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Sample records for mm borax ph

  1. Influence of adding borax and modifying pH on effectiveness of food attractants for melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Duyck, P F; Rousse, P; Ryckewaert, P; Fabre, F; Quilici, S

    2004-06-01

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most damaging pest of cucurbits in Reunion Island. The influence of adding borax and modifying pH on the effectiveness of different food attractants for both sexes of the melon fly is analyzed by a release-recapture method in field cages. Adding borax to protein hydrolysates Nulure and Buminal strongly reduced their attractiveness for B. cucurbitae. Acidification of 5% Buminal solution (from pH 6 to pH 3) doubled its attractiveness for melon fly. Conversely, Torula yeast at pH 10.5 was significantly more attractive than the standard Torula yeast at pH 9 (28% of captured flies compared with 17%). However, a further pH increase of the yeast solution does not improve its attractiveness. The results are discussed in relation to other studies on pH modification of various baits for Tephritidae. PMID:15279302

  2. Desulphurization of coal using borax

    SciTech Connect

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this study, a high sulphur Turkish lignite was mixed with various amounts of solid borax [Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}10H{sub 2}O] and then these mixtures were subjected to various oxydesulphurization processes. Effects of amount of borax, temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on sulphur removal and coal recovery were investigated in the ranges of 0.625--15.000 g for 5 g lignite, 423--498 K, 0.0--1.5 MPa, respectively.

  3. [Infrared spectral analysis for calcined borax].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Ren, Li-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Bo-Tao

    2011-08-01

    To valuate the quality of calcined borax which is sold in the market, 18 samples of calcined borax were studied using the Fourier transform infrared, and samples with different water content were selected and analyzed. Then, the results of analysis were used to evaluate the quality of calcined borax. Results show that the infrared spectra of calcined borax include OH vibration, BO3(-3) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration absorption bands. The position and width of OH vibration absorption band depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, the wider the absorption band. The number of BO3(3-) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration bands also depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, and the stronger the hydrogen bond and the lower the symmetry of B atoms, the more the number of infrared absorption peaks. It was concluded that because the quality of calcined borax has direct correlation with water content, the infrared spectroscopy is an express and objective approach to quality analysis and evaluation of calcined borax. PMID:22007396

  4. 40 CFR 415.270 - Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... borax production subcategory. 415.270 Section 415.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Borax Production Subcategory § 415.270 Applicability; description of the borax production... borax by the ore-mining process and by the Trona process....

  5. Assessment of boric acid and borax using the IEHR evaluative process for assessing human developmental and reproductive toxicity of agents

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    This document presents an evaluation of the reproductive and developmental effects of boric acid, H3BO3 (CAS Registry No. 10043-35-3) and disodium tetraborate decahydrate or borax, Na2B4O2O(CAS Registry No. 1303-96-4). The element, boron, does not exist naturally. In dilute aqueous solution and at physiological pH (7.4), the predominant species in undissociated boric acid (greater than 98%), irrespective of whether the initial material was boric acid of borax. Therefore, it is both useful and correct to compare exposures and dosages to boric acid and borax in terms of `boron equivalents`, since both materials form equivalent species in dilute aqueous solution with similar systemic effects. In order to be clear in this document, the term `boron` will refer to `boron equivalents` or percent boron in boric acid and borax.

  6. Dry borax applicator operator's manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Karsky, Richard, J.

    1999-01-01

    Annosum root rot affects conifers throughout the Northern Hemisphere, infecting their roots and eventually killing the trees. The fungus Heterobasidion annosum causes annosum root rot. The fungus colonizes readily on freshly cut stumps. Partially cut stands have a high risk of infestation because the fungus can colonize on each of the stumps and potentially infect the neighboring trees. Wind and rain carry the annosum spores. Spores that land on freshly cut stumps grow down the stump's root system where they can infect living trees through root grafts or root contacts. Once annosum becomes established, it can remain active for many years in the Southern United States and for several decades in the north. About 7% of the trees that become infected die. When thinning, stumps can be treated successfully using a competing fungus, Phlebia gigantea, and with ''Tim-Bor'' in liquid formulations. These liquid products are no longer approved in the United States. Only the dry powder form is registered and approved by the EPA. Stumps can be treated with a dry formula of borax, (Sporax), significantly reducing one of the primary routes by which Heterobasidion annosum infects a stand of trees. Sporax is used by the USDA Forest Service to control annosum root rot. Sporax is now applied by hand, but once the felled trees are skidded it becomes very hard to locate the stumps. A stump applicator will reduce error, labor costs, and hazards to workers.

  7. Crystallization kinetics of the borax decahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyhan, A. A.; Sahin, Ö.; Bulutcu, A. N.

    2007-03-01

    The growth and dissolution rates of borax decahydrate have been measured as a function of supersaturation for various particle sizes at different temperature ranges of 13 and 50 °C in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed crystallizer. The values of mass transfer coefficient, K, reaction rate constant, kr and reaction rate order, r were determined. The relative importances of diffusion and integration resistance were described by new terms named integration and diffusion concentration fraction. It was found that the overall growth rate of borax decahydrate is mainly controlled by integration (reaction) steps. It was also estimated that the dissolution region of borax decahydrate, apart from other materials, is controlled by diffusion and surface reaction. Increasing the temperature and particle size cause an increase in the values of kinetic parameters ( Kg, kr and K). The activation energies of overall, reaction and mass transfer steps were determined as 18.07, 18.79 and 8.26 kJmol -1, respectively.

  8. 40 CFR 436.130 - Applicability; description of the borax subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... borax subcategory. 436.130 Section 436.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Borax Subcategory § 436.130 Applicability; description of the borax subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of borate minerals. Borax obtained from brine lakes is...

  9. 40 CFR 436.130 - Applicability; description of the borax subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... borax subcategory. 436.130 Section 436.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Borax Subcategory § 436.130 Applicability; description of the borax subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of borate minerals. Borax obtained from brine lakes is...

  10. 40 CFR 436.130 - Applicability; description of the borax subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... borax subcategory. 436.130 Section 436.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Borax Subcategory § 436.130 Applicability; description of the borax subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of borate minerals. Borax obtained from brine lakes is...

  11. Intracrystalline site preference of hydrogen isotopes in borax

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhananga, T.M.; Matsuo, S.

    1985-01-03

    The total hydrogen involved in borax synthesized at 25/sup 0/C in aqueous solution is enriched in deuterium by 5.3% compared with the mother liquor. There is no change in the value of the D/H fractionation factor between the hydrogen in borax and those in the mother liquor with changes in the degree of supersaturation. The fractionation factor changes slightly with a change in the crystallization temperature of borax in the range from 5 to 25/sup 0/C. The D/H ratio in the different sites of borax was estimated by a fractional dehydration technique. The results show that hydrogen atoms of the polyanionic group (B/sub 4/O/sub 5/(OH)/sub 4/) are much more enriched in deuterium than those of the cationic group (Na/sub 2/ x 8H/sub 2/O). The delta D values, referred to the mother liquor from which the borax was crystallized, for the cationic group (site A) and the polyanionic group (site B) are -35 +/- 3 and 167 +/- 13%, respectively based on the fractional dehydration results obtained at -21/sup 0/C. At -21/sup 0/C, isotopic exchange between different sites during dehydration is assumed not to occur. The mechanism for dehydration of borax is discussed. 48 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Borax spends $30M for cogeneration system. [US Borax and Chemical Corp

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.

    1982-09-20

    A $30 million natural-gas-fired turbine power plant will provide all the electricity and steam needed at the US Borax and Chemical Corp. plant in Los Angeles. The cogeneration facility will come on line in 1984, and will pay for itself in about five years. The plant will use only half the 46 megawatts produced, the 22 megawatt surplus being sold to Southern California Edison Co. on a 20-year contract at a price pegged to the utility's avoided costs. Natural gas consumption at the plant will remain about the same. (DCK)

  13. 40 CFR 415.270 - Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the borax... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Production Subcategory § 415.270 Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory....

  14. 40 CFR 415.270 - Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the borax... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Production Subcategory § 415.270 Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory....

  15. 40 CFR 415.270 - Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the borax... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Production Subcategory § 415.270 Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory....

  16. 40 CFR 415.270 - Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the borax... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Production Subcategory § 415.270 Applicability; description of the borax production subcategory....

  17. 40 CFR 436.130 - Applicability; description of the borax subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... borax subcategory. 436.130 Section 436.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Subcategory § 436.130 Applicability; description of the borax subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  18. 40 CFR 436.130 - Applicability; description of the borax subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... borax subcategory. 436.130 Section 436.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Subcategory § 436.130 Applicability; description of the borax subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  19. Beneficiation of borax by reverse flotation in boron saturated brine.

    PubMed

    Cafer Cilek, Emin; Uresin, Hasan

    2005-10-15

    Flotation is one of the plausible methods for recovering borax fines discharged as fine waste to the tailings dam in the Kirka borax processing plant. A literature review dealing with the flotation behavior of boron minerals reveals that clay minerals in the boron ores coat boron minerals and thus deteriorate the quality of boron concentrates produced by direct flotation. The main objective of this study is therefore to recover borax fines from the tailings of the concentrator by reverse flotation. A three-level-factor experimental design was used to determine the main and interaction effects of variables selected on the metallurgical performance of reverse flotation. An analysis of variance for experimental results indicates that interaction effects of the variables for concentrate quality and recovery of B2O3 is nonsignificant and the most important variable for grade of concentrate and recovery is the collector dosage. It is shown that a concentrate assaying 11.25% B2O3 with 89.90% B2O3 recovery could be produced by means of single-stage (rougher) reverse flotation. Additionally, in order to produce a sufficient-quality concentrate, a multistage reverse flotation scheme involving rougher, scavenger, and two cleaners was devised. A final concentrate containing 23.47% B2O3 with 81.78% B2O3 recovery was obtained from these tests. The reverse flotation method can be thus considered as an important option for the beneficiation of borax fines. PMID:15939429

  20. Borax-Loaded PLLA for Promotion of Myogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rico, Patricia; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Boron is an essential metalloid, which plays a key role in plant and animal metabolisms. It has been reported that boron is involved in bone mineralization, has some uses in synthetic chemistry, and its potential has been only recently exploited in medicinal chemistry. However, in the area of tissue engineering, the use of boron is limited to works involving certain bioactive glasses. In this study, we engineer poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) substrates with sustained release of boron. Then, we analyze for the first time the uniqueness effects of boron in cell differentiation using murine C2C12 myoblasts and discuss a potential mechanism of action in cooperation with Ca(2+). Our results demonstrate that borax-loaded materials strongly enhance myotube formation at initial steps of myogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) plays an essential role in combination with borax as chelating or blocking Ca(2+) entry into the cell leads to a detrimental effect on myoblast differentiation observed on borax-loaded materials. This research identifies borax-loaded materials to trigger differentiation mechanisms and it establishes a new tool to engineer microenvironments with applications in regenerative medicine for muscular diseases. PMID:26239605

  1. A new Tertiary borax deposit in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, R. N.; Helvac?, C.; Sureda, R. J.; Viramonte, J. G.

    1988-10-01

    The Loma Blanca borate deposit was formed in the muds of playa-lake environments during the Late Miocene and is the fourth Tertiary commercial borax deposit discovered within the borate districts of the world. It is the only South American deposit known to contain any of the minerals colemanite, inyoite, ulexite, borax, tincalconite and teruggite with a unique and characteristic mineral sequence among the other Argentinian borate deposits. The Loma Blanca deposit is characterized by abundant Ca, Na and B, very low Cl and relatively high As, S and Mg concentrations compared with other borate deposits. Thermal springs and hydrothermal solutions associated with local volcanic activity are thought to be the source of the borates. The early colemanite, inyoite, ulexite, borax and teruggite nodules and crystals appear to have been formed directly from brines penecontemporaneously within the unconsolidated sediments, and they continued to grow as the sediments were compacted. Later generations of borate minerals occur in vughs, veins and as thin layers. Diagenetic alterations include the partial replacement of borax by ulexite and tincalconite; when weathered, borates are often almost completely replaced by calcite.

  2. Dynamics of pH modification of an acidic protein bait used for tropical fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Heath, Robert R; Vazquez, Aime; Schnell, Elena Q; Villareal, Janett; Kendra, Paul E; Epsky, Nancy D

    2009-12-01

    Several species of Anastrepha and Bactrocera fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are captured in traps baited with the protein bait NuLure combined with borax (sodium tetraborate decahydrate) in an aqueous solution, typically 9% NuLure (vol:vol) with 3% borax (wt:vol). NuLure is an acid hydrolysate of corn and has an acidic pH. Addition of borax makes the solution more alkaline, and increase in alkalinity results in increase of ammonia release from the bait solution. This is a very dynamic system, with resultant pH affected by factors such as the amount of borax added, the pH of the water used for preparation, the age of the bait solution, and the development of microbial growth. Problems with borax include amount needed to increase alkalinity of NuLure solutions, which creates difficulties in disposing of spent bait in fruit fly trapping programs. Therefore, research was conducted to evaluate NaOH as an alternative method to increase alkalinity of NuLure solutions. Laboratory experiments compared effect of NaOH versus borax for pH modification on changes in pH and ammonia content of NuLure solutions over time. Although NuLure/NaOH solutions could be adjusted to a more alkaline pH than NuLure/borax solutions, borax plays a critical role in pH stability over time. However, the pH of NuLure/NaOH is stabilized when propylene glycol (10% vol:vol) was used to prepare the bait solution. The use of NaOH can provide an alternative to the use of borax to increase bait solution alkalinity. PMID:20069869

  3. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif†

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qingzhou; Muscatello, Michelle M. Ward; Asher, Sanford A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols. PMID:19381378

  4. Effect of borax on the crystallization kinetics of boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?ahin, Ömer

    2002-03-01

    The effect of different borax concentrations on the growth and dissolution rates of boric acid crystals were measured in a fluidized bed crystallizer under well-established conditions of supersaturation and undersaturation and fluidization. It was found that the presence of borax in boric-acid solution decreases the mass-transfer coefficient, kd, the surface-reaction constant, kr and reaction order r pertaining to growth and dissolution rates of boric acid crystals. The effectiveness factors were estimated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitudes of the two resistances in series, diffusion and integration. The controlling mechanism is mainly by integration for the crystal growth of boric acid in the pure state and in the presence of borax in solution. The kinetic parameters ( kr, kd, r) were determined by a new method which is called trial and error under no assumption. This method gives a high accuracy of determination of the mass-transfer coefficient, kd, the surface-reaction constant, kr and surface-reaction order, r. The relative standard deviation between the equation Rg= kr(( ??- ?eq)- Rg(1- w?)/ kd) r and those experimentally obtained and represented by the equation Rg= kg( ??- ?eq) g do not exceed 0.013 for both the growth and dissolution regions.

  5. Measurement and analysis of polar stratospheric ClO and N2O by ground-based mm-wave spectroscopy. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Emmons, L.K.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis and interpretation of measured spectra of spring-time stratospheric ClO and N2O in Antarctica and Greenland during three field campaigns are presented in this dissertation. Measurements were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during September and October in 1992, and at Thule Air Base, Greenland during February and March in 1992 and 1993, using a ground-based mm-wave receiver. Measurements of ClO, a direct product of ozone destruction, were made through the evolution of the Antarctic `ozone hole.` The emission spectrum of ClO at 278.632 GHz was observed and vertical profiles have been determined from measurements both inside and outside the polar vortex and a sharp difference is seen between them. Comparisons are made to coincident balloon and satellite measurements of ozone, and ground-based measurements of NO2. The Arctic polar vortex generally has warmer stratospheric temperatures and is more variable in its position over the pole, consequently no ozone hole has been observed there. However, these measurements, as well as others, show the presence of ClO indicating some ozone depletion has occurred by the same mechanisms at work in the Antarctic. Low altitude mixing ratios of ClO in 1992 were never above 0.2 ppbv, but in 1993 up to 0.5 ppbv was observed in late February. The diurnal variation of the low altitude layer of ClO present in the Antarctic ozone `hole` has also been measured. The mixing ratio increases after sunrise, from less than 0.1 ppbv just before sunrise to approximately 1.5 ppbv at midday, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle after midday. This diurnal record is unique and is valuable for the validation of photochemical models of the polar stratosphere. N2O is a good tracer of stratospheric dynamics, having only ground sources and having a long chemical lifetime in the atmosphere. N2O spectra at 276.328 GHz were observed at Thule from late February to late March, 1992.

  6. Toxicity detection of sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate using electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dengbin; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-04-01

    Based on the inhibition effect on the respiratory chain activity of microorganisms by toxicants, an electrochemical method has been developed to measure the current variation of a mediator in the presence of microorganisms contacted with a toxicant. Microelectrode arrays were adopted in this study, which can accelerate the mass transfer rate of an analyte to the electrode and also increase the total current signal, resulting in an improvement in detection sensitivity. We selected Escherichia coli as the testee and the standard glucose-glutamic acid as an exogenous material. Under oxygen restriction, the experiments in the presence of toxicant were performed at optimum conditions (solution pH 7.0, 37 degrees C and reaction for 3 hr). The resulting solution was then separated from the suspended microorganisms and was measured by an electrochemical method, using ferricyanide as a mediator. The current signal obtained represents the reoxidation of ferrocyanide, which was transformed to inhibiting efficiency, IC50, as a quantitative measure of toxicity. The IC50 values measured were 410, 570 and 830 mg/L for sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate, respectively. The results show that the toxicity sequence for these three food additives is consistent with the value reported by other methods. Furthermore, the order of damage degree to the microorganism was also observed to be: sodium nitrite > borax > aluminum potassium sulfate > blank, according to the atomic force microscopy images of E. coli after being incubated for 3 hr with the toxic compound in buffer solutions. The electrochemical method is expected to be a sensitive and simple alternative to toxicity screening for chemical food additives. PMID:23923788

  7. Effect of borax on immune cell proliferation and sister chromatid exchange in human chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pongsavee, Malinee

    2009-01-01

    Background Borax is used as a food additive. It becomes toxic when accumulated in the body. It causes vomiting, fatigue and renal failure. Methods The heparinized blood samples from 40 healthy men were studied for the impact of borax toxicity on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and sister chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. The MTT assay and Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) technic were used in this experiment with the borax concentrations of 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml. Results It showed that the immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) was decreased when the concentrations of borax increased. The borax concentration of 0.6 mg/ml had the most effectiveness to the lymphocyte proliferation and had the highest cytotoxicity index (CI). The borax concentrations of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml significantly induced sister chromatid exchange in human chromosomes (P < 0.05). Conclusion Borax had effects on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and induced sister chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. Toxicity of borax may lead to cellular toxicity and genetic defect in human. PMID:19878537

  8. 40 CFR 180.1121 - Boric acid and its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boric acid and its salts, borax... salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide (boric anhydride... its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1121 - Boric acid and its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boric acid and its salts, borax... salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide (boric anhydride... its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1121 - Boric acid and its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boric acid and its salts, borax... salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide (boric anhydride... its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1121 - Boric acid and its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boric acid and its salts, borax... salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide (boric anhydride... its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1121 - Boric acid and its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boric acid and its salts, borax... salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide (boric anhydride... its salts, borax (sodium borate decahydrate), disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, boric oxide...

  13. Effect of sodium tetraborate (borax) on the thermal properties of frozen aqueous sugar and polyol solutions.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Rimando, Annie; Aoyagi, Nobuo; Kojima, Shigeo

    2003-06-01

    The effect of sodium tetraborate (Na(2)B(4)O(7), borax) on the thermal property of frozen aqueous sugar and polyol solutions was studied through thermal analysis. Addition of borax raised the thermal transition temperature (glass transition temperature of maximally freeze-concentrated solutes; T(g)') of frozen sucrose solutions depending on the borax/sucrose concentration ratios. Changes in the T(g)' of frozen mono- and disaccharide solutions suggested various forms of complexes, including those of a borate ion and two saccharide molecules. Borax exerted the maximum effect to raise the oligosaccharide and dextran T(g)'s at borax/saccharide molar ratios of approximately 1-2 (maltose and maltooligosaccharides), 2 (dextran 1060), 5 (dextran 4900), and 10 (dextran 10200). Further addition of borax lowered T(g)'s of the saccharide solutions. Borax also raised T(g) and T(g)' temperatures of frozen aqueous glycerol solutions. The decreased solute mobility in frozen solutions by the borate-polyol complexes suggested higher collapse temperature in the freeze-drying process and improved stability of biological systems in frozen solutions. PMID:12808243

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V leach pond. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the BORAX-V leach pond located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The leach pond became radioactively contaminated from the periodic discharge of low-level liquid waste during operation of the Boiling Water Reactor Experiments (BORAX) from 1954 to 1964. This report describes work performed to accomplish the D and D objectives of stabilizing the leach pond and preventing the spread of contamination. D and D of the BORAX-V leach pond consisted to backfilling the pond with clean soil, grading and seeding the area, and erecting a permanent marker to identify very low-level subsurface contamination.

  15. Hydrologic data and description of a hydrologic monitoring plan for the Borax Lake area, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Tiffany Rae; McFarland, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Information from field visits was used to develop a monitoring plan. The plan would include monitoring Borax Lake by measuring discharge, stage, evaporation, temperature, and specific conductance; water-quality sampling and analysis; and monitoring shallow ground-water levels near Borax Lake using shallow piezometers. Minimally, one hot spring in North Borax Lake Spring Group 1 would be monitored for temperature and specific conductance and sampled for water-quality analysis. In addition, two flowing wells would be monitored for water levels, temperature, specific conductance, and discharge and sampled for water-quality analysis. The construction characteristics of these wells must be verified before long-term data collection begins. In the future, it may be helpful to monitor shallow and (or) deep observation wells drilled into the thermal aquifer to understand the possible effects of geothermal development on Borax Lake and nearby springs.

  16. Effect of Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTAB) on the Growth Rate and Morphology of Borax Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suharso; Parkinson, Gordon; Ogden, Mark

    An investigation of the effect of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on both growth rate and morphology of borax crystal has been carried out. This experiment was carried out at temperature of 25°C and relative supersaturation of 0.21 and 0.74 under in situ cell optical microscopy method. The result shows that CTAB inhibits the growth rate and changes the morphology of borax crystal.

  17. Geophysical Characterization of the Borax Lake Hydrothermal System in the Alvord Desert, Southeastern Oregon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S.; Paul, C.; Bradford, J.; Lyle, M.; Clement, W.; Liberty, L.; Myers, R.; Donaldson, P.

    2003-12-01

    We are conducting a detailed geophysical characterization of an active hydrothermal system as part of an interdisciplinary project aiming to study the link between the physical characteristics of hydrothermal systems and biota that occupy those systems. The Borax Lake Hydrothermal System (BLHS), consisting of Borax Lake and the surrounding hot springs, is located near the center of the Alvord Basin in southeastern Oregon. As a result of Basin and Range extension, the Alvord Basin is a north-south trending graben bounded by the Steens Mountains to the west and the Trout Creek Mountains to the east. We are using several geophysical techniques to generate both basin-wide and high-resolution local characterizations of the Alvord Basin and the BLHS. To date we have completed two scales of seismic reflection surveys: an east-west trending basin scale survey and a shallow (~10 - 300 m depth) 3D survey of the BLHS. The basin scale seismic survey consists of 11 km of 2D, 60 fold CMP data acquired with a 200 lb accelerated weight drop. We acquired the 3D survey of the BLHS using a 7.62x39 mm SKS rifle and 240 channel recording system. The 3D patch covers ~ 90,000 sq. m with a maximum inline offset aperture of 225 m, crossline aperture of 75 m, and 360 degree azimuthal coverage. Additionally, we have completed a regional total-field magnetic survey for a large portion of the Alvord Basin and a 3D transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey of the BLHS. The 3D TEM survey covers the central portion of the 3D seismic survey. Initial results from the regional magnetic and seismic surveys indicate a mid-basin basement high. The basement high appears to correlate with the northeast trending BLHS. Additionally, the cross-basin seismic profile clearly shows that recent deformation has primarily been along an eastward dipping normal fault that bounds the basement high to the east. This suggests that both spatial and temporal characteristics of deformation control hydrothermal activity within the BLHS.

  18. Borax counteracts genotoxicity of aluminum in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan; Geyiko?lu, Fatime; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2013-10-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the protective role of borax (BX) on genotoxicity induced by aluminum (Al) in rat liver, using liver micronucleus assay as an indicator of genotoxicity. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into six groups and each group had four animals. Aluminum chloride (AlCl?; 5 mg/kg b.w.) and BX (3.25 and 13 mg/kg b.w.) were injected intraperitoneally to rats. Besides, animals were also treated with Al for 4 consecutive days followed by BX for 10 days. Rats were anesthetized after Al and BX injections and the hepatocytes were isolated for counting the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs). AlCl? was found to significantly (p < 0.05) increase the number of MNHEPs. Rats treated with BX, however, showed no increase in MNHEPs. Moreover, simultaneous treatments with BX significantly modulated the genotoxic effects of AlCl? in rats. It can be concluded that BX has beneficial influences and has the ability to antagonize Al toxicity. PMID:22491726

  19. Response to Thermal Exposure of Ball-Milled Aluminum-Borax Powder Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel

    2013-04-01

    Aluminum-borax powder mixtures were ball milled and heated above 873 K (600 °C) to produce Al-B master alloys. Ball-milled powder blends reveal interpenetrating layers of deformed aluminum and borax grains that are increasingly refined with increasing milling time. Thermal exposure of the ball-milled powder blends facilitates a series of thermite reactions between these layers. Borax, dehydrated during heating, is reduced by Al, and B thus generated reacts with excess Al to produce AlB2 particles dispersed across the aluminum grains starting at 873 K (600 °C). AlB2 particles start to form along the interface of the aluminum and borax layers. Once nucleated, these particles grow readily to become hexagonal-shaped crystals that traverse the aluminum grains with increasing temperatures as evidenced by the increase in the size as well as in the number of the AlB2 particles. Ball milling for 1 hour suffices to achieve a thermite reaction between borax and aluminum. Ball milling further does not impact the response of the powder blend to thermal exposure. The nucleation-reaction sites are multiplied, however, with increasing milling time and thus insure a higher number of smaller AlB2 particles. The size of the AlB2 platelets may be adjusted with the ball milling time.

  20. Experimental determination of the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate by ultrasonic velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, H.; Özdemir, B.

    2003-05-01

    The metastable zone width of borax decahydrate (disodium tetraborate decahydrate), represented by the maximum undercooling ? Tmax, both in pure and impure aqueous solutions were determined according to polythermal method by using the ultrasonic technique. It is found that the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate in pure solutions determined by ultrasonic method fulfills well the linear relation between log? Tmax and log(-d T/d t). However, the sensitivity of the method using the ultrasonic technique increases with increasing saturation temperature, probably due to the increase of temperature dependence of solubility with increasing saturation temperature. A comparison of the nucleation temperatures from ultrasonic measurements and from visual determination shows that both detection techniques give almost the same results for borax decahydrate. The results obtained from ultrasonic measurements show, that the presence of Ca 2+ as impurity has only a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate as long as the impurity concentrations is in the range of 25-200 ppm. Similar to the effect of Ca 2+, Mg 2+ also has a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax up to the impurity concentration of 100 ppm. However, the presence of 200 ppm Mg 2+ results in a reasonable increase of the metastable zone width.

  1. Prediction of Layer Thickness in Molten Borax Bath with Genetic Evolutionary Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylan, Fatih

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the vanadium carbide coating in molten borax bath process is modeled by evolutionary genetic programming (GEP) with bath composition (borax percentage, ferro vanadium (Fe-V) percentage, boric acid percentage), bath temperature, immersion time, and layer thickness data. Five inputs and one output data exist in the model. The percentage of borax, Fe-V, and boric acid, temperature, and immersion time parameters are used as input data and the layer thickness value is used as output data. For selected bath components, immersion time, and temperature variables, the layer thicknesses are derived from the mathematical expression. The results of the mathematical expressions are compared to that of experimental data; it is determined that the derived mathematical expression has an accuracy of 89%.

  2. Effect of borax concentration on the structure of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Mathias B.; Desa, J. A. E.; Aswal, V. K.

    2012-06-01

    Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) hydrogels cross-linked with varying concentrations of borax have been studied using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and X-Ray Diffraction. The intensity of scattering increases with borax concentration from 1 mg/ml up to 2 mg/ml and falls thereafter for 4 mg/ml, increasing again for a concentration of 10 mg/ml. The mesoscopic structural changes that cause these trends in the SANS data are in keeping with the variations in the X-ray diffraction patterns pertaining to structures within the PVA chains.

  3. Borax as flux on sintering of iron Ancor Steel 1000® under glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza Suarez, H. G.; Sarmiento Santos, A.; Ortiz Otálora, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work studies the flux effect of borax (di sodium tetraborate decahydrate) on sintering of iron Ancor Steel 1000® in abnormal glow discharge. The incidence of the percentage by weight of borax and the sintering temperature in the process were observed. Samples of powder metallurgical iron were prepared with proportions of 0.50%, 2.0%, 4.0% and 6.0% by weight of borax using the procedures of powder metallurgy. The samples were sintered at 800 and 1100°C for 30min, by glow discharge at low pressure in a reducing atmosphere composed of 20% H2+80% Ar. The samples in compact green-state were analyzed by TGA-DSC to determine the fusion process and mass loss during sintering. The analysis of microhardness and density, shows that at a sintering temperature of 800°C the sample density decreases and the sample microhardness increases with respect to sintered samples without borax. Sintered samples were analysed by DRX showing the absence of precipitates.

  4. Enhancing fluorescence intensity of Ellagic acid in Borax-HCl-CTAB micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Guokui; Li, Kexiang; Tang, Bo

    2011-03-01

    Ellagic acid (C 14H 6O 8), a naturally occurring phytochemical, found mainly in berries and some nuts, has anticarcinogenic and antioxidant properties. It is found that fluorescence of Ellagic acid (EA) is greatly enhanced by micelle of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant. Based on this effect, a sensitive proposed fluorimetric method was applied for the determination of Ellagic acid in aqueous solution. In the Borax-HCl buffer, the fluorescence intensity of Ellagic acid in the presence of CTAB is proportional to the concentration of Ellagic acid in range from 8.0 × 10 -10 to 4.0 × 10 -5 mol L -1; and the detection limits are 3.2 × 10 -10 mol L -1 and 5.9 × 10 -10 mol L -1 excited at 266 nm and 388 nm, respectively. The actual samples of pomegranate rinds are simply manipulated and satisfactorily determined. The interaction mechanism studies argue that the negative EA-Borax complex is formed and solubilized in the cationic surfactant CTAB micelle in this system. The fluorescence intensity of EA enhances because the CTAB micelle provides a hydrophobic microenvironment for EA-Borax complex, which can prevent collision with water molecules and decrease the energy loss of EA-Borax complex.

  5. Dispersion of borax in plastic is excellent fire-retardant heat insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H.; Hughes, J.; Schmitz, F.

    1967-01-01

    A mix of borax powder and a chlorinated anhydrous polyester resin yields a plastic composition that is fire-retardant, yields a minimum of toxic gases when heated, and exhibits high thermal insulating properties. This composition can be used as a coating or can be converted into laminated or cast shapes.

  6. Comparative antibacterial properties in vitro of seven olivanic acid derivatives: MM 4550, MM 13902, MM 17880, MM 22380, MM 22381, MM 22382 and MM 22383.

    PubMed

    Basker, M J; Boon, R J; Hunter, P A

    1980-08-01

    Streptomyces olivaceus ATCC 31365 produces a family of novel beta-lactam antibiotics collectively referred to as the olivanic acids. Seven such compounds, MM 4550, MM 13902, MM 17880, MM 22380, MM 22381, MM 22382 and MM 22383 have been identified which have the same carbapenem nucleus but with different side chains attached to the nucleus. The compounds with an (8S) hydroxyethyl substituent and cis-orientated beta-lactam protons, MM 22380 and MM 22382, and their sulphate esters, MM 17880 and MM 123902, are potent antibiotic with MIC values against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the range 0.1 3.1 microgram/ml. The corresponding (8S) hydroxyethyl compounds with trans-beta-lactam protons, MM 22381 and MM 22383, also have broad-spectrum activity but are rather less potent than the cis-compound. In addition to their antibiotic activity, the olivanic acids inhibit a number of beta-lactamases and enhance the activity of beta-lactams such as amoxycillin against beta-lactamase-producing bacteria. Significant differences are observed both in antibacterial activities and in beta-lactamase inhibition properties when the olivanic acids are compared with the related thienamycin antibiotics which have (8R) rather than (8S) stereochemistry and trans-beta-lactam protons. PMID:6968745

  7. Characterization of uranium surfaces machined with aqueous propylene glycol-borax or perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.; Dillon, J.J.; Richards, H.L.; Seals, R.D.; Byrd, V.R.

    1986-12-31

    The use of perchloroethylene (perc) as an ingredient in coolants for machining enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been discontinued because of environmental concerns. A new coolant was substituted in December 1985, which consists of an aqueous solution of propylene glycol with borax (sodium tetraborate) added as a nuclear poison and with a nitrite added as a corrosion inhibitor. Uranium surfaces machined using the two coolants were compared with respects to residual contamination, corrosion or corrosion potential, and with the aqueous propylene glycol-borax coolant was found to be better than that of enriched uranium machined with the perc-mineral oil coolant. The boron residues on the final-finished parts machined with the borax-containing coolant were not sufficient to cause problems in further processing. All evidence indicated that the enriched uranium surfaces machined with the borax-containing coolant will be as satisfactory as those machined with the perc coolant.

  8. Corrosion resistance of inconel 690 to borax, boric acid, and boron nitride at 1100{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1996-12-12

    Significant general and localized corrosion was observed on Inconel 690 coupons following exposure to borax, boric acid and boron nitride at 1100{degrees}C. Severe localized attack at and below the melt line was observed on coupons exposed to borax. An intergranular attack at and below the melt line was observed on coupons exposed to borax. An intergranular attack (IGA) of the Inconel 690 was also observed. Severe internal void formation and IGA (30 mils penetration after 3 days) was observed in the coupon exposed to boric acid. Both borax and boric acid remove the protective chromium oxide; however, this layer can be reestablished by heating the Inconel 690 to 975 {degrees}C in air for several hours. Inconel 690 in direct contact with boron nitride resulted in the formation of a thick chromium borate layer, a general corrosion rate of 50 to 90 mils per year, and internal void formation of 1 mil per day.

  9. Determination of kinetic parameters of crystal growth rate of borax in aqueous solution by using the rotating disc technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Omer; Aslan, Fevzi; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Durgun, Mustafa

    2004-10-01

    Growth rate of polycrystalline disc of borax compressed at different pressure and rotated at various speed has been measured in a rotating disc crystallizer under well-defined conditions of supersaturation. It was found that the mass transfer coefficient, K, increased while overall growth rate constant, Kg, and surface reaction constant, kr, decreased with increasing smoothness of the disc. It was also determined that kinetic parameters (kr , r , K , g) of crystal growth rate of borax decreased with increasing rotating speed of the polycrystalline disc. The effectiveness factor was calculated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the steps in series bulk diffusion through the mass transfer boundary layer and the surface integration. At low rotating speed of disc, the crystal growth rate of borax is mainly controlled by integration. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth rate of borax at higher rotating speed of polycrystalline disc.

  10. Validation of MCNP: SPERT-D and BORAX-V fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Palmer, B.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses critical experiments involving SPERT-D[sup 1,2] fuel elements and BORAX-V[sup 3-8] fuel which have been modeled and calculations performed with MCNP. MCNP is a Monte Carlo based transport code. For this study continuous-energy nuclear data from the ENDF/B-V cross section library was used. The SPERT-D experiments consisted of various arrays of fuel elements moderated and reflected with either water or a uranyl nitrate solution. Some SPERT-D experiments used cadmium as a fixed neutron poison, while others were poisoned with various concentrations of boron in the moderating/reflecting solution. ne BORAX-V experiments were arrays of either boiling fuel rod assemblies or superheater assemblies, both types of arrays were moderated and reflected with water. In one boiling fuel experiment, two fuel rods were replaced with borated stainless steel poison rods.

  11. Validation of MCNP: SPERT-D and BORAX-V fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Palmer, B.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses critical experiments involving SPERT-D{sup 1,2} fuel elements and BORAX-V{sup 3-8} fuel which have been modeled and calculations performed with MCNP. MCNP is a Monte Carlo based transport code. For this study continuous-energy nuclear data from the ENDF/B-V cross section library was used. The SPERT-D experiments consisted of various arrays of fuel elements moderated and reflected with either water or a uranyl nitrate solution. Some SPERT-D experiments used cadmium as a fixed neutron poison, while others were poisoned with various concentrations of boron in the moderating/reflecting solution. ne BORAX-V experiments were arrays of either boiling fuel rod assemblies or superheater assemblies, both types of arrays were moderated and reflected with water. In one boiling fuel experiment, two fuel rods were replaced with borated stainless steel poison rods.

  12. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building

    SciTech Connect

    Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D&D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D&D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D&D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D&D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

  13. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building

    SciTech Connect

    Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

  14. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  15. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  16. Development of a cleaning process for uranium chips machined with a glycol-water-borax coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1984-12-01

    A chip-cleaning process has been developed to remove the new glycol-water-borax coolant from oralloy chips. The process involves storing the freshly cut chips in Freon-TDF until they are cleaned, washing with water, and displacing the water with Freon-TDF. The wash water can be reused many times and still yield clean chips and then be added to the coolant to make up for evaporative losses. The Freon-TDF will be cycled by evaporation. The cleaning facility is currently being designed and should be operational by April 1985.

  17. a Theoretical Analysis of Physical Properties of Aqueous Trehalose with Borax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara; Aniya, Masaru

    2013-07-01

    The temperature and composition dependence of the viscosity of aqueous trehalose and aqueous trehalose-borax mixtures has been investigated by means of the Bond Strength-Coordination Number Fluctuation (BSCNF) model. The result indicates that the variation in the fragility of the system is very small in the composition range analyzed. The values of the materials parameters determined are consistent with those of the trehalose-water-lithium iodide system which were analyzed in a previous study. Based on the analysis of the obtained parameters of the BSCNF model, the physical interpretation of the WLF parameters reported in a previous study is reconfirmed.

  18. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Boyer, Norman W. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  19. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, N.W.; Taylor, R.S.

    1980-10-28

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  20. Precipitation method for barium metaborate (BaB2O4) synthesis from borax solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ak?ener, Eymen; Figen, Aysel Kantürk; Pi?kin, Sabriye

    2013-12-01

    In this study, barium metaborate (BaB2O4, BMB) synthesis from the borax solution was carried out. BMB currently is used in production of ceramic glazes, luminophors, oxide cathodes as well as additives to pigments for aqueous emulsion paints and also ?-BaB2O4 single crystals are the best candidate for fabrication of solid-state UV lasers operating at a wavelength of 200 nm due to excellent nonlinear optical properties. In the present study, synthesis was carried out from the borax solution (Na2B4O7?10H2O, BDH) and barium chloride (BaCI2?2H2O, Ba) in the glass-batch reactor with stirring. The effect of, times (5-15 min), molar ratio [stoich.ration (1.0:2.0), 1.25:2.0, 1.5:2.0, 2.5:2:0, 3.0:2.0, 3.5:2.0,4.0:2.0, 5.0:2.0] and also crystallization time (2-6 hour) on the BMB yield (%) was investigated at 80 °C reaction temperature. It is found that, BMB precipitation synthesis with 90 % yield can be performed from 0.50 molar ration (BDH:Ba), under 80 °C, 15 minute, and 6 hours crystallization time. The structural properties of BMB powders were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR and DTA-TG instrumental analysis technique.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF BORIC ACID AND BORAX USING THE IEHR EVALUATIVE PROCESS FOR ASSESSING HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents an evaluation of the reproductive and developmental effects of boric acid, H3803 (CAS Registry No. 10043-35-3) and disodium tetraborate decehydrate or borax, Na2B4O2O(CAS Registry No. 1303-96-4). he element, boron, does not exist naturally. oron always exis...

  2. Redetermination of the borax structure from laboratory X-ray data at 145 K

    PubMed Central

    Gainsford, Graeme J.; Kemmitt, Tim; Higham, Caleb

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, sodium tetraborate decahydrate (mineral name: borax), Na2[B4O5(OH)4]·8H2O, has been studied previously using X-ray [Morimoto (1956). Miner. J. 2, 1–18] and neutron [Levy & Lisensky (1978). Acta Cryst. B34, 3502–3510] diffraction data. The structure contains tetra­borate anions [B4O5(OH)4]2? with twofold rotation symmetry, which form hydrogen-bonded chains, and [Na(H2O)6] octa­hedra that form zigzag chains [Na(H2O)4/2(H2O)2/1]. The O—H bond distances obtained from the present redetermination at 145?K are shorter than those in the neutron study by an average of 0.127?(19)?Å. PMID:21202161

  3. Experimenting with cameraless photography using turmeric and borax: an introduction to photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleyard, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    An alcoholic extract of the spice turmeric can be used to create a light-sensitive dye that can be used to stain paper. On exposure to sunlight, the dyed paper can be used to capture photographic images of flat objects or reproduce existing images through the preferential degradation of the dye in light-exposed areas over a time period of a few hours. The images can be developed and preserved by spraying the exposed paper with a dilute solution of borax, which forms coloured organo-boron complexes that limit further degradation of the dye and enhance the colour of the image. Similar photochemical reactions that lead to the degradation of the turmeric dye can also be used for reducing the organic pollution load in wastewater produced by many industrial processes and in dye-sensitized solar cells for producing electricity.

  4. Total cost of 46-Mw Borax cogen system put at $30M

    SciTech Connect

    de Biasi, V.

    1983-03-01

    The cogeneration system, designed around a W-251B gas turbine power plant exhausting into a Deltak waste heat boiler to produce ''free'' process steam from the gas turbine exhaust, is discussed. The design includes water injection for NO/sub x/ control, self-cleaning inlet air filters, evaporative coolers, supercharger, and supplementary firing of the waste heat boiler. Once the system is operational Borax will be able to generate all of the electricity needed for on-site operations and a large share of process steam needs--plus still have 22-23 Mw surplus electric power to sell, so that the installation should pay for itself in less than 5 years of service.

  5. Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial wound dressings based on silver, gellan, PVA and borax.

    PubMed

    Cencetti, C; Bellini, D; Pavesio, A; Senigaglia, D; Passariello, C; Virga, A; Matricardi, P

    2012-10-15

    Silver-loaded dressings are designed to provide the same antimicrobial activity of topical silver, with the advantages of a sustained silver release and a reduced number of dressing changes. Moreover, such type of dressing must provide a moist environment, avoiding fiber shedding, dehydration and adherence to the wound site. Here we describe the preparation of a novel silver-loaded dressing based on a Gellan/Hyaff(®) (Ge-H) non woven, treated with a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/borax system capable to enhance the entrapment of silver in the dressing and to modulate its release. The new hydrophilic non woven dressings show enhanced water uptake capability and slow dehydration rates. A sustained silver release is also achieved. The antibacterial activity was confirmed on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22939352

  6. Borax in the supraglacial moraine of the Lewis Cliff, Buckley Island quadrangle--first Antarctic occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Muhs, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    During the 1987-1988 austral summer field season, membersof the south party of the antarctic search for meteorites south-ern team* working in the Lewis Cliff/Colbert Hills region dis-covered several areas of unusual mineralization within theLewis Cliff ice tongue and its associated moraine field (figure1). The Lewis Cliff ice tongue (84°15'S 161°25'E) is a meteorite-stranding surface of ablating blue ice, about 2.3 by 7.0 kilo-meters, bounded on the west by the Lewis Cliff, on the northand northeast by a large supraglacial moraine, and on the eastby the Colbert Hills. To the south it opens to the Walcott Névé.Because it is a meteorite-stranding surface, the major component of ice motion in the area is believed to be vertical(Whillans and Cassidy 1983). The presence of Thule-Baffinmoraines at the northern terminus of the blue ice tends tosupport the hypothesis that the area underlying the moraineis essentially stagnant and that ice arriving from the south ispiling up against it. Areas containing mineral deposits werefound within the moraine field to the north and east of theblue ice margin and also along the east margins of the blue iceitself. Subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses of these depositshave shown that they are composed predominantly of nah-colite (NaHCO3), trona [Na3(CO3)(HCO3) · 2H20], borax[Na2B405(OH)4 · 8H20], and a new hexagonal hydrous sulfatespecies. This paper reports the details of the borax occurrence,because it is the first known on the continent.

  7. Characterization of two glycoside hydrolase family 36 α-galactosidases: novel transglycosylation activity, lead-zinc tolerance, alkaline and multiple pH optima, and low-temperature activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yiyan; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-03-01

    Two α-galactosidases, AgaAJB07 from Mesorhizobium and AgaAHJG4 from Streptomyces, were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant AgaAJB07 showed a 2.9-fold and 22.6-fold increase in kcat with a concomitant increase of 2.3-fold and 16.3-fold in Km in the presence of 0.5mM ZnSO4 and 30.0mM Pb(CH3COO)2, respectively. Recombinant AgaAHJG4 showed apparent optimal activity at pH 8.0 in McIlvaine or Tris-HCl buffer and 9.5 in glycine-NaOH or HCl-borax-NaOH buffer, retention of 23.6% and 43.2% activity when assayed at 10 and 20°C, respectively, and a half-life of approximately 2min at 50°C. The activation energies for p-nitrophenyl-α-d-galactopyranoside hydrolysis by AgaAJB07 and AgaAHJG4 were 71.9±0.8 and 48.2±2.0kJmol(-1), respectively. Both AgaAJB07 and AgaAHJG4 exhibited transglycosylation activity, but they required different acceptors and produced different compounds. Furthermore, potential factors for alkaline and multiple pH optima and low-temperature adaptations of AgaAHJG4 were presumed. PMID:26471539

  8. In vitro studies on chemoprotective effect of borax against aflatoxin B1-induced genetic damage in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Turkez, Hasan; Geyiko?lu, Fatime; Dirican, Ebubekir; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2012-12-01

    A common dietary contaminant, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), has been shown to be a potent mutagen and carcinogen in humans and many animal species. Since the eradication of AFB1 contamination in agricultural products has been rare, the use of natural or synthetic free radical scavengers could be a potential chemopreventive strategy. Boron compounds like borax (BX) and boric acid are the major components of industry and their antioxidant role has recently been reported. In the present report, we evaluated the capability of BX to inhibit the rate of micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) formations induced by AFB1. There were significant increases (P < 0.05) in both SCE and MN frequencies of cultures treated with AFB1 (3.12 ppm) as compared to controls. However, co-application of BX (1, 2 and 5 ppm) and AFB1 resulted in decreases of SCE and MN rates as compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone. Borax gave 30-50 % protection against AFB1 induced SCEs and MNs. In conclusion, the support of borax was especially useful in aflatoxin-toxicated blood tissue. Thus, the risk on target tissues of AFB1 could be reduced and ensured early recovery from its toxicity. PMID:22526492

  9. Influence of Environmental Factors on Bacteriocin Production by Human Isolates of Lactococcus lactis MM19 and Pediococcus acidilactici MM33.

    PubMed

    Turgis, Mélanie; Vu, Khanh Dang; Millette, Mathieu; Dupont, Claude; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-03-01

    The influence of temperature, initial pH, and carbon and nitrogen sources on bacteriocin secreted by Lactococcus lactis MM19 (MM19) and Pediococcus acidilactici MM33 (MM33) was evaluated. It was found that 30 and 45 °C were the growth temperatures for higher nisin and pediocin production by MM19 and MM33, respectively. The initial pH values for higher production of nisin and pediocin were 9 and 6, respectively. Glucose and wheat peptone E430 were found as suitable carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, for highest nisin production by MM19 at 30 °C and initial pH of 9. In these conditions, nisin production could be increased by 6.7 times as compared to the control medium (de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe-MRS broth). Similarly, fructose and pea peptone were suitable carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, for highest production of pediocin by MM33 at 45 °C and initial pH of 6. In these conditions, pediocin production by MM33 was increased by three times as compared to the control medium (tryptone-glucose-yeast extract-TGE broth). PMID:26686688

  10. Primeval galaxies in the sub-mm and mm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Myers, Steven T.

    1993-01-01

    Although the results of COBE's FIRAS experiment 1 constrain the deviation in energy from the CMB blackbody in the 500-5000 micron range to be delta E/E, sub cmb less than 0.005, primeval galaxies can still lead to a brilliant sub-mm sky of non-Gaussian sources that are detectable at 10 inch resolution from planned arrays such as SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and, quite plausibly, at sub-arcsecond resolution in planned mm and sub-mm interferometers. Here, we apply our hierarchical peaks method to a CDM model to construct sub-mm and mm maps of bursting PG's appropriate for these instruments with minimum contours chosen to correspond to realistic observational parameters for them and which pass the FIRAS limits.

  11. Impact of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant on material recovery operations

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Taylor, P.A.

    1983-05-01

    The reaction of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant with nitric acid has now been studied in some detail. This document is intended to provide a summary of the results. Findings are summarized under nine headings. Tests have also been conducted to determine if the new coolant would have any adverse effects on the uranium recycle systems. Experiments were scientifically designed after observation of the production operations so that accurate response to the immediate production concerns could be provided. Conclusions from these studies are: formation of glycol nitrates is very improbable; the reaction of concentrated (70%) nitric acid with pure propylene glycol is very violent and hazardous; dilution of the nitric acid-glycol mixture causes a drastic decrease in the rate and intensity of the reaction; the mechanism of the nitric acid propylene glycol reaction is autocatalytic in nitrous acid; no reaction is observed between coolant and 30% nitric acid unless the solution is heated; the coolant reacts fairly vigorously with 55% nitric acid after a concentration-dependent induction time; experiments showed that the dissolution of uranium chips that had been soaked in coolant proceeded at about the same rate as if the chips had not previously contacted glycol; thermodynamic calculations show that the enthalpy change (heat liberated) by the reaction of nitric acid (30%) with propylene glycol is smaller than if the same amount of nitric acid reacted with uranium. Each of these conclusions is briefly discussed. The effect of new coolant on uranium recycle operations is then briefly discussed.

