used to create a biomimetic environment. In this study, blow spinning was used to construct nanofiber scaffolds with up to 10 % chitosan and poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) in the absence or presence of poly(ethylene glycol). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that nanofibers were distributed randomly to form three-dimensional mats. With respect to chitosan concentration, the average fiber diameter did not differ statistically in either the absence or presence of poly(ethylene glycol). In poly(ethylene glycol)-formulations, the average fiber diameter ranged from (981.9 ± 611.3) nm to (1139.2 ± 814.2) nm. In vitro cellular metabolic activity and proliferation studies using keratinized rat squamous epithelial cells (RL-65) showed that cytocompatibility was not compromised with the addition of poly(ethylene glycol). The cell responses at lower (1 and 2.5 %) chitosan concentrations were not significantly different from the groups without chitosan or no scaffold when cultivated for 3, 6, or 9 days. However, >15 % reduction in cellular responses were observed at 10 % chitosan. In presence of poly(ethylene glycol), nearly a 1-log incremental reduction in the number of colony forming units of Streptococcus mutans occurred as the chitosan concentration increased from 0-1 to 2.5 %. Bacterial preparations tested with poly(ethylene glycol) and 5 or 10 % chitosan were not significantly different than the positive kill control. Taken together, the most favorable conditions for attaining cytocompatibility and maintaining antibacterial functionality existed in poly(ethylene glycol)/poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) blow-spun scaffolds with integrated 1 or 2.5 % chitosan. PMID:27568217

  8. New approach in direct-simulation of gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of a new direct-simulation Monte Carlo method by which energy transfer and chemical reactions are calculated. The new method, which reduces to the variable cross-section hard sphere model as a special case, allows different viscosity-temperature exponents for each species in a gas mixture when combined with a modified Larsen-Borgnakke phenomenological model. This removes the most serious limitation of the usefulness of the model for engineering simulations. The necessary kinetic theory for the application of the new method to mixtures of monatomic or polyatomic gases is presented, including gas mixtures involving chemical reactions. Calculations are made for the relaxation of a diatomic gas mixture, a plane shock wave in a gas mixture, and a chemically reacting gas flow along the stagnation streamline in front of a hypersonic vehicle. Calculated results show that the introduction of different molecular interactions for each species in a gas mixture produces significant differences in comparison with a common molecular interaction for all species in the mixture. This effect should not be neglected for accurate DSMC simulations in an engineering context.

  9. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  10. Melting of corrosion-resisting steels using air in bath agitation at the end of oxygen blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Yedesheva, Ch V.

    2014-10-01

    A number of metallurgical plants employ ladle stirring with argon at the end of oxygen blowing during the melting process of corrosion-resisting steels [1, 2]. At the same time, the scarcity and relatively high cost of argon, its low pressure in a shop air pipeline restrain most plants from using argon for corrosion-resisting steel production. Compressed air was used instead of argon to intensify the process of decarbonizing when chromium-nickel stainless steels were made with a 40-ton electric arc furnace at the Kuznetsk Metallurgical Plant.

  11. Small scale wind tunnel model investigation of hybrid high lift systems combining upper surface blowing with the internally blown flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, W. L.; Chin, Y. T.

    1974-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel test of a two engine hybrid model with upper surface blowing on a simulated expandable duct internally blown flap was accomplished in a two phase program. The low wing Phase I model utilized 0.126c radius Jacobs/Hurkamp flaps and 0.337c radius Coanda flaps. The high wing Phase II model was utilized for continued studies on the Jacobs/Hurkamp flap. Principal study areas included: basic data both engines operative and with an engine out, control flap utilization, horizontal tail effectiveness, spoiler effectiveness, USB nacelle deflector study and USB/IBF pressure ratio effects.

  12. Ground simulation with moving belt and tangential blowing for full-scale automotive testing in a wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Mercker, E.; Knape, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes full-scale vehicle tests made on a standard-type passenger car in a wind tunnel and on the road in order to evaluate different moving-ground simulation techniques for wind tunnels. The test was first executed over a moving belt, supporting the car with a rear sting and measuring the aerodynamic forces with an internal balance. The test was then repeated with the same support arrangement over a fixed test-section floor, and moving-ground simulation was attained with boundary layer control by tangential blowing. Besides force measurements, the surface pressure distribution underneath the vehicle and at the base were also measured.

  13. Thermobaric investigations of coal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinskii, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamics of the evolution of gas when coals of various types from the Donbass and binary and ternary mixtures of them are heated have been studied. The discrete nature of the evolution of gas has been established, the temperature intervals of which depend primarily on the ratio of the coals in the mixtures. The possibility of using the results obtained in determining rational schemes for the industrial processing of coals is suggested.

  14. Refining the Parameterisation of Sea Salt Aerosol Production from Blowing Snow on Sea Ice Based on Data Collected in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Frey, M. M.; Levine, J. G.; Brooks, I. M.; Anderson, P. A.; Jones, A. E.; Wolff, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis of blowing snow lifted snow particles, via a subsequent sublimation process, as a significant sea salt aerosol (SSA) source over sea ice has recently been strongly supported by a winter cruise through the Weddell Sea during June-August 2013. The newly collected data, including both physical and chemical components, provide a unique way to test and validate the parameterisation used to date. The observed salinity of surface and blowing snow is very low; on average more than an order in magnitude smaller than column mean value. Here we apply a low salinity of 0.27 PSU (representing an average of the top 10cm of snow plus blowing snow samples) in the p-TOMCAT model to test its effect on sea salt concentrations reaching the Antarctic. The comparison with previous model output (using column mean salinity) shows that SSA concentration in central Antarctica is insensitive to change in snow salinity, due to the compensating effect of increasing fine SSA partitioning upon reducing the salinity. We also investigate the impact of changing the number of SSA particles formed from each snow particle on SSA concentration and size distribution. Applying a ratio of 10 SSA particles per blowing snow particle, rather than one as assumed to date, greatly increases the amount of sub-micrometer SSA reaching central Antarctica. Without applying blowing snow related SSA production in the p-TOMCAT model, the observed elevated SSA in the Weddell Sea could not be reproduced.

  15. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-canard configuration with underwing spanwise blowing on the trailing-edge flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Paulson, John W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of spanwise blowing applied to the lower surface of a trailing-edge flap system on a wing-canard configuration has been conducted in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel. The investigation studied spanwise-blowing angles of 30 deg., 45 deg., and 60 deg. measured from a perpendicular to the body center-line. The test conditions covered a range of free-stream dynamic pressures up to 50 psf for thrust coefficients up to 2.1 over a range of angles of attack from -2 deg. to 26 deg. Model height above the wind tunnel floor was varied from a height-to-span ratio of 1.70 down to 0.20 (a representative wheel touchdown height). The results indicate that blowing angles of 30 deg. and 45 deg. increase the induced-lift increment produced by spanwise blowing on the lower surface of a trailing-edge flap system. Increasing the blowing angle to 60 deg., in general, produces little further improvement.

  16. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  17. Blowing-Type Boundary-Layer Control as Applied to the Trailing-Edge Flaps of a 35 Degree Swept-Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark W; Anderson, Seth B; Innis, Robert C

    1958-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 35 degree swept-wing airplane of applying blowing-type boundary-layer control to the trailing-edge flaps. Flight tests of a similar airplane were then conducted to determine the effects of boundary-layer control on the handling qualities and operation of the airplane, particularly during landing and take-off. The wind-tunnel and flight tests indicated that blowing over the flaps produced large increases in flap lift increment, and significant increases in maximum lift. The use of blowing permitted reductions in the landing approach speeds of as much as 12 knots.

  18. Wind tunnel measurements on a full-scale F/A-18 with a tangentially blowing slot. [conducted in the Ames 80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.

    1994-01-01

    A full-scale F/A-18 was tested in the 80 by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center to measure the effectiveness of a tangentially blowing slot in generating significant yawing moments while minimizing coupling in the pitch and roll axes. Various slot configurations were tested to determine the optimum configuration. The test was conducted for angles of attack from 25 to 50 deg, angles of sideslip from -15 to +15 deg, and freestream velocities from 67 ft/sec to 168 ft/sec. By altering the forebody vortex flow, yaw control was maintained for angles of attack up to 50 deg. Of particular interest was the result that blowing very close to the radome apex was not as effective as blowing slightly farther aft on the radome, that a 16-inch slot was more efficient, and that yawing moments were generated without inducing significant rolling or pitching moments.

  19. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite fibrous membranes prepared by solution blow spinning.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliano E; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Medeiros, Eliton S

    2012-03-01

    Nanocomposite fibers based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were prepared by solution blow spinning (SBS). Fiber morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). Electrical, thermal, surface and crystalline properties of the spun fibers were evaluated, respectively, by conductivity measurements (4-point probe), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), contact angle and X-ray diffraction (XRD). OM analysis of the spun mats showed a poor dispersion of MWCNT in the matrix, however dispersion in solution was increased during spinning where droplets of PLA in solution loaded with MWCNT were pulled by the pressure drop at the nozzle, producing PLA fibers filled with MWCNT. Good electrical conductivity and hydrophobicity can be achieved at low carbon nanotube contents. When only 1 wt% MWCNT was added to low-crystalline PLA, surface conductivity of the composites increased from 5 x 10(-8) to 0.46 S/cm. Addition of MWCNT can slightly influence the degree of crystallinity of PLA fibers as studied by XRD and DSC. Thermogravimetric analyses showed that MWCNT loading can decrease the onset degradation temperature of the composites which was attributed to the catalytic effect of metallic residues in MWCNT. Moreover, it was demonstrated that hydrophilicity slightly increased with an increase in MWCNT content. These results show that solution blow spinning can also be used to produce nanocomposite fibers with many potential applications such as in sensors and biosensors. PMID:22755116

  20. The technical viability of alternative blowing agents in polyisocyanurate roof insulation: A cooperative industry/government project

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Wendt, R.L.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report is a summary of the cooperative industry/government program to establish the viability of alternative blowing agents to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The project was initiated in 1989 following two workshops that focused on needed research on thermal insulation blown with substitutes for CFC-11 and CFC-12. The project is directed by a steering committee of representatives of the sponsors and of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the project is to determine if the performance of polyisocyanurate (PIR) roof insulation foam boards blown with alternate agents differs from the performance of boards blown with CFC-1. This report describes apparent thermal conductivity (k) results obtained from field and laboratory tests from 1989 to 1992 on a set of experimental PIR laminate boardstock produced to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents. All boardstock was manufactured from similar formulations that were not optimized for thermal performance. Commercial broadstock made in the future may differ in performance from this set. The PIR boards were prepared with CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-141b, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b.

