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Sample records for mo-si-b intermetallic coatings

  1. FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  2. FeAI and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright; W. David Swank

    2004-12-01

    FeAl and Mo–Si–B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe–24Al (wt%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 to 700 m/s. Mo–13.4Si–2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo–Si–B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity. For Mo–Si–B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and a-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  3. Mo-Si-B-Based Coatings for Ceramic Base Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John Harry (Inventor); Sakidja, Ridwan (Inventor); Ritt, Patrick (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Alumina-containing coatings based on molybdenum (Mo), silicon (Si), and boron (B) ("MoSiB coatings") that form protective, oxidation-resistant scales on ceramic substrate at high temperatures are provided. The protective scales comprise an aluminoborosilicate glass, and may additionally contain molybdenum. Two-stage deposition methods for forming the coatings are also provided.

  4. Extended Functionality of Environmentally-Resistant Mo-Si-B-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Sakidja, R.

    2013-02-01

    Multiphase Mo-Si-B alloys with compositions which yield the ternary intermetallic Mo5SiB2 (T2) phase as a key microstructure constituent together with the Mo and Mo3Si phases, offer an attractive balance of high melting temperature, oxidation resistance, and mechanical properties. The investigation of reaction kinetics involving the T2 phase enables the analysis of oxidation in terms of diffusion pathways and the design of effective coatings. From this basis, kinetic biasing is used together with pack cementation to develop Mo-Si-B-based multilayered coatings with an aluminoborosilica surface and in situ diffusion barriers with self-healing characteristics for enhanced oxidation resistance. While a combustion environment contains water vapor that can accelerate an attack of silica-based coatings, the Mo-Si-B-based coatings provide oxidation resistance in water vapor up to at least 1,500°C. An exposure to hot ionized gas species generated in an arc jet confirms the robust coating performance in extreme environments. To extend the application beyond Mo-based systems, a two-stage process has been implemented to provide effective oxidation resistance for refractory metal cermets, SiC and ZrB2 ultra-high-temperature composites.

  5. Novel Processing of mo-si-b Intermetallics for improved efficiency of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Kramer; O. Degirmen; A.J. Thom; M. Akinc

    2004-09-30

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing applications such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. Alloys based on the Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} phase (Tl phase) possess excellent oxidation resistance to at least 1600 C in synthetic air atmospheres. However, the ability of Tl-based alloys to resist aggressive combustion environments has not yet been determined. The present work seeks to investigate the resistance of these Mo-Si-B alloys to simulated combustion atmospheres. Material was pre-alloyed by combustion synthesis, and samples for testing were prepared by classic powder metallurgical processing techniques. Precursor material synthesized by self-heating-synthesis was sintered to densities exceeding 98% in an argon atmosphere at 1800 C. The approximate phase assemblage of the material was 57% Tl, 29% MoB, 14% MoSi{sub 2} (wt%). The alloy was oxidized from 1000-1100 C in flowing air containing water vapor at 18 Torr. At 1000 C the material achieved a steady state mass loss, and at 1100 C the material undergoes a steady state mass gain. The oxidation rate of these alloys in this temperature regime was accelerated by the presence of water vapor compared to oxidation in dry air. The results of microstructural analysis of the tested alloys will be discussed. Techniques and preliminary results for fabricating near-net-shaped parts will also be presented.

  6. Polymer-Derived Ceramics as Innovative Oxidation Barrier Coatings for Mo-Si-B Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasemann, Georg; Baumann, Torben; Dieck, Sebastian; Rannabauer, Stefan; Krüger, Manja

    2015-04-01

    A preceramic polymer precursor, perhydropolysilazane, is used to investigate its function as a new type of oxidation barrier coating on Mo-Si-B alloys. After dip-coating and pyrolysis at 1073 K (800 °C), dense and well-adhering SiON ceramic coatings could be achieved, which were investigated by SEM and cyclic oxidation tests at 1073 K and 1373 K (800 °C and 1100 °C). The coating is promising in reducing the mass loss during the initial stage of oxidation exposure at 1373 K (1100 °C) significantly.

  7. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF MO-SI-B-BASED INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS FOR VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay K. Vasudevan

    2005-02-08

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. During this year, the microstructure, bend strength and compressive creep behavior of a Mo-3Si-1B (in wt.%) alloy were studied. The microstructure of this alloy was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The elastic limit strength of the alloy remained quite high until 1200 C with a value of 800MPa, but dropped rapidly thereafter to a value of 220 MPa at 1400 C. Results of compressive creep tests at 1200 C showed that the creep rates were quite high and varied nearly linearly with stress between 250 and 500 MPa, which suggests that diffusional mechanisms dominate the creep process. Microstructural observations of post-crept samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. These results and presented and discussed.

  8. Synthesis and analysis of Mo-Si-B based coatings for high temperature oxidation protection of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Patrick J.

    The use of Ni-based superalloys in turbine engines has all but been exhausted, with operating temperatures nearing the melting point of these materials. The use of ceramics in turbine engines, particularly ceramic matrix composites such as SiC/C and SiC/SiC, is of interest due to their low density and attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The same materials are also in consideration for leading edges on hypersonic vehicles. However, SiC-based composites degrade in high temperature environments with low partial pressures of oxygen due to active oxidation, as well as high temperature environments containing water or sand. The need for a protective external coating for SiC-based composites in service is obvious. To date, no coating investigated for SiC/C or SiC/SiC has been proven to be resistant to oxidation and corrosion at intermediate and high temperatures, as well as in environments deficient in oxygen. The Mo-Si-B coating shows great promise in this area, having been proven resistant to attack from oxidation at extreme temperatures, from water vapor and from calcia-magnesia-aluminosilicate (CMAS). The adaptation of the Mo-Si-B coating for ceramic materials is presented in detail here. Evaluation of the coating under a range of oxidation conditions as well as simulated re-entry conditions confirms the efficacy of the Mo-Si-B based coating as protection from catastrophic failure. The key to the oxidation and corrosion resistance is a robust external aluminoborosilica glass layer that forms and flows quickly to cover the substrate, even under the extreme simulated re-entry conditions. Suppression of active oxidation of SiC, which may occur during atmospheric re-entry and hypersonic flight trajectories, has also been examined. In order to adapt the Mo-Si-B based coating to low partial pressures of oxygen and elevated temperatures, controlled amounts of Al were added to the Mo-Si-B based coating. The resulting coating decreased the inward

  9. Processing, Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Mo-Si-B-Based Intermetallic Alloys for Very High Temperature Structural Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay Vasudevan

    2008-03-31

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. In the first part of this project, the compression creep behavior of a Mo-8.9Si-7.71B (in at.%) alloy, at 1100 and 1200 C was studied, whereas in the second part of the project, the constant strain rate compression behavior at 1200, 1300 and 1400 C of a nominally Mo-20Si-10B (in at.%) alloy, processed such as to yield five different {alpha}-Mo volume fractions ranging from 5 to 46%, was studied. In order to determine the deformation and damage mechanisms and rationalize the creep/high temperature deformation data and parameters, the microstructure of both undeformed and deformed samples was characterized in detail using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with back scattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD)/orientation electron microscopy in the SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure of both alloys was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The values of stress exponents and activation energies, and their dependence on microstructure were determined. The data suggested the operation of both dislocation as well as diffusional mechanisms, depending on alloy, test temperature, stress level and microstructure. Microstructural observations of post-crept/deformed samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized {alpha}-Mo grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays within the grains (in Mo-8.9Si-7.71B) or fine sub-grains with a high density of b = 1/2<111> dislocations (in Mo-20Si-10B), which

  10. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF Mo-Si-B-BASED INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS FOR VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay K. Vasudevan

    2005-12-21

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. During this year, the compressive creep behavior of a Mo-3Si-1B (in wt.%) alloy at 1100 and 1200 C were studied and related to the deformation mechanisms through electron microscopy observations of microstructural changes and deformation structures. The microstructure of this alloy was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. Results of compressive creep tests at 1200 and 1100 C showed that the creep rates were quite high at stress levels between 250 and 500 MPa, Two minima in the creep strain rate versus strain data were noted, one at small strain values and the second at much larger strains. A stress exponent of 4.26 was obtained upon plotting the strain rate corresponding to the first minima versus stress, which suggests that dislocation climb and glide dominate the creep process in the early stages. On the other hand, the large strain, minimum creep rate versus stress data gave a stress exponent of {approx}1.18, which indicates diffusional mechanisms and recrystallization dominate the later stages of the creep process. At 1100 C, a stress exponent of 2.26 was obtained, which suggests that both diffusional and dislocation mechanisms contribute to the creep strain. Based on the minimum creep rate data at 1100 C and 1200 C, the activation energy for creep was determined to be 525 kJ/mole, which is somewhat higher than that reported for self diffusion in {alpha}-Mo. Microstructural observations of post-crept samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. In addition, TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays

  11. An ultra-high temperature Mo-Si-B based coating for oxidation protection of NbSS/Nb5Si3 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Linfen; Lu-Steffes, Otto; Zhang, Hu; Perepezko, John H.

    2015-05-01

    A Mo-Si-B based coating was prepared on an NbSS/Nb5Si3 composite by a two-step process consisting of the initial deposition of Mo followed by pack cementation co-deposition of Si and B. After a conditioning treatment, an aluminoborosilica layer fully covered the sample. Following oxidation at 1300 °C for 24 h, the coated sample demonstrated a weight loss of about 0.55 mg/cm2 and the uncoated sample exhibited catastrophic oxidation with a weight gain of 87.6 mg/cm2. These results demonstrate that the Mo-Si-B based coating can enable the use of the NbSS/Nb5Si3 composites at temperature up to 1300 °C in an oxidizing environment.

  12. Development of a multi-variate calibration approach for quantitative analysis of oxidation resistant Mo-Si-B coatings using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakara, Anja; Bonta, Maximilian; Riedl, Helmut; Mayrhofer, Paul H.; Limbeck, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, for the production of oxidation protection coatings in ultrahigh temperature environments, alloys of Mo-Si-B are employed. The properties of the material, mainly the oxidation resistance, are strongly influenced by the Si to B ratio; thus reliable analytical methods are needed to assure exact determination of the material composition for the respective applications. For analysis of such coatings, laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been reported as a versatile method with no specific requirements on the nature of the sample. However, matrix effects represent the main limitation of laser-based solid sampling techniques and usually the use of matrix-matched standards for quantitative analysis is required. In this work, LA-ICP-MS analysis of samples with known composition and varying Mo, Si and B content was carried out. Between known analyte concentrations and derived LA-ICP-MS signal intensities no linear correlation could be found. In order to allow quantitative analysis independent of matrix effects, a multiple linear regression model was developed. Besides the three target analytes also the signals of possible argides (40Ar36Ar and 98Mo40Ar) as well as detected impurities of the Mo-Si-B coatings (108Pd) were considered. Applicability of the model to unknown samples was confirmed using external validation. Relative deviations from the values determined using conventional liquid analysis after sample digestion between 5 and 10% for the main components Mo and Si were observed.

  13. Processing of Mo-Si-B intermetallics by extrusion and oxidation properties of the extruded Tl-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB System

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Eric

    1999-11-08

    An extrusion process was developed that is able to consistently produce large quantities of Mo-Si-B rods without the presence of defects. Binder removal from the extruded rods was studied in detail and it was determined that heating rates on the order of 0.02{degree}/minute (1.2{degree}/hour) are necessary to remove the binder without the formation of defects. This low heating rate resulted in debinding times in excess of 70 hours (approximately 3 days). Wicking was investigated as a means to decrease the time necessary for binder removal. Using 0.05{micro}m alumina powder as a wicking agent, binder removal times were reduced to 10 hours with heating rates up to 1{degree}/minute employed without defect formation. Once the extrusion process was complete the oxidation properties of the Tl-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB extruded phase assemblage was investigated. It was determined that this composition exhibits catastrophic oxidation or pesting in the temperature range of 660--760 C, resulting in the material turning to dust. Outside of this temperature range the composition is oxidatively stable. Continuous mass measurements were taken at 1,300, 1,450, and 1,600 C to determine the oxidation rate constants of this material. Parabolic rate constants of 6.9 x 10{sup {minus}3}, 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}3}, and 9.1 x 10{sup {minus}3} mg{sup 2}/cm{sup 4}/hr were determined for 1,300, 1,450, and 1,600 C respectively.

  14. Superplasticity of a multiphase refractory Mo-Si-B alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jehanno, P.; Heilmaier, M.; Saage, H.; Heyse, Hartmut; Boening, Mike Boening; Kestler, Heinrich; Schneibel, Joachim H

    2006-01-01

    Mo-Si-B alloys consisting of a Mo solid solution and the intermetallic phases Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} were synthesized by mechanical alloying followed by sintering and hot isostatic pressing to field an ultra-fine (triplex) microstructure with all three phases being in the sub-micron range. at temperatures as low as 1300C the material exhibits superplasticity, with tensile strain to failures of 200-400% at strain rates as high as 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}.

  15. Mo-Si-B Alloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Brady, Michael P; Meyer III, Harry M; Horton Jr, Joe A; Kruzic, JJ; Ritchie, R O

    2005-01-01

    Mo-Si-B silicides consisting of the phases {alpha}-Mo (Mo solid solution), Mo{sub 3}Si, and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} have melting points on the order of 2000 C and have potential as ultra-high temperature structural materials. Mo-Si-B alloys can be processed such that the {alpha}-Mo is present in the form of isolated particles in a silicide matrix, or as a continuous matrix 'cementing' individual silicide particles together. The latter microstructure is similar to that of WC-Co hard metals. This paper focuses on the relationship between the topology as well as scale of the microstructure of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} alloys, and their creep strength and fracture toughness. For example, the creep strength of Mo-Si-B alloys is improved by reducing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase discontinuous. The fracture toughness is improved by increasing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase continuous. Room temperature stress intensity factors as high as 21 MPa m{sup 1/2} were obtained. The room temperature fracture toughness of Mo-Si-B alloys can also be improved by microalloying with Zr. The room temperature ductility of Mo itself can be improved by adding MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel particles suggesting yet another way to improve the ductile phase toughening of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  16. Mo-Si-B Alloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Kruzie, J.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-04-24

    Mo-Si-B silicides consisting of the phases {alpha}-Mo (Mo solid solution), Mo{sub 3}Si, and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} have melting points on the order of 2000 C and have potential as ultra-high temperature structural materials. Mo-Si-B alloys can be processed such that the {alpha}-Mo is present in the form of isolated particles in a silicide matrix, or as a continuous matrix ''cementing'' individual silicide particles together. The latter microstructure is similar to that of WC-Co hard metals. This paper focuses on the relationship between the topology as well as scale of the microstructure of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} alloys, and their creep strength and fracture toughness. For example, the creep strength of Mo-Si-B alloys is improved by reducing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase discontinuous. The fracture toughness is improved by increasing the {alpha}-Mo volume fraction and by making the {alpha}-Mo phase continuous. Room temperature stress intensity factors as high as 21 MPa m{sup 1/2} were obtained. The room temperature fracture toughness of Mo-Si-B alloys can also be improved by microalloying with Zr. The room temperature ductility of Mo itself can be improved by adding MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel particles suggesting yet another way to improve the ductile phase toughening of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  17. High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys with High Ti Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliephake, Daniel; Azim, Maria; von Klinski-Wetzel, Katharina; Gorr, Bronislava; Christ, Hans-Jürgen; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P.; Heilmaier, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Multiphase alloys in the Mo-Si-B system are potential high-temperature structural materials due to their good oxidation and creep resistance. Since they suffer from relatively high densities, the current study focuses on the influence of density-reducing Ti additions on creep and oxidation behavior at temperatures above 1273 K (1000 °C). Two alloys with compositions of Mo-12.5Si-8.5B-27.5Ti and Mo-9Si-8B-29Ti (in at. pct) were synthesized by arc melting and then homogenized by annealing in vacuum for 150 hours at 1873 K (1600 °C). Both alloys show similar creep behavior at stresses of 100 to 300 MPa and temperatures of 1473 K and 1573 K (1200 °C and 1300 °C), although they possess different intermetallic volume fractions. They exhibit superior creep resistance and lower density than a state-of-the-art Ni-base superalloy (single-crystalline CMSX-4) as well as other Mo-Si-B alloys. Solid solution strengthening due to Ti was confirmed by Vickers hardness measurements and is believed to be the reason for the significant increase in creep resistance compared to Mo-Si-B alloys without Ti, but with comparable microstructural length scales. The addition of Ti degrades oxidation resistance relative to a Mo-9Si-8B reference alloy due to the formation of a relatively porous duplex layer with titania matrix enabling easy inward diffusion of oxygen.

  18. Role of Microstructure in Promoting Fracture and Fatigue Resistance in Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H

    2005-04-01

    An investigation of how microstructural features affect the fracture and fatigue properties of a promising class of high temperature Mo-Si-B based alloys is presented. Fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth properties are measured at 25 and 1300 C for five Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} containing alloys produced by powder metallurgy with {alpha}-Mo matrices. Results are compared with previous studies on intermetallic-matrix microstructures in alloys with similar compositions. It is found that increasing the {alpha}-Mo phase volume fraction (17-49%) or ductility (by increasing the temperature) benefits the fracture resistance; in addition, {alpha}-Mo matrix materials show significant improvements over intermetallic-matrix alloys. Fatigue thresholds were also increased with increasing {alpha}-Mo phase content, until a transition to more ductile fatigue behavior occurred with large amounts of {alpha}-Mo phase (49%) and ductility (i.e., at 1300 C). The beneficial role of such microstructural variables are attributed to the promotion of the observed toughening mechanisms of crack trapping and bridging by the relatively ductile {alpha}-Mo phase.

  19. Mechanically alloyed Mo-Si-B alloys with a continuous a-Mo matrix and improved mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, M.; Franz, S.; Heilmaier, M.; Schneibel, Joachim H; Jehanno, P.; Boening, Mike Boening; Kestler, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) followed by cold isostatic pressing (CIPing), sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) was used to prepare Mo-base silicide alloys consisting of a Mo(Si) solid solution and the intermetallic phases Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}. The microstructural development during milling of both binary Mo-Si and Mo-B and ternary Mo-Si-B powder mixtures was evaluated. While obtaining a supersaturated solid solution requires rather long milling times, domain size (which correlates with the grain size) is reduced to below 100 {angstrom} after about 10 h of milling. After heat treatment and consolidation the microstructure reveals a continuous {alpha}-Mo matrix with embedded, uniformly distributed intermetallic particles. The establishment of such a microstructure is beneficial for the mechanical properties since, as compared to a discontinuous {alpha}-Mo matrix, it decreases the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature (BDTT) by about 150 K.

  20. Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kramer; A. Thom; O. Degirmen; V. Behrani; M. Akinc

    2002-04-22

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)- MoSi{sub 2}- MoB, Alloy 2 = T1- Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)- Mo{sub 3}Si, and Alloy 3 = Mo- T2- Mo{sub 3}Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H{sub 2}O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO{sub 3}. All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO{sub 2}. This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO{sub 2} that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air.

  1. Cold Sprayed Intermetallic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchinsky, Evgeny

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat-isolative topcoat. Several recent research activities are concentrated on the development of improved multilayer bond coat and TBC materials. This study represents an investigation performed for the aluminum based bond coats, especially those with reduced thermal conductivities. Using alternative TBC materials, such as metal alloys and intermetallics, their processing methods can be further optimized to achieve the best thermal physical parameters. One example is the ten-layer system in which cold sprayed aluminum based intermetallics are synthesized. These systems demonstrated improved heat insulation and thermal fatigue capabilities compared to conventional TBC. The microstructures and properties of the laminar coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD; micromechanical and durability tests were performed to define the structure and coating formation mechanisms. Application prospects for HCCI engines are discussed. Fuel energy can be utilized more efficiently with the concept of low heat rejection engines with applied TBC.