  12. A new scleroglucan/borax hydrogel: swelling and drug release studies.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Tommasina; Grassi, Mario; Palleschi, Antonio; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Coluzzi, Gina; Banishoeib, Fateme; Alhaique, Franco

    2005-01-31

    The aim of the work was the characterization of a new polysaccharidic physical hydrogel, obtained from Scleroglucan (Sclg) and borax, following water uptake and dimension variations during the swelling process. Furthermore, the release of molecules of different size (Theophylline (TPH), Vitamin B12 (Vit. B12) and Myoglobin (MGB)) from the gel and from the dried system used as a matrix for tablets was studied. The increase of weight of the tablets with and without the loaded drugs was followed together with the relative variation of the dimensions. The dry matrix, in the form of tablets was capable, during the swelling process, to incorporate a relevant amount of solvent (ca. 20 g water/g dried matrix), without dissolving in the medium, leading to a surprisingly noticeable anisotropic swelling that can be correlated with a peculiar supramolecular structure of the system induced by compression. Obtained results indicate that the new hydrogel can be suitable for sustained drug release formulations. The delivery from the matrix is deeply dependent on the size of the tested model drugs. The experimental release data obtained from the gel were satisfactorily fitted by an appropriate theoretical approach and the relative drug diffusion coefficients in the hydrogel were estimated. The release profiles of TPH, Vit. B12 and MGB from the tablets have been analyzed in terms of a new mathematical approach that allows calculating of permeability values of the loaded drugs. PMID:15652203

  13. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( ? = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  14. OpenMM accelerated MMTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kevin P.; Constable, Steve; Faruk, Nabil F.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we provide an interface developed to link the Molecular Modelling toolkit (MMTK) with OpenMM in order to take advantage of the fast evaluation techniques of OpenMM. This interface allows MMTK scripts using the Langevin dynamics integrator, for both classical and path integral simulations, to be executed on a variety of hardware including graphical processing units via OpenMM. The interface has been developed using Python and Cython to take advantage of the high level abstraction thanks to the MMTK and OpenMM software packages. We have tested the interface on a number of systems to observe which systems benefit most from the acceleration libraries of OpenMM.

  15. SSC 40 mm cable results and 50 mm design discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, D.; Capone, D.; Hannaford, R.; Remsbottom, R.; Jayakumar, R.; Snitchler, G. ); Scanlan, R.; Royet, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A summary of the cable produced for the 1990 40 mm Dipole Program is presented. The cable design parameters for the 50 mm Dipole Program are discussed, as well as portions of the SSC specification draft. Considerations leading to the final cable configuration and the results of preliminary trials are included. The first iteration of a strand mapping program to automate cable strand maps is introduced. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mg- and K-bearing borates and associated evaporites at Eagle Borax spring, Death Valley, California: A spectroscopic exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Efflorescent crusts at the Eagle Borax spring in Death Valley, California, contain an array of rare Mg and K borate minerals, several of which are only known from one or two other localities. The Mg- and/or K-bearing borates include aristarainite, hydroboracite, kaliborite, mcallisterite, pinnoite, rivadavite, and santite. Ulexite and probertite also occur in the area, although their distribution is different from that of the Mg and K borates. Other evaporite minerals in the spring vicinity include halite, thenardite, eugsterite, gypsum-anhydrite, hexahydrite, and bloedite. Whereas the first five of these minerals are found throughout Death Valley, the last two Mg sulfates are more restricted in occurrence and are indicative of Mg-enriched ground water. Mineral associations observed at the Eagle Borax spring, and at many other borate deposits worldwide, can be explained by the chemical fractionation of borate-precipitating waters during the course of evaporative concentration. The Mg sulfate and Mg borate minerals in the Eagle Borax efflorescent crusts point to the fractionation of Ca by the operation of a chemical divide involving Ca carbonate and Na-Ca borate precipitation in the subsurface sediments. At many other borate mining localities, the occurrence of ulexite in both Na borate (borax-kernite) and Ca borate (ulexite-colemanite) deposits similarly reflects ulexite's coprecipitation with Ca carbonate at an early concentration stage. Such ulexite may perhaps be converted to colemanite by later reaction with the coexisting Ca carbonate - the latter providing the additional Ca2+ ions needed for the conversion. Mg and Ca-Mg borates are the expected late-stage concentration products of waters forming ulexite-colemanite deposits and are therefore most likely to occur in the marginal zones or nearby mud facies of ulexite-colemanite orebodies. Under some circumstances, Mg and Ca-Mg borates might provide a useful prospecting guide for ulexite-colemanite deposits, although the high solubility of Mg borate minerals may prevent their formation in lacustrine settings and certainly inhibits their geologic preservation. The occurrence of Mg borates in borax-kernite deposits is also related to fractionation processes and points to the operation of an Mg borate chemical divide, characterized by Mg borate precipitation ahead of Mg carbonate. All of these considerations imply that Mg is a significant chemical component of many borate-depositing ground waters, even though Mg borate minerals may not be strongly evident in borate orebodies. The Eagle Borax spring borates and other evaporite minerals were studied using spectroscopic and X-ray powder diffraction methods, which were found to be highly complementary. Spectral reflectance measurements provide a sensitive means for detecting borates present in mixtures with other evaporites and can be used to screen samples rapidly for X-ray diffraction analysis. The apparently limited occurrence of Mg and K borate minerals compared to Ca and Na borates may stem partly from the inefficiency of X-ray diffraction methods for delineating the mineralogy of large and complex deposits. Spectral reflectance measurements can be made in the laboratory, in the field, on the mine face, and even remotely. Reflectance data should have an important role in studies of existing deposit mineralogy and related chemical fractionation processes, and perhaps in the discovery of new borate mineral resources.

  17. High-compactness coating grown by plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 magnesium alloy in the solution of silicate-borax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M. J.; Wang, X. J.; Zhang, M. F.

    2012-10-01

    A ceramic coating was formed on the surface of AZ31 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in the silicate solution with and without borax doped. The composition, morphology, elements and roughness as well as mechanical property of the coating were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reciprocal-sliding tribometer. The results show that the PEO coating is mainly composed of magnesia. When using borax dope, boron element is permeating into the coating and the boron containing phase exist in the form of amorphous. In addition, the microhardness and compactness of the PEO coating are improved significantly due to doped borax.

  18. Apollo 12 photography 70 mm, 16 mm, and 35 mm frame index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    For each 70-mm frame, the index presents information on: (1) the focal length of the camera, (2) the photo scale at the principal point of the frame, (3) the selenographic coordinates at the principal point of the frame, (4) the percentage of forward overlap of the frame, (5) the sun angle (medium, low, high), (6) the quality of the photography, (7) the approximate tilt (minimum and maximum) of the camera, and (8) the direction of tilt. A brief description of each frame is also included. The index to the 16-mm sequence photography includes information concerning the approximate surface coverage of the photographic sequence and a brief description of the principal features shown. A column of remarks is included to indicate: (1) if the sequence is plotted on the photographic index map and (2) the quality of the photography. The pictures taken using the lunar surface closeup stereoscopic camera (35 mm) are also described in this same index format.

  19. Preparing high- and low-aspect ratio AlB2 flakes from borax or boron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. C.; Economy, J.

    2000-02-01

    The commercial preparation of aluminum-diboride flakes in aluminum relies on relatively expensive starting materials. A new synthesis has been developed that allows AlB2 to be prepared directly from the reaction of borax (Na2B4O7·10H2O) or boron oxide (B2O3) with aluminum. Aluminum metal at temperatures higher than 900°C has been shown to reduce these boron-containing compounds, producing an Al2O3-containing slag and AlB2. A natural separation occurs, leaving AlB2 in the molten aluminum and Al2O3 as part of a slag that forms at the melt surface. Samples containing up to 10 vol.% AlB2 in an aluminum matrix have been directly prepared using this method.

  20. Precipitation method for barium metaborate (BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}) synthesis from borax solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ak?ener, Eymen; Figen, Aysel Kantürk; Pi?kin, Sabriye

    2013-12-16

    In this study, barium metaborate (BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, BMB) synthesis from the borax solution was carried out. BMB currently is used in production of ceramic glazes, luminophors, oxide cathodes as well as additives to pigments for aqueous emulsion paints and also ??BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} single crystals are the best candidate for fabrication of solid-state UV lasers operating at a wavelength of 200 nm due to excellent nonlinear optical properties. In the present study, synthesis was carried out from the borax solution (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7?}10H{sub 2}O, BDH) and barium chloride (BaCI{sub 2?}2H{sub 2}O, Ba) in the glass-batch reactor with stirring. The effect of, times (5-15 min), molar ratio [stoich.ration (1.0:2.0), 1.25:2.0, 1.5:2.0, 2.5:2:0, 3.0:2.0, 3.5:2.0,4.0:2.0, 5.0:2.0] and also crystallization time (2-6 hour) on the BMB yield (%) was investigated at 80 °C reaction temperature. It is found that, BMB precipitation synthesis with 90 % yield can be performed from 0.50 molar ration (BDH:Ba), under 80 °C, 15 minute, and 6 hours crystallization time. The structural properties of BMB powders were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR and DTA-TG instrumental analysis technique.

  1. Density, thermal expansion coefficient and viscosity of sodium tetraborate (borax)-UO 2 and of sodium metaborate-UO 2 solutions at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, M. Dalle; Dorner, S.; Roth, A.

    1983-10-01

    Measurements have been performed of the density, of the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient and of the viscosity of liquid sodium tetraborate (borax) and of sodium metaborate both pure and with two different amounts of UO 2 dissolved in each. The viscosity measurements have been performed for the solution of sodium tetraborate with UO 2 and CeO 2, and with CeO 2 only as well. These data are required for the design of core-catchers based on sodium borates. The density measurements have been performed with the buoyancy method in the temperature range from 825°C to 1300°C, the viscosity measurements in the temperature range 700-1250°C with a modified Haake viscosity balance. The balance was previously calibrated at ambient temperature with a standard calibration liquid and at high temperatures with data for pure borax available from the literature.

  2. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ...

  3. Apollo 12 70 mm photographic catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Proof prints of the 70-mm photography are presented, sorted by magazine and frame number. The 28 lunar surface panorama mosaics and a listing of the mosaics are included. The catalog is designed to be used in conjunction with the "Apollo 12 Photography: 70-mm, 16-mm, and 35-mm Frame Index', which makes it possible to locate the area covered by each frame.

  4. 3D Seismic and Magnetic characterization of the Borax Lake Hydrothermal System in the Alvord Desert, southeastern Oregon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S.; Bradford, J.; Lyle, M.; Routh, P.; Liberty, L.; Donaldson, P.

    2004-05-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary project aiming to study the link between the physical characteristics of hydrothermal systems and biota that occupy those systems, we are conducting a detailed geophysical characterization of an active hydrothermal system. The Borax Lake Hydrothermal System (BLHS), consisting of Borax Lake and the surrounding hot springs. BLHS is located near the center of the Alvord Basin in southeastern Oregon. The Alvord Basin is a north-south trending graben in the Northern Great Basin bounded by the Steens Mountains to the west and the Trout Creek Mountains to the east. We conducted a 2D seismic survey to characterize the geologic structure of the basin, a high-resolution 3D seismic survey to characterize the geologic structure of the BLHS, and a high-resolution 3D magnetic survey to characterize any lineaments in the bedrock that might control fluid flow in the BLHS. Previous results from the 2D seismic survey show a mid-basin basement high aligned approximately with the hot springs. In this study we present the results from the high-resolution 3D seismic and magnetic survey of the BLHS. We acquired the 3D seismic data using an SKS rifle and 240 channel recording system. The seismic survey covers approximately 90,000 sq. m with a maximum inline offset aperture of 225 m, crossline aperture of 75 m, and 360 degree azimuthal coverage. The coincidental magnetic survey was collected using a Geometrics 858G cesium vapor magnetometer. We designed both surveys to span nearly 100 active hydrothermal springs, including an approximately 50 m stepover in the trend of the surface expression of the hot springs. After preliminary processing, the 3D seismic data show continuous reflections up to 300 ms (~ 480 m). The initial interpretation of features seen in the 3D data cube include: normal faults dipping to the east and west, near-surface disturbances that are consistent with the trend of the hot springs, and significant near surface velocity anomalies throughout the survey area. Time slices through the 3D seismic cube show evidence of semi-continuous linear features consistent with the trend of the hot springs. A large scale inversion has been performed on the magnetic data. The fit to the observed data is good given the noise assumption of 3 nT. After more extensive processing, we will compare structures in the inverted magnetic model with features in the seismic data and explore the connection between the subsurface geology and the surface geometry of the hot springs.

  5. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  6. Confirmatory radiological survey of the BORAX-V turbine building Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.H.; Coleman, R.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Egidi, P.V.; Mather, S.K.

    1993-07-01

    An independent assessment of the remediation of the BORAX-V (Boiling Water Reactor Experiment) turbine building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho, was accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group (ORNL/PAG). The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with applicable Department of Energy guidelines. The assessment included reviews of both the decontamination and decommissioning Plan and data provided from the pre- and post-remedial action surveys and an independent verification survey of the facility. The independent verification survey included determination of background exposure rates and soil concentrations, beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, smears for detection of removable contamination, and direct measurements for alpha and beta-gamma radiation activity on the basement and mezzanine floors and the building`s interior and exterior walls. Soil samples were taken, and beta-gamma and gamma radiation exposure rates were measured on areas adjacent to the building. Results of measurements on building surfaces at this facility were within established contamination guidelines except for elevated beta-gamma radiation levels located on three isolated areas of the basement floor. Following remediation of these areas, ORNL/PAG reviewed the remedial action contractor`s report and agreed that remediation was effective in removing the source of the elevated direct radiation. Results of all independent soil analyses for {sup 60}Co were below the detection limit. The highest {sup 137}Cs analysis result was 4.6 pCi/g; this value is below the INEL site-specific guideline of 10 pCi/g.

  7. Application of MM wave therapy in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, R.S.; Gasparyan, L.V.

    1995-12-31

    The authors studied the effects of MM wave electromagnetic radiation influence on patients, affected by X-ray radiation during the reparation works after Chernobyl nuclear power plant exposure. They compared results of treatment of two groups of patients: (1) control group patients received only basis therapy; (2) testing group, 10 patients received basis therapy and MM wave influence. The authors used the wide band noise generator `Artsakh - 2` for local irradiation on the acupuncture points. Their data proved that low intensity MM waves have immunocorrective, antioxidant effects, and MM wave therapy is a perspective method for treatment of patients with radiological pathology.

  8. A Toddler's Treatment of "Mm" and "Mm Hm" in Talk with a Parent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipi, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The study to be reported in this paper examined the work accomplished by "mm" and "mm hm" in the interactions of a parent and his daughter aged 0;10-2;0. Using the findings of Gardner (2001) for adults, the analysis shows that "mm" accomplished a range of functions based on its sequential placement and prosodic features, whereas "mm hm" was much…

  9. High-water-content mouldable polyvinyl alcohol-borax hydrogels reinforced by well-dispersed cellulose nanoparticles: dynamic rheological properties and hydrogel formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingquan; Lei, Tingzhou; Wu, Qinglin

    2014-02-15

    Cellulose nanoparticle (CNP) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol-borax (PB) hydrogels were produced via a facile approach in an aqueous system. The effects of particle size, aspect ratio, crystal structure, and surface charge of CNPs on the rheological properties of the composite hydrogels were investigated. The rheological measurements confirmed the incorporation of well-dispersed CNPs to PB system significantly enhanced the viscoelasticity and stiffness of hydrogels. The obtained free-standing, high elasticity and mouldable hydrogels exhibited self-recovery under continuous step strain and thermo-reversibility under temperature sweep. With the addition of cellulose I nanofibers, a 19-fold increase in the high-frequency plateau of storage modulus was obtained compared with that of the pure PB. CNPs acted as multifunctional crosslinking agents and nanofillers to physically and chemically bridge the 3D network hydrogel. The plausible mechanism for the multi-complexation between CNPs, polyvinyl alcohol and borax was proposed to understand the relationship between the 3D network and hydrogel properties. PMID:24507286

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Subpart MM 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Subpart MM 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Subpart MM 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  13. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Peng, Z; Kronberger, L; Pfeifer, J; Salehi, B

    1998-10-01

    Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the method of choice for treatment of symptomatic gallbladder disorders. It minimizes effects of the operation that are independent of the gallbladder, such as trauma to the abdominal wall and other soft tissue. The surgical wounds were even smaller when 2-mm trocars were used. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments was performed in a consecutive series of 14 patients with symptomatic gallstones. The procedure was completed in 12 cases, with conversion to open surgery in two cases. Intraoperative cholangiography was always performed. The postoperative course was always uneventful. The cosmetic effect was highly satisfactory. The procedure using 2-mm instruments could be indicated in selected patients with uncomplicated gallstone disease. PMID:9820716

  14. Microeconomics of 300-mm process module control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Kevin M.; Chatterjee, Arun K.; Falessi, Georges; Levy, Ady; Stoller, Meryl D.

    2001-08-01

    Simple microeconomic models that directly link metrology, yield, and profitability are rare or non-existent. In this work, we validate and apply such a model. Using a small number of input parameters, we explain current yield management practices in 200 mm factories. The model is then used to extrapolate requirements for 300 mm factories, including the impact of simultaneous technology transitions to 130nm lithography and integrated metrology. To support our conclusions, we use examples relevant to factory-wide photo module control.

  15. MM-122: High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Bill; Anders, Kurt; Manchec, John; Yang, Eric; Overgaard, Dan; Kalkwarf, Mike

    1992-01-01

    The rapidly expanding Pacific Rim market along with other growing markets indicates that the future market potential for a high speed civil transport is great indeed. The MM-122 is the answer to the international market desire for a state of the art, long range, high speed civil transport. It will carry 250 passengers a distance of 5200 nm at over twice the speed of sound. The MM-122 is designed to incorporate the latest technologies in the areas of control systems, propulsions, aerodynamics, and materials. The MM-122 will accomplish these goals using the following design parameters. First, a double delta wing planform with highly swept canards and an appropriately area ruled fuselage will be incorporated to accomplish desired aerodynamic characteristics. Propulsion will be provided by four low bypass variable cycle turbofan engines. A quad-redundant fly-by-wire flight control system will be incorporated to provide appropriate static stability and level 1 handling qualities. Finally, the latest in conventional metallic and modern composite materials will be used to provide desired weight and performance characteristics. The MM-122 incorporates the latest in technology and cost minimization techniques to provide a viable solution to this future market potential.

  16. Mm-wave power meter mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, D. L.; Oltmans, D. A.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    E-band thermistor mount and a technique for adjusting a temperature compensating thermistor to provide an electrically balanced bridge are used for measuring RF power in the mm-wavelength. The mount is relatively insensitive to temperature effects that cause measurement errors in single ended circuits.

  17. Optimizing digital 8mm drive performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schadegg, Gerry

    1993-01-01

    The experience of attaching over 350,000 digital 8mm drives to 85-plus system platforms has uncovered many factors which can reduce cartridge capacity or drive throughput, reduce reliability, affect cartridge archivability and actually shorten drive life. Some are unique to an installation. Others result from how the system is set up to talk to the drive. Many stem from how applications use the drive, the work load that's present, the kind of media used and, very important, the kind of cleaning program in place. Digital 8mm drives record data at densities that rival those of disk technology. Even with technology this advanced, they are extremely robust and, given proper usage, care and media, should reward the user with a long productive life. The 8mm drive will give its best performance using high-quality 'data grade' media. Even though it costs more, good 'data grade' media can sustain the reliability and rigorous needs of a data storage environment and, with proper care, give users an archival life of 30 years or more. Various factors, taken individually, may not necessarily produce performance or reliability problems. Taken in combination, their effects can compound, resulting in rapid reductions in a drive's serviceable life, cartridge capacity, or drive performance. The key to managing media is determining the importance one places upon their recorded data and, subsequently, setting media usage guidelines that can deliver data reliability. Various options one can implement to optimize digital 8mm drive performance are explored.

  18. Optimizing digital 8mm drive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schadegg, Gerry

    The experience of attaching over 350,000 digital 8mm drives to 85-plus system platforms has uncovered many factors which can reduce cartridge capacity or drive throughput, reduce reliability, affect cartridge archivability and actually shorten drive life. Some are unique to an installation. Others result from how the system is set up to talk to the drive. Many stem from how applications use the drive, the work load that's present, the kind of media used and, very important, the kind of cleaning program in place. Digital 8mm drives record data at densities that rival those of disk technology. Even with technology this advanced, they are extremely robust and, given proper usage, care and media, should reward the user with a long productive life. The 8mm drive will give its best performance using high-quality 'data grade' media. Even though it costs more, good 'data grade' media can sustain the reliability and rigorous needs of a data storage environment and, with proper care, give users an archival life of 30 years or more. Various factors, taken individually, may not necessarily produce performance or reliability problems. Taken in combination, their effects can compound, resulting in rapid reductions in a drive's serviceable life, cartridge capacity, or drive performance. The key to managing media is determining the importance one places upon their recorded data and, subsequently, setting media usage guidelines that can deliver data reliability. Various options one can implement to optimize digital 8mm drive performance are explored.

  19. VLA 7-mm Observations of Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Hendrik; Hofner, Peter; Araya, Esteban; Stecklum, Bringfried

    2003-07-01

    The early stages during the formation of massive stars are deeply enshrouded due to the presence of dense and dusty natal material. This prevents observations in the optical and often also in the near-infrared. The emission of the star-forming regions peaks in the far-infrared and sub-mm regime, but at these wavelengths, single-dish observations are restricted in spatial resolution and can give only upper limits on the energetics of the objects of interest. Interferometry at mm wavelengths is one appropriate technique to overcome these limitations. We have started an extensive programme to observe pre-selected massive star-forming regions. Our tool is the VLA and its 7-mm receiver system. The VLA can be operated in several antenna configurations delivering resolutions from 1.5 arcsec down to 0.05 arcsec, which is superior to other current mm-interferometers. Sub-arcsec resolution is strongly needed to disentangle the often crowded regions of high-mass star formation and to clearly separate our objects of interest from the adjacent ultracompact HII regions. At 7 mm we are on the save ground of the Rayleigh-Jeans limit even for emission of cold dust (a fact that is not always true for observations at smaller wavelengths). Almost all circumstellar density configurations are optically thin at 7 mm, thus, the observations will trace the total dust content. However, at 7 mm also the free-free emission from ionised gas (caused by the UV emission of the young massive stars) can contribute to the observed signal. Therefore, we have to identify and remove these "parasitic" constituents by extrapolating interferometric data obtained at cm-wavelengths. The targets are either taken from the list of Molinari (Molinari et al. 2000, A&A, 355, 617) or are well-known massive star-forming complexes, for which we have already acquired additional data at other wavelengths. We have started with observations at lower and medium resolution (1.5 - 0.5 arcsec) to distinguish candidates for follow-up observations with higher resolution. For the majority of our sample targets we have revealed pronounced 7-mm emission. Especially interesting is G31.41+0.31 where we could resolve the 7-mm emission arising from a so-called hot molecular core. For GGD27, we found the 7-mm counterpart of the object that illuminates this region in the near-infrared and that also acts as the driving source of the associated outflow system HH80/81. Consequently, this detection establishes GGD27 as a key candidate regarding the search for an accretion disk around a forming high-mass star. Furthermore, we demonstrate some synergy effects between radio and infrared data concerning the interpretation of the nature of those very young massive stars. H.L. and B.S. are supported by DFG grant Ste 605/17-2. P.H. acknowledges partial support from the Research Corporation grant No CC4996, as well as from NSF grant AST-0098524.

  20. Evolutino of Coronal mm-Wave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, A.; Hildebrandt, J.; Urpo, S.; Pohjolainen, S.

    1994-07-01

    Coronal mm-wave emission at source heights up to the order 100 000 km above the photosphere are sporadically observed as off-limb sources by radio telescopes of medium angular resolution. Previous work showed that coronal mm-wave sources (CMMS) fall into different categories, e.g., explosive burst emission, post- and interflare radiation, and radiation from prominences. The source heights can be checked in the case of behind-limb sources. Systematic knowledge on the evolution of CMMS is still lacking. The present report discusses some general properties of CMMS and considers new observations from the Metsahovi Radio Research Station at 37 GHz of the year 1992 with respect to the effect of temporal evolution.

  1. Terahertz/mm wave imaging simulation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, M. R.; Dougherty, J.; Kiser, W. L., Jr.

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a mm wave/terahertz imaging simulation package from COTS graphic software and custom MATLAB code. In this scheme, a commercial ray-tracing package was used to simulate the emission and reflections of radiation from scenes incorporating highly realistic imagery. Accurate material properties were assigned to objects in the scenes, with values obtained from the literature, and from our own terahertz spectroscopy measurements. The images were then post-processed with custom Matlab code to include the blur introduced by the imaging system and noise levels arising from system electronics and detector noise. The Matlab code was also used to simulate the effect of fog, an important aspect for mm wave imaging systems. Several types of image scenes were evaluated, including bar targets, contrast detail targets, a person in a portal screening situation, and a sailboat on the open ocean. The images produced by this simulation are currently being used as guidance for a 94 GHz passive mm wave imaging system, but have broad applicability for frequencies extending into the terahertz region.

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National...

  3. Coping with PH over the Long Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ...

  4. Rotman lens for mm-wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Leonard T.; Hansen, Hedley J.; Abbott, Derek

    2002-11-01

    The 77 GHz band has been reserved for intelligent cruise control in luxury cars and some public transport services in America and the United Kingdom. The Rotman lens offers a cheap and compact means to extend the single beam systems generally used, to fully functional beam staring arrangements. Rotman lenses have been built for microwave frequencies with limited success. The flexibility of microstrip transmission lines and the advent of fast accurate simulation packages allow practical Rotman lenses to be designed at mm-wavelengths. This paper discusses the limitations of the conventional design approach and predicts the performance of a new Rotman lens designed at 77 GHz.

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  6. SSC 50 mm dipole cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Kahn, S.A.; Morgan, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present the magnetic design of the two dimensional coil and iron cross section, referred to as DSX201/W6733, for the 50 mm aperture main ring dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The computed values of the allowed field harmonics as a function of current, the quench performance predictions, the stored energy calculations, the effect of random errors on the coil placement and the Lorentz forces on the coil will be presented. The yoke has been optimized to reduce iron saturation effects on the field harmonics. We shall present the summary of this design which will include the expected overall performance of this cross section. Prototypes of these dipoles are being built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). There are slight differences between the cross sections at the two laboratories. 7 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. The Table Mountain 8-mm wavelength interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Gary, B. L.; Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.; Soltis, F. S.; Yamane, N. I.

    1979-01-01

    A two-element radio interferometer operating at 8.33-mm wavelength has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Observatory near Wrightwood, CA. The interferometer employs a 5.5-m and a 3-m diameter antenna on an east-west baseline of 60 or 120 m, yielding fringe spacings at transit of 28 or 14 arcsec, respectively. The broad intermediate-frequency bandpass of 100-350 MHz and the system noise temperature of 500 K provide high sensitivity for the measurement of continuum sources. The interferometer has been used for high-resolution studies of the planets and the sun, and it is currently being adapted to study solar flare emissions at high spatial and time resolution.

  8. Mercury Pollution from Small-Scale Gold Mining Can Be Stopped by Implementing the Gravity-Borax Method - A Two-Year Follow-Up Study from Two Mining Communities in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Westergaard, Maria L; Brasholt, Marie; Gutierrez, Richard; Jørs, Erik; Thomsen, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Mercury is used globally to extract gold in artisanal and small-scale gold mining. The mercury-free gravity-borax method for gold extraction was introduced in two mining communities using mercury in the provinces Kalinga and Camarines Norte. This article describes project activities and quantitative changes in mercury consumption and analyzes the implementation with diffusion of innovations theory. Activities included miner-to-miner training; seminars for health-care workers, school teachers, and children; and involvement of community leaders. Baseline (2011) and follow-up (2013) data were gathered on mining practices and knowledge about mercury toxicology. Most miners in Kalinga converted to the gravity-borax method, whereas only a few did so in Camarines Norte. Differences in the nature of the social systems impacted the success of the implementation, and involvement of the tribal organization facilitated the shift in Kalinga. In conclusion, the gravity-borax method is a doable alternative to mercury use in artisanal and small-scale gold mining, but support from the civil society is needed. PMID:26463257

  9. The MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to estimate ligand-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The molecular mechanics energies combined with the Poisson–Boltzmann or generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA) methods are popular approaches to estimate the free energy of the binding of small ligands to biological macromolecules. They are typically based on molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor–ligand complex and are therefore intermediate in both accuracy and computational effort between empirical scoring and strict alchemical perturbation methods. They have been applied to a large number of systems with varying success. Areas covered: The authors review the use of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to calculate ligand-binding affinities, with an emphasis on calibration, testing and validation, as well as attempts to improve the methods, rather than on specific applications. Expert opinion: MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA are attractive approaches owing to their modular nature and that they do not require calculations on a training set. They have been used successfully to reproduce and rationalize experimental findings and to improve the results of virtual screening and docking. However, they contain several crude and questionable approximations, for example, the lack of conformational entropy and information about the number and free energy of water molecules in the binding site. Moreover, there are many variants of the method and their performance varies strongly with the tested system. Likewise, most attempts to ameliorate the methods with more accurate approaches, for example, quantum-mechanical calculations, polarizable force fields or improved solvation have deteriorated the results. PMID:25835573

  10. Low-Friction Minilaparoscopy Outperforms Regular 5-mm and 3-mm Instruments for Precise Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Firme, Wood A.; Lima, Diego L.; de Paula Lopes, Vladmir Goldstein; Montandon, Isabelle D.; Filho, Flavio Santos; Shadduck, Phillip P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Therapeutic laparoscopy was incorporated into surgical practice more than 25 y ago. Several modifications have since been developed to further minimize surgical trauma and improve results. Minilaparoscopy, performed with 2- to 3-mm instruments was introduced in the mid 1990s but failed to attain mainstream use, mostly because of the limitations of the early devices. Buoyed by a renewed interest, new generations of mini instruments are being developed with improved functionality and durability. This study is an objective evaluation of a new set of mini instruments with a novel low-friction design. Method: Twenty-two medical students and 22 surgical residents served as study participants. Three designs of laparoscopic instruments were evaluated: conventional 5 mm, traditional 3 mm, and low-friction 3 mm. The instruments were evaluated with a standard surgical simulator, emulating 4 exercises of various complexities, testing grasping, precise 2-handed movements, and suturing. The metric measured was time to task completion, with 5 replicates for every combination of instrument–exercise–participant. Results: For all 4 tasks, the instrument design that performed the best was the same in both the medical student and surgical resident groups. For the gross-grasping task, the 5-mm conventional instruments performed best, followed by the low-friction mini instruments. For the 3 more complex and precise tasks, the low-friction mini instruments outperformed both of the other instrument designs. Conclusion: In standard surgical simulator exercises, low-friction minilaparoscopic instruments outperformed both conventional 3- and 5-mm laparoscopic instruments for precise tasks. PMID:26390530

  11. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  12. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  13. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Langry, Kevin C. (Tracy, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  14. How Photoisomerization Drives Peptide Folding and Unfolding: Insights from QM/MM and MM Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Wei-Hai; Thiel, Walter

    2016-02-01

    Photoswitchable azobenzene cross-linkers can control the folding and unfolding of peptides by photoisomerization and can thus regulate peptide affinities and enzyme activities. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and classical MM force fields, we report the first molecular dynamics simulations of the photoinduced folding and unfolding processes in the azobenzene cross-linked FK-11 peptide. We find that the interactions between the peptide and the azobenzene cross-linker are crucial for controlling the evolution of the secondary structure of the peptide and responsible for accelerating the folding and unfolding events. They also modify the photoisomerization mechanism of the azobenzene cross-linker compared with the situation in vacuo or in solution. PMID:26836339

  15. Case-specific performance of MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA, and SIE in virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Salla I; Niinivehmas, Sanna P; Pentikäinen, Olli T

    2015-11-01

    In drug discovery the reliable prediction of binding free energies is of crucial importance. Methods that combine molecular mechanics force fields with continuum solvent models have become popular because of their high accuracy and relatively good computational efficiency. In this research we studied the performance of molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA), molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA), and solvated interaction energy (SIE) both in their virtual screening efficiency and their ability to predict experimentally determined binding affinities for five different protein targets. The protein-ligand complexes were derived with two different approaches important in virtual screening: molecular docking and ligand-based similarity search methods. The results show significant differences between the different binding energy calculation methods. However, the length of the molecular dynamics simulation was not of crucial importance for accuracy of results. PMID:26550792

  16. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  17. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  18. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  19. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  20. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  1. The LLAMA 12 m mm/sub-mm radiotelescope in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepine, Jacques; Edemundo Arnal, Marcelo; de Graauw, Thijs; Abraham, Zulema; Gimenez de Castro, Guillermo; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Morras, Ricardo; Larrarte, Juan; Viramontes, José; Finger, Ricardo; Kooi, Jacob; Reeves, Rodrigo; Beaklini, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    LLAMA (Large Latin American Millimetric Array) is a joint Argentinean-Brazilian project of a 12m mm/sub-mm radio telescope similar to the APEX antenna, to be installed at a site at 4800 m altitude near San Antonio de Los Cobres in the Salta Province in Argentine, at 150 km from ALMA. The scientific cases for single dish and VLBI observations include black holes and accretion disks, the molecular evolution of interstellar clouds, the structure of the Galaxy, the formation of galaxies, and much more. The antenna was ordered to the company Vertex Antennentechnik in June 2014, and the construction is progressing quickly; it will be installed at the site in 2016. The radio telescope will be equipped with up to six receivers covering bands similar to those of ALMA. Cryostats with room for 3 cartridges, constructed by NAOJ (Tokyo,Japan), will be installed in each of the two Nasmyth cabins. Among the first receivers we will have an ALMA band 9 provided by NOVA (Groningen, Holland) and a band 5 from the Chalmers University (Sweden). Other receivers are still being discussed at the time of submission of this abstract,At high frequencies, VLBI observations at high frequencies could be made with ALMA, APEX and ASTE, and Northern radiotelescopes. In this way, LLAMA will be a seed for a Latin-American VLBI network.

  2. Urine pH test

    MedlinePLUS

    pH - urine ... meat products or cranberries can decrease your urine pH. ... provider may order this test to check for changes in your body's ... stones can form, depending on the acidity level of your urine.

  3. Teaching Evolutionary Mechanisms: Genetic Drift and M&M's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity that teaches the mechanism of genetic drift to undergraduates. Illustrates a number of concepts that are critical in developing evolution literacy by sampling M&M milk chocolate candies. (MM)

  4. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease MM1+2C and MM1 are Identical in Transmission Properties.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Matsuura, Yuichi; Iwaki, Toru; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Murayama, Shigeo; Takao, Masaki; Kato, Shinsuke; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The genotype (methionine, M or valine, V) at polymorphic codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the type (1 or 2) of abnormal prion protein in the brain are the major determinants of the clinicopathological features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), thus providing molecular basis for classification of sporadic CJD, that is, MM1, MM2, MV1, MV2, VV1 or VV2. In addition to these "pure" cases, "mixed" cases presenting mixed neuropathological and biochemical features have also been recognized. The most frequently observed mixed form is the co-occurrence of MM1 and MM2, namely MM1+2. However, it has remained elusive whether MM1+2 could be a causative origin of dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD), one of the largest subgroups of iatrogenic CJD. To test this possibility, we performed transmission experiments of MM1+2 prions and a systematic neuropathological examination of dCJD patients in the present study. The transmission properties of the MM1+2 prions were identical to those of MM1 prions because MM2 prions lacked transmissibility. In addition, the neuropathological characteristics of MM2 were totally absent in dCJD patients examined. These results suggest that MM1+2 can be a causative origin of dCJD and causes neuropathological phenotype similar to that of MM1. PMID:25851836

  5. Role of decorin in multiple myeloma (MM) bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Neeharika; Santo, Loredana; Eda, Homare; Cirstea, Diana; Mishima, Yuko; Patel, Chirayu; O'Donnell, Elizabeth; Yee, Andrew; Raje, Noopur

    2015-03-01

    Decorin is a small, leucine-rich proteoglycan found in the extracellular matrix of various connective tissues with potential effective tumor suppressive properties. Recent data suggest low levels of decorin in multiple myeloma (MM) patients compared to healthy volunteers, as well as in patients with osteolytic bone lesions compared to non-osteolytic lesions. In the present report, we investigated the role of decorin in the MM microenvironment or niche. Our data suggests that decorin is produced by osteoblasts (OBs) but not by MM cells. Furthermore, MM cells decrease OB-induced decorin secretion and this effect is mediated by CCL3. Importantly, neutralizing CCL3 from MM cells restores decorin levels in OBs as does proteasome inhibitors such as carfilzomib. These findings indicate that decorin may indirectly act as an antagonist to MM cell survival and that the interplay between MM and decorin may be an important target to explore in manipulating the tumor niche to inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:25407518

  6. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  7. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  8. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  9. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  10. Production and characterization of an extracellular polysaccharide from Streptomyces violaceus MM72.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Sivasankar, Palaniappan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-08-01

    The isolation, optimization, purification and characterization of an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) from a marine actinobacterium, Streptomyces violaceus MM72 were investigated. Medium composition and culture conditions for the EPS production by S. violaceus MM72 were optimized using two statistical methods: Plackett-Burman design applied to find the key ingredients and conditions for the best yield of EPS production and central composite design used to optimize the concentration of the three significant variables: glucose, tryptone and NaCl. The preferable culture conditions for EPS production were pH 7.0, temperature 35°C and NaCl concentration 2.0% for 120h with fructose and yeast extract as best carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The results showed that S. violaceus MM72 produced a kind of EPS having molecular weight of 8.96×10(5)Da. In addition, the EPS showed strong DPPH radical-scavenging activity, superoxide scavenging and metal chelating activities while moderate inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing activities determined in this study. These results showed the great potential of EPS produced by S. violaceus MM72 could be used in industry in place of synthetic compounds. The EPS from S. violaceus MM72 may be a new source of natural antioxidants with potential value for health, food and therapeutics. PMID:23597709

  11. Dual Function pH and Oxygen Phosphonated Trityl Probe

    PubMed Central

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Komarov, Denis A.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    Triarylmethyl radicals, TAMs, are used as persistent paramagnetic probes for EPR spectroscopic and imaging applications and as hyperpolarizing and contrast agents for MRI and proton-electron double-resonance imaging, PEDRI. Recently we proposed the concept of dual function pH and oxygen TAM probes based on the incorporation of ionizable groups into the TAM structure (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 7240–7241). In this paper we report the synthesis of deuterated derivative of phosphonated trityl radical, pTAM. The presence of phosphono substitutes in the structure of TAM provides pH sensitivity of its EPR spectrum in the physiological range of pH from 6 to 8, the phosphorus hyperfine splitting being convenient and highly sensitive pH marker (spectral sensitivity, 3?aP/?pH?0.5 G/pH unit; accuracy of pH measurements, ±0.05). In addition, substitution of 36 methyl protons with deuterons significantly decreased the individual linewidth of pTAM down to 40 mG and, as consequence, provided high sensitivity of the linewidth broadening to pO2 (?H/?pO2?0.4 mG/mmHg; accuracy of pO2 measurements, ?1 mmHg). The independent character of pH and [O2] effects on the EPR spectra of pTAM provides dual functionality to this probe allowing for an extraction of both parameters from a single EPR spectrum. PMID:22703565

  12. Effect of the borax mass and pre-spray medium temperature on droplet size and velocity vector distributions of intermittently sprayed starchy solutions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2015-02-01

    Spray coating technology has demonstrated great potential in the slow release fertilizers industry. The better understanding of the key spray parameters benefits both the environment and low cost coating processes. The use of starch based materials to coat the slow release fertilizers is a new development. However, the hydraulic spray jet breakup of the non-Newtonian starchy solutions is a complex phenomenon and very little known. The aim of this research was to study the axial and radial distributions of the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and velocity vectors in pulsing spray patterns of native and modified tapioca starch solutions. To meet the objective, high speed imaging and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques were employed to characterize the four compositions of the starch-urea-borax complex namely S0, S1, S2 and S3. The unheated solutions exhibited very high viscosities ranging from 2035 to 3030 cP. No jet breakup was seen at any stage of the nozzle operation at an injection pressure of 1-5 bar. However, at 80 °C temperature and 5 bar pressure, the viscosity was reduced to 455 to 638 cP and dense spray patterns emerged from the nozzle obscuring the PDA signals. The axial size distribution revealed a significant decrease in SMD along the spray centreline. The smallest axial SMD (51 to 79 ?m) was noticed in S0 spray followed by S1, S2 and S3. Unlikely, the radial SMD in S0 spray did not vary significantly at any stage of the spray injection. This trend was attributed to the continuous growth of the surface wave instabilities on the native starch sheet. However, SMD obtained with S1, S2 and S3 varied appreciably along the radial direction. The mean velocity vector profiles followed the non-Gaussian distribution. The constant vector distributions were seen in the near nozzle regions, where the spray was in the phase of development. In far regions, the velocity vectors were poly-dispersed and a series of ups and downs were seen in the respective radial distributions. PMID:25557285

  13. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  14. Is smaller better? Comparison of 3-mm and 5-mm leaf size for stereotactic radiosurgery: A dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Shyh-shi . E-mail: Richard.Chern@hci.utah.edu; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of a minimal 3-mm leaf width multileaf collimator (MLC) and a minimal 5-mm MLC in dynamic conformal arc stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of intracranial lesions. Methods and Materials: The treatment plans of 23 patients previously treated for intracranial lesions in our institution were redone using the BrainSCAN, version 5.3, stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning system (BrainLAB). For each case, two dynamic conformal arc plans were generated: one using a minimal 3-mm micro-MLC (BrainLAB, Novalis) and one using a minimal 5-mm MLC (Varian Millennium). All arc parameters were the same in each of the two plans, except for the collimator angle settings. The collimator angle settings were optimized for each arc in each plan. A peritumoral rind structure (1 cm) was created to evaluate normal tissue sparing immediately adjacent to the target volume. Conformity indexes (CIs) were calculated for each plan. The dependence of normal tissue sparing and target conformity on target volume (TV) was determined. Results: The TV was 0.14-36.32 cm{sup 3} (median, 5.90). The CI was 1.22-2.60 (median, 1.51) for the 3-mm micro-MLC and 1.23-2.69 (median, 1.60) for the 5-mm MLC. Despite this small difference, it was a statistically significant increase (p < 0.0001) for the 5-mm MLC compared with the 3-mm micro-MLC. Improved normal tissue sparing was demonstrated using the 3-mm micro-MLC compared with the 5-mm MLC by examining the peritumoral rind volumes (PRVs) receiving 50% (PRV{sub 5}), 80% (PRV{sub 8}), and 90% (PRV{sub 9}) of the prescription dose. The reduction in the PRV{sub 5}, PRV{sub 8}, and PRV{sub 9} for the 3-mm micro-MLC compared with the 5-mm MLC was 13.5%, 12.9%, and 11.5%, respectively. The CI decreased with a larger TV, as did the difference in the CIs between the 3-mm micro-MLC and 5-mm MLC. A reduction in the PRV increased with larger TVs. Conclusion: The 3-mm micro-MLC provided better target conformity and greater normal tissue sparing than the 5-mm MLC in stereotactic radiosurgery using dynamic conformal arcs. These differences were small but consistent in the patients examined. Future research is needed to determine whether this small improvement can yield a clinical impact on patient care.

  15. Photoionization study of PH: PH/sub 2/ revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Cho, H.

    1989-01-01

    The photoion yield curve of PH/sup +/ (PH) is presented, from threshold to 1040 A. The adiabatic ionization potential of PH is 10.149 +- 0.008 eV. Extensive autoionization structure is observed and analyzed. It is attributed to several Rydberg series, whose mutual convergence limit is 11.852 +- 0.002 eV, and corresponds to the onset of PH/sup +/ (a /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/). The photoion yield curve of AsH/sup +/ (AsH) is juxtaposed, and shown to have a similar pattern. A new photoion yield curve of PH/sup +//sub 2/ (PH/sub 2/) is shown, where the source of PH/sub 2/ is the H+PH/sub 3/ reaction. The new results corroborate the earlier data (based on the pyrolysis of benzylphosphine) regarding the adiabatic ionization potential of PH/sub 2/ to form X /sup 1/A/sub 1/, and the presence of broad autoionizing structure. They also display less scatter, and enable one to estimate the onset for a-italic-tilde /sup 3/B/sub 1/ to be about 0.70 eV above X /sup 1/A/sub 1/. From the analogous behavior of the AsH/sup +//sub 2/ (AsH/sub 2/) curve, the a /sup 3/B/sub 1/--X /sup 1/A/sub 1/ splitting in AsH/sup +//sub 2/ is estimated to be 0.58--0.68 eV.

  16. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 ?M) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant ?1?2?2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission, which is mediated by both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. PMID:24780768

  17. Japanese Science Films; a Descriptive and Evaluative Catalog of: 16mm Motion Pictures, 8mm Cartridges, and Video Tapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newren, Edward F., Ed.

    One hundred and eighty Japanese 16mm motion pictures, 8mm cartridges, and video tapes produced and judged appropriate for a variety of audience levels are listed in alphabetical order by title with descriptive and evaluative information. A subject heading list and a subject index to the film titles are included, as well as a sample of the…

  18. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ...

  19. The 19 mm data recorders similarities and differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Confusion over the use of non-video 19 mm data recorders is becoming more pronounced as we enter the world of high performance computing. This paper addresses the following: the differences between ID-1, ID-2, MIL-STD-2179 and DD-2; what the proper machine is for various applications; how the machine can be integrated into an environment; and any misconceptions there might be about 19 mm tape recorders. DD-2 and 19 mm instrumentation recorders have missions for which each is well designed. While the differences may appear subtle, understanding the difference between the two is the key to picking the right recorder for a particular application.

  20. The 19 mm data recorders similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Steve

    1992-09-01

    Confusion over the use of non-video 19 mm data recorders is becoming more pronounced as we enter the world of high performance computing. This paper addresses the following: the differences between ID-1, ID-2, MIL-STD-2179 and DD-2; what the proper machine is for various applications; how the machine can be integrated into an environment; and any misconceptions there might be about 19 mm tape recorders. DD-2 and 19 mm instrumentation recorders have missions for which each is well designed. While the differences may appear subtle, understanding the difference between the two is the key to picking the right recorder for a particular application.

  1. Replacing 16 mm film cameras with high definition digital cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    For many years 16 mm film cameras have been used in severe environments. These film cameras are used on Hy-G automotive sleds, airborne gun cameras, range tracking and other hazardous environments. The companies and government agencies using these cameras are in need of replacing them with a more cost effective solution. Film-based cameras still produce the best resolving capability, however, film development time, chemical disposal, recurring media cost, and faster digital analysis are factors influencing the desire for a 16 mm film camera replacement. This paper will describe a new camera from Kodak that has been designed to replace 16 mm high speed film cameras.

  2. Corneal biomechanical properties changes after coaxial 2.2-mm microincision and standard 3.0-mm phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Hua; Dong, Hui; Wang, Li; Jia, Ya-Ding; Zhang, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the changes in corneal biomechanics measured by ocular response analyzer (ORA) after 2.2-mm microincision cataract surgery and 3.0-mm standard coaxial phacoemulsification. METHODS The prospective nonrandomized study comprised eyes with cataract that had 2.2-mm coaxial microincision or 3.0-mm standard incision phacoemulsification. The corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc) and Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg) were measured by ORA preoperatively and at 1d, 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-week postoperatively. Results were analyzed and compared between groups. RESULTS In both groups, CH decreased in the immediate postoperative period (P<0.05), returned to the preoperative level at one week (P=0.249) in the 2.2-mm group, and at two weeks in the 3.0-mm group (P=0.264); there was no significant change in CRF values. In 2.2-mm group, mean IOPcc and IOPg increased at 1d postoperatively (both P<0.05), and returned to preoperative level at one week (P=0.491 and P=0.923, respectively). In 3.0-mm group, mean IOPcc and IOPg increased at 1d and 1wk postoperatively (P=0.005 and P=0.029, respectively), and returned to preoperative level at 2wk (P=0.347 and P=0.887, respectively). CONCLUSION Significant differences between preoperative and postoperative corneal biomechanical values were found for CH, IOPcc and IOPg. But the recovery time courses were different between the two groups. The 2.2-mm coaxial microincision cataract surgery group seemed recovery faster compared to the 3.0-mm standard coaxial phacoemulsification group.

  3. Building 931, oblique view to northwest, 210 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 931, oblique view to northwest, 210 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Central Battery Charging Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  4. Building 1204, oblique view to east, 90 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 1204, oblique view to east, 90 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Squadron Operations & Readiness Crew Facility, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. Building 904, oblique view to northwest, 135 mm lens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to northwest, 135 mm lens - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  6. Building 904, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  7. Building 931, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 931, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Central Battery Charging Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  8. Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building 908 at extreme right for context. - Travis Air Force Base, Handling Crew Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  9. Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building 933-935 at extreme left. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 5, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  10. Building 904, oblique view to northeast, 210mm lens Travis ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to northeast, 210mm lens - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  11. Building 1204, oblique view to west, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 1204, oblique view to west, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Squadron Operations & Readiness Crew Facility, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  12. A 1.6-mm, metal tube ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Cagatay, Serra; Koc, Burhanettin; Uchino, Kenji

    2003-07-01

    A miniaturized metal tube ultrasonic motor, the dimensions of which are 1.6 mm in diameter and 6 mm in length, was developed. Two flattened surfaces with 90-degrees were ground on the outer surface of the stator. Two PZT-based piezoelectric ceramics were bonded onto these flat surfaces. The asymmetrical surface of the stator developed the split of the two degenerated orthogonal bending modes, resulting in a wobble motion. The working frequency of the 1.6-mm motor with 6 mm in length was 130 kHz. A torque of 0.5 mNm was reached at a maximum power of 45 mW with a speed of 45 rad/sec. The maximum efficiency was 16%. PMID:12894912

  13. Electromagnetic launch of mm-size pellets to great velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Drobyshevski, E.M.; Zhukov, B.G.; Kurakin, R.O.; Sakharov, V.A.; Studenkov, A.M.