  1. Reduced-order modeling of the flow around a high-lift configuration with unsteady Coanda blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaan, Richard; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd; Kumar, Pradeep; Burnazzi, Marco; Tissot, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    We propose a low-dimensional POD model for the transient and post-transient flow around a high-lift airfoil with unsteady Coanda blowing over the trailing edge. This model comprises the effect of high-frequency modulated blowing which mitigates vortex shedding and increases lift. The structure of the dynamical system is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations with a Galerkin projection and from subsequent dynamic simplifications. The system parameters are determined with a data assimilation (4D-Var) method. The boundary actuation is incorporated into the model with actuation modes following Graham et al. (1999); Kasnakoğlu et al. (2008). As novel enabler, we show that the performance of the POD model significantly benefits from employing additional actuation modes for different frequency components associated with the same actuation input. In addition, linear, weakly nonlinear and fully nonlinear models are considered. The current study suggests that separate actuation modes for different actuation frequencies improve Galerkin model performance, in particular with respect to the important base-flow changes. We acknowledge (1) the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC 880) ``Fundamentals of High Lift of Future Civil Aircraft,'' and 2) the Senior Chair of Excellence ``Closed-loop control of turbulent shear flows using reduced-order models'' (TUCOROM).

  2. Small scale model static acoustic investigation of hybrid high lift systems combining upper surface blowing with the internally blown flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Rathburn, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    A static acoustic and propulsion test of a small radius Jacobs-Hurkamp and a large radius Flex Flap combined with four upper surface blowing (USB) nozzles was performed. Nozzle force and flow data, flap trailing edge total pressure survey data, and acoustic data were obtained. Jacobs-Hurkamp flap surface pressure data, flow visualization photographs, and spoiler acoustic data from the limited mid-year tests are reported. A pressure ratio range of 1.2 to 1.5 was investigated for the USB nozzles and for the auxiliary blowing slots. The acoustic data were scaled to a four-engine STOL airplane of roughly 110,000 kilograms or 50,000 pounds gross weight, corresponding to a model scale of approximately 0.2 for the nozzles without deflector. The model nozzle scale is actually reduced to about .17 with deflector although all results in this report assume 0.2 scale factor. Trailing edge pressure surveys indicated that poor flow attachment was obtained even at large flow impingement angles unless a nozzle deflector plate was used. Good attachment was obtained with the aspect ratio four nozzle with deflector, confirming the small scale wind tunnel tests.

  3. A blow to the fly - Lucilia cuprina draft genome and transcriptome to support advances in biology and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Anstead, Clare A; Batterham, Philip; Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Bowles, Vernon M; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Maxwell J; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    The blow fly, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann, 1830) is a parasitic insect of major global economic importance. Maggots of this fly parasitize the skin of animal hosts, feed on excretions and tissues, and cause severe disease (flystrike or myiasis). Although there has been considerable research on L. cuprina over the years, little is understood about the molecular biology, biochemistry and genetics of this parasitic fly, as well as its relationship with its hosts and the disease that it causes. This situation might change with the recent report of the draft genome and transcriptome of this blow fly, which has given new and global insights into its biology, interactions with the host animal and aspects of insecticide resistance at the molecular level. This genomic resource will likely enable many fundamental and applied research areas in the future. The present article gives a background on L. cuprina and myiasis, a brief account of past and current treatment, prevention and control approaches, and provides a perspective on the impact that the L. cuprina genome should have on future research of this and related parasitic flies, and the design of new and improved interventions for myiasis. PMID:26944522

  4. Characterization of impurity confinement on Alcator C-Mod using a multi-pulse laser blow-off system.

    PubMed

    Howard, N T; Greenwald, M; Rice, J E

    2011-03-01

    A new laser blow-off system for use in impurity transport studies on Alcator C-Mod was developed and installed for the 2009 run campaign. Its design included capabilities for multiple impurity injections during a single plasma pulse and remote manipulation of the ablated spot size. The system uses a 0.68 J, Nd:YAG laser operating at up to 10 Hz coupled with the fast beam steering via a 2D piezoelectric mirror mount able to move spot locations in the 100 ms between laser pulses and a remote controllable optical train that allow ablated spot sizes to vary from ∼0.5 to 7 mm. The ability to ablate a wide range in target Z along with Alcator C-Mod's extensive diagnostic capabilities (soft x-ray, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), charge exchange spectroscopy, etc.) allows for detailed studies of the impurity transport dependencies and mechanisms. This system has demonstrated the achievement of all its design goals including the ability for non-perturbative operation allowing for insight into underlying impurity transport processes. A detailed overview of the laser blow-off system and initial results of operation are presented. This includes an investigation into the characterization of impurity confinement in the I-mode confinement regime recently investigated on C-Mod. PMID:21456742

  5. Characterization of impurity confinement on Alcator C-Mod using a multi-pulse laser blow-off system

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2011-03-15

    A new laser blow-off system for use in impurity transport studies on Alcator C-Mod was developed and installed for the 2009 run campaign. Its design included capabilities for multiple impurity injections during a single plasma pulse and remote manipulation of the ablated spot size. The system uses a 0.68 J, Nd:YAG laser operating at up to 10 Hz coupled with the fast beam steering via a 2D piezoelectric mirror mount able to move spot locations in the 100 ms between laser pulses and a remote controllable optical train that allow ablated spot sizes to vary from {approx}0.5 to 7 mm. The ability to ablate a wide range in target Z along with Alcator C-Mod's extensive diagnostic capabilities (soft x-ray, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), charge exchange spectroscopy, etc.) allows for detailed studies of the impurity transport dependencies and mechanisms. This system has demonstrated the achievement of all its design goals including the ability for non-perturbative operation allowing for insight into underlying impurity transport processes. A detailed overview of the laser blow-off system and initial results of operation are presented. This includes an investigation into the characterization of impurity confinement in the I-mode confinement regime recently investigated on C-Mod.

  6. Validation of a high voltage leak detector for use with pharmaceutical blow-fill-seal containers--a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Möll, F; Doyle, D L; Haerer, M; Morton Guazzo, D

    1998-01-01

    Proposed requirements for pharmaceutical package integrity testing outlined in the EU Guide for Sterile Medicinal Products may make it necessary to evaluate and validate alternate ways to perform 100% leak inspection. One such method is high voltage leak detection (HVLD). Even though HVLD has been used for glass ampoules and vials for years, qualification and validation strategies are not well established. In this article, we describe and discuss our practical approach to validation and the protocols used to qualify and validate a high voltage leak detector for use with blow-fill-seal containers. For this work, we used laser drilled pinholes as a model for pinholes produced during manufacturing and defined a "window diagram." This diagram allowed us to plot the parameters of influence and the settings of the HVLD in an easy to visualize pictorial display. In the validation step, we initially determined the most sensitive standard integrity test for our product and container design from the available choices, the vacuum chamber, dye bath and microbial challenge visual inspection tests. In the next phase of our work, the HVLD was crossed-validated against the most sensitive of these tests, the dye bath visual inspection test. This was accomplished with a large number of containers mixed with deliberately defective ampoules. Our conclusion from this work is that the HVLD is an appropriate and feasible integrity test for 100% inspection of blow-fill-seal containers. PMID:9846069

  7. The effect of starvation on the larval behavior of two forensically important species of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Bala, Madhu

    2009-12-15

    The postfeeding larval stage in blow flies is generally an irreversible condition when the fully grown third instar larvae stop feeding and give no response towards food. The larvae of most species then disperse away from their feeding medium and pupariate. There are several cases reported about the use of postfeeding larvae as forensic evidence. It is a matter of common observation that the postfeeding stage can be reached earlier than the expected time if food becomes unavailable. However, no information is available on whether postfeeding stage induced by scarcity of food is also irreversible. Similarly, the minimum period of development required by the larvae of different blow flies species to enable their survival as postfeeding larvae and pupariation in the absence of food is unknown. It was observed during the present studies that the larvae of two Chrysomya species must feed for at least 35 h at 28 degrees C in order to be capable of reaching the postfeeding stage and subsequent pupariation. Duration of the starvation period required to induce postfeeding behavior decreases with increasing age of larvae. In the case of Chrysomya megacephala, 35, 45, 55 and 65 h old larvae attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 30, 20, 12 and 2 h of starvation, respectively. Similarly, larvae of Chrysomya rufifacies that were 35, 45, 55 and 60 h old attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 25, 16, 6 and 2 h of starvation, respectively. PMID:19892500

  8. The role of blowing snow in the activation of bromine over first-year Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb-Lappen, R. M.; Obbard, R. W.

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that during polar springtime halide sea salt ions, in particular Br-, are photochemically activated into reactive halogen species (e.g. Br and BrO), where they break down tropospheric ozone. This research investigated the role of blowing snow in transporting salts from the sea ice/snow surface into reactive bromine species in the air. At two different locations over first-year ice in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, collection baskets captured blowing snow at different heights. In addition, sea ice cores and surface snow samples were collected throughout the month-long campaign. Over this time, sea ice and surface snow Cl-/Br- mass ratios remained constant and equivalent to seawater, and only in lofted snow did bromide become depleted relative to chloride. This suggests that replenishment of bromide in the snowpack occurs faster than bromine activation in mid-strength wind conditions (approximately 10 m s-1). Additionally, lofted snow was found to be depleted in sulfate and enriched in nitrate relative to surface snow.