  2. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vikas Behrani

    2004-12-19

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  3. Phase field simulation of a directional solidification of a ternary eutectic Mo-Si-B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a eutectic Phase-Field Model for a Mo-Si-B alloy at ternary eutectic composition (Mo-17.5Si-8B), under a constant thermal gradient. The process parameters like cooling rate and thermal gradient were obtained directly from the experimental procedure of zone melting. The equilibrium interface geometries and interface mobility were calculated using an isotropic model. The phase equilibria and the other thermodynamic parameters are obtained by linearizing the Mo-Si-B ternary phase diagram. We have investigated the effect of process parameters on the lamellar growth pattern and lamella pattern stability with respect to the Jackson-Hunt minimum undercooling spacing theory. In order to examine the generated results by the model, they were validated with experimental observed microstructures and measurements and showed to be in a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Chlorination treatment to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrani, Vikas; Thom, Andrew J.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Akinc, Mufit

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quaternary Nb-Mo-Si-B system is not oxidation resistant. The difference in oxidation resistance between Mo-Si-B and Nb-Mo-Si-B may be interpreted in terms of the volatility of the metal oxide that forms. MoO3 evaporates from the surface scale at about 650 °C, leaving a porous borosilicate glassy scale. Nb2O5 persists as a rapidly growing condensed phase that overwhelms the ability of the borosilicate glass to form a protective layer. In the present work, a novel chlorination process was employed to selectively remove Nb2O5 from the scale of the quaternary alloy as volatile NbCl5. A Nb-Mo-Si-B alloy was studied with a nominal composition of 63(Nb,Mo)-30Si-7B (at. pct) with Nb/Mo = 1:1. The alloy consisted of a three-phase microstructure of (Nb,Mo)5Si3B x (T1)-(Nb,Mo)5(Si,B)3 (T2)-(Nb,Mo)5Si3B x (D88). The oxidation behavior of these alloys in air was studied both before and after chlorination. Results showed that Nb2O5 can be selectively removed from the scale to leave a borosilicate-rich scale, which then forms a dense scale after heat treatment at 1100 °C in argon. The oxidation rate of the chlorinated alloy was about one-third that of the unchlorinated alloy under identical conditions. Alloy oxidation during heating to the test temperature was studied, and a plausible mechanism for the formation of porosity in the oxide scale has been offered.

  5. Temperature dependent mechanical properties of Mo-Si-B compounds via ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmawardhana, C. C.; Sakidja, R.; Aryal, S.; Ching, W. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A new method was proposed to obtain high temperature mechanical properties with a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and stress-strain analyses. It was applied to compounds in the Mo-Si-B ternary system, namely, T1 (Mo5Si3) and T2 (Mo5SiB2) phases. The calculated coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal expansion anisotropy, and elastic constants agree well with those from the available experiments. The method enables us to theoretically access these properties up to 2000 K.

  6. Mo-Si-B alloys for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, J A; Ritchie, R O

    2012-07-10

    A continuing quest in science is the development of materials capable of operating structurally at ever-increasing temperatures. Indeed, the development of gas-turbine engines for aircraft/aerospace, which has had a seminal impact on our ability to travel, has been controlled by the availability of materials capable of withstanding the higher-temperature hostile environments encountered in these engines. Nickel-base superalloys, particularly as single crystals, represent a crowning achievement here as they can operate in the combustors at ~1100 °C, with hot spots of ~1200 °C. As this represents ~90% of their melting temperature, if higher-temperature engines are ever to be a reality, alternative materials must be utilized. One such class of materials is Mo-Si-B alloys; they have higher density but could operate several hundred degrees hotter. Here we describe the processing and structure versus mechanical properties of Mo-Si-B alloys and further document ways to optimize their nano/microstructures to achieve an appropriate balance of properties to realistically compete with Ni-alloys for elevated-temperature structural applications. PMID:22711489

  7. Creep Resistance and Oxidation Behavior of Novel Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azim, M. A.; Schliephake, D.; Hochmuth, C.; Gorr, B.; Christ, H.-J.; Glatzel, U.; Heilmaier, M.

    2015-11-01

    Mo-Si-B-alloys are promising materials for high-temperature applications because of their high melting point, excellent phase stability, large alloying capabilities, and reasonable mechanical as well as oxidative properties. A continuing alloy development is, however, required because of the catastrophic oxidation taking place at intermediate temperatures and the rather high density. The addition of Ti stabilizes a new ternary phase field including the Mo5Si3 (T1) phase instead of the Mo3Si (A15) phase. Alloys comprising the phases Moss, T1 and Mo5SiB2 (T2) show very high creep resistance, improved oxidation behavior and significantly reduced density. The new T1 phase seems to play a crucial role in the improved oxidation resistance of these new materials, since this phase exhibits excellent oxidation behavior at intermediate and high temperatures. The 4-component alloys possess superior creep behavior compared to Mo-Si-B alloys with the same microstructural phase arrangement and size or to the single crystal Ni-base superalloy CMSX-4. The main reason was found to be the formation of Ti-rich silicide precipitates during processing.

  8. Phase stability and alloying behavior in the Mo-Si-B system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakidja, R.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2005-03-01

    The effect of transition metal (TM) substitution for Mo has been examined in terms of the phase stability and multiphase microstructures in the Mo-Si-B ternary system. The metal-rich portion of the ternary Mo-Si-B system at equilibrium is comprised of thermally stable bcc Mo(ss) phase, a ternary-based Mo5SiB2 (T2) phase, and a binary-based metal-rich silicide (Mo3Si [A15]). The structures that are developed by following systematic alloying with a wide range of TMs, which are substitutional in both Mo(ss) and T2 phases (group IVB, VB, and VIB metals), have been analyzed to elucidate the roles of the substitution on the stability of the three phase fields of Mo(ss) + T2 + Mo3Si. In particular, the borosilicide ternary-based T2 phase shows an extended solid solution with a wide range of TMs. The extended solubility in the T2 phase essentially mimics the alloying behavior of the TM-based bcc phase. The critical factor for the phase stability appears to be the existence of a unique feature of bcc-like TM clusters within the T2 lattice structure. The combined criteria of atomic size factor and the valence electron concentration per atom (e/a) have been used to elucidate the observed alloying behavior.

  9. High-Temperature Compressive Properties of TiC-Added Mo-Si-B Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimi, Kyosuke; Nakamura, Junya; Kanekon, Daiki; Yamamoto, Shiho; Maruyama, Kouichi; Katsui, Hirokazu; Goto, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature compressive properties of two TiC-added Mo-Si-B alloys with nominal compositions of Mo-5Si-10B-7.5TiC (70Mo alloy) and Mo-6.7Si-13.3B-7.5TiC (65Mo alloy) (at.%) were investigated. The alloys were composed of four constituent phases: Mo solid solution (Moss), Mo5SiB2, (Mo,Ti)C, and (Mo,Ti)2C. The primary phases of the 70Mo and 65Mo alloys were Moss and T2, respectively. The compressive deformability of the 65Mo alloy was significantly limited even at 1600°C because of the elongated, coarse primary T2 phase, whereas the 70Mo alloy had good compressive deformability and a high strength in the test-temperature range of 1000-1600°C; the peak stresses were 1800 MPa at 1000°C, 1230 MPa at 1200°C, and 350 MPa at 1600°C. At and above 1200°C, the peak stress values were more than double those of Mo-6.7Si-7.9B, Ti-Zr-Mo, and Mo-Hf-C alloys. The plastic strain in the 70Mo alloy at temperatures lower than the ductile-brittle transition temperature of T2 was generated by plastic deformation of not only Moss but also of (Mo,Ti)C and (Mo,Ti)2C. This work indicates that (Mo,Ti)C and (Mo,Ti)2C play an important role in determining the high-temperature strength and deformation properties of TiC-added Mo-Si-B alloys.

  10. Characterization of electrical resistivity as a function of temperature in the Mo-Si-B system

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, Sarah E.

    1999-12-10

    Measurements of electrical resistivity as a function of temperature from 25 to 1,500 C were conducted on polycrystalline samples in the Mo-Si-B system. Single phase, or nearly single phase, samples were prepared for the following phases: Mo{sub 3}Si, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}, Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x}, MoB, MoSi{sub 2}, and Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Thesis materials all exhibit resistivity values within a narrow range(4--22 x 10{sup {minus}7}{Omega}-m), and the low magnitude suggests these materials are semi-metals or low density of states metals. With the exception of MoSi{sub 2}, all single phase materials in this study were also found to have low temperature coefficient of resistivity(TCR) values. These values ranged from 2.10 x 10{sup {minus}10} to 4.74 x 10{sup {minus}10}{Omega}-m/{degree} C, and MoSi{sub 2} had a TCR of 13.77 x 10{sup {minus}10}{Omega}-m/{degree} C. The results from the single phase sample measurements were employed in a natural log rule-of-mixtures model to relate the individual phase resistivity values to those of multiphase composites. Three Mo-Si-B phase regions were analyzed: the binary Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-MoSi{sub 2} system, the ternary phase field Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x}MoB-MoSi{sub 2}, and the Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}-Mo{sub 5} Si{sub 3}B{sub x} ternary region. The experimental data for samples in each of these regions agreed with the natural log model and illustrated that this model can predict the electrical resistivity as a function of temperature of multi-phase, sintered samples within an error of one standard deviation.

  11. Development of intermetallic coatings for fusion power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Domenico, T.; Dragel, G.; Clark, R.

    1994-03-01

    In the design of liquid-metal cooling systems, corrosion resistance of structural materials and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force and its subsequent influence on thermal hydraulics and corrosion are major concerns. The objective of this study is to develop stable corrosion-resistant electrical insulator coatings at the liquid-metal/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coatings that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the structural walls. Vanadium and V-base alloys are potential materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor. Insulator coatings inside the tubing are required when the system is cooled by liquid metals. Various intermetallic films were produced on V, V-t, and V-20 Ti, V-5Cr-t and V-15Cr-t, and Ti, and Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The intermetallic layers were developed by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium of 3--5 at.% and containing dissolved metallic solutes at temperatures of 416--880{degrees}C. Subsequently, electrical insulator coatings were produced by reaction of the reactive layers with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium or by air oxidation under controlled conditions at 600--1000{degrees}C. These reactions converted the intermetallic layers to electrically insulating oxide/nitride or oxy-nitride layers. This coating method could be applied to a commercial product. The liquid metal can be used over and over because only the solutes are consumed within the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. This paper will discuss initial results on the nature of the coatings and their in-situ electrical resistivity characteristics in liquid lithium at high temperatures.

  12. Effects of Wet Air and Synthetic Combustion Gas Atmospheres on the Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M.J.; Thom, A.J.; Mandal, P.; Behrani, V.; Akinc, M.

    2003-04-24

    Continuing our work on understanding the oxidation behavior of multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system, we investigated three alloys in the Mo-Si-B system, designated as A1, A2, and A3. The nominal phase assemblages of these alloys are: A1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB, A2 = T1-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)-Mo{sub 3}Si, and A3 = Mo-T2-Mo{sub 3}Si. Our previous work showed that for exposures to 1100 C, all alloys formed a protective oxide scale in dry air. Exposures to wet air containing about 150 Torr water promoted the formation of a multiphase layer near the scale/alloy interface composed of Mo and MoO{sub 2}. Interrupted mass loss measurements indicated a near zero mass change. In the present study, isothermal mass measurements were conducted in order to quantitatively determine the oxidation rate constants at 1000 C in both dry and wet air. These measurements are critical for understanding the nature of scale development during the initial exposure, as well as the nature of scale stability during the long-term exposure. Isothermal measurements were also conducted at 1600 C in dry air to make an initial determination of alloy stability with respect to Vision 21 goals. We also conducted alloy oxidation testing in a synthetic oxidizing combustion atmosphere. Alloys were exposed up to 300 hours at 1100 C to a gas mixture having an approximate gas composition of N{sub 2} - 13 CO{sub 2} - 10 H{sub 2}O - 4 O{sub 2}. This gas composition simulates oxidizing flue gas, but does not contain a sulfidizing agent that would also be present in flue gas. The oxidized samples were carefully analyzed by SEM/EDS. This analysis will be discussed to provide an understanding of the role of water vapor and the synthetic combustion atmosphere on the oxidative stability of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  13. Phase Equilibria, Microstructure, and High-Temperature Strength of TiC-Added Mo-Si-B Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Shimpei; Yoshimi, Kyosuke; Ha, Seong-Ho; Kaneko, Takahiro; Nakamura, Junya; Sato, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Kouichi; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    TiC was added to Mo-Si-B alloys using a conventional Ar arc-melting technique, and the phase equilibria, microstructure evolution, and high-temperature strength at 1673 K (1400 °C) were investigated. The primary phase changed to Mo solid solution (Moss), Mo5SiB2 (T2), or TiC depending on the composition. Following the primary phase solidification, a Moss + TiC, Moss + T2, or Moss + T2 + TiC + Mo2C eutectic reaction took place as the secondary solidification step. In some alloys, Moss + T2 + TiC and Moss + T2 + Mo2C eutectic reactions were present as higher-order solidification steps. After annealing at 2073 K (1800 °C) for 24 hours, Moss, T2, TiC, and Mo2C coexisted stably with microstructural coarsening. The coarsening rate was much faster in an alloy with no TiC dispersion, suggesting that TiC has a strong pinning effect on the grain boundary and interface migration. Compression tests conducted at 1673 K (1400 °C) revealed strength properties of almost all the alloys that were better than those of the Mo-Hf-C alloy (MHC). Alloy densities were 9 g/cm3 or less, which is lighter than pure Mo and MHC (≥10 g/cm3) and competitive with Ni-base superalloys. TiC-added Mo-Si-B alloys are promising candidates for ultrahigh-temperature materials beyond Ni-base superalloys.

  14. Thermal stability of sputtered intermetallic Al-Au coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, M.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Ross, I. M.; Rainforth, W. M.

    2007-09-15

    Recently, the authors have shown that single-phase Al{sub 2}Au coatings, prepared by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, exhibit a dense columnar structure and highest hardness and indentation moduli of 8 and 144 GPa, respectively, within the Al-Au films investigated. This study focuses on the thermal stability of Al{sub 2}Au with respect to films containing more Al and Au having Al/Au at. % ratios of 4.32 and 1.85, respectively. Single-phase Al{sub 2}Au has the highest onset temperature for recovery of 475 deg. C and recrystallization of 575 deg. C. Upon annealing Au- and Al-rich films, their stresses deviate from the linear thermoelastic behavior at temperatures (T) above 200 and 450 deg. C, respectively, due to pores and metallic phases present. Metastable Au within the as-deposited Au-rich film is consumed by the growing intermetallic AlAu and AlAu{sub 2} phases at T{>=}450 deg. C, which themselves melt at {approx}625 deg. C. Due to nanometer scale segregations of Al, encapsulated by Al{sub 2}Au in Al-rich coatings, their melting point is reduced by {approx}85 deg. C to 575 deg. C. Dynamic thermal analyses up to 1100 deg. C in synthetic air reveal the single-phase Al{sub 2}Au films with a superior thermal stability and only negligible oxidation. At 750 deg. C, the mass gain is {approx}1.5 mg/cm{sup 2} after 50 h isothermal exposure. Based on the investigations, the authors can conclude that single-phase intermetallic Al{sub 2}Au films have a high potential for oxidation protection of sensitive materials.

  15. Modification of Surface Layers by Surfacing Intermetallic Coatings with Variable Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, D. N.; Zakharov, O. V.; Vinogradov, A. N.; Kochetkov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper considers the possibility of forming coating layers for parts within wide limits of microhardness. The technology uses surfacing of intermetallic coatings provided by a unique experimental setup. Theoretical and experimental dependence of the coating layer microhardness on the filler concentration using the changes in the speed of the filler wire feed and current intensity were determined.

  16. Microstructural Simulation of Three-Point Bending Test with Mo-Si-B Alloy at High Temperature: Sources of Strain Field Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollacoop, Nuwong; Alur, Amruthavalli P.; Kumar, K. Sharvan

    Deformation behavior in three-point bending test of Mo-Si-B alloy was investigated by recourse to finite element analysis (FEA) with microstructure incorporated. This Mo-Si-B alloy consists of hard, brittle T2 (Mo5SiB2) phase embedded in soft matrix of Mo solid solution. The sample contains pre-crack configuration at the middle in order to study the effect of the second phase (T2 particles) onto a crack tip during the bending test. Various optical micrographs were scanned, digitized and meshed for FEA. It was found that strain localization from the second phase at the crack tip was interfered with that from the loading pin in three-point bending test. Such interference could be reduced by replacement with end moment loading, in order to identify sole strain localization effect from the second phase at the crack tip.

  17. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  18. Novel Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Coatings for Metal Alloys in Coal-fired Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Zak Fang; H. Y. Sohn

    2009-08-31

    Intermetallic coatings (iron aluminide and nickel aluminide) were prepared by a novel reaction process. In the process, the aluminide coating is formed by an in-situ reaction between the aluminum powder fed through a plasma transferred arc (PTA) torch and the metal substrate (steel or Ni-base alloy). Subjected to the high temperature within an argon plasma zone, aluminum powder and the surface of the substrate melt and react to form the aluminide coatings. The prepared coatings were found to be aluminide phases that are porosity-free and metallurgically bonded to the substrate. The coatings also exhibit excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance under the conditions which simulate the steam-side and fire-side environments in coal-fired boilers. It is expected that the principle demonstrated in this process can be applied to the preparation of other intermetallic and alloy coatings.

  19. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  20. Preparation and properties of the Ni-Al/Fe-Al intermetallics composite coating produced by plasma cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Min; Liu, Bang-Wu; Sun, Dong-Bai

    2011-12-01

    A novel approach to produce an intermetallic composite coating was put forward. The microstructure, microhardness, and dry-sliding wear behavior of the composite coating were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis, microhardness test, and ball-on-disc wear experiment. XRD results indicate that some new phases FeAl, Fe0.23Ni0.77Al, and Ni3Al exit in the composite coating with the Al2O3 addition. SEM results show that the coating is bonded with carbon steel metallurgically and exhibits typical rapid directional solidification structures. The Cr7C3 carbide and intermetallic compounds co-reinforced composite coating has a high average hardness and exhibits an excellent wear resistance under dry-sliding wear test compared with the Cr7C3 carbide-reinforced composite coating. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was also investigated.

  1. Wear Behavior and Mechanism of Fe-Al Intermetallic Coating Prepared by Hot-Dip Aluminizing and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, J. Q.; Chen, K. M.; Mo, J. G.; Cui, X. H.; Wang, S. Q.

    2016-05-01

    A Fe-Al intermetallic compound coating was prepared on AISI H13 steel by hot-dip aluminizing and subsequent high-temperature diffusion. Dry sliding wear tests of the Fe-Al intermetallic coating were performed at 298 K to 873 K (25 °C to 600 °C). The wear behavior of the Fe-Al intermetallic coating was noticed to vary markedly with the temperature and load. At 298 K (25 °C), the wear rate rapidly increased with an increase of the load. As the temperature was elevated, the wear rate dramatically decreased except for the cases under 300 N at 473 K and 673 K (200 °C and 400 °C). The Fe-Al intermetallic coating possessed an excellent elevated-temperature wear performance, especially at 673 K to 873 K (400 °C to 600 °C), but worse room-temperature one, which were noticed to be attributed to the existence and inexistence of thin tribo-oxide layers, respectively. Such a thin tribo-oxide layer was considered to provide a protection for the intermetallic compound. When the tribo-oxide layer did not form at room temperature or the formed one was massively delaminated above the critical load at elevated temperatures, Fe-Al intermetallic coating possessed poor wear resistance.