    1994-11-01

    Small body launching that uses gas or plasma faces the fundamental problem caused by excess energy loss that is due to the great wall surface/volume ratio of the barrel. For example, the efficiency of the plasma armature (PA) rail-gun acceleration is maximum for 8-10 mm-size bodies and drops as their size decreases. That is why in the case of nuclear fusion applications, where 1-2 mm-size pellets at 5-10 km/s velocity are desirable, electromagnetic launchers have not yet demonstrated an advantage over light-gas guns and one is now forced to search for a compromise between the pellet size (increasing it up to 3-4 mm) and its velocity (decreasing it down to {approx}3 km/s). As a whole, the probability of attaining 5-10 km/s velocity for 1-2 mm pellets seems to be rather remote at the present.

  14. QM/MM investigations of organic chemistry oriented questions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas C; Paasche, Alexander; Grebner, Christoph; Ansorg, Kay; Becker, Johannes; Lee, Wook; Engels, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    About 35 years after its first suggestion, QM/MM became the standard theoretical approach to investigate enzymatic structures and processes. The success is due to the ability of QM/MM to provide an accurate atomistic picture of enzymes and related processes. This picture can even be turned into a movie if nuclei-dynamics is taken into account to describe enzymatic processes. In the field of organic chemistry, QM/MM methods are used to a much lesser extent although almost all relevant processes happen in condensed matter or are influenced by complicated interactions between substrate and catalyst. There is less importance for theoretical organic chemistry since the influence of nonpolar solvents is rather weak and the effect of polar solvents can often be accurately described by continuum approaches. Catalytic processes (homogeneous and heterogeneous) can often be reduced to truncated model systems, which are so small that pure quantum-mechanical approaches can be employed. However, since QM/MM becomes more and more efficient due to the success in software and hardware developments, it is more and more used in theoretical organic chemistry to study effects which result from the molecular nature of the environment. It is shown by many examples discussed in this review that the influence can be tremendous, even for nonpolar reactions. The importance of environmental effects in theoretical spectroscopy was already known. Due to its benefits, QM/MM can be expected to experience ongoing growth for the next decade.In the present chapter we give an overview of QM/MM developments and their importance in theoretical organic chemistry, and review applications which give impressions of the possibilities and the importance of the relevant effects. Since there is already a bunch of excellent reviews dealing with QM/MM, we will discuss fundamental ingredients and developments of QM/MM very briefly with a focus on very recent progress. For the applications we follow a similar strategy. PMID:22392477

  15. The 19 mm date recorders: Similarities and differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Confusion over the use of non-video 19 mm data recorders is becoming more pronounced in the world of high performance computing. The following issues are addressed: (1) the difference between ID-1, ID-2, MIL-STD-2179, and DD-2; (2) the proper machine for the necessary application; and (3) integrating the machine into an existing environment. Also, an attempt is made to clear up any misconceptions there might be about 19 mm tape recorders.

  16. The 19 mm date recorders: Similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Steve

    Confusion over the use of non-video 19 mm data recorders is becoming more pronounced in the world of high performance computing. The following issues are addressed: (1) the difference between ID-1, ID-2, MIL-STD-2179, and DD-2; (2) the proper machine for the necessary application; and (3) integrating the machine into an existing environment. Also, an attempt is made to clear up any misconceptions there might be about 19 mm tape recorders.

  17. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  18. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  19. Spectral Line Survey toward the Young Massive Protostar NGC 2264 CMM3 in the 4 mm, 3 mm, and 0.8 mm Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Furuya, Ryuta; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Spectral line survey observations are conducted toward the high-mass protostar candidate NGC 2264 CMM3 in the 4, 3, and 0.8 mm bands with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope. In total, 265 emission lines are detected in the 4 and 3 mm bands, and 74 emission lines in the 0.8 mm band. As a result, 36 molecular species and 30 isotopologues are identified. In addition to the fundamental molecular species, many emission lines of carbon-chain molecules such as HC5N, C4H, CCS, and C3S are detected in the 4 and 3 mm bands. Deuterated molecular species are also detected with relatively strong intensities. On the other hand, emission lines of complex organic molecules such as HCOOCH3 and CH3OCH3 are found to be weak. For the molecules for which multiple transitions are detected, rotation temperatures are derived to be 7-33 K except for CH3OH. Emission lines with high upper-state energies (Eu > 150 K) are detected for CH3OH, indicating the existence of a hot core. In comparison with the chemical composition of the Orion KL, carbon-chain molecules and deuterated molecules are found to be abundant in NGC 2264 CMM3, while sulfur-bearing species and complex organic molecules are deficient. These characteristics indicate the chemical youth of NGC 2264 CMM3 in spite of its location at the center of the cluster forming core, NGC 2264 C.

  20. Influence of pH on Ammonia Accumulation and Toxicity in Halophilic, Methylotrophic Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, P. C.; Boone, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effects of pH and ammonia concentration on the growth of three methanogens. These three halophilic, methylotrophic methanogens, Methanolobus bombayensis, Methanolobus taylorii, and Methanohalophilus zhilinaeae, grew at environmental pH ranges that overlapped with each other and spanned the pH range from 7.0 to 9.5. During growth they had reversed membrane pH gradients ((Delta)pH) at all pH values tested. The (Delta)pH was in the range of -0.4 to -0.9 pH units, with the cytosol being more acidic than the environmental pH. Methanohalophilus zhilinaeae had the most negative (Delta)pH (-0.9 pH units). These negative pH gradients resulted in the accumulation of ammonium (NH(inf4)(sup+)), and when grown at the highest external ammonia concentrations that allowed good growth, cells had cytosolic NH(inf4)(sup+) concentrations as high as 180 mM. The high concentrations of cytosolic NH(inf4)(sup+) were accompanied by greater (Delta)pH and lower concentrations of the major cytosolic cation K(sup+) (compared with cells grown in medium with only 5 mM ammonia). Methanolobus bombayensis and Methanolobus taylorii were more sensitive to total external ammonia at higher external pH values, but the inhibitory concentration of un-ionized ammonia that resulted in a 50% reduction of the growth rate was about 2 to 5 mM, regardless of the pH. This is consistent with growth inhibition by ammonia in other bacteria. However, Methanohalophilus zhilinaeae was more resistant to un-ionized ammonia than any other known organism. It had a 50% inhibitory concentration for un-ionized ammonia of 13 mM at pH 8.5 and 45 mM at pH 9.5. We examined the effects of pH on three ammonia-assimilating activities (glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine dehydrogenase) in cell lysates and found that the pH ranges were consistent with the observed ranges of intracellular pH. PMID:16535465

  1. Classical polarization in hybrid QM/MM methods.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Christopher J R; Gooding, Stuart R; Winn, Peter J; Jones, Garth A; Ferenczy, György G; Reynolds, Christopher A

    2006-05-25

    We have presented a method for modeling polarization in hybrid QM/MM calculations. The method, which expresses the induced dipoles as a set of "induced" charges, is based on the induced dipole approach and methodology for calculating potential-derived point charges from distributed multipole series. The method has the advantage that the same methodology can be used to determine the induced charges and the potential derived charges and so both sets of charges are rigorously defined within the same framework. This underlying link with the wave function makes the method particularly suitable for use in hybrid QM/MM calculations. Here we assess the importance of explicit polarization in the classical part of a QM/MM system with regard to improving the classical description and the consequent effects on the quantum description. The main advantages of the induced charge approach are that the method is readily interfaced with quantum mechanical methods and that induced charges are more readily interpreted than induced dipoles. The ease of interpretation is illustrated by analysis of the charges involved in dimeric and trimeric hydrogen bonded systems. The method for treating the MM polarization has been validated by a regression analysis of the charges induced in both the QM and MM systems against those derived from full quantum mechanical calculations. The method has also been validated using two energy decomposition approaches, which show that MM polarization makes a significant and reliable contribution to the QM - MM interaction energy in a hybrid system. The distance dependency of the induced charges is investigated in calculations on methylsuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala chlormethyl ketone interacting with human neutrophil elastase and propranolol interacting with asparagine residues in a model of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor. PMID:16706406

  2. The same-source parallel MM{sub 5}.

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-08-23

    The set of architectures available to users of the Penn State/NCAR MM5 has been expanded to included distributed-memory parallel computers, providing cost-effective scalable performance and memory capacity for large problem sizes. The same-source approach uses high-level parallel library and source-translation technology for adapting MM5, simplifying maintenance and allowing new physics modules to be incorporated without modification. The approach facilitates maintenance of the DM-parallel option to MM5 as an option within the official version, rather than as a separate stand-alone version. As a result, the DM-parallel option to MM5 (now at Version 3.1) has been a part of six subsequent model releases since MM5 Version 2.8 in March 1998. The same-source approach is applicable to other, similarly constructed codes when there is a need or desire to develop the code for distributed memory parallel machines without impacting the pre-existing source code. The approach is also compatible with pre-existing loop-level multithreading directives so that the code will run in distributed-memory/shared-memory mode on SMP clusters.

  3. QM/MM X-ray refinement of zinc metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Hayik, Seth A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2010-05-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play an important role in biology. However, due to the limitation of molecular force field energy restraints used in X-ray refinement at medium or low resolutions, the precise geometry of the zinc coordination environment can be difficult to distinguish from ambiguous electron density maps. Due to the difficulties involved in defining accurate force fields for metal ions, the QM/MM (quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical) method provides an attractive and more general alternative for the study and refinement of metalloprotein active sites. Herein we present three examples that indicate that QM/MM based refinement yields a superior description of the crystal structure based on R and R(free) values and on the inspection of the zinc coordination environment. It is concluded that QM/MM refinement is an useful general tool for the improvement of the metal coordination sphere in metalloenzyme active sites. PMID:20116858

  4. Brain tissue oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in neurosurgical patients at risk for ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, W E; Charbel, F T; Edelman, G

    1996-03-01

    A sensor that measures oxygen pressure (PO2), carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2), and pH was evaluated in brain tissue of patients at risk for ischemia. The sensor is 0.5 mm in diameter and was inserted into cortex tissue in 14 patients undergoing craniotomy for cerebrovascular surgery. A compromised cerebral circulation was identified in 8 of 14 patients by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan, cerebral angiography, and transient ischemic episodes before surgery. Under baseline conditions with isoflurane anesthesia and normal blood gases, tissue P02 was lower in the eight compromised compared to six noncompromised patients (noncompromised 37 +/- 12 mm Hg, compromised 10 +/- 5 mm Hg; P < 0.05), PCO2 was increased (noncompromised 49 +/- 5 mm Hg, compromised 72 +/- 23 mm Hg; P < 0.05), and pH was decreased (noncompromised 7.16 +/- 0.08, compromised 6.82 +/- 0.21; P < 0.05). Critical tissue values for the identification of ischemia were a P02 of 20 mm Hg, PCO2 of 60 mm Hg, and a pH of 7.0. These results suggest that brain tissue measures of P02, PCO2, and pH provide information on the adequacy of cerebral perfusion in neurosurgical patients. PMID:8623965

  5. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  6. WO3 nanoparticle-based conformable pH sensor.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lídia; Neto, Joana P; Crespo, Ana; Nunes, Daniela; Costa, Nuno; Fonseca, Isabel M; Barquinha, Pedro; Pereira, Luís; Silva, Jorge; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2014-08-13

    pH is a vital physiological parameter that can be used for disease diagnosis and treatment as well as in monitoring other biological processes. Metal/metal oxide based pH sensors have several advantages regarding their reliability, miniaturization, and cost-effectiveness, which are critical characteristics for in vivo applications. In this work, WO3 nanoparticles were electrodeposited on flexible substrates over metal electrodes with a sensing area of 1 mm(2). These sensors show a sensitivity of -56.7 ± 1.3 mV/pH, in a wide pH range of 9 to 5. A proof of concept is also demonstrated using a flexible reference electrode in solid electrolyte with a curved surface. A good balance between the performance parameters (sensitivity), the production costs, and simplicity of the sensors was accomplished, as required for wearable biomedical devices. PMID:25020126

  7. Computational Modeling in Plasma Processing for 300 mm Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Migration toward 300 mm wafer size has been initiated recently due to process economics and to meet future demands for integrated circuits. A major issue facing the semiconductor community at this juncture is development of suitable processing equipment, for example, plasma processing reactors that can accomodate 300 mm wafers. In this Invited Talk, scaling of reactors will be discussed with the aid of computational fluid dynamics results. We have undertaken reactor simulations using CFD with reactor geometry, pressure, and precursor flow rates as parameters in a systematic investigation. These simulations provide guidelines for scaling up in reactor design.

  8. Performance evaluation of 4.75-mm NMAS superpave mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Farhana

    A Superpave asphalt mixture with 4.75-mm nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS) is a promising, low-cost pavement preservation treatment for agencies such as the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT). The objective of this research study is to develop an optimized 4.75-mm NMAS Superpave mixture in Kansas. In addition, the study evaluated the residual tack coat application rate for the 4.75-mm NMAS mix overlay. Two, hot-in-place recycling (HIPR) projects in Kansas, on US-160 and K-25, were overlaid with a 15- to 19-mm thick layer of 4.75-mm NMAS Superpave mixture in 2007. The field tack coat application rate was measured during construction. Cores were collected from each test section for Hamburg wheel tracking device (HWTD) and laboratory bond tests performed after construction and after one year in service. Test results showed no significant effect of the tack coat application rate on the rutting performance of rehabilitated pavements. The number of wheel passes to rutting failure observed during the HWTD test was dependent on the aggregate source as well as on in-place density of the cores. Laboratory pull-off tests showed that most cores were fully bonded at the interface of the 4.75-mm NMAS overlay and the HIPR layer, regardless of the tack application rate. The failure mode during pull-off tests at the HMA interface was highly dependent on the aggregate source and mix design of the existing layer material. This study also confirmed that overlay construction with a high tack coat application rate may result in bond failure at the HMA interface. Twelve different 4.75-mm NMAS mix designs were developed using materials from the aforementioned but two binder grades and three different percentages of natural (river) sand. Laboratory performance tests were conducted to assess mixture performance. Results show that rutting and moisture damage potential in the laboratory depend on aggregate type irrespective of binder grade. Anti-stripping agent affects moisture sensitivity test results. Fatigue performance is significantly influenced by river sand content and binder grade. Finally, an optimized 4.75-mm NMAS mixture design was developed and verified based on statistical analysis of performance data.

  9. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  10. QM/MM hybrid calculation of biological macromolecules using a new interface program connecting QM and MM engines.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Ohta, Takehiro; Tateno, Masaru

    2009-02-11

    An interface program connecting a quantum mechanics (QM) calculation engine, GAMESS, and a molecular mechanics (MM) calculation engine, AMBER, has been developed for QM/MM hybrid calculations. A protein-DNA complex is used as a test system to investigate the following two types of QM/MM schemes. In a 'subtractive' scheme, electrostatic interactions between QM/MM regions are truncated in QM calculations; in an 'additive' scheme, long-range electrostatic interactions within a cut-off distance from QM regions are introduced into one-electron integration terms of a QM Hamiltonian. In these calculations, 338 atoms are assigned as QM atoms using Hartree-Fock (HF)/density functional theory (DFT) hybrid all-electron calculations. By comparing the results of the additive and subtractive schemes, it is found that electronic structures are perturbed significantly by the introduction of MM partial charges surrounding QM regions, suggesting that biological processes occurring in functional sites are modulated by the surrounding structures. This also indicates that the effects of long-range electrostatic interactions involved in the QM Hamiltonian are crucial for accurate descriptions of electronic structures of biological macromolecules. PMID:21715936

  11. A comparative study of trypsin specificity based on QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation and QM/MM GBSA calculation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen bonding and polar interactions play a key role in identification of protein-inhibitor binding specificity. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations combined with DFT and semi-empirical Hamiltonian (AM1d, RM1, PM3, and PM6) methods were performed to study the hydrogen bonding and polar interactions of two inhibitors BEN and BEN1 with trypsin. The results show that the accuracy of treating the hydrogen bonding and polar interactions using QM/MM MD simulation of PM6 can reach the one obtained by the DFT QM/MM MD simulation. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM/MM-GBSA) method was applied to calculate binding affinities of inhibitors to trypsin and the results suggest that the accuracy of binding affinity prediction can be significantly affected by the accurate treatment of the hydrogen bonding and polar interactions. In addition, the calculated results also reveal the binding specificity of trypsin: (1) the amidinium groups of two inhibitors generate favorable salt bridge interaction with Asp189 and form hydrogen bonding interactions with Ser190 and Gly214, (2) the phenyl of inhibitors can produce favorable van der Waals interactions with the residues His58, Cys191, Gln192, Trp211, Gly212, and Cys215. This systematic and comparative study can provide guidance for the choice of QM/MM MD methods and the designs of new potent inhibitors targeting trypsin. PMID:25562613

  12. QM/MM hybrid calculation of biological macromolecules using a new interface program connecting QM and MM engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Ohta, Takehiro; Tateno, Masaru

    2009-02-01

    An interface program connecting a quantum mechanics (QM) calculation engine, GAMESS, and a molecular mechanics (MM) calculation engine, AMBER, has been developed for QM/MM hybrid calculations. A protein-DNA complex is used as a test system to investigate the following two types of QM/MM schemes. In a 'subtractive' scheme, electrostatic interactions between QM/MM regions are truncated in QM calculations; in an 'additive' scheme, long-range electrostatic interactions within a cut-off distance from QM regions are introduced into one-electron integration terms of a QM Hamiltonian. In these calculations, 338 atoms are assigned as QM atoms using Hartree-Fock (HF)/density functional theory (DFT) hybrid all-electron calculations. By comparing the results of the additive and subtractive schemes, it is found that electronic structures are perturbed significantly by the introduction of MM partial charges surrounding QM regions, suggesting that biological processes occurring in functional sites are modulated by the surrounding structures. This also indicates that the effects of long-range electrostatic interactions involved in the QM Hamiltonian are crucial for accurate descriptions of electronic structures of biological macromolecules.

  13. IMPLEMENTATION OF AN URBAN CANOPY PARAMETERIZATION IN MM5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) (Grell et al. 1994) has been modified to include an urban canopy parameterization (UCP) for fine-scale urban simulations (~1-km horizontal grid spacing). The UCP accounts for drag ...

  14. 26. Photocopy of 35 mm. color slide (City of New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of 35 mm. color slide (City of New York Department of Ports, International Trade, and Commerce), May 1985, Norman Berger AERIAL VIEW NORTHEAST OF PIERS 95, 96, AND 97 - West 55th Street & West 56th Street Piers, Hudson River at West Fifty-fifth & West Fifty-sixth Streets, Manhattan, New York, New York County, NY

  15. Guide to Films (16 mm) About Negroes. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    Over 740 films (16 mm.) concerning the lives, culture, history, and problems of Black people in the United States and in Africa are listed alphabetically by title in this guide. Each entry includes the running time, a synopsis of the film's content, and a source code and tells whether the film is in black-and-white or in color. The guide includes…

  16. Guide to Films (16 mm) About Ecology, Adaptation and Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Synopses of 350 films (16 mm.) on ecology, adaptation of plants and animals to their environment, and environmental pollution are listed alphabetically by title in this guide. It specifies whether the film is black-and-white or color, its running time, and its source. An abbreviated subject index and a directory of sources are also provided. The…

  17. 0. 4 mm interferometer system using dielectric waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Ma, C.H.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    A 0.4 mm submillimeter-wave, phase-modulated polarimeter/interferometer is used for simultaneous time-dependent measurement of line-averaged electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation along chords of the plasma column in ISX-B tokamak. Heterodyna detection and hollow dielectric waveguide are utilized to achieve the high sensitivity required for the multichord equipment.

  18. LIGA-fabricated compact mm-wave linear accelerator cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Bajikar, S.S.; DeCarlo, F.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Mancini, D.C.; Nassiri, A.; Lai, B.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.

    1998-03-23

    Millimeter-wave rf cavities for use in linear accelerators, free-electron lasers, and mm-wave undulatory are under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Typical cavity dimensions are in the 1000 mm range, and the overall length of the accelerator structure, which consists of 30-100 cavities, is about 50-100 mm. An accuracy of 0.2% in the cavity dimensions is necessary in order to achieve a high Q-factor of the cavity. To achieve this these structures are being fabricated using deep X-ray lithography, electroforming, and assembly (LIGA). The first prototype cavity structures are designed for 108 GHz and 2p/3-mode operation. Input and output couplers are integrated with the cavity structures. The cavities are fabricated on copper substrates by electroforming copper into 1-mm-thick PMMA resists patterned by deep x-ray lithography and polishing the copper down to the desired thickness. These are fabricated separately and subsequently assembled with precision spacing and alignment using microspheres, optical fibers, or microfabricated spacers/alignment pieces. Details of the fabrication process, alignment, and assembly work are presented in here.

  19. Guide to Free-Loan Sports Films (16mm).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    This catalog provides information on free 16 mm films dealing with a wide variety of individual and team sports, such as football, golf, water sports, snow sports, racing, and baseball, as well as on general sports competition and safety. Unless otherwise noted, the films are in color and with sound. Titles are listed alphabetically under their…

  20. RF and mm-Wave Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Sullivan, C.

    1999-07-08

    RF and mm-wave photonic devices and circuits have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for applications ranging from RF optical data links to optical generation of mm-wave frequencies. This talk will explore recent high-speed photonics technology developments at Sandia including: (1) A monolithic optical integrated circuit for all-optical generation of mm-waves. Using integrated mode-locked diode lasers, amplifiers, and detectors, frequencies between 30 GHz and 90 GHz are generated by a single monolithic (Al,Ga)As optical circuit less than 2mm in its largest dimension. (2) Development of polarization-maintaining, low-insertion-loss, low v-pi, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulators with DC-to-potentially-K-band modulation bandwidth. New low-loss polarization-maintaining waveguide designs using binary alloys have been shown to reduce polarization crosstalk in undoped (Al,Ga)As waveguides, yielding high extinction ratio (>40dB) and low on-chip loss (<6dB) in Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF drive voltage is reduced through use of 45rnrn-active length devices with modulator sensitivity, v-pi, less than 3V.

  1. Advisory List of Instructional Media--16MM Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Educational Media.

    These two advisory lists include information on 16mm films appropriate for the K-12 instructional program. In both bibliographies films are listed in the following categories: communication skills; guidance; health, physical education, safety, and sports; science; and social studies. The list for the 1982-1983 school year also includes categories…

  2. Guide to Films (16 mm) About Ecology, Adaptation and Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Synopses of 350 films (16 mm.) on ecology, adaptation of plants and animals to their environment, and environmental pollution are listed alphabetically by title in this guide. It specifies whether the film is black-and-white or color, its running time, and its source. An abbreviated subject index and a directory of sources are also provided. The…

  3. An active solar prominence in 1.3 MM radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. A.; Carter, M. K.; Clark, T. A.; Lindsey, C.; Jefferies, J. T.; Sime, D. G.; Watt, G.; Roellig, T. L.; Becklin, E. E.; Naylor, D. A.; Tompkins, G. J.; Braun, D.

    1993-07-01

    We present new millimetre-wavelength observations of an active solar prominence. Observations made over a two-day period with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Manna Kea, Hawaii, give a unique view in 1.3 mm radiation of the spectacular prominence that appeared on the west solar limb in the total solar eclipse of 11 July 1991.

  4. Security architecture of the M&M mobile agent framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Paulo J.; Santos, Nuno F.; Silva, Luis; Silva, Joao G.

    2001-07-01

    In the Mobile Agent programming model, small threads of execution migrate from machine to machine, performing their operations locally. For being able to deploy such a model into real world applications, security is a vital concern. In the M&M project we have developed a system that departures from the traditional platform-based execution model for mobile agents. In M&M there are no agent platforms. Instead there is a component framework that allows the applications to become able of sending and receiving agents by themselves in a straightforward manner. In this paper we examine the security mechanisms available in M&M, and how integration with existing applications is done. One difficult aspect of this work is that all the features must work with the security mechanisms that already exist on the applications. This is so because the components are integrated from within into the applications, which already have security mechanisms in place. Currently, M&M provides features like fine-grain security permissions, encryption of agents and data, certificate distribution using LDAP and cryptographic primitives for agents. For validating the approach and solutions found, we have integrated the framework into several off-the-shelf web servers, having the security mechanisms running, with no problems.

  5. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  6. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2002-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M&O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed stratigraphy and structural features of the site into a 3-D model that will be useful in primary downstream models and repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential nuclear waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for a repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. The lateral boundaries of the ISM and its three component models are shown in Figure 2.

  7. Conjugate heat transfer analysis of 300-mm bake station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Natarajan; Liang, Frank F.; Sims, James B.

    1999-06-01

    An exhaustive heat-transfer analysis of 200-mm and 300-mm bake equipment has been conducted to infer the temperature uniformity on the wafer from the time it is set on the plate until the end of the bake process. The objective of the analysis was to gain insight into the heat transport to the wafer and improve the thermal uniformity of the wafer. During the soft, hard and post-exposure bake processes, the temperatures to which the wafer is heated can range from 50 degrees to 250 degrees C. The influence of the variables that contribute to the temperature nonuniformity, namely the height of the proximity pins, wafer warp and bow, heater thickness, insulation of the bake plate, and lid material, have been analyzed. The analysis has been carried out using computational fluid dynamics packages, FLUENT/UNS and FIDAP. The accuracy of the numerical simulations has been verified through analytical solution is presented which provides a closed-form expression for the temperature of the wafer in terms of Biot number, a dimensionless parameter. The temperature rise of the wafer based on this simple expression compares very favorably with the detailed axisymmetric numerical solution that was carried out using variable material properties and the complex boundary conditions for the geometry of a 200-mm bake plate. The radial temperature variation on the wafer after 100 seconds on the bake plate also matches very well with the measurements. Based on the success of the modeling results with the 200-mm bake plates, a 300-mm bake plate analysis was conducted to determine if the temperature uniformity would be within specifications. The analysis revealed some key factors that caused temperature nonuniformity and the design was then altered to improve the temperature uniformity. Subsequent measurements confirmed the improvement of the temperature uniformity.

  8. Spitzer Imaging of Herschel Lensed Sub-mm Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Wardlow, Julie; Kim, Sam; Khostovan, Ali; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Barton, Elizabeth; Gong, Yan; Amblard, Alexandre; Serra, Paolo; Cooke, Jeff; Riechers, Dominik; Dominic, Benford; Frayer, David; Gardner, Jonathan; Fu, Hai; Bussmann, Shane; Gurwell, Mark; Leeuw, Lerothodi; Pasquale, Temi; Conley, Alex; Bock, Jamie; Vieira, Joaquin; Bridge, Carrie; Glenn, Jason; Zemcov, Michael; Schulz, Bernhard; Shupe, David; Hopwood, Ros; Negrello, Mattia; Andreani, Paola; Clements, David; Dannerbauer, Helmut; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Dunne, Loretta; Dunlop, James; Eales, Steve; Farrah, Duncan; Ivison, Rob; Jarvis, Matt; Maddox, Steve; Michalowski, Michal; Omont, Alain; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Serjeant, Stephen; Smail, Ian; Thompson, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; Verma, Aprajita; Coppin, Kirsten; Oliver, Seb; Wang, Lingyu

    2011-05-01

    Sub-millimeter surveys have, in the last decade, revealed an unexpected population of high-redshift dust-obscured sub-mm galaxies (SMGs) which are forming stars at a tremendous rate. Due to steep number counts and the negative k-correction at sub-mm wavelengths sub-mm surveys are effective at finding intrinsically faint, gravitationally lensed galaxies. We have now produced a reliable list of about 150 bright lensed SMGs in 200 sq. deg of the Herschel-ATLAS and HerMES (the GTO program of the SPIRE Instrument team) surveys with Herschel-SPIRE. We propose Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging of 122 of these gravitationally lensed SMGs. The target SMGs are selected to maximally overlap with existing and planned multi-wavelength followup programs, without duplicating existing deep IRAC data. Using the proposed Spitzer data we will: (a) Extend the SEDs of z~ 1 to 5 lensed SMGs into the near-IR regime, where derived stellar masses are more reliable than those estimated at other wavelengths alone; (b) Combine with lens models from existing and planned high-resolution sub-mm imaging (SMA, CARMA, PdBI) to map the evolution of stellar mass as a function of redshift and star-formation rate (SFR); (c) Combine with existing and planned CO and CII molecular line measurements to map the evolution of dust-to-gas and stellar-to-gas mass ratios as a function of redshift and SFR; (d) Obtain snapshot statistics on the sub-mm galaxy evolution from z of 1 to 5 as a function of stellar, dust, and gas mass to study the role of mergers and AGN contribution that may regulate the starburst phenomenon; (e) Compare our results to those from numerical simulations of high-redshift starburst galaxies to investigate the physical conditions in SMGs, and their evolutionary pathways.

  9. Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is involved in two cooperative projects, with international participants, both of which involve Charpy V-notch impact tests with instrumented strikers of 2mm and 8mm radii. Two heats of A 533 grade B class I pressure vessel steel and a low upper-shelf (LUS) submerged-arc (SA) weld were tested on the same Charpy machine, while one heat of a Russian Cr-Mo-V forging steel and a high upper-shelf (HUS) SA weld were tested on two different machines. The number of replicate tests at any one temperature ranged from 2 to 46 specimens. Prior to testing with each striker, verification specimens at the low, high, and super high energy levels from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were tested. In the two series of verification tests, the tests with the 2mm striker met the requirements at the low and high energy levels but not at the super high energy. For one plate, the 2mm striker showed somewhat higher average absorbed energies than those for the 8-mm striker at all three test temperatures. For the second plate and the LUS weld, however, the 2mm striker showed somewhat lower energies at both test temperatures. For the Russian forging steel and the HUS weld, tests were conducted over a range of temperatures with tests at one laboratory using the 8mm striker and tests at a second laboratory using the 2mm striker. Lateral expansion was measured for all specimens and the results are compared with the absorbed energy results. The overall results showed generally good agreement (within one standard deviation) in energy measurements by the two strikers. Load-time traces from the instrumented strikers were also compared and used to estimate shear fracture percentage. Four different formulas from the European Structural Integrity Society draft standard for instrumented Charpy test are compared and a new formula is proposed for estimation of percent shear from the force-time trace.

  10. Expansion of Bound-State Energies in Powers of m/M and (1-m/M)

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2002-01-30

    Elaborating on a previous letter [1], we use a new approach to compute energy levels of a nonrelativistic bound-state of two constituents, with masses m and M, by systematic expansions--one in powers of m/M and another in powers of (1-m/M). Technical aspects of the calculations are described in detail. Theoretical predictions are given for {Omicron}({alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 5}) radiative recoil and {Omicron}((Z{alpha}){sup 6}) pure recoil corrections to the average energy shift and hyperfine splitting relevant for hydrogen, muonic hydrogen, and muonium.

  11. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  12. Cari Kitahara, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kitahara earned her Ph.D. in cancer epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She joined the Radiation Epidemiology Branch in 2008 as a predoctoral fellow and became a research fellow in 2011. In 2015, she was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator.

  13. MmTX1 and MmTX2 from coral snake venom potently modulate GABAA receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Jean-Pierre; Schwarz, Jürgen R.; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; Céard, Brigitte; Gutiérrez, José M.; Kneussel, Matthias; Pongs, Olaf; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors shape synaptic transmission by modulating Cl? conductance across the cell membrane. Remarkably, animal toxins that specifically target GABAA receptors have not been identified. Here, we report the discovery of micrurotoxin1 (MmTX1) and MmTX2, two toxins present in Costa Rican coral snake venom that tightly bind to GABAA receptors at subnanomolar concentrations. Studies with recombinant and synthetic toxin variants on hippocampal neurons and cells expressing common receptor compositions suggest that MmTX1 and MmTX2 allosterically increase GABAA receptor susceptibility to agonist, thereby potentiating receptor opening as well as desensitization, possibly by interacting with the ?+/?? interface. Moreover, hippocampal neuron excitability measurements reveal toxin-induced transitory network inhibition, followed by an increase in spontaneous activity. In concert, toxin injections into mouse brain result in reduced basal activity between intense seizures. Altogether, we characterized two animal toxins that enhance GABAA receptor sensitivity to agonist, thereby establishing a previously unidentified class of tools to study this receptor family. PMID:25675485

  14. A Piezoelectric Micromotor with a Stator of φ=1.6 mm and l=4 mm Using Bulk PZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagatay, Serra; Koc, Burhanettin; Moses, Paul; Uchino, Kenji

    2004-04-01

    The smallest discrete piezoelectric ultrasonic motor using bulk ceramics was developed. We are proposing basically a two-part motor: stator and rotor. The stator of the present motor consists of a hollow metal brass tube with outer diameter of 1.6 mm, inner diameter of 0.8 mm and length of only 4 mm with 2 PZT plates bonded onto it. Owing to the asymmetrical stator surface, two degenerated orthogonal bending modes were slightly split, resulting in a wobbling motion. Thus, the motor can be driven by a single driving source. The rotor is a spring, which is basically different from previous designs, pressed at both ends to the stator by a pair of ferrules. Consequently, the length of the whole motor assembly was reduced significantly; a final motor length of only 5 mm was obtained. The working frequency under zero load was approximately 227-233 kHz. Although the size is small, relatively high power was obtained under an optimized load condition: torque of 0.06 mNm, maximum power of 3.2 mW with a speed of 118 rad/s, and maximum efficiency of 11% under 48 Vrms at 221 kHz.

  15. MmTX1 and MmTX2 from coral snake venom potently modulate GABAA receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Jean-Pierre; Schwarz, Jürgen R; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; Céard, Brigitte; Gutiérrez, José M; Kneussel, Matthias; Pongs, Olaf; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2015-02-24

    GABAA receptors shape synaptic transmission by modulating Cl(-) conductance across the cell membrane. Remarkably, animal toxins that specifically target GABAA receptors have not been identified. Here, we report the discovery of micrurotoxin1 (MmTX1) and MmTX2, two toxins present in Costa Rican coral snake venom that tightly bind to GABAA receptors at subnanomolar concentrations. Studies with recombinant and synthetic toxin variants on hippocampal neurons and cells expressing common receptor compositions suggest that MmTX1 and MmTX2 allosterically increase GABAA receptor susceptibility to agonist, thereby potentiating receptor opening as well as desensitization, possibly by interacting with the ?(+)/?(-) interface. Moreover, hippocampal neuron excitability measurements reveal toxin-induced transitory network inhibition, followed by an increase in spontaneous activity. In concert, toxin injections into mouse brain result in reduced basal activity between intense seizures. Altogether, we characterized two animal toxins that enhance GABAA receptor sensitivity to agonist, thereby establishing a previously unidentified class of tools to study this receptor family. PMID:25675485

  16. Bacteria in the apical 5 mm of infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, J C; Falkler, W A

    1991-08-01

    Ten freshly extracted teeth which had carious pulpal exposures and periapical lesions contiguous with the root apex were placed inside an anaerobic chamber and the apical 5 mm of the root canals cultured. In addition to anaerobic incubation, duplicate cultures were incubated aerobically. Fifty strains of bacteria from the 10 root canals were isolated and identified. The most prominent bacteria cultured from the 10 root canals were Actinomyces, Lactobacillus, black-pigmented Bacteroides, Peptostreptococcus, nonpigmented Bacteroides, Veillonella, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus mutans. Of the 50 bacterial isolates, 34 (68%) were strict anaerobes. This study demonstrates the presence of predominantly anaerobic bacteria in the apical 5 mm of infected root canals in teeth with carious pulpal exposures and periapical lesions. PMID:1809801

  17. A 10-mm MR-Conditional Unidirectional Pneumatic Stepper Motor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Mershon, Christopher D.; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) conditional robotic devices facilitate accurate interventional procedures under MR imaging (MRI) guidance. For this purpose, a compact (10-mm diameter) MR-conditional stepper motor is presented. The device features seven key components, which contribute to a dense and easy to fabricate design. Alternating bursts of pressurized air and vacuum can drive the motor in 60° per step to achieve a maximum torque of 2.4 mNm. The relationship between torque and angular speed was investigated to demonstrate motor performance under different loading conditions. The stepper motor was tested in a GE 3T MRI scanner to verify its MR-compatibility. A maximum artifact width of 3 mm was measured in MRI images and a maximum signal-to-noise ratio reduction of 2.49% was recorded. PMID:25419104

  18. Design of 15 mm collars for SSC dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.

    1986-03-01

    Ten 1-m long dipole magnets of the SSC design ''D'' cross section have been constructed and tested. In each model a collar type structure was used to contain and support the coil assembly at assembly and during operation at 4K. The collar structure must provide enough coil compression to minimize training and guarantee the coil cross section dimensions. Three types of collar designs were used. The behavior, measured and predicted, of two types of 15 mm stainless steel collars used on eight of the ten models is examined. The mechanical measurement of the 15 mm stainless steel collars used on eight 1-m dipole models are given. Observed behavior and preliminary design criteria are discussed. In order to better understand observed collar behavior and to evaluate new designs, finite element analysis of the collar designs was undertaken, and results are correlated with measured behavior. The behavior of alternate collar designs is predicted. 3 refs., 19 figs. (LEW)

  19. [Enforcement of type M 20 cal. 4 mm cartridges].

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jaworski, Ryszard; Kawecki, Jerzy; Semiczek, Wies?aw; Trnka, Jakub

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to investigate and compare the speed and energy of a bullet from 4 mm cal. cartridges of central ignition type M20, both original and transformed by addition of different kinds of propellants. Original cartridges are characterized by an average speed of the bullet of 144 m/s and average energy of 4.8 J. After transformation by the addition of on an average 31.3 mg of smokeless powder from a cartridge type LR'22, a maximum bullet speed of 299 m/s (average) and maximum energy of 21.2 joule (average) were reached. Our test showed that shots using transformed ammunition type M 20 cal. 4 mm can be dangerous for both health and life. Multiple M20 shot wounds may be very similar to single shot wounds caused by a shotshell cartridge fired from a shotgun weapon. PMID:14669686

  20. A 10-mm MR-Conditional Unidirectional Pneumatic Stepper Motor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Mershon, Christopher D; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) conditional robotic devices facilitate accurate interventional procedures under MR imaging (MRI) guidance. For this purpose, a compact (10-mm diameter) MR-conditional stepper motor is presented. The device features seven key components, which contribute to a dense and easy to fabricate design. Alternating bursts of pressurized air and vacuum can drive the motor in 60° per step to achieve a maximum torque of 2.4 mNm. The relationship between torque and angular speed was investigated to demonstrate motor performance under different loading conditions. The stepper motor was tested in a GE 3T MRI scanner to verify its MR-compatibility. A maximum artifact width of 3 mm was measured in MRI images and a maximum signal-to-noise ratio reduction of 2.49% was recorded. PMID:25419104

  1. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Chau, H.H.

    1993-06-14

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250ns, with a time-to-burst jitter under 10ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts.

  2. Mechanistic Investigation of Enzymes using QM/MM Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Yolanda

    2004-03-01

    Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase (DHODase) is in the class of flavin-containing enzymes that form the pyrimidines essential to DNA and RNA synthesis. The process of pyrimidine biosynthesis is a focal point for drug design research. We applied mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods to investigate the proton and hydride transfer mechanism in DHODase. Our finding illustrates one possibility for the mechanistic pathway, and demonstrates the energetic significance of mutating key residues.

  3. Wireless channel characterization for mm-size neural implants.

    PubMed

    Mark, Michael; Bjorninen, Toni; Chen, Yuhui David; Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Ukkonen, Leena; Sydanheimo, Lauri; Carmena, Jose M; Rabaey, Jan M

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to modeling and characterizing wireless channel properties for mm-size neural implants. Full-wave electromagnetic simulation was employed to model signal propagation characteristics in biological materials. Animal tests were carried out, proving the validity of the simulation model over a wide range of frequency from 100MHz to 6GHz. Finally, effects of variability and uncertainty in human anatomy and dielectric properties of tissues on these radio links are explored. PMID:21096382

  4. EFG growth of sapphire tubes upto 85 mm in diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlov, V. N.; Epelbaum, B. M.

    1998-04-01

    Conditions for large tubular sapphire crystal growth have been examined. Single crystalline tubes with outer diameters of upto 85 mm were grown successfully by the EFG technique using a simple one-heater growth assembly. The dependence of structural perfection on growth conditions and die-top design have been investigated. The process for seed enlargement upto the full-circular cross-section was found to be of primary importance for high-quality growth, and a suitable algorithm has been suggested.

  5. Thermal radiation detecting in far-infrared and MM ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasan-Zade, S. G.; Salkov, Evgenij A.; Shepelshky, G. A.; Sizov, Fiodor F.; Svechnikov, George S.

    1998-08-01

    It had been discussed earlier existing of the controlled photoconductivity (PC) in gapless semiconductor Hg(subscript 1-x)Cd(subscript x)Te which is induced within the millimeter (MM) and IR ranges by uniaxial stress or high magnetic field. These forces open the energy gap following to E(subscript g)(P)-bx(s(subscript 11)-s(subscript 12)) xP or E(subscript g)(H)-heH/4m(subscript n)c respectively and influence the generation and recombination processes in the material. Here, b is a deformation potential constant, s(subscript ij) is an elastic strain tensor components and m is an electron effective mass in conduction band. In this report a possibility is analyzed of effective detecting of the MM and submillimeter (SMM) thermal radiation by means of the above mentioned controlled PC in combination with a parametric heterodyning of frequencies. The problem seems to be resolvable because the number of spectral lines can be generated with tunable lasers of high enough power within the MM and SMM radiation range. The features are also taken into account that arise in connection with the spectral 'quality' of black-body radiation and in the cases when radiator has a size of order of the wavelength to be detected. It is shown that the ratio can drastically influence the efficiency of detecting process because the time which is necessary to detect this radiator, or object consist of small-size particles.

  6. Projected Hybrid Orbitals: A General QM/MM Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A projected hybrid orbital (PHO) method was described to model the covalent boundary in a hybrid quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) system. The PHO approach can be used in ab initio wave function theory and in density functional theory with any basis set without introducing system-dependent parameters. In this method, a secondary basis set on the boundary atom is introduced to formulate a set of hybrid atomic orbtials. The primary basis set on the boundary atom used for the QM subsystem is projected onto the secondary basis to yield a representation that provides a good approximation to the electron-withdrawing power of the primary basis set to balance electronic interactions between QM and MM subsystems. The PHO method has been tested on a range of molecules and properties. Comparison with results obtained from QM calculations on the entire system shows that the present PHO method is a robust and balanced QM/MM scheme that preserves the structural and electronic properties of the QM region. PMID:25317748

  7. Projected hybrid orbitals: a general QM/MM method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjie; Gao, Jiali

    2015-01-22

    A projected hybrid orbital (PHO) method was described to model the covalent boundary in a hybrid quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) system. The PHO approach can be used in ab initio wave function theory and in density functional theory with any basis set without introducing system-dependent parameters. In this method, a secondary basis set on the boundary atom is introduced to formulate a set of hybrid atomic orbtials. The primary basis set on the boundary atom used for the QM subsystem is projected onto the secondary basis to yield a representation that provides a good approximation to the electron-withdrawing power of the primary basis set to balance electronic interactions between QM and MM subsystems. The PHO method has been tested on a range of molecules and properties. Comparison with results obtained from QM calculations on the entire system shows that the present PHO method is a robust and balanced QM/MM scheme that preserves the structural and electronic properties of the QM region. PMID:25317748

  8. Enhancing Paradynamics for QM/MM Sampling of Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Jerônimo; Kupchencko, Ilya; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-03-10

    Despite the enormous increase in computer power, it is still extremely challenging to obtain computationally converging sampling of ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy surfaces in condensed phases. The sampling problem can be significantly reduced by the use of the reference potential paradynamics (PD) approach, but even this approach still requires major computer time in studies of enzymatic reactions. To further reduce the sampling problem we developed here a new PD version where we use an empirical valence bond reference potential that has a minimum rather than a maximum at the transition state region of the target potential (this is accomplished conveniently by shifting the EVB of the product state). Hence, we can map the TS region in a more efficient way. Here, we introduce and validate the inverted EVB PD approach. The validation involves the study of the SN2 step of the reaction catalyzed by haloakene dehalogenase (DhlA) and the GTP hydrolysis in the RasGAP system. In addition, we have also studied the corresponding reaction in water for each of the systems described here and the reaction involving trimethylsulfonium and dimethylamine in solution. The results are encouraging and the new strategy appears to provide a powerful way of evaluating QM(ai)/MM activation free energies. PMID:26866994

  9. The LLNL 150-mm equation-of-state gun system

    SciTech Connect

    Rienecker, F.; Honodel, C.; Waldron, R.; Moor, E.; Perfect, S.; Bast, R.

    1987-09-22

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently designing a large gun system for expanded studies of a wide range of materials, including samples of high explosives weighing up to 10 kg. In its initial configuration, the system will have a 150-mm bore, 20-m-long, single-stage gun that can fire a 10-kg projectile at velocities of 2.2 km/s. Future plans include conversion either to a two-stage gun, or to a single-stage 100-mm gun, and conversion to a ballistic range. The high-explosive samples will be contained in a stainless steel tank that is 3.8 m in diameter, 12.5-m long, and 89-mm thick. This paper emphasizes improvements in the gun design, including tube couplings that use large coupling nuts and elastic interference fits to achieve precise alignment, a rail support system that allows rapid changes of configuration without need for re-alignment, and a barrel venting experiment designed to reduce projectile tilt in free flight. In addition, the authors discuss a computer modeling experiment in which they examined the effects of stress and strain on one part of the gun, the breech. Results showed that peak stresses would cause the breech to deform, producing autofrettaged conditions.

  10. pH sensitivity of ammonium transport by Rhbg.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Nazih L; Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Schmidt, Eric; Doetjes, Rienk; Rabon, Edd; Hamm, L Lee

    2010-12-01

    Rhbg is a membrane glycoprotein that is involved in NH(3)/NH(4)(+) transport. Several models have been proposed to describe Rhbg, including an electroneutral NH(4)(+)/H(+) exchanger, a uniporter, an NH(4)(+) channel, or even a gas channel. In this study, we characterized the pH sensitivity of Rhbg expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We used two-electrode voltage clamp and ion-selective microelectrodes to measure NH(4)(+)-induced [and methyl ammonium (MA(+))] currents and changes in intracellular pH (pH(i)), respectively. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM NH(4)Cl (NH(3)/NH(4)(+)) at extracellular pH (pH(o)) of 7.5 induced an inward current, decreased pH(i), and depolarized the cell. Raising pH(o) to 8.2 significantly enhanced the NH(4)(+)-induced current and pH(i) changes, whereas decreasing bath pH to 6.5 inhibited these changes. Lowering pH(i) (decreased by butyrate) also inhibited the NH(4)(+)-induced current and pH(i) decrease. In oocytes expressing Rhbg, 5 mM methyl amine hydrochloride (MA/MA(+)), often used as an NH(4)Cl substitute, induced an inward current, a pH(i) increase (not a decrease), and depolarization of the cell. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA(+) at alkaline bath pH (8.2) enhanced the MA(+)-induced current, whereas lowering bath pH to 6.5 inhibited the MA(+) current completely. Exposing the oocyte to MA/MA(+) at low pH(i) abolished the MA(+)-induced current and depolarization; however, pH(i) still increased. These data indicate that 1) transport of NH(4)(+) and MA/MA(+) by Rhbg is pH sensitive; 2) electrogenic NH(4)(+) and MA(+) transport are stimulated by alkaline pH(o) but inhibited by acidic pH(i) or pH(o); and 3) electroneutral transport of MA by Rhbg is likely but is less sensitive to pH changes. PMID:20810915

  11. Stella Koutros, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Koutros received her M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University. She completed her doctoral work through the Yale-NCI partnership training program in cancer epidemiology, conducting research in the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch (OEEB). In 2008, upon completion of her doctorate she became a fellow in OEEB; she was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator in 2015.

  12. The Methods Behind PH WINS.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers-a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  13. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  14. Lambmeat colour values (HunterLab CIE and reflectance) are influenced by aperture size (5 mm v. 25 mm).

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Ponnampalam, Eric N; van de Ven, Remy J; Kerr, Matthew G; Hopkins, David L

    2015-02-01

    The effect of aperture size on the assessment of lamb meat colour values (L*, a*, b* and R630/580)was investigated. Two experiments using 2 HunterLab MiniScan colorimeters (large [25 mm] and small [5 mm] apertures) were conducted: 1) coloured tiles were measured and 2) unaged lamb (n = 65) m. longissimus lumborum (LL) and m. semimembranosus (SM) muscles were measured over 2.5 d under simulated retail display. For Experiment three, 2 different colorimeters were used on lamb (n = 36) LL aged for 6 weeks before measurement over 4 don simulated retail display. Coloured tile a* and b* values were unaffected by aperture size, but L* values and the R630/580 ratio were influenced by aperture size. The effect of aperture size on lamb meat colour measurements varied with display time and muscle type. The large aperture size generally provided the highest colorimetric values, and is recommended for measuring lamb meat colour. PMID:25460126

  15. Results from a partial lifetime test of a 40 mm-aperture 17 mm SSC model dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Radusewicz, P.; Devred, A.; Bush, T.; Coombes, R.; DiMarco, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Kuzminski, J.; Ogitsu, T.; Potter, J.; Puglisi, M.; Sanger, P.; Schermer, R.; Tompkins, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H.; Anerella, M.; Cottingham, J.; Ganetis, G.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Greene, A.; Gupta, R.; Jain, A.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Prodell, A.; Rehak, M.; Roher, E.P.; Sampson, W.; Shutt, R.; Thomas, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bleadon, M.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Peterson, T.; Strait, J.; Royett, J.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.

    1992-03-01

    A 40-mm-aperture, 17-m-long Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) model dipole was assembled at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and tested initially at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL) and later at BNL. At BNL an extended cycle test was devised to examine the magnet`s performance through numerous cold tests and thermal cycles. This paper discusses the magnet`s mechanical and quench performance and magnet field measurements during the tests.

  16. Insights into structure and redox potential of lignin peroxidase from QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ludovic; Crawford, Luke; Mutengwa, Archford; Götze, Jan P; Bühl, Michael

    2016-02-16

    Redox potentials are computed for the active form (compound I) of lignin peroxidase (LiP) using a suitable QM/MM methodology (B3LYP/SDD/6-311G**//BP86/SVP:CHARMM). Allowing for dynamic conformational averaging, a potential of 0.67(33) V relative to ferrocenium/ferrocene is obtained for the active form with its oxoiron(iv) core. The computed redox potential is very sensitive to the charge distribution around the active site: protonation of titratable residues close to the metal center increases the redox potential, thereby rationalising the known pH dependence of LiP activity. A simple MM-charge deletion scheme is used to identify residues that are critical for the redox potential. Two mutant proteins are studied through homology modelling, E40Q and D183N, which are predicted to have an increased redox potential by 140 mV and 190 mV, respectively, relative to the wild type. These mutant proteins are thus promising targets for synthesis and further exploration toward a rational design of biocatalytic systems for oxidative degradation of lignin. PMID:26815633

  17. FT-Raman and QM/MM study of the interaction between histamine and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Chica, A. J.; Soriano, A.; Tuñón, I.; Sánchez-Jiménez, F. M.; Silla, E.; Ramírez, F. J.