  9. Modeling and analysis of personal exposures to VOC mixtures using copulas

    PubMed Central

    Su, Feng-Chiao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Batterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposures typically involve mixtures of pollutants, which must be understood to evaluate cumulative risks, that is, the likelihood of adverse health effects arising from two or more chemicals. This study uses several powerful techniques to characterize dependency structures of mixture components in personal exposure measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with aims of advancing the understanding of environmental mixtures, improving the ability to model mixture components in a statistically valid manner, and demonstrating broadly applicable techniques. We first describe characteristics of mixtures and introduce several terms, including the mixture fraction which represents a mixture component's share of the total concentration of the mixture. Next, using VOC exposure data collected in the Relationship of Indoor Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study, mixtures are identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and by toxicological mode of action. Dependency structures of mixture components are examined using mixture fractions and modeled using copulas, which address dependencies of multiple variables across the entire distribution. Five candidate copulas (Gaussian, t, Gumbel, Clayton, and Frank) are evaluated, and the performance of fitted models was evaluated using simulation and mixture fractions. Cumulative cancer risks are calculated for mixtures, and results from copulas and multivariate lognormal models are compared to risks calculated using the observed data. Results obtained using the RIOPA dataset showed four VOC mixtures, representing gasoline vapor, vehicle exhaust, chlorinated solvents and disinfection by-products, and cleaning products and odorants. Often, a single compound dominated the mixture, however, mixture fractions were generally heterogeneous in that the VOC composition of the mixture changed with concentration. Three mixtures were identified by mode of action, representing VOCs associated with hematopoietic, liver

  10. Highly-Complex Environmentally-Realistic Mixtures: Challenges and Advances

    EPA Science Inventory

    The difficulties involved in design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of defmed mixtures experiments and use of the resulting data in risk assessment are now wellknown to the toxicology, risk assessment and risk management communities. The arena of highly-complex environment...

  11. A computer program for calculating symmetrical aerodynamic characteristics and lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with blowing jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Mehrotra, S. C.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics under symmetrical flight conditions and the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with upper-surface-blowing (USB) or over-wing-blowing (OWB) jets are described. The following new features were added to the program: (1) a fuselage of arbitrary body of revolution has been included. The effect of wing-body interference can now be investigated, and (2) all nine lateral-directional stability derivatives can be calculated. The program is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC Cyber 175 and Honeywell 66/60 computers.

  12. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  13. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:22523437

  14. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  15. De Novo Sequencing of Complex Mixtures of Heparan Sulfate Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongrong; Zong, Chengli; Venot, Andre; Chiu, Yulun; Zhou, Dandan; Boons, Geert-Jan; Sharp, Joshua S

    2016-05-17

    Here, we describe the first sequencing method of a complex mixture of heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides by LC-MS/MS. Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are linear polysaccharides that are modified in a complex manner by N- and O-sulfation, N-acetylation, and epimerization of the uronic acid. Heparin and HS are involved in various essential cellular communication processes. The structural analysis of these glycosaminoglycans is challenging due to the lability of their sulfate groups, the high heterogeneity of modifications, and the epimerization of the uronic acids. While advances in liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) have enabled compositional profiling of HS oligosaccharide mixtures, online separation and detailed structural analysis of isomeric and epimeric HS mixtures has not been achieved. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a chemical derivatization and tandem mass spectrometry method that can separate and identify isomeric and epimeric structures from complex mixtures. A series of well-defined synthetic HS tetrasaccharides varying in sulfation patterns and uronic acid epimerization were analyzed by chemical derivatization and LC-MS/MS. These synthetic compounds made it possible to establish relationships between HS structure, chromatographic behavior and MS/MS fragmentation characteristics. Using the analytical characteristics determined through the analysis of the synthetic HS tetrasaccharide standards, an HS tetrasacharide mixture derived from natural sources was successfully sequenced. This method represents the first sequencing of complex mixtures of HS oligosaccharides, an essential milestone in the analysis of structure-function relationships of these carbohydrates. PMID:27087275

  16. Modeling phase equilibria in mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride and halocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lencka, M. ); Anderko, A. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the production of environmentally acceptable refrigerants, which not only offer desirable physico-chemical properties, but do not deplete the ozone layer and do not cause the greenhouse effect. The production of such refrigerants involves the separation of multicomponent mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and various chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons. Therefore, it is indispensable to know the phase behavior of these mixtures. While the phase behavior of refrigerant mixtures can be adequately modeled in the absence of HF using standard thermodynamic techniques, drastically increases the complexity of the mixture because of its unusually strong association. The association of HF manifests itself in its significantly reduced gas-phase compressibility factor and the strong nonideality of mixtures containing HF and hydrocarbons or halocarbons. In this work, the authors develop an accurate, yet simple, association model for HF and compare it with simulation data. The model is combined with a simple equation of state to yield a closed-form expression that is applicable to both pure fluids and mixtures. In addition to representing the pure-component data for HF, the theory accurately predicts phase equilibria in HF + halocarbon systems.

  17. Ionic liquid mixtures--an analysis of their mutual miscibility.

    PubMed

    Omar, Salama; Lemus, Jesus; Ruiz, Elia; Ferro, Víctor R; Ortega, Juan; Palomar, Jose

    2014-03-01

    The use of ionic liquid mixtures (IL-IL mixtures) is being investigated for fine solvent properties tuning of the IL-based systems. The scarce available studies, however, evidence a wide variety of mixing behaviors (from almost ideal to strongly nonideal), depending on both the structure of the IL components and the property considered. In fact, the adequate selection of the cations and anions involved in IL-IL mixtures may ensure the absence or presence of two immiscible liquid phases. In this work, a systematic computational study of the mixing behavior of IL-IL systems is developed by means of COSMO-RS methodology. Liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) and excess enthalpy (H(E)) data of more than 200 binary IL-IL mixtures (including imidazolium-, pyridinium-, pyrrolidinium-, ammonium-, and phosphonium-based ILs) are calculated at different temperatures, comparing to literature data when available. The role of the interactions between unlike cations and anions on the mutual miscibility/immiscibility of IL-IL mixtures was analyzed. On the basis of proposed guidelines, a new class of immiscible IL-IL mixtures was reported, which only is formed by imidazolium-based compounds. PMID:24521179

  18. Landfilling ash/sludge mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.; Eighmy, T.T.; Crannell, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    The geotechnical properties of a mixture of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge was investigated for a proposed ash/sludge secure landfill. The components as well as mixtures ranging from 10:1 to 5:1 (ash:sludge, by volume) were evaluated, where appropriate, for a number of geotechnical index and mechanical properties including particle size, water content, specific gravity, density-moisture relationships, shear strength, and compressibility. The results from a compactibility study and stability analysis of the proposed landfill were used to help approve a landfill codisposal concept; a full-scale facility was constructed and is currently operating successfully.

  19. Acoustics and precondensation phenomena in gas-vapor saturated mixtures.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, C; Bruneau, M; Gavioso, R M

    2014-02-01

    Starting from fundamental hydrodynamics and thermodynamics equations for thermoviscous fluids, a new modeling procedure, which is suitable to describe acoustic propagation in gas mixtures, is presented. The model revises the boundary conditions which are appropriate to describe the condensation-evaporation processes taking place on a solid wall when one component of the mixture approaches saturation conditions. The general analytical solutions of these basic equations now give a unified description of acoustic propagation in an infinite, semi-infinite, or finite medium, throughout and beyond the boundary layers. The solutions account for the coupling between acoustic propagation and heat and concentration diffusion processes, including precondensation on the walls. The validity of the model and its predictive capability have been tested by a comparison with the description available in the literature of two particular systems (precondensation of propane and acoustic attenuation in a duct filled with an air-water vapor saturated mixture). The results of this comparison are discussed to clarify the relevance of the various physical phenomena that are involved in these processes. The model proposed here might be useful to develop methods for the acoustic determination of the thermodynamic and transport properties of gas mixtures as well as for practical applications involving gas and gas-vapor mixtures like thermoacoustics and acoustics in wet granular or porous media. PMID:25353596

  20. Acoustics and precondensation phenomena in gas-vapor saturated mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guianvarc'h, C.; Bruneau, M.; Gavioso, R. M.

    2014-02-01

    Starting from fundamental hydrodynamics and thermodynamics equations for thermoviscous fluids, a new modeling procedure, which is suitable to describe acoustic propagation in gas mixtures, is presented. The model revises the boundary conditions which are appropriate to describe the condensation-evaporation processes taking place on a solid wall when one component of the mixture approaches saturation conditions. The general analytical solutions of these basic equations now give a unified description of acoustic propagation in an infinite, semi-infinite, or finite medium, throughout and beyond the boundary layers. The solutions account for the coupling between acoustic propagation and heat and concentration diffusion processes, including precondensation on the walls. The validity of the model and its predictive capability have been tested by a comparison with the description available in the literature of two particular systems (precondensation of propane and acoustic attenuation in a duct filled with an air-water vapor saturated mixture). The results of this comparison are discussed to clarify the relevance of the various physical phenomena that are involved in these processes. The model proposed here might be useful to develop methods for the acoustic determination of the thermodynamic and transport properties of gas mixtures as well as for practical applications involving gas and gas-vapor mixtures like thermoacoustics and acoustics in wet granular or porous media.

  1. Estimating proportions of materials using mixture models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, R. P.; Basu, R.