  2. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  3. Intermetallic-ceramic coatings for metals protection against erosion-corrosion at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.; Verstak, A.; Beliaev, A.

    1999-07-01

    A series of erosion-corrosion (E-C) tests was carried out on the NiAl-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} intermetallic-ceramic coatings deposited with high-velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF). The tests attempted to simulate the erosion conditions at the heat exchanger tubes in coal-fired boilers. The E-C behavior of these coatings was investigated and compared with other thermal sprayed coatings. It was found that in comparison to other coatings, eroded by the bed ash at 300 C, the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} coating exhibited the lowest thickness loss at a 90{degree} impact angle, and was the second best at a 30{degree} impact angle. Eroded by the fly ash under test temperatures 450--600 C, the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating demonstrated the highest erosion-corrosion resistance at all impact angles of testing. At temperatures below 200 C, the E-C wastage of the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating had essentially no dependence on temperature. From 200 C to 600 C the coating thickness loss increased and from 600 to 800 C the thickness loss decreased with temperature. The HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating eroded by cracking and chipping brittle mechanism.

  4. Development of Cu alloy anode and separator coated with Al-Ni intermetallic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Toyokura, K.; Hoshino, K.; Yamamoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Anode made of Cu alloy and separator coated with Al-Ni intermetallic compound have been developed for VCFC. Anode of Ni alloy is usually used. However, the alternative of cost lower than Ni alloy anode should be needed, because Ni is expensive. Cu is attractive as an anode material for VCFC because it is inexpensive and electrochemically noble. However, the creep resistance of Cu is not sufficient, compared with Ni alloy. In this study, strengthening due to oxide-dispersed microstructure has been developed in Cu-Ni-Al alloy with the two-step sintering process. A wet-seal technique has been widely applied for gas-sealing and supporting of electrolyte in MCFC. Since the wet-seal area is exposed to a severe corrosive environment, corrosion resistance of material for wet sealing is related with the cell performance. Al-Ni plating with post-heat treating for stainless steel has been investigated. Stainless steel substrate was plated with Al after being coated with Ni, then heat-treated at 750 {degrees}C for 1 hour in Ar gas atmosphere. Due to the treatment, Al-Ni intermetallic compound ( mainly Al3Ni2 ) layer is formed on stainless steel surface. The long-term immersion test was carried out till 14,500 hours in 62 mol% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-38 mol% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 650 {degrees}C under air-30%CO{sub 2} atmosphere, for the purpose of evaluating the corrosion resistance and thermal stability of Al-Ni intermetallic compound layer in actual generating with VCFC.

  5. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Several intermetallic films were fabricated to high-temperature alloys (V-alloys and 304 and 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain-growth behavior at 1000{degrees}C for the V-5Cr-5Ti was investigated to determine the stability of alloy substrate during coating formation by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metallic vapor processes at 800-850{degrees}C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis and tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. The results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  6. Deposition of Functional Coatings Based on Intermetallic Systems TiAl on the Steel Surface by Vacuum Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilov, V.; Vardanyan, E.; Ramazanov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Laws governing the formation of intermetallic phase by sequential deposition of nano-sized layers coatings from vacuum arc plasma were studied. Mathematical modeling process of deposition by vacuum arc plasma was performed. In order to identify the structural and phase composition of coatings and to explain their physical and chemical behaviour XRD studies were carried out. Production tests of the hardened punching tools were performed.

  7. CaO insulator and Be intermetallic coatings on V-base alloys for liquid-lithium fusion blanket applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop (a) stable CaO insulator coatings at the Liquid-Li/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coating that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the V-alloy wall, and (b) stable Be-V intermetallic coating for first-wall components that face the plasma. Electrically insulating and corrosion-resistant coatings are required at the liquid-Li/structural interface in fusion first-wall/blanket application. The electrical resistance of CaO coatings produced on oxygen-enriched surface layers of V-5%Cr-5%Ti by exposing the alloy to liquid Li that contained 0.5-85 wt% dissolved Ca was measured as a function of time at temperatures between 250 and 600{degrees}C. Crack-free Be{sub 2}V intermetallic coatings were also produced by exposing V-alloys to liquid Li that contained Be as a solute. These techniques can be applied to various shapes (e.g., inside/outside of tubes, complex geometrical shapes) because the coatings are formed by liquid-phase reactions.

  8. Heat treatment induced intermetallic phase transition of arc-sprayed coating prepared by the wires combination of aluminum-cathode and steel-anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongxiong; Liang, Xiubing; Wei, Shicheng; Liu, Yan; Xu, Binshi

    2009-07-01

    A method to prepare intermetallic composite coatings employing the cost-efficient electric arc spraying twin wires assistant with suitable heat treatment was developed. In this study, a Fe-Al composite coating was produced by spraying twin wires, i.e. a carbon steel wire as the anode and an aluminum wire as the cathode. The inter-deposited Fe-Al coating was transformed in-situ to Fe-Al intermetallic composite coating after a post annealing treatment. The effect of annealing treatment conditions on phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coating was investigated by using XRD, SEM, EDS and OM as well as microhardness tester. The results show that the desirable intermetallic phases such as Fe 2Al 5, FeAl and Fe 3Al are obtained under the annealing condition. The main oxide in the coating is FeO which can partially transform to Fe 3O 4 up to the annealing condition.

  9. Characterization of High-Temperature Abrasive Wear of Cold-Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Compound Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Hong-Tao; Yang, Guan-Jun; Bao, Chong-Gao

    2011-01-01

    FeAl intermetallic compound coating was prepared by cold spraying using a mechanically alloyed Fe(Al) alloy powder followed by post-spray annealing at 950 °C. The high-temperature abrasive wear test was carried out for the FeAl coating at a temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C. The high-temperature abrasive wear of a heat-resistant stainless steel 2520 was performed for comparison. It was observed that the abrasive wear weight loss of FeAl coating was proportional to wear cycles in terms of sample revolutions at the tested temperatures. It was found that with the increase of the test temperature higher than 400 °C, the wear rate of cold-sprayed FeAl coating decreased with the increase of test temperature, while the wear rate of the heat-resistant steel increased significantly. The results indicate that the high-temperature abrasive wear resistance of the cold-sprayed FeAl intermetallic coating increased with the increase of the wear temperature in a temperature range from 400 to 800 °C. The wear resistance of cold-sprayed FeAl coating was higher than that of heat-resistant 2520 stainless steel under 800 °C by a factor of 3.

  10. Nanocomposite Fe-Al Intermetallic Coating Obtained by Gas Detonation Spraying of Milled Self-Decomposing Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderowski, Cezary

    2014-10-01

    The nanocomposite structure of Fe-Al intermetallic coating, created in situ during gas detonation spraying (GDS) of as-milled self-decomposing powder and containing disordered 8 nm FeAl nanocrystals, was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and x-ray diffraction methods. It is found that the Fe-Al coating is characterized by a sublayer morphology consisting of flattened and partially melted splats containing a wide Al range from about 26 to 52 at.%, as well as Al2O3 oxides, created in situ at the internal interfaces of splats during the GDS process. The complex oxide films, identified as amorphous Al2O3, which are formed in the nanocrystalline Fe-Al matrix of the GDS coating behave like a composite reinforcement in the intermetallic Fe-Al coating. The combined presence of nanosized subgrains in the Fe-Al matrix and the Al2O3 nanoceramic dispersoids significantly increases the microhardness of the coating.

  11. Electrodeposited nickel(3) aluminide base intermetallic coatings and their resistance to high temperature degradation in hydrocarbon cracking environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haifeng

    This research was aimed at developing novel Ni-A1 base intermetallic coatings to protect commercial Fe-Ni-Cr tube alloys from severe corrosive degradation at high temperatures. These alloys are widely used in petrochemical, chemical, and energy conversion industries. The coating process and coating evaluation were the two main aspects of this investigation. A two-step coating processing has been successfully developed to in situ apply pure and CeO2-modified Ni3Al intermetallic coatings onto Fe-Ni-Cr substrates. The process consists of the electrodeposition of Ni-Al and Ni-Al-CeO2 composite coatings from a Watt's nickel bath containing Al and CeO2 particles via a cost-effective electroplating technique and an annealing treatment of the as-plated coatings. It was found that the deposition of Al particles obeyed a Guglielmi model, and that REO particles interfered significantly with the deposition of Al particles. The long-term resistance of pure and CeO2-modified Ni 3A1 coatings to cyclic oxidation, carburization, coke formation, and metal dusting was evaluated in flowing dry air, 2 % CH4-H 2, and CO-H2-H2O respectively. Due to the high porosity, pure and CeO2-dispersed Ni3Al coatings exhibited poor resistance to cyclic oxidation at 850°C. CeO2 improved the spallation resistance of the Ni3Al base coatings during cyclic oxidation at 1050°C. CeO2-dispersed Ni3Al coatings showed better carburization resistance, particularly at 1050°C. Ni 3A1-based coatings. Those CeO2-dispersed were susceptible to coke formation and metal dusting at 650°C. Pre-oxidation improved the resistance of Ni3Al-based coatings to coke formation and metal dusting at 650°C, but the effectiveness depended on the integrity of the induced alumina scale. Special attention was paid to several aspects of coating degradation. These aspects included microstructure changes, degradation mechanisms, coating/substrate interdiffusion, effect of corrosive atmosphere, and effect of CeO2 on coating

  12. Corrosion behaviour and biocompatibility of a novel Ni-free intermetallic coating growth on austenitic steel by hot dipping in an Al-12.6%Si alloy.

    PubMed

    Arenas, M A; Frutos, E; Saldaña, L; Conde, A; Labajos-Broncano, L; González-Martín, M L; González-Carrasco, J L; Vilaboa, N

    2011-04-01

    Commercial 316 LVM austenitic stainless steel samples have been coated by immersion in a bath of molten Al-12.6%Si alloy for 120 s. The coating consists of the Al(12)(Fe,Cr)(3)Si(2) intermetallic. In vitro corrosion behaviour has been evaluated in the Ringer's solution by means of potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results reveal that the coated specimens exhibit lower susceptibility to localised corrosion with respect to the substrate. XPS analysis suggests that the ennoblement of the pitting potential is due to the formation of a chromium oxyhydroxide containing passive layer. The intermetallic coating shows a good biocompatibility, as demonstrated by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow which attached, grew and differentiated to the osteoblastic lineage to a similar extent on coated and bare steels. In summary, this study proposes a method that generates Ni-free coatings of the stainless steel with useful properties for biomedical applications. PMID:21437641

  13. Characterization of the elastic-plastic behavior of intermetallic coatings growth on medical stainless steel by instrumented ultramicroindentation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, E; Cuevas, A; González-Carrasco, J L; Martín, F

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the elastoplastic properties of novel intermetallic coatings grown by hot dipping on medical steel 316 LVM and their correlation with the scratch resistance by means of instrumented ultramicroindentation techniques. Elastoplastic properties are defined by the plasticity index (PI), which correlates the hardness and the Young's modulus, and the yield strength that delimits the elastic-plastic transition. To avoid overestimations of the PI due to the so-called indentation size effect, macroscopic hardness values were determined. The PI of the coating increases from 0.6 to 0.8 with increasing immersion time. These values are always lower than those of the bare substrate (0.9) but higher than those found for ceramics (∼0.5). The increase of the PI is accompanied by a decrease in the yield strength from 0.73 to 0.34 GPa, which highlights the relevance of the compressive residual stresses and their relaxation with increasing immersion time. The higher plasticity is shown by higher apparent friction coefficients (0.159), which are always lower than those of the bare steel (0.264). Therefore, these intermetallic coatings could be considered "hard but tough" coatings, suitable for enhancing the wear resistance of the medical steel, especially when using short periods of immersion. The study provides evidence that the load-depth curve of indentation contains abundant information and that its analysis can be used to determine various mechanical properties of coatings that could be important for load bearing components. PMID:23137617

  14. Effects of Al Content and Addition of Third Element on Fabrication of Ti-Al Intermetallic Coatings by Heat Treatment of Warm-Sprayed Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, J.; Kuroda, S.; Minagawa, K.; Murakami, H.; Araki, H.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    Four powder mixtures of titanium and aluminum with 50:50, 40:60, 30:70, and 20:80 atomic ratios were used as feedstock for Warm Spray process to produce composite coatings. A two-stage heat treatment at 600 and 1000 °C was applied to the deposits in order to obtain titanium aluminide intermetallic phases. The microstructure, chemical, and phase composition of the as-deposited and heat-treated coatings were investigated using SEM, EDS, and XRD. It was found that the Al content affects on the thickness expansion of the heat-treated Ti-Al coatings significantly and also has a major influence on the porosity development, which is caused by the Kirkendall effect. The effects of adding a third element Si and heat treatment with pressure to produce denser Ti-Al intermetallic coating were also examined. The investigated hot-pressed coatings with addition of Si exhibited much denser microstructure and contained Ti-Al intermetallic phases with titanium silicide precipitates.

  15. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  16. Characterization of Nanostructured NbSi2 Intermetallic Coatings Obtained by Plasma Spraying of Mechanically Alloyed Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Zohreh; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Abbasi, Mohammad-Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured NbSi2 powders plasma sprayed on to Ti-6Al-4V substrates were characterized in this research. After preparation of the nanostructured NbSi2 powders by mechanical alloying of an Nb-Si powder mixture, agglomeration was performed to obtain a particle size suitable for spraying. The agglomerated powders were then sprayed by atmospheric plasma spraying. Structural transformation of the powders and morphological and mechanical changes of the coatings were examined by use of x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and microhardness testing. During milling, NbSi2 intermetallic with a grain size of approximately 15 nm was gradually formed. After plasma spraying, a coating of hardness 550 ± 8 HV with a uniform nanocrystalline structure, low oxide content, low porosity, and a good adhesion to the substrate was obtained. No phase change occurred after spraying and the NbSi2 compound remained nanostructured with a grain size of approximately 82 nm.

  17. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-01-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis. PMID:27194417

  18. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  19. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-01-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis. PMID:27194417

  20. FeAl and NbAl3 Intermetallic-HVOF Coatings: Structure and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Cinca, N.; Dosta, S.; Cano, I. G.

    2009-12-01

    Transition metal aluminides in their coating form are currently being explored in terms of resistance to oxidation and mechanical behavior. This interest in transition metal aluminides is mainly due to the fact that their high Al content makes them attractive for high-temperature applications. This is also a reason to study their resistance to wear; they may be suitable for use in applications that produce a lot of wear in aggressive environments, thus replacing established coating materials. In this study, the microstructure, microhardness, and wear and oxidation performance of FeAl and NbAl3 coatings produced by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying are evaluated with two main aims: (i) to compare these two coating systems—a commonly studied aluminide (FeAl) and, NbAl3, an aluminide whose deposition by thermal spraying has not been attempted to date—and (ii) to analyze the relationship between their microstructure, composition and properties, and so clarify their wear and oxidation mechanisms. In the present study, the higher hardness of niobium aluminide coatings did not correlate with a higher wear resistance and, finally, although pesting phenomena (disintegration in oxidizing environments) were already known of in bulk niobium aluminides, here their behavior in the coating form is examined. It was shown that such accelerated oxidation was inevitable with respect to the better resistance of FeAl, but further improvements are foreseen by addition of alloying elements in that alloy.

  1. Influence of Detonation Gun Spraying Conditions on the Quality of Fe-Al Intermetallic Protective Coatings in the Presence of NiAl and NiCr Interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderowski, Cezary; Bojar, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    The paper presents results of detailed research of the application of detonation gun (D-gun) spraying process for deposition of Fe-Al intermetallic coatings in the presence of NiAl and NiCr interlayers. A number of D-gun experiments have been carried out with significant changes in spraying parameters which define the process energy levels (changes in volumes of the working and fuel gases, and the distance and frequency of spraying). These changes directly influenced the quality of the coatings. The initial results underlay the choice of the process parameters with the view to obtain the most advantageous of geometric and physical-mechanical properties of the coating material, interlayer and substrate. The metallurgical quality of the coatings was considered by taking into account grain morphology, the inhomogeneity of chemical content and phase structure, the cohesive porosity in the coating volume, and adhesive porosity in the substrate/interlayer/coating boundaries. The surface roughness level was also considered. It was found that the D-gun sprayed coatings are in all cases built with flat lamellar splats. The splats develop from powder particles which are D-gun transformed in their plasticity and geometry. A significant result of the optimization of D-gun spraying parameters is the lack of signs of melting of the material (even in microareas) while the geometry of the subsequently deposited grains is considerably changed and the adhesivity and cohesion of the layers proves to be high. This is considered as an undeniable proof of high plasticity of the D-gun formed Fe-Al intermetallic coating.

  2. Whisker formation in Sn and Pb-Sn coatings: Role of intermetallic growth, stress evolution, and plastic deformation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Jadhav, N.; Kumar, K. S.; Chan, W. L.; Reinbold, L.

    2008-04-28

    We have simultaneously measured the evolution of intermetallic volume, stress, and whisker density in Sn and Pb-Sn alloy layers on Cu to study the fundamental mechanisms controlling whisker formation. For pure Sn, the stress becomes increasingly compressive and then saturates, corresponding to a plastically deformed region spreading away from the growing intermetallic particles. Whisker nucleation begins after the stress saturates. Pb-Sn layers have similar intermetallic growth kinetics but the resulting stress and whisker density are much less. Measurements after sputtering demonstrate the important role of the surface oxide in inhibiting stress relaxation.

  3. Dynamic nanomechanical properties of novel Si-rich intermetallic coatings growth on a medical 316 LVM steel by hot dipping in a hypereutectic Al-25Si alloy.

    PubMed

    Frutos, E; González-Carrasco, J L

    2015-06-01

    This aim of this study is to determine the elastoplastic properties of Ni-free Al3FeSi2 intermetallic coatings grown on medical stainless steel under different experimental conditions. Elastoplastic properties are defined by the plasticity index (PI), which correlates the hardness and the Young's modulus. Special emphasis is devoted to correlate the PI with the wear resistance under sliding contact, determined by scratch testing, and fracture toughness, determined by using a novel method based on successive impacts with small loads. With regard to the substrate, the developed coatings are harder and exhibit a lower Young's reduced modulus, irrespective of the experimental conditions. It has been shown that preheating of the samples prior to hot dipping and immersion influences the type and volume fraction of precipitates, which in turn also affect the nanomechanical properties. The higher the preheating temperature is, the greater the Young's reduced modulus is. For a given preheating condition, an increase of the immersion time yields a decrease in hardness. Although apparent friction coefficients of coated specimens are smaller than those obtained on AISI 316 LVM, they increase when using preheating or higher immersion times during processing, which correlates with the PI. The presence of precipitates produces an increase in fracture toughness, with values greater than those presented by samples processed on melted AlSi alloys with lower Si content (12 wt%). Therefore, these intermetallic coatings could be considered "hard but tough", suitable to enhance the wear resistance, especially when using short periods of immersion. PMID:25778350

  4. The structure and physical-mechanical properties of the heat-resistant Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y intermetallic coating obtained using rebuilt plasma equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Yu. P.; Tsareva, I. N.; Berdnik, O. B.; Fel, Ya. A.; Kuzmin, V. I.; Mikhalchenko, A. A.; Kartaev, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    Results of a study of the structure, physico-mechanical properties, and the resistance to heat of Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y intermetallic coatings obtained by powder spraying on the standard UPU-3D plasma spray facility (plasmatron with self-establishing arc length) and on the rebuilt facility equipped with the enhanced-power PNK-50 plasmatron with sectionalized inter-electrode insert, are reported. Coatings of higher density ( ρ = 7.9 g/cm3) and higher microhardness (H μ = 770 kg-force/mm2) with lower porosity values ( P = 5.7 %, P c = 5.1 %, and P 0 = 0.6 %) and high resistance to heat ((M - M0)/M0 = 1.2) were obtained. The developed coating is intended for protection of the working surfaces of turbine engine blades in gas-turbine power plants.