    2006-05-01

    The interaction between histamine and highly polymerized calf-thymus DNA has been investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) methodology. Raman spectra of solutions containing histamine and calf-thymus DNA, at different molar ratios, were recorded. Solutions were prepared at physiological settings of pH and ionic strength, using both natural and heavy water as the solvent. The analysis of the spectral changes on the DNA Raman spectra when adding different concentrations of histamine allowed us to identify the reactive sites of DNA and histamine, which were used to built two minor groove and one intercalated binding models. They were further used as starting points of the QM/MM theoretical study. However, minimal energy points were only reached for the two minor groove models. For each optimized structure, we calculated analytical force constants of histamine molecule in order to perform the vibrational dynamics. Normal mode descriptions allowed us to compare calculated wavenumbers for DNA-interacting histamine to those measured in the Raman spectra of DNA-histamine solutions.

  18. Formation of asteroids from mm-cm sized grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, D.; Johansen, A.; Davies, M. B.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Asteroids and comets are intricately connected to life in the universe. Asteroids are the building blocks of terrestrial planets; water-rich asteroids and comets are likely to be the primary source of water for Earth's oceans and other volatiles (Morbidelli et al. 2000; Hartogh et al. 2011); and they may play role in mass extinctions. Yet, the formation of these objects is poorly understood. There is mounting evidence that the traditional picture of the formation of asteroids must be revised. The size distribution of asteroids is hard to reconcile with a traditional bottomup formation scenario. Instead, asteroids may form top-down, with large 100 - 1000 km sized objects forming first by the gravitational collapse of dense clumps of small particles. Experiments and simulations suggest that dust grains cannot grow to sizes larger than mm-cm in protoplanetary disks (Zsom et al. 2010). Also, primitive meteorites from the asteroid belt contain a large mass fraction in chondrules of sizes from 0.1 mm to a few mm. Hence, it is desirable to find a model for asteroid formation from mm-sized particles. Aims. In this work, we model the dynamics of mm-cm sized grains in dust-enriched inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We model the dust-gas interaction to determine whether dust grains of this size can form dense, self-gravitating clouds that can collapse to form asteroids. Methods. We perform shearing box simulations of the inner disk using the Pencil Code (Brandenburg & Dobler 2002). The simulations start with a Solar-type solids-to-gas ratio of 0.01 and we gradually increase the particle concentration. In a real protoplanetary disk, solid particles are expected to migrate from the outer regions and concentrate in the inner disk. Results. Our simulations show that mm-sized particles can form very dense clumps, driven by a run-away convergence in the radial-drift flow of these particles - this dynamic is known as the streaming instability (Youdin & Goodman 2005; Johansen et al. 2007). We show that the streaming instability can also occur for small grains, strongly coupled to the surouning gas. We further show that the resulting particle clumps can reach the density where gravitational collapse is expected to take place, giving rise to planetesimals and asteroids. This process requires either a very high solids-to-gas ratio, or a reduced background pressure gradient, such as that produced by large-scale pressure bumps in the disk. Interpretation. This result offers a promising avenue to the formation of asteroids and comets. Additional work with this model may provide insight on the initial distribution of the masses and orbits of asteroids and comets. This information is important because these are the initial conditions for the formation of terrestrial planets, and for the delivery of water and other volatiles to rocky planets in the habitable zone.

  19. Performance of 2mm radius straw tube drift cells

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Bantly, J.; Blessing, S.; Buchholz, D.; Gobbi, B.; Liu, Y.; Rajagopalan, S.; Tilden, R. ); Martin, M. )

    1993-08-01

    The performance of a 128 channel test module made with straw tubes of 2mm radius has been studied in a test beam and with cosmic rays. Different gases were used and for each one the time-to-distance relation and the hit efficiency was measured. Comparison are made between results when two different electronics readouts were used. The information was recorded with 106 MHz FADC units and also with TDCs (50ps resolution). The best resolution, of 135 [mu]m, was obtained using 50% ethane, 50% argon and reading out the information with the TDCs, at an operating HV of 1,750V.

  20. Entropy estimation for M/M/1 queueing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnault, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate the entropy of Markovian queueing systems. The marginal entropy and entropy rate of a stochastic process are well-known to measure its uncertainty. When only observations of the process are available, the need to estimate themarises. Regnault [5, 6] provide estimators with good asymptotic properties of the entropy of continuous-time ergodic Markov processes. We specialize these results in the context of birth-death processes used in continuous-time M/M/1 queueing systems. Links with maximum entropy arguments are used to characterize the asymptotic behavior of the estimators.

  1. Living with Omniback and the 8mm drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Apollo's OmniBack backup system provides a convenient and effective way of storing network backup information on 8mm tape. In addition it has a journaling facility to write extensive log files, recording the backup process in almost any degree of detail desired. The directory structure and file names used are logical and well-defined. Summary files announce the degree of success of the backup as specified in the work file. The system will run unattended under the UNIX cron command, allowing the backup to be performed during the night when user demands on the network are small and most user files are free.

  2. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of {open_quotes}rough-handling{close_quotes}-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  3. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of [open quotes]rough-handling[close quotes]-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  4. Multilayer Laue Lenses with Focal Length of 10 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Kubec, A.; Menzel, M.; Niese, S.; Krüger, P.; Seiboth, F.; Patommel, J.; Schroer, C.

    2013-03-01

    Multilayer laue lenses are diffractive optics with a high potential for producing X-ray foci in the order of 10 nm or even below. Particularly for hard X-rays (E > 6 keV) these optics promise better resolution and higher efficiencies than currently available Fresnel zone plates. Magnetron sputter deposition has been used for the fabrication of multilayer laue lenses using the layer materials MoSi2 and Si. The lens design has been defined to get focal length in the order of 10 mm. One of the lenses with an aperture of about 20 ?m has been used as focusing optics in the nanoprobe beamline P06 at PETRA III. Ptychography has been applied to characterize the caustic of the focused beam and to determine the size of the X-ray focus. A spot size of about 39 nm could be obtained with a photon energy of 21 keV and a focal length of 9.9 mm.

  5. Using 70-mm aerial photography to identify rangeland sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Alaniz, M. A.; Bowen, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A south Texas rangeland area was used as a study site to test the use of microdensitometry on 70-mm color-infrared and black-and-white photographs (scale 1:19,000) for distinguishing among 11 range sites (two brushland, seven grassland, two barren land) during the winter (February), spring (May), and summer (August) of 1976. Color-infrared photographs were also taken at a scale of 1:42,000 for the summer date. Film optical density readings were made on one color-infrared film with white light only. The best separations among density readings for all range sites were obtained using white light exposed on color-infrared film in the summer when vegetation was at peak foliage development. Results from this study indicate that 70-mm aerial color-infrared photography at a scale of 1:19,000 or 1:42,000 has good potential for identifying range sites in large and inaccessible areas, and could be a useful tool for range management.

  6. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vidossich, Pietro; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)) simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-?-lactamases, ?-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu) and main group (Mg) metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions. PMID:25006697

  7. Stress relaxation in SSC 50mm dipole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.; Markley, F.

    1992-04-01

    We are measuring the stress relaxation of SSC 50mm outer coils with the goal of predicting how much of the coil prestress will be lost while the coils are warehoused between manufacture and cooldown. We manufacture 3 inch (76.2mm) long segments of coil with the same materials and techniques that have been used for prototype coils. We are running four simultaneous tests in an attempt to separate the contributions of the different coil materials. Test one is a completely insulated coil section where the insulation is the all polyamide system being tested at Brookhaven; test two is a wire stack insulated only with the normal Kapton overwrap; test three is a stack of bare cable; and test four is a completely insulated normal coil section. All, except for the bare cable, include the ground insulation. The insulated coil sections are carefully dried before loading and testing in order to eliminate stress changes due to varying moisture content. The temperature dependence of the stress relaxation is being studied separately. Three companion papers presented at this conference will be: (1) ``Temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of SSC coil insulation`` (2) ``Measurement of the elastic modulus of Kapton perpendicular to the plane of the film at room and cryogenic temperatures`` (3) ``Theoretical methods for creep and stress relaxation studies of SSC coil.``

  8. Stress relaxation in SSC 50mm dipole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.; Markley, F.

    1992-04-01

    We are measuring the stress relaxation of SSC 50mm outer coils with the goal of predicting how much of the coil prestress will be lost while the coils are warehoused between manufacture and cooldown. We manufacture 3 inch (76.2mm) long segments of coil with the same materials and techniques that have been used for prototype coils. We are running four simultaneous tests in an attempt to separate the contributions of the different coil materials. Test one is a completely insulated coil section where the insulation is the all polyamide system being tested at Brookhaven; test two is a wire stack insulated only with the normal Kapton overwrap; test three is a stack of bare cable; and test four is a completely insulated normal coil section. All, except for the bare cable, include the ground insulation. The insulated coil sections are carefully dried before loading and testing in order to eliminate stress changes due to varying moisture content. The temperature dependence of the stress relaxation is being studied separately. Three companion papers presented at this conference will be: (1) Temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of SSC coil insulation'' (2) Measurement of the elastic modulus of Kapton perpendicular to the plane of the film at room and cryogenic temperatures'' (3) Theoretical methods for creep and stress relaxation studies of SSC coil.''

  9. Single Crystal Si Passive Optical Components for mm-Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ari; Chervenak, James; Chuss, David; Wollack, Edward; Henry, Ross; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2006-03-01

    Construction of ultrasensitive, cryogenic-focal-planes for mm-radiation detection requires simultaneous maximization of detector quantum efficiency and minimization of stray light effects, e.g., optical ``ghosting''. To achieve this task in the focal plane detector arrays of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, integration of two technologies are envisioned; (1) an antireflective (AR) coating for reducing ghosting from the reflected component and increasing absorption at the focal plane, and (2) a backside absorber for suppressing reflections of the transmitted component. We propose a novel approach, involving single crystal Si components, to fabricate AR coatings and backside absorbers. AR coatings are made from Si dielectric honeycombs, in which their dielectric constant may be tuned via honeycomb dimension and wall thickness. Backside absorbers consist of AR Si honeycomb coated-resistors, and the resistors consist of P-implanted Si wafers. This approach enables us to circumvent the mechanical complexities arising from thermal expansion effects, because the detector array, back-short, and AR coating are fabricated out of the same material. We also extend the functionality of single crystal Si in the field of mm-radiation detection by fabricating curved, low-loss, broadband waveguides. These waveguides may enable compact structures for applications requiring variable pathlength, e.g., interferometric spectroscopy.

  10. Resonant biaxial 7-mm MEMS mirror for omnidirectional scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Aikio, M.; Janes, J.; Senger, F.; Stenchly, V.; Weiss, M.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2013-03-01

    Low-cost automotive laser scanners for environment perception are needed to enable the integration of advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) into all automotive vehicle segments, a key to reducing the number of traffic accidents on roads. An omnidirectional 360 degree laser scanning concept has been developed based on combination of an omnidirectional lens and a biaxial large aperture MEMS mirror. This omnidirectional scanning concept is the core of a small sized low-cost time-of-flight based range sensor development. This paper describes concept, design, fabrication and first measurement results of a resonant biaxial 7mm gimbal-less MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated by stacked vertical comb drives. Identical frequencies of the two resonant axes are necessary to enable the required circle scanning capability. A tripod suspension was chosen since it allows minimizing the frequency splitting of the two resonant axes. Low mirror curvature is achieved by a thickness of the mirror of more than 500 ?m. Hermetic wafer level vacuum packaging of such large mirrors based on multiple wafer bonding has been developed to enable to achieve a large mechanical tilt angle of +/- 6.5 degrees in each axis. The 7mm-MEMS mirror demonstrates large angle circular scanning at 1.5kHz.

  11. The 0.3 mm diameter flexible amperometric lactate probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan L.; Heller, Adam

    1993-01-01

    A flexible lactate electrode was made of 400 +/- 100 7 micrometers diameter carbon fibers, epoxy embedded in a 0.3 mm diameter polyimide tubing. The electrode was modified by precipitating on it the relatively insoluble complex formed between 1100 kd partially N-ethylamine quaternized poly((vinylpyridine)Os(bipyridine)2Cl)Cl (POs-EA) and lactate oxidase. The steady-state lactate electrooxidation current, at 2mM lactate concentration and at 22 C, was 4OO nA. The 5O +/- 10 microA/sq cm current density and the 2OmA/sq cm/M sensitivity decreased only by 5 percent upon increasing the partial pressure of oxygen from 0.0 to 0.2 atm. The electrode retains its sensitivity after dry storage at 4 C for 4 months in air but loses at 37 C half of its sensitivity in 7 hours through polymer desorption when operated at 0.4V (SCE).

  12. OCTAN-1-OL/WATER PARTITION COEFFICIENTS OF P-BENZO- AND P-NAPHTHOQUINONES CORRECTED FOR PH EFFECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of pH of the aqueous phase on the octan-1-ol / water partition coefficients (kow) of quinones was demontrated. The kow of a series of p-benzo- and p-naphthoquinones were determined using a mildly buffered aqueous phase (1 mM Hepes, pH 7.0) to correct for the pH effects on the lipophilicit...

  13. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  14. A densitometric analysis of commercial 35mm films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Ruffin, Christopher, III

    1989-01-01

    IIaO films have been subjected to various sensitometric tests. The have included thermal and aging effects and reciprocity failure studies. In order to compare the special IIaO film with popular brands of 35 mm films and their possible use in astrophotography, Agfa, Fuji and Kodak print and slide formats, as well as black and white and color formats, were subjected to sensitometric, as well as densitometric analysis. A scanning electron microscope was used to analyze grain structure size, and shape as a function of both speed and brand. Preliminary analysis of the grain structure using an ISI-SS40 scanning electron microscope indicates that the grain sizes for darker densities are much larger than the grain size for lighter densities. Researchers analyze the scanning electron microscope findings of the various grains versus densities as well as enhancement of the grains, using the IP-8500 Digital Image Processor.

  15. QM/MM method for metal - organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Sushko, Petr V.; Abarenkov, Igor V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2010-07-19

    Organic/inorganic interfaces are ubiquitous in organic electronics and energy materials. These interfaces often have defects, such as grain and domain boundaries, which influence their electronic properties. Fundamental studies of such extended defects, understanding of their effect on the performance of the interfaces in practical applications, and, ultimately, design of new interfaces requires theoretical modeling of their structure and properties. However, due to the large size of these systems, their accurate quantum mechanical description is often unfeasible. Here we present a QM/MM method for modeling metal/organic interfaces, which incorporates contributions from long-range electron correlation, characteristic to metals and non-bonded interactions in organic systems. This method can be used to study structurally irregular systems. We apply the method to model finite size domains of self-assembled monolayers on gold (111) surface and discuss the influence of boundary effects on the electrostatic and electronic properties of these systems.

  16. 40 mm bore Nb-Ti model dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Gilbert, W.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meuser, R.; Peters, C.; Rechen, J.; Scanlan, R.

    1984-09-10

    Preliminary R and D has been started on magnets for a next-generation high-energy-physics accelerator, the 20 TeV Superconducting Supercollider (SSC). One design now being developed at LBL is described in this paper. The design is based on two layers of flattened Nb-Ti cable, a 40 mm ID winding with flared ends, and an operating field of 6.5 T. Experimental results are presented on several one-meter-long models tested at both He I and He II temperature. Measurement of field, residual magnetization, quench propagation velocity, and winding prestress are presented. (A 2-in-1 magnet based on this coil design is being jointly developed by LBL and Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 15 ft. long models are being constructed at BNL).

  17. Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM: Development, testing, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.J.; Cooley, H.S.; He, Y.; Torn, M.S.

    2003-06-10

    Surface water and energy fluxes are tightly coupled with CO2 exchanges between the ecosystem and atmosphere. Other surface-to-atmosphere trace-gas exchanges of interest in climate change research (e.g., N2O, CH4, C18OO, and H218O) are also strongly impacted by surface energy exchanges. Further, land-use change has large effects on the surface energy balance and therefore the exchanges of these trace gases. To investigate these issues at the regional scale we have coupled MM5 (Grell et al. 1995) with ISOLSM (Riley et al. 2002, Riley et al. 2003), a land-surface model based on LSM1 (Bonan 1995).

  18. Supersonic Love waves in strong piezoelectrics of symmetry mm2

    SciTech Connect

    Darinskii, A. N.; Weihnacht, M.

    2001-07-01

    A study has been made of the Love wave propagation on piezoelectric substrates of symmetry mm2. It has been shown that under certain conditions the velocity of the Love wave exceeds that of shear horizontal (SH) bulk waves in the substrate. This occurs when the slowness curve of SH bulk waves in the substrate either has a concavity or is convex with nearly zero curvature. For such {open_quotes}supersonic{close_quotes} Love waves to appear, it is also required that the substrate as well as the layer be specially oriented and that their material constants fulfill a number of inequalities. Numerical computations have been carried out for a number of structures. The results of numerical computations have been compared with approximate analytical estimations. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Quantum Phase Slips in 6 mm Long Niobium Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Liu, Xin; Chan, M H W

    2016-02-10

    Transport measurements were made to study the superconducting transition of four 6 mm long niobium nanowires with different cross-sectional dimensions. A low-temperature residual resistance tail measured with an excitation current of 5 nA is found in the thinnest wire down to 50 mK or 7.7% of Tc of Nb. The functional form of the residual resistance is consistent with quantum phase slip (QPS) processes. Resistance measured at high bias excitation current switches among many discrete values that are well below the normal state resistance. These discrete resistance values as a function of temperature fall into several parallel curves all showing QPS-like decay in the low temperature limit similar to that found at low current. The coexistence of QPS-like resistance tails and resistance jumps found in the same wire unifies results from previous experiments where these two distinct sets of evidence for QPS are exclusive of each other. PMID:26788964

  20. 1.25-mm observations of luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carico, David P.; Keene, Jocelyn; Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements at a wavelength of 1.25 mm have been obtained for 17 IRAS galaxies selected on the basis of high far-infrared luminosity. These measurements are used to estimate the lower and upper limits to the mass of cold dust in infrared galaxies. As a lower limit on dust mass, all of the galaxies can be successfully modeled without invoking any dust colder than the dust responsible for the 60 and 100 micron emission that was detected by IRAS. As an upper limit, it is possible that the dust mass in a number of the galaxies may actually be dominated by cold dust. This large difference between the lower and upper limits is due primarily to uncertainty in the long-wavelength absorption efficiency of the astrophysical dust grains.

  1. Calibration of a HTS Based LOX 400 mm Level Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.; Nadig, D. S.; Prasad, M. V. N.; Gour, Abhay S.; Pankaj, S.; Gowthaman, M.; Sudharshan, H.

    The measurement of the cryogen level in a cryostage of space crafts is crucial. At the same time the weight of the sensor should be small as it affects the payload fraction of the space craft. An attempt to develop a HTS based level sensor of 400 mm for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) measurement was made. In the initial phase of testing, loss of superconductivity of HTS wire in LOX inside a cryostat was noticed. Thus, a new four wall cryostat was designed to have a stable LOX level to provide thermal stability to the HTS based LOX sensor. The calibration of the developed sensor was carried out against capacitance level sensor which was pre calibrated using diode array to verify its linearity and performance for different current excitation levels. The calibrations were carried out without heater wires. The automatic data logging was accomplished using a program developed in LabVIEW 11.0.

  2. The Apollo 15 coarse fines (4-10 mm)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Sherman, Sarah Bean

    1989-01-01

    A new catalog of the Apollo 15 coarse fines particles is presented. Powell's macroscopic descriptions, resulting from his 1972 particle by particle binocular examination of all of the Apollo 15 4 to 10 mm fines samples, are retained. His groupings are also retained, but petrographic, chemical, and other data from later analyses are incorporated into this catalog to better characterize individual particles and describe the groups. A large number of particles have no characterization beyond that done by Powell. Complete descriptions of the particles and all known references are provided. The catalog is intended for anyone interested in the rock types collected by Dave Scott and Jim Irwin in the Hadley-Appenine region, and particularly for researchers requiring sample allocations.

  3. Modelling and performance of Nb SIS mixers in the 1.3 mm and 0.8 mm bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpov, A.; Carter, M.; Lazareff, B.; Billon-Pierron, D.; Gundlach, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the modeling and subsequent improvements of SIS waveguide mixers for the 200-270 and 330-370 GHz bands (Blundell, Carter, and Gundlach 1988, Carter et al 1991). These mixers are constructed for use in receivers on IRAM radiotelescopes on Pico Veleta (Spain, Sierra Nevada) and Plateau de Bure (French Alps), and must meet specific requirements. The standard reduced height waveguide structure with suspended stripline is first analyzed and a model is validated through comparison with scale model and working scale measurements. In the first step, the intrinsic limitations of the standard mixer structure are identified, and the parameters are optimized bearing in mind the radioastronomical applications. In the second step, inductive tuning of the junctions is introduced and optimized for minimum noise and maximum bandwidth. In the 1.3 mm band, a DSB receiver temperature of less than 110 K (minimum 80 K) is measured from 180 through 260 GHz. In the 0.8 mm band, a DSB receiver temperature of less than 250 K (minimum 175 K) is obtained between 325 and 355 GHz. All these results are obtained with room-temperature optics and a 4 GHz IF chain having a 500 MHz bandwidth and a noise temperature of 14 K.

  4. Comparison of less lethal 40 mm sponge projectile and the 37 mm projectile for injury assessment on human thorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsiampa, N.; Robbe, C.; Oukara, A.; Papy, A.

    2012-08-01

    Since there is an increasing interest in avoiding human body injury in diverse situations like crowd control or peacekeeping missions, less lethal ammunition are more and more used. In this study we focus only on kinetic energy non-lethal (KENLW) projectiles. Their desired effects on human body are the temporary incapacitation through blunt trauma. There are different types of KENLW projectiles ranging from rigid to deformable projectiles. Unfortunately, the effects of such projectiles are not really well known as it is difficult to measure the force transmitted to the human body or the related deformation. Because the potential of injury excludes human living tests, tests are performed on cadavers, animals or human tissue surrogates. Besides these tests, numerical simulations are more and more used to gain more understanding, to assess or to predict the effects of this kind of projectile on human body. In this paper a comparison based on the viscous criterion between the 37 mm rigid projectile and the 40 mm sponge projectile was made.

  5. 300mm pilot line DSA contact hole process stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argoud, M.; Servin, I.; Gharbi, A.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Jullian, K.; Sanche, M.; Chamiot-Maitral, G.; Barnola, S.; Tiron, R.; Navarro, C.; Chevalier, X.; Nicolet, C.; Fleury, G.; Hadziioannou, G.; Asai, M.; Pieczulewski, C.

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is today a credible alternative lithographic technology for semiconductor industry [1]. In the coming years, DSA integration could be a standard complementary step with other lithographic techniques (193nm immersion, e-beam, extreme ultraviolet). Its main advantages are a high pattern resolution (down to 10nm), a capability to decrease an initial pattern edge roughness [2], an absorption of pattern guide size variation, no requirement of a high-resolution mask and can use standard fab-equipment (tracks and etch tools). The potential of DSA must next be confirmed viable for high volume manufacturing. Developments are necessary to transfer this technology on 300mm wafers in order to demonstrate semiconductor fab-compatibility [3-7]. The challenges concern especially the stability, both uniformity and defectivity, of the entire process, including tools and Blok Co-Polymer (BCP) materials. To investigate the DSA process stability, a 300mm pilot line with DSA dedicated track (SOKUDO DUO) is used at CEALeti. BCP morphologies with PMMA cylinders in a PS matrix are investigated (about 35nm natural period). BCP selfassembly in unpatterned surface and patterned surface (graphoepitaxy) configurations are considered in this study. Unpatterned configuration will initially be used for process optimization and fix a process of record. Secondly, this process of record will be monitored with a follow-up in order to validate its stability. Steps optimization will be applied to patterned surface configurations (graphoepitaxy) for contact hole patterning application. A process window of contact hole shrink process will be defined. Process stability (CD uniformity and defectivity related to BCP lithography) will be investigated.

  6. Improved mm-wave photometry for kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; Roesch, M.; Désert, F.-X.; Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Mauskopf, P.; Ade, P.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Camus, P.; Cruciani, A.; Doyle, S.; Hoffmann, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Ponthieu, N.; Schuster, K. F.; Tucker, C.; Vescovi, C.

    2013-03-01

    Context. We have developed a dual-band (140 and 220 GHz) mm-wave imaging camera based on superconducting kinetic inductance detector (KID) arrays. Each array contains 132 superconducting resonators whose resonant frequencies are shifted by mm-wave photons absorption. The read out is achieved with a single electronics chain per band, taking advantage of the intrinsic KID frequency-domain multiplexability. The arrays are easily scalable and well adapted for future large format focal plane instruments. NIKA (formerly Néel IRAM KID Array, now New IRAM KID Array) has been specifically designed for the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, and is one of the first instruments using KIDs to have made measurements of astronomical sources. Aims: In this Letter we describe the solutions adopted to improve the calibration accuracy and the sensitivity of the instrument, and we report on the outcome of the 3rd NIKA observing run of October, 2011. Methods: We use a fast electronic modulation of the readout tone for each KID pixel in order to linearize the instrument calibration, which we track with measurements of planets. We also adopt a new design of the KIDs, sensitive to both polarizations, to increase the amount of radiation absorbed and thus the optical efficiency of the system. Results: We measured an average sensitivity on the sky of 21 mJys0.5 per beam at 140 GHz and 140 mJys0.5 at 220 GHz in the best observing conditions (?220 ? 0.2) after atmospheric noise decorrelation. The sensitivity at 220 GHz was limited by the atmospheric attenuation and loading as well as a reduction in the spectral bandwidth due to a misplaced filter. We found the repeatability in the photometry over the entire observing run to be better than 10% in both bands, thus demonstrating a significant improvement over the previous runs. We also find good agreement between NIKA measurements of faint astronomical sources and previous measurements of the same sources.

  7. Effects of acetic acid and arginine on pH elevation and growth of Bacillus licheniformis in an acidified cucumber juice medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenquan; Meng, Xia; Breidt, Frederick; Dean, Lisa L; Arritt, Fletcher M

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has been shown to cause pH elevation in tomato products having an initial pH below 4.6 and metabiotic effects that can lead to the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Because of this, the organism poses a potential risk to acidified vegetable products; however, little is known about the growth and metabolism of this organism in these products. To clarify the mechanisms of pH change and growth of B. licheniformis in vegetable broth under acidic conditions, a cucumber juice medium representative of a noninhibitory vegetable broth was used to monitor changes in pH, cell growth, and catabolism of sugars and amino acids. For initial pH values between pH 4.1 to 6.0, pH changes resulted from both fermentation of sugar (lowering pH) and ammonia production (raising pH). An initial pH elevation occurred, with starting pH values of pH 4.1 to 4.9 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and was apparently mediated by the arginine deiminase reaction of B. licheniformis. This initial pH elevation was prevented if 5 mM or greater acetic acid was present in the brine at the same pH. In laboratory media, under favorable conditions for growth, data indicated that growth of the organism was inhibited at pH 4.6 with protonated acetic acid concentrations of 10 to 20 mM, corresponding to 25 to 50 mM total acetic acid; however, growth inhibition required greater than 300 mM citric acid (10-fold excess of the amount in processed tomato products) products under similar conditions. The data indicate that growth and pH increase by B. licheniformis may be inhibited by the acetic acid present in most commercial acidified vegetable products but not by the citric acid in many tomato products. PMID:25836398

  8. Influence of Calcium, Iron, and pH on Phosphate Availability for Microbial Mineralization of Organic Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B. K.; Alexander, Martin

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine some of the factors affecting the P requirement for the biodegradation of p-nitrophenol, phenol, and glucose by Pseudomonas and Corynebacterium strains. Mineralization of glucose was rapid and the Pseudomonas sp. grew extensively in solutions with 5 and 10 mM phosphate, but the rate and extent of degradation were low and the bacterial population never became abundant in media with 0.2 mM phosphate. Similar results were obtained with the Corynebacterium sp. growing in media containing p-nitrophenol or phenol and in solutions with a purified phosphate salt. The extent of growth of the Corynebacterium sp. was reduced with 2 or 10 mM phosphate in media containing high Fe concentrations. Ca at 5 mM but not 0.5 mM inhibited p-nitrophenol mineralization by the Corynebacterium sp. with phosphate concentrations from 0.2 to 5.0 mM. Phenol mineralization by the Pseudomonas sp. in medium with 0.2 mM phosphate was rapid at pH 5.2, but the bacteria had little or no activity at pH 8.0. In contrast, the activity was greater at pH 8.0 than at pH 5.2 when the culture contained 10 mM phosphate. These effects of pH were similar in media with 5 mM Ca or no added Ca. We conclude that the effect of P on bacterial degradation can be influenced by the pH and the concentrations of Fe and Ca. PMID:16348635

  9. Cytoplasmic pH mediates pH taxis and weak-acid repellent taxis of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, M; Macnab, R M

    1981-01-01

    Bacteria migrate away from an acid pH and from a number of chemicals, including organic acids such as acetate; the basis for detection of these environmental cues has not been demonstrated. Membrane-permeant weak acids caused prolonged tumbling when added to Salmonella sp. or Escherichia coli cells at pH 5.5. Tethered Salmonella cells went from a prestimulus behavior of 14% clockwise rotation to 80% clockwise rotation when 40 mM acetate was added and remained this way for more than 30 min. A low external pH in the absence of weak acid did not markedly affect steady-state tumbling frequency. Among the weak acids tested, the rank for acidity (salicylate greater than benzoate greater than acetate greater than 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione) was the same as the rank for the ability to collapse the transmembrane pH gradient and to cause tumbling. At pH 7.0, the tumbling responses caused by the weak acids were much briefer. Indole, a non-weak-acid repellent, did not cause prolonged tumbling at low pH. Two chemotaxis mutants (a Salmonella mutant defective in the chemotaxis methylesterase and an E. coli mutant defective in the methyl-accepting protein in MCP I) showed inverse responses of enhanced counterclockwise rotation in the first 1 min after acetate addition. The latter mutant had been found previously to be defective in the sensing of gradients of extracellular pH and (at neutral pH) of acetate. We conclude (i) that taxes away from acid pH and membrane-permeant weak acids are both mediated by a pH-sensitive component located either in the cytoplasm or on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, rather than by an external receptor (as in the case of the attractants), and (ii) that both of these taxes involve components of the chemotaxis methylation system, at least in the early phase of the response. PMID:7009572

  10. Photodynamic therapy for Barrett's esophagus using a 20-mm diameter light-delivery balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Phan, Mary N.; Haydek, John M.; Robinson, Amy R.

    2002-06-01

    Background and Objective: Patients with high grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett's esophagus are at a high risk for developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. Esophagectomy is the standard treatment for such patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using an improved light delivery balloon for ablation of Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasia and/or early cancer. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with HGD or early cancer (19 with HGD, 1 with T1 cancer) received 2 mg/kg of porfimer sodium, intravenously. Two to three days after the injection, laser light was delivered using a cylindrical diffuser inserted inside a 20-mm diameter reflective esophageal PDT balloon. Initially, the balloon was inflated to a pressure of 80 mm Hg. The balloon pressure was gradually reduced to 30 mm Hg. A KTP/dye laser at 630 nm was used as the light source. Light dose of 115 J/cm was delivered at an intensity of 270 mw/cm. Nodules were pre- treated with an extra 50 J/cm using a short diffuser inserted through the scope. Patients were maintained on PPI therapy to keep the gastric pH higher than 4. Eighteen patients required one treatment, while two patients were treated twice. Follow-up consisted of endoscopy with four quadrant biopsies at every 2 cm of the treated area. Thermal ablation was used to treat small residual islands on the follow-ups. The follow-up endoscopies ranged from 6 to 17 months. Results: On follow-up endoscopy, 12 patients had complete replacement of their Barrett's mucosa with neosquamous mucosa. Five patients had residual non-dysplastic Barrett's mucosa, one had indefinite dysplasia, two had low grad dysplasia. There were no residual HGD or cancers. The average length of Barrett's was reduced from 5.4 cm to 1.2 cm. High balloon pressure resulted in wide variation in PDT response among patients. Lower balloon pressures resulted in more consistent destruction of Barrett's mucosa among patients. Five patients developed strictures which responded well to dilations. One patient developed atrial fibrillation which responded to medications. Conclusions: Photodynamic therapy using a 20 mm diameter balloon was effective for ablation of high grade dysplasia and early cancer in Barrett's esophagus. Low balloon inflation pressure was a critical parameter in producing consistent tissue destruction.

  11. Defining and Teaching pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Richard F.

    2007-07-01

    The 1909 definition of pH given in most general chemistry textbooks conflicts with the modern, operationally-defined pH scale that underlies laboratory measurement and relates to activities. At an elementary level, pH and the algebra of equilibria can be simply and correctly taught, without logarithms, in terms of the latter scale.

  12. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH

  13. Experimental characteristics of a high-gain free-electron laser amplifier operating at 8-mm and 2-mm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Throop, A.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Anderson, B.R.; Chambers, F.W.; Clark, J.C.; Fawley, W.M.; Jong, R.A.; Halbach, K.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.

    1987-06-08

    The Electron Laser Facility (ELF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses a high-current induction linac (3.5 MeV, 1000 A), in conjunction with a pulsed electromagnetic wiggler (4.0 M, 4000 G), to operate a free electron laser (FEL) that produces intense radiation in the microwave regime (2 to 8 mm). ELF is a high-gain, single-pass amplifier, using a commercial microwave source as an oscillator input (200 W-50 kW). Previous experiments at 35 GHz produced exponential gains of 40 dB/m, peak powers exceeding 1 GW, and beam-to-rf conversion efficiencies of 34%. Recent experiments at 140 GHz have demonstrated exponential gains of 22 dB/m, peak powers exceeding 50 MW, and total gains of 65 dB. In this paper, we describe the experimental results at these two frequencies and compare then with the predictions of simulation codes.

  14. GDx-MM: An imaging Mueller matrix retinal polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twietmeyer, Karen Marie

    2007-12-01

    Retinal diseases are a major cause of blindness worldwide. Although widely studied, disease mechanisms are not completely understood, and diagnostic tests may not detect disease early enough for timely intervention. The goal of this research is to contribute to research for more sensitive diagnostic tests that might use the interaction of polarized light with retinal tissue to detect subtle changes in the microstructure. This dissertation describes the GDx-MM, a scanning laser polarimeter which measures a complete 16-element Mueller matrix image of the retina. This full polarization signature may provide new comparative information on the structure of healthy and diseased retinal tissue by highlighting depolarizing structures as well as structures with varying magnitudes and orientations of retardance and diattenuation. The three major components of this dissertation are: (1) Development of methods for polarimeter optimization and error analysis; (2) Design, optimization, assembly, calibration, and validation of the GDx-MM polarimeter; and (3) Analysis of data for several human subjects. Development involved modifications to a Laser Diagnostics GDx, a commercially available scanning laser ophthalmoscope with incomplete polarization capability. Modifications included installation of polarization components, development of a data acquisition system, and implementation of algorithms to convert raw data into polarization parameter images. Optimization involved visualization of polarimeter state trajectories on the Poincare sphere and a condition number analysis of the instrument matrix. Retinal images are collected non-invasively at 20 mum resolution over a 15° visual field in four seconds. Validation of the polarimeter demonstrates a polarimetric measurement accuracy of approximately +/- 5%. Retinal polarization data was collected on normal human subjects at the University of Arizona and at Indiana University School of Optometry. Calculated polarization parameter images reveal properties of the tissue microstructure. For example, retardance images indicate nerve fiber layer thickness and orientation, and depolarization images (uniform for these normal subjects), are predicted to indicate regions of disease-related tissue disruption. This research demonstrates a method for obtaining a full polarization signature of the retina in one measurement using a polarimetrically optimized instrument, and provides a step toward the use of complete retinal imaging polarimetry in the diagnosis and monitoring of retinal disease.

  15. Heterogeneous Distribution of Microbial Activity in Methanogenic Aggregates: pH and Glucose Microprofiles

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Piet N. L.; De Beer, Dirk; Cronenberg, Carel C. H.; Houwen, Frans P.; Ottengraf, Simon P. P.; Verstraete, Willy H.

    1993-01-01

    Methanogenic aggregates, harvested from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating potato starch wastewater, were acclimatized to either glucose or a mixture of sugars and organic nitrogen compounds (i.e., diluted molasses). Both types of granules exhibited internal pH and substrate concentration gradients in mineral medium (pH 7.0, 30°C) as was measured with microelectrodes. Glucose-acclimatized granules suspended in a mineral medium lacking glucose exhibited a distinct internal pH decrease of about 1 U within the granule, suggesting strong metabolism by the acidogenic bacteria. Molasses-acclimatized and aged granules suspended in mineral medium did not exhibit such a pH decrease, suggesting the importance of the metabolic state of these acidogens. The pH gradient did not occur in deactivated granules and was not observable in strongly buffered media (mineral medium containing 33 mM phosphate or reactor liquid). When glucose (0.5 to 5.0 mM) was added to the mineral medium, granules exhibited a convex pH profile. Glucose consumption was located exclusively in the outer 200 to 300 μm of the aggregates (mean diameter = 1.5 mm). The addition of 20 mM 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid to the mineral medium indicated that the higher pH levels in the centre of the granule appeared to be related to the activity of methanogens. It is suggested that acidogenic activity occurs predominantly in the outer 200 to 300 μm of the aggregate and methanogenic activity occurs predominantly in the center of the investigated granules. Images PMID:16349091

  16. Phosphocreatine kinetics at the onset of contractions in skeletal muscle of MM creatine kinase knockout mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Brian B.; Meyer, Ronald A.; Wiseman, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphocreatine (PCr) depletion during isometric twitch stimulation at 5 Hz was measured by (31)P-NMR spectroscopy in gastrocnemius muscles of pentobarbital-anesthetized MM creatine kinase knockout (MMKO) vs. wild-type C57B (WT) mice. PCr depletion after 2 s of stimulation, estimated from the difference between spectra gated to times 200 ms and 140 s after 2-s bursts of contractions, was 2.2 +/- 0.6% of initial PCr in MMKO muscle vs. 9.7 +/- 1.6% in WT muscles (mean +/- SE, n = 7, P < 0.001). Initial PCr/ATP ratio and intracellular pH were not significantly different between groups, and there was no detectable change in intracellular pH or ATP in either group after 2 s. The initial difference in net PCr depletion was maintained during the first minute of continuous 5-Hz stimulation. However, there was no significant difference in the quasi-steady-state PCr level approached after 80 s (MMKO 36.1 +/- 3.5 vs. WT 35.5 +/- 4.4% of initial PCr; n = 5-6). A kinetic model of ATPase, creatine kinase, and adenylate kinase fluxes during stimulation was consistent with the observed PCr depletion in MMKO muscle after 2 s only if ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation was included in the model. Taken together, the results suggest that cytoplasmic ADP more rapidly increases and oxidative phosphorylation is more rapidly activated at the onset of contractions in MMKO compared with WT muscles.

  17. Parallel implementation, validation, and performance of MM5

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakes, J.; Canfield, T.; Nanjundiah, R.; Hammond, S.; Grell, G.

    1994-12-31

    We describe a parallel implementation of the nonhydrostatic version of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model, MM5, that includes nesting capabilities. This version of the model can run on many different massively Parallel computers (including a cluster of workstations). The model has been implemented and run on the IBM SP and Intel multiprocessors using a columnwise decomposition that supports irregularly shaped allocations of the problem to processors. This stategy will facilitate dynamic load balancing for improved parallel efficiency and promotes a modular design that simplifies the nesting problem AU data communication for finite differencing, inter-domain exchange of data, and I/O is encapsulated within a parallel library, RSL. Hence, there are no sends or receives in the parallel model itself. The library is Generalizable to other, similar finite difference approximation codes. The code is validated by comparing the rate of growth in error between the sequential and parallel models with the error growth rate when the sequential model input is perturbed to simulate floating point rounding error. Series of runs on increasing numbers of parallel processors demonstrate that the parallel implementation is efficient and scalable to large numbers of processors.

  18. Manufacturing and performance test of an 800-mm space optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krödel, Matthias R.; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi; Kume, Masami; Furuya, Akira; Yui, Yukari Y.; Imai, Hiroko; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Tange, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Takao; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2008-07-01

    Next generation space telescopes, which are currently being developed in the US and Europe, require large-scale light-weight reflectors with high specific strength, high specific stiffness, low CTE, and high thermal conductivity. To meet budget constraints, they also require materials that produce surfaces suitable for polishing without expensive over-coatings. HB-Cesic - a European and Japanese trademark of ECM - is a Hybrid Carbon-Fiber Reinforced SiC composite developed jointly by ECM and MELCO to meet these challenges. The material's mechanical performance, such as stiffness, bending strength, and fracture toughness are significantly improved compared to the classic ECM Cesic material (type MF). Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of HB-Cesic at cryogenic temperatures are now partly established; and excellent performance for large future space mirrors and structures are expected. This paper presents the design and manufacturing of an 800-mm mirror for space application, starting with the C/C raw material preparation to the finishing of the components, including the polishing of the mirror. The letters "HB" in HB-Cesic stand for "hybrid" to indicate that the C/C raw material is composed of a mixture of different types of chopped, short carbon-fibers.

  19. Mapping wetlands on beaver flowages with 35-mm photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Beaver flowages and associated wetlands on the Chippewa National Forest, north-central Minnesota, were photographed from the ground and from the open side window of a small high-wing monoplane. The 35-mm High Speed Ektachrome transparencies obtained were used to map the cover-type associations visible on the aerial photographs. Nearly vertical aerial photos were rectified by projecting the slides onto a base map consisting ofcontrol points located by plane-table survey. Maps were prepared by tracing the recognizable stands of vegetation in the rectified projection at the desired map scale. Final map scales ranging from 1:260 to 1:571 permitted identification and mapping of 26 cover-type associations on 10 study flowages in 1971. This cover-mapping technique was economical and substituted for detailed ground surveys. Comparative data from 10 flowages were collected serially throughout the entire open-water season. Although developed for analysis of waterfowl habitat, the technique has application to other areas of wildlife management and ecological investigation.

  20. COSMOG: Cosmology Oriented Sub-mm Modeling of Galactic Foregrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Leisawitz, D.

    2004-01-01

    With upcoming missions in mid- and far-Infrared there is a need for software packages to reliably simulate the planned observations. This would help in both planning the observation and scanning strategy and in developing the concepts of the far-off missions. As this workshop demonstrated, many of the new missions are to be in the far-IR range of the electromagnetic spectrum and at the same time will map the sky with a sub-arcsec angular resolution. We present here a computer package for simulating foreground maps for the planned sub-mm and far-IR missions. such as SPECS. The package allows to study confusion limits and simulate cosmological observations for specified sky location interactively and in real time. Most of the emission at wavelengths long-ward of approximately 50 microns is dominated by Galactic cirrus and Zodiacal dust emission. Stellar emission at these wavelengths is weak and is for now neglected. Cosmological sources (distant and not-so-distant) galaxies for specified cosmologies will be added. Briefly, the steps that the algorithm goes through is described.

  1. mm-wave filter design with suspended stripline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, R. M.

    1986-07-01

    In treating the subject of planar filter design using suspended stripline architectures, it is noted that the prime objective in any filter design is to achieve low insertion loss within the prescribed bandwidth while attaining the required out-of-band signal rejection. When operating in the mm-wave region, mode propagation within the enclosed structure is an additional concern. In the particular design case considered, the objectives were: center frequency 45 GHz, bandwidth 3.6 GHz, percentage bandwidth 8 percent, 3 poles, 0.2 dB ripple. To obtain the required values of gap capacitance for the suspended stripline network, one must know the odd and even mode fringing capacitance for coupled line structures. The work of Smith (1971) was adapted and used to develop a FORTRAN computer program for determining the gap-capacitances along with even and odd mode impedances and capacitances as a function of the ratio of gap spacing to dielectric thickness. The program inputs line width, gap spacing, dielectric constant and upper and low ground plane spacing and material thickness. A listing of the program is provided along with a sample run. The final printed circuit layout including probe transition is illustrated, and a photograph of the filter is included.

  2. Kinetic Inductance Detectors development for mm-wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Swenson, L. J.; Benoit, A.; Bideau, A.; Bres, G.; Camus, P.; Garde, G.; Hoffmann, C.; Minet, J.; Rodenas, H.; Nika Collaboration

    Throughout the last decades, development of low-temperat- ure detectors focused mainly on the design of high-sensitivity, single-pixel devices. This includes such devices as semiconductor-based photodetectors and bolometers, Magnetic Metallic Calorimeters (MMC), Superconducting Tunnel Junctions (STJ), and Transition Edge Sensors (TES). However, these devices have had limited success in achieving the simultaneous large-scale array sizes and large-bandwidth operation necessary for high-speed, high-resolution detection. To overcome this performance limitation, it is advisable to focus on low-temperature detectors which are intrinsically adapted to giant-array multiplexing and ultra-fast readout. To adopt large scale frequency-domain multiplexing for low-temperature detectors, it is necessary to find detectors which"broadcast" at microwave frequencies. Superconducting microwave resonators naturally lend themselves to this task. One recent demonstration is an implementation known as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). This detection mechanism can be adopted for low-energy EM radiation (radio, mm, THz) in continuous mode, or in pulsed mode for higher energy radiation and particles. We present an ongoing development for a KIDs instrument dedicated to millimetric ground-based observations at the 30m IRAM telescope at Pico Veleta. The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) project is coordinated in Grenoble and involves groups in Holland (SRON), UK (Cardiff) and Italy (Roma).

  3. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Dobbs, Matt; Bissonnette, Eric; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-07-23

    An FPGA based digital signal processing (DSP) system for biasing and reading out multiplexed bolometric detectors for mm-wavelength telescopes is presented. This readout system is being deployed for balloon-borne and ground based cosmology experiments with the primary goal of measuring the signature of inflation with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The system consists of analog superconducting electronics running at 250 mK and 4 K, coupled to digital room temperature backend electronics described here. The digital electronics perform the real time functionality with DSP algorithms implemented in firmware. A soft embedded processor provides all of the slow housekeeping control and communications. Each board in the system synthesizes multi-frequency combs of 8 to 32 carriers in the MHz band to bias the detectors. After the carriers have been modulated with the sky-signal by the detectors, the same boards digitize the comb directly. The carriers are mixed down to base-band and low pass filtered. The signal bandwidth of 0.050Hz-100 Hz places extreme requirements on stability and requires powerful filtering techniques to recover the sky-signal from the MHz carriers.

  4. Development of in situ CO2 and pH sensor for AUVs and ROVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Kimoto, Hideshi; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has been developing two-type autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs): a cruising AUV and a working AUV, since October 2010. These vehicles will perform carbon dioxide (CO2) and pH observations to explore hydrothermal plume on seabed mineral resources and to monitor a leak of CO2 in carbon capture and storage (CCS) up to depth of 3,000 meters. We here have been developing the compact in situ CO2 and pH sensor (Hybrid CO2-pH sensor: HCS) for the AUVs to obtain vertical and horizontal distributions of CO2 and pH. The HCS consists of an aluminum pressure housing (diameter 84 mm, length 570 mm, weight 4 kg) and an acrylic silicon-oil filled, pressure-compensated vessel (diameter 90 mm, length 355 mm, weight 2 kg) containing valves and pump unit. The HCS is also useful for the observation by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The measured data were transmitted to the AUVs or ROVs by serial communications. We can monitor the data of in situ pCO2, pH and so on in real time on board. The measurement principle for the CO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. On the other hand, we adopt potentiometric analysis using original glass and reference electrodes as a pH sensor because of the most commonly used technique for sea water pH measurements and high-speed response (within 20 seconds). From simultaneously measured data of in situ pCO2 and pH, we can also calculate dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) as other carbonate species in the ocean. The resolutions of HCS are 1 ?atm for pCO2 and 0.001 pH. In the laboratory experiment, the HCS obtained precisions within 3 ?atm and within 0.01 pH, respectively. Our first in situ observational test of the HSC with cruising AUV was made in the coast of the Japan Sea last August. And also first in situ test of the HCS with ROV was performed at Okinawa Trough last September. The data obtained from each tests are consistent with predictions based on past studies.

  5. Photophysical properties of MM quadruply bonded complexes supported by carboxylate ligands, MM = Mo2, MoW, or W2.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Malcolm H; Gustafson, Terry L; Turro, Claudia

    2013-02-19

    While chemists have extensively studied the photophysical properties of d(6), d(8), and d(10) transition metal complexes, their early transition metal counterparts have received less attention. Quadruply bonded complexes of molybdenum and tungsten supported by carboxylate ligands have intense metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) absorptions that arise from the electronic coupling of the metal-metal (MM) ? orbital with the CO(2) ?-system. This coupling may in turn be linked to an extended ?-conjugated organic functional group. The major interaction is akin to the so-called back-bonding in metal carbonyl complexes. By the appropriate selection of MM, its attendant ligands, and the organic group, this absorption can be tuned to span the visible and near IR range, from 400 to 1000 nm. Consequently, these complexes offer potential as photon harvesters for photovoltaic devices and photocatalysis. In this Account, we describe recent studies of dinuclear M(II) containing complexes, where M = Mo or W, and show that there are both parallels and disparities to the monomeric transition metal complexes. These early transition metal complexes have relatively long lived excited state singlets when compared to other transition metal complexes. They also often show unusual dual emission (fluorescence and phosphorescence), with singlet (S(1)) lifetimes that range from 1 to 20 ps, and triplet (T(1)) lifetimes from 3 ns to 200 ?s. The fluorescent S(1) states are typically (1)MLCT for both M = Mo and W. These extended singlet lifetimes are uncommon for mononuclear transition metal complexes, which typically have very short lived (1)MLCT states due to rapid femto-second intersystem crossing rates. However, the T(1) states differ. This phosphorescence is MLCT in nature when M = W, while this emission comes from the ??* state for M = Mo. Through time-resolved femtosecond infrared spectroscopy, we can detect the asymmetric stretch of the CO(2) ligand in both the singlet and triplet ??* states. Through these analytical methods, we can study how the charge distribution in the singlet and triplet excited states changes over time. In addition, we can detect delocalized or localized examples of MLCT states, which represent class III and I excited state mixed valence in the Robin and Day scheme. PMID:23145921

  6. Sub-mm CO Measurements of the Orion Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. L.; Muders, D.; Kramer, C.; Henkel, C.