    1983-01-01

    An approach to proportion estimation based on the notion of a mixture model, appropriate parametric forms for a mixture model that appears to fit observed remotely sensed data, methods for estimating the parameters in these models, methods for labelling proportion determination from the mixture model, and methods which use the mixture model estimates as auxiliary variable values in some proportion estimation schemes are addressed.

  2. Implications of chemical mixtures in public health practice.

    PubMed

    de Rosa, C T; El-Masri, H A; Pohl, H; Cibulas, W; Mumtaz, M M

    2004-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is a federal public health agency that investigates and strives to prevent human health problems produced by exposure to toxic chemicals and their mixtures in the environment. Most human exposures involving toxic chemicals or mixtures are thought to originate from environmental and occupational sources; however, concurrent exposures are also likely from other sources, such as prescription and nonprescription drugs, indoor air pollutants, alcohol, and tobacco smoke. Thus, in evaluating the potential hazard following exposure to environmental mixtures, ATSDR not only considers the inherent joint toxicity of the mixture but also the influence of environmental, demographic, occupational, and lifestyle factors. To foster these goals, ATSDR has pursued a Mixtures Research and Assessment Program that consists of three component efforts: trend analysis, joint toxicity assessment, and experimental testing. Through trend analysis, ATSDR sets priorities for environmental mixtures of concern for which joint toxicity assessments are conducted as needed. If data are not available to conduct appropriate assessments, a research agenda is pursued through established extramural mechanisms. Ultimately, the data generated are used to support ATSDR's work at sites involving exposure to chemical mixtures. This pragmatic approach allows testable hypotheses or research needs to be identified and resolved and enhances our understanding of the mechanisms of joint toxicity. Several collaborative and cooperative efforts with national and international organizations such as the Toxicology and Nutrition Office, the Netherlands, and the Department of Energy are being pursued as part of these activities. ATSDR also develops guidance manuals to consistently and accurately apply current methodologies for the joint toxicity assessment of chemicals. Further, expert panels often are assembled to resolve outstanding scientific issues or

  3. An NCME Instructional Module on Latent DIF Analysis Using Mixture Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Suh, Youngsuk; Lee, Woo-yeol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using mixture item response models. The mixture item response models for DIF analysis involve comparing item profiles across latent groups, instead of manifest groups. First, an overview of DIF analysis based on latent groups, called…

  4. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruner, Susan V.; Slone, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2–6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30°C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  5. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  6. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: a challenging quest along empirical sciences.

    PubMed

    Groten, John P; Heijne, Wilbert H M; Stierum, Rob H; Freidig, Andreas P; Feron, Victor J

    2004-12-01

    (toxicogenomics) which offers an in-depth analysis of several involved enzymatic pathways in parallel through the use of a systems biology approach. This was illustrated with mixtures of food additives known to affect the liver. Key to further maturation of mixture toxicology is collaboration of experimental toxicologists, biomathematicians, biologists, pharmacologists, model developers, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians to ensure parallel and coordinated research in this challenging area of toxicology. For this reason, the next sequel will be even more challenging and exciting to that first 15 years of empirical testing. PMID:21782748

  7. Miscibility of poly(lactic acid) and poly(ethylene oxide) solvent polymer blends and nanofibers made by solution blow spinning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The miscibility of blends of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in polymer solutions by dilute solution viscometry and in solution blow spun nanofibers by microscopy (SEM, TEM) and by thermal and spectral analysis. Three blends of PLA and PEO were solution blended in...

  8. A Comparative Study of the Effect of Web-Based versus In-Class Textbook Ethics Instruction on Accounting Students' Propensity to Whistle-Blow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Lisa; Subramaniam, Nava; James, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined whether accounting students' propensity to whistle-blow differed between those instructed through a web-based teaching module and those exposed to a traditional in-class textbook-focused approach. A total of 156 students from a second-year financial accounting course participated in the study. Ninety students utilized the…

  9. The Use of Elasto-Visco-Plastic Material Model Coupled with Pressure-Volume Thermodynamic Relationship to Simulate the Stretch Blow Molding of Polyethylene Terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, H.; Benrabah, Z.; Thibault, F.

    2007-05-01

    The use of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in the stretch blow molding process presents several challenging issues due to various processing parameters and complex behavior of the material, which is both temperature and strain-rate dependent. In this paper, we generalize the G'Sell-Jonas law in 3D to model and simulate the elasto-visco-plastic (EVP) behavior of PET, taking into account strain-hardening and strain-softening. It is observed that the internal pressure (inside the preform) is significantly different from the nominal pressure (imposed in the blowing device upstream) since the internal pressure and the enclosed volume of the preform are fully coupled. In order to accurately simulate this phenomenon, a thermodynamic model was used to characterize the pressure-volume relationship (PVR). The predicted pressure evolution is thus more realistic when imposing only the machine power of the blowing device (air compressor or vacuum pump). Mechanical and temperature equilibrium equations are fully nonlinear and solved separately with implicit schemes on the current deformed configuration, which is updated at each time step. Biaxial characterization tests were used to determine the model parameters in order to simulate the stretch blow molding process using the pressure-volume thermodynamic relationship. To validate this model, thickness predictions for three industrial cases will be presented and compared to experimental measurements.

  10. Solution blow spinning: parameters optimization and effects on the properties of nanofibers from poly(lactic) acid/dimethyl carbonate solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution blow spinning (SBS) is a process to produce non-woven fiber sheets with high porosity and an extremely large amount of surface area. In this study, a Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) was used to optimize the processing parameters for the production of nanofibers from polymer solutions ...

  11. Insect satiety: Sulfakinin localization and the effect of drosulfakinin on protein and carbohydrate ingestion in the blow fly, Phormia regina (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfakinins, which are satiety factors in invertebrates, have previously been shown to inhibit feeding in the German cockroach and desert locust. This study examines the occurrence of sulfakinin immunoreactivity and the role of sulfakinin as a feeding satiety factor in the black blow fly, Phormia re...

  12. Weak solutions and blow-up for wave equations of p-Laplacian type with supercritical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Pei; Rammaha, Mohammad A.; Toundykov, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates a quasilinear wave equation with Kelvin-Voigt damping, utt - Δpu - Δut = f(u), in a bounded domain Ω ⊂ ℝ3 and subject to Dirichlét boundary conditions. The operator Δp, 2 < p < 3, denotes the classical p-Laplacian. The nonlinear term f(u) is a source feedback that is allowed to have a supercritical exponent, in the sense that the associated Nemytskii operator is not locally Lipschitz from W0 1 , p ( Ω ) into L2(Ω). Under suitable assumptions on the parameters, we prove existence of local weak solutions, which can be extended globally provided the damping term dominates the source in an appropriate sense. Moreover, a blow-up result is proved for solutions with negative initial total energy.

  13. Impact of Blow/Fill/Seal process variables in determining rate of vial contamination by air dispersed microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Leo, Frank; Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Controlled challenges of air dispersed spores of Bacillus subtilis NCIMB 8649 have been generated in a custom-built challenge room housing a Blow/Fill/Seal machine filling filter-sterilized trypticase soy broth into 5.5 cm3 low density polyethylene vials. The effects on the rate of vial contamination of systematic changes in the process variables, rate of provision of ballooning air, delay in the application of mould vacuum and duration of transfer of the open vial, have been examined. Overall, the findings show that the conditions of vial formation can affect appreciably the rate of vial contamination from airborne spores. The indications are that heat lethality, associated with the elevated temperature required for polymer extrusion and vial formation, has a role in determining such contamination. PMID:16316067

  14. Blow Flies from Forest Fragments Embedded in Different Land Uses: Implications for Selecting Indicators in Forensic Entomology.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Mirian S; Pepinelli, Mateus; de Almeida, Eduardo C; Ochoa-Quintero, Jose M; Roque, Fabio O

    2016-01-01

    Given the general expectation that forest loss can alter biodiversity patterns, we hypothesize that blow fly species abundances differ in a gradient of native vegetation cover. This study was conducted in 17 fragments across different landscapes in central Brazil. Different land cover type proportions were used to represent landscape structure. In total, 2334 specimens of nine species of Calliphoridae were collected. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce dimensionality and multicollinearity of the landscape data. The first component explained 70%, and it represented a gradient of forest-pasture land uses. Alien species showed a wide distribution in different fragments with no clear relationship between the abundance values and the scores of PCA axes, whereas native species occurred only in areas with a predominance of forest cover. Our study revealed that certain native species may be sensitive to forest loss at the landscape scale, and they represent a bioindicator in forensic entomology. PMID:26251038

  15. Three-dimensional strutted graphene grown by substrate-free sugar blowing for high-power-density supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebin; Zhang, Yuanjian; Zhi, Chunyi; Wang, Xi; Tang, Daiming; Xu, Yibin; Weng, Qunhong; Jiang, Xiangfen; Mitome, Masanori; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures in the macroworld can in principle maintain all the extraordinary nanoscale properties of individual graphene flakes. However, current 3D graphene products suffer from poor electrical conductivity, low surface area and insufficient mechanical strength/elasticity; the interconnected self-supported reproducible 3D graphenes remain unavailable. Here we report a sugar-blowing approach based on a polymeric predecessor to synthesize a 3D graphene bubble network. The bubble network consists of mono- or few-layered graphitic membranes that are tightly glued, rigidly fixed and spatially scaffolded by micrometre-scale graphitic struts. Such a topological configuration provides intimate structural interconnectivities, freeway for electron/phonon transports, huge accessible surface area, as well as robust mechanical properties. The graphene network thus overcomes the drawbacks of presently available 3D graphene products and opens up a wide horizon for diverse practical usages, for example, high-power high-energy electrochemical capacitors, as highlighted in this work.