  5. Microstructure and high-temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy surface by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongxi; Wang, Chuanqi; Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Yehua

    2010-11-01

    A high-temperature oxidation resistant TiN embedded in Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating was fabricated on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V surface by 6kW transverse-flow CO2 laser apparatus. The composition, morphology and microstructure of the laser clad TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). In order to evaluate the high-temperature oxidation resistance of the composite coatings and the titanium alloy substrate, isothermal oxidation test was performed in a conventional high-temperature resistance furnace at 600°C and 800°C respectively. The result shows that the laser clad intermetallic composite coating has a rapidly solidified fine microstructure consisting of TiN primary phase (granular-like, flake-like, and dendrites), and uniformly distributed in the Ti3Al matrix. It indicates that a physical and chemical reaction between the Ti powder and AlN powder occurred completely under the laser irradiation. In addition, the microhardness of the TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating is 844HV0.2, 3.4 times higher than that of the titanium alloy substrate. The high-temperature oxidation resistance test reveals that TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating results in the better modification of high-temperature oxidation behavior than the titanium substrate. The excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance of the laser cladding layer is attributed to the formation of the reinforced phase TiN and Al2O3, TiO2 hybrid oxide. Therefore, the laser cladding TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating is anticipated to be a promising oxidation resistance surface modification technique for Ti6Al4V alloy.

  6. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2015-11-20

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  7. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  8. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based Coatings Manufactured with HVOF and HVAF Thermal Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanti, A.; Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure and micromechanical behavior of thermally sprayed Fe-based coatings manufactured with high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes were investigated. Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C and Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C powders were used as the feedstock materials. The coatings showed a highly dense microstructure with near-zero oxidation. The microstructure of the feedstock powders was better retained when sprayed with HVAF process. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed two small exothermic peaks at about 600 °C for the HVOF-sprayed coatings, without any increase in weight in thermogravimetric analysis. It suggested the re-precipitation of carbides that were dissolved during spraying due to the higher particle temperature reported by spray diagnostics system during the HVOF process (≈1800 °C) compared to the HVAF one (≈1400 °C). Micro- and nano-indentations helped to show the difference in inter-lamellar cohesive strength and, in turn, in the particle deposition mechanism. Coatings sprayed with Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C composition possessed higher sliding wear resistance than that of Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C due to higher nano-hardness. More specifically, HVOF-sprayed Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C coating showed the largest intra-lamellar hardness, the largest elasticity, and high quality of particle interfaces which resulted in lower sliding wear rate.

  9. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based Coatings Manufactured with HVOF and HVAF Thermal Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanti, A.; Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure and micromechanical behavior of thermally sprayed Fe-based coatings manufactured with high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes were investigated. Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C and Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C powders were used as the feedstock materials. The coatings showed a highly dense microstructure with near-zero oxidation. The microstructure of the feedstock powders was better retained when sprayed with HVAF process. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed two small exothermic peaks at about 600 °C for the HVOF-sprayed coatings, without any increase in weight in thermogravimetric analysis. It suggested the re-precipitation of carbides that were dissolved during spraying due to the higher particle temperature reported by spray diagnostics system during the HVOF process (≈1800 °C) compared to the HVAF one (≈1400 °C). Micro- and nano-indentations helped to show the difference in inter-lamellar cohesive strength and, in turn, in the particle deposition mechanism. Coatings sprayed with Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C composition possessed higher sliding wear resistance than that of Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C due to higher nano-hardness. More specifically, HVOF-sprayed Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C coating showed the largest intra-lamellar hardness, the largest elasticity, and high quality of particle interfaces which resulted in lower sliding wear rate.

  10. Processing and properties of molybdenum silicide intermetallics containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L. Jr.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1998-11-01

    The processing and mechanical properties of Mo-Si-B intermetallic alloys with compositions Mo-26.7Si-7.3B and Mo-12Si-8.5B (at.%) were investigated. The first alloy consisted of the phases Mo{sub 3}Si, Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} (T1) and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2). Attempts to extrude castings of this alloy at 1700 or 1800 C were not successful. Hot isostatic pressing of elemental powders was more promising and room temperature flexure strengths on the order of 200 MPa were reached. The second alloy with the composition Mo-12Si-8.5B could be readily cast and consisted of {alpha}-Mo inclusion in a brittle matrix of Mo{sub 3}Si and T2. A heat treatment of 1 day at 1600C in vacuum improved the room temperature strength and fracture toughness. Values on the order of 500 MPa and 10 MPa m{sup 1/2}, respectively, were obtained. Consistent with ductile phase toughening, limited plastic deformation as well as debonding of the {alpha}-Mo inclusions were seen on fracture surfaces.

  11. In-situ identification of iron--zinc intermetallics in galvannealed steel coatings and iron oxides on exposed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Desmond C.

    1998-12-01

    Identification of all the compounds present in various coatings on steels is particularly difficult. Non-destructive, in-situ analysis is necessary if the fraction of each compound as well as its probable layering within the coating, is to be determined. Mössbauer spectroscopy is one valuable probe capable of uniquely identifying all iron compounds which form as coatings on steel and other iron alloy surfaces. To investigate a complete coating several criteria need to be considered. Removing the coating inevitably leaves a small and perhaps important component intact on the substrate. Therefore investigating the coating as it remains intact on the steel is important if complete identification of the iron compounds is to be made. This also preserves crystalline texture or preferred growth orientation within the coating to which the Mössbauer effect is sensitive. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique which allows the integrity of the coating to be maintained during analysis. The combined transmission and scattering Mössbauer geometries generally result in accurate analysis of the coating composition. For the scattering geometry added information on compound layering is obtained if separate Mössbauer spectra are recorded using the re-emitted gamma rays as well as the conversion electrons and subsequently emitted X-rays. In-situ scattering Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to characterize the iron--zinc alloys which form in the coatings of commercially produced corrosion resistant galvannealed sheet steel, a product of great interest to automotive producers. The results show that different amounts of four iron--zinc phases are present depending on the production conditions of the coating. The different phases are also distinctly layered. Mössbauer analyses of corrosion coatings formed on the surface of steels which have been exposed to different environments has also been undertaken. Materials include structural steels exposed for up to 25

  12. The structure and composition of chromate conversion coatings formed on aluminum-copper alloy AA2024-T3 and thin film analogs of constituent intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Marvin Jaime

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of spectroscopy have been used to study the composition and structure of Chromate Conversion Coatings (CCC) formed on Aluminum Copper (Al-Cu) alloy AA2024-T3 and constituent Intermetallic Compounds (IMCs). Based on previous work the CCC formed over the IMCs is expected to be thinner and therefore different in structure and composition than the CCC formed on the matrix. The formation of the CCC over the different IMCs is expected to be dependent on the chemistry and the interaction of the IMCs with accelerators such as ferricyanide. Surface chemical and structural data determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Secondary Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDAX) have been developed to refine an existing model for the CCC formed on the AA2024-T3 surface, an Al-Cu aircraft alloy, by considering the composition and structure of the CCC formed on constituent intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The limited corrosion behavior of AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy is generally attributed to the presence of a variety of constituent IMC. These IMC particles are of the order of 1--20 mum which makes their direct analysis exceedingly difficult and has lead to a limited understanding of their surface chemical properties relative to CCC formation. To overcome this limitation, it was necessary to develop for the first time large area samples composed of compositionally homogenous thin films of the various IMCs found on the AA2024-T3 surface, which were galvanically attached to thin films of Al-4.2wt%Cu (representative of the AA2024-T3 matrix). This was performed in a two-step process: Disks of IMC compositions were formed by Reactive Arc Melting (RAM), followed by ultra-fast laser ablation of the RAM IMCs resulting in the formation of homogenous thin films

  13. Al-21Ti-23Cr high-temperature protective coating on TiAl intermetallic compounds by RF magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.Y.; Lee, H.N.; Wee, D.M.; Park, S.W.; Oh, M.H.

    1997-12-31

    Ti-48Al specimens were coated with Al-21Ti-23Cr film at 200 W, 0.8 Pa and 573 K by RF magnetron sputtering. The oxidation behavior of the coated specimens was investigated through isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests, and the tensile deformation properties of the coated specimens were also investigated before and after oxidation. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation curves showed that the Al-21Ti-23Cr film was very effective in decreasing the oxidation rate of Ti-48Al. This excellent oxidation resistance is attributable to the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on the surface of the Al-21Ti-23Cr film. It was found from the results of the tensile test that the protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on the surface of the Al-21Ti-23Cr film enabled the Ti-48Al to maintain its tensile properties in an oxidizing environment.

  14. Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagiwa, Y.; Matsuura, Y.; Kimura, K.

    2014-06-01

    We have focused on the binary narrow-bandgap intermetallic compounds FeGa3 and RuGa3 as thermoelectric materials. Their crystal structure is FeGa3-type (tetragonal, P42/ mnm) with 16 atoms per unit cell. Despite their simple crystal structure, their room temperature thermal conductivity is in the range 4-5-W-m-1-K-1. Both compounds have narrow-bandgaps of approximately 0.3-eV near the Fermi level. Because their Seebeck coefficients are quite large negative values in the range 350-<-| S 373K|-<-550- μV-K-1 for undoped samples, it should be possible to obtain highly efficient thermoelectric materials both by adjusting the carrier concentration and by reducing the thermal conductivity. Here, we report the effects of doping on the thermoelectric properties of FeGa3 and RuGa3 as n and p-type materials. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, was significantly improved by substitution of Sn for Ga in FeGa3 (electron-doping) and by substitution of Zn for Ga in RuGa3 (hole-doping), mainly as a result of optimization of the electronic part, S 2 σ.

  15. Reaction synthesis of intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Sikka, V.K.

    1994-12-31

    Exothermicity associated with the synthesis of aluminides was utilized to obtain nickel, iron, and cobalt aluminides. Combustion synthesis, extrusion, and hot pressing were utilized to obtain intermetallics and their composites. Extrusion conditions, reduction ratios, and hot-pressing conditions of the intermetallics and their composites are discussed.

  16. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  17. Dislocation sources in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.; Mecking, H.

    1996-09-01

    An overview on the current understanding of dislocation sources and multiplication mechanisms is made for ordered intermetallic alloys of the L1{sub 2}, B2, and D0{sub 19} structures. In L1{sub 2} alloys, a large disparity of edge/screw segments in their relative mobility reduces the efficiency of a Frank-Read Type multiplication mechanism. In Fe-40%Al of the B2 structure, a variety of dislocation sources are available for <111> slip, including ones resulting from condensation of thermal vacancies. In NiAl with the relatively high APB energy, <100> dislocations may result from the dislocation decomposition reactions, the prismatic punching out from inclusion particles, and/or steps and coated layers of the surface. Internal interfaces often provide sites for dislocation multiplication, e.g., grain boundaries, sub-boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Ga, NiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al, and antiphase domain boundaries in Ti{sub 3}Al. As for the crack tip as a dislocation source, extended SISFs trailed by super-Shockley partials emanating form the cracks in Ni{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Ti are discussed in view of a possible toughening mechanism.

  18. Recent advances in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1992-12-31

    This paper briefly summarizes recent advances in intermetallic research and development. Ordered intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides possess attractive properties for structural applications at elevated temperatures in hostile environments; however, brittle fracture and poor fracture resistance limit their use as engineering materials in many cases. In recent years, considerable efforts have been devoted to the study of the brittle fracture behavior of intermetallic alloys; as a result, both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing brittle fracture have been identified. Recent advances in first-principles calculations and atomistic simulations further help us in understanding atomic bonding, dislocation configuration, and alloying effects in intermetallics. The basic understanding has led to the development of nickel, iron, and titanium aluminide alloys with improved mechanical and metallurgical properties for structural use. Industrial interest in ductile intermetallic alloys is high, and several examples of industrial involvement are mentioned.

  19. Recent advances in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    Ordered intermetallic alloys based on aluminides and silicides offer many advantages for structural use at high temperatures in hostile environments. Attractive properties include excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance, light weight, and superior strength at high temperatures. The major concern for structural use of intermetallics was their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. For the past 10 years, considerable effort was devoted to R&D of ordered intermetallic alloys, and progress has been made on understanding intrinsic and extrinsic factors controlling brittle fracture in intermetallic alloys based on aluminides and silicides. Parallel effort on alloy design has led to the development of a number of ductile and strong intermetallic alloys based on Ni{sub 3}Al, NiAl, Fe{sub 3}Al, FeAl, Ti{sub 3}Al, and TiAl systems for structural applications.

  20. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.G.; Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  1. Microstructure and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed Ni-50Cr Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Joel A. Simpson; Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright

    2006-06-01

    Thermal spray coatings represent a potential cost-effective means of protecting structural components in advanced fossil energy systems. Previous work at the INL has focused on relationships between thermal spray processing conditions, structure, and properties in alumina- and silica-forming coatings, namely Fe3Al, FeAl, and Mo-Si-B alloys. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of chromia-forming Ni-50%Cr coatings, an alloy similar to the INCOCLAD 671 cladding, which has shown excellent performance in the Niles Plant service tests. The structure and properties of Ni-50Cr coatings are similar to other HVOF-sprayed metallic coatings: a typical lamellar microstructure is observed with essentially no porosity and little oxide. The microhardness and compressive residual stress both increase with increased spray particle velocity. Corrosion tests were performed on a variety of free-standing coatings (removed from the substrate, wrought Fe3Al alloy, and Grade 91 steel in a simulated coal combustion gas (N2-10%CO-5%CO2-2%H2O-0.12%H2S) and gas-slag environments (same gas, with iron sulfide powder in contact with the coating surface). The coatings tested included Fe3Al, FeAl, and Ni-50Cr alloys sprayed at different velocities. In these tests the iron aluminides in wrought and coating form showed the best performance, with Ni-50Cr coatings slightly worse; the Grade 91 steel was severely attacked.

  2. Property evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coating by acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Asako; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Mikio; Ono, Kanji

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed acoustic emission signals from plasma sprayed sheets by first obtaining the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density. The sheets of a high Cr-Ni alloy (55Cr-41Ni-Mo, Si, B) were made by low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) and heat treated. Utilizing laser induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs), the group velocity dispersion data of Rayleigh waves was obtained and matched to that computed by Adler's matrix transfer method. They monitored the acoustic emissions (Lamb waves) produced by microfractures in free standing as sprayed coating subjected to bending. Fast cleavage type microfracture with source rise time of around 2 {micro}s occurred as precursors to the final brittle fracture. The velocity and time-frequency amplitude spectrograms (wavelet contour maps) of the Lamb waves were utilized for the source location and fracture kinetic analyses.

  3. Intermetallic Layers in Soldered Joints

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-12-10

    ILAG solves the one-dimensional partial differential equations describing the multiphase, multicomponent, solid-state diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic layers in soldered joints. This software provides an analysis capability for materials researchers to examine intermetallic growth mechanisms in a wide variety of defense and commercial applications involving both traditional and advanced materials. ILAG calculates the interface positions of the layers, as well as the spatial distribution of constituent mass fractions, and outputs the results at user-prescribed simulation times.

  4. Intermetallics for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Intermetallics are introduced as possible structural materials. The attributes and useful temperature limits of eight of the most likely candidates have been described. In addition, detailed descriptions are given for chemical compositions, corrosion properties, mechanical properties, melting and processing, and applications of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys. Mechanical properties of Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys are compared with commercially used HU alloys in the cast condition and Haynes 214 in the wrought condition. The mechanical properties of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys are compared with an oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Inco alloy MA-956. Comparisons have shown that Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys offer the best combination of oxidation and carburization resistance and are significantly stronger than the commercially used HU alloy for many of the furnace-fixture applications. However, the Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys, which offer the best sulfidation resistance of the commercially available alloys, are significantly weaker in creep than the ODS MA-956 alloy. Even with the current strength level, Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys are superior as porous, sintered metal filters for hot-gas cleanup in coal gasification systems. Oxide-dispersion strengthening of the Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is currently under way to improve their creep strength.

  5. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  6. Third Intermetallic Matrix Composites Symposium, volume 350

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J.A.; Bowman, R.R.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    Partial contents include: issues in potential IMC application for aerospace structures; powder metallurgy processing of intermetallic matrix composites; microstructure and properties of intermetallic matrix composites produced by reaction synthesis; combustion synthesis of niobium aluminide matrix composites; ambient temperature synthesis of bulk intermetallics; wear behavior of SHS intermetallic matrix composites; fracture characteristics of metal-intermetallic laminates produced by SHS reactions; and vapor phase synthesis of Ti aluminides and the interfacial bonding effect on the mechanical property of micro-composites reinforced by pyrolized SiC fibers.

  7. Low-Temperature Synthesis Routes to Intermetallic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Schaak, Raymond E

    2008-01-08

    of many of the products, the superconductors and their nanocrystalline precursors are potentially amenable to inexpensive and large-scale solution-based processing into wires, coatings, films, and templated or patterned structures with nanoscale and microscale features. Also, because of the new synthetic variables that play a key role in the low-temperature formation of intermetallics, the possibility exists to discover new superconductors.

  8. Microstructure of a plasma-sprayed Mo-Si-B alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Okumus, S. C.; Besser, M. F.; Ünal, Ö.; Akinc, M.

    2000-03-01

    Powders of Mo52Si38B10 were plasma sprayed under inert conditions onto stainless steel substrates to determine if high density free standing forms could be synthesized by this process. Thermal spray conditions were varied to minimize porosity and oxygen impurities while minimizing evaporative metal losses. The assprayed and sintered microstructures were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and quantitative x-ray diffraction (XRD). The as-sprayed microstructure consisted of elongated splats tens of microns in length and only one to three microns in thickness. The splats contained submicrometer grains of primarily MoB and Mo5Si3B x (T1) and minor amounts of MoSi2 and a glassy grain boundary phase. The interior of the splats typically consisted of a fine eutectic of MoB and T1. Small pieces were cut out of the cross section of the sample and pressureless sintered for 2, 6, and 10 h at 1800 °C in flowing Ar. After sintering for 2 h at 1800 °C, the samples exhibited a coarser but equiaxed microstructure (1 to 5 µm grain size) containing 78 vol.% T1, 16 vol.% MoB, and 6 vol.% MoSi2 as determined by XRD. Approximately 8 at.% of the Si formed silica. The high-temperature anneal removed all vestiges of the layered structure observed in the as-sprayed samples.

  9. Phase Stability and Deformation Behavior of Mo-Si-B System and effect of alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2012-02-01

    Molybdenum silicides are promising materials for ultra-high temperature applications above 1300 C. One of the main drawbacks is their brittleness at low temperatures, which may be improved by additions. We employ first principles calculations with the highly precise FLAPW method to investigate the effect of alloying with 3d, 4d and 5d transition metals on phase stability, cleavage and shear characteristics of the 3-component system Mo -- Mo3Si -- Mo5SiB2. We determined site preference, phase partitioning of alloying elements, and their effect on shear behavior and preferred deformation modes. We show that in Mo3Si alloying with 3d transition metals results in a significant reduction of energy barriers to shear deformation (softening effect), while 4d and 5d additions increase shear barriers (hardening effect). In Mo5SiB2, 3d transition metals (except for Ti) act as weak softeners, while 4d and 5d show mixed behavior -- hardening for early elements and softening for late ones. The softening potency of additions increases with atomic number, but exhibits non-monotonic behavior as a result of a competition between size and electronic effects. The results are discussed in conjunction with possible pathways to ductility enhancement through alloying.