    2000-05-01

    Images of a >3' region around the Orion KL source have been made in the J=4-3 (461 GHz) and J=7-6 (806 GHz) lines of CO with angular resolutions of 18'' and 13'', using the 10-meter Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT) of the Sub-Millimeter Telescope Observatory (SMTO). This region contains a variety of objects: (1) the Hot Core (a region containing complex molecules) and Orion KL outflow (NE of the center of the 10'' diameter Hot Core, and very likely associated with the continuum source `I' (Menten & Reid 1995 ApJ 445, L157)), (2) another outflow source, Orion-S ( ~100'' south of the Hot Core (Rodriguez-Franco et al. 1999 A&A 344, L57)), (3) the ionized-neutral interface at the rear of the Orion HII region, and (4) the Orion Bar feature (an ionized-neutral interface to the SW of the HII region). Regions (3) and (4) are examples of `Photon Dominated Regions' or `PDR's'. The sub-mm CO lines are emitted from warm gas; the J=7-6 line is emitted from an energy level 156 Kelvin above the ground state. The excellent pointing and low sidelobes of the HHT allow accurate comparisons with high r! esolution CO images in lower J lines and images of other species. Our J=7-6 CO image was made with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Hot Electron Bolometer (Kawamura et al. 1999 IEEE Trans. on Appl. Superconductivity 9, 3753. The HHT is operated by the Submillimeter Telescope Observatory on behalf of the Max-Planck-Institut f. Radioastronomie and Steward Observatory of The University of Arizona. We thank the CfA receiver group for providing the Hot Electron Bolometer used to take the J=7-6 CO line data.

  7. Erroneous gender differences in axillary skin surface/sweat pH.

    PubMed

    Burry, J S; Coulson, H F; Esser, I; Marti, V; Melling, S J; Rawlings, A V; Roberts, G; Mills, A K

    2001-04-01

    Assessing accurately the pH of axillary eccrine sweat is of vital importance in the antiperspirant industry. Eccrine sweat pH is a critical parameter in determining the effectiveness of antiperspirants; antiperspirant salts dissolve in sweat and diffuse into the sweat glands, where the resultant acidic solution hydrolyses in more alkaline sweat forming an amorphous metal hydroxide gel, thereby restricting the flow of eccrine sweat. Comparison of the skin surface and sweat pH of males and females reported in the literature shows that, although consistent male/female differences have been observed on the forearm, determination of significant gender-based pH differences across other sites are less conclusive. Studies on the back and infra-mammary regions exhibited significant gender differences in skin surface pH, whereas those on the forehead, cheek, neck and inguinal area showed no such difference. With regard to the axilla specifically, four studies have been reported, three showing no significant difference in axillary skin surface pH and one indicating that females have an eccrine sweat pH of 7 and males have a sweat pH of 5.6. This paper describes a series of carefully controlled studies aimed at assessing potential gender differences in eccrine sweat and skin surface pH following exposure to a variety of temperature, humidity and time conditions. The results highlight the importance of controlling precisely the time of investigation, site of measurement and, most importantly, the necessity to pre-equilibrate samples in 40 mmHg carbon dioxide (equivalent to arterial CO(2) tension (pCO2)) before determining sweat pH. When these parameters are controlled no gender differences in axillary sweat or skin surface pH are observed. Large differences in eccrine sweat and skin surface pH are found, however, between the vault (hairy region) and fossa (non-hairy region) of the axilla. PMID:18498454

  8. Low pH affects survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of the postlarvae and early juveniles of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Gunzo; Bagarinao, Teodora; Yong, Annita Seok Kian; Chen, Chiau Yu; Noor, Siti Norasidah Mat; Lim, Leong Seng

    2015-06-01

    Acidification of rain water caused by air pollutants is now recognized as a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. We examined the effects of low pH (control pH 7.5, pH 6, pH 5, pH 4) on the survival, growth, and shell quality of Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles in the laboratory. Hatcheryproduced postlarvae (PL 5) were stocked at 250 PL per aquarium, acclimated over 7 d to experimental pH adjusted with hydrochloric acid, and reared for 30 d. Dead specimens were removed and counted twice a day. After 27 d rearing, all specimens were measured for total length and body weight. Carapace quality was assessed by spectrophotometry. Survival of juveniles was highest at pH 6 (binomial 95% confidence interval 79 - 89%) followed by control pH 7.5 (56 - 68%) and pH 5 (50 - 60%) and was lowest for unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles at pH 4 (43 - 49%). The final median total length and body weight of juveniles were similar at control pH 7.5 (18.2 TL, 50.2 mg BW) and pH 6 (17.7 mm TL, 45.0 mg BW) but significantly less at pH 5 (16.7 mm TL, 38.2 mg BW); at pH 4, the postlarvae did not metamorphose and measured only 9.8 mm TL, 29.3 mg BW. Length frequency distribution showed homogeneous growth at pH 6, positive skew at control pH 7.5 and pH 5, and extreme heterogeneity at pH 4. The carapace showed different transmittance spectra and lower total transmittance (i.e. thicker carapace) in juveniles at pH 7.5, pH 6, and pH 5 than in unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles with thinner carapace at pH 4. Thus, survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of M. rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles were negatively affected by pH 5 and especially pH 4. The thinner carapace of the survivors at pH 4 was mostly due to their small size and failure to metamorphose. Natural waters affected by acid rain could decimate M. rosenbergii populations in the wild.

  9. DNA synthesis and microtubule assembly-related events in fertilized Paracentrotus lividus eggs: reversible inhibition by 10 mM procaine.

    PubMed

    Raymond, M N; Foucault, G; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the effects of 10 mM procaine on microtubule assembly and on DNA synthesis, as followed by [3H]colchicine binding assays and [3H]thymidine incorporation respectively, in fertilized Paracentrotus lividus eggs. In the absence of microtubule assembly inhibitors, about 25% of the total egg tubulin is submitted to two cycles of polymerization prior to the first cell division, this polymerization process precedes DNA synthesis. If the zygotes are treated with 10 mM procaine in the course of the cell cycle, tubulin polymerization is inhibited or microtubules are disassembled. DNA synthesis is inhibited when procaine treatment is performed 10 min, before the initiation of the S-period. However, when the drug is applied in the course of this synthetic period, the process is normally accomplished, but the next S-period becomes inhibited. Moreover, procaine treatment increases the cytoplasmic pH of the fertilized eggs by about 0.6 to 0.8 pH units. This pH increase precedes microtubule disassembly and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Washing out the drug induces a decrease of the intracellular pH which returns to about the same value as that of the fertilized egg controls. This pH change is then followed by the reinitiation of microtubule assembly, DNA synthesis and cell division. Our results show that the inhibition of both tubulin polymerization and DNA synthesis in fertilized eggs treated with 10 mM procaine, appears to be related to the drug-induced increase in cytoplasmic pH. PMID:3709552

  10. The role of pH in determining the species composition of the human colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Thomson, John M; Flint, Harry J

    2009-08-01

    The pH of the colonic lumen varies with anatomical site and microbial fermentation of dietary residue. We have investigated the impact of mildly acidic pH, which occurs in the proximal colon, on the growth of different species of human colonic bacteria in pure culture and in the complete microbial community. Growth was determined for 33 representative human colonic bacteria at three initial pH values (approximately 5.5, 6.2 and 6.7) in anaerobic YCFA medium, which includes a mixture of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) with 0.2% glucose as energy source. Representatives of all eight Bacteroides species tested grew poorly at pH 5.5, as did Escherichia coli, whereas 19 of the 23 gram-positive anaerobes tested gave growth rates at pH 5.5 that were at least 50% of those at pH 6.7. Growth inhibition of B. thetaiotaomicron at pH 5.5 was increased by the presence of the SCFA mix (33 mM acetate, 9 mM propionate and 1 mM each of iso-valerate, valerate and iso-butyrate). Analysis of amplified 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated a major pH-driven shift within a human faecal bacterial community in a continuous flow fermentor. Bacteroides spp. accounted for 27% of 16S rRNA sequences detected at pH 5.5, but 86% of sequences at pH 6.7. Conversely, butyrate-producing gram-positive bacteria related to Eubacterium rectale represented 50% of all 16S rRNA sequences at pH 5.5, but were not detected at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the growth of a major group of gram-negative bacteria at mildly acidic pH apparently creates niches that can be exploited by more low pH-tolerant microorganisms. PMID:19397676

  11. Effect of heparin or saline dilution of blood on PCO2 and pH.

    PubMed

    Karendal, B

    1975-01-01

    The effect of different dilutions with heparin solutions or saline on blood PCO2, pH and standard bicarbonate was investigated. Blood was first equilibrated to give about 40 or 60 mmHg PCO2. The solutions were in equilibrium with room air. The effect on blood PCO2 etc. could be fully explained by the dilution with a medium having a much lower PCO2. Thus, correction of the heparin solution to pH 7.40 and PCO2 40 mmHg eliminated the effect on PCO2, pH and standard bicarbonate. With ordinary procedure for blood heparinization (about 2% dilution) the effect is practically negligible. PMID:1888

  12. Dosimetric study of the 15 mm ROPES eye plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, D.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.; Casal, E.; Frutos, J.M. de

    2004-12-01

    The main aim of this paper is to make a study of dose-rate distributions obtained around the 15 mm, radiation oncology physics and engineering services, Australia (ROPES) eye plaque loaded with {sup 125}I model 6711 radioactive seeds. In this study, we have carried out a comparison of the dose-rate distributions obtained by the algorithm used by the Plaque Simulator (PS) (BEBIG GmbH, Berlin, Germany) treatment planning system with those obtained by means of the Monte Carlo method for the ROPES eye plaque. A simple method to obtain the dose-rate distributions in a treatment planning system via the superposition of the dose-rate distributions of a seed placed in the eye plaque has been developed. The method uses eye plaque located in a simplified geometry of the head anatomy and distributions obtained by means of the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The favorable results obtained in the development of this method suggest that it could be implemented on a treatment planning system to improve dose-rate calculations. We have also found that the dose-rate falls sharply along the eye and that outside the eye the dose-rate is very low. Furthermore, the lack of backscatter photons from the air located outside the eye-head phantom produces a dose reduction negligible for distances from the eye-plaque r<1 cm but reaches up to 20% near the air-eye interface. Results showed that the treatment planning system lacks accuracy around the border of the eye (in the sclera and the surrounding area) due to the simplicity of the algorithm used. The BEBIG treatment planning system uses a global attenuation factor that takes into account the effect of the eye plaque seed carrier and the lack of backscatter photons caused by the metallic cover, which in the case of a ROPES eye plaque has a default value of T=1 (no correction). In the present study, a global attenuation factor T=0.96 and an air-interface correction factor which improve on treatment planning system calculations were obtained.

  13. A QM/MM study of the catalytic mechanism of aspartate ammonia lyase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    Aspartate ammonia lyase (Asp) is one of three types of ammonia lyases specific for aspartate or its derivatives as substrates, which catalyzes the reversible reaction of l-aspartate to yield fumarate and ammonia. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of Asp has been studied by using combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) approach. The calculation results indicate that the overall reaction only contains two elementary steps. The first step is the abstraction of Cβ proton of l-aspartate by Ser318, which is calculated to be rate limiting. The second step is the cleavage of CαN bond of l-aspartate to form fumarate and ammonia. Ser318 functions as the catalytic base, whereas His188 is a dispensable residue, but its protonation state can influence the active site structure and the existing form of leaving amino group, thereby influences the activity of the enzyme, which can well explain the pH dependence of enzymatic activity. Mutation of His188 to Ala only changes the active site structure and slightly elongates the distance of Cβ proton of substrate with Ser318, causing the enzyme to remain significant but reduced activity. PMID:24875395

  14. The influence of calcium and pH on growth in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and pH on root elongation in Zea mays L. cv. B73 x Missouri 17 and cv. Merit. Seedlings were raised to contain high levels of Ca2+ (HC, imbibed and raised in 10 mM CaCl2) or low levels of Ca2+ (LC, imbibed and raised in distilled water). In HC roots, lowering the pH (5 mM MES/Tris) from 6.5 to 4.5 resulted in strong, long-lasting growth promotion. Surprisingly, increasing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 also resulted in strong growth promotion. In LC roots acidification of the medium (pH 6.5 to 4.5) resulted in transient growth stimulation followed by a gradual decline in the growth rate toward zero. Exposure of LC roots to high pH (pH shift from 6.5 to 8.5) also promoted growth. Addition of EGTA resulted in strong growth promotion in both LC and HC roots. The ability of EGTA to stimulate growth appeared not to be related to H+ release from EGTA upon Ca2+ chelation since, 1) LC roots showed a strong and prolonged response to EGTA, but only a transient response to acid pH, and 2) promotion of growth by EGTA was observed in strongly buffered solutions. We also examined the pH dependence of the release of 45Ca2+ from roots of 3-day-old seedlings grown from grains imbibed in 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ from the root into agar blocks placed on the root surface was greater the more acidic the pH of the blocks. The results indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary for the acid growth response in roots.

  15. Stabilization of pH in solid-matrix hydroponic systems.

    PubMed

    Frick, J; Mitchell, C A

    1993-10-01

    2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer or Amberlite DP-1 (cation-exchange resin beads) were used to stabilize substrate pH of passive-wicking, solid-matrix hydroponic systems in which small canopies of Brassica napus L. (CrGC 5-2, genome : ACaacc) were grown to maturity. Two concentrations of MES (5 or 10 mM) were included in Hoagland 1 nutrient solution. Alternatively, resin beads were incorporated into the 2 vermiculite : 1 perlite (v/v) growth medium at 6% or 12% of total substrate volume. Both strategies stabilized pH without toxic side effects on plants. Average seed yield rates for all four pH stabilization treatments (13.3 to 16.9 g m-2 day-1) were about double that of the control (8.2 g m-2 day-1), for which there was no attempt to buffer substrate pH. Both the highest canopy seed yield rate (16.9 g m-2 day-1) and the highest shoot harvest index (19.5%) occurred with the 6% resin bead treatment, even though the 10 mM MES and 12% bead treatments maintained pH within the narrowest limits. The pH stabilization methods tested did not significantly affect seed oil and protein contents. PMID:11537992

  16. Stabilization of pH in solid-matrix hydroponic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, J.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer or Amberlite DP-1 (cation-exchange resin beads) were used to stabilize substrate pH of passive-wicking, solid-matrix hydroponic systems in which small canopies of Brassica napus L. (CrGC 5-2, genome : ACaacc) were grown to maturity. Two concentrations of MES (5 or 10 mM) were included in Hoagland 1 nutrient solution. Alternatively, resin beads were incorporated into the 2 vermiculite : 1 perlite (v/v) growth medium at 6% or 12% of total substrate volume. Both strategies stabilized pH without toxic side effects on plants. Average seed yield rates for all four pH stabilization treatments (13.3 to 16.9 g m-2 day-1) were about double that of the control (8.2 g m-2 day-1), for which there was no attempt to buffer substrate pH. Both the highest canopy seed yield rate (16.9 g m-2 day-1) and the highest shoot harvest index (19.5%) occurred with the 6% resin bead treatment, even though the 10 mM MES and 12% bead treatments maintained pH within the narrowest limits. The pH stabilization methods tested did not significantly affect seed oil and protein contents.

  17. pH of estuarine waters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The emf measurements for the TRIS buffer in seawater have been used to define buffer solutions that can be used to determine the pH on a free or total proton scale for estuarine waters. The pH is related to the stoichiometric dissociation constant (K*) of TRISH/sup +/, the concentration of buffer (m/sub TRIS/) and salinity (S). An electrode system with liquid junction was used to measure these buffers to compare the various pH scales.

  18. Control of protozoa contamination and lipid accumulation in Neochloris oleoabundans culture: Effects of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon.

    PubMed

    Peng, Licheng; Lan, Christopher Q; Zhang, Zisheng; Sarch, Cody; Laporte, Matt

    2015-12-01

    Combined effects of pH (i.e., 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5) and bicarbonate (i.e., 0, 80 and 160mM NaHCO3) on lipid accumulation and on biological contaminant viability in a protozoa-contaminated culture of the freshwater microalga Neochloris oleoabundans were studied. Cultures grown in the media containing 160mM NaHCO3 at pH 9.5 obtained the highest biomass concentration (DCWmax=1.32g/L), lipid content (LC=327mg/g), which corresponded to a lipid productivity of 56mg/(L·d), and the culture was protozoa free one day after inoculation. Other cultures, 160mM NaHCO3 at pH 8.5 (DCWmax=1.32g/L, LC=223mg/g), and 80mM NaHCO3 at pH 9.5 (DCWmax=1.25g/L, LC=264mg/g) could delay protozoan growth, but not inhibit it completely. These results suggest 160mM NaHCO3 or slightly above at pH levels of 8.5-9.5 may be used in outdoor cultivation processes of freshwater N. oleoabundans to control protozoa contamination while maintain a high lipid content. PMID:26320019

  19. Regulation of intracellular pH during anoxia in rice coleoptiles in acidic and near neutral conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kulichikhin, Konstantin Yu; Greenway, Hank; Byrne, Lindsay; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Rice coleoptiles, renowned for anoxia tolerance, were hypoxically pretreated, excised, ‘healed’, and then exposed to a combination of anoxia and pH 3.5. The putative acid load was confirmed by net effluxes of K+ to the medium, with concurrent net decreases of H+ in the medium, presumably mainly due to H+ influx. Yet the coleoptiles survived the combination of anoxia and pH 3.5 for at least 90 h, and even for at least 40 h when the energy crisis, inherent to anoxia, had been aggravated by supplying the coleoptiles with 2.5 mM rather than 50 mM glucose. Even in the case of coleoptiles with 2.5 mM glucose, an accumulation ratio of 6 for Cl– was attained at 4 h after the start of re-aeration, implying plasma membrane integrity was either maintained during anoxia, or rapidly restored after a return to aerated conditions. Cytoplasmic pH and vacuolar pH were measured using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 50 mM glucose in the basal perfusion medium. After 60 h in anoxia, external pH was suddenly decreased from 6.5 to 3.5, but cytoplasmic pH only decreased from 7.35 to 7.2 during the first 2 h and then remained steady for the next 16 h. During the first 3 h at pH 3.5, vacuolar pH decreased from 5.7 to 5.25 and then stabilized. After 18 h at pH 3.5, the initial values of cytoplasmic pH and vacuolar pH were rapidly restored, both upon a return to pH 6.5 while maintaining anoxia and after subsequent return to aerated solution. Summing up, rice coleoptiles exposed to a combination of anoxia and pH 3.5 retained pH regulation and cellular compartmentation, demonstrating tolerance to anoxia even during the acid load imposed by exposure to pH 3.5. PMID:19363206

  20. Modulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve activation by low pH solutions in guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed

    Auberson, S; Lacroix, J S; Lundberg, J M

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the stimulation of airways sensory nerves by low pH solutions and concomitantly induced bronchoconstriction. The effect of low pH buffer and lactic acid solutions at the same pH (5 and 6) were compared and the influence of low pH on the capsaicin effect was recorded. We have used the isolated guinea-pig perfused lung model taking the insufflation pressure as an indicator of bronchial smooth muscle tone while the calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity measured in the lung perfusate represented sensory nerves activation. Low pH buffer and lactic acid solution (3 and 4.1 mM) at the same pH of 5 and 6 induced pH-dependent bronchoconstriction and peptides release which were completely abolished after systemic pretreatment with capsaicin. Both responses were significantly inhibited after Ca2+-free infusion. Capsazepine (10(-6) M), a selective capsaicin antagonist, significantly reduced the calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity overflow evoked by all the solutions studied. Diclofenac (10(-5) M), a cyclooxygenase blocker, inhibited pH 5, pH 6 and lactic acid 3 mM (pH 6)-evoked peptide release, but not lactic acid 4.1 mM (pH 5). The functional response was not significantly modified after diclofenac while only the lactic acid 3 mM response was significantly reduced by capsazepine. There was a synergistic interaction between capsaicin and low pH buffer on calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity release and an additive effect on bronchoconstriction. It is concluded that in the isolated perfused guinea-pig lung, lactic acid and low pH buffer induced calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity release and bronchoconstriction by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive C fibres via a pathway partly dependent of extracellular Ca2+. The mechanism of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity release seems to be the same at pH 6, while differences are evident at pH 5 between low pH buffer and lactic acid. Our results also suggest that proton activity could exert a modulatory role on the capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves by a mechanism which remains to be clarified. PMID:10720102

  1. Coal slurry pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1995-12-01

    Coal slurry pH values can be used to characterize coals. pH values depend on the coal, time since slurry preparation, contact with gas atmosphere, particle size, and stirring. Measured values reflect a sequence of reactions including: carbon dioxide absorption by water from the air, wetting of the coal (pH may be affected by the elemental composition of the mineral matter), and further equilibration with species in the water. The pH initially drops as carbon dioxide is absorbed, then rapidly increases as the coal is wetted, and then slowly decreases as some reactions with species in the water take place.

  2. Coal slurry pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal slurry pH values can be used to characterize coals. pH values depend on the coal, time since slurry preparation, contact with gas atmosphere, particle size, and stirring. Measured values reflect a sequence of reactions probably including: carbon dioxide absorption by water from the air, wetting of the coal (pH may be affected by the elemental composition of the mineral matter), and further equilibration with species in the water. The pH initially drops as carbon dioxide is absorbed, then rapidly increases as the coal is wetted, and then slowly decreases as some reactions with species in the water take place.

  3. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J. (San Jose, CA)

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  4. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  5. pH Wave-Front Propagation in the Urea-Urease Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Magdalena M.; Bánsági, Tamás; Scott, Stephen K.; Taylor, Annette F.; Bounds, Chris O.; Carranza, Arturo; Pojman, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The urease-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea displays feedback that results in a switch from acid (pH ?3) to base (pH ?9) after a controllable period of time (from 10 to >5000 s). Here we show that the spatially distributed reaction can support pH wave fronts propagating with a speed of the order of 0.1?1 mm min?1. The experimental results were reproduced qualitatively in reaction-diffusion simulations including a Michaelis-Menten expression for the urease reaction with a bell-shaped rate-pH dependence. However, this model fails to predict that at lower enzyme concentrations, the unstirred reaction does not always support fronts when the well-stirred reaction still rapidly switches to high pH. PMID:22947878

  6. Superiority of 10-mm-wide Balloon over 8-mm-wide Balloon in Papillary Dilation for Bile Duct Stones: A Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Dai; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Tsujino, Takeshi; Umefune, Gyotane; Takahara, Naminatsu; Mohri, Dai; Kogure, Hirofumi; Matsubara, Saburo; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Sasahira, Naoki; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) is a possible alternative to endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) for common bile duct (CBD) stones. To date, 10- and 8-mm EPBD have not been fully compared. Patients and Methods: Patients who underwent EPBD for CBD stones at two Japanese tertiary care centers between May 1994 and January 2014 were identified. Matched pairs with 10- and 8-mm EPBD were generated. Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 869 patients were identified (61 and 808 patients for 10- and 8-mm EPBD, respectively), and 61 well-balanced pairs were generated. The rate of complete stone removal within a single session was higher in the 10-mm EPBD group than in the 8-mm EPBD group (69% vs. 44%, P < 0.001), and use of lithotripsy was less frequent in the 10-mm EPBD group (23% vs. 56%, P < 0.001). The rates of post-ERCP pancreatitis were similar between the 10- and 8-mm EPBD groups (11% vs. 8%). Cumulative biliary complication-free rates were not statistically different between the two groups: 88% [95% confidence interval (CI): 79–97%] and 94% (95% CI: 88–100%) at 1 year and 69% (95% CI: 56–85%) and 80% (95% CI: 69–93%) at 2 years in the 10- and 8-mm EPBD groups, respectively. In the 10-mm EPBD group, ascending cholangitis was not observed, and pneumobilia was found in 5% of cases during the follow-up period. Conclusions: EPBD using a 10-mm balloon for CBD stones is safe and more effective than 8-mm EPBD. The sphincter function is highly preserved after 10-mm EPBD. PMID:26228364

  7. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American…

  8. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  9. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  10. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Normal pH: 7.25 to 7.35 Borderline pH: 7.20 to 7.25 The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  11. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  12. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American…

  13. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePLUS

    The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the kidneys to send acid to the urine when there is too much acid in the ... Urine with a pH less than 5.3 is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different ...

  14. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  15. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  16. CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

  17. Stress Analysis on Single Cobalt/Chrome Prosthesis With a 15-mm Cantilever Placed Over 10/13/15-mm-length Implants: A Simulated Photoelastic Model Study.

    PubMed

    Gastaldo, José Fábio Guastelli; Pimentel, Angélica Castro; Gomes, Maria Helena; Sendyk, Wilson Roberto; Laganá, Dalva Cruz

    2015-12-01

    The aim of study was to assess the stress around 10/13/15-mm implants in the mandibular area with a 15-mm cantilevered acrylic-resin-coated prostheses following the application force, using the photoelasticity method. Three photoelastic mandibular models were created containing 10-, 13-, and 15-mm implants in length and 3.75 mm in diameter. The implants had bore internal hex connections and were placed parallel to the intermental region. Abutments with 1-mm high cuffs were placed over the implants, and a single cobalt/chrome metallic prosthesis with a 15-mm cantilever, coated with thermoplastic acrylic resin, was placed on top. Loads of 1.0 and 3.0 bars were applied, and the images were photographed and assessed by photoelasticity method. The greatest stress levels were observed for the 10-mm implants. The stress pattern was the same regardless of implant length; only the magnitude of the stress along the implant body revealed changes. Increased implant length played a role in reducing stress on the investigated area of the model, and the 15-mm implants exhibited the best performance in regard to stress distribution. The highest stress levels were found in the implants closest to the cantilever and the central implant. The longest implants were more favorable in regard to the stress distribution on the peri-implant support structures in the 15-mm cantilevered prosthesis under loads. PMID:24914673

  18. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  19. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  20. Feasibility of converting hi-speed processor for processing Kodak film types 7381/7271 (16mm) and 5381/5271 (35mm) using Kodak ECP chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    Testing conducted to determine the feasibility of converting the 16/35/70 hi-speed processor to process Kodak film types 7381/7271 (16mm) and 5381/5271 (35mm) color negative films using Kodak ECP chemistry is described.

  1. 77 FR 76408 - Safety Zone, Upper Mississippi River MM 35.0 to MM 55.0; Thebes, IL and Cape Girardeau, MO, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Upper Mississippi River MM 35.0 to MM 55.0... waters of the Upper Mississippi River, extending the entire width between miles 35.0 to 55.0, and...

  2. Noninvasive in vivo fluorescence measurement of airway-surface liquid depth, salt concentration, and pH

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Sujatha; Song, Yuanlin; Vetrivel, L.; Shankar, Leena; Verkman, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of salt in the thin layer of fluid at the surface of large airways, the airway-surface liquid (ASL), is believed to be of central importance in airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. Invasive sampling methods have yielded a wide range of ASL [NaCl] from 40 to 180 mM. We have developed novel fluorescent probes and microscopy methods to measure ASL thickness, salt concentration, and pH quantitatively in cell-culture models and in the trachea in vivo. By rapid z-scanning confocal microscopy, ASL thickness was 21 ± 4 ?m in well-differentiated cultures of bovine tracheal epithelial cells grown on porous supports at an air-liquid interface. By ratio imaging fluorescence microscopy using sodium, chloride, and pH-sensitive fluorescent indicators, ASL [Na+] was 97 ± 5 mM, [Cl–] was 118 ± 3 mM, and pH was 6.94 ± 0.03. In anesthetized mice in which a transparent window was created in the trachea, ASL thickness was 45 ± 5 ?m, [Na+] was 115 ± 4 mM, [Cl–] was 140 ± 5 mM, and pH was 6.95 ± 0.05. Similar ASL tonicity and pH were found in cystic fibrosis (CFTR-null) mice. In freshly harvested human bronchi, ASL thickness was 55 ± 5 ?m, [Na+] was 103 ± 3 mM, [Cl–] was 92 ± 4 mM, and pH was 6.78 ± 0.2. These results establish by a noninvasive approach the key properties of the ASL and provide direct evidence that the ASL is approximately isotonic and not saltier in cystic fibrosis. PMID:11160155

  3. Effects of Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation on pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Uchida, Giichirou; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    We have studied the effects of atmospheric air plasma irradiation to water using a scalable dielectric barrier discharge device. Measurements of the pH of water treated by the plasmas have shown the pH decreases due to peroxide molecules generated by plasma irradiation and depends on material of water container. We also found this plasma treated water has little effect on the growth enhancement on Radish sprouts compare with plasma irradiation on dry seeds and the plasma irradiation can affect them through the water buffer of 0.2?mm in thickness.

  4. Fluorescence ratio imaging of interstitial pH in solid tumours: effect of glucose on spatial and temporal gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Dellian, M.; Helmlinger, G.; Yuan, F.; Jain, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    Tumour pH plays a significant role in cancer treatment. However, because of the limitations of the current measurement techniques, spatially and temporally resolved pH data, obtained non-invasively in solid tumours, are not available. Fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM) has been used previously for noninvasive, dynamic evaluation of pH in neoplastic tissue in vivo (Martin GR, Jain RK 1994, Cancer Res., 54, 5670-5674). However, owing to problems associated with quantitative fluorescence in thick biological tissues, these studies were limited to thin (50 microns) tumours. We, therefore, adapted the FRIM technique for pH determination in thick (approximately 2 mm) solid tumours in vivo using a pinhole illumination-optical sectioning (PIOS) method. Results show that (1) steep interstitial pH gradients (5 microns resolution), with different spatial patterns, exist between tumour blood vessels; (2) pH decreased by an average of 0.10 pH units over a distance of 40 microns away from the blood vessel wall, and by 0.33 pH units over a 70 microns distance; (3) the maximum pH drop, defined as the pH difference between the intervessel midpoint and the vessel wall, was positively correlated with the intervessel distance; (4) 45 min following a systemic glucose injection (6 g kg-1 i.v), interstitial pH gradients were shifted to lower pH values by an average of 0.15 pH units, while the spatial gradient (slope) was maintained, when compared with preglucose values. This pH decrease was not accompanied by significant changes in local blood flow. pH gradients returned to near-baseline values 90 min after glucose injection; (5) interstitial tumour pH before hyperglycaemia and the glucose-induced pH drop strongly depended on the local vessel density; and (6) sodium bicarbonate treatment, either acute (1 M, 0.119 ml h-1 for 3 h i.v.) or chronic (1% in drinking water for 8 days), did not significantly change interstitial tumour pH. Modified FRIM may be combined with other optical methods (e.g. phosphorescence quenching) to evaluate non-invasively the spatial and temporal characteristics of extracellular pH, intracellular pH and pO2 in solid tumours. This will offer unique information about tumour metabolism and its modification by treatment modalities used in different cancer therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8883406

  5. Effect of pH, salt, and biopolymer ratio on the formation of pea protein isolate-gum arabic complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghui; Low, Nicholas H; Nickerson, Michael T

    2009-02-25

    Turbidity measurements were used to study the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes between pea protein isolate (PPI) and gum arabic (GA) mixtures as a function of pH (6.0-1.5), salt concentration (NaCl, 0-50 mM), and protein-polysaccharide weight mixing ratio (1:4 to 10:1 w/w). For mixtures in the absence of salt and at a 1:1 mixing ratio, two structure-forming transitions were observed as a function of pH. The first event occurred at a pH of 4.2, with the second at pH 3.7, indicating the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes, respectively. Sodium chloride (mM) was found to have no effect on biopolymer interactions, but interfered with interactions at higher levels (>7.5 mM) due to substantial PPI aggregation. The pH at which maximum PPI-GA interactions occurred was 3.5 and was independent of NaCl levels. As PPI-GA ratios increased, structure-forming transitions shifted to higher pH. PMID:19170635

  6. Washout/rainout contribution in wet deposition estimated by 0.5 mm precipitation sampling/analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masahide; Hiraki, Takatoshi

    A precipitation dataset collected on a 0.5 mm precipitation basis was studied. The parameters analyzed in this study were the pH (i.e., H + concentration), electric conductivity (EC), and SO42- and NO3- concentrations. The NO3- concentration clearly decayed with an increase of the precipitation amount, while a larger variation was observed in the SO42- concentration even when the precipitation amount increased. Assuming that the decaying NO3- concentration (0.70 ?g ml -1) was the result of the rainout process, the estimates were: annual total deposition, 3252 mg m -2 yr -1; rainout process, 1092 mg m -2 yr -1; and rainout/total, 34%. The estimates for SO42- were: annual total deposition, 4687 mg m -2 yr -1; rainout process, 2096 mg m -2 yr -1; and rainout/total, 45%.

  7. Colorimetric Determination of pH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sheryl; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which the pH of a solution can be quantitatively measured using a spectrophotometer. The theory, experimental details, sample preparation and selection, instrumentation, and results are discussed. (CW)

  8. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  9. Sub-mm Jet Properties of the X-Ray Binary Swift J1745-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Curran, P. A.; Russell, T. D.; Coulson, I. M.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S. B.; Migliari, S.; Petitpas, G. R.; Rupen, M. P.; Rushton, A. P.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of our observations of the early stages of the 2012-2013 outburst of the transient black hole X-ray binary (BHXRB), Swift J1745-26, with the Very Large Array, Submillimeter Array, and James Clerk Maxwell telescope (SCUBA-2). Our data mark the first multiple-band mm and sub-mm observations of a BHXRB. During our observations the system was in the hard accretion state producing a steady, compact jet. The unique combination of radio and mm/sub-mm data allows us to directly measure the spectral indices in and between the radio and mm/sub-mm regimes, including the first mm/sub-mm spectral index measured for a BHXRB. Spectral fitting revealed that both the mm (230 GHz) and sub-mm (350 GHz) measurements are consistent with extrapolations of an inverted power law from contemporaneous radio data (1-30 GHz). This indicates that, as standard jet models predict, a power law extending up to mm/sub-mm frequencies can adequately describe the spectrum, and suggests that the mechanism driving spectral inversion could be responsible for the high mm/sub-mm fluxes (compared to radio fluxes) observed in outbursting BHXRBs. While this power law is also consistent with contemporaneous optical data, the optical data could arise from either jet emission with a jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 1× {{10}14} Hz or the combination of jet emission with a lower jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 2× {{10}11} Hz and accretion disk emission. Our analysis solidifies the importance of the mm/sub-mm regime in bridging the crucial gap between radio and IR frequencies in the jet spectrum, and justifies the need to explore this regime further.

  10. Sampling and storage of blood for pH and blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Haskins, S C

    1977-02-15

    Techniques used in sampling and storage of a blood sample for pH and gas measurements can have an important effect on the measured values. Observation of these techniques and principles will minimize in vitro alteration of the pH and blood gas values. To consider that a significant change has occurred in a pH or blood gas measurement from previous values, the change must exceed 0.015 for pH, 3 mm Hg for PCO2, 5 mm Hg for PO2, and 2 mEq/L for [HCO-3] or base excess/deficit. In vitro dilution of the blood sample with anticoagulant should be avoided because it will alter the measured PCO2 and base excess/deficit values. Arterial samples should be collected for meaningful pH and blood gas values. Central venous and free-flowing capillary blood can be used for screening procedures in normal patients but are subject to considerable error. A blood sample can be stored for up to 30 minutes at room temperature without significant change in acid-base values but only up to 12 minutes before significant changes occur in PO2. A blood sample can be stored for up to 3.5 hours in an ice-water bath without significant change in pH and for 6 hours without significant change in PCO2 or PO2. Variations of body temperatures from normal will cause a measurable change in pH and blood gas values when the blood is exposed to the normal water bath temperatures of the analyzer. PMID:14093

  11. In Vivo Model to Test Implanted Biosensors for Blood pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Somps, Chris J.; Madou, Marc; Hines, John; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Biosensors for monitoring physiologic data continuously through telemetry are available for heart rate, respiration, and temperature but not for blood pH or ions affected by hydrogen ion concentration. A telemetric biosensor for monitoring blood pH on-line could be used to identify and manage problems in fluid and electrolyte metabolism, cardiac and respiratory function during space flight and the acid-base status of patients without the need for venipuncture in patients on Earth. Critical to the development of biosensors is a method for evaluating their performance after implantation. Mature rats, prepared with jugular, cannulas for repeated blood samples, were exposed to a gas mixture containing high levels of carbon dioxide (7%) in a closed environment to induce mild respiratory acidosis. Serial blood gas and pH measurements in venous blood were compared with electrical responses from sensors implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals became slightly tachypneic after exposure to excess CO2, but remained alert and active. After 5 minutes, basal blood pH decreased from 7.404 +/- 0.013 to 7.289 +/- 0.010 (p less than 0.001)and PC02 increased from 45 +/- 6 to 65 +/- 4 mm. Hg (p les than 0.001). Thereafter pH and blood gas parameters remained stable. Implanted sensors showed a decrease in millivolts (mV) which paralleled the change in pH and averaged 5-6 mV per 0.1 unit pH. Implanted sensors remained sensitive to modest changes in tissue pH for one week. A system for inducing acidosis in rats was developed to test the in vivo performance of pH biosensors. The system provides a method which is sensitive, rapid and reproducible in the same and different animals with full recovery, for testing the performance of sensors implanted in subcutaneous tissues.

  12. Heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hypophosphite by H2O2: pH effect.

    PubMed

    Hung, C C; Huang, Y H; Chen, C Y

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus chemicals control key aspects of eutrophication and other environmental process. Hypophosphite (HP) originating from manmade and natural sources was evidenced as present in the environment and was investigated rarely. Recently, iron oxide has been used as a catalyst for oxidising organic contaminants with hydrogen peroxide (i.e. heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction). This study focused mainly on the oxidation of 1.0 mM HP by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a novel iron oxide catalyst (B1 catalyst) which was prepared through a fluidised-bed Fenton reactor (FBR-Fenton). The background experiments including the oxidation experiment of HP by air only, by H2O2 only and adsorption of HP by B1 catalyst were first elucidated. It was found that HP could not be oxidised at all by air and H2O2 at pH 2.5-12 in 24 hours. On the other hand, it could be adsorbed by B1 catalyst with 89.8% removal at pH 2.5 in 5 hours and complete desorption at pH 11.0. Then, we investigated the effects of pH and Fe leaching from the catalyst on the oxidative efficiency of HP. We found that although the removal rate of HP at pH 2.5 is faster than that at pH 4.0, B1 catalyst has a higher HP oxidation efficiency at pH 4.0 than that at pH 2.5. We conclude that it is a major heterogeneous catalytic oxidation by our novel iron oxide catalyst to oxidise HP at pH 4.0. Also, B1 could be a useful and potential catalyst for the treatment of HP wastewater. PMID:17674832

  13. Rainwater ph in the vicinity of hadera power plant, Israel during the winter season of 1981/82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolton-Shapira, Rivka; Lakritz, Yerucham; Luria, Menachem

    A new method for the continuous pH measurement of rainwater is discussed. Tkis method, applied at a site near a new coal-fired power plant (before its operation), showed a pH variation of 4.3 to 9.2 as compared to 6.5 ± 1.0 observed using conventional methods which measure pH at the end of each rain episode. The alkalinity of top soil in the vicinity, and hence natural aerosols act as a buffer, reducing the acidity of the rain. This buffering effect disappears after 30-40 mm of rainfall.

  14. Submillimeter Array Observations Toward the Massive Star-forming Core MM1 of W75N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Su, Y.-N.; Chen, H.-R.; Liu, S.-Y.; Yan, C.-H.; Kim, S.-J.

    2010-11-01

    The massive star-forming core MM1 of W75N was observed using the Submillimeter Array with ~1'' and 2'' spatial resolutions at 217 and 347 GHz, respectively. From the 217 GHz continuum we found that the MM1 core consists of two sources, separated by about 1'': MM1a (~0.6 M sun) and MM1b (~1.4 M sun), located near the radio continuum sources VLA 2/VLA 3 and VLA 1, respectively. Within MM1b, two gas clumps were found to be expanding away from VLA 1 at about ±3 km s-1, as a result of the most recent star formation activity in the region. Observed molecular lines show emission peaks at two positions, MM1a and MM1b: sulfur-bearing species have emission peaks toward MM1a, but methanol and saturated species at MM1b. We identified high-temperature (~200 K) gas toward MM1a and the hot core in MM1b. This segregation may result from the evolution of the massive star-forming core. In the very early phase of star formation, the hot core is seen through the evaporation of dust ice-mantle species. As the mantle species are consumed via evaporation the high-temperature gas species (such as the sulfur-bearing molecules) become bright. The SiO molecule is unique in having an emission peak exactly at the VLA 2 position, probably tracing a shock powered by VLA 2. The observed sulfur-bearing species show similar abundances both in MM1a and MM1b, whereas the methanol and saturated species show significant abundance enhancement toward MM1b, by about an order of magnitude, compared to MM1a.

  15. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference. PMID:25969385

  16. Comparison of the holding power of 3.5-mm cortical versus 4.0-mm cancellous orthopedic screws in the pelvis of immature dogs (cadavers).

    PubMed

    Sardinas, J C; Kraus, K H; Sisson, R D

    1995-02-01

    A 3.5-mm cortical orthopedic screw was compared with a 4.0-mm cancellous screw for maximal load to failure in the pelvis of immature dogs. The pelvis from young cadavers (7 to 13 months old) was divided into hemipelves and used for testing of the 2 screw types. Two sites in each hemipelvis were used, mid-shaft of the ilium and mid-sacrum, including the wing of the ilium. The screws were extracted, and maximal load to failure and mode of failure were recorded. Maximal load to failure per millimeter of engaged thread was calculated. In either pelvic site, the 4.0-mm cancellous screw required a significantly (P < 0.05) higher pullout force per millimeter of engaged screw threads than did the 3.5-mm cortical bone screw. PMID:7717594

  17. Tomato responses to ammonium and nitrate nutrition under controlled root-zone pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peet, M. M.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Tolley, L. C.; Robarge, W. P.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. Mill. 'Vendor') plants were grown for 21 days in flowing solution culture with N supplied as either 1.0 mM NO3- or 1.0 mM NH4+. Acidity in the solutions was automatically maintained at pH 6.0. Accumulation and distribution of dry matter and total N and net photosynthetic rate were not affected by source of N. Thus, when rhizosphere acidity was controlled at pH 6.0 during uptake, either NO3- or NH4+ can be used efficiently by tomato. Uptake of K+ and Ca2+ were not altered by N source, but uptake of Mg2+ was reduced in NH4(+)-fed plants. This indicates that uptake of Mg2+ was regulated at least partially by ionic balance within the plant.

  18. Kinetic evidence for the interactive inhibition of laccase from Trametes versicolor by pH and chloride.

    PubMed

    Raseda, Nasrin; Hong, Soonho; Kwon, O Yul; Ryu, Keungarp

    2014-12-28

    The interactive inhibitory effects of pH and chloride on the catalysis of laccase from Trametes versicolor were investigated by studying the alteration of inhibition characteristics of sodium chloride at different pHs for the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). At pH 3.0, the addition of sodium chloride (50 mM) brought about a 40-fold increase in Km(app) and a 4-fold decrease in Vmax(app). As the pH increased to 7.0, the inhibitory effects of sodium chloride became significantly weakened. The mixed-inhibition mechanism was successfully used to quantitatively estimate the competitive and uncompetitive inhibition strengths by chloride at two different pHs (pH 3.0 and 6.0). At pH 3.0, the competitive inhibition constant, Ki, was 0.35 mM, whereas the uncompetitive inhibition constant, Ki', was 18.1 mM, indicating that the major cause of the laccase inhibition by chloride is due to the competitive inhibition step. At a higher pH of 6.0, where the inhibition of the laccase by hydroxide ions takes effect, the inhibition of the laccase by chloride diminished to a great extent, showing increased values of both the competitive inhibition constant (Ki= 23.7 mM) and uncompetitive inhibition constant (Ki' = 324 mM). These kinetic results evidenced that the hydroxide anion and chloride share a common mechanism to inhibit the laccase activity. PMID:25152059

  19. Evaluation of the hemodynamics in straight 6-mm and tapered 6- to 8-mm grafts as upper arm hemodialysis vascular access.

    PubMed

    Sarmast, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F; Samiei, E

    2014-09-01

    The present study is intended to investigate and compare the hemodynamics in two different sizes of hemodialysis arteriovenous grafts for upper arm hemodialysis vascular access: 8-mm tapered to 6-mm at the arterial side and straight 6 mm. A computational simulation approach is presented for this study, which is validated against the available experimental and numerical pressure measurements in the literature. The imposed boundary conditions at the arterial inlet and venous outlet boundaries of the models are physiological velocity and pressure waveforms, respectively. Blood flow fields and distribution patterns of the hemodynamic indices including wall shear stress (WSS) as one of the major hemodynamic parameters of the cardiovascular system and spatial wall shear stress gradient (SWSSG) as an indicator of disturbed flow patterns and hence susceptible sites of lesion developments are analyzed and compared between the two grafts. The tapered 6- to 8-mm graft seemingly is associated with less disturbed flow patterns within the venous anastomosis (VA) and the vein downstream while benefiting from higher blood flow rates within. Also, it shows a definitive advantage in terms of WSS and SWSSG distribution patterns around the VA and throughout the vein downstream with significantly lower values, which reduce the risk of thrombosis formation and stenotic lesion developments. The only disadvantage encountered in using 6- to 8-mm tapered graft is higher values of hemodynamic parameters at the arterial junction attributable to its significantly higher mean blood flow rate within. The results clearly indicate that the tapered 6- to 8-mm graft entirely outperforms straight 6-mm graft hemodynamically as an upper arm hemodialysis vascular access graft and confirms clinical data in the literature, which suggests advantageous use of tapered 6- to 8-mm grafts in the creation of upper arm brachioaxillary hemodialysis vascular access grafts in selected groups of patients with expectably higher patency rates and lower complications. PMID:25112274

  20. Assessing the performance of the MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods. 1. The accuracy of binding free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Wang, Junmei; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-24

    The Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) and the Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) methods calculate binding free energies for macromolecules by combining molecular mechanics calculations and continuum solvation models. To systematically evaluate the performance of these methods, we report here an extensive study of 59 ligands interacting with six different proteins. First, we explored the effects of the length of the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, ranging from 400 to 4800 ps, and the solute dielectric constant (1, 2, or 4) on the binding free energies predicted by MM/PBSA. The following three important conclusions could be observed: (1) MD simulation length has an obvious impact on the predictions, and longer MD simulation is not always necessary to achieve better predictions. (2) The predictions are quite sensitive to the solute dielectric constant, and this parameter should be carefully determined according to the characteristics of the protein/ligand binding interface. (3) Conformational entropy often show large fluctuations in MD trajectories, and a large number of snapshots are necessary to achieve stable predictions. Next, we evaluated the accuracy of the binding free energies calculated by three Generalized Born (GB) models. We found that the GB model developed by Onufriev and Case was the most successful model in ranking the binding affinities of the studied inhibitors. Finally, we evaluated the performance of MM/GBSA and MM/PBSA in predicting binding free energies. Our results showed that MM/PBSA performed better in calculating absolute, but not necessarily relative, binding free energies than MM/GBSA. Considering its computational efficiency, MM/GBSA can serve as a powerful tool in drug design, where correct ranking of inhibitors is often emphasized. PMID:21117705

  1. MRF with adjustable pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2011-10-01

    Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

  2. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  3. Performance of ultra-small silicon photomultiplier array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wang; Zongde, Chen; Chenhui, Li; Ran, He; Shenyuan, Wang; Baicheng, Li; Ruiheng, Wang; Kun, Liang; Ru, Yang; Dejun, Han

    2015-07-01

    We report the performance of an ultra-small silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) line array with 7 elements of 0.12×0.12 mm2 in active area, 0.2 mm in pitch and 120 micro cells in one element. The device features an epitaxial bulk quenching resistor concept, demonstrated high geometrical fill factor of 41% and photon detection efficiency (PDE) of 25.4% in the wavelength region between 430 nm and 480 nm while retaining high micro cell density around 10 000 mm-2 and ~3 ns FWHM of dark pulses width; it also demonstrated dark count rate of less than 28.7 kHz, optical crosstalk of the order of 2% to 4%, and excellent photon number discrimination. A 0.15 mm×1.6 mm×1.6 mm lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal, corresponding to the width, length and height respectively, was successfully coupled to the 1×7 SiPM array for possible ultra-highly resolved positron emission tomography (PET) applications. This novel type of device has advantages particularly for small active area since the performances, such as PDE and response speed is one of the best among SiPMs with similarly high density of micro cells. It may pave a way for this type of SiPM as a promising pixel position sensitive device in imaging sensor applications.

  4. Balloon dilatation of the mitral valve by a single bifoil (2 x 19 mm) or trefoil (3 x 15 mm) catheter.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J; Vythilingum, S; Mitha, A S

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of balloon dilatation of the mitral valve by a bifoil (2 x 19 mm) or trefoil (3 x 15 mm) catheter (single catheter technique) was assessed in 53 patients (mean age 28) with mitral stenosis, most of whom were women. The procedure was unsuccessful in three patients. After balloon dilatation the left atrial pressure decreased from 22 mm Hg to 13 mm Hg and the mitral valve gradient from 12 mm Hg to 4 mm Hg. The mitral valve area increased from 0.7 cm2 to 2.1 cm2. Exercise time on the standard Bruce protocol increased from 3.9 minutes to 7.2 minutes. In 22 (44%) patients mitral regurgitation developed or the grade of regurgitation increased. Left to right shunts with pulmonary to systemic flow ratios greater than 1:5 were detected in four patients. Transient cerebrovascular episodes developed in two patients. One patient died after emergency valve replacement for severe mitral regurgitation. Balloon dilatation of the mitral valve by the single catheter technique with the bifoil or trefoil catheters is an effective treatment for patients with mitral stenosis. Mild mitral regurgitation is a frequent complication of the procedure. Images Figure 3 PMID:2245119

  5. ?-Galactoside-binding activity of human galectin-1 at basic pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Takeuchi, Katsuyuki; Fukuda, Koki; Nishino, Tomohide

    2013-06-01

    ?-Galactoside-binding activity of human galectin-1 (hGal-1) was evaluated at pH 7-9.5 by fluorescence spectroscopy from the fraction bound to lactose gel (Y) and the lactose binding constant (Kb). Y decreases at pH > 8.2 ± 0.1 in the absence of NaCl, while it is constant in the presence of 150 mM NaCl. On the other hand, Kb is independent of pH and the NaCl concentration at basic pH. Analysis of Raman spectrum has shown that the pKa of Cys residues of hGal-1 is 8.5 ± 0.1 on average, indicating that about 40% of the six Cys residues of hGal-1 would be deprotonated at pH 8.2. The pH dependence of Y is explained by an increase of Coulombic repulsion among negatively charged hGal-1 on the lactose gel surface. This result suggests that Y is not always a good indicator of the ?-galactoside-binding activity of galectins, which contain many Cys residues.