  16. USB environment measurements based on full-scale static engine ground tests. [Upper Surface Blowing for YC-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, M. B.; Harkonen, D. L.; Reed, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Flow turning parameters, static pressures, surface temperatures, surface fluctuating pressures and acceleration levels were measured in the environment of a full-scale upper surface blowing (USB) propulsive-lift test configuration. The test components included a flightworthy CF6-50D engine, nacelle and USB flap assembly utilized in conjunction with ground verification testing of the USAF YC-14 Advanced Medium STOL Transport propulsion system. Results, based on a preliminary analysis of the data, generally show reasonable agreement with predicted levels based on model data. However, additional detailed analysis is required to confirm the preliminary evaluation, to help delineate certain discrepancies with model data and to establish a basis for future flight test comparisons.

  17. Blow-up of unsteady two-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions having stagnation-point form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childress, S.; Ierley, G. R.; Spiegel, E. A.; Young, W. R.

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent form of the classic, two-dimensional stagnation-point solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is considered. If the viscosity is zero, a class of solutions of the initial-value problem can be found in closed form using Lagrangian coordinates. These solutions exhibit singular behavior in finite time, because of the infinite domain and unbounded initial vorticity. Thus, the blow-up found by Stuart in three dimensions using the stagnation-point form, also occurs in two. The singularity vanishes under a discrete, finite-dimensional 'point vortex' approximation, but is recovered as the number of vortices tends to infinity. We find that a small positive viscosity does not arrest the breakdown, but does strongly alter its form. Similar results are summarized for certain Boussinesq stratified flows.

  18. Engineering Education for All University First Year Students Using Playing in the Sand and Blowing Soap Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunekawa, Masami; Hiroyoshi, Naoki; Ito, Mayumi; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi

    Hokkaido University holds first year student seminars for promoting student ability in communication, presentation, design, and creativity. The authors have held this seminar to students of all faculties, where the research topics were determined by the students themselves from the phenomena or questions relating to children‧s games such as playing in the sand and blowing soap bubbles. Then, they planned experimental procedures, discussed, summarized, and presented the results with minimal advice from teachers. After the student presentations the teachers introduced the techniques and equipments related to the topics, which are used in industrial plants. The final questionnaire showed that this type of lecture is very effective to promote student motivation and ability.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the thermal field in a turbulent channel flow with spanwise sinusoidal blowing/suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Can; Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano; Leonardi, Stefano

    2012-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of an incompressible turbulent channel flow with given local perturbations at the walls are performed. Steady blowing and suction are applied at both walls by means of five spanwise holes. The sinusoidal perturbing velocity is considered at several amplitudes (0.025, 0.1 and 0.2 based on the centerline velocity) as well as at two different angles (30 and 40 degrees with respect to the flow direction) in order to explore its effects on the adiabatic efficiency. The Reynolds number of the unperturbed case is Re = 394 and the molecular Prandtl number is Pr = 0.71. Isoflux conditions are assumed for the lower and the upper walls. Furthermore, turbulence statistics, energy budgets and energy spectra are going to be examined for the velocity and thermal fields.

  20. In-situ and thin-specimen aging of experimental polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports apparent thermal conductivity (k) values from field and laboratory aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as alternatives to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-14lb. The k-values were determined from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) using techniques that meet ASTM C 114 (Thin Heater Apparatus) and ASTM C 518 (Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). Results on laminate boards with facers provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the ORNL Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The observed laboratory increase in k was between 8% and 11% for a 240 day field exposure in the RTRA. A thin-specimen aging procedure established the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. Thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 24 and 65{degree}C (75{degree}F and 150{degree}F) for up to 300 days. An exponential dependency of k with the quantity (diffusion coefficient X time){sup {1/2}}/ thickness, provide effective diffusion coefficients for air components into the foams and blowing agent out of the foams. The foams blown with alternative blowing agents exhibited k-values 3 to 16% (average 9.4%) above CFC-11 foams under similar conditions. Field exposures were conducted on specimens under single ply EPDM membranes in the RTRA for over 400 days. Hourly averages of panel temperature and heat flux were analyzed to obtain K as a function of mean temperature on a week by week basis. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-14B under a black and under a white membrane is reported. 29 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of an I-box wind tunnel model for assessment of behavioral responses of blow flies.

    PubMed

    Moophayak, Kittikhun; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Sukontason, Kom

    2013-11-01

    The behavioral response of flies to olfactory cues remains the focus of many investigations, and wind tunnels have sometimes been employed for assessment of this variable in the laboratory. In this study, our aim was to design, construct, and operate a new model of I-box wind tunnel with improved efficacy, highlighting the use of a new wind tunnel model to investigate the behavioral response of the medically important blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius). The I-box dual-choice wind tunnel designed for this study consists of seven conjoined compartments that resulted in a linear apparatus with clear glass tunnel of 30 × 30 × 190 cm ended both sides with wooden "fan compartments" which are equipped with adjustable fans as wind source. The clear glass tunnel consisted of two "stimulus compartments" with either presence or absence (control) of bait; two "trap compartments" where flies were attracted and allowed to reside; and one central "release compartment" where flies were introduced. Wind tunnel experiments were carried out in a temperature-controlled room, with a room light as a light source and a room-ventilated fan as odor-remover from tunnel out. Evaluation of testing parameters revealed that the highest attractive index was achieved with the use of 300 g of 1-day tainted pork scrap (pork meat mixed with offal) as bait in wind tunnel settings wind speed of 0.58 m/s, during 1.00-5.00 PM with light intensity of 341.33 lux from vertical light and 135.93 lux from horizontal light for testing a group of 60 flies. In addition, no significant response of well-fed and 24 h staved flies to this bait under these conditions was found. Results of this study supported this new wind tunnel model as a suitable apparatus for investigation of behavioral response of blow flies to bait chemical cues in the laboratory. PMID:23979494

  2. Dissolved methane plume mapping using Membrane Inlet Mass-Spectrometry (MIMS) at a blow out site in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Linke, P.

    2012-04-01

    A blow out site in the North Sea (well 22/4-b, UK EEZ) in a water depth of 83 m, served as a test area to demonstrate MIMS as a powerful tool for the continuous measurement of dissolved methane simultaneously to the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen as well as other gases. A pump-CTD arrangement was used to generate a continuous water stream through a 2.5 cm thick tube to the ship laboratory and was analyzed using a membrane inlet quadrupole mass spectrometer (GAM 200, InProcessInstruments). The pump-CTD was further equipped with calibrated HydroC CH4/CO2 sensors. The MIMS measurements were conducted under fully controlled temperature conditions and were calibrated for CH4, N2, O2, and pCO2. The pump-CTD arrangement was towed along transects across the blow out and dissolved gas concentrations as well as physical water column data were synchronized and geo-referenced. The transects were repeated in three different depth layers, including a bottom layer of ~ 2 m above the sea floor, 60 m above the sea floor just below the thermocline and a third plane in 10 m water depth. During the tows water samples were taken for later onboard methane analysis and cross-calibration with the MIMS and HydroC data. After data selection under consideration of the tidal regime lateral and vertical plume dimensions of dissolved methane were constructed. Dissolved methane concentrations ranged between background and up to about 18µM. Below the thermocline, which represents an effective barrier for the vertical distribution of dissolved methane, methane distinctively spreads laterally. Only at locations were the gas bubble stream and concurrently advected water from below the thermocline reaches the sea surface enhanced methane emission into the atmosphere took place.

  3. Active control of vortex-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder using windward-suction- leeward-blowing actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglei; Tang, Hui; Yu, Simon C. M.; Duan, Fei

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the control of two-dimensional vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) of a single circular cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100 using a novel windward-suction-leeward-blowing (WSLB) concept. A lattice Boltzmann method based numerical framework is adopted for this study. Both open-loop and closed-loop controls are implemented. In the open-loop control, three types of actuation arrangements, including the pure suction on the windward side of the cylinder, the pure blowing on the leeward side, and the general WSLB on both sides, are implemented and compared. It is found that the general WSLB is the most effective, whereas the pure suction is the least effective. In the closed-loop control, the proportional (P), integral (I), and proportional-integral (PI) control schemes are applied to adjust the WSLB velocities according to the flow information obtained from a sensor. The effects of four key control parameters including the proportional gain constant, the integral gain constant, the length of data history used for the feedback, and the location of the sensor are investigated. It is found that the use of only P control fails to completely suppress the VIV, the use of only I control can achieve the complete suppression, and the PI control performs the best in terms of both the control effectiveness and efficiency. In the PI control, there exists an optimal length of data history for the feedback, at which the VIV control is the most efficient. There also exist the minimum required WSLB velocities for the VIV suppression, independent of the control schemes. Moreover, it is found that the VIV control is independent of the sensor location.

  4. Photophysical study of Zn phthalocyanine in binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, A.; Pascu, A.; Boni, M.; Pascu, M. L.; Enescu, M.

    2013-07-01

    Photophysical properties of phthalocyanines are important in photodynamic therapy, where these compounds are proposed as photosensitizing agents. We report here some significant solvent effects on the photophysical properties of Zn phthalocyanine (ZnPc) observed in binary solvent mixture dimethyl sulfoxide/water at several ratios of cosolvents. The absorbance of ZnPc at the maximum of Q band has a sharp drop in intensity for a water mass percent in the solvent mixture larger than 40%. The same characteristic shows also the quantum yield of fluorescence. A particular result is the increase of singlet oxygen lifetime for water percentage raise up to 20% in the solvent mixture. The effects are discussed in connection with the particular solvent microenvironment, involving DMSO/water clusters formation and the strong interaction between the solute and the solvent.