  10. Fracture and fatigue resistance of Mo-Si-B alloys for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, J.J.; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-08-29

    Fracture and fatigue-crack growth properties are examined for a series of Mo-Mo3Si-Mo5SiB2 containing alloys, which utilize a continuous a-Mo matrix to achieve unprecedented room-temperature fracture resistance (>20 MPaAm). Mechanistically, these properties are explained in terms of toughening by crack trapping and crack bridging by the more ductile a-Mo phase.

  11. Intermetallic-Based High-Temperature Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1999-04-25

    The intermetallic-based alloys for high-temperature applications are introduced. General characteristics of intermetallics are followed by identification of nickel and iron aluminides as the most practical alloys for commercial applications. An overview of the alloy compositions, melting processes, and mechanical properties for nickel and iron aluminizes are presented. The current applications and commercial producers of nickel and iron aluminizes are given. A brief description of the future prospects of intermetallic-based alloys is also given.

  12. Method for making devices having intermetallic structures and intermetallic devices made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Brian Kevin; Wilson, Richard Dean; Alman, David Eli

    2004-01-06

    A method and system for making a monolithic intermetallic structure are presented. The structure is made from lamina blanks which comprise multiple layers of metals which are patternable, or intermetallic lamina blanks that are patternable. Lamina blanks are patterned, stacked and registered, and processed to form a monolithic intermetallic structure. The advantages of a patterned monolithic intermetallic structure include physical characteristics such as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Applications are broad, and include among others, use as a microreactor, heat recycling device, and apparatus for producing superheated steam. Monolithic intermetallic structures may contain one or more catalysts within the internal features.

  13. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  14. Microstructure and wear behavior of γ/Al 4C 3/TiC/CaF 2 composite coating on γ-TiAl intermetallic alloy prepared by Nd:YAG laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-Bo; Shi, Shi-Hong; Guo, Jian; Fu, Ge-Yan; Wang, Ming-Di

    2009-03-01

    As a further step in obtaining high performance elevated temperature self-lubrication anti-wear composite coatings on TiAl alloy, a novel Ni-P electroless plating method was adopted to encapsulate the as-received CaF 2 in the preparation of precursor NiCr-Cr 3C 2-CaF 2 mixed powders with an aim to decrease its mass loss and increase its compatibility with the metal matrix during a Nd:YAG laser cladding. The microstructure of the coating was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against the hardened 0.45% C steel ring was evaluated using a block-on-ring wear tester at room temperature. It was found that the coating had a unique microstructure consisting of primary dendrites TiC and block Al 4C 3 carbides reinforcement as well as fine isolated spherical CaF 2 solid lubrication particles uniformly dispersed in the NiCrAlTi ( γ) matrix. The good friction-reducing and anti-wear abilities of the laser clad composite coating was suggested to the Ni-P electroless plating and the attendant reduction of mass loss of CaF 2 and the increasing of it's wettability with the NiCrAlTi ( γ) matrix during the laser cladding process.

  15. Structure Defect Property Relationships in Binary Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ding, Hong; Chen, Wei; Persson, Kristin; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordered intermetallics are light weight materials with technologically useful high temperature properties such as creep resistance. Knowledge of constitutional and thermal defects is required to understand these properties. Vacancies and antisites are the dominant defects in the intermetallics and their concentrations and formation enthalpies could be computed by using first principles density functional theory and thermodynamic formalisms such as dilute solution method. Previously many properties of the intermetallics such as melting temperatures and formation enthalpies were statistically analyzed for large number of intermetallics using structure maps and data mining approaches. We undertook a similar exercise to establish the dependence of the defect properties in binary intermetallics on the underlying structural and chemical composition. For more than 200 binary intermetallics comprising of AB, AB2 and AB3 structures, we computed the concentrations and formation enthalpies of vacancies and antisites in a small range of stoichiometries deviating from ideal stoichiometry. The calculated defect properties were datamined to gain predictive capabilities of defect properties as well as to classify the intermetallics for their suitability in high-T applications. Supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231 under the Materials Project Center grant (Award No. EDCBEE).

  16. Environmental Effects in Advanced Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-11-24

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of environmental embrittlement in iron and nickel aluminizes. The embrittlement involves the interaction of these intermetallics with moisture in air and generation of atomic hydrogen, resulting in hydrogen-induced embrittlement at ambient temperatures. Environmental embrittlement promotes brittle grain-boundary fracture in Ni{sub 3}Al alloys but brittle cleavage fracture in Fe{sub 3}Al-FeAl alloys. The embrittlement strongly depends on strain rate, with tensile-ductility increase with increasing strain rate. It has been demonstrated that environmental embrittlement can be alleviated by alloying additions, surface modifications, and control of grain size and shape. Boron tends to segregate strongly to grain boundaries and is most effective in suppressing environmental embrittlement in Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. The mechanistic understanding of alloy effects and environmental embrittlement has led to the development of nickel and iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for structural use at elevated temperatures in hostile environments.

  17. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, Kevin; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite.

  18. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  19. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  20. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ZIRCALOY-4 SUBSTRATES WITH NICKEL ZIRCONIUM INTERMETALLICS

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Gilbert, Edgar R.; Pitman, Stan G.; Love, Edward F.

    2013-02-01

    Surfaces of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) substrates were modified with nickel-zirconium (NiZr) intermetallics to tailor oxidation performance for specialized applications. Surface modification was achieved by electroplating Zr-4 substrates with nickel (Ni) and then performing thermal treatments to fully react the Ni plating with the substrates, which resulted in a coating of NiZr intermetallics on the substrate surfaces. Both plating thickness and thermal treatment were evaluated to determine the effects of these fabrication parameters on oxidation performance and to identify an optimal surface modification process. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed on surface-modified materials at 290°, 330°, and 370°C under a constant partial pressure of oxidant (i.e., 1 kPa D2O in dry Ar at 101 kPa) for 64 days. Test results revealed an enhanced, transient oxidation rate that decreased asymptotically toward the rate of the Zr-4 substrate. Oxidation kinetics were analyzed from isothermal weight gain data, which were correlated with microstructure, hydrogen pickup, strength, and hardness.

  1. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  2. Overview of the development of FeAl intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Liu, C.T.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-09-01

    B2-phase FeAl ordered intermetallic alloys based on an Fe-36 at.% Al composition are being developed to optimize a combination of properties that includes high-temperature strength, room-temperature ductility, and weldability. Microalloying with boron and proper processing are very important for FeAl properties optimization. These alloys also have the good to outstanding resistance to oxidation, sulfidation, and corrosion in molten salts or chlorides at elevated temperatures, characteristic of FeAl with 30--40 at.% Al. Ingot- and powder-metallurgy (IM and PM, respectively) processing both produce good properties, including strength above 400 MPa up to about 750 C. Technology development to produce FeAl components for industry testing is in progress. In parallel, weld-overlay cladding and powder coating technologies are also being developed to take immediate advantage of the high-temperature corrosion/oxidation and erosion/wear resistance of FeAl.

  3. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  4. Growth behavior and corrosion resistance of 5% Al-Zn coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, K.L.; Ho, J.K.; Lee, J.T. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Effects of reaction time and temperature on growth behavior and corrosion performance of batch type 5% aluminum-zinc (Al-Zn) coating were investigated. A fast growth in coating thickness and intermetallic layer occurred within temperatures of 480 C. to 520 C. The coatings grew to a maximum thickness after 520 C. Corrosion performance was enhanced greatly by formation of an intermetallic layer. The best performance was produced at 500 C.

  5. Reduced workfunction intermetallic seed layers allow growth of porous n-GaN and low resistivity, ohmic electron transport.

    PubMed

    Bilousov, Oleksandr V; Carvajal, Joan J; Drouin, Dominique; Mateos, Xavier; Díaz, Francesc; Aguiló, Magdalena; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2012-12-01

    Porous GaN crystals have been successfully grown and electrically contacted simultaneously on Pt- and Au-coated silicon substrates as porous crystals and as porous layers. By the direct reaction of metallic Ga and NH(3) gas through chemical vapor deposition, intermetallic metal-Ga alloys form at the GaN-metal interface, allowing vapor-solid-solid seeding and subsequent growth of porous GaN. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements confirm that the intermetallic seed layers prevent interface oxidation and give a high-quality reduced workfunction contact that allows exceptionally low contact resistivities. Additionally, the simultaneous formation of a lower workfunction intermetallic permits ohmic electron transport to n-type GaN grown using high workfunction metals that best catalyze the formation of porous GaN layers and may be employed to seed and ohmically contact a range of III-N compounds and alloys for broadband absorption and emission. PMID:23167596

  6. Surfaces of Intermetallics: Quasicrystals and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, Chad

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize surfaces of intermetallics, including quasicrystals. In this work, surface characterization is primarily focused on composition and structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.

  7. High-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys VII

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.C.; Liu, C.T.; Stoloff, N.S.; Wanner, A.

    1997-12-31

    This volume is divided into the following sections: (1) processing; (2) titanium aluminides; (3) creep and fatigue of titanium aluminides; (4) iron aluminides; (5) nickel aluminides; (6) refractory metal-based and other intermetallics; and (7) composites. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Nanoparticles of Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2015-03-12

    The research program from 2010 to the end of the grant focused on understanding the factors important to the synthesis of single phase intermetallic nano-particles (NPs), their size, crystalline order, surface properties and electrochemical activity. The synthetic method developed is a co-reduction of mixtures of single metal precursors by strong, soluble reducing agents in a non-protic solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). With some exceptions, the particles obtained by room temperature reduction are random alloys that need to be annealed at modest temperatures (200 to 600 °C) in order to develop an ordered structure. To avoid significant particle size growth and agglomeration, the particles must be protected by surface coatings. We developed a novel method of coating the metal nanoparticles with KCl, a by-product of the reduction reaction if the proper reducing agents are employed. In that case, a composite product containing individual metal nanoparticles in a KCl matrix is obtained. The composite can be heated to at least 600 °C without significant agglomeration or growth in particle size. Washing the annealed product in the presence of catalyst supports in ethylene glycol removes the KCl and deposits the particles on the support. Six publications present the method and its application to producing and studying new catalyst/support combinations for fuel cell applications. Three publications concern the use of related methods to explore new lithium-sulfur battery concepts.

  9. Forging of FeAl intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Juarez, J.; Campillo, B.; Martinez, L.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Much activity has been concentrated on the development of intermetallic compounds with the aim of improving tensile ductility, fracture toughness and high notch sensitivity in order to develop an attractive combination of properties for high and low temperature applications. This paper reports experience in processing and forging of FeAl intermetallic of B2 type. During the experiments two different temperatures were employed, and the specimens were forged after annealing in air, 10{sup {minus}2} torr vacuum and argon. From the results it was learned that annealing FeAl in argon atmosphere prior to forging resulted in better deformation behavior than for the other two environments. For the higher forging temperature used in the experiments (700C), the as-cast microstructure becomes partially recrystallized.

  10. Arc Casting Intermetallic Alloy (Materials Preparation Center)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Arc casting of intermetallic (La-Ni-Sn) AB5 alloy used for metal hydride hydrogen storage. Upon solidification the Sn is partially rejected and increases in concentration in the remaining liquid. Upon completing solidification there is a great deal of internal stress in the ingot. As the ingot cools further the stress is relieved. This material was cast at the Ames Laboratorys Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  11. Plasma spray forming metals, intermetallics, and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Sanjay; Herman, Herbert

    1993-07-01

    Plasma spray processing is a droplet deposition method that combines the steps of melting, rapid solidification, and consolidation into a single step. The versatility of the technology enables the processing of freestanding bulk, near-net shapes of a wide range of alloys, intermetallics, ceramics, and composites, while still retaining the benefits of rapid solidification processing. In particular, it is possible to produce dense forms through vacuum plasma spraying.

  12. Oxygen stabilized zirconium vanadium intermetallic compound

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1982-01-01

    An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr.sub.x OV.sub.y where x=0.7 to 2.0 and y=0.18 to 0.33. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 450.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO.sub.2.

  13. Brushing up on the history of intermetallics in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterstrat, Richard M.

    1990-03-01

    Employing a silver-tin-mercury intermetallic to repair cavities may seem a little unusual, but intermetallics are quite common in dentistry, ranging from gold crowns to braces. Although the human mouth can be unfriendly territory for a brittle intermetallic alloy, dental amalgam has been around since 659 A.D., and its technology has been developed to the point where a filling can be expected to last 30 years or more.

  14. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Monica Sorescu

    2003-05-07

    This six-month work is focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}2, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T=Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe(80-20 wt%) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x=0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co(80-20 wt%) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which are currently being considered for publication in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Journal of Materials Science. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of

  15. Identification and Characterization of the Iron - Intermetallics Formed in Galvanneal Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Richard Frederick George

    1995-01-01

    electrons which are emitted from the galvanneal coatings following the resonant absorption of a gamma -ray. The detector probes the full coating depth allowing the complete coating composition to be determined. Finally, the database of the crystallographic and hyperfine parameters of the iron-zinc intermetallics along with the new detector were used to study several commercially produced galvanneal coatings. The detailed analysis of the coatings has enabled the positive identification of the phases as layers within the coatings. Phase fractions and relative iron concentrations were determined for each coating. Furthermore, the Mossbauer spectral areas showed a linear correlation with the weight of iron in the coatings. Lastly, the effect of aluminum impurity in the galvanneal bath on phase formation was investigated.

  16. Nonstoichiometry of Al-Zr intermetallic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Radmilovic, V.; Thomas, G.

    1994-06-01

    Nonstoichiometry of metastable cubic {beta}{prime} and equilibrium tetragonal {beta} Al-Zr intermetallic phases of the nominal composition Al{sub 3}Zr in Al-rich alloys has been extensively studied. It is proposed that the ``dark contrast`` of {beta}{prime} core in {beta}{prime}/{sigma}{prime} complex precipitates, in Al-Li-Zr based alloys, is caused by incorporation of Al and Li atoms into the {beta}{prime} phase on Zr sublattice sites, forming nonstoichiometric Al-Zr intermetallic phases, rather than by Li partitioning only. {beta}{prime} particles contain very small amounts of Zr, approximately 5 at.%, much less than the stoichiometric 25 at.% in the Al{sub 3}Zr metastable phase. These particles are, according to simulation of high resolution images, of the Al{sub 3}(Al{sub 0.4}Li{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 0.2}) type. Nonstoichiometric particles of average composition Al{sub 4}Zr and Al{sub 6}Zr are observed also in the binary Al-Zr alloy, even after annealing for several hours at 600{degree}C.

  17. Oxidation of high-temperature intermetallics; Proceedings of the Workshop, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 22, 23, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni (Editor); Doychak, Joseph (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of aerospace structures-applicable intermetallic compounds discusses the influence of reactive-element additions on the oxidation of Ni3Al base alloys, the effect of Ni3Al oxidation below 850 C on fracture behavior, the oxidation of FeAl + Hf, Zr, and B, the synergistic effect of Al and Si on the oxidation resistance of Fe alloys, and pack cementation coatings of Cr-Al on Fe, Ni, and Co alloys. Also discussed are the formation of alumina on Nb- and Ti-base alloys, the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, silicide coatings for refractory metals, the oxidation of chromium disilicide, and the oxidation behavior of nickel beryllides.

  18. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  19. Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  20. Titanium aluminide intermetallic alloys with improved wear resistance

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay; Blau, Peter J.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2014-07-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy composition having an improved wear resistance, the method comprising heating a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy material in an oxygen-containing environment at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a top oxide layer and underlying oxygen-diffused layer, followed by removal of the top oxide layer such that the oxygen-diffused layer is exposed. The invention is also directed to the resulting oxygen-diffused titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy, as well as mechanical components or devices containing the improved alloy composition.

  1. Containerless automated processing of intermetallic compounds and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Joslin, S. M.; Reviere, R. D.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    An automated containerless processing system has been developed to directionally solidify high temperature materials, intermetallic compounds, and intermetallic/metallic composites. The system incorporates a wide range of ultra-high purity chemical processing conditions. The utilization of image processing for automated control negates the need for temperature measurements for process control. The list of recent systems that have been processed includes Cr, Mo, Mn, Nb, Ni, Ti, V, and Zr containing aluminides. Possible uses of the system, process control approaches, and properties and structures of recently processed intermetallics are reviewed.

  2. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  3. Roles of Titanium-Intermetallic Compound Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chii-Chang

    Four different configurations have been tested: Al-Cu, Ti/Al-Cu, Al-Cu/Ti, and Ti/Al-Cu/Ti to evaluate the possible contributions of Ti-intermetallic compound layer(s) to enhancement of the lifetime to failure. Basically, the proposed mechanisms can be classified into two groups: shunting effect and effects limited to changes in Al-Cu conducting layer(s). A resistance monitoring technique was adopted to supplement lifetime measurement to separate these two effects. By correlating the first resistance jump (spike) to the happening of a complete open across Al-Cu layer, it was found that the shunting effect contributes to enhancement of the lifetime by 4 times in Ti/Al-Cu, 2 times in Al-Cu/Ti, and 2 times in Ti/Al-Cu/Ti. A Ti underlayer was found to contribute mainly the shunting effect. However, from drift velocity measurements and failure mode analysis, it is possible to deduce that a Ti overlayer contributes not only the shunting effect but also another effect that acts to diminish the grain boundary mass transport rate by a factor of about 76. It is believed that the latter effect is a consequence of the high compressive yield stength conferred by the Ti-intermetallic compound overlayer to the Al-Cu layer. Finally, an important non-destructive technique, based on the characteristic x-rays generated by energetic electrons, to characterize the mass divergences in multilayer interconnects, was developed in this research, called SMEISIS, representing Simultaneous Multiple Elements Intensity Scanning of Interconnecting Stripes. This technique was proved to be capable of revealing detail about the shapes, nature, and location of mass divergence that cannot be revealed by thermal wave image technique and that requires time consuming multiple sectioning in TEM and SEM methods.

  4. Multishell Intermetallic Onions by Symmetrical Configuration of Ordered Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, R.; Chen, W.; Cheng, Z. Y.; Li, Y. D.; Zhu, J.

    2010-11-01

    Ordered domains are utilized to construct new nanostructures, i.e., multishell intermetallic onions, which are formed by symmetrical configuration of ordered domains. Through density-functional theory calculations, we have shown that the energy penalties for introducing antiphase boundaries into the nanoparticles are small in some alloy systems compared to typical surface energies, making it feasible to prepare intermetallic onions by tuning surface energies. The unique surface atomic arrangements would provide opportunities for developing novel materials like efficient catalysts.

  5. Section 2: Phase transformation studies in mechanically alloyed Fe-Nz and Fe-Zn-Si intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, A.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    The initial stage of this study, which was completed in FY 1995, entailed an extensive analysis characterizing the structural evolution of the Fe-Zn intermetallic system. The primary interest in these Fe-Zn phases stems from the fact that they form an excellent coating for the corrosion protection of steel (i.e., automobile body panels). The Fe-Zn coating generally forms up to four intermetallic phases depending on the particular industrial application used, (i.e., galvanization, galvannealing, etc.). Since the different coating applications are non-equilibrium in nature, it becomes necessary to employ a non-equilibrium method for producing homogeneous alloys in the solid-state to reflect the structural changes occurring in a true coating. This was accomplished through the use of a high energy/non-equilibrium technique known as ball-milling which allowed the authors to monitor the evolution process of the alloys as they transformed from a metastable to stable equilibrium state. In FY 1996, this study was expanded to evaluate the presence of Si in the Fe-Zn system and its influence in the overall coating. The addition of silicon in steel gives rise to an increased coating. However, the mechanisms leading to the coating anomaly are still not fully understood. For this reason, mechanical alloying through ball-milling of pure elemental powders was used to study the structural changes occurring in the sandelin region (i.e., 0.12 wt % Si). Through the identification of invariant reactions (i.e., eutectic, etc.) the authors were able to explore the sandelin phenomenon and also determine the various fields or boundaries associated with the Fe-Zn-Si ternary system.