  6. Alkalinizing the intralysosomal pH inhibits degranulation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Klempner, M S; Styrt, B

    1983-01-01

    Degranulation of lysosomes is one of the consequences of neutrophil activation. Regulatory mechanisms of lysosomal secretion are thought to be localized largely in the plasma membrane and cytosol, with the lysosome playing a passive role in secretion. Recent evidence indicates that the intralysosomal pH is highly acidic (pH congruent to 5.5) and is maintained by active transport of H+. We investigated whether changes in the intralysosomal pH altered the availability of lysosomes for exocytosis. Intralysosomal pH in intact neutrophils was monitored with the weakly basic fluorescent probe, 9-aminoacridine (9AA). The weak bases, methylamine, chloroquine, clindamycin, propanolol, and ammonium chloride (0.1-50 mM), caused an alkalinization of the intralysosomal pH as determined by reversal of quenching of 9AA fluorescence. Similarly, each of the weak bases, including ammonium chloride, methylamine, chloroquine, ethylamine, propylamine, propanolol, clindamycin, and dansylcadaverine, inhibited neutrophil degranulation in response to the calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol myristate acetate, or the chemotactic peptide, formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine plus cytochalasin B. These studies indicate that an acid intralysosomal pH is important to the neutrophil secretory response and suggest that the lysosome may play an active part in control of degranulation. PMID:6415117

  7. Kinetic equivalence of transmembrane pH and electrical potential differences in ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Soga, Naoki; Kinosita, Kazuhiko; Yoshida, Masasuke; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2012-03-16

    ATP synthase is the key player of Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory, converting the energy of transmembrane proton flow into the high energy bond between ADP and phosphate. The proton motive force that drives this reaction consists of two components, the pH difference (?pH) across the membrane and transmembrane electrical potential (??). The two are considered thermodynamically equivalent, but kinetic equivalence in the actual ATP synthesis is not warranted, and previous experimental results vary. Here, we show that with the thermophilic Bacillus PS3 ATP synthase that lacks an inhibitory domain of the ? subunit, ?pH imposed by acid-base transition and ?? produced by valinomycin-mediated K(+) diffusion potential contribute equally to the rate of ATP synthesis within the experimental range examined (?pH -0.3 to 2.2, ?? -30 to 140 mV, pH around the catalytic domain 8.0). Either ?pH or ?? alone can drive synthesis, even when the other slightly opposes. ?? was estimated from the Nernst equation, which appeared valid down to 1 mm K(+) inside the proteoliposomes, due to careful removal of K(+) from the lipid. PMID:22253434

  8. Development of luminescent pH sensor films for monitoring bacterial growth through tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenglin; Raval, Yash; Chen, Hongyu; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J.; DesJardins, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Although implanted medical devices (IMDs) offer many benefits, they are susceptible to bacterial colonization and infections. Such infections are difficult to treat because bacteria could form biofilms on the implant surface, which reduce antibiotics penetration and generate local dormant regions with low pH and low oxygen. In addition, these infections are hard to detect early because biofilms are often localized on the surface. Herein, an optical sensor film is developed to detect local acidosis on an implanted surface. The film contains both upconverting particles (UCPs) that serve as a light source and a pH indicator that alters the luminescence spectrum. When irradiated with 980 nm light, the UCPs produce deeply penetrating red light emission, while generating negligible autofluorescence in the tissue. The basic form of the pH indicator absorbs more of upconversion luminescence at 661 nm than at 671 nm and consequently the spectral ratio indicates pH. Implanting this pH sensor film beneath 6-7 mm of porcine tissue does not substantially affect the calibration curve because the peaks are closely spaced. Furthermore, growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis on the sensor surface causes a local pH decrease that can be detected non-invasively through the tissue. PMID:23832869

  9. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: effects of pH and mixed nitrogen sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.

    1991-01-01

    To determine if the daily pattern of NO3- and NH4+ uptake is affected by acidity or NO3- : NH4+ ratio of the nutrient solution, non-nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max) were exposed for 21 days to replenished, complete nutrient solutions at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 which contained either 1.0 mM NH4+, 1.0 mM NO3- [correction of NO3+], 0.67 mM NH4+ plus 0.33 mM NO3- (2:1 NH4+ : NO3-) [correction of (2:1 NH3+ : NO4-)], or 0.33 mM NH4+ plus 0.67 mM NO3- (1:2 NH4+ : NO3-). Net uptake rates of NH4+ and NO3- were measured daily by ion chromatography as depletion from the replenished solutions. When NH4+ and NO3- were supplied together, cumulative uptake of total nitrogen was not affected by pH or solution NH4+ : NO3- ratio. The cumulative proportion of nitrogen absorbed as NH4+ decreased with increasing acidity; however, the proportional uptake of NH4+ and NO3- was not constant, but varied day-to-day. This day-to-day variation in relative proportions of NH4+ and NO3- absorbed when NH4+ : NO3- ratio and pH of solution were constant indicates that the regulatory mechanism is not directly competitive. Regardless of the effect of pH on cumulative uptake of NH4+, the specific nitrogen uptake rates from mixed and from individual NH4+ and NO3- sources oscillated between maxima and minima at each pH with average periodicities similar to the expected interval of leaf emergence.

  10. Cyclic variations in nitrogen uptake rate of soybean plants: effects of pH and mixed nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Raper, C D; Vessey, J K; Henry, L T; Chaillou, S

    1991-01-01

    To determine if the daily pattern of NO3- and NH4+ uptake is affected by acidity or NO3- : NH4+ ratio of the nutrient solution, non-nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max) were exposed for 21 days to replenished, complete nutrient solutions at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 which contained either 1.0 mM NH4+, 1.0 mM NO3- [correction of NO3+], 0.67 mM NH4+ plus 0.33 mM NO3- (2:1 NH4+ : NO3-) [correction of (2:1 NH3+ : NO4-)], or 0.33 mM NH4+ plus 0.67 mM NO3- (1:2 NH4+ : NO3-). Net uptake rates of NH4+ and NO3- were measured daily by ion chromatography as depletion from the replenished solutions. When NH4+ and NO3- were supplied together, cumulative uptake of total nitrogen was not affected by pH or solution NH4+ : NO3- ratio. The cumulative proportion of nitrogen absorbed as NH4+ decreased with increasing acidity; however, the proportional uptake of NH4+ and NO3- was not constant, but varied day-to-day. This day-to-day variation in relative proportions of NH4+ and NO3- absorbed when NH4+ : NO3- ratio and pH of solution were constant indicates that the regulatory mechanism is not directly competitive. Regardless of the effect of pH on cumulative uptake of NH4+, the specific nitrogen uptake rates from mixed and from individual NH4+ and NO3- sources oscillated between maxima and minima at each pH with average periodicities similar to the expected interval of leaf emergence. PMID:11538044

  11. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  12. Evaluation of pH at the Bacteria–Dental Cement Interface

    PubMed Central

    Mayanagi, G.; Igarashi, K.; Washio, J.; Nakajo, K.; Domon-Tawaraya, H.; Takahashi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Physiochemical assessment of the parasite-biomaterial interface is essential in the development of new biomaterials. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to evaluate pH at the bacteria-dental cement interface and to demonstrate physiochemical interaction at the interface. The experimental apparatus with a well (4.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm deep) was made of polymethyl methacrylate with dental cement or polymethyl methacrylate (control) at the bottom. Three representative dental cements (glass-ionomer, zinc phosphate, and zinc oxide-eugenol cements) were used. Each specimen was immersed in 2 mM potassium phosphate buffer for 10 min, 24 hrs, 1 wk, or 4 wks. The well was packed with Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449, and a miniature pH electrode was placed at the interface between bacterial cells and dental cement. The pH was monitored after the addition of 1% glucose, and the fluoride contained in the cells was quantified. Glass-ionomer cement inhibited the bacteria-induced pH fall significantly compared with polymethyl methacrylate (control) at the interface (10 min, 5.16 ± 0.19 vs. 4.50 ± 0.07; 24 hrs, 5.20 ± 0.07 vs. 4.59 ± 0.11; 1 wk, 5.34 ± 0.14 vs. 4.57 ± 0.11; and 4 wks, 4.95 ± 0.27 vs. 4.40 ± 0.14), probably due to the fluoride released from the cement. This method could be useful for the assessment of pH at the parasite-biomaterial interface. PMID:21933936

  13. pH. Training Module 5.305.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with pH, measurement of pH with a pH meter and maintenance of pH meter electrodes. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers the definition of pH, types of electrodes and…

  14. Laboratory sand column study of encapsulated buffer release for potential in situ pH control.

    PubMed

    Rust, Christine M; Aelion, C Marjorie; Flora, Joseph R V

    2002-01-01

    Encapsulation technology is being investigated as a method for controlling pH in situ at contaminated groundwater sites where pH may limit remediation of organic contaminants. This study examined the effectiveness of using KH2PO4 buffer encapsulated in a pH-sensitive coating to neutralize pH in laboratory sand columns (1.5-1) under a simulated groundwater flow rate and characterized the pattern of capsule release in the flow-through system. Denitrification was used in the columns to increase the pH of the pore water. Each of three columns was equipped with three miniature mesh wells to allow contact of the buffer with column pore water, but capsules (15 g) were inserted into only one column (amended). The two other columns served as amendment (no buffer) and abiotic (no denitrification) controls. Oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, NH4+, NO3- +NO2-, PO(4)3-, and pH were measured in the influent, two side ports, and effluent of the columns over time. Near complete conversion of 80 mg N/1 of nitrate and 152 mg/l of ethanol per day resulted in a mean pH increase from 6.2 to 8.2 in the amendment control column. The amended column maintained the target pH of 7.0 +/- 0.2 for 4 weeks until the capsules began to be depleted, after which time the pH slowly started to increase. The capsules exhibited pulses of buffer release, and were effectively dissolved after 7.5 weeks of operation. Base-neutralizing capacity contributed by the encapsulated buffer over the entire study period, calculated as cation equivalents, was 120 mM compared to 8 mM without buffer. This study demonstrates the potential for this technology to mediate pH changes and provides the framework for future studies in the laboratory and in the field, in which pH is controlled in order to enhance organic contaminant remediation by pH-sensitive systems. PMID:11858196

  15. pH Dependent Transitions in Xanthorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Balashov, Sergei P.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthorhodopsin (XR), the light-driven proton pump of the halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, exhibits substantial homology to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) of archaea and proteorhodopsin (PR) of marine bacteria, but unlike them contains a light-harvesting carotenoid antenna, salinixanthin, as well as retinal. We report here the pH dependent properties of XR. The pKa of the retinal Schiff base is as high as in BR, i.e., ? 12.4. Deprotonation of the Schiff base and the ensuing alkaline denaturation causes large changes in the absorption bands of the carotenoid antenna, which lose intensity and become broader making the spectrum similar to that of salinixanthin not bound to XR. A small red shift of the retinal chromophore band and increase of its extinction, as well as the pH dependent amplitude of the M intermediate indicate that in detergent-solubilized XR the pKa of the Schiff base counter-ion and proton acceptor is about 6 (compared to 2.6 in BR, and 7.5 in PR). The protonation of the counter-ion is accompanied by a small blue shift of the carotenoid absorption bands. The pigment is stable in the dark upon acidification to pH 2. At pH < 2 a transition to a blue shifted species absorbing around 440 nm occurs, accompanied by loss of resolution of the carotenoid absorption bands. At pH < 3 illumination of XR with continuous light causes accumulation of long-lived photoproducts(s) with an absorption maximum around 400 nm. The photocycle of XR was examined between pH 4 and 10 in solubilized samples. The pH dependence of recovery of the initial state slows at both acid and alkaline pH, with pKa’s of 6.0 and 9.3. The decrease in the rates with pKa 6.0 is apparently caused by protonation of the counter-ion and proton acceptor while that at high pH reflects the pKa of the internal proton donor, Glu94, at the times in the photocycle when this group equilibrates with the bulk. PMID:16649816

  16. A Nanocrystal-based Ratiometric pH Sensor for Natural pH Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Rebecca C.; Lanning, Ryan M.; Snee, Preston T.; Greytak, Andrew B.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor based on CdSe/CdZnS nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) has been designed for biological pH ranges. The construct is formed from the conjugation of a pH dye (SNARF) to NCs coated with a poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. The sensor exhibits a well–resolved ratio response at pH values between 6 and 8 under linear or two–photon excitation, and in the presence of a 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. PMID:26413260

  17. Detection of the 267 GHz J = 1-0 rotational transition of PH3 in Saturn with a new Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisstein, Eric W.; Serabyn, E.

    1994-01-01

    In recent observations at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, the highly pressure-broadened (FWHM = 11.2 GHz) J = 1-0 rotational transition of PH3 (phosphine) was detected on Saturn. By modeling the Saturnian atmosphere with a radiative transfer code, the observed line profile was consistent with a constant PH3 mole fraction of 3.0 plus or minus 1.0 ppm in the upper troposphere. A best-fit to the depth of the line implies a cutoff at high altitudes, with no PH3 present at pressures approximately less than 100 mbar. The observed line depth, combined with the lack of a detectable emission core, implies that a cutoff in the PH3 abundance occurs at a pressure between 13 and 140 mbar. PH3 in Jupiter was not detected, nor any other molecular lines between 195 and 295 GHz (1.54 mm and 1.02 mm, respectively) in either Jupiter or Saturn.

  18. Sensitization of Listeria monocytogenes to Low pH, Organic Acids, and Osmotic Stress by Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Clive; Park, Simon F.

    2001-01-01

    The killing of Listeria monocytogenes following exposure to low pH, organic acids, and osmotic stress was enhanced by the addition of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol. At pH 3, for example, the presence of this agent stimulated killing by more than 3 log units in 40 min of exposure. The rate of cell death at pH 3.0 was dependent on the concentration of ethanol. Thus, while the presence 10% (vol/vol) ethanol at pH 3.0 stimulated killing by more than 3 log units in just 5 min, addition of 1.25% (vol/vol) ethanol resulted in less than 1 log unit of killing in 10 min. The ability of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol to stimulate killing at low pH and at elevated osmolarity was also dependent on the amplitude of the imposed stress, and an increase in the pH from 3.0 to 4.0 or a decrease in the sodium chloride concentration from 25 to 2.5% led to a marked reduction in the effectiveness of 5% (vol/vol) ethanol as an augmentative agent. Combinations of organic acids, low pH, and ethanol proved to be particularly effective bactericidal treatments; the most potent combination was pH 3.0, 50 mM formate, and 5 % (vol/vol) ethanol, which resulted in 5 log units of killing in just 4 min. Ethanol-enhanced killing correlated with damage to the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:11282610

  19. pH regulation in anoxic rice coleoptiles at pH 3.5: biochemical pHstats and net H+ influx in the absence and presence of NO3−

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, Hank; Kulichikhin, Konstantin Y.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    During anoxia, cytoplasmic pH regulation is crucial. Mechanisms of pH regulation were studied in the coleoptile of rice exposed to anoxia and pH 3.5, resulting in H+ influx. Germinating rice seedlings survived a combination of anoxia and exposure to pH 3.5 for at least 4 d, although development was retarded and net K+ efflux was continuous. Further experiments used excised coleoptile tips (7–10 mm) in anoxia at pH 6.5 or 3.5, either without or with 0.2 mM NO3−, which distinguished two processes involved in pH regulation. Net H+ influx (μmol g−1 fresh weight h−1) for coleoptiles with NO3− was ∼1.55 over the first 24 h, being about twice that in the absence of NO3−, but then decreased to 0.5–0.9 as net NO3− uptake declined from ∼1.3 to 0.5, indicating reduced uptake via H+–NO3− symports. NO3− reduction presumably functioned as a biochemical pHstat. A second biochemical pHstat consisted of malate and succinate, and their concentrations decreased substantially with time after exposure to pH 3.5. In anoxic coleoptiles, K+ balancing the organic anions was effluxed to the medium as organic anions declined, and this efflux rate was independent of NO3− supply. Thus, biochemical pHstats and reduced net H+ influx across the plasma membrane are important features contributing to pH regulation in anoxia-tolerant rice coleoptiles at pH 3.5. PMID:22174442

  20. Effects of pH, Chloride, and Bicarbonate on Cu(I) Oxidation Kinetics at Circumneutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Pham, A.; Waite, T.; Xing, G.; Rose, A.

    2012-12-01

    The redox chemistry of copper species in the upper water column plays a significant role in its speciation, transport and bioavailability. Most previous studies have focused primarily on Cu(II), principally because Cu(I) is easily oxidized to Cu(II) by oxygen or other oxidants. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that a number of potentially important reactions may lead to Cu(I) formation and result in a significant steady-state concentration of Cu(I) in natural waters. Redox reactions of Cu(I) could result in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical, that may subsequently induce a cascade of radical-promoted reactions with other constituents in natural waters. As such, a better understanding of copper-catalysed processes that produce and consume O2- is important in furthering our insight into factors contributing to global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, the oxidation kinetics of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(I) in NaCl solutions have been investigated over the pH range 6.5-8.0.The overall apparent oxidation rate constant was strongly affected by chloride, moderately by bicarbonate and, and to a lesser extent, by pH. In the absence of bicarbonate, an equilibrium-based speciation model indicated that Cu+ and CuClOH- were the most kinetically reactive species, while the contribution of other Cu(I) species to the overall oxidation rate was minor. A kinetic model based on recognized key redox reactions for these two species further indicated that oxidation of Cu(I) by oxygen and superoxide were important reactions at all pH values and [Cl-] considered, but back reduction of Cu(II) by superoxide only became important at relatively low chloride concentrations. Bicarbonate concentrations from 2-5 mM substantially accelerated Cu(I) oxidation. Kinetic analysis over a range of bicarbonate concentrations revealed that this was due to the formation of CuCO3-, which reacts relatively rapidly with oxygen, and not due to inhibition of the back reduction of Cu(II) by formation of Cu(II)-carbonate complexes. We conclude that the simultaneous oxygenation of Cu+, CuClOH- and CuCO3- is the rate-limiting step in the overall oxidation of Cu(I) under these conditions. Determination of values for apparent and intrinsic rate constants for the oxidation of those critical Cu(I) species by O2 over the pH range 6.5-8.0 should greatly assist in understanding and predicting inorganic Cu(I) and Cu(II) transformations in natural waters.

  1. MUSTANG 3.3 mm CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Yancy L.; Bolin, David E.; Mason, Brian S.; Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Korngut, Phillip M.

    2011-02-15

    We present observations of six Class 0 protostars at 3.3 mm (90 GHz) using the 64 pixel MUSTANG bolometer camera on the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. The 3.3 mm photometry is analyzed along with shorter wavelength observations to derive spectral indices (S{sub {nu}} {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}) of the measured emission. We utilize previously published dust continuum radiative transfer models to estimate the characteristic dust temperature within the central beam of our observations. We present constraints on the millimeter dust opacity index {beta} between 0.862 mm, 1.25 mm, and 3.3 mm. {beta}{sub mm} typically ranges from 1.0 to 2.4 for Class 0 sources. The relative contributions from disk emission and envelope emission are estimated at 3.3 mm. L483 is found to have negligible disk emission at 3.3 mm, while L1527 is dominated by disk emission within the central beam. The {beta}{sup disk}{sub mm} {<=} 0.8-1.4 for L1527 indicates that grain growth is likely occurring in the disk. The photometry presented in this paper may be combined with future interferometric observations of Class 0 envelopes and disks.

  2. Characteristics of thick (>12 mm) Class225 EFG sapphire sheet for IR window applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locher, John; Jones, Christopher; Bates, Herbert; Rioux, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Demand for larger aperture sapphire IR windows is increasing. To withstand the higher dynamic and pressure forces exerted on them these larger windows require thicker material. Edge Defined Film-fed Growth (EFG)TM Sapphire crystals have traditionally been grown with a thickness of <= 11 mm, then finished and polished to a nominal thickness of 5.5 mm. We present optical characteristics data here for Class225(R) EFGTM sapphire sheet that is being grown up to 22 mm thick and finished at 16.8 mm.

  3. The production of 225 x 325 mm sapphire windows for IR (1 to 5 ?m) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locher, John W.; Bates, Herbert E.; Zanella, Steven A.; Lundstedt, Evan C.; Warner, Charles T.

    2003-09-01

    Edge Defined film Fed Growth (EFG) SaphikonTM sapphire crystals have been grown and successfully processed into windows measuring 225 x 325 mm with a thickness of 5.6 mm. More than 40 windows have been completed and assembled into customer hardware and delivered. The polished and coated windows have exhibited average transmission >93% from 1 to 5 mm and wavefront measurements of <0.1 waves rms (@ 0.633 ?m) over a 125 mm aperture. Optical measurement data are presented and aspects of the crystal growth and polishing processes are discussed.

  4. ADIFOR working note No. 11: ADIFOR strategies related to POINTER usage in MM5

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Khademi, P.; Knauff, T.

    1994-03-01

    POINTERs are nonstandard Fortran statements which cannot be processed by ADIFOR. We are interested in generating derivative code for MM5, a mesoscale model code which uses POINTERs extensively and in a particular structured manner. We briefly report on POINTERs and their role in MM5 and, for their particular usage in MM5, describe the three-step code transformation scheme consisting of pre-ADIFOR, ADIFOR, and post-ADIFOR transformations that result in the generation of correct derivative code for MM5.

  5. Seed coordinates of a new COMS-like 24 mm plaque verified using the FARO Edge.

    PubMed

    McCauley Cutsinger, Sarah E; Furutani, Keith M; Forsman, Renae M; Corner, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    A 24 mm COMS-like eye plaque was developed to meet the treatment needs of our eye plaque brachytherapy practice. As part of commissioning, it was necessary to determine the new plaque's seed coordinates. The FARO Edge, a commercially available measurement arm, was chosen for this purpose. In order to validate the FARO Edge method, it was first used to measure the seed marker coordinates in the silastic molds for the standard 10, 18, and 20 mm COMS plaques, and the results were compared with the standard published Task Group 129 coordinates by a nonlinear least squares match in MATLAB version R2013a. All measured coordinates were within 0.60 mm, and root mean square deviation was 0.12, 0.23, and 0.35 mm for the 10, 18, and 20 mm molds, respectively. The FARO Edge was then used to measure the seed marker locations in the new 24 mm silastic mold. Those values were compared to the manufacturing specification coordinates and were found to demonstrate good agreement, with a maximum deviation of 0.56mm and a root mean square deviation of 0.37 mm. The FARO Edge is deemed to be a reliable method for determining seed coordinates for COMS silastics, and the seed coordinates for the new 24 mm plaque are presented. PMID:26699584

  6. A positron tomograph with 600 BGO crystals and 2. 6 mm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Moses, W.W.; Uber, D.C.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1988-02-01

    The authors describe the imaging performance of the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph, a single 60 cm diam ring of 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled individually to 14 mm phototubes. With a pulse height threshold of 200 keV and a slice thickness of 5 mm, the sensitivity is 7024 events/sec per ..mu..Ci/ml in a 20 cm cylinder of water. The measured rates for 18 ..mu..Ci/ml are 95,000 trues/sec plus 20,000 random/sec. A 0.3 mm diam /sup 22/Na line source near the center of the tomograph has a circular point spread function (PSF) with a full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) of 2.6 mm. At 5 cm from the center the PSF is elliptical with a fwhm of 2.7 mm tangential x 3.2 mm radial. At 10 cm the PSF has a fwhm of 2.8 mm tangential x 4.8 mm radial. Attenuation data are accumulated with a 20 mCi /sup 68/Ge orbiting transmission source and 100 million coincident events are collected in 200 sec.

  7. A positron tomograph with 600 BGO (bismuth germanate) crystals and 2. 6 mm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Moses, W.W.; Uber, D.C.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1987-10-01

    We describe the imaging performance of the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph, a single 600 cm diam ring of 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled individually to 14 mm phototubes. With a pulse height threshold of 200 keV and a slice thickness of 5 mm, the sensitivity is 7024 eventssec per ..mu..Ciml in a 20 cm cyliner of water. The measured rates for 18 ..mu..Ciml are 95,000 truessec plus 20,000 randomsec. A 0.3 mm diam /sup 22/Na line source near the center of the tomograph has a circular point spread function (PSF) with a full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) of 2.6 mm. At 5 cm from the center the PSF is elliptical with a fwhm of 2.7 mm tangential )times) 3.2 mm radial. At 10 cm the PSF has a fwhm of 2.8 mm tangential )times) 4.8 mm radial. Attenuation data are accumulated with a 20 mCi /sup 68/Ge orbiting transmission source and 100 million coincident events are collected in 200 sec. 20 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Conventional metrizamide myelography (MM) and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in scoliosis: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.; Fitz, C.R.; Chuang, H.S.; Armstrong, E.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective examination was performed to assess the accuracy of metrizamide myelography (MM) and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography (CTMM) in scoliosis. Of 81 consecutive scoliotic children studied by myelography, 30 had only MM while the remaining 51 had CTMM immediately afterward. CTMM added esential diagnostic information in 13 cases of dysraphism and 4 cases, both methods gave the same imformation. The outhors conclude that in patients with severe scoliosis, dysraphism, and scoliosis with localized neurological disturbances, CTMM should always be added to MM or be the only examination; while in idiopathic scoliosis with vague neurological disturbances a survey of the entire spine is essential, preferably with MM.

  9. Electronic Absorption Spectra from MM and ab initio QM/MM Molecular Dynamics: Environmental Effects on the Absorption Spectrum of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Isborn, Christine M.; Götz, Andreas W.; Clark, Matthew A.; Walker, Ross C.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new interface of the GPU parallelized TeraChem electronic structure package and the Amber molecular dynamics package for quantum mechanical (QM) and mixed QM and molecular mechanical (MM) molecular dynamics simulations. This QM/MM interface is used for computation of the absorption spectra of the photoactive yellow protein (PYP) chromophore in vacuum, aqueous solution, and protein environments. The computed excitation energies of PYP require a very large QM region (hundreds of atoms) covalently bonded to the chromophore in order to achieve agreement with calculations that treat the entire protein quantum mechanically. We also show that 40 or more surrounding water molecules must be included in the QM region in order to obtain converged excitation energies of the solvated PYP chromophore. These results indicate that large QM regions (with hundreds of atoms) are a necessity in QM/MM calculations. PMID:23476156

  10. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a…

  11. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  12. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  13. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  14. James M. Cherry, Ph.D. (Video)

    Cancer.gov

    View this video on YouTube. James M. Cherry, Ph.D. details his educational journey from football player to biology major and, ultimately, a career in molecular biology. Dr. Cherry serves as scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations,

  15. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  16. PhAST: pharmacophore alignment search tool.

    PubMed

    Hähnke, Volker; Hofmann, Bettina; Grgat, Tomislav; Proschak, Ewgenij; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-04-15

    We present a ligand-based virtual screening technique (PhAST) for rapid hit and lead structure searching in large compound databases. Molecules are represented as strings encoding the distribution of pharmacophoric features on the molecular graph. In contrast to other text-based methods using SMILES strings, we introduce a new form of text representation that describes the pharmacophore of molecules. This string representation opens the opportunity for revealing functional similarity between molecules by sequence alignment techniques in analogy to homology searching in protein or nucleic acid sequence databases. We favorably compared PhAST with other current ligand-based virtual screening methods in a retrospective analysis using the BEDROC metric. In a prospective application, PhAST identified two novel inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase product formation with minimal experimental effort. This outcome demonstrates the applicability of PhAST to drug discovery projects and provides an innovative concept of sequence-based compound screening with substantial scaffold hopping potential. PMID:18727161

  17. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  18. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  19. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  20. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  1. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  2. Quantification of iopamidol multi-site chemical exchange properties for ratiometric chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe Sun, Phillip; Livio Longo, Dario; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-08-01

    pH-sensitive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI holds great promise for in vivo applications. However, the CEST effect depends on not only exchange rate and hence pH, but also on the contrast agent concentration, which must be determined independently for pH quantification. Ratiometric CEST MRI normalizes the concentration effect by comparing CEST measurements of multiple labile protons to simplify pH determination. Iopamidol, a commonly used x-ray contrast agent, has been explored as a ratiometric CEST agent for imaging pH. However, iopamidol CEST properties have not been solved, determination of which is important for optimization and quantification of iopamidol pH imaging. Our study numerically solved iopamidol multi-site pH-dependent chemical exchange properties. We found that iopamidol CEST MRI is suitable for measuring pH between 6 and 7.5 despite that T1 and T2 measurements varied substantially with pH and concentration. The pH MRI precision decreased with pH and concentration. The standard deviation of pH determined from MRI was 0.2 and 0.4 pH unit for 40 and 20?mM iopamidol solution of pH 6, and it improved to be less than 0.1 unit for pH above 7. Moreover, we determined base-catalyzed chemical exchange for 2-hydrooxypropanamido (ksw = 1.2*10pH-4.1) and amide (ksw = 1.2*10pH-4.6) protons that are statistically different from each other (P < 0.01, ANCOVA), understanding of which should help guide in vivo translation of iopamidol pH imaging.

  3. Quantification of iopamidol multi-site chemical exchange properties for ratiometric chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of pH

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Longo, Dario Livio; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    pH-sensitive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI holds great promise for in vivo applications. However, CEST effect depends on not only exchange rate and hence pH, but also on the contrast agent concentration, which must be determined independently for pH quantification. Ratiometric CEST MRI normalizes the concentration effect by comparing CEST measurements of multiple labile protons to simplify pH determination. Iopamidol, a commonly used X-Ray contrast agent, has been explored as a ratiometric CEST agent for imaging pH. However, iopamidol CEST properties have not been solved, determination of which is important for optimization and quantification of iopamidol pH imaging. Our study numerically solved iopamidol multi-site pH-dependent chemical exchange properties. We found that iopamidol CEST MRI is suitable for measuring pH between 6 and 7.5 despite that T1 and T2 measurements varied substantially with pH and concentration. The pH MRI precision decreased with pH and concentration. The standard deviation of pH determined from MRI was 0.2 and 0.4 pH unit for 40 and 20 mM iopamidol solution of pH 6, and it improved to be less than 0.1 unit for pH above 7. Moreover, we determined base-catalyzed chemical exchange for 2-hydrooxypropanamido (ksw=1.2*10pH?4.1) and amide (ksw=1.2*10pH?4.6) protons that are statistically different from each other (P<0.01, ANCOVA), understanding of which should help guide in vivo translation of iopamidol pH imaging. PMID:25054859

  4. Regulation of cytoplasmic pH under extreme acid conditions in suspension cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus: a possible role of inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Mimura, T; Shindo, C; Kato, M; Yokota, E; Sakano, K; Ashihara, H; Shimmen, T

    2000-04-01

    Changes in cytoplasmic pH of suspension-cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus under extreme acid conditions were measured with the pH-dependent fluorescence dye; 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6) carboxyfluorescein (-acetoxymethylester) (BCECF). When cells were treated with 1 mM HCl (pH 3 solution), the cytoplasmic pH first decreased then returned to the original level. Treatment with 10 mM HCl (pH 2 solution) acidified the cytoplasm to a greater extent, and the acidification continued at a constant level throughout the measurement. Treatment with a pH 2 solution resulted in a gradual decrease of the malate content, indicating the operation of biochemical pH regulation mechanism. The pH 2 treatment also caused a sudden decrease of the intracellular level of Pi. The cellular content of total phosphorus did not change during the acidification. The Pi was converted to the organic phosphate form. The ATP level was not increased by the pH 2 treatment, but slightly decreased. The role of Pi, which might be functioning as a regulatory factor of cytoplasmic pH, a non-competitive inhibitor of the H+-pumps of both the plasma membrane and tonoplast is discussed. PMID:10845455

  5. The effect of pH and various cations on the GTP hydrolysis of rice heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hak Soo; Jeong, Jin Yong; Nahm, Min Yeop; Kim, Sam Woong; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2003-03-31

    Previously, we reported the biochemical properties of RGA1 that is expressed in Escherichia coli (Seo et al., 1997). The activities of RGA1 that hydrolyzes and binds guanine nucleotide were dependent on the MgCl(2) concentration. The steady state rate constant (k(cat) ) for GTP hydrolysis of RGA1 at 2 mM MgCl(2) was 0.0075 +/- 0.0001 min(-1). Here, we examined the effects of pH and cations on the GTPase activity. The optimum pH at 2 mM MgCl(2) was approximately 6.0; whereas, the pH at 2 mM NH(4)Cl was approximately 4.0. The result from the cation dependence on the GTPase (guanosine 5'-triphosphatase) activity of RGA1 under the same condition showed that the GTP hydrolysis rate (k(cat)= 0.0353 min(-1)) under the condition of 2 mM NH(4)Cl at pH 4.0 was the highest. It corresponded to about 3.24-fold of the k(cat) value of 0.0109 min(-1) in the presence of 2 mM MgCl(2) at pH 6.0. PMID:12689519

  6. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a sub-Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification (OA) and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (?arag) indicate that it is already close to corrosive states (?arag < 1). In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and ?arag is far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. As most calcifiers occupy coastal habitats, the assessment of risks from OA to these vulnerable organisms cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but requires an understanding of the regimes of pH and ?arag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability of pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH-variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from km-scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord, over 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores, to cm-m scale within kelp forests and mm-scale across boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH-measurements combined with relationships between salinity, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon we also estimated variability of ?arag. Results show variability in pH and ?arag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and macrophyte boundary layers a pH-range of up to 0.8 units. Overall, ?arag was favorable to calcification, and pelagic and benthic metabolism was an important driver of pH and ?arag producing mosaics of variability from low levels in the dark to peak levels at high irradiance. We suggest that productive coastal environments may form niches of high pH in a future acidified Arctic Ocean.

  7. Stricture Rate after Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass with a 21-mm Circular Stapler versus a 25-mm Linear Stapler

    PubMed Central

    Vunnamadala, Kalyan; Sakharpe, Aniket; Wilhelm, B. Jakub; Aksade, Artun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is estimated to affect more than one and a half billion adults. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has become one of the preferred weight loss procedures. However, complications can occur. Strictures at the gastrojejunal anastomosis lead to clinical symptoms such as vomiting, dysphagia, and patient discomfort. The stricture rate has been correlated with the size and type of stapler used. Methods: A retrospective review of the clinical records of patients who underwent LRYGB was performed between 2003 and 2010. A comparison was made between a 21-mm circular stapler technique and a 25-mm linear stapler technique. Results: The stricture rate for the 21-mm circular stapler group was 7.12% and comparable to the national average. Using the 25-mm linear stapler, this complication rate significantly decreased to 1.09% (p<0.0004; odds ratio 6.5; [95% confidence interval 1.96–33.83]). Conclusions: Stricture after LRYGB is a serious complication. This study found that with a change in technique, this complication can be decreased considerably. PMID:25830078

  8. Effectiveness of 2.0 mm Standard and 2.0 mm Locking Miniplates in Management of Mandibular Fractures: A Clinical Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Mahaboob; Subba Raju, T; Rao, N Koteswara; Reddy, Chandra Kiran

    2014-03-01

    To compare and evaluate the effectiveness of 2.0 mm locking miniplates versus 2.0 mm standard miniplates in treatment of mandible fractures. Sixty randomly selected patients who sustained mandibular fractures were selected for this study. The fractured fragments were stabilized using 2.0 mm locking miniplates in 30 cases and in the remaining 30 cases the fractured fragments were fixed with conventional 2.0 mm miniplates. Post-operative stability was assessed with radiographs at 7th day, 1st, and 3rd months. The stability of the reduced fracture was assessed clinically and both the types of plates were assessed with an OPG or conventional radiographs. This study shows favorable results on use of locking miniplates in mandibular fractures. The results show that there were no significant differences in the post-operative complications between the conventional and the locking plate/screw mandibular systems. The locking plate/screw system was more rigid than conventional plate/screw system, thereby reducing the need and duration of intermaxillary fixation (IMF). PMID:24644396

  9. Condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture in 5 mm and 4 mm outside diameter horizontal microfin tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiangchao; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Zhu, Yu.; Gao, Yifeng; Deng, Bin

    2010-10-15

    Condensation heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture in 5 mm and 4 mm outside diameter horizontal microfin tubes were investigated experimentally. The experimental condensing temperature is 40 C, and nominal oil concentration range is from 0% to 5%. The test results indicate that the presence of oil deteriorates the heat transfer. The deterioration effect is negligible at nominal oil concentration of 1%, and becomes obvious with the increase of nominal oil concentration. At 5% nominal oil concentration, the heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture is found to have a maximum reduction of 25.1% and 23.8% for 5 mm and 4 mm tubes, respectively. The predictabilities of the existing condensation heat transfer correlations were verified with the experimental data, and Yu and Koyama correlation shows the best predictability. By replacing the pure refrigerant properties with the mixture's properties, Yu and Koyama correlation has a deviation of -15% to + 20% in predicting the local condensation heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture. (author)

  10. The M/M Center: Meeting the Demand for Multicultural, Multilingual Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Pia Lindquist; Murai, Harold; Berta-Avila, Margarita; William-White, Lisa; Baker, Susan; Arellano, Adele; Echandia, Adriana

    2007-01-01

    The Multilingual/Multicultural Teacher Preparation Center (M/M Center), a teacher preparation program offered by the Bilingual/Multicultural Education Department (BMED) at California State University, Sacramento, is entering its third decade of operation. The M/M Center was established by a group of progressive teacher educators, most with a…

  11. Young’s modulus calculations for cellulose Iß by MM3 and quantum mechanics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM) calculations were performed to elucidate Young’s moduli for a series of cellulose Iß models. Computations using the second generation empirical force field MM3 with a disaccharide cellulose model, 1,4'-O-dimethyl-ß-cellobioside (DMCB), and an analo...

  12. Estimation of the Young’s modulus of cellulose Iß by MM3 and quantum mechanics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Young’s modulus provides a measure of the resistance to deformation of an elastic material. In this study, modulus estimations for models of cellulose Iß relied on calculations performed with molecular mechanics (MM) and quantum mechanics (QM) programs. MM computations used the second generation emp...

  13. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).

  14. Evolution of pH during in-situ leaching in small concrete cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Saguees, A.A.; Moreno, E.I.; Andrade, C.

    1997-11-01

    Small amounts (0.4 cc) of neutral water placed in small cylindrical cavities (5 mm diameter) in concrete exposed to 100% relative humidity first developed a pH comparable to that of a saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. The pH then increased over a period of days-weeks toward a higher terminal value. A micro pH electrode arrangement was used. This behavior was observed in samples of 12 different concrete mix designs, including some with pozzolanic additions. The average terminal cavity pH closely approached that of expressed pore water from the same concretes. A simplified mathematical model reproduced the experimentally observed behavior. The model assumed inward diffusional transport of the pH-determining species in the surrounding concrete pore solution. The experimental results were consistent with the model predictions when using diffusion parameters on the order of those previously reported for alkali cations in concrete. The cavity size, cavity water content, and exposure to atmospheric CO{sub 2} should be minimized when attempting to obtain cavity pH values approaching those of the surrounding pore water.

  15. Influence of Acidic pH on Hydrogen and Acetate Production by an Electrosynthetic Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (?5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at ?600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ?5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ?6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at ?765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at ?800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying ?800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (?2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate (?=?4.7 kg CO2 captured). PMID:25333313

  16. Algal and Bacterial Activities in Acidic (pH 3) Strip Mine Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Gyure, Ruth A.; Konopka, Allan; Brooks, Austin; Doemel, William

    1987-01-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H2S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H2S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [14C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake. PMID:16347430

  17. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominatedmore » community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).« less

  18. Design of the multilayer insulation system for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1991-03-01

    The development of the multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 50 mm collider dipole cryostat is an ongoing extension of work conducted during the 40 mm cryostat program. While the basic design of the MLI system for the 50 mm cryostat resembles that of the 40 mm cryostat, results from measurements of MLI thermal performance below 80K have prompted a re-design of the MLI system for the 20K thermal radiation shield. Presented is the design of the MLI system for the 50 mm collider dipole cryostat, with discussion focusing on system performance, blanket geometry, cost-effective fabrication techniques, and built-in quality control measures that assure consistent thermal performance throughout the SSC accelerator. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Is There a Benefit to Head Size Greater Than 36 mm in Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Haughom, Bryan D; Plummer, Darren R; Moric, Mario; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the rate of dislocation and revision for instability between 36-mm and anatomic femoral heads (large diameter metal-on-metal THA, dual-mobility bearings, and hip resurfacing arthroplasty) in patients at high risk for dislocation. A total of 501 high-risk patients, over a 10-year period, were identified (282 36-mm THA, 24 dual-mobility bearings, 83 metal-on-metal arthroplasty, and 112 hip resurfacing arthroplasty). There were 13 dislocations in the 36-mm group compared to 1 in the anatomic group (4.6% vs 0.5%; P = .005). Four patients dislocated more than once in the 36-mm group (1.4% vs 0%; P = .04), and 2 patients in the 36-mm group required a revision for instability (0.7% vs 0%; P = .11). These results suggest that anatomic head sizes significantly lower the risk of dislocation in high-risk patients. PMID:26360768

  20. Corneal Optical Quality Following Sub 1.8 mm Micro-Incision Cataract Surgery vs. 2.2 mm Mini-Incision Coaxial Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Alió, Jorge L.; Elkady, Bassam; Ortiz, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study and compare the effects of the micro-incision cataract surgery (MICS-sub 1.8 mm) and miniincision coaxial phacoemulsification (2.2 mm) on the optical quality of the cornea characterized in terms of corneal aberrations. Materials and Methods: Fifty eyes underwent MICS and 50 mini-incision phacoemulsification, by the same surgeon. Both types of cataract surgery were performed using low ultrasound power and through a clear corneal incision, placed on the steepest corneal meridian ranging from 1.6 to 1.8 in MICS (Group I) and from 2.12 to 2.3 mm in mini-incision coaxial phacoemulsification (Group II). Seidel and Zernike aberration coefficients and RMS values were obtained for a 6-mm pupil preoperatively and one month after surgery. Results: The corneal astigmatism did not show statistically significant changes in either of the two groups: (MICS: –0.73 ± 0.63, –0.65 ± 0.53 D, P = 0.25), (mini-incision phacoemulsification; –1.21 ± 1.52, –1.00 ± 1.19 D, P = 0.12). The total RMS remained unchanged after MICS (1.77 ± 1.7, 1.65 ± 1.3 ?m, P = 0.18) and mini-incision phacoemulsification (2.00 ± 1.87, 2.09 ± 1.8 ?m, P = 0.41). Statistically significant changes were found for coma (P = 0.004) and higher-order aberrations (P < 0.001), showing MICS significantly less changes in cornea. Conclusions: Both MICS and mini-incision phacoemulsification do not degrade the optical quality of the cornea. Both surgeries do not induce a modification of the corneal astigmatism, even in the axis. It seems that 2 mm is the limit around which no optical changes are induced by cataract surgery in the human cornea. PMID:20543945

  1. Prospects for observing the Galactic Center: combining LBT LINC-NIRVANA observations in the near-infrared with observations in the mm/sub-mm wavelength domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckart, Andreas; Witzel, Gunther; Kunneriath, Devaky; König, Sabine; Straubmeier, Christian; Bertram, Thomas; Zamaninasab, Mohammad; Schödel, Rainer; Muzic, Koraljka; Tremou, Evangelia; Meyer, Leonhard; Rost, Steffen; Vogel, Stuart; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Sjouwerman, Lorant; Herbst, Tom

    2008-07-01

    As a near-infrared (NIR) wide field interferometric imager offering an angular resolution of about 10 milliarcseconds LINC-NIRVANA at the Large Binocular Telescope will be an ideal instrument for imaging the center of the Milky Way especially in conjunction with mm/sub-mm interferometers like CARMA, ATCA or, in the near future, ALMA. Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is the electromagnetc manifestation of the ~4×106M super-massive black hole (SMBH) at the Galactic Center. First results from a mult-wavelength campaign focused on Sgr A*, based on the VLT and on CARMA, ATCA, and the IRAM 30m-telescope, in May 2007 show that the NIR data are consistent with partially depolarized non-thermal emission from confined hot spots in relativistic orbits around SgrA*. A 3mm flare following a May 2007 NIR flare is consistent with SSC emission from adiabatically expanding plasma in a wind or jet. With the LBT and ALMA we will be able to study the spectral evolution of NIR/sub-mm/mm flare emission in order to constrain the emission mechanism, the jet/wind physics, and possibly determine the angular momentum of the SMBH. LINC/NIRVANA will also serve to investigate the stellar population and dynamics in the cluster surrounding Sgr A*. A particular emphasis will lie on examining dust embedded and young stars and to unravel the star formation history in the cluster. For the 0.3 parsec core radius central star cluster the investigation of will be investigated.

  2. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if Enceladus' rocky core has been completely altered by past hydrothermal activity. The presence of native H2 in the plume would provide strong evidence for contemporary aqueous alteration that replenishes this source of energy for possible life. The high pH also suggests that the delivery of strong oxidants from the surface to the ocean has not been significant (otherwise, sulfuric acid would be produced), which would be consistent with geophysical models of episodic resurfacing activity on Enceladus. This paper represents an expansion of chemical oceanography to an "ocean planet" beyond Earth.

  3. An efficient method of measuring the 4 mm helmet output factor for the Gamma Knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Li, X. Allen; Yu, Cedric X.

    2000-03-01

    It is essential to have accurate measurements of the 4 mm helmet output factor in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia patients using the Gamma Knife. Because of the small collimator size and the sharp dose gradient at the beam focus, this measurement is generally tedious and difficult. We have developed an efficient method of measuring the 4 mm helmet output factor using regular radiographic films. The helmet output factor was measured by exposing a single Kodak XV film in the standard Leksell spherical phantom using the 18 mm helmet with 30-40 of its plug collimators replaced by the 4 mm plug collimators. The 4 mm helmet output factor was measured to be 0.876 ± 0.009. This is in excellent agreement with our EGS4 Monte Carlo simulated value of 0.876 ± 0.005. This helmet output factor value also agrees with more tedious TLD, diode and radiochromic film measurements that were each obtained using two separate measurements with the 18 mm helmet and the 4 mm helmet respectively. The 4 mm helmet output factor measured by the diode was 0.884 ± 0.016, and the TLD measurement was 0.890 ± 0.020. The radiochromic film measured value was 0.870 ± 0.018. Because a single-exposure measurement was performed instead of a double-exposure measurement, most of the systematic errors that appeared in the double-exposure measurements due to experimental setup variations were cancelled out. Consequently, the 4 mm helmet output factor is more precisely determined by the single-exposure approach. Therefore, routine measurement and quality assurance of the 4 mm helmet output factor of the Gamma Knife could be efficiently carried out using the proposed single-exposure technique.

  4. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives: pH influence

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values to enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 200 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values were tested both on enamel and on dentin: Adperâ„¢ Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive (pH = 0.8-1), Futurabond NR (pH=2), G-aenial Bond (pH = 1.5), Clearfil S3 Bond (pH = 2.7). After adhesive systems application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the bonded surface. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until the sample rupture. The shear bond strength values (MPa) of the different groups were compared with analysis of variance after that Kolmogorov and Smirnov tests were applied to assess normality of distributions. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In enamel shear bond strength, the highest shear bond strength values were reported with Futurabond NR (P < 0.01); however, no significant differences were found with Clearfil S3 Bond. The others adhesive systems showed lower shear bond strength values with significant differences between them (P < 0.05). When comparing the dentin shear bond strength, the lowest shear bond strength values were reported with Clearfil S3 Bond (P < 0.05), while there were no significant differences among the other three products (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The pH values of adhesive systems did not influence significantly their shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. PMID:26005459

  5. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO?-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH?Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na?-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na?/H? plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited. PMID:24256552

  6. Effect of pH of amine fluoride containing toothpastes on enamel remineralization in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Haase, Anabel; Hacklaender, Julia; Gintner, Zeno; Bánóczy, Jolan; Gaengler, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background One of the important factors of the demineralization and remineralization equilibrium of enamel is the pH of the surrounding solutions. Effort has been laid in the formulation of different fluoride compounds and the fluoride content in toothpastes but much less is known about the influence of the pH of the toothpastes on their effectiveness. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the influence of different pH levels on enamel remineralization in an in vitro experiment using polarization light microscopy and EDX quantitative element analysis. Methods A 5 × 5 mm window on the enamel surface of 40 caries free extracted human premolars was demineralized in a hydroxyethylcellulose solution at pH 4.8. The teeth were divided into 8 groups and the lower half of the window was covered with varnish serving as control. Each group was then immersed in toothpaste slurry containing amine fluoride (1400 ppm) at pH 4.1, 4.5, 5.1 and 6.9 or control toothpaste slurry without fluoride at pH 4.3, 4.7, 5.3 and 7.0. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarization light microscopy and quantitative EDX element analysis. Results The PLM results showed a decreased porous volume of the body of the lesion after incubation with fluoridated toothpaste at pH 4.53 and 5.16. No differences between the experimental window and the control window were found in the other groups. The quantitative element analysis showed no differences in the element content of any of the groups. Conclusion From the results it can be concluded that slightly acidified fluoridated dentifrices may have a certain positive effect on enamel remineralization. PMID:17941981

  7. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  8. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePLUS

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  9. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  10. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  11. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  12. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH......