  5. Combined toxicity of heavy metal mixtures in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xialu; Gu, Yuanliang; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Guochuan; Zou, Baobo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2016-09-01

    With rapid industrialization, China is now facing great challenges in heavy metal contamination in the environment. Human exposure to heavy metals through air, water and food commonly involves a mixture consisting of multiple heavy metals. In this study, eight common heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni) that cause environmental contamination were selected to investigate the combined toxicity of different heavy metal mixtures in HL7702 cells. Toxicity (24 h LC50 ) of each individual metal on the cells ranked Hg > Cr = Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni > Mn > Pb; toxicity of the different mixtures ranked: M5 > M3PbHgCd > M5+Mn > M5+Cu > M2CdNi > M4A > M8-Mn > M8 > M5+Zn > M4B > M8-Cr > M8-Zn > M8-Cu > M8-Pb > M8-Cd > M8-Hg > M8-Ni > M3PbHgNi > M3CuZnMn. The cytotoxicity data of individual metals were successfully used to build the additive models of two- to eight-component metal mixtures. The comparison between additive model and combination model or partly additive model was useful to evaluate the combined effects in mixture. Synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of the toxicity were observed in different mixtures. These results suggest that the combined effects should be considered in the risk assessment of heavy metal co-exposure, and more comprehensive investigations on the combined effects of different heavy metal mixtures are needed in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26865462

  6. Spinodal decomposition in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto; Shinnar, Reuel; Triantafyllou, George

    1996-03-01

    We study the early stage of the phase separation of a binary mixture far from its critical point of demixing. Whenever the mixture of two mutually repulsive species is quenched to a temperature below its critical point of miscibility, the effect of the enthalpic repulsive force prevails upon the entropic tendency to mix, so that the system eventually separates itno two coexisting phases. We have developed a highly nonlinear model, in close analogy with the linear theory of Cahn and Hilliard, where a generalized free energy is defined in terms of two parameters ψ and a, the first describing the equilibrium composition of the two phases, ad the second denoting a characteristic length scale that is inversely proportional to the equilibrium surface tension. The linear stability analysis predicts that any perturbation of the initial mixture composition with wave number k smaller than √2ψ /a will grow exponentially in time, with a maximum growth corresponding to kmax= √ψ /a. A numerical solution of the equation shows that nonlinear effects saturate the exponential growth, and that the concentraiton distribution tends to a steady state, peroidic profile with wavelength λ=2πa/ √ψ corresponding to the fastest growing mode of the linear regime. The main result of our theoretical model is that this steady state does not depend on the form of the initial perturbation to the homogeneous composition profile.

  7. A statistical approach to optimizing concrete mixture design.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Alghamdi, Saeid A

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step statistical approach is proposed to obtain optimum proportioning of concrete mixtures using the data obtained through a statistically planned experimental program. The utility of the proposed approach for optimizing the design of concrete mixture is illustrated considering a typical case in which trial mixtures were considered according to a full factorial experiment design involving three factors and their three levels (3(3)). A total of 27 concrete mixtures with three replicates (81 specimens) were considered by varying the levels of key factors affecting compressive strength of concrete, namely, water/cementitious materials ratio (0.38, 0.43, and 0.48), cementitious materials content (350, 375, and 400 kg/m(3)), and fine/total aggregate ratio (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45). The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for compressive strength in terms of the three design factors considered in this study. The developed statistical model was used to show how optimization of concrete mixtures can be carried out with different possible options. PMID:24688405

  8. A Statistical Approach to Optimizing Concrete Mixture Design

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Saeid A.

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step statistical approach is proposed to obtain optimum proportioning of concrete mixtures using the data obtained through a statistically planned experimental program. The utility of the proposed approach for optimizing the design of concrete mixture is illustrated considering a typical case in which trial mixtures were considered according to a full factorial experiment design involving three factors and their three levels (33). A total of 27 concrete mixtures with three replicates (81 specimens) were considered by varying the levels of key factors affecting compressive strength of concrete, namely, water/cementitious materials ratio (0.38, 0.43, and 0.48), cementitious materials content (350, 375, and 400 kg/m3), and fine/total aggregate ratio (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45). The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for compressive strength in terms of the three design factors considered in this study. The developed statistical model was used to show how optimization of concrete mixtures can be carried out with different possible options. PMID:24688405

  9. Small Scale Evaporation Kinetics of a Binary Fluid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdeo, Carl; Ye, Dezhuang; Kalonia, Devendra; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Mechanical Engineering Team; Pharmaceutical Sciences Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Evaporation induces a concentrating effect in liquid mixtures. The transient process has significant influence on the dynamic behaviors of a complex fluid. To simultaneously investigate the fluid properties and small-scale evaporation kinetics during the transient process, the quartz crystal microbalance is applied to a binary mixture droplet of light alcohols including both a single volatile component (a fast evaporation followed by a slow evaporation) and a mixture of two volatile components with comparable evaporation rates. The density and viscosity stratification are evaluated by the shear wave, and the evaporation kinetics is measured by the resonant signature of the acoustic p-wave. The evaporation flux can be precisely determined by the resonant frequency spikes and the complex impedance. To predict the concentration field, the moving interface, and the precision evaporation kinetics of the mixture, a multiphase model is developed to interpret the complex impedance signals based on the underlying mass and momentum transport phenomena. The experimental method and theoretical model are developed for better characterizing and understanding of the drying process involving liquid mixtures of protein pharmaceuticals.

  10. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Blowing Boundary-Layer Control on Leading- and Trailing-Edge Flaps of a Large-Scale, Low-Aspect-Ratio, 45 Swept-wing Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Ralph L.

    1959-01-01

    Blowing boundary-layer control was applied to the leading- and trailing-edge flaps of a 45 deg sweptback-wing complete model in a full-scale low-speed wind-tunnel study. The principal purpose of the study was to determine the effects of leading-edge flap deflection and boundary-layer control on maximum lift and longitudinal stability. Leading-edge flap deflection alone was sufficient to maintain static longitudinal stability without trailing-edge flaps. However, leading-edge flap blowing was required to maintain longitudinal stability by delaying leading-edge flow separation when trailing-edge flaps were deflected either with or without blowing. Partial-span leading-edge flaps deflected 60 deg with moderate blowing gave the major increase in maximum lift, although higher deflection and additional blowing gave some further increase. Inboard of 0.4 semispan leading-edge flap deflection could be reduced to 40 deg and/or blowing could be omitted with only small loss in maximum lift. Trailing-edge flap lift increments were increased by boundary-layer control for deflections greater than 45 deg. Maximum lift was not increased with deflected trailing-edge flaps with blowing.

  11. Physiological modeling and extrapolation of pharmacokinetic interactions from binary to more complex chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Kannan; Haddad, Sami; Béliveau, Martin; Tardif, Robert

    2002-12-01

    The available data on binary interactions are yet to be considered within the context of mixture risk assessment because of our inability to predict the effect of a third or a fourth chemical in the mixture on the interacting binary pairs. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models represent a potentially useful framework for predicting the consequences of interactions in mixtures of increasing complexity. This article highlights the conceptual basis and validity of PBPK models for extrapolating the occurrence and magnitude of interactions from binary to more complex chemical mixtures. The methodology involves the development of PBPK models for all mixture components and interconnecting them at the level of the tissue where the interaction is occurring. Once all component models are interconnected at the binary level, the PBPK framework simulates the kinetics of all mixture components, accounting for the interactions occurring at various levels in more complex mixtures. This aspect was validated by comparing the simulations of a binary interaction-based PBPK model with experimental data on the inhalation kinetics of m-xylene, toluene, ethyl benzene, dichloromethane, and benzene in mixtures of varying composition and complexity. The ability to predict the kinetics of chemicals in complex mixtures by accounting for binary interactions alone within a PBPK model is a significant step toward the development of interaction-based risk assessment for chemical mixtures. PMID:12634130

  12. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  13. Uncertainty in Mixtures and Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans and environmental species are rarely exposed to single chemicals. These chemicals typically affect multiple tissues through multiple modes of action, which may depend on the dose. Mixtures risk assessment may employ dose response information from the mixture of interest,...

  14. CLUSTERING CRITERIA AND MULTIVARIATE NORMAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New clustering criteria for use when a mixture of multivariate normal distributions is an appropriate model are presented. They are derived from maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches corresponding to different assumptions about the covariance matrices of the mixture componen...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a...

  20. Investigations of reversible thermochromic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Douglas C.

    Three-component organic thermochromic systems have potential applications in reversible, rewritable thermal printing. In principle, such mixtures could maintain a coloured or non-coloured state at ambient temperature depending on their thermal treatment. These systems generally consist of a functional dye (1--3 mol%), a weakly acidic colour developer (5--25 mol%), and a high-melting organic solvent (75--90 mol%). Colour development occurs at the fusion temperature of the mixture, which triggers the interaction of the dye and developer. Slow cooling of the melt results in an equilibrium state with low colour density, whereas rapid cooling of the melt results in a metastable state with high colour density. The metastable state can be decoloured by heating to an intermediate decolourisation temperature at which the coloured state becomes unstable. Barriers to the widespread use of reversible, rewritable thermochromic materials include problems with colour contrast, colour stability, and decolourisation rates. Development is hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the interactions between components in these systems. In this study the developer-dye and developer-solvent interactions were examined for an archetypal dye/developer/solvent thermochromic system. Vibrational spectroscopy, NMR, and thermal analysis were used to examine compounds formed in developer/dye and developer/solvent binary mixtures. Rewritable thermochromic properties such as metastable colour density, equilibrium colour density, and decolourisation rates were examined and discussed in terms of the thermodynamics of the developer/dye and developer/solvent interactions. Observed thermochromic properties are shown to be strongly correlated to a competition between the dye and the solvent for interaction with the developer. Increasing the attractive interaction between the solvent and developer results in enhanced rewritable thermochromic properties.

  1. Mixture Models for Dependent Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric mixture models appropriate for data presented in homogeneous blocks of varying sizes from several unidentified source populations are considered. For most applications, the data elements within each block are dependent. Models are proposed for multivariate normal data incorporating two types of dependence, exchangeability of elements within blocks, and a Markov structure for blocks. The consequences of assuming exchangeability, when in fact the Markov structure holds, are explored. Computational problems for each model are considered, and results of a simple test of the exchangeability hypothesis for LANDSAT data are presented.