  6. First Principles Study of Al-Li Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-li; Duan, Xiao-hui; Ma, Yong-jun; Zeng, Min

    2012-12-01

    The structural properties, heats of formation, elastic properties, and electronic structures of four compositions of binary Al-Li intermetallics, Al3Li, AlLi, Al2Li3, and Al4Li9, are analyzed in detail by using density functional theory. The calculated formation heats indicate a strong chemical interaction between Al and Li for all the Al-Li intermetallics. In particular, in the Li-rich Al-Li compounds, the thermodynamic stability of intermetallics linearly decreases with increasing concentration of Li. According to the computational single crystal elastic constants, all the four Al-Li intermetallic compounds considered here are mechanically stable. The polycrystalline elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio have been deduced by using Voigt, Reuss, and Hill approximations, and the calculated ratios of bulk modulus to shear modulus indicate that the four compositions of binary Al-Li intermetallics are brittle materials. With the increase of Li concentration, the bulk modulus of Al-Li intermetallics decreases in a linear manner.

  7. First-principles studies of Al-Ni intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Dongmin; Wen Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Yao Shan; Li Tingju

    2009-10-15

    The structural properties, heats of formation, elastic properties, and electronic structures of Al-Ni intermetallic compounds are analyzed here in detail by using density functional theory. Higher calculated absolute values of heats of formation indicate a very strong chemical interaction between Al and Ni for all Al-Ni intermetallic compounds. According to the computational single crystal elastic constants, all the Al-Ni intermetallic compounds considered here are mechanically stable. The polycrystalline elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio have been deduced by using Voigt, Reuss, and Hill (VRH) approximations, and the calculated ratio of shear modulus to bulk modulus indicated that AlNi, Al{sub 3}Ni, AlNi{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 5} compounds are ductile materials, but Al{sub 4}Ni{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} are brittle materials. With increasing Ni concentration, the bulk modulus of Al-Ni intermetallic compounds increases in a linear manner. The electronic energy band structures confirm that all Al-Ni intermetallic compounds are conductors. - Graphical abstract: Calculated bulk modulus compared to experimental and other theoretical values for the Al-Ni intermetallic compounds.

  8. Microstructure characterization of hypereutectoid aluminium bronze composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucita, P.; Wang, S. C.; Li, W. S.; Cook, R. B.; Starink, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Hypereutectoid aluminium bronze coating was deposited onto an E.N. 10503 steel substrate using plasma transferred arc welding (PTA). Microstructure characterisation of the coating and a section near the steel substrate joint was carried out using SEM, EBSD, EDS in conjunction with XRD and depth-sensing nano-indentation. The constituent phases in the coating were identified as: martensitic Cu3Al β1' phase, solid solution of Al in Cu α phase and the intermetallic Fe3Al κ1 phase. The region near the steel substrate was characterised by high hardness, large grains and presence of Cu precipitates. No cracks were observed in this region. The coating has high hardness of 4.9GPa and Young's modulus of 121.7GPa. This is attributed to homogeneous distribution of sub microns size Fe3Al intermetallic phase. The implications of the coating to the engineering application of sheet metal forming are discussed.

  9. Coating Microstructure-Property-Performance Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright

    2005-05-01

    Results of studies on the relationships between spray parameters and performance of thermally-sprayed intermetallic coatings for high-temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance are presented. Coating performance is being assessed by corrosion testing of free-standing coatings, thermal cycling of coating substrates, and coating ductility measurement. Coating corrosion resistance was measured in a simulated coal combustion gas environment (N2-CO-CO2-H2O-H2S) at temperatures from 500 to 800°C using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA testing was also performed on a typical ferritic-martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel, and a wrought Fe3Al-based alloy for direct comparison to coating behavior. FeAl and Fe3Al coatings showed corrosion rates slightly greater than that of wrought Fe3Al, but markedly lower than the steels at all temperatures. The corrosion rates of the coatings were relatively independent of temperature. Thermal cycling was performed on coated 316SS and nickel alloy 600 substrates from room temperature to 800°C to assess the relative effects of coating microstructure, residual stress, and thermal expansion mismatch on coating cracking by thermal fatigue. Measurement of coating ductility was made by acoustic emission monitoring of coated 316SS tensile specimens during loading.

  10. Effects of molten aluminum on H13 dies and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Shivpuri, R.; Rapp, R. A.

    1995-04-01

    The effects of molten aluminum casting alloy A390 on a commercially heat treated H13 die steel and two wear-resistant coatings, Cr23C6 and TiN, were investigated by an accelerated corrosion test. The H13 steel suffered severe corrosion due to the rapid formation of intermetallic compounds. The formation of multilayer intermetallic compounds and the simultaneous dissociation of the intermetallic compound τ6 (Al4FeSi) were attributed to the fast dissolution of H13 steels into the melt. This dissolution of the H13 steel was accelerated dramatically by turbulence and an increase in melt temperature. Significant improvement in corrosion resistance was achieved for the H13 steel coated by Cr23C6 via a pack cementation process.

  11. Ground state searches in fcc intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D. ); Ceder, G. ); Dreysse, H. . Lab. de Physique du Solide)

    1991-12-01

    A cluster expansion is used to predict the fcc ground states, i.e., the stable phases at zero Kelvin as a function of composition, for alloy systems. The intermetallic structures are not assumed, but derived regorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. This ground state search includes pair and multiplet interactions which spatially extend to fourth nearest neighbor. A large number of these concentration-independent interactions are computed by the method of direct configurational averaging using a linearized-muffin-tin orbital Hamiltonian cast into tight binding form (TB-LMTO). The interactions, derived without the use of any adjustable or experimentally obtained parameters, are compared to those calculated via the generalized perturbation method extention of the coherent potential approximation within the context of a KKR Hamiltonian (KKR-CPA-GPM). Agreement with the KKR-CPA-GPM results is quite excellent, as is the comparison of the ground state results with the fcc-based portions of the experimentally-determined phase diagrams under consideration.

  12. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  13. Driving magnetostructural transitions in layered intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, J L; Caron, L; Campbell, S J; Kennedy, S J; Hofmann, M; Cheng, Z X; Din, M F Md; Studer, A J; Brück, E; Dou, S X

    2013-05-24

    We report the dramatic effect of applied pressure and magnetic field on the layered intermetallic compound Pr(0.5)Y(0.5)Mn(2)Ge(2). In the absence of pressure or magnetic field this compound displays interplanar ferromagnetism at room temperature and undergoes an isostructural first order magnetic transition (FOMT) to an antiferromagnetic state below 158 K, followed by another FOMT at 50 K due to the reemergence of ferromagnetism as praseodymium orders (T(C)(Pr)). The application of a magnetic field drives these two transitions towards each other, whereas the application of pressure drives them apart. Pressure also produces a giant magnetocaloric effect such that a threefold increase of the entropy change associated with the lower FOMT (at T(C)(Pr)) is seen under a pressure of 7.5 kbar. First principles calculations, using density functional theory, show that this remarkable magnetic behavior derives from the strong magnetoelastic coupling of the manganese layers in this compound. PMID:23745927

  14. SCB ignition of pyrotechnics, thermites and intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1996-09-01

    We investigated ignition of pyrotechnics, metal-fuel/metal-oxide compositions (thermites), and exothermic alloy compositions (intermetallics) using a semiconductor bridge (SCB). It was shown that these materials could be ignited at low energy levels with an appropriately designed SCB, proper loading density, and good thermal isolation. Materials tested included Al/CuO, B/BaCrO{sub 4}, TiH{sub 1.65}/KClO{sub 4}, Ti/KClO{sub 4}, Zr/BaCrO{sub 4}, Zr/CuO, Zr/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Zr/KClO{sub 4}, and 100-mesh Al/Pd. Firing set was a capacitor discharge unit with charge capacitors ranging from 3 to 20,000 {mu}F at charge voltages 5-50 V. Devices functioned a few miliseconds after onset of current pulse at input energies as low as 3 mJ. We also report on a thermite torch design.

  15. Bulk and defect properties of ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.L.; Yoo, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    First-principles calculations based on the local-density-functional theory have been used to investigate the factors governing strength of ordered intermetallic alloys. Unlike Ni{sub 3}Al, calculated elastic constants and shear fault energies indicate anomalous yield strength behavior is not likely to occur in Ni{sub 3}Si. This suggests the inadequacy of cross-slip-pinning model to explain the strength anomaly in the L1{sub 2} structure. For strongly ordered NiAl, the defect structure is dominated by two types of defects -- monovacancies on the Ni sites and substitutional antisite defects on the Al sites. By contrast, for Ni{sub 3}Al, absence of structural vacancies and deviations from stoichiometry are accommodated by substitutional antisite defects on both sublattices. Intrinsic strengthening mechanisms in TiAl are discussed in terms of calculated elastic constants and shear fault energies. Because of reduced fault energies at the {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} interface, slip and twinning contribute significantly to high shear deformation of the lamellar structure.

  16. First-principles studies of Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yi; Wen Bin; Ma Yunqing; Melnik, Roderick; Liu Xingjun

    2012-03-15

    The structural properties, heats of formation, elastic properties, and electronic structures of Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds are investigated in detail based on density functional theory. Our results indicate that all Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds calculated here are mechanically stable except for P21/m-Ni{sub 3}Ta and hc-NiTa{sub 2}. Furthermore, we found that Pmmn-Ni{sub 3}Ta is the ground state stable phase of Ni{sub 3}Ta polymorphs. The polycrystalline elastic modulus has been deduced by using the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation. All Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds in our study, except for NiTa, are ductile materials by corresponding G/K values and poisson's ratio. The calculated heats of formation demonstrated that Ni{sub 2}Ta are thermodynamically unstable. Our results also indicated that all Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds analyzed here are conductors. The density of state demonstrated the structure stability increases with the Ta concentration. - Graphical abstract: Mechanical properties and formation heats of Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds are discussed in detail in this paper. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds are investigated by first principle calculations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P21/m-Ni{sub 3}Ta and hc-NiTa{sub 2} are mechanically unstable phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pmmn-Ni{sub 3}Ta is ground stable phase of Ni{sub 3}Ta polymorphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All Ni-Ta intermetallic compounds are conducting materials.

  17. Phase stability in processing of high temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Perepezko, J.H.; Nunes, C.A.; Yi, S.H.; Thoma, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    In the development of high temperature intermetallics involving various aluminides, silicides and Laves phases, it has become evident that it is essential to consider the strong influence of materials processing throughout all stages. The underlying basis for alloy synthesis, processing and the assessment of thermal stability is established by the relevant phase equilibria, the characteristic diffusivities and the possible solidification reaction pathways. In almost all cases the microstructures of the most useful metallic alloys are multiphase assemblies in which the relative phase fractions, compositions and morphologies play key roles in optimizing the performance under high temperature conditions. The microstructure designs are usually tailored for strength, toughness, creep resistance and environmental stability and involve a balance of features derived from mixtures of a ductile phase and intermetallic phases. There is a clear experience that the level of materials processing can only be as sophisticated as the level of knowledge of the phase equilibria and the underlying kinetics. In many of the contemporary intermetallic alloys the phase stability must be considered in terms of multicomponent equilibria and non-stoichiometric intermetallic compositions. Recent developments in several important intermetallic alloy classes illustrate the guidance into alloy design and processing options provided by systematic studies of phase stability. 58 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Laser Assisted Additively Manufactured Transition Metal Coating on Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Hitesh D.; Rajamure, Ravi Shanker; Roy, Anurag; Srinivasan, S. G.; Sundararajan, G.; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2016-05-01

    Various physical and chemical properties of surface and subsurface regions of Al can be improved by the formation of transition metal intermetallic phases (Al x TM y ) via coating of the transition metal (TM). The lower equilibrium solid solubility of TM in Al (<1 at.%) is a steep barrier to the formation of solid solutions using conventional alloying methods. In contrast, as demonstrated in the present work, surface engineering via a laser-aided additive manufacturing approach can effectively synthesize TM intermetallic coatings on the surface of Al. The focus of the present work included the development of process control to achieve thermodynamic and kinetic conditions necessary for desirable physical, microstructural and compositional attributes. A multiphysics finite element model was developed to predict the temperature profile, cooling rate, melt depth, dilution of W in Al matrix and corresponding micro-hardness in the coating, and the interface between the coating and the base material and the base material.

  19. Laser Assisted Additively Manufactured Transition Metal Coating on Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Hitesh D.; Rajamure, Ravi Shanker; Roy, Anurag; Srinivasan, S. G.; Sundararajan, G.; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2016-07-01

    Various physical and chemical properties of surface and subsurface regions of Al can be improved by the formation of transition metal intermetallic phases (Al x TM y ) via coating of the transition metal (TM). The lower equilibrium solid solubility of TM in Al (<1 at.%) is a steep barrier to the formation of solid solutions using conventional alloying methods. In contrast, as demonstrated in the present work, surface engineering via a laser-aided additive manufacturing approach can effectively synthesize TM intermetallic coatings on the surface of Al. The focus of the present work included the development of process control to achieve thermodynamic and kinetic conditions necessary for desirable physical, microstructural and compositional attributes. A multiphysics finite element model was developed to predict the temperature profile, cooling rate, melt depth, dilution of W in Al matrix and corresponding micro-hardness in the coating, and the interface between the coating and the base material and the base material.

  20. Explosive reaction pressing of intermetallic compounds from stoichiometric powder mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kochsiek, D.; Pruemmer, R.; Brunold, A.

    1995-09-01

    Intermetallic NiAl, TiAl, and TiAl{sub 3} were synthesized by shock compression experiments from stoichiometric powder mixtures of nickel and aluminium as well as of titanium and aluminium. Good consolidation and complete intermetallic reaction were achieved by the direct method of explosive compaction. For each powder mixture, a certain individual threshold pressure has to be exceeded in order to initiate intermetallic reaction. The reacting compounds melted completely with subsequent rapid solidification during the passage of the shock wave. The new material shows high hardness. Pores are formed by gaseous reaction products in the NiAl and TiAl{sub 3} compacts. The TiAl structure is fully-dense and dendritic.

  1. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  2. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  3. Microwave assisted combustion synthesis of non-equilibrium intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Paolo; Rosa, Roberto; Colombini, Elena; Leonelli, Cristina; Poli, Giorgio; Casagrande, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    A simplified model of the microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of Ni and Al metal powders to form the NiAl intermetallic on titanium and steel substrates is presented. The simulation couples an electro-thermal model with a chemical model, accounting for local heat generation due to the highly exothermic nature of the reactions between the powders. Numerical results, validated by experimental values, show that the capability of microwaves to convey energy, and not heat, can be used to alter the temperature profiles during and after the combustion synthesis, leading to unique intermetallic microstructures. This phenomenon is ascribed to the extended existence of high temperature liquid intermetallic phases, which react with the metallic substrates at the interface. Moreover, microwave heating selectivity allows to maintain the bulk of the substrate metallic materials to a much lower temperature, compared to combustion synthesis in conventionally heated furnaces, thus reducing possible unwanted transformations like phase change or oxidation. PMID:21721328

  4. Stress distribution in a continuously cast intermetallic strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, George; Wronski, Zbignew; Sahoo, Mahi; Kiff, Dave

    Results of a study on the determination of the residual stress state in a nickel aluminide intermetallic strip by the hole drilling method (HDM) are presented. Special correlation functions that relate the relaxed surface strain and the original stresses before drilling were developed. It is shown that the HDM may be used to determine residual stresses in anisotropic materials such as intermetallic strips. The results indicate that a complex stress field develops through the thickness and across the width of the strip. However, a suitable thermomechanical treatment may be applied to redistribute the stresses before aluminide strips can be used to make engineering components.

  5. Quaternary borocarbides: New class of intermetallic superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarajan, R.; Gupta, L. C.; Dhar, S. K.; Mazumdar, Chandan; Hossain, Zakir; Godart, C.; Levy-Clement, C.; Padalia, B. D.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Our recent discovery of superconductivity (SC) in the four-element multiphase Y-Ni-B-C system at an elevated temperature (TC approximately 12 K) has opened up great possibilities of identifying new superconducting materials and generating new physics. Superconductivity with Tc (greater than 20 K) higher than that known so far in bulk intermetallics has been observed in multiphase Y-Pd-B-C and Th-Pd-B-C systems and a family of single phase materials RENi2B2C (RE= Y, rare earth) have been found. Our investigations show YNi2B2C to be a strong coupling hard type-II SC. HC2(T) exhibits an unconventional temperature dependence. Specific heat and magnetization studies reveal coexistence of SC and magnetism in RNi2B2C (R = Ho, Er, Tm) with magnetic ordering temperatures (Tc approximately 8 K, 10.5 K, 11 K and Tm approximately 5 K, approximately 7K, approximately 4 K respectively) that are remarkably higher than those in known magnetic superconductors . Mu-SR studies suggest the possibility of Ni atoms carrying a moment in TmNi2B2C. Resistivity results suggests a double re-entrant transition (SC-normal-SC) in HoNi2B2C. RENi2B2C (RE = Ce, Nd, Gd) do not show SC down to 4.2 K. The Nd- and Gd-compounds order magnetically at approximately 4.5 K and approximately 19.5 K, respectively. Two SC transitions are observed in Y-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 22 K, approximately 10 K) and in Th-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 20 K, approximately 14 K) systems, which indicate that there are at least two structures which support SC in these borocarbides. In our multiphase ThNi2B2C we observe SC at approximately 6 K. No SC was seen in multiphase UNi2B2C, UPd2B2C, UOs2Ge2C and UPd5B3C(0.35) down to 4.2 K. Tc in YNi2B2C is depressed by substitutions (Gd, Th and U at Y-sites and Fe, Co at Ni-sites).

  6. Quaternary borocarbides: New class of intermetallic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, R.; Gupta, L. C.; Dhar, S. K.; Mazumdar, Chandan; Hossain, Zakir; Godart, C.; Levy-Clement, C.; Padalia, B. D.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1995-04-01

    Our recent discovery of superconductivity (SC) in the four-element multiphase Y-Ni-B-C system at an elevated temperature (TC approximately 12 K) has opened up great possibilities of identifying new superconducting materials and generating new physics. Superconductivity with Tc (greater than 20 K) higher than that known so far in bulk intermetallics has been observed in multiphase Y-Pd-B-C and Th-Pd-B-C systems and a family of single phase materials RENi2B2C (RE= Y, rare earth) have been found. Our investigations show YNi2B2C to be a strong coupling hard type-II SC. HC2(T) exhibits an unconventional temperature dependence. Specific heat and magnetization studies reveal coexistence of SC and magnetism in RNi2B2C (R = Ho, Er, Tm) with magnetic ordering temperatures (Tc approximately 8 K, 10.5 K, 11 K and Tm approximately 5 K, approximately 7K, approximately 4 K respectively) that are remarkably higher than those in known magnetic superconductors . Mu-SR studies suggest the possibility of Ni atoms carrying a moment in TmNi2B2C. Resistivity results suggests a double re-entrant transition (SC-normal-SC) in HoNi2B2C. RENi2B2C (RE = Ce, Nd, Gd) do not show SC down to 4.2 K. The Nd- and Gd-compounds order magnetically at approximately 4.5 K and approximately 19.5 K, respectively. Two SC transitions are observed in Y-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 22 K, approximately 10 K) and in Th-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 20 K, approximately 14 K) systems, which indicate that there are at least two structures which support SC in these borocarbides. In our multiphase ThNi2B2C we observe SC at approximately 6 K. No SC was seen in multiphase UNi2B2C, UPd2B2C, UOs2Ge2C and UPd5B3C(0.35) down to 4.2 K. Tc in YNi2B2C is depressed by substitutions (Gd, Th and U at Y-sites and Fe, Co at Ni-sites).