  13. Sealing vessels up to 7 mm in diameter solely with ultrasonic technology

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Richard W; Asher, Ryan M; Tellio, Karalyn R; Welling, Alissa L; Clymer, Jeffrey W; Amaral, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasonic energy is a mainstay in the armamentarium of surgeons, providing multifunctionality, precision, and control when dissecting and sealing vessels up to 5 mm in diameter. Historically, the inability to seal vessels in the 5–7 mm range has been perceived as an inherent limitation of ultrasonic technology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sealing of vessels up to 7 mm in diameter with an ultrasonic device that modulates energy delivery during the sealing period. Methods In ex vivo benchtop and in vivo acute and survival preclinical models, a new ultrasonic device, Harmonic ACE®+7 Shears (Harmonic 7), was compared with advanced bipolar devices in sealing vessels 1–7 mm in diameter with respect of burst pressure, seal reliability, and seal durability. Lateral thermal damage and transection time were also evaluated. Results Ex vivo tests of Harmonic 7 demonstrated significantly greater median burst pressures than an advanced bipolar device both for vessels <5 mm in diameter (1,078 mmHg and 836 mmHg, respectively, P=0.046) and for those in the range of 5–7 mm (1,419 mmHg and 591 mmHg, P<0.001). In vivo tests in porcine and caprine models demonstrated similar rates of hemostasis between Harmonic 7 and advanced bipolar devices, with high success rates at initial transection and seal durability of 100% after a 30-day survival period. Conclusion Sealing 5–7 mm vessels is not a limitation of the type of energy used but of how energy is delivered to tissue. These studies document the ability of ultrasonic energy alone to reliably seal large vessels 5–7 mm in diameter, with significantly greater burst pressure observed in in vitro studies than those observed with an advanced bipolar technology when energy delivery is modulated during the sealing cycle. Furthermore, the seals created in 5–7 mm vessels are shown to be reliable and durable in in vivo preclinical studies. PMID:25114600

  14. Not Your Father's Ph.D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Brandon G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the author, a devoted blogger, confronts his fear that his virtual life is damaging his career prospects in academe. As a new Ph.D. in religious studies, the author has every reason to believe he will find a tenure-track job. He has read the numbers and know that, on average, job candidates spend two to five years in…

  15. Iodine evolution and pH control

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Lorenz, R.A.; Weber, C.F.

    1993-10-01

    pH is the major factor in determining the extent of I{sub 2} in solution. In containment where no pH-control chemicals are present, the acidity or basicity of the water pool will be determined by materials that are introduced into containment as a result of the accident itself. These materials may be fission products (i.e., cesium compounds), thermally produced products (i.e., core-concrete aerosols), or compounds produced by radiation (i.e., nitric acid). In situations where pH levels fall below {approximately}7, the formation of I{sub 2} will occur in irradiated iodide solutions. A correlation between pH and iodine formation is needed so that the amounts I{sub 2} in water pools can be assessed. This, in turn, determines the amount of I{sub 2} in the atmosphere available for escape by containment leakage. A number of calculational routines based on more than 100 differential equations representing individual reactions can be found in the literature. In this work, it is shown that a simpler approach based on the steady-state decomposition of hydrogen peroxide should correctly describe iodine formation in severe accidents. Comparisons with test data show this approach to be valid. The most important acids in containment will be nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), produced by irradiation of water and air, and hydrochloric acid (HCl), produced by irradiation or heating of electrical cable insulation. The most important bases in containment will be cesium hydroxide, cesium borate (or cesium carbonate), and in some plants pH additives, such as sodium hydroxide or sodium phosphate.

  16. Chloride dependence of intracellular pH in frog skin: a /sup 31/P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson-Yantorno, K.; Civan, M.M.

    1986-03-01

    Single frog skins from Northern Variety Rana pipiens were analyzed by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy during superfusion alternately with control and experimental Ringer's solutions, permitting each preparation to serve as its own control. The spectral positions of intracellular inorganic phosphate and extracellular methylphosphonate permitted continuous monitoring of intracellular (pH/sub c/) and extracellular (pH/sub 0/) pH, respectively. Acute and steady state measurements suggested that pH/sub c/ is well regulated at about 7.29 +- 0.05 over an external pH range of about 7.25-7.65. Below this range, pH/sub c/ decreased markedly when the external pH was reduced with nonvolatile acid. In the presence of 2.5 mM HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and 1% CO/sub 2/, total substitution of external Cl/sup -/ by gluconate reversibly increased pH/sub c/ by 0.34 +- 0.05 U (mean +- SE). Replacing external Cl/sup -/ by SO/sup 2 -//sub 4/ increased pH/sub c/ by 0.12 +- 0.01 in the presence of external HCO/sup -//sub 3/, but only by 0.05 +- 0.02 in its absence. SITS (1 mM) at a pH/sub 0/ of 6.95 +- 0.05 did not significantly alter pH/sub c/, but entirely prevented the steady state alkalinization characteristically induced by gluconate substitution for external Cl/sup -/. The results document that: (1) intracellular pH is maintained relatively constant when the external pH is varied over the physiologic range by adding fixed acid or base, and (2) this regulation is (at least in part) a reflection of Cl/HCO/sub 3/ antiport activity.

  17. Dual-function pH and oxygen phosphonated trityl probe.

    PubMed

    Bobko, Andrey A; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Komarov, Denis A; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2012-07-17

    Triarylmethyl radicals (TAMs) are used as persistent paramagnetic probes for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic and imaging applications and as hyperpolarizing and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton-electron double-resonance imaging (PEDRI). Recently we proposed the concept of dual-function pH and oxygen TAM probes based on the incorporation of ionizable groups into the TAM structure ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007 , 129 , 7240 - 7241 ). In this paper we report the synthesis of a deuterated derivative of phosphonated trityl radical, pTAM. The presence of phosphono substitutes in the structure of TAM provides pH sensitivity of its EPR spectrum in the physiological range from 6 to 8, the phosphorus hyperfine splitting acting as a convenient and highly sensitive pH marker (spectral sensitivity, 3?a(P)/?pH ? 0.5 G/pH unit; accuracy of pH measurements, ±0.05). In addition, substitution of 36 methyl protons with deuterons significantly decreased the individual line width of pTAM down to 40 mG and, as consequence, provided high sensitivity of the line-width broadening to pO(2) (?H/?pO(2) ? 0.4 mG/mmHg; accuracy of pO(2) measurements, ?1 mmHg). The independent character of pH and [O(2)] effects on the EPR spectra of pTAM provides dual functionality to this probe, allowing extraction of both parameters from a single EPR spectrum. PMID:22703565

  18. Suspected melanoma only when the lesion is greater than 6mm may harm patients.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Filho, Renato Santos de; Oliveira, Daniel Arcuschin de; Souza, Murilo Costa; Silva, Mariane da; Brandão, Mireille Darc Cavalcanti

    2015-12-01

    Objective To analyze the distribution of larger diameter in the pathological report of cutaneous melanoma patients. Methods Data were obtained from patients seen from 1994 to 2015. Date, sex, age, maximum diameter, histological subtype, primary site, microscopic thickness, mitoses, ulceration, vertical growth phase, and regression were the variables studied. This study was approved by the National Ethics Committee - Brazil Platform. Patients were grouped into smaller diameter (?6mm) and larger diameter (>6mm). The statistical analysis used the ?2test (p<0.05). Results Of the 292 patients analyzed, 123 were seen between 1994 and 2004, and 169 between 2005 and 2015; in that, 151 women and 141 men, mean age of 52 years. The diameters ranged from 2 to 76mm (mean of 14mm), 81 patients with smaller diameter (?6mm) and 211 with larger diameter (>6mm). Out of 81 patients with smaller diameter, 29 had invasive melanoma, while 179 of the 211 with larger diameter were invasive. A difference was observed in frequency of vertical growth phase. Conclusion Pigmented skin lesions with diameter smaller than 6mm should not be an excluding factor for biopsies, especially when patients present risk of developing skin cancer. PMID:26761547

  19. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Block, J.; Boselli, A.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriquez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dowell, C. D.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric redshifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micron by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm sources with reliable radio identifications in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North and Lockman Hole North fields, 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm color evolution with redshift, finding that the colors of mm sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (Nu/nu(sub 0))(exp Beta), where Beta = +1.8 and nu(sub 0) = c/100 micron. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation, we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE-detected mm sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic or good quality optical/near-IR photometric redshifts, we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.16 (absolute value of Delta sub (z)) = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far-IR correlation, the accuracy is improved to (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.14 (((absolute value of Delta sub (z))) = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at Z > 3 when compared to approx 8S0 micron selected samples.

  20. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Dwek, E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric red-shifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micrometers by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm-sources with reliable radio identifications in the GOODS-N and Lockman Hole North fields 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm colour evolution with redshift, finding that the colours of mm-sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (nu/nu(0))beta where beta = +1.8 and nu(0) = c/100 micrometers. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE detected mm-sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic, or good quality optical/near-IR photometric, redshifts we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of |delta z|/(1+z) = 0.16 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far IR correlation the accuracy is improved to |delta z|/(1 + z) = 0.15 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at z greater than 3 when compared to 850 micrometer selected samples.

  1. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  2. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  3. G11.92–0.61-MM2: A BONAFIDE MASSIVE PRESTELLAR CORE?

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Schnee, S.; Graninger, D.; Öberg, K. I.; Zhang, Q.; Vasyunin, A.; Friesen, R.

    2014-11-20

    Core accretion models of massive star formation require the existence of stable massive starless cores, but robust observational examples of such objects have proven elusive. We report subarcsecond-resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm, 1.1 mm, and 0.88 mm and Very Large Array 1.3 cm observations of an excellent massive starless core candidate, G11.92–0.61-MM2, initially identified in the course of studies of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects (EGOs). Separated by ∼7.''2 from the nearby MM1 protostellar hot core, MM2 is a strong, compact dust continuum source (submillimeter spectral index α = 2.6 ± 0.1), but is devoid of star formation indicators. In contrast to MM1, MM2 has no masers, no centimeter continuum, and no (sub)millimeter wavelength line emission in ∼24 GHz of bandwidth observed with the SMA, including N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), and HCN(3-2). Additionally, there is no evidence for an outflow driven by MM2. The (sub)millimeter spectral energy distribution of MM2 is best fit with a dust temperature of ∼17-19 K and luminosity of ∼5-7 L {sub ☉}. The combined physical properties of MM2, as inferred from its dust continuum emission, are extreme: M ≳ 30 M {sub ☉} within a radius <1000 AU, N{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup 25} cm{sup –2} and n{sub H{sub 2}} >10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. Comparison of the molecular abundance limits derived from our SMA observations with gas-grain chemical models indicates that extremely dense (n(H) >> 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}), cold (<20 K) conditions are required to explain the lack of observed (sub)millimeter line emission, consistent with the dust continuum results. Our data suggest that G11.92–0.61-MM2 is the best candidate for a bonafide massive prestellar core found to date, and a promising target for future higher-sensitivity observations.

  4. CMOS mm-wave system-on-chip for sensing and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    CMOS technology offers relatively low performance at mm-wave frequencies compared with other III-V technologies and the high levels of process variation further exacerbate design margins. This paper discusses several CMOS system-on-chips (SoCs) developed by JPL through collaboration with UCLA that use a self-healing approach to optimize mm-wave transceiver performance, as well as calibrate operation at runtime. Several applications will be discussed for mm-wave spectroscopy, radar, and communication systems, with SoCs demonstrated at V, W and D band.

  5. G11.92-0.61-MM2: A Bonafide Massive Prestellar Core?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Graninger, D.; Öberg, K. I.; Vasyunin, A.; Zhang, Q.; Friesen, R.; Schnee, S.

    2014-11-01

    Core accretion models of massive star formation require the existence of stable massive starless cores, but robust observational examples of such objects have proven elusive. We report subarcsecond-resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm, 1.1 mm, and 0.88 mm and Very Large Array 1.3 cm observations of an excellent massive starless core candidate, G11.92-0.61-MM2, initially identified in the course of studies of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects (EGOs). Separated by ~7.''2 from the nearby MM1 protostellar hot core, MM2 is a strong, compact dust continuum source (submillimeter spectral index α = 2.6 ± 0.1), but is devoid of star formation indicators. In contrast to MM1, MM2 has no masers, no centimeter continuum, and no (sub)millimeter wavelength line emission in ~24 GHz of bandwidth observed with the SMA, including N2H+(3-2), HCO+(3-2), and HCN(3-2). Additionally, there is no evidence for an outflow driven by MM2. The (sub)millimeter spectral energy distribution of MM2 is best fit with a dust temperature of ~17-19 K and luminosity of ~5-7 L ⊙. The combined physical properties of MM2, as inferred from its dust continuum emission, are extreme: M >~ 30 M ⊙ within a radius <1000 AU, N_H_2>1025 cm-2 and n_H_2 >109 cm-3. Comparison of the molecular abundance limits derived from our SMA observations with gas-grain chemical models indicates that extremely dense (n(H) Gt 108 cm-3), cold (<20 K) conditions are required to explain the lack of observed (sub)millimeter line emission, consistent with the dust continuum results. Our data suggest that G11.92-0.61-MM2 is the best candidate for a bonafide massive prestellar core found to date, and a promising target for future higher-sensitivity observations.

  6. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  7. The effects of intracellular pH changes on resting cytosolic calcium in voltage-clamped snail neurones

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Debbie; Thomas, Roger C; Schwiening, Christof J

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of changing intracellular pH on intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in voltage-clamped neurones of the snail Helix aspersa. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using the fluorescent dye 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid (HPTS) and changed using weak acids and weak bases. Changes in [Ca2+]i were recorded using either fura-2 or calcium-sensitive microelectrodes. Acidification of the neurones with 5 mM or 20 mM propionate (?0.2 or 0.3 pH units acidification, respectively) caused a small reduction in resting [Ca2+]i of 5 ± 2 nM (n = 4) and 7 ± 16 nM (n = 4), respectively. The removal of the 20 mM propionate after ?40 min superfusion resulted in an alkalinization of ?0.35 pH units and an accompanying rise in resting [Ca2+]i of 31 ± 9 nM (n = 4, P < 0.05). The removal of 5 mM propionate did not significantly affect [Ca2+]i. Alkalinizations of ?0.2-0.4 pH units of Helix neurones induced by superfusion with 3 mM concentrations of the weak bases trimethylamine (TMA), ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) and procaine were accompanied by significant (P < 0.05) increases in resting [Ca2+]i of 42 ± 4 nM (n = 26), 30 ± 7 nM (n = 5) and 36 ± 4 nM (n = 3), respectively. The effect of TMA (0.5-6 mM) on [Ca2+]i was dose dependent with an increase in [Ca2+]i during pHi increases of less than 0.1 pH units (0.5 mM TMA). Superfusion of neurones with zero calcium (1 mM EGTA) Ringer solution inhibited depolarization-induced calcium increases but not the calcium increase produced by the first exposure to TMA (3 mM). In the prolonged absence of extracellular calcium (?50 min) TMA-induced calcium rises were decreased by 64 ± 10% compared to those seen in the presence of external calcium (P < 0.05). The calcium rise induced by TMA (3 mM) was reduced by 60 ± 5% following a 10 min period of superfusion with caffeine (10 mM) to deplete the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores of calcium (P < 0.05). Cyclopiazonic acid (10-30 ?M CPA), an inhibitor of the ER calcium pump, inhibited the calcium rise produced by TMA (3 mM) and NH4Cl (3 mM) by 61 ± 4% compared to controls (P < 0.05). These data are consistent with physiological intracellular alkaline shifts stimulating release of calcium, or inhibiting re-uptake of calcium by an intracellular store. The calcium increase was much reduced following application of caffeine, treatment with CPA or prolonged removal of external calcium. Hence the ER was likely to be the source of mobilized calcium. PMID:11158272

  8. Assessment of Bite Force in Patients Treated with 2.0-mm Traditional Miniplates versus 2.0-mm Locking Plates for Mandibular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Sanjay; Reddy, Mahendra Parvath; Swarup, Azeez Gaurav; Swarup, Divya; Choudhury, Rupshikha

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the difference in bite forces in patients treated for mandibular fractures with 2.0 mm conventional and locking titanium plating system. A randomized study was performed for the treatment of fractures of mandible. In this study, 20 adult patients with isolated mandibular fracture were included. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups, that is, Group I-2.0 mm nonlocking (traditional) and Group II-2.0 mm locking plates. Bite force was evaluated at 1st, 3rd, and 6th weeks. Comparison of all the assessed parameters between both the groups depicted no significant difference in terms of pain, swelling including the incidence of infection, paresthesia, and hardware failure. Although same was true in case of bite force between both the groups at various time intervals, there was statistically significant increase in the bite force within the group comprising patients in whom locking plates was used between 1st and 3rd weeks follow-up period and highly significant increase in bite force between 1st and 6th weeks of follow-up period. The rapid improvement of bite force values when locking plates were used implies that the locking plate can be used in preference to conventional plates to achieve early mobilization with assured stability in the treatment of mandibular fractures. PMID:26889350

  9. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    In this work we used an "in-diffusion" method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(a)) increases from 5.52 x 10(-12) (10(-7)M) to 2.18 x 10(-11) (10(-3)M)m(2)/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D(a) and D(e) values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL. PMID:18321721

  10. Depth Penetration and Detection of pH Gradients in Biofilms by Two-Photon Excitation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vroom, Jurrien M.; De Grauw, Kees J.; Gerritsen, Hans C.; Bradshaw, David J.; Marsh, Philip D.; Watson, G. Keith; Birmingham, John J.; Allison, Clive

    1999-01-01

    Deep microbial biofilms are a major problem in many industrial, environmental, and medical settings. Novel approaches are needed to understand the structure and metabolism of these biofilms. Two-photon excitation microscopy (TPE) and conventional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were compared quantitatively for the ability to visualize bacteria within deep in vitro biofilms. pH gradients within these biofilms were determined by fluorescence lifetime imaging, together with TPE. A constant-depth film fermentor (CDFF) was inoculated for 8 h at 50 ml · h?1 with a defined mixed culture of 10 species of bacteria grown in continuous culture. Biofilms of fixed depths were developed in the CDFF for 10 or 11 days. The microbial compositions of the biofilms were determined by using viable counts on selective and nonselective agar media; diverse mixed-culture biofilms developed, including aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic species. TPE was able to record images four times deeper than CLSM. Importantly, in contrast to CLSM images, TPE images recorded deep within the biofilm showed no loss of contrast. The pH within the biofilms was measured directly by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging; the fluorescence decay of carboxyfluorescein was correlated with biofilm pH and was used to construct a calibration curve. pH gradients were detectable, in both the lateral and axial directions, in steady-state biofilms. When biofilms were overlaid with 14 mM sucrose for 1 h, distinct pH gradients developed. Microcolonies with pH values of below pH 3.0 were visible, in some cases adjacent to areas with a much higher pH (>5.0). TPE allowed resolution of images at significantly greater depths (as deep as 140 ?m) than were possible with CLSM. Fluorescence lifetime imaging allowed the in situ, real-time imaging of pH and the detection of sharp gradients of pH within microbial biofilms. PMID:10427041

  11. Concentration-independent MRI of pH with a dendrimer-based pH-responsive nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Mohammed P. I.; Aryal, Madhava P.; Janic, Branislava; Karki, Kishor; Varma, Nadimpalli R. S.; Ewing, James R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Ali, Meser M.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe) has significant clinical value for pathological diagnoses and for monitoring the effects of pH-altering therapies. One of the major problems of measuring pHe with a relaxation-based MRI contrast agent is that the longitudinal relaxivity depends on both pH and the concentration of the agent, requiring the use of a second pH-unresponsive agent to measure the concentration. Here we tested the feasibility of measuring pH with a relaxation-based dendritic MRI contrast agent in a concentration-independent manner at clinically relevant field strengths. The transverse and longitudinal relaxation times in solutions of the contrast agent (GdDOTA-4AmP)44-G5, a G5–PAMAM dendrimer-based MRI contrast agent in water, were measured at 3 T and 7 T magnetic field strengths as a function of pH. At 3 T, longitudinal relaxivity (r1) increased from 7.91 to 9.65 mM?1 s?1 (on a per Gd3+ basis) on changing pH from 8.84 to 6.35. At 7 T, r1 relaxivity showed pH response, albeit at lower mean values; transverse relaxivity (r2) remained independent of pH and magnetic field strengths. The longitudinal relaxivity of (GdDOTA-4AmP)44-G5 exhibited a strong and reversible pH dependence. The ratio of relaxation rates R2/R1 also showed a linear relationship in a pH-responsive manner, and this pH response was independent of the absolute concentration of (GdDOTA-4AmP)44-G5 agent. Importantly, the nanoprobe (GdDOTA-4AmP)44-G5 shows pH response in the range commonly found in the microenvironment of solid tumors. PMID:26173742

  12. Fiber-optic pH sensor based on sol-gel film immobilized with neutral red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Dayeong; Yoo, Wook Jae; Seo, Jeong Ki; Shin, Sang Hun; Han, Ki-Tek; Kim, Seon Geun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we developed a fiber-optic pH sensor based on a sol-gel film immobilized with neutral red (NR). A solgel film was prepared by mixing tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS), trimethoxymethylsilane (MTMS), ethanol (EtOH), distilled water (H2O), and NR powder. Accordingly, the thin pH sol-gel film was fabricated through a sol-gel process with a dip-coating method. The thickness and diameter of the fabricated pH sol-gel film are 0.11 and 0.6 mm, respectively. We measured the optical absorbance and the light intensity with the spectra of reflected light, which change with the color variation of the pH sol-gel film in the fiber-optic sensing probe. From the experimental results, we demonstrated that the proposed fiber-optic pH sensor has good reversibility, reproducibility, and a fast response time, in which the optical properties of the NR-based pH sol-gel film change with the pH value.

  13. 5. East portal of Tunnel 26, view to southwest, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East portal of Tunnel 26, view to southwest, 135mm lens. Tunnel 25 (HAER CA-201) is visible in the distance. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 26, Milepost 133.29, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  14. 7. Detail, east portal of Tunnel 34/Snowshed 33, 135mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, east portal of Tunnel 34/Snowshed 33, 135mm lens. Tall signal mast necessary in order to be seen above winter snows. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 41, Milepost 193.3, Donner, Placer County, CA

  15. Molecular properties from combined QM/MM methods. I. Analytical second derivative and vibrational calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qiang; Karplus, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Analytical second derivatives for combined QM/MM calculations have been formulated and implemented in the CHARMM program interfaced with the ab initio quantum mechanical GAMESS and CADPAC programs. This makes possible evaluation of vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities in large systems that cannot be treated effectively by QM or MM alone; examples are polarizable molecules in solution and substrates or transition states in enzymes. Test calculations on a number of systems, including formamide in water, butanol, a model transition state structure for triosephosphate isomerase and the active site model of myoglobin, show that the MM description of the environment can capture much of its polarization effects on the QM region. Thus the implementation of analytical second derivatives within the QM/MM framework has considerable potential for the study of large systems.

  16. TELEPHOTO VIEW (600MM LENS) OF SILVERTON, COLORADO, LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TELEPHOTO VIEW (600MM LENS) OF SILVERTON, COLORADO, LOOKING NORTH NORTHEAST. NOTE DURANGO & SILVERTON NARROW GAUGE RAILROAD AT BOTTOM CENTER. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  17. Same-source parallel implementation of the PSU/NCAR MM5

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakes, J.

    1997-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model is a limited-area model of atmospheric systems, now in its fifth generation, MM5. Designed and maintained for vector and shared-memory parallel architectures, the official version of MM5 does not run on message-passing distributed memory (DM) parallel computers. The authors describe a same-source parallel implementation of the PSU/NCAR MM5 using FLIC, the Fortran Loop and Index Converter. The resulting source is nearly line-for-line identical with the original source code. The result is an efficient distributed memory parallel option to MM5 that can be seamlessly integrated into the official version.

  18. 18. Southeast end room; view to northeast, 65mm lens plus ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Southeast end room; view to northeast, 65mm lens plus electronic flash illumination. Failed south wall at right. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  19. 17. Oblique view, typical room; view to south, 65mm lens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Oblique view, typical room; view to south, 65mm lens plus electronic flash illumination. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  20. 19. Southeast end room; view to southeast, 65mm lens plus ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Southeast end room; view to southeast, 65mm lens plus electronic flash illumination. Note extent of failure; figure for scale. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  1. 16. Oblique view, typical room; view to north, 65mm lens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Oblique view, typical room; view to north, 65mm lens plus electronic flash illumination. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  2. Solvents effects on the mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis: A QM/MM study.

    PubMed

    Loerbroks, Claudia; Heimermann, Andreas; Thiel, Walter

    2015-06-01

    This article reports a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) investigation on the acid hydrolysis of cellulose in water using two different models, cellobiose and a 40-unit cellulose chain. The explicitly treated solvent molecules strongly influence the conformations, intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exoanomeric effects in these models. As these features are largely responsible for the barrier to cellulose hydrolysis, the present QM/MM results for the pathways and reaction intermediates in water are expected to be more realistic than those from a former density functional theory (DFT) study with implicit solvent (CPCM). However, in a qualitative sense, there is reasonable agreement between the DFT/CPCM and QM/MM predictions for the reaction mechanism. Differences arise mainly from specific solute-solvent hydrogen bonds that are only captured by QM/MM and not by DFT/CPCM. PMID:25809959

  3. 50. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWER MAIN STREET, WITH M.M. WALKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. OVERALL VIEW OF LOWER MAIN STREET, WITH M.M. WALKER COMPANY WAREHOUSE IN LEFT FOREGROUND AND THOMAS J. MULGREW COMPANY BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Dubuque Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  4. Building 810, oblique view to northwest, 90mm lens. KC10 tanker ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 810, oblique view to northwest, 90mm lens. KC-10 tanker aircraft in hangar bay for maintenance. - Travis Air Force Base, B-36 Hangar, Between Woodskill Avenue & Ellis, adjacent to Taxiway V & W, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. Optical design and evaluation of a 4 mm cost-effective ultra-high-definition arthroscope

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Yu, Lu; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    High definition and magnification rigid endoscope plays an important role in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and diagnosis. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation methods of a high definition rigid endoscope, specifically an arthroscope, with a large depth of field (DOF). The incident heights and exit angles of the sampled rays on the relay lens are controlled during the optimization process to ensure an effective field view (70°) and a normal ray path within the limited lens diameter of 2.7 mm. The lens is set up as a multi-configuration system with two extreme and one middle object distances to cover a large DOF. As a result, an entrance pupil of 0.3 mm is achieved for the first time, to bring the theoretical resolution to 23.1 lps/mm in the object space at a working distance of 20 mm, with the wavelength of 0.532 um. The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves approach diffraction limit, and the values are all higher than 0.3 at 160 line pairs/mm (lps/mm) in the image space. Meanwhile, stray light caused by total internal reflection on the inner wall of the rod lenses and the objective lens is eliminated. The measured resolution in the object space at a 20 mm working distance is 22.3 lps/mm, and test results show that other performance characteristics also fulfill design requirements. The relay lenses are designed with only one type of the spacer and two types of lenses to greatly reduce the fabrication and assembly cost. The design method has important research and application values for lens systems used in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and industrial non-destructive testing area. PMID:25136495

  6. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E.; Cisneros, G. Andrés

    2015-07-01

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Ã… cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  7. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E; Cisneros, G Andrés

    2015-07-28

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Ã… cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution. PMID:26233103

  8. Accuracy of buffered-force QM/MM simulations of silica

    SciTech Connect

    Peguiron, Anke; Moras, Gianpietro; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; De Vita, Alessandro; Kermode, James R.

    2015-02-14

    We report comparisons between energy-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and buffered force-based QM/MM simulations in silica. Local quantities—such as density of states, charges, forces, and geometries—calculated with both QM/MM approaches are compared to the results of full QM simulations. We find the length scale over which forces computed using a finite QM region converge to reference values obtained in full quantum-mechanical calculations is ∼10 Å rather than the ∼5 Å previously reported for covalent materials such as silicon. Electrostatic embedding of the QM region in the surrounding classical point charges gives only a minor contribution to the force convergence. While the energy-based approach provides accurate results in geometry optimizations of point defects, we find that the removal of large force errors at the QM/MM boundary provided by the buffered force-based scheme is necessary for accurate constrained geometry optimizations where Si–O bonds are elongated and for finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations of crack propagation. Moreover, the buffered approach allows for more flexibility, since special-purpose QM/MM coupling terms that link QM and MM atoms are not required and the region that is treated at the QM level can be adaptively redefined during the course of a dynamical simulation.

  9. Accuracy of buffered-force QM/MM simulations of silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peguiron, Anke; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; De Vita, Alessandro; Kermode, James R.; Moras, Gianpietro

    2015-02-01

    We report comparisons between energy-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and buffered force-based QM/MM simulations in silica. Local quantities—such as density of states, charges, forces, and geometries—calculated with both QM/MM approaches are compared to the results of full QM simulations. We find the length scale over which forces computed using a finite QM region converge to reference values obtained in full quantum-mechanical calculations is ˜10 Å rather than the ˜5 Å previously reported for covalent materials such as silicon. Electrostatic embedding of the QM region in the surrounding classical point charges gives only a minor contribution to the force convergence. While the energy-based approach provides accurate results in geometry optimizations of point defects, we find that the removal of large force errors at the QM/MM boundary provided by the buffered force-based scheme is necessary for accurate constrained geometry optimizations where Si-O bonds are elongated and for finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations of crack propagation. Moreover, the buffered approach allows for more flexibility, since special-purpose QM/MM coupling terms that link QM and MM atoms are not required and the region that is treated at the QM level can be adaptively redefined during the course of a dynamical simulation.

  10. Rotary-linear piezoelectric microactuator with a cubic stator of side length 3.5 mm.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki; Toyama, Shigeki

    2010-08-01

    We report a miniature rotary-linear piezoelectric actuator with a single cubic stator of side length 3.5 mm which can generate rotary motion around the center axis and linear motion in the axial direction. The stator is fabricated as a single metallic cube of side length 3.5 mm with a 2.5-mm diameter through-hole and four piezoelectric elements bonded to the sides of the stator. The simplicity makes the actuator compact without any special manufacturing. In the design for miniaturization, the modal analysis using the finite element method indicates the natural frequency of the stator from the side length 14 mm to 3.5 mm. In the experiments, rotary motion of 24 rad/s and 2.5 microNm were obtained at a resonant frequency of 280 kHz, and linear motion of 80 mm/s and 2.6 mN was observed at 305 kHz by driving the system at an applied voltage of 42 V(rms). PMID:20679011

  11. Mechanism of proteolysis in matrix metalloproteinase-2 revealed by QM/MM modeling.

    PubMed

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana; Khrenova, Maria G; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Thiel, Walter

    2015-08-01

    The mechanism of enzymatic peptide hydrolysis in matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was studied at atomic resolution through quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. An all-atom three-dimensional molecular model was constructed on the basis of a crystal structure from the Protein Data Bank (ID: 1QIB), and the oligopeptide Ace-Gln-Gly?Ile-Ala-Gly-Nme was considered as the substrate. Two QM/MM software packages and several computational protocols were employed to calculate QM/MM energy profiles for a four-step mechanism involving an initial nucleophilic attack followed by hydrogen bond rearrangement, proton transfer, and C-N bond cleavage. These QM/MM calculations consistently yield rather low overall barriers for the chemical steps, in the range of 5-10 kcal/mol, for diverse QM treatments (PBE0, B3LYP, and BB1K density functionals as well as local coupled cluster treatments) and two MM force fields (CHARMM and AMBER). It, thus, seems likely that product release is the rate-limiting step in MMP-2 catalysis. This is supported by an exploration of various release channels through QM/MM reaction path calculations and steered molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26132652

  12. QM/MM-PBSA method to estimate free energies for reactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaukonen, Markus; Söderhjelm, Pär; Heimdal, Jimmy; Ryde, Ulf

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a method to estimate free energies of reactions in proteins, called QM/MM-PBSA. It estimates the internal energy of the reactive site by quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, whereas bonded, electrostatic, and van der Waals interactions with the surrounding protein are calculated at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. The electrostatic part of the solvation energy of the reactant and the product is estimated by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, and the nonpolar part of the solvation energy is estimated from the change in solvent-accessible surface area (SA). Finally, the change in entropy is estimated from the vibrational frequencies. We test this method for five proton-transfer reactions in the active sites of [Ni,Fe] hydrogenase and copper nitrite reductase. We show that QM/MM-PBSA reproduces the results of a strict QM/MM free-energy perturbation method with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 8-10 kJ/mol if snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations are used and 4-14 kJ/mol if a single QM/MM structure is used. This is appreciably better than the original QM/MM results or if the QM energies are supplemented with a point-charge model, a self-consistent reaction field, or a PB model of the protein and the solvent, which give MADs of 22-36 kJ/mol for the same test set. PMID:18781715

  13. Sub-Nanometer Resolution Ultrasonic Motor for 300 mm Wafer Lithography Precision Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Yoshiya; Kosaka, Kouji; Iwabuchi, Tetsuya; Kosaka, Tetsuya; Baba, Tetsuro; Endo, Taishi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Harada, Takashi; Nagamoto, Keiichi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Yamakawa, Takahiro; Miyata, Noboru; Moriyama, Shiro; Morizono, Yasuhiro; Nakada, Akira; Kubota, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2002-09-01

    This paper describes the development of the nonresonant ultrasonic motor (NRUSM) applied to a 300-mm-stroke ultra-precision stage for future LSI manufacturing, in particular electron beam based technologies. Advantages of the NRUSM are high resolution, no magnetic noise generation, high servo rigidity and high retention. It is confirmed that the NRUSM is suitable for ultra-precision positioning, and slow- and high-velocity feeding at closed-loop controls. The performance of the NRUSM-driven stage includes; (1) 85 mm/s feed velocity with average acceleration 375 mm/s2 over the 300 mm stroke at open-loop control; (2) ± 0.69 nm positioning accuracy at step and repeat response, 17 ms average positioning time for ± 30 nm positioning accuracy, positional error during constant velocity feeding below ± 1.5 nm for 100 nm/s and ± 40 nm for 20 mm/s, and velocity ripple at 36 mm/s is below 0.04% at closed-loop control.

  14. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed. PMID:25674150

  15. Bioelectricity production from food waste leachate using microbial fuel cells: effect of NaCl and pH.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Min; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2013-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells are a promising technology for simultaneous treatment and energy recovery from food waste leachate. This study evaluates the effects of NaCl (0-150 mM) and pH on the treatment of food waste leachate using microbial fuel cells. The food waste leachate amended with 100mM NaCl enabled the highest maximum power density (1000 mW/m(3)) and lowest internal resistance (371?). Increasing the anodic pH gradually from acidic to alkaline conditions (pH 4-9) resulted in a gradual increase in maximum power density to 9956 mW/m(3) and decrease in internal cell resistance to 35.3?. The coulombic efficiency obtained under acidic conditions was only 17.8%, but increased significantly to 60.0% and 63.4% in the neutral and alkaline pH's MFCs, respectively. Maintaining a narrow pH window (6.3-7.6) was essential for efficient bioelectricity production and COD removal using microbial fuel cells for the treatment of food waste leachate. PMID:24140849

  16. [Sequence-specific interaction of pyrimidine oligonucleotides with double-stranded DNA at acidic pH complexes of different types].

    PubMed

    Brossalina, E B; Demchenko, E N; Demchenko, Iu N; Vlassov, V V

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of pyrimidine oligonucleotides (OLN(15) and OLN(6)) and their alkylating derivatives bearing 4-(3-amino)-N-methyl and N-2-chloroethyl (RCl) aniline residues at the 5'-phosphate with a fragment of the human gamma-interferon gene was studied. In the presence of 150 mM NaCl at pH 5.4, the yield of dsDNA alkylation was 60% for RCl-OLN(15) and 10% for RCl-OLN(6); at pH 4.0 in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 10 mM MgCl2, the yield of the dsDNA modification product was 100% for RCl-OLN(6) and 50% for RCl-OLN(15). It was shown by native electrophoresis that OLN(15) could form with the target dsDNA complexes of two types in the presence of magnesium ions at pH 4.0. One of the complexes was stable at pH 5.4 in the presence of magnesium ions, whereas the other was not. We found that only the complex stable in 10 mM Mg(OAc)2, pH 5.4, was effectively alkylated. PMID:19915644

  17. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  18. Toxicity evaluation of pH dependent stable Achyranthes aspera herbal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Alok; Kumari, Sarika; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticles have gained substantial attention for the control of various diseases. However, any adverse effect of herbal gold nanoparticles (HGNPs) on animals including human being has not been investigated in details. The objectives of current study are to assess the cytotoxicity of HGNPs synthesized by using leaf extract of Achyranthes aspera, and long epoch stability. The protocol deals with stability of HGNPs in pH dependent manner. Visually, HGNPs formation is characterized by colour change of extract from dark brown to dark purple after adding gold chloride solution (1 mM). The 100 ?g/ml HGNPs concentration has been found nontoxic to the cultured spleenocyte cells. Spectrophotometric analysis of nanoparticles solution gave a peak at 540 nm which corresponds to surface plasmon resonance absorption band. As per scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), size of HGNPs are in the range of 50-80 nm (average size 70 nm) with spherical morphology. TEM-selected area electron diffraction observation showed hexagonal texture. HGNPs showed substantial stability at higher temperature (85 °C), pH 10 and salt concentration (5 M). The zeta potential value of HGNPs is -35.9 mV at temperature 25 °C, pH 10 showing its good quality with better stability in comparison to pH 6 and pH 7. The findings advocate that the protocol for the synthesis of HGNPs is easy and quick with good quality and long epoch stability at pH 10. Moreover, non-toxic dose could be widely applicable for human health as a potential nano-medicine in the future to cure diseases.

  19. Toxicity evaluation of pH dependent stable Achyranthes aspera herbal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Alok; Kumari, Sarika; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have gained substantial attention for the control of various diseases. However, any adverse effect of herbal gold nanoparticles (HGNPs) on animals including human being has not been investigated in details. The objectives of current study are to assess the cytotoxicity of HGNPs synthesized by using leaf extract of Achyranthes aspera, and long epoch stability. The protocol deals with stability of HGNPs in pH dependent manner. Visually, HGNPs formation is characterized by colour change of extract from dark brown to dark purple after adding gold chloride solution (1 mM). The 100 μg/ml HGNPs concentration has been found nontoxic to the cultured spleenocyte cells. Spectrophotometric analysis of nanoparticles solution gave a peak at 540 nm which corresponds to surface plasmon resonance absorption band. As per scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), size of HGNPs are in the range of 50-80 nm (average size 70 nm) with spherical morphology. TEM-selected area electron diffraction observation showed hexagonal texture. HGNPs showed substantial stability at higher temperature (85 °C), pH 10 and salt concentration (5 M). The zeta potential value of HGNPs is -35.9 mV at temperature 25 °C, pH 10 showing its good quality with better stability in comparison to pH 6 and pH 7. The findings advocate that the protocol for the synthesis of HGNPs is easy and quick with good quality and long epoch stability at pH 10. Moreover, non-toxic dose could be widely applicable for human health as a potential nano-medicine in the future to cure diseases.

  20. Exchangeable hydrogen explains the pH of spodosol Oa horizons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.; David, M.B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bartlett, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The chemistry of extremely acid Oa horizons does not conform to traditional pH, Al, and base saturation relationships. Results from two separate studies of northeastern U.S. forested soils were used to investigate relationships between pH in water or dilute salt solutions and other soil characteristics. In Oa horizons with pH below 4, soil pH in dilute CaCl2 solution was correlated with exchangeable H+ measured either by titration (r = -0.88, P = 0.0001, n = 142) or by electrode (r = -0.89, P = 0.0001, n = 45). Exchangeable H+ expressed as a percentage of the cation-exchange capacity (CEC) was linear with pH and showed similar slopes for data from both studies. For all samples, pHw = 4.21 - 1.80 x H+/CEC (R2 = 0.69, n = 194). The reciprocal of the H+/CEC ratio is base saturation with Al added to the bases. Because of the low pH, exchangeable Al does not appear to behave as an acid. Exchangeable H+ remains an operationally defined quantity because of the difficulty in separating exchange and hydrolysis reactions. In a variety of neutral-salt extractants, concentration of H+ were correlated with 0.1 M BaCl2-exchangeable H+ (r > 0.91, P = 0.0001, n = 26) regardless of the strength of the extract. Nine successive extractions with 0.33 mM CaCl2 removed more H+ than was removed by single batch extractions with either 1 M KCl or 0.1 M BaCl2 (average H+ of 70, 43, and 49 mmol kg-1, respectively for 26 samples). The data showed little difference in the chemical behavior of Oa horizons from a variety of geographical sites and vegetation types.

  1. Somatic embryogenesis of carrot in hormone-free medium: external pH control over morphogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. L.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Cultures of preglobular stage proembryos (PGSPs) were initiated from mechanically wounded mature zygotic embryos of carrot, Daucus carota, on a hormone-free, semisolid medium. These PGSPs have been maintained and multiplied for extended periods without their progression into later embryo stages on the same hormone-free medium containing 1 mM NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source. Sustained maintenance of cultures comprised exclusively of PGSPs was dependent on medium pH throughout the culture period. Best growth and multiplication of PGSP cultures occurred when the pH of unbuffered, hormone-free medium fell from 4.5 to 4 over a 2-week period or when buffered medium was titrated to pH 4. If the hormone-free medium was buffered to sustain a pH at or above 4.5, PGSPs developed into later embryo stages. Maintenance with continuous multiplication of PGSPs occurred equally well on medium containing NH4+ or NH4+ and NO3-, but growth was poor with NO3- alone. Additional observations on the effects of medium components such as various nitrogen sources and levels, sucrose concentration, semisolid supports, type of buffer, borate concentration, activated charcoal, and initial pH that permit optimum maintenance of the PGSPs or foster their continued developmental progression into mature embryos and plantlets are reported. The influence of the pH of the hormone-free medium as a determinant in maintaining cultures as PGSPs or allowing their continued embryonic development are unequivocally demonstrated by gross morphology, scanning electron microscopy, and histological preparations.

  2. Noninvasive NIR measurement of tissue pH to assess hemorrhagic shock in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Zhang, Songbiao; Micheels, Ronald H.; Puyana, Juan C.

    1999-07-01

    Body-worn noninvasive physilogical sensors are needed to continuously monitor soldiers for hemorrhage and to provide real-time information for minimally skilled medics to treat the injured. In the hospital intramucosal pHi of the gut is used to monitor shock and its treatment. We hypothesize that abdominal wall muscle (AWM) pH can be measured noninvasively using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares analysis (PLS) and will correlate with pHi. METHODS: AWM pH was measured with microelectrodes and gastric pHi was measured with a tonometric catheter simultaneously while NIR spectra were collected using prototype LED spectrometers placed on the pig's flanks. Animals were subject to hemorrhagic shock at 45 mm Hg for 45 minutes, then resuscitated with blood and lactated ringers. Relationships between electrode pH, pHi and NIR spectra were developed using PLS with cross validation. RESULTS: NIR spectral changes noninvasively acquired through the skin were shown to be from the muscle, not from changes in skin blood flow. Trending ability (R2) model accuracy (RMSD), and relative error were calculated for individual pigs. Using electrode pH as the reference, average R2 was 0.88 with a predicted accuracy of 0.17 pH units, a 9.3% relative error. Slightly degraded results were observed when pHi was used as a reference. CONCLUSIONS: NIR measurement of tissue pH can be used to noninvasively monitor for shock and guide its treatment in a swine model. These measurements correlate with gastric pHi, a clinically accepted measure of shock, providing an approach to develop similar methodology for humans.

  3. Effect of postweld heat treatment on weld metal impact toughness of a semi-austenitic PH stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, N.; Raja, K.S.; Prasad Rao, K. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Semi-austenitic precipitation hardened PH stainless steel plates, PH 15-7 Mo (Cu), 6.14 mm thick were autogenously welded using the electron beam welding (EBW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. Impact toughness studies using Charpy V-notch samples (V-notch at the center of the weld metal) showed that EB welds had higher impact toughness than PA welds in various identical postweld heat treated (PWHT) conditions. Based on hardness and impact toughness values, the optimal postweld heat treated conditions are recommended. The effect of retained austenite, carbides and delta ferrite on impact toughness of the welds are discussed.

  4. Assessment of Salivary Flow Rate and pH Among Areca Nut Chewers and Oral Submucous Fibrosis Subjects: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Khader, Nishat Fatima; Dyasanoor, Sujatha

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess and compare the salivary flow rate (SFR) and salivary pH among areca nut chewers, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) patients and apparently healthy individuals. Methods: A comparative study was conducted to assess and compare the SFR and pH among 135 outpatients (45 areca nut chewers + 45 OSMF + 45 control) at The Oxford Dental College and Research Hospital, Bangalore, India. Subjects were interviewed using structural proforma and Modified Schirmer strips and pH paper were implemented for assessing SFR and pH respectively. Statistical analysis was done using IBM SPSS ver. 21.0 software. Results: A statistically significant increase in SFR (35.7 mm at 3rd minutes) among areca nut group and a decrease in SFR among OSMF group (23.4 mm at 3rd minutes) when compared to apparently healthy subjects (30.7 mm at 3rd minutes). The mean pH among areca nut, OSMF and control groups was 6.76, 6.82, and 6.74 respectively with no statistical significance. Conclusions: The observation and findings of the study clearly showed hypersalivation among areca nut group and hyposalivation among OSMF group, with no significant change in salivary pH when compared to healthy subjects. PMID:26473160

  5. Metabolism and disposition of MM-433593, a selective FAAH-1 inhibitor, in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Banijamali, Ali R; Wakefield, James D; Mermerian, Ara H; Busby, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    MM-433593 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase-1 (FAAH-1) with potential utility as an orally administered treatment of pain, inflammation, and other disorders. In this study, we investigated the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of MM-433593 in monkeys, and compared plasma and urine metabolites of this compound to the in vitro metabolites produced by monkey hepatocytes. Intravenous administration of MM-433593 to cynomolgus monkeys produced a rapid distribution phase and slower elimination phase with a mean systemic clearance rate of 8–11 mL/min/kg. Absolute oral bioavailability was determined to be 14–21% with maximum plasma concentrations reached ∼3 h (Tmax) following a 10 mg/kg oral dose. The average terminal half-life of MM-433593 was 17–20 h, and there were no qualitative sex differences in the metabolite profile of MM-433593. The major site of metabolism was oxidation of the methyl group at the five position of the indole ring, which was confirmed by chromatography and mass spectrometry comparison to a synthesized authentic standard. This metabolite was further oxidized to the corresponding carboxylic acid and/or conjugated with sulfate, glucuronide, or glutathione. In all, 18 metabolites were found in plasma and urine. In vitro incubations of MM-433593 with monkey hepatocytes yielded 13 metabolites, all of which were found in vivo, indicating a good correlation between the in vitro and in vivo metabolism data. A comprehensive pathway for the metabolism of MM-433593 is proposed, including a plausible, five-step biotransformation for the formation of N-acetylcysteine conjugate metabolite (M18) from the hydroxylated parent (M5). PMID:25505606

  6. Compact, mission configurable mm-wave spectrometer based on a channel drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Bailey, Aimee G.; Earley, Lawrence M.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a novel mm-wave spectrometer based on a Photonic Band Gap (PBG) channel-drop filter (CDF). There is a need for a compact wide-band versatile and configurable mm-wave spectrometer for applications in mm-wave communications and remote sensing. CDFs present us with a unique means for filtering frequencies at mm-waves. CDF is a novel concept allowing filtering the frequency spectra and channeling selected frequencies into separate waveguides through a PBG structure. We have designed a spectrometer with a CDF working in the frequency range of 90-130 GHz. The CDF can be connected to any type of antenna and detector. A large ground based outdoor antenna can be used for remote sensing with radars. A compact antenna can be used for indoor or space applications. The signal in the waveguide channels can be measured with any type of sensor such as a cooled bolometer or a room temperature mm-wave diode. The size of the spectrometer is under 5 inches by 5 inches and just a quarter of an inch in thick. Multiple filters can be stacked together to construct a mission specific package. We propose to construct the filter with silicon rods on a 100mm silicon wafer using MEMS technology. We will then evaluate the filter at our mm-wave laboratory to demonstrate the channeling of frequencies in a proof-of-principle experiment at 100GHz. This technology will work well for frequencies from 60GHz to 1000GHz.

  7. Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm: Risk factors for recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Briedigkeit, Alexander; Sultanie, Omar; Sido, Bernd; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate risk factors for local recurrence after endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm. METHODS: Retrospective data analysis of 216 endoscopic mucosal resections for colorectal adenomas > 20 mm in 179 patients (40.3% female; median age 68 years; range 35-91 years). All patients had at least 1 follow-up endoscopy with a minimum control interval of 2 mo (mean follow-up 6 mo/2.0-43.4 mo). Possible factors associated with local recurrence were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Median size of the lesions was 30 mm (20-70 mm), 69.0% were localized in the right-sided (cecum, ascending and transverse) colon. Most of the lesions (85.6%) showed a non-pedunculated morphology and the majority of resections was in piecemeal technique (78.7%). Histology showed carcinoma or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 51/216 (23.6%) lesions including 4 low risk carcinomas (pT1a, L0, V0, R0 - G1/G2). Histologically proven recurrence was observed in 33/216 patients (15.3%). Patient age > 65 years, polyp size > 30 mm, non-pedunculated morphology, localization in the right-sided colon, piecemeal resection and tubular-villous histology were found as associated factors in univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only localization in the right-sided colon (HR = 6.842/95%CI: 1.540-30.394; P = 0.011), tubular-villous histology (HR = 3.713/95%CI: 1.617-8.528; P = 0.002) and polyp size > 30 mm (HR = 2.563/95%CI: 1.179-5.570; P = 0.017) were significantly associated risk factors for adenoma recurrence. CONCLUSION: Meticulous endoscopic follow-up is warranted after endoscopic mucosal resection of adenomas localized in the right-sided colon larger than > 30 mm, with tubular-villous histology. PMID:26981180

  8. The pH of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. C.; Bishop, J. L.; Edwards, J. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking labeled release (LR) experiments provided data that can be used to determine the acid-base characteristics of the regolith. Constraints on the acid-base properties and redox potentials of the Martian surface material would provide additional information for determining what reactions are possible and defining formation conditions for the regolith. Calculations devised to determine the pH of Mars must include the amount of soluble acid species or base species present in the LR regolith sample and the solubility product of the carbonate with the limiting solubility. This analysis shows that CaCO3, either as calcite or aragonite, has the correct K(sub sp) to have produced the Viking LR successive injection reabsorption effects. Thus CaCO3 or another MeCO3 with very similar solubility characteristics must have been present on Mars. A small amount of soluble acid, but no more than 4 micro-mol per sample, could also have been present. It is concluded that the pH of the regolith is 7.2 +/- 0.1.