  2. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  3. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  4. Exploring the Fate of Nitrogen Heterocycles in Complex Prebiotic Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    A long standing question in the field of prebiotic chemistry is the origin of the genetic macromolecules DNA and RNA. DNA and RNA have very complex structures with repeating subunits of nucleotides, which are composed of nucleobases (nitrogen heterocycles) connected to sugar-phosphate. Due to the instability of some nucleobases (e.g. cytosine), difficulty of synthesis and instability of D-ribose, and the likely scarcity of polyphosphates necessary for the modern nucleotides, alternative nucleotides have been proposed for constructing the first genetic material. Thus, we have begun to investigate the chemistry of nitrogen heterocycles in plausible, complex prebiotic mixtures in an effort to identify robust reactions and potential alternative nucleotides. We have taken a complex prebiotic mixture produced by a spark discharge acting on a gas mixture of N2, CO2, CH4, and H2, and reacted it with four nitrogen heterocycles: uracil, 5-hydroxymethyluracil, guanine, and isoxanthopterin (2-amino-4,7-dihydroxypteridine). The products of the reaction between the spark mixture and each nitrogen heterocycle were characterized by liquid chromatography coupled to UV spectroscopy and Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We found that the reaction between the spark mixtUl'e and isoxanthopterin formed one major product, which was a cyanide adduct. 5-hydroxymethyluracil also reacted with the spark mixture to form a cyanide adduct, uracil-5-acetonitrile, which has been synthesized previously by reacting HCN with S-hydroxymethyluracil. Unlike isoxanthopterin, the chromatogram of the 5-hydroxymethyluracil reaction was much more complex with multiple products including spark-modified dimers. Additionally, we observed that HMU readily self-polymerizes in solution to a variety of oligomers consistent with those suggested by Cleaves. Guanine and uracil, the biological nucleobases, did not react with the spark mixture, even at high temperature (100 C). This suggests that there are alternative

  5. Linear Inviscid Damping for Monotone Shear Flows in a Finite Periodic Channel, Boundary Effects, Blow-up and Critical Sobolev Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillinger, Christian

    2016-09-01

    In a previous article (Zillinger, Linear inviscid damping for monotone shear flows, 2014), we have established linear inviscid damping for a large class of monotone shear flows in a finite periodic channel and have further shown that boundary effects asymptotically lead to the formation of singularities of derivatives of the solution as {t → infty}. As the main results of this article, we provide a detailed description of the singularity formation and establish stability in all sub-critical fractional Sobolev spaces and blow-up in all super-critical spaces. Furthermore, we discuss the implications of the blow-up to the problem of nonlinear inviscid damping in a finite periodic channel, where high regularity would be essential to control nonlinear effects.

  6. Keys to the blow flies of Taiwan, with a checklist of recorded species and the description of a new species of Paradichosia Senior-White (Diptera, Calliphoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Tsai; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Shiao, Shiuh-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) show a great diversity in behavior and ecology, play important roles in ecosystems, and have medical and forensic importance to humans. Despite this, the taxonomy and classification of Taiwan's Calliphoridae have rarely been studied. In this study, specimens of Taiwanese calliphorids were collected and carefully studied, and all 76 species recorded in Taiwan are listed following the identification keys. Dichotomous keys to all subfamilies, tribes, genera, and species of blow flies recorded in Taiwan are provided, including 16 species that are newly recorded from Taiwan. In addition, one new species of the genus Paradichosia Senior-White is described and illustrated. We also discuss the morphological differences between the specimens of Silbomyia hoeneana Enderlein collected from China and Taiwan, a species that has only been found previously in Southern China. PMID:25152681

  7. Linear Inviscid Damping for Monotone Shear Flows in a Finite Periodic Channel, Boundary Effects, Blow-up and Critical Sobolev Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillinger, Christian

    2016-03-01

    In a previous article (Zillinger, Linear inviscid damping for monotone shear flows, 2014), we have established linear inviscid damping for a large class of monotone shear flows in a finite periodic channel and have further shown that boundary effects asymptotically lead to the formation of singularities of derivatives of the solution as {t → &infty}; . As the main results of this article, we provide a detailed description of the singularity formation and establish stability in all sub-critical fractional Sobolev spaces and blow-up in all super-critical spaces. Furthermore, we discuss the implications of the blow-up to the problem of nonlinear inviscid damping in a finite periodic channel, where high regularity would be essential to control nonlinear effects.

  8. Blow-up rate of the unique solution for a class of one-dimensional problems on the half-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Mi, Ling; Yin, Xiugui

    2008-12-01

    For more general nonlinear term g, the paper shows the exact blow-up rate of the unique solution [psi](t) to the singular boundary value problem where b[set membership, variant]C1(0,[infinity]), which is positive and non-decreasing on (0,[infinity]) (may vanish at zero). Our results are obtained in a more general setting to those in [S. Cano-Casanova, J. López-Gómez, Existence, uniqueness and blow-up rate of large solutions for a canonical class of one-dimensional problems on the half-line, J. Differential Equations 244 (12) (2008) 3180-3203], where g(u)[congruent with]up (p>1) for sufficiently large u.

  9. Just noticeable differences in component concentrations modify the odor quality of a blending mixture.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, E; Béno, N; Ishii, A; Chabanet, C; Etiévant, P; Thomas-Danguin, T

    2008-04-01

    The odors we perceive are mainly the result of mixtures of odorants that, however, are commonly perceived as single undivided entities; nevertheless, the processes involved remain poorly explored. It has been recently reported that perceptual blending based on configural olfactory processing can cause odorant mixtures to give rise to an emergent odor not present in the components. The present study examined whether specific component proportions are required to elicit an emergent odor. Starting from the composition of a ternary target mixture in which an emergent pineapple odor was perceived, 4 concentration levels of each component were chosen to elicit just noticeable differences (JNDs). Each combination of levels was used to design sample mixtures. Fifteen subjects evaluated the intensity, typicality, and pleasantness of each sample mixture against the target mixture in a paired-comparison protocol. Statistical modeling showed that a variation of less than 1 JND in one of the components was sufficient to induce a significant decrease in pineapple odor typicality in the ternary mixture. This finding confirms previous findings on perceptual blending in simple odorant mixtures and underscores the human ability to discriminate between odor percepts induced by mixtures including very similar odorant proportions. PMID:18304991

  10. Perceptual blending in odor mixtures depends on the nature of odorants and human olfactory expertise.

    PubMed

    Barkat, S; Le Berre, E; Coureaud, G; Sicard, G; Thomas-Danguin, T

    2012-02-01

    Our olfactory system is confronted with complex mixtures of odorants, often recognized as single entities due to odor blending (e.g., coffee). In contrast, we are also able to discriminate odors from complex mixtures (e.g., off-odors). Therefore, the olfactory system is able to engage either configural or elemental processes when confronted with mixtures. However, the rules that govern the involvement of these processes during odor perception remain poorly understood. In our first experiment, we examined whether simple odorant mixtures (binary/ternary) could elicit configural perception. Twenty untrained subjects were asked to evaluate the odor typicality of mixtures and their constituents. The results revealed a significant increase in odor typicality in some but not all mixtures as compared with the single components, which suggest that perceptual odor blending can occur only in specific mixtures (configural processing). In our second experiment, we tested the hypothesis that general olfactory expertise can improve elemental perception of mixtures. Thirty-two trained subjects evaluated the odor typicality of the stimuli presented during the first experiment, and their responses were compared with those obtained from the untrained panelists. The results support the idea that general training with odors increases the elemental perception of binary and ternary blending mixtures. PMID:21873604

  11. A peculiar blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall complicated by extensive subcutaneous emphysema: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rzymska-Grala, Iwona; Palczewski, Piotr; Błaż, Marcin; Zmorzyński, Michał; Gołębiowski, Marek; Wanyura, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Blow-out fracture of the orbit is a common injury. However, not many cases are associated with massive subcutaneous emphysema. Even fewer cases are caused by minor trauma or are associated with barotrauma to the orbit due to sneezing, coughing, or vomiting. The authors present a case of blow-out fracture complicated by extensive subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema that occurred without any obvious traumatic event. Case Report: A 43-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with a painful right-sided exophthalmos that he had noticed in the morning immediately after waking up. The patient also complained of diplopia. Physical examination revealed exophthalmos and crepitations suggestive of subcutaneous emphysema. The eye movements, especially upward gaze, were impaired. CT showed blow-out fracture of the inferior orbital wall with a herniation of the orbital soft tissues into the maxillary sinus. There was an extensive subcutaneous emphysema in the head and neck going down to the mediastinum. The patient did not remember any significant trauma to the head that could explain the above mentioned findings. At surgery, an inferior orbital wall fracture with a bony defect of 3×2 centimeter was found and repaired. Conclusions: Blow-out fractures of the orbit are usually a result of a direct trauma caused by an object with a diameter exceeding the bony margins of the orbit. In 50% of cases, they are complicated by orbital emphysema and in 4% of cases by herniation of orbital soft tissues into paranasal sinuses. The occurrence of orbital emphysema without trauma is unusual. In some cases it seems to be related to barotrauma due to a rapid increase in pressure in the upper airways during sneezing, coughing, or vomiting, which very rarely leads to orbital wall fracture. Computed tomography is the most accurate method in detecting and assessing the extent of orbital wall fractures. PMID:22844312

  12. Injection of new psychoactive substance snow blow associated with recently acquired HIV infections among homeless people who inject drugs in Dublin, Ireland, 2015.