  7. Unique intermetallic compounds prepared by shock wave synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.; Reece, O. Y.; Roy, U.

    1971-01-01

    Technique compresses fine ground metallic powder mixture beyond crystal fusion point. Absence of vapor pressure voids and elimination of incongruous effects permit application of technique to large scale fabrication of intermetallic compounds with specific characteristics, e.g., semiconduction, superconduction, or magnetic properties.

  8. Erosion behavior of Fe-Al intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Song, J.H.; Chang, Y.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Fe-rich Fe-Al intermetallics have generated some interest, especially during the last decade, due to their excellent resistance for oxidation and sulfidation, high specific strength, and low material cost. The aluminide is therefore considered as one of the promising candidates for high-temperature structural materials in a corrosive atmosphere. Research effort has been focused mainly on process, development, and enhancement of room-temperature ductility together with the characterization of physical properties such as mechanical properties, oxidation, corrosion, and abrasive wear behavior. However, there have been only a few works reported to date in regard to the erosion characteristics of the alloy, one of the most important material property of this ordered intermetallic alloy for the use in a fossil-fuel plant. In this study, the solid-particle erosion behavior of the Fe-Al intermetallic alloys containing the various aluminum contents ranging from 25 to 30 at.% has been investigated to clarify the effect of aluminum content and different ordered structures, viz. DO{sub 3} and B2, on the erosion behavior. An attempt has been made to correlate the erosion behavior of these intermetallics to their mechanical properties by carrying out tensile tests together with SEM observation of the eroded surfaces.

  9. PAC Studies on Zr-Based Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damonte, L. C.; Mendoza-Zélis, L. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Zr2Al, Zr3Al2 and Zr6NiAl2 intermetallic compounds were characterized by means of time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) and X-ray diffraction. Our interest in these Zr(Hf) aluminides comes from crystallization studies of Zr(Hf)-based bulk metallic glasses which have a wide supercooled liquid region.

  10. Intermetallic Phase Formation in Explosively Welded Al/Cu Bimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, H.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion couples of aluminum and copper were fabricated by explosive welding process. The interface evolution caused by annealing at different temperatures and time durations was investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Annealing in the temperature range of 573 K to 773 K (300 °C to 500 °C) up to 408 hours showed that four types of intermetallic layers have been formed at the interface, namely Al2Cu, AlCu, Al3Cu4, and Al4Cu9. Moreover, it was observed that iron trace in aluminum caused the formation of Fe-bearing intermetallics in Al, which is near the interface of the Al-Cu intermetallic layers. Finally, the activation energies for the growth of Al2Cu, AlCu + Al3Cu4, Al4Cu9, and the total intermetallic layer were calculated to be about 83.3, 112.8, 121.6, and 109.4 kJ/mol, respectively. Considering common welding methods (i.e., explosive welding, cold rolling, and friction welding), although there is a great difference in welding mechanism, it is found that the total activation energy is approximately the same.

  11. Intermetallic Phase Formation in Explosively Welded Al/Cu Bimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, H.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion couples of aluminum and copper were fabricated by explosive welding process. The interface evolution caused by annealing at different temperatures and time durations was investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Annealing in the temperature range of 573 K to 773 K (300 °C to 500 °C) up to 408 hours showed that four types of intermetallic layers have been formed at the interface, namely Al2Cu, AlCu, Al3Cu4, and Al4Cu9. Moreover, it was observed that iron trace in aluminum caused the formation of Fe-bearing intermetallics in Al, which is near the interface of the Al-Cu intermetallic layers. Finally, the activation energies for the growth of Al2Cu, AlCu + Al3Cu4, Al4Cu9, and the total intermetallic layer were calculated to be about 83.3, 112.8, 121.6, and 109.4 kJ/mol, respectively. Considering common welding methods ( i.e., explosive welding, cold rolling, and friction welding), although there is a great difference in welding mechanism, it is found that the total activation energy is approximately the same.

  12. Electrocatalytic activity of ordered intermetallic phases for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Casado-Rivera, Emerilis; Volpe, David J; Alden, Laif; Lind, Cora; Downie, Craig; Vázquez-Alvarez, Terannie; Angelo, Antonio C D; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2004-03-31

    The electrocatalytic activities of a wide range of ordered intermetallic phases toward a variety of potential fuels have been studied, and results have been compared to those of a pure polycrystalline platinum (Pt(pc)) electrode. A significant number of the ordered intermetallic phases exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity when compared to that of Pt, in terms of both oxidation onset potential and current density. The PtBi, PtIn, and PtPb ordered intermetallic phases appeared to be the most promising electrocatalysts tested thus far for fuel cell applications. PtPb, in particular, showed an onset potential that was 100 mV less positive and a peak current density approximately 40 times higher than those observed for Pt in the case of methanol oxidation. The ability to control the geometric and electronic structures of the electrocatalytic material by using ordered intermetallic phases has been shown to be a promising direction of inquiry in the search for superior electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. PMID:15038758

  13. Advanced reinforcement systems for intermetallic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, H.F.; Labib, M.L.

    1993-03-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric model was employed to determine the magnitude of the radial, axial, and hoop stresses caused by the thermal expansion difference between fiber and matrix and which result from the fabrication temperature cycle. Finite element analysis was conducted for single fiber model systems based on SCS-6/Ti3Al+Nb and Al2O3/NiAl. The stress distribution due to the imposition of a graded intermediate layer for each system was determined and included variables of layer thickness and gradation in interlayer chemistry in order to vary the expansion gradient between fiber and matrix. Thermal cycling tests were conducted on sputter coated SCS-6 fibers selectively coated with Ti3Al+Nb, with and without an intermediate layer. Cracking of the Ti3Al+Nb layers was prevented by an interlayer based on Ti-TiN-Ti. The interlayer thickness appeared critical to its efficiency. Similarly, for the case of Al2O3/NiAl, an intermediate layer consisting of a Ni bond coat on the sapphire fiber followed by a graded Al2O3-NiAl layer did not crack when given a thermal excursion to 1100 C and then cooled to room temperature. Acoustic emission tests on single fiber specimens were unsuccessful in detecting load drops associated with the successive fracture of the fiber. For the SCS-6/Ti3Al system this was the result of several factors which included the matrix/fiber ratio and poor bonding of the matrix and fiber. In the case of the Al2O3/NiAl system brittle failure of the NiAl matrix precluded fiber breakdown during tensile loading.

  14. Advanced reinforcement systems for intermetallic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, Howard F.; Labib, Mohammed L.

    1993-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric model was employed to determine the magnitude of the radial, axial, and hoop stresses caused by the thermal expansion difference between fiber and matrix and which result from the fabrication temperature cycle. Finite element analysis was conducted for single fiber model systems based on SCS-6/Ti3Al+Nb and Al2O3/NiAl. The stress distribution due to the imposition of a graded intermediate layer for each system was determined and included variables of layer thickness and gradation in interlayer chemistry in order to vary the expansion gradient between fiber and matrix. Thermal cycling tests were conducted on sputter coated SCS-6 fibers selectively coated with Ti3Al+Nb, with and without an intermediate layer. Cracking of the Ti3Al+Nb layers was prevented by an interlayer based on Ti-TiN-Ti. The interlayer thickness appeared critical to its efficiency. Similarly, for the case of Al2O3/NiAl, an intermediate layer consisting of a Ni bond coat on the sapphire fiber followed by a graded Al2O3-NiAl layer did not crack when given a thermal excursion to 1100 C and then cooled to room temperature. Acoustic emission tests on single fiber specimens were unsuccessful in detecting load drops associated with the successive fracture of the fiber. For the SCS-6/Ti3Al system this was the result of several factors which included the matrix/fiber ratio and poor bonding of the matrix and fiber. In the case of the Al2O3/NiAl system brittle failure of the NiAl matrix precluded fiber breakdown during tensile loading.

  15. Characterization of industrially produced galvannealed coating using cross-sectional specimen in TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, A.; Saha, R.; Ray, R.K.

    2009-08-15

    Galvannealed coated sheet steels are extensively used in the automotive industry due to their inherent advantages, as compared to other zinc based coating, such as excellent spot weldability, good corrosion resistance and better paintability. Despite the above advantages, galvannealed coating suffers from poor formability due to the presence of hard and brittle Fe-Zn intermetallic phases. The formability of the coating depends on the amount and orientation of different Fe-Zn intermetallic phases. The present study deals with the characterization of an industrially produced galvannealed coating using cross-sectional specimen in a Transmission Electron Microscope. From the selected area diffraction patterns obtained in Transmission Electron Microscope, the orientations of the delta phase were calculated.

  16. Alloying of cold-sprayed Al Ni composite coatings by post-annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ha Yong; Jung, Se Hun; Lee, Soo Yong; Ko, Kyung Hyun

    2007-01-01

    A new cold spray coating technique for thick Al coating with finely dispersed Al-Ni intermetallic compounds was tested. For easy powder preparation and high yield, rather than using of Al/compound mixture feed stock, the spraying of pure Al and Ni powders mixture followed by post-annealing was suggested. The powder composition of Al and Ni was 75:25, and 90:10 (wt.%) to expect full consumption of pure Ni into intermetallic compounds. After Al-Ni composite coatings, the Ni particles were finely dispersed and embedded in the Al matrix with a good coating yield. Above 450 °C of post-annealing temperature, the Al 3Ni and Al 3Ni 2 phases were observed in the cold-sprayed Al-Ni coatings. The Ni particles in the Al matrix were fully consumed via compounding reaction with Al at 550 °C of the annealing temperature.

  17. Multi-component intermetallic electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M; Trahey, Lynn; Vaughey, John T

    2015-03-10

    Multi-component intermetallic negative electrodes prepared by electrochemical deposition for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to composite intermetallic electrodes comprising two or more compounds containing metallic or metaloid elements, at least one element of which can react with lithium to form binary, ternary, quaternary or higher order compounds, these compounds being in combination with one or more other metals that are essentially inactive toward lithium and act predominantly, but not necessarily exclusively, to the electronic conductivity of, and as current collection agent for, the electrode. The invention relates more specifically to negative electrode materials that provide an operating potential between 0.05 and 2.0 V vs. metallic lithium.

  18. Theoretical energy release of thermites, intermetallics, and combustible metals

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1998-06-01

    Thermite (metal oxide) mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantages of these systems typically include high energy density, impact insensitivity, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability, and possess insensitive ignition properties. In this paper, the authors review the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. Calculated values for reactant density, heat of reaction (per unit mass and per unit volume), and reaction temperature (without and with consideration of phase changes and the variation of specific heat values) are tabulated. These data are ranked in several ways, according to density, heat of reaction, reaction temperature, and gas production.

  19. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  20. An intermetallic forming steel under radiation for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, C.; Stergar, E.; Maloy, S. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we investigated the formation and stability of intermetallics formed in a maraging steel PH 13-8 Mo under proton radiation up to 2 dpa utilizing nanoindentation, microcompression testing and atom probe tomography. A comprehensive discussion analyzing the findings utilizing rate theory is introduced, comparing the aging process to radiation induced diffusion. New findings of radiation induced segregation of undersize solute atoms (Si) towards the precipitates are considered.

  1. Fracture toughness of Cu-Sn intermetallic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrisnan, B.; Chum, C. C.; Li, M.; Chen, Z.; Cahyadi, T.

    2003-03-01

    Intermetallic compounds (IMCs) are formed as a result of interaction between solder and metallization to form joints in electronic packaging. These joints provide mechanical and electrical contacts between components. The knowledge of fracture strength of the IMCs will facilitate predicting the overall joint property, as it is more disposed to failure at the joint compared to the solder because of its brittle characteristics. The salient feature of this paper is the measurement of the fracture toughness and the critical energy-release rate of Cu3Sn and Cu6Sn5 intermetallic thin films, which is the result of the interaction between Sn from the solder and Cu from the metallization. To achieve the objective, a controlled buckling test was used. A buckling test in the current work refers to one that displays large transverse displacement caused by axial compressive loading on a slender beam. The stress and strain along the beam can be easily calculated by the applied displacement. Fracture-toughness values of Cu3Sn and Cu6Sn5 are 2.85 MPa √m ± 0.17 MPa √m and 2.36 MPa √m ± 0.15 MPa √m, respectively. Corresponding critical energy-release rate values are 65.5 J/m2 ± 8.0 J/m2 and 55.9 J/m2 ± 7.3 J/m2, respectively. The values obtained were much higher than the ones measured in bulk intermetallic samples but correlated well with those values obtained from conventional fracture-toughness specimens when fracture was confined within the intermetallic layers. Hence, the controlled buckling test is a promising fast and effective way to elucidate mechanical properties of thin films.

  2. Magnetism and superconductivity of uranium and intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J. C.; Gay, E. C.; Hanrahan, R. J.; Hults, W. L.; Lashley, J. C.; Manley, M. E.; McPheeters, C. C.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Thoma, D. J.; Touton, S.; Smith, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Heat capacity, resistivity, and phonon density of states have been measured on uranium and reported already. Many of the results are on single crystals of purity that has been unavailable before. Some intermetallic compounds have been measured that are in the class of so-called heavy-fermion materials. We present here the latest results along with a discussion of the occurrence of superconductivity or magnetism in these materials.

  3. Cluster expansion of fcc Pd-V intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    de Fontaine, D.; Wolverton, C.; Ceder, G. ); Dreysse, H. . Lab. de Physique du Solide)

    1991-06-01

    A cluster expansion is used to compute fcc ground states from first principles for the Pd-V system. Intermetallic structures are not assumed but derived rigorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. A large number of concentration-independent interactions are calculated by the method of direct configurational averaging. Agreement with the fcc-based portion of the experimentally-determined Pd-V phase diagram is quite satisfactory. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Superplastic ceramics and intermetallics and their potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-11-01

    Recent advances in the basic understanding of superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics and intermetallics are reviewed. Fine-grained superplastic ceramics, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Y- or MgO-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Hydroxyapatite, {beta}-spodumene glass ceramics, Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-YTZP two-phase composites, SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Fe-Fe{sub 3}C composites, are discussed. Superplasticity in the nickel-base (e.g., Ni{sub 3}Al and Ni{sub 3}Si) and titanium-base intermetallics (TiAl and T1{sub 3}Al), is described. Deformation mechanisms as well as microstructural requirements and effects such as grain size, grain growth, and grain-boundary phases, on the superplastic deformation behavior am addressed. Factors that control the superplastic tensile elongation of ceramics are discussed. Superplastic forming, and particularly biaxial gas-pressure forming, of several ceramics and intermetallics are presented with comments on the likelihood of commercial application.

  5. Magnetic field controlled FZ single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, R.; Behr, G.; Gerbeth, G.; Priede, J.; Uhlemann, H.-J.; Fischer, F.; Schultz, L.

    2005-02-01

    Intermetallic rare-earth-transition-metal compounds with their coexistence of magnetic ordering and superconductivity are still of great scientific interest. The crystal growth of bulk single crystals is very often unsuccessful due to an unfavorable solid-liquid interface geometry enclosing concave fringes. The aim of the work is the contactless control of heat and material transport during floating-zone single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds. This control is provided by a tailored design of the electromagnetic field and the resulting electromagnetically driven convection. Numerical simulations for the determination of the electromagnetic field configuration induced by the RF heater coil and the solution of the coupled heat and hydrodynamic equations were done for the model substance Ni with and without additional magnetic field. As a result, an innovative magnetic two-phase stirrer system has been developed which enables the controlled influence on the melt ranging from intensive inwards/outwards flows to flows almost at rest. The selection of parameters necessary for the desired fluid flow is determined from numerical simulation. The basis for the calculations are the process-related fluid flow conditions which are determined by the mode of heating, heat radiation at the free surface and material parameters. This treatment of the problem leads to the customised magnetic field for the special intermetallic compound. The application of the new magnetic system leads to a distinct improvement of the solid-liquid interface validated on experiments with the model substance Nickel.

  6. Influence of Electron Beam Treatment Regimes on the Structure and Properties of Intermetallic Clads Obtained on Titanium Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazurenko, D. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Maliutina, Iu N.; Mats, O. E.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    Intermetallic clads were obtained on the basis of the titanium workpieces. The cladding was carried out using a non-vacuum electron beam treatment technique. A powder mixture which contained 16.97 Al - 28.27 Ti - 41.07 CaF2 - 13.69 LiF (wt. %) was used for cladding. Two regimes with the beam current of 16 mA and 18 mA were used. The beam current influenced significantly the structure and phase composition of clads. In case of the electron beam treatment with a beam current of 16 mA a lamellar structure consisted of a mixture of AlTi3 and A1Ti was fabricated. An increase of the beam current to 18 mA led to the formation of an AlTi3 acicular structure. Microhardness and wear resistance of the intermetallic coating was significantly higher in comparison with cp-Ti. The maximum microhardness of clads was 480 HV. A wear rate of clads was 10 times lower than that of cp-Ti.

  7. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  8. Microstructural Evolution of the 55 Wt Pct Al-Zn Coating During Press Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; De Cooman, Bruno Charles

    2014-09-01

    Press hardening is increasingly being used to produce ultra-high strength steel parts for passenger cars. Al-Si, Zn, and Zn-alloy coatings have been used to provide corrosion protection to press hardening steel grades. The use of coatings has drawbacks such as coating delamination or liquid metal-induced embrittlement. In the present work, the microstructural evolution of Al-Zn coating during press hardening was studied. The 55 wt pct Al-Zn coating can in principle provide both Al barrier protection and Zn cathodic protection to press hardened steel. During the heat treatment associated with the press hardening, the 55 wt pct Al-Zn alloy coating is converted to an intermetallic surface layer of Fe2Al5 and a FeAl intermetallic diffusion layer. The Zn is separated from both intermetallic compounds and accumulates at grain boundaries and at the surface. This Zn separation process is beneficial in terms of providing cathodic protection to Al-Zn coated press hardening steel.

  9. Model-based predictions of solid state intermetallic compound layer growth in hybrid microelectronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Erickson, K.L.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model was developed to quantitatively describe the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer growth that takes place between a Sn-based solder and a noble metal thick film conductor material used in hybrid microcircuit (HMC) assemblies. The model combined the reaction kinetics of the solder/substrate interaction, as determined from ancillary isothermal aging experiments, with a 2-D finite element mesh that took account of the porous morphology of the thick film coating. The effect of the porous morphology on the IMC layer growth when compared to the traditional 1-D computations was significant. The previous 1-D calculations under-predicted the nominal IMC layer thickness relative to the 2-D case. The 2-D model showed greater substrate consumption by IMC growth and lesser solder consumption that was determined with the 1-D computation. The new 2-D model allows the design engineer to better predict circuit aging and hence, the reliability of HMC hardware that is placed in the field.

  10. Innovative processing to produce advanced intermetallic materials. Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loutfy, R.O.

    1989-09-01

    The program demonstrates the technical feasibility of synthesizing submicron titanium aluminide in a thermal rf plasma. Micron and submicron spherical titanium aluminide particles are produced in argon, hydrogen, and argon/hydrogen plasmas from the reaction of TiCl4(g), and Al(g). The ratio of Ti and Al is varied to produce the compounds Ti3Al, TiAl, and TiAl3. Microalloying with boron and macroalloying with niobium is demonstrated. Ti3Al whiskers can be produced, as well as other intermetallics of niobium aluminide, nickel aluminide, and molybdenum disilicide in the plasma synthesis process. Since submicron particles are produced, they have a high surface area and are sensitive to oxidation if not treated with a fugitive protective coating or utilized in a nonoxidizing atmosphere. Ti3Al particles are consolidated and utilized as a matrix for TiC and AlN composites. The submicron AlTi3 has significantly higher strength at room temperature than reported for commercial Ti3Al-11Nb alloy and useable strength is maintained up to 1000 C. The elongation is about the same as for commercial material because of possible oxide contamination in powder handling. However, dimpling and nacking is evident in the fracture surface, which suggests true room temperature ductility. Titanium aluminides have the potential to replace superalloys and become the dominant material for aerospace engines, air frames and skins for hypersonic vehicles.

  11. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  12. Distribution of aluminum in hot-dip galvanized coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Furdanowicz, V.; Shastry, C.R.

    1999-12-01

    Hot-dip galvanized panels of low-carbon (LC) and interstitial-free (IF) steels were produced in a laboratory simulator with an average coating mass of 60 g/m{sup 2}. Three pot aluminum levels were used, viz. 0.10% (by wt), 0.15%, and 0.18%. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize coating and base steel microstructures. Wet chemical analysis and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were employed for compositional analyses. The aluminum content of the melt was found to be the predominant factor influencing the distribution of Al in the coating. At 0.18% melt aluminum, Al is partitioned between the aluminide inhibition layer at the coating-steel interface ({approximately}80%) and the zinc overlay ({approximately}20%). At 0.15%, it is partitioned among the aluminide layer ({approximately}75% to 80%), zinc-iron (FeZn{sub 13}, {zeta}) intermetallic layer ({approximately}5% to 15%), and the coating overlay ({approximately}10%). At 0.10%, the aluminum is divided almost equally between the overlay and the zinc-iron intermetallics. At the two lower aluminum levels is the distribution marginally influenced by the steel grade. The {zeta} was found to not preferentially nucleate at the ferrite grain boundaries. When both the aluminide and {zeta} occurred at the coating-steel interface, the {zeta} particles appeared near discontinuities and thinner regions in the aluminide layer. The coating, relative to the melt, is enriched in aluminum because of its concentration in the aluminide and in the zinc-iron intermetallics. This enrichment increases with melt aluminum through an increase in the aluminum content of the aluminide layer and not of its thickness.

  13. Chemistry and Properties of Complex Intermetallics from Metallic Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-03-28

    This project investigated the reaction chemistry and synthesis of new intermetallic materials with complex compositions and structures using metallic fluxes as solvents. It was found that the metallic fluxes offer several key advantages in facilitating the formation and crystal growth of new materials. The fluxes mostly explored were liquid aluminum, gallium and indium. The main purpose of this project was to exploit the potential of metallic fluxes as high temperature solvent for materials discovery in the broad class of intermetallics. This work opened new paths to compound formation. We discovered many new Si (or Ge)-based compounds with novel structures, bonding and physicochemical properties. We created new insights about the reaction chemistry that is responsible for stabilizing the new materials. We also studied the structural and compositional relationships to understand their properties. We investigated the use of Group-13 metals Al, Ga and In as solvents and have generated a wide variety of new results including several new ternary and quaternary materials with fascinating structures and properties as well as new insights as to how these systems are stabilized in the fluxes. The project focused on reactions of metals from the rare earth element family in combination with transition metals with Si and Ge. For example molten gallium has serves both as a reactive and non-reactive solvent in the preparation and crystallization of intermetallics in the system RE/M/Ga/Ge(Si). Molten indium behaves similarly in that it too is an excellent reaction medium, but it gives compounds that are different from those obtained from gallium. Some of the new phase identified in the aluminide class are complex phases and may be present in many advanced Al-matrix alloys. Such phases play a key role in determining (either beneficially or detrimentally) the mechanical properties of advanced Al-matrix alloys. This project enhanced our basic knowledge of the solid state chemistry

  14. Exo-Melt{trademark} process for intermetallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    The methods of powder production for intermetallics are reviewed. An innovative method known as Exo-Melt{trademark} is described for producing molten aluminides for gas- and water-atomization processes that require a molten metal stream. The Exo-Melt{trademark} process is based on the effective utilization of the heats of formation of aluminides from their constituent elements. The Exo-Melt{trademark} process principles are discussed along with a description of a furnace-loading sequence that uses the principles for practical applications. The benefits of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process are compared with the problems associated with the conventional melting process.

  15. Oxygen-stabilized zirconium-vanadium intermetallic compound

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.

    1981-10-06

    An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr/sub x/OV/sub y/ where x = 0.7 to 2.0 and y = 0.18 to 0.33 is described. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from - 196/sup 0/C to 450/sup 0/C at pressures down to 10/sup -6/ Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO/sub 2/.

  16. Study of Intermetallic Nanostructures for Light-Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Niels Grobech; Asta, Mark D.; Hosemann, Peter; Maloy, Stuart

    2015-09-30

    High temperature mechanical measurements were conducted to study the effect of the dynamic precipitation process of PH 13-8 Mo maraging steel. Yield stress, ultimate tensile strength, total elongation, hardness, strain rate sensitivity and activation volume were evaluated as a function of the temperature. The dynamic changes in the mechanical properties at different temperatures were evaluated and a balance between precipitation hardening and annealed softening is discussed. A comparison between hardness and yield stress and ultimate tensile strength over a temperature range from 300 to 600 °C is made. The behavior of the strain rate sensitivity was correlated with the intermetallic precipitates formed during the experiments.

  17. A survey of combustible metals, thermites, and intermetallics for pyrotechnic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1996-08-01

    Thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnics. Advantages include high energy density, impact insensitivity, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability and possess insensitive ignition properties. This paper reviews the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. 50 refs, tables.

  18. Structural and Tribological Properties of Nanostructured Supersonic Cold Sprayed Ni-20 wt.% Sn Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, E. P.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Matteazzi, P.; Kowalski, K.; Kusinski, J.; Piticescu, R. R.; Celis, J.-P.

    2016-05-01

    80-μm-thick nanostructured coatings consisting of a Ni solid solution, Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and metastable NiSn intermetallic phases were deposited via supersonic cold spraying onto inconel 718 alloy substrates. These coatings have complex nanostructured metallurgical phases as revealed by transition electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Their mechanical properties were determined by nanoindentation measurements. Furthermore, the wear behavior of these nanostructured sprayed coatings was compared to the one of the industrial bulk or sprayed coated benchmark materials. It was found that the nanostructured coatings exhibit higher wear resistance than the industrial benchmarks, thanks to an appropriate balance of hard intermetallic phases and soft Ni matrix, as well as to their nanostructuring. Their frictional characteristics under reciprocating sliding are mainly determined by the formation of an oxide-based tribo-layer, which was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The role of intermetallic phases in these coatings on the friction and wear is also discussed.

  19. Structural and Tribological Properties of Nanostructured Supersonic Cold Sprayed Ni-20 wt.% Sn Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, E. P.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Matteazzi, P.; Kowalski, K.; Kusinski, J.; Piticescu, R. R.; Celis, J.-P.

    2016-06-01

    80-μm-thick nanostructured coatings consisting of a Ni solid solution, Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and metastable NiSn intermetallic phases were deposited via supersonic cold spraying onto inconel 718 alloy substrates. These coatings have complex nanostructured metallurgical phases as revealed by transition electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Their mechanical properties were determined by nanoindentation measurements. Furthermore, the wear behavior of these nanostructured sprayed coatings was compared to the one of the industrial bulk or sprayed coated benchmark materials. It was found that the nanostructured coatings exhibit higher wear resistance than the industrial benchmarks, thanks to an appropriate balance of hard intermetallic phases and soft Ni matrix, as well as to their nanostructuring. Their frictional characteristics under reciprocating sliding are mainly determined by the formation of an oxide-based tribo-layer, which was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The role of intermetallic phases in these coatings on the friction and wear is also discussed.

  20. Formation and nitridation of vanadium-aluminum intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lewalter, H; Bock, W; Kolbesen, B O

    2002-10-01

    V(5)Al(8) and V(3)Al intermetallics have been formed by interdiffusion, by annealing of sputtered V/Al-multilayers at 700 degrees C in vacuo; sapphire (102) was used as substrate. The V/Al intermetallics were nitridated in NH(3) at 900 degrees C for 1 min by RTP (rapid thermal processing). The samples were investigated with XRD (X-ray diffraction), SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). A 5-10 nm thick AlN film (001 textured) was formed by nitridation of V(5)Al(8) (110 textured) and 2-3% nitrogen was incorporated in the V(5)Al(8) bulk. Nitridation of V(3)Al resulted in the formation of VN and AlN. Direct nitridation of V/Al-multilayers showed that near the surface nitridation is faster than intermixing of the V and Al layers. The capability of VN as diffusion barrier for Al could also be shown. PMID:12397502

  1. Theoretical Energy Release of Thermites, Intermetallics, and Combustible Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-05-14

    Thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantages of these systems typically include high energy density, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability and possess insensitive ignition properties. For the specific applications of humanitarian demining and disposal of unexploded ordnance, these pyrotechnic formulations offer additional benefits. The combination of high thermal input with low brisance can be used to neutralize the energetic materials in mines and other ordnance without the "explosive" high-blast-pressure events that can cause extensive collateral damage to personnel, facilities, and the environment. In this paper, we review the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. Calculated values for reactant density, heat of reaction (per unit mass and per unit volume), and reaction temperature (without and with consideration of phase changes and the variation of specific heat values) are tabulated. These data are ranked in several ways, according to density, heat of reaction, reaction temperature, and gas production.

  2. In situ examination of moving crack tips in ordered intermetallics.

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, J.; Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R.; Stubbins, J. F.

    1999-01-25

    Recent studies have shown that high stress concentrations at moving crack tips in the intermetallic compound NiTi can induce a crystalline-to-amorphous (C-A) transformation of the crack tip region. This stress-induced C-A transformation has a temperature dependence and crystallization behavior similar to those of ion irradiation-induced C-A transformation of NiTi. The present study examines if these similarities between stress- and irradiation-induced amorphization hold true for two other intermetallic compounds, CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti. In situ straining was performed in an intermediate-voltage transmission electron microscope. The presence or absence of an amorphous phase was determined by dark field imaging and selected area diffraction of crack tip regions. Crack tips in both CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti were found to remain crystalline upon fracture. The observed absence of stress-induced amorphization in Ni{sub 3}Ti is consistent with its known absence during irradiation, but the absence in CuTi differs from its known irradiation-induced amorphization behavior. Reasons for the similarity and difference are discussed.

  3. Intermetallic and titanium matrix composite materials for hypersonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Berton, B.; Surdon, G.; Colin, C. |

    1995-09-01

    As part of the French Program of Research and Technology for Advanced Hypersonic Propulsion (PREPHA) which was launched in 1992 between Aerospatiale, Dassault Aviation, ONERA, SNECMA and SEP, an important work is specially devoted to the development of titanium and intermetallic composite materials for large airframe structures. At Dassault Aviation, starting from a long experience in Superplastic Forming - Diffusion Bonding (SPF-DB) of titanium parts, the effort is brought on the manufacturing and characterization of composites made from Timet beta 21S or IMI 834 foils and Textron SCS6 fiber fabrics. At `Aersopatiale Espace & Defence`, associated since a long time about intermetallic composite materials with university research laboratories, the principal effort is brought on plasma technology to develop the gamma titanium aluminide TiAl matrix composite reinforced by protected silicon carbide fibers (BP SM 1240 or TEXTRON SCS6). The objective, is to achieve, after 3 years of time, to elaborate a medium size integrally stiffened panel (300 x 600 sq mm).

  4. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  5. Surfaces of complex intermetallic compounds: insights from density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürgen; Krajčí, Marian

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Complex intermetallic compounds are a class of ordered alloys consisting of quasicrystals and other ordered compounds with large unit cells; many of them are approximant phases to quasicrystals. Quasicrystals are the limiting case where the unit cell becomes infinitely large; approximants are series of periodic structures converging to the quasicrystal. While the unique properties of quasicrystals have inspired many investigations of their surfaces, relatively little attention has been devoted to the surface properties of the approximants. In general, complex intermetallic compounds display rather irregular, often strongly corrugated surfaces, making the determination of their atomic structure a very complex and challenging task. During recent years, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been used to study the surfaces of several complex intermetallic compounds. If atomic resolution can be achieved, STM permits visualization of the local atomistic surface structure. However, the interpretation of the STM images is often ambiguous and sometimes even impossible without a realistic model of the structure of the surface and the distribution of the electronic density above the surface. Here we demonstrate that ab initio density functional theory (DFT) can be used to determine the energetics and the geometric and electronic structures of the stable surfaces of complex intermetallic compounds. Calculations for surfaces with different chemical compositions can be performed in the grand canonical ensemble. Simulated cleavage experiments permit us to determine the formation of the cleavage planes requiring the lowest energy. The investigation of the adsorption of molecular species permits a comparison with temperature-programmed thermal desorption experiments. Calculated surface electronic densities of state can be compared with the results of photoelectron spectroscopy. Simulations of detailed STM images can be directly confronted with the experimental results

  6. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyunjin

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  7. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  8. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  9. Aluminide coatings

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  10. Influence of heat treatment on tribological properties of electroless Ni-P and Ni-P-Al 2O 3 coatings on Al-Si casting alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, M.; Vojtěch, D.; Vítů, T.

    2010-02-01

    Evolution of tribological properties of electroless Ni-P and Ni-P-Al 2O 3 coating on an Al-10Si-0.3Mg casting alloy during heat treatment is investigated in this work. The pre-treated substrate was plated using a bath containing nickel hypophosphite, nickel lactate and lactic acid. For preparation of fiber-reinforced coating Al 2O 3 Saffil fibers pre-treated in demineralised water were used. The coated samples were heat treated at 400-550 °C/1-8 h. Tribological properties were studied using the pin-on-disc method. It is found that the best coating performance is obtained using optimal heat treatment regime (400 °C/1 h). Annealing at higher temperatures (450 °C and above) leads to the formation of intermetallic compounds that reduce the coating wear resistance. The reason is that the intermetallic phases adversely affect the coating adherence to the substrate. The analysis of wear tracks proves that abrasion is major wear mechanism, however due to the formed intermetallic sub-layers, partial coating delamination may occur during the pin-on-disc test on the samples annealed at 450 °C and above. It was found that fiber reinforcement reduces this scaling and increases wear resistance of coatings as compared to the non-reinforced Ni-P coatings.

  11. Influence of Chemical Composition of Mg Alloys on Surface Alloying by Diffusion Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirmke, J.; Zhang, M.-X.; St John, D. H.

    2012-05-01

    A recently developed technique of surface alloying by diffusion-coating has been used to produce coatings on Mg alloys with various Al and Zn contents. The experimental results show that both Al and Zn solutes in the alloy promote the diffusion of alloying elements through grain refinement of the substrate alloys and through reduction of diffusion active energy because of the reduction of melting temperature of the alloys. Therefore, the efficiency of surface alloying increases by diffusion coating. Thick, dense, uniform, and continuous layers of intermetallic compounds, which consist of a τ-phase layer and a β-phase layer, can be produced on the surface of various Mg alloys. The intermetallic compound layers not only have microhardness values that are 4 to 6 times higher than the substrate but also provide effective protection of the Mg alloys from corrosion in 5 pct NaCl solution at room temperature.

  12. Role of Ag in the formation of interfacial intermetallic phases in Sn-Zn soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jenn-Ming; Liu, Pei-Chi; Shih, Chia-Ling; Lin, Kwang-Lung

    2005-09-01

    This study explored the effect of Ag as the substrate or alloying element of solders on the interfacial reaction in Sn-Zn soldering. Results show that instead of Ag-Sn compounds, ζ-AgZn and γ-Ag5Zn8 form at the Sn-Zn/Ag interface. The addition of Ag in Sn-Zn solders leads to the precipitation of ɛ-AgZn3 from the liquid solder on preformed interfacial intermetallics. The morphology of this additional AgZn3 is closely related to the solidification process of Ag-Zn intermetallics and the under intermetallic layer.

  13. Fundamentals of mechanical behavior in structural intermetallics: A synthesis of atomistic and continuum modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Fu, C.L.

    1993-08-01

    After a brief account of the recent advances in computational research on mechanical behavior of structural intermetallics, currently unresolved problems and critical issues are addressed and the knowledge base for potential answers to these problems is discussed. As large-scale problems (e.g., dislocation core structures, grain boundaries, and crack tips) are treated by atomistic simulations, future development of relevant interatomic potentials should be made consistent with the results of first-principles calculations. The bulk and defect properties calculated for intermetallic compounds, both known and as yet untested, can furnish insights to alloy designers in search of new high-temperature structural intermetallics.

  14. Formation of intermetallics at the interface of explosively welded Ni-Al multilayered composites during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogneva, T. S.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Mali, V. I.; Esikov, M. A.; Bataev, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The Ni-Al multilayer composite was fabricated using explosive welding. The zones of mixing of Ni and Al are observed at the composite interfaces after the welding. The composition of these zones is inhomogeneous. Continuous homogeneous intermetallic layers are formed at the interface after heat treatment at 620 °C during 5 h These intermetallic layers consist of NiAl3 and Ni2Al3 phases. The presence of mixed zones significantly accelerates the growth rate of intermetallic phases at the initial stages of heating.

  15. Metal- and intermetallic-matrix composites for aerospace propulsion and power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for high specific strength refractory materials of prospective military, civil, and space propulsion systems are presently addressed in the context of emerging capabilities in metal- and intermetallic-matrix composites. The candidate systems encompass composite matrix compositions of superalloy, Nb-Zr refractory alloy, Cu-base, and Ti-base alloy types, as well as such intermetallics as TiAl, Ti3Al, NiAl, and MoSi2. The brittleness of intermetallic matrices remains a major consideration, as does their general difficulty of fabrication.

  16. Mechanical and Tribological Behavior of Ni(Al)-Reinforced Nanocomposite Plasma Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, B.

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical and tribological behavior and microstructural evolutions of the Ni(Al)-reinforced nanocomposite plasma spray coatings were studied. At first, the feedstock Ni(Al)-15 wt.% (Al2O3-13% TiO2) nanocomposite powders were prepared using low-energy mechanical milling of the pure Ni and Al powders as well as Al2O3-13% TiO2 nanoparticle mixtures. The characteristics of the powder particles and the prepared coatings depending on their microstructures were examined in detail. The results showed that the feedstock powders after milling contained only α-Ni solid solution with no trace of the intermetallic phase. However, under the air plasma spraying conditions, the NiAl intermetallic phase in the α-Ni solid solution matrix appeared. The lack of nickel aluminide formation during low-energy ball milling is beneficial hence, the exothermic reaction can occur between Ni and Al during plasma spraying, improving the adhesive strength of the nanocomposite coatings. The results also indicated that the microhardness of the α-Ni phase was 3.91 ± 0.23 GPa and the NiAl intermetallic phase had a mean microhardness of 5.69 ± 0.12 GPa. The high microhardness of the nanocomposite coatings must be due to the presence of the reinforcing nanoparticles. Due to the improvement in mechanical properties, the Ni(Al) nanocomposite coatings showed significant modifications in wear resistance with low frictional coefficient.

  17. Modeling of Intermetallic Compounds Growth Between Dissimilar Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Wang, Yin; Prangnell, Philip; Robson, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    A model has been developed to predict growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases (IMCs) formed in a reactive diffusion couple between