  9. Thiosquaramides: pH switchable anion transporters†

    PubMed Central

    Busschaert, Nathalie; Elmes, Robert B. P.; Czech, Dawid D.; Wu, Xin; Kirby, Isabelle L.; Peck, Evan M.; Hendzel, Kevin D.; Shaw, Scott K.; Chan, Bun; Smith, Bradley D.; Jolliffe, Katrina A.; Gale, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    The transport of anions across cellular membranes is an important biological function governed by specialised proteins. In recent years, many small molecules have emerged that mimick the anion transport behaviour of these proteins, but only a few of these synthetic molecules also display the gating/switching behaviour seen in biological systems. A small series of thiosquaramides was synthesised and their pH-dependent chloride binding and anion transport behaviour was investigated using 1H NMR titrations, single crystal X-ray diffraction and a variety of vesicle-based techniques. Spectrophotometric titrations and DFT calculations revealed that the thiosquaramides are significantly more acidic than their oxosquaramide analogues, with pKa values between 4.0 and 9.0. This led to the observation that at pH 7.2 the anion transport ability of the thiosquaramides is fully switched OFF due to deprotonation of the receptor, but is completely switched ON at lower pH. PMID:26146535

  10. Histone acetylation regulates intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    McBrian, Matthew A; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S; Christofk, Heather R; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2013-01-24

    Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pH(i)). As pH(i) decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pH(i). Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pH(i) rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pH(i), particularly compromising pH(i) maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pH(i) with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  11. Effect of pH on the accumulation kinetics of pentachlorophenol in goldfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of accumulation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) at various pH values were investigated to explore how pH-dependent accumulation might influence PCP toxicity. Goldfish (Carassius auratus ) were exposed to 5 mu g PCP/L in a static system buffered with 7.5 mM bicine or N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminoethane sulfonic acid (BES) at pH 7.0, 8.0, or 9.0. The amount of PCP in the fish, concentration of PCP in water, and the total amount of metabolites in the system were measured after exposure of fish from 1 to 96 hr. The distribution of PCP within the fish was altered by changes in the external pH. The pH-associated changes in distribution may have altered access of PCP to sites of metabolism, thereby altering the metabolic clearance. The pH-related changes in the pharmacokinetics of PCP resulted in a decrease in its bioconcentration factor with an increase in pH and account both for the decreased capacity of the fish to accumulated PCP and for its reduced LC50.

  12. Brain oxygen, CO2, pH, and temperature monitoring: evaluation in the feline brain.

    PubMed

    Zauner, A; Bullock, R; Di, X; Young, H F

    1995-12-01

    Currently, no ideal method exists for monitoring the injured brain. Recently, a single, compact, fiberoptic sensor has become available for measuring oxygen, CO2, pH and temperature in blood. We have adapted this instrument for continuous use in brain tissue to measure oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension (pCO2), pH, and temperature. To evaluate this new technique, we produced hypercapnia, hypocapnia, intracranial pressure increase, and hypoxemia in seven normal cats. In an additional six animals, sensors were placed within a zone of focal brain ischemia induced by occluding the left middle cerebral artery. The sensor readings were compared with cerebral blood flow measurements, intracranial pressure, and brain histological findings. An in vitro experiment was also performed using human blood to test the accuracy of the sensor over a wide range of pCO2 and oxygen tension values. After careful precalibration and rigid cranium fixation, stable measurements could be obtained throughout the 6- to 8-hour experiments. In normal animals, brain oxygen was 42 +/- 9 mm Hg, brain CO2 was 59 +/- 14 mm Hg, brain pH was 7.0 +/- 0.2, and brain temperature was 36.7 +/- 0.7 degrees C. Hypocapnia and hypoxemia produced a significant decline in tissue oxygen (< or = 30 +/- 3 mm Hg; P < 0.001), whereas hypercapnia caused by hypoventilation and intracranial pressure increase produced a significant increase in tissue CO2 (> or = 74 +/- 4 mm Hg; P < 0.001). Focal ischemia produced a rapid 42% decline in brain oxygen (25 +/- 7 mm Hg) and a 25% increase in tissue pCO2 (71 +/- 23 mm Hg). Brain oxygen further decreased to 19 +/- 6 mm Hg toward the end of the experiment, 4 hours later. After middle cerebral artery occlusion, the regional cerebral blood flow decreased to 10 +/- 5 ml per 100 g per minute, within the 1st hour, from a baseline value of 65 +/- 15 ml per 100 g per minute. It then gradually increased to 15 +/- 5 ml per 100 g per minute by the end of the 4-hour experiment. Brain pH was closely and inversely related to brain CO2. The brain temperature in the focally ischemic tissue decreased from 36.7 +/- 0.7 to 35.5 +/- 1.6 degrees C by the end of the experiment. The in vitro experiment demonstrated good linear correlation between the sensor readings and the blood gas analysis. Continuous monitoring of oxygen, CO2, pH, and temperature in damaged or at-risk brain tissue using a single sensor is now feasible and will, thus, allow improved continuous monitoring of neurosurgical patients who are at risk of significant secondary brain damage. PMID:8584158

  13. Sagitally focusing scanning monochromator produces 0.4-mm focus (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Sullivan, M.; Fischetti, R.; Rock, L.

    1992-01-01

    A sagitally focusing stage has been constructed for the double-crystal scanning monochromator on beam line X9-A at the NSLS which can be exchanged with the normally used flat crystal stage. The bending device located at 12.0 m from the source is designed to accept a beam up to 200-mm wide. The monochromator with bending stage can be scanned over Bragg angles from 10° to 71° corresponding to photon energies from 11.4 to 2.1 keV with Si-111 crystals. In conjunction with the vertically focusing mirror a point focus of 0.38 mm×0.18 mm [horizontal×vertical, full width at half maximum (FWHM) each] has been achieved at a focal length of 3.8 m (center of a four-circle diffractometer). Focused at the back of the experimental hutch (focal length=5.4 m) the focal size was 0.55 mm×0.30 mm. The measured horizontal width of the focus equals the calculated size of the demagnified source and is independent of the horizontal convergence used. The horizontal focus produced by the crystal is very clean: the full width at 1% of maximum is 1.5 mm and at 0.01% it is about 4 mm. The flux into the focus is 5×1011 photons/s at a photon energy of 7.4 keV and beam current of 200 mA. The average flux density in the center of the focus (FWHM area) is 5×1011 photons/s/mm2. The preliminary crystal presently used has been made from a thin Si plate of 0.4-mm thickness, 80-mm width, and 75-mm length (in the direction of the beam). Steel ribs of 0.6-mm thickness have been glued at 3-mm pitch to the back of the crystal in order to stiffen the plate and reduce anticlastic bending.1 Plates have been glued to this crystal plate to extend the width to size the bending stage. The crystal was cut in 111 orientation with a 4° angle between the lattice planes and the crystal surface. The asymmetric cut was used to increase the angle of incidence and thus decrease the effect of the remaining anticlastic bending. The bending stage has a bending couple at both ends of the crystal in order to produce the desired curvature of the crystal. The bending couples can be adjusted to produce a conical shape as needed for the particular choice of focal length.2 Small piezotranslators push on the bending couples to remove small amounts of twist in the crystal introduced by alignment errors of the bending couples. All of the adjustment drives are outside of the monochromator tank and transmitted to the bending stage via linear feedthroughs and cables. A full description of this device and the crystal with glued ribs will be submitted shortly to this journal. This work was supported by Grant RR-01633, National Institutes of Health, Division of Research Resources.

  14. Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dibya, Pooja Arora

    2010-05-16

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work. Chapter 2 illustrates the methodology of the interface of the EFP method with the configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS) method to study solvent effects in excited states. Chapter 3 discusses the study of the adiabatic electron affinity of the hydroxyl radical in aqueous solution and in micro-solvated clusters using a QM/EFP method. Chapter 4 describes the study of etching and diffusion of oxygen atom on a reconstructed Si(100)-2 x 1 surface using a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model (SIMOMM). Chapter 4 elucidates the application of the EFP method towards the understanding of the aqueous ionization potential of Na atom. Finally, a general conclusion of this dissertation work and prospective future direction are presented in Chapter 6.

  15. The use of MM3 monoclonal antibodies for the early immunodiagnosis of ovine fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; Ubeira, Florencio M

    2007-02-01

    This study reports a new capture ELISA (MM3-SERO) for the serodiagnosis of sheep fascioliasis, based on the use of the monoclonal antibody (mAb) MM3. Like our previously reported indirect ELISA method, based on the use of a FPLC-purified fraction (fraction IV) of the Fasciola hepatica excretion/secretion antigens (ESAs), this new test was able to detect animals infected with very small numbers of metacercariae (5-40) and showed no cross-reaction with sera from sheep infected with other parasites, i.e., Moniezia spp., Cysticercus tenuicollis, and Dicrocoelium dendriticum. In contrast with these 2 methods, some sera (mainly those obtained from animals infected with D. dendriticum) showed high reactivities in indirect ELISA with whole F. hepatica ESAs used as control. Interestingly, the MM3-SERO ELISA has a better signal-to-noise ratio than the fraction-IV ELISA, thus allowing detection of seroconversion in infected sheep on average 1 wk earlier (3.2 +/- 0.4 wk postinfection [PI] for MM3-SERO ELISA vs. 4.2 +/- 0.9 wk PI for fraction IV ELISA). Moreover, the antibody response detected with MM3-SERO ELISA was more uniform, with seroconversion always occurring at 4 wk PI in sheep with 1-2 flukes and at 3 wk PI in sheep with more than 2 flukes. The MM3-SERO ELISA was also used to evaluate the kinetics of antibody response against MM3-recognized antigens in sera from sheep experimentally infected with F. hepatica and then treated with triclabendazole. Our results showed that antibody levels dropped by about 25% during the 4-wk observation period following the flukicide treatment, whereas they remained invariably high in all sheep left untreated. We conclude that the MM3-SERO ELISA is a 100% sensitive and 100% specific test for the early serodiagnosis of sheep fascioliasis. Preliminary studies in our laboratory seem to indicate that this method may also be useful for the determination of anti-F. hepatica antibodies in serum and milk of other ruminants. A commercial version of MM3-SERO is currently available from BIO X Diagnostics (La Jemelle, Belgium). PMID:17436943

  16. Use of 5-mm-diameter implants: Periotest values related to a clinical and radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, C; Orozco, P

    1998-12-01

    A modified design of the original Brånemark implant consisting of a cp. Titanium 5.0-mm-diameter self-tapping implant threaded up to the marginal platform has been proposed for specific indications. From February 1992 to November 1995, a total of 185 machined screw implants (Nobel Biocare, Gothenburg, Sweden) were installed in 45 patients to withstand 58 prostheses. Of these, 91 were 3.75-mm diameter and 94 were 5.0-mm wide. Most of the implants were placed in type B and C bone quantity and type 2 and 3 bone quality. A retrospective evaluation with regard to indications, marginal bone remodelling, Periotest values (PTv) and survival rate is presented. PTv and radiographic measurements were made at abutment connection and repeated 3, 6 and 12 months later and thereafter every year. The follow-up ranged from 16 to 55 months (mean 32.9 months) post-loading. Three patients with 8 5.0-mm implants dropped-out of the study at different stages. Out of the wide implants, 1 was expelled during the healing period; 3 were found mobile at the abutment connection; 1 lost its osseointegration suddenly after 2 years of function; 4 belonging to 1 patient did not meet the success criteria due to continuous marginal bone loss. The cumulative success rate of 5.0-mm implants (CSR) after 1 year of function was 97.2% for upper jaws and 88.4% in mandibles, whereas the CSR in maxilla after 48 months was 97.2% and 83.4% in mandibles. The obtained PTv from 5.0-mm-wide fixtures in maxilla and mandibles were respectively 1.1 and 0.6 units lower than those obtained PTv for 3.75-mm-diameter implants in the same patients. The hypothesis that there are differences in the damping capacity of the bone surrounding a 5.0-mm-wide implant compared to the 3.75-mm-diameter implant is supported by the PTv results. PMID:11429941

  17. Simulation of Adsorption Processes at Metallic Interfaces: An Image Charge Augmented QM/MM Approach.

    PubMed

    Golze, Dorothea; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Passerone, Daniele; Hutter, Jürg

    2013-11-12

    A novel method for including polarization effects within hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations of adsorbate-metal systems is presented. The interactions between adsorbate (QM) and metallic substrate (MM) are described at the MM level of theory. Induction effects are additionally accounted for by applying the image charge formulation. The charge distribution induced within the metallic substrate is modeled by a set of Gaussian charges (image charges) centered at the metal atoms. The image charges and the electrostatic response of the QM potential are determined self-consistently by imposing the constant-potential condition within the metal. The implementation is embedded in a highly efficient Gaussian and plane wave framework and is naturally suited for periodic systems. Even though the electronic properties of the metallic substrate are not taken into account explicitly, the augmented QM/MM scheme can reproduce characteristic polarization effects of the adsorbate. The method is assessed through the investigation of structural and electronic properties of benzene, nitrobenzene, thymine, and guanine on Au(111). The study of small water clusters adsorbed on Pt(111) is also reported in order to demonstrate that the approach provides a sizable correction of the MM-based interactions between adsorbate and substrate. Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a water film in contact with a Pt(111) surface show that the method is suitable for simulations of liquid/metal interfaces at reduced computational cost. PMID:26583423

  18. 450 mm dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma sources: Conventional, graded, and segmented electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yang; Kushner, Mark J.

    2010-12-01

    Wafer diameters for microelectronics fabrication will soon transition from 300 to 450 mm at a time when excitation frequencies for capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) are increasing to 200 MHz or higher. Already for 300 mm tools, there is evidence that wave behavior (i.e., propagation, constructive, and destructive interference) affects the uniformity of processing. The increase in diameter to 450 mm is likely to exacerbate these effects, perhaps requiring nontraditional tool designs. This is particularly important in dual frequency (DF) CCP tools in which there are potential interactions between frequencies. In this paper, results from a two-dimensional computational investigation of Ar plasma properties in a 450 mm DF-CCP reactor, incorporating a full-wave solution of Maxwell's equations, are discussed. As in 300 mm DF-CCP reactors, the electron density collapses toward the center of the reactor with increasing high frequency (HF), however, with more pronounced finite wavelength effects. Graded conductivity electrodes with multilayer of dielectrics are computationally demonstrated as a possible means to suppress wave effects thereby increasing plasma uniformity. Segmentation of the HF electrode also improves the plasma uniformity by making the electrical distance between the feeds and the sheath edges as uniform as possible.

  19. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Laroche, G.; Vallade, J.; Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F.; Nijnatten, P. van

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  20. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of <10 mm length. The use of the Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of <0.2 nm/min and lowest resonance frequencies of 2.5 (xy) and 5.5 kHz (z). We present examples of the performance of the multitip STM designed using the Koala Drive.

  1. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroche, G.; Vallade, J.; Bazinette, R.; van Nijnatten, P.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm × 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45° beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  2. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Laroche, G; Vallade, J; Bazinette, R; van Nijnatten, P; Hernandez, E; Hernandez, G; Massines, F

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm × 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45° beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma. PMID:23126767

  3. Inactivation of adenovirus, reovirus and bacteriophages in fecal sludge by pH and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Magri, Maria Elisa; Fidjeland, Jørgen; Jönsson, Håkan; Albihn, Ann; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inactivation of adenovirus, reovirus and bacteriophages (MS2, ?X174, 28B) in a fecal sludge. We conducted two experiments. In the first, we tested different compositions of the fecal sludge by mixing different amounts of water, feces and urine, totaling nine combinations which were kept at temperatures between 10 and 28°C. In the second study, urea was added to the mixtures, which were kept at temperatures from 5 to 33°C. The inactivation was based on a combination of temperature, pH and uncharged ammonia concentration. The increase in pH and ammonia was provided mainly by urine content (Experiment 1) and by urine and added urea (Experiment 2). The inactivation of bacteriophages was slower than the AdV and ReV. At 23°C and 28°, reasonable treatment times were obtained when pH was higher than 8.9 and NH3 concentrations were higher than 35 and 55 mM respectively. With those conditions, the maximum time for a 3 log reduction in viruses, according to this study, would be 35 days (23°C) and 21 days (28°C). However, in most applications where helminth eggs are present, the treatment time and NH3 for sanitization will be the scaling criteria, as they are more persistent. Concerning the sanitization of effluents from latrines, vacuum toilets or dry toilets in developing countries with tropical and sub-tropical climates, the use of intrinsic ammonia combined with high pH can be effective in producing a safe and highly valuable liquid that can be used as a fertilizer. In the case of the fecal sludge with very intrinsic ammonia concentration (<20 mM), sanitization could still be achieved by the addition of urea. PMID:25817758

  4. Effects of external calcium concentration and pH on charge movement in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Shlevin, H H

    1979-01-01

    1. The effects of both external Ca2+ (1.8, 25, 50 and 100 mM) and external pH (pH 5.5, 7.15, and 9.0) on the voltage-dependence of charge movement in frog skeletal muscle were examined using the three intracellular micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. The two-state model of Schneider & Chandler (1973) was used to describe the voltage distribution of membrane charge. The parameters of this model are: Qmax, the maximum quantity of charge; V, the potential of equal distribution of charge; and k, a constant relating to the steepness of the charge vs. voltage relationship. 3. In 1.8 mM external Ca2+, alterations, in external pH shifted the transition potential, V, from a mean +/- S.E. of mean of -36.5 +/- 0.9 mV at pH 7.15 to -25.8 +/- 1.3 mV at pH 5.5 and to -42.5 +/- 1.8 mV at pH 9.0. These shifts are consistent with surface charge theory. No significant changes in Qmax or k were observed over the range of pH 5.5--9.0. 4. A reasonable fit of surface charge theory to the shifts in V over the range pH 5.5--9.0 could be obtained with surface charge densities and binding constants: sigma 1 = -1 e/165 A2, pK1 = 3.9 and sigma 2 = -1 e/400 A2, pK2 = 8. 5. However, at pH 7.15, both V and k changed with increasing external Ca2+ concentration. V shifted from -34.9 +/- 3.7 mV in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ to -13.8 +/- 5.1 mV, -19.3 +/- 3.6 mV and 3.3 +/- 9.3 mV in 25, 50 and 100 mM-Ca2+ respectively. k increased from 8.3 +/- 0.6 mV in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ to 15.3 +/- 1.4 mV, 14.6 +/- 1.6 mV and 20.0 +/- 2.9 mV in 25, 50 and 100 mM-Ca2+. Changes in k reflect decreases in the apparent charged particle valence from approximately 3 in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ to approximately 1.2 in 100 mM-Ca2+. As the external Ca2+ concentration was raised, Qmax was at least as large as that measured in 1.8 mM-Ca2+. The 43% decrease in the apparent valence of the charged groups cannot be explained by simple surface charge theory and may reflect a specific interaction between external Ca2+ and the charged groups. 6. Shifts in V with alterations in external pH and Ca2+ concentration are consistent with the effects of these agents on the contraction threshold of muscle fibres. This observation lends further support to the hypothesis that the charge movement is involved in gating muscle contraction and that the charged particles respond to changes in the electric field across the muscle cell membrane. 7. No difference was observed in the charge movement parameters of fibres from both room-temperature and cold-adapted frog tested at 2--5 degrees C in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ at pH 7.15. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:38332

  5. The Influence of pH on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation between calcium carbonate and water is temperature-dependent and can therefore be used as a paleothermometer. Although oxygen isotope fractionation is expected from principles of equilibrium isotopic partitioning, the temperature-dependence remains uncertain because other factors, such as slow exchange between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and water, can obscure the temperature signal. Oxygen isotopic equilibrium between aqueous solution and calcium carbonate includes two distinct equilibria: equilibrium of the DIC species in solution (i.e., CO2(aq), H2CO3, HCO3-, and CO32-) with water, and equilibrium between the dissolved inorganic carbon with the precipitated carbonate. To isolate kinetic isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, isotopic equilibrium among DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration between DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic oxygen isotope effects during precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is constantly bubbled through a beaker containing ~1300 mL of solution (30 mM CaCl2 + 5 mM NH4Cl + 0.1 mM SrCl2). As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. We will present results from this set of experiments and discuss kinetic oxygen isotope effects in the context of a recently-developed ion-by-ion growth model of calcite.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Mono-13C acetaldehydes mm/submm wave spectra (Margules+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margules, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of a series of studies conducted in PhLAM Lille (France) that are devoted to the investigations of the spectra of different isotopic species of astrophysical molecules. We present a new study of the 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO spectra with measurements and analysis extended up to 945GHz. (6 data files).

  7. New Routes to the PhD: Cause for Concern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Bill; Murray, Rowena

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments suggest that the PhD is at a turning point. Professional groups have criticised the so-called traditional PhD. New routes to the PhD are proposed by several bodies and endorsed by one funding council. In light of these developments, it is appropriate to ask what the implications are for the PhD and for the academy. A focus…

  8. Development of a porous polymer pH optrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, J N; Shahriari, M R; Sigel, G H

    1992-12-15

    A novel fiber-optic pH sensor has been developed with long-term stability and high sensitivity. The sensor is based on a porous cellulose triacetate fiber immobilized with Congo Red (pH indicator). This intrinsic fiberoptic pH sensor has shown excellent sensitivity, reversibility, and stability. It has also been demonstrated that the pH optrode is immune to metal-ion interferences. PMID:19798326

  9. Organelle pH in the Arabidopsis endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinbo; Zeng, Yonglun; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Sun, Lei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Pimpl, Peter; Jiang, Liwen

    2013-09-01

    The pH of intracellular compartments is essential for the viability of cells. Despite its relevance, little is known about the pH of these compartments. To measure pH in vivo, we have first generated two pH sensors by combining the improved-solubility feature of solubility-modified green fluorescent protein (GFP) (smGFP) with the pH-sensing capability of the pHluorins and codon optimized for expression in Arabidopsis. PEpHluorin (plant-solubility-modified ecliptic pHluorin) gradually loses fluorescence as pH is lowered with fluorescence vanishing at pH 6.2 and PRpHluorin (plant-solubility-modified ratiomatric pHluorin), a dual-excitation sensor, allowing for precise measurements. Compartment-specific sensors were generated by further fusing specific sorting signals to PEpHluorin and PRpHluorin. Our results show that the pH of cytosol and nucleus is similar (pH 7.3 and 7.2), while peroxisomes, mitochondrial matrix, and plastidial stroma have alkaline pH. Compartments of the secretory pathway reveal a gradual acidification, spanning from pH 7.1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pH 5.2 in the vacuole. Surprisingly, pH in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and multivesicular body (MVB) is, with pH 6.3 and 6.2, quite similar. The inhibition of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) with concanamycin A (ConcA) caused drastic increase in pH in TGN and vacuole. Overall, the PEpHluorin and PRpHluorin are excellent pH sensors for visualization and quantification of pH in vivo, respectively. PMID:23702593

  10. Three-degree-of-freedom ultrasonic motor using a 5-mm-diameter piezoelectric ceramic tube.

    PubMed

    Mingsen Guo; Junhui Hu; Hua Zhu; Chunsheng Zhao; Shuxiang Dong

    2013-07-01

    A small three-degree-of-freedom ultrasonic motor has been developed using a simple piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-tube stator (OD 5 mm, ID 3 mm, length 15 mm). The stator drives a ball-rotor into rotational motion around one of three orthogonal (x-, y-, and z-) axes by combing the first longitudinal and second bending vibration modes. A motor prototype was fabricated and characterized; its performance was superior to those of previous motors made with a PZT ceramic/metal composite stator of comparable size. The method for further improving the performance was discussed. The motor can be further miniaturized and it has potential to be applied to medical microrobots, endoscopes or micro laparoscopic devices, and cell manipulation devices. PMID:25004511

  11. Investigation of optical transmittance and light response uniformity of 600-mm-long BGO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhiming; Ni, Haihong; Yuan, Lanying; Chen, Junfeng; Wang, Shaohua

    2014-07-01

    Optical transmittance and light response uniformity were investigated for 25 mm×25 mm×600 mm BGO crystals, the longest BGO single crystals reported so far. The long BGO crystals exhibit good optical transmittance within the wavelength range concerned and an overall energy resolution of 19.68% for 0.662 MeV ?-rays. The light response uniformity of one long BGO, SIC-BGO-125, was measured in the single-end or dual-end readout mode combined with different reflecting materials. It was suggested that the light response uniformity of the long rectangular BGO is primarily affected by internal absorption, the reflectivity of reflecting materials and the readout mode. The best uniformity of -1.4±0.8% can be achieved when the crystal is measured only from the tail end and wrapped with ESR. Reflecting materials of high reflectivity can significantly improve the light response uniformity, but further improvement is limited by the internal absorption of the crystal.

  12. Graft-free Ahmed tube insertion: a modified method at 5 mm from limbus

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos; Lillo-Sopena, Juan; Monés-Llivina, Anna; Sanz-Moreno, Silvia; Arruga-Ginebreda, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the medium-term outcome of Ahmed implants inserted through a needle tract at 5 mm from limbus that eliminates the need for a donor scleral graft. Methods A retrospective case series of 19 patients undergoing Ahmed implant surgery for refractory glaucoma with a mean follow-up of 12 months. Primary outcome measures included control of intraocular pressure after surgery. Secondary outcome measure included the frequency of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results Intraocular pressure was maintained between 6 and 21 mmHg throughout the study. There was no postoperative hypotony. There were no complications related to this modified technique. Conclusion Needle tract at 5 mm from limbus maintains implant’s ability to control intraocular pressure and eliminates the need for a donor scleral graft or heterologous material. PMID:20463805

  13. Ultrastructural response of rat lung to 90 days' exposure to oxygen at 450 mm Hg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    Young Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 100% oxygen at 450 mm Hg in constant environment capsules for 90 days. Lung tissue examined by electron microscopy revealed a number of changes, many similar to those observed after exposure to oxygen at 760 mm Hg for shorter periods of time. Alterations in vesicle size and number and in mitochondrial matrix and cristae appear in both the endothelial and epithelial cells. Blebbing and rarefication of cytoplasm occur in both cell layers of the alveolo-capillary wall. Also seen are fluid in the basement membrane, platelets in the capillaries, and alveolar fluid and debris. All of these alterations occur at 1 atm exposure. However, after exposure to 450 mm Hg the changes are not as widespread nor as destructive as they are at the higher pressure.

  14. Recording and wear characteristics of 4 and 8 mm helical scan tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, Klaus J.; Speliotis, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    Performance data of media on helical scan tape systems (4 and 8 mm) is presented and various types of media are compared. All measurements were performed on a standard MediaLogic model ML4500 Tape Evaluator System with a Flash Converter option for time based measurements. The 8 mm tapes are tested on an Exabyte 8200 drive and 4 mm tapes on an Archive Python drive; in both cases, the head transformer is directly connected to a Media Logic Read/Write circuit and test electronics. The drive functions only as a tape transport and its data recover circuits are not used. Signal to Noise, PW 50, Peak Shift and Wear Test data is used to compare the performance of MP (metal particle), BaFe, and metal evaporate (ME). ME tape is the clear winner in magnetic performance but its susceptibility to wear and corrosion, make it less than ideal for data storage.

  15. A study on friction stir welding of 12mm thick aluminum alloy plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepati Anil; Biswas, Pankaj; Tikader, Sujoy; Mahapatra, M. M.; Mandal, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the investigations regarding friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminum alloy plates have been limited to about 5 to 6 mm thick plates. In prior work conducted the various aspects concerning the process parameters and the FSW tool geometry were studied utilizing friction stir welding of 12 mm thick commercial grade aluminum alloy. Two different simple-to-manufacture tool geometries were used. The effect of varying welding parameters and dwell time of FSW tool on mechanical properties and weld quality was examined. It was observed that in order to achieve a defect free welding on such thick aluminum alloy plates, tool having trapezoidal pin geometry was suitable. Adequate tensile strength and ductility can be achieved utilizing a combination of high tool rotational speed of about 2000 r/min and low speed of welding around 28 mm/min. At very low and high dwell time the ductility of welded joints are reduced significantly.

  16. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at3.3 mm Wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength in 1982, 1983, and 1984 as part of a larger project to determine the CBR temperature at five wavelengths from 12 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot et al. 1985). The 3.3-mm measurements yield a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 20.12 K. This paper describes the instrument, the measurement techniques, and the data-analysis procedures used. Our result is in good agreement with recent measurements at comparable wavelengths by Meyer and Jura (1985) and by Peterson, Richards, and Timusk (1985), but it disagrees with the temperatures reported by Woody and Richards (1981).

  17. Efficient approach to obtain free energy gradient using QM/MM MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Toshio; Ando, Kanta; Koseki, Shiro

    2015-12-01

    The efficient computational approach denoted as charge and atom dipole response kernel (CDRK) model to consider polarization effects of the quantum mechanical (QM) region is described using the charge response and the atom dipole response kernels for free energy gradient (FEG) calculations in the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method. CDRK model can reasonably reproduce energies and also energy gradients of QM and MM atoms obtained by expensive QM/MM calculations in a drastically reduced computational time. This model is applied on the acylation reaction in hydrated trypsin-BPTI complex to optimize the reaction path on the free energy surface by means of FEG and the nudged elastic band (NEB) method.

  18. New QM/MM implementation of the DFTB3 method in the gromacs package.

    PubMed

    Kuba?, Tomáš; Welke, Kai; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2015-10-01

    The approximate density-functional tight-binding theory method DFTB3 has been implemented in the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) framework of the Gromacs molecular simulation package. We show that the efficient smooth particle-mesh Ewald implementation of Gromacs extends to the calculation of QM/MM electrostatic interactions. Further, we make use of the various free-energy functionalities provided by Gromacs and the PLUMED plugin. We exploit the versatility and performance of the current framework in three typical applications of QM/MM methods to solve biophysical problems: (i) ultrafast proton transfer in malonaldehyde, (ii) conformation of the alanine dipeptide, and (iii) electron-induced repair of a DNA lesion. Also discussed is the further development of the framework, regarding mostly the options for parallelization. PMID:26238364

  19. LICHEM: A QM/MM program for simulations with multipolar and polarizable force fields.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Eric G; Walker, Alice R; Lagardère, Louis; Lipparini, Filippo; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Andrés Cisneros, G

    2016-04-30

    We introduce an initial implementation of the LICHEM software package. LICHEM can interface with Gaussian, PSI4, NWChem, TINKER, and TINKER-HP to enable QM/MM calculations using multipolar/polarizable force fields. LICHEM extracts forces and energies from unmodified QM and MM software packages to perform geometry optimizations, single-point energy calculations, or Monte Carlo simulations. When the QM and MM regions are connected by covalent bonds, the pseudo-bond approach is employed to smoothly transition between the QM region and the polarizable force field. A series of water clusters and small peptides have been employed to test our initial implementation. The results obtained from these test systems show the capabilities of the new software and highlight the importance of including explicit polarization. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26781073

  20. OpenMM 4: A Reusable, Extensible, Hardware Independent Library for High Performance Molecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Peter; Friedrichs, Mark S.; Chodera, John D.; Radmer, Randall J.; Bruns, Christopher M.; Ku, Joy P.; Beauchamp, Kyle A.; Lane, Thomas J.; Wang, Lee-Ping; Shukla, Diwakar; Tye, Tony; Houston, Mike; Stich, Timo; Klein, Christoph; Shirts, Michael R.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2012-01-01

    OpenMM is a software toolkit for performing molecular simulations on a range of high performance computing architectures. It is based on a layered architecture: the lower layers function as a reusable library that can be invoked by any application, while the upper layers form a complete environment for running molecular simulations. The library API hides all hardware-specific dependencies and optimizations from the users and developers of simulation programs: they can be run without modification on any hardware on which the API has been implemented. The current implementations of OpenMM include support for graphics processing units using the OpenCL and CUDA frameworks. In addition, OpenMM was designed to be extensible, so new hardware architectures can be accommodated and new functionality (e.g., energy terms and integrators) can be easily added. PMID:23316124

  1. Fundamental impact-welding parameters—an experimental investigation using a 76-mm powder cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botros, K. K.; Groves, T. K.

    1980-07-01

    A specially designed 76-mm cannon was used to drive small metal plates (copper, 3.175 mm thick) against metal target plates (steel, 6.250 mm thick) in order to study the fundamental parameters involved in the high-velocity impact-welding process. This method of study allowed experimental examination of the influence of each variable separately, in the classical mode. The results of these experiments were analyzed to define the required impact conditions for welding. A line of optimum weldability was identified and shown to be characterized by invariance in the metallic jet velocity. The analysis was also used to identity conditions applying to the transition zone between laminar and wavy interfaced welds.

  2. Large-Area Reflective Infrared Filters for Millimeter/Sub-mm Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Grayson, J. A.; Thompson, K. L.; Kuo, C.-L.; Brooks, G.; Pothoven, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ground-based millimeter and sub-millimeter telescopes are attempting to image the sky with ever-larger cryogenically-cooled bolometer arrays, but face challenges in mitigating the infrared loading accompanying large apertures. Absorptive infrared filters supported by mechanical coolers scale insufficiently with aperture size. Reflective metal-mesh filters placed behind the telescope window provide a scalable solution in principle, but have been limited by photolithography constraints to diameters under 300 mm. We present laser etching as an alternate technique to photolithography for fabrication of large-area reflective filters, and show results from lab tests of 500-mm-diameter filters. Filters with up to 700-mm diameter can be fabricated using laser etching with existing capability.

  3. A geochemical and petrographic study of 1-2-mm fines from Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, D. P.; Haskin, L. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Brannon, J. C.; Jacobs, J. W.; Brown, R. W.; Reid, A. M.; Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of fines less than 1-mm and 155 1-2 mm particles from several Apollo 17 sites were analyzed for Na, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Hf, Ta, Th, and REE. Products of comminution and construction are present in the 1-2 mm particles, and the compositions of the rock fragments clearly indicate the general chemical characteristics of their parent rock types. The likely sources of materials for the glassy particles are considered. Glasses are enriched over their parent soils in Fe, Sc, Mn, and Cr, and are relatively enriched in light REE, so that some chemical fractionation accompanies glass-forming processes. Elements were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  4. Third-body abrasive wear challenge of 32 mm conventional and 44 mm highly crosslinked polyethylene liners in a hip simulator model.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, T; Clarke, I C; Williams, P A; Gustafson, A; Yamamoto, K

    2009-07-01

    Hip simulator studies have shown that wear in the polyethylene liners used for total hip replacements increased with the larger-diameter femoral balls and could also be exacerbated by third-body abrasion. However, they also indicated that the more highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXPE) bearings were more wear resistant than conventional polyethylene (CXPE) bearings. Unfortunately the HXPE bearings appeared to be particularly sensitive to adverse wear conditions. One simulator study in particular indicated that poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) debris increased wear sixfold by means of two-body abrasive interactions rather than the supposed third-body abrasion or roughening effects of the Co-Cr surfaces. There has been no confirmation of such novel theories. Therefore the goal of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of large-diameter HXPE bearings to the third-body PMMA wear challenge in a hip simulator model. An orbital hip simulator was used in standard test mode with a physiological load profile. The 32 mm control liners were machined from moulded GUR1050 and gamma irradiated to 35 kGy under nitrogen (CXPE). The 44 mm liners were also from moulded blanks, gamma irradiated to 75 kGy, machined to shape, given a proprietary heat treatment, and sterilized by gas plasma (HXPE). As in the published simulator model, the study was conducted in three phases. In phase 1, all cups were run in standard ('clean') lubricant for 1.5 x 10(6) cycles duration. In phase 2, three CXPE cups and six HXPE cups were run for 2 x 10(6) cycles with a slurry of PMMA particles added to the lubricant. In phase 3, the implants were again run in 'clean' lubricant for 2 x 10(6) cycles duration. In addition, three HXPE cups were run as wear controls for 5.5 x 10(6) cycles duration in clean lubricant. In phase-1, the HXPE liners demonstrated twelvefold reduced wear compared with the CXPE controls. The 32 mm and 44 mm Co-Cr balls were judged of comparable roughnesses. However, the surface finish of HXPE liners was superior to that of CXPE liners. In phase-2 abrasion, wear rates increased sixfold and eighty-fold for CXPE and HXPE bearings respectively. These data confirmed that HXPE bearings were particularly sensitive to 'severe' test modes. The Co-Cr balls revealed numerous surface patches representing transferred PMMA with average transient roughness increased to 25 nm and 212 nm for the 32 mm and 44 mm balls respectively. These PMMA patches produced an aggressive two-body abrasion wear of the polyethylene. After cleaning, the ball roughness returned to near normal. Therefore the Co-Cr roughness was not an issue in this severe test mode. In phase 3, the wear decreased to near the index values of phase 1, while liner roughness dropped by more than 90 per cent. The control CXPE liners now demonstrated twice the wear of the HXPE, as would be predicted comparing the diameter and cross-linking algorithms. No previous study has correlated polyethylene roughness profiles to wear performance. In phase 2, PMMA abrasion created significant damage to the polyethylene surfaces. The average roughness Sa of CXPE liners increased to 3.6 microm, a twenty-four-fold increase with some scratches up to 40 microm deep. The HXPE roughness also increased but only to 1.5 microm, a ninefold increase. The scratch indices Sz and Sp for HXPE surfaces were also 50 per cent less severe than on CXPE surfaces. However, within 2 x 10(6) cycles duration of phase 3, all liners had recovered to virtually their original surface finish in phase 1. In all test phases, the surface finish of the HXPE liners remained superior to control liners. These experimental data confirmed many of the results from the previous simulator study with the PMMA abrasion models. Thus the 44 mm liners appeared an excellent clinical alternative to the smaller ball designs used in total hip replacements. PMID:19623913

  5. Anisodamine accelerates spontaneous passage of single symptomatic bile duct stones ? 10 mm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Ding, Xue-Mei; Ke, Shan; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Qian, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Rui-Liang; Ning, Chun-Min; Xin, Zong-Hai; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the rate of spontaneous passage of single and symptomatic common bile duct (CBD) stones ? 10 mm in diameter in 4 wk with or without a 2-wk course of anisodamine. METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. A total of 197 patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Ninety-seven patients were assigned randomly to the control group and the other 100 to the anisodamine group. The anisodamine group received intravenous infusions of anisodamine (10 mg every 8 h) for 2 wk. The control group received the same volume of 0.9% isotonic saline for 2 wk. Patients underwent imaging studies and liver-function tests every week for 4 wk. The rate of spontaneous passage of CBD stones was analyzed. RESULTS: The rate of spontaneous passage of CBD stones was significantly higher in the anisodamine group than that in the control group (47.0% vs 22.7%). Most (87.2%, 41/47) stone passages in the anisodamine group occurred in the first 2 wk, and passages in the control group occurred at a comparable rate each week. Factors significantly increasing the possibility of spontaneous passage by univariate logistic regression analyses were stone diameter (< 5 mm vs ? 5 mm and ? 10 mm) and anisodamine therapy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that these two factors were significantly associated with spontaneous passage. CONCLUSION: Two weeks of anisodamine administration can safely accelerate spontaneous passage of single and symptomatic CBD stones ? 10 mm in diameter, especially for stones < 5 mm. PMID:24151390

  6. Prediction of heavy rainfall events over Rangamati, Bangladesh using high-resolution MM5 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahasan, M. N.; Mannan Chowdhury, M. A.; Quadir, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, prediction of the heavy rainfall events over Rangamati, Bangladesh has been carried out using the Fifth-Generation PSU/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) conducting two historical rainfall events. The model was run on two-way triple-nested domains at 45, 15, 5 km horizontal resolutions using Anthes-Kuo cumulus parameterization schemes (CPS) with MRF planetary boundary layer (PBL). Bangladesh is the main focus area in this study. Thus, Bangladesh is taken as inner most domain (D3) with 5 km horizontal resolution. The model-predicted rainfall was compared with TRMM 3B42V7 and BMD observed rainfall. Both subjective and objective evaluation methods have been followed. The MM5 model produces realistic prediction of heavy rainfall events in terms of intensity and structure. The results show that the model performed all the Day 1 (24 h), Day 2 (48 h) and Day 3 (72 h) predictions reasonably well. The predictions are more accurate for Day 2 (48 h) and worse for Day 4 (96 h) in both cases. The prediction deteriorates as the prediction time increases. Thus, the prediction may be updated in every 24 h which would provide more realistic prediction. The RMSE shows that the value for 24 h prediction lies within 10-20 mm range. The prediction error is minimal for 48 h prediction, the error ranging from 8 to 12 mm. The error increases thereafter for 72 and 96 h of predictions. The errors range from around 10-20 and 15-25 mm, respectively. The topography/terrain over the southeast hilly region of Bangladesh has not been resolved by USGS terrain data which was used in the MM5 model. Thus, accurate and high-resolution terrain data of this region is expected to improve the performance of the model over the southeast hilly regions of Bangladesh.

  7. Molecular properties from combined QM/MM methods. 2. Chemical shifts in large molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Q.; Karplus, M.

    2000-04-20

    A method for calculating the chemical shielding tensor of any atom with the QM/MM approach has been developed. The method is described and applied to a number of model systems including the water dimer, NMA-water complexes, cytosine monophosphate, paired and stacked nucleic acid bases, imidazole-metal complexes, and 1{prime}-deoxyribose-metal ion complexes. The results demonstrate that with an appropriate QM/MM partition, good descriptions of the environmental effects on chemical shift tensors are obtained. The typical error compared to full QM calculations is 1--2 ppm for heavy atoms. At distances below 2.5 {angstrom}, such as occur in hydrogen bonding, larger errors arise due to the lack of Pauli repulsion and magnetic susceptibility of the nearby groups in the current QM/MM model; including the hydrogen bonded molecules as part of the QM region is a way of solving this problem. The method is also applied to a simple model of myoglobin-CO and it is shown that the significant influence from the distal histidine on the shielding of Fe and CO is well reproduced by a QM/MM calculation. Application to the chemical shift of the 1-N nitrogen in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), relative to N-methyl nicotinamide, gives good results, indicating that accurate chemical shifts can be obtained for specific atoms in large molecules that cannot be treated by QM at the MP2 level. The effect of solvation on the chemical shift of water was also studied with the QM/MM approach in a molecular dynamics framework. The test calculations described in this paper demonstrate that the QM/MM method for estimating shielding tensors and chemical shifts is a useful approach for large systems.

  8. A new 3 mm band receiver for the Onsala 20 m antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, V.; Lapkin, I.; Fredrixon, M.; Sundin, E.; Helldner, L.; Pettersson, L.; Ferm, S.-E.; Pantaleev, M.; Billade, B.; Bergman, P.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Lerner, M. S.; Strandberg, M.; Whale, M.; Pavolotsky, A.; Flygare, J.; Olofsson, H.; Conway, J.

    2015-08-01

    A new receiver for the Onsala 20 m antenna with the possibility of being equipped with 3 mm and 4 mm bands has been built and the 3 mm channel has been commissioned during the Spring 2014. For single-dish operation, the receiver uses an innovative on-source/off-source optical switch. In combination with additional optical components and within the same optical layout, the switch provides two calibration loads (for the 3 mm and 4 mm channels), sideband rejection measurement, and tuning possibilities. The optical layout of the receiver employs all cold (4 K) offset elliptical mirrors for both channels, whereas the on-off switch employs flat mirrors only. The 3 mm channel employs a sideband separation (2SB) dual polarization receiver with orthomode transducer (OMT), 4-8 GHz intermediate frequency (IF), x 2pol x upper and lower sidebands (USB + LSB). The cryostat has four optical windows made of high density polyethylene (HDPE) with anti-reflection corrugations, two for the signal and two for each frequency band cold load. The cryostat uses a two-stage cryocooler produced by Sumitomo HI RDK 408D2 with anti-vibration suspension of the cold-head to minimize impact of the vibrations on the receiver stability. The local oscillator (LO) system is based on a Gunn oscillator with aphase lock loop (PLL) and four mechanical tuners for broadband operation, providing independently tunable LO power for each polarization. This paper provides a technical description of the receiver and its technology and could be useful for instrumentation engineers and observers using the Onsala 20 m telescope.

  9. Binding free energy calculation with QM/MM hybrid methods for Abl-Kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kshatresh Dutta; Ojha, Rajendra Prasad

    2011-01-01

    We report a Quantum mechanics/Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann/ Surface Area (QM/MM-PB/SA) method to calculate the binding free energy of c-Abl human tyrosine kinase by combining the QM and MM principles where the ligand is treated quantum mechanically and the rest of the receptor by classical molecular mechanics. To study the role of entropy and the flexibility of the protein ligand complex in a solvated environment, molecular dynamics calculations are performed using a hybrid QM/MM approach. This work shows that the results of the QM/MM approach are strongly correlated with the binding affinity. The QM/MM interaction energy in our reported study confirms the importance of electronic and polarization contributions, which are often neglected in classical MM-PB/SA calculations. Moreover, a comparison of semi-empirical methods like DFTB-SCC, PM3, MNDO, MNDO-PDDG, and PDDG-PM3 is also performed. The results of the study show that the implementation of a DFTB-SCC semi-empirical Hamiltonian that is derived from DFT gives better results than other methods. We have performed such studies using the AMBER molecular dynamic package for the first time. The calculated binding free energy is also in agreement with the experimentally determined binding affinity for c-Abl tyrosine kinase complex with Imatinib.Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10867-010-9199-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:22210962

  10. The Galactic Centre Mini-Spiral in the MM-Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunneriath, D.; Eckart, A.; Vogel, S. N.; Teuben, P.; Muzic, I.; Schoedel, R.; Garcia-Marin, M.; Moultaka, J.; Staguhn, J.; Straubmeier, C.; Zensus, J. A.; Valencia-S., M.; Karas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The mini-spiral is a feature of the interstellar medium in the central approx.2 pc of the Galactic center. It is composed of several streamers of dust and ionised and atomic gas with temperatures between a few 100 K to 10(exp 4) K. There is evidence that these streamers are related to the so-called circumnuclear disk of molecular gas and are ionized by photons from massive, hot stars in the central parsec. Aims: We attempt to constrain the emission mechanisms and physical properties of the ionized gas and dust of the mini-spiral region with the help of our multiwavelength data sets. Methods: Our observations were carried out at 1.3 mm and 3 mm with the mm interferometric array CARMA in California in March and April 2009, with the MIR instrument VISIR at ESO's VLT in June 2006, and the NIR Bry with VLT NACO in August 2009. Results: We present high resolution maps of the mini-spiral, and obtain a spectral index of 0.5 +/- 0.25 for Sgr A *, indicating an inverted synchrotron spectrum. We find electron densities within the range 0.8-1.5 x 10(exp 4)/cu cm for the mini-spiral from the radio continuum maps, along with a dust mass contribution of approx. 0.25 Mo from the MIR dust continuum. and extinctions ranging from 1.8-3 at 2.16 microns in the Bry line. Conclusions: We observe a mixture of negative and positive spectral indices in our 1.3 mm and 3 mm observations of the extended emission of the mini-spiral, which we interpret as evidence that there are a range of contributions to the thermal free-free emission by the ionized gas emission and by dust at 1.3 mm.

  11. Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

  12. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  13. A Multiattributes Approach for Ranking PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbancic, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    In its plan to combat the PhD shortage crisis, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB; 2003) has called for the development of PhD program rankings to serve as incentives for academic institutions to invest more in PhD programs, thereby counterbalancing the disproportionate influence of master of business…

  14. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  15. A Multiattributes Approach for Ranking PhD Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbancic, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    In its plan to combat the PhD shortage crisis, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB; 2003) has called for the development of PhD program rankings to serve as incentives for academic institutions to invest more in PhD programs, thereby counterbalancing the disproportionate influence of master of business…

  16. Steel slag raises pH of greenhouse substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is the primary liming agent used for increasing pH in peatmoss-based substrates. Steel slag (SS) is a byproduct of the steel manufacturing industry that has been used to elevate field soil pH. The objective of this research was to determine the pH response of a peatmoss-based g...

  17. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  18. pH dynamics in sewers and its modeling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Keshab; Ganigue, Ramon; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-10-15

    pH variation in sewers has a significant effect on hydrogen sulfide production and emissions, and hence its accurate prediction is critical for the optimization of mitigation strategies. In this study, the nature and dynamics of pH variation in a sewer system is examined. Three sewer systems collecting domestic wastewater were monitored, with pH in all cases showing large diurnal variations. pH in fresh sewage in all three cases had a very similar trend with maximum pH in the range of 8.5-8.7. pH variation in fresh sewage followed the same pattern as the sewage flow rate, suggesting that sewage pH is influenced by household water use. Nitrogen content of the wastewater was found to be the most influential factor causing pH variation in fresh sewage, with the total ammonium concentration variation well correlated with the pH variation. A methodology for predicting pH variation in sewers is developed and calibration protocols proposed. The methodology, which is based on the concept of charge balance, was validated using titration curves and field pH data. Measurement of the total ammonium concentration in fresh sewage was found necessary and adequate for the calibration of the charge balance-based pH model. PMID:23962970

  19. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  20. High temperature pH measurements using novel pH electrodes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Song, H.; Hettiarachchi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Researchers used three pH sensors: (1) a yttria-stabilized zirconia, (2) tungsten/tungsten oxide, and (3) platinum hydrogen electrodes to measure the pH in concentrated solutions heated to temperatures from 125-300 C in autoclaves. The studies indicated measurements of pH for solutions containing sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, boric acid, ferrous sulfate, nickel sulfate, and chromous sulfate in various compositions. The solution composition and pH was then calculated by MULTEQ at the experimental conditions. These calculations compared well with the experimental measurements for binary and quaternary systems at temperatures to 300 C and concentrations to 1 molal. The agreement was also excellent for the metal sulfate systems but was poor for chromous sulfate. The agreement for boric acid solutions was adequate for low concentrations of boric acid but was poor for concentrated borate solutions where polyborate ions likely exist. It is not known whether the lack of agreement under these conditions is due to deficiencies in MULTEQ or the experimental measurements.