    PubMed

    Giese, Coralie; Igoe, Derval; Gibbons, Zorina; Hurley, Caroline; Stokes, Siobhan; McNamara, Sinead; Ennis, Orla; O'Donnell, Kate; Keenan, Eamon; De Gascun, Cillian; Lyons, Fiona; Ward, Mary; Danis, Kostas; Glynn, Ronan; Waters, Allison; Fitzgerald, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, an outbreak of recently acquired HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) was identified in Dublin, following similar outbreaks in Greece and Romania in 2011. We compared drug and risk behaviours among 15 HIV cases and 39 controls. Injecting a synthetic cathinone, snow blow, was associated with recent HIV infection (AOR: 49; p=0.003). Prevention and control efforts are underway among PWID in Dublin, but may also be needed elsewhere in Europe. PMID:26537764

  13. On the blow-up criterion of strong solutions for the MHD equations with the Hall and ion-slip effects in R3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gala, Sadek; Ragusa, Maria Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we establish a blow-up criterion of strong solutions to the 3D incompressible magnetohydrodynamics equations including two nonlinear extra terms: the Hall term (quadratic with respect to the magnetic field) and the ion-slip term (cubic with respect to the magnetic field). This is an improvement of the recent results given by Fan et al. (Z Angew Math Phys, 2015).

  14. L-Type Calcium Channels Do Not Play a Critical Role in Chest Blow Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Commotio Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Madias, Christopher; Garlitski, Ann C.; Kalin, John; Link, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In a commotio cordis swine model, ventricular fibrillation (VF) can be induced by a ball blow to the chest believed secondary to activation of mechanosensitive ion channels. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether stretch induced activation of the L-type calcium channel may cause intracellular calcium overload and underlie the VF in commotio cordis. Method and Results. Anesthetized juvenile swine received 6 chest wall strikes with a 17.9 m/s lacrosse ball timed to the vulnerable period for VF induction. Animals were randomized to IV verapamil (n = 6) or placebo (n = 6). There was no difference in the observed frequency of VF between verapamil (19/26: 73%) and placebo (20/36: 56%) treated animals (p = 0.16). There was also no significant difference in the combined endpoint of VF or nonsustained VF (21/26: 81% in verapamil versus 24/36: 67% in controls, p = 0.22). Conclusions. In this experimental model of commotio cordis, verapamil did not prevent VF induction. Thus, in commotio cordis it is unlikely that stretch activation of the L-type calcium channel with resultant intracellular calcium overload plays a prominent role. PMID:26925288

  15. An experimental setup to study the expansion dynamics of laser blow-off plasma plume in variable transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajai; Chaudhari, Vishnu; Patel, Kiran; George, Sony; Sunil, S.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, Ranjeet

    2009-03-01

    In the present work we report generation of uniform and variable pulsed magnetic field in synchronization with pulsed plasma for the study of the expansion dynamics of laser blow-off (LBO) plasma plume. The experimental procedure for optimizing various parameters of the setup, e.g., the production of pulsed field and its synchronization with pulsed plasma and diagnostics system, is also reported. Until now the effect of magnetic field was studied using fixed field. The present setup, however, provides variable and uniform field in synchronization with the setup. A low cost time sequencing control module has been developed for the above purpose. Although the main emphasis is on the technical aspect of the setup, salient features of the effect of transverse magnetic field on the evolution features of the neutral and ionic species are also reported briefly. It is observed that LBO generated plume have a stronger correlation with the magnetic field in comparison to the conventional laser produced plasma experiments as reported earlier.

  16. IL-1α induces CD11b(low) alveolar macrophage proliferation and maturation during granuloma formation.

    PubMed

    Huaux, François; Lo Re, Sandra; Giordano, Giulia; Uwambayinema, Francine; Devosse, Raynal; Yakoub, Yousof; Panin, Nadtha; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Rabolli, Virginie; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Dauguet, Nicolas; Couillin, Isabelle; Ryffel, Bernhard; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lison, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages play a central role in immune and tissue responses of granulomatous lung diseases induced by pathogens and foreign bodies. Circulating monocytes are generally viewed as central precursors of these tissue effector macrophages. Here, we provide evidence that granulomas derive from alveolar macrophages serving as a local reservoir for the expansion of activated phagocytic macrophages. By exploring lung granulomatous responses to silica particles in IL-1-deficient mice, we found that the absence of IL-1α, but not IL-1β, was associated with reduced CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophage accumulation and fewer granulomas. This defect was associated with impaired alveolar clearance and resulted in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Reconstitution of IL-1α(-/-) mice with recombinant IL-1α restored lung clearance functions and the pulmonary accumulation of CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophages. Mechanistically, IL-1α induced the proliferation of CD11b(low) alveolar macrophages and differentiated these cells into CD11b(high) macrophages which perform critical phagocytic functions and organize granuloma. We newly discovered here that IL-1α triggers lung responses requiring macrophage proliferation and maturation from tissue-resident macrophages. PMID:25421226

  17. Alimentary Canal of the Adult Blow Fly, Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae)-Part I: Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Boonsriwong, Worachote; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Chaisri, Urai; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Sukontason, Kom

    2012-01-01

    The salivary gland ultrastructure of the adult male blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), was investigated at the ultrastructural level using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The salivary glands are paired structures composed of a single median deferent duct bifurcated into two long, narrow efferent ducts connected to the coiled tubular glands. The SEM image of the gland surface revealed that the basal lamina is relatively smooth in general, but the whole surface appeared as a trace of rough swollen insertion by intense tracheal ramification. Ultrastructurally, the salivary gland is enclosed within the basal lamina, and interdigitation cytoplasmic extensions were apparent between the adjacent gland cells. The basement membrane appeared infoldings that is similar to the complex of the labyrinth channel. The cytoplasm characteristic of the gland revealed high activity, based on the abundance of noticeable secretory granules, either singly or in an aggregated reservoir. In addition, mitochondria were found to intersperse among rich parallel of arrays rough endoplasmic reticulum. Thick cuticle, which was well-delineated and electron dense, apically lined the gland compartments, with discontinuity of the double-layer cuticle revealing a trace of secretion discharged into the lumen. Gross anatomy of the adult salivary gland was markedly different from that of the third instar of the same species, and structural dissimilarity is discussed briefly. PMID:22666549

  18. A melamine-assisted chemical blowing synthesis of N-doped activated carbon sheets for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiliang; Xuan, Huaqing; Lin, Gaoxin; Wang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Dong, Xiaoping

    2016-07-01

    N-doped activated carbon sheets (NACS) have been successfully synthesized using glucose as carbon source via melamine-assisted chemical blowing and sequent KOH-activation method. The obtained carbon material possesses a sheet-like morphology with ultrathin thickness, hierarchical micro/mesoporous structure, high specific surface area (up to 1997.5 m2 g-1) and high pore volume (0.94 cm3 g-1). Besides, NACS material with a nitrogen content of 3.06 wt% presents a maximum specific capacitance of 312 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte due to the cocontribution of double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. It also displays good rate performance (246 F g-1 at 30 A g-1) and cycle stability (∼91.3% retention after 4000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles). The assembled NACS-based symmetric capacitor exhibits a maximum energy density of 20.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 448 W kg-1 within a voltage range of 0-1.8 V in 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the unique porous sheet structure and nitrogen-doping characteristic endue the electrode material a potential application for high-performance supercapacitors.

  19. Alimentary Canal of the Adult Blow Fly, Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae)—Part I: Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Boonsriwong, Worachote; Sukontason, Kabkaew L.; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Chaisri, Urai; Vogtsberger, Roy C.; Sukontason, Kom

    2012-01-01

    The salivary gland ultrastructure of the adult male blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), was investigated at the ultrastructural level using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The salivary glands are paired structures composed of a single median deferent duct bifurcated into two long, narrow efferent ducts connected to the coiled tubular glands. The SEM image of the gland surface revealed that the basal lamina is relatively smooth in general, but the whole surface appeared as a trace of rough swollen insertion by intense tracheal ramification. Ultrastructurally, the salivary gland is enclosed within the basal lamina, and interdigitation cytoplasmic extensions were apparent between the adjacent gland cells. The basement membrane appeared infoldings that is similar to the complex of the labyrinth channel. The cytoplasm characteristic of the gland revealed high activity, based on the abundance of noticeable secretory granules, either singly or in an aggregated reservoir. In addition, mitochondria were found to intersperse among rich parallel of arrays rough endoplasmic reticulum. Thick cuticle, which was well-delineated and electron dense, apically lined the gland compartments, with discontinuity of the double-layer cuticle revealing a trace of secretion discharged into the lumen. Gross anatomy of the adult salivary gland was markedly different from that of the third instar of the same species, and structural dissimilarity is discussed briefly. PMID:22666549

  20. Observation of Oxide Formation for Molten Fe-Cr-C Alloy at a High Carbon Region by Oxygen Top Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Ryosuke; Gao, Xu; Kaneko, Shigeru; Kim, Sunjoong; Ueda, Shigeru; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Seok, Min Oh; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-04-01

    The oxide formation behavior during decarburization by top blowing for molten Fe-Cr-C alloy was directly observed. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1673 K to 1723 K (1400 °C to 1450 °C), as well as for 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1623 K to 1673 K (1350 °C to 1400 °C), oxide particles always formed within several minutes after decarburization started. Also, unstable oxide film followed by stable oxide film formed after C content was decreased to certain levels. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1773 K (1500 °C) and 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), only the oxide particle and stable oxide film were observed. For 18 mass pct Cr-5 mass pct C alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), stable oxide film formed twice. By comparing the critical C and Cr contents of alloy when oxides started to form with the equilibrium relation, the formation of the oxide particle and unstable oxide film was found to be under a nonequilibrium condition, whereas the stable oxide film that formed was near an equilibrium condition. For 11 and 14 mass pct Cr alloy, the decarburization rate stayed constant and was not affected by the formation of the oxide particle or unstable oxide film, but it started to decrease after the formation of the stable oxide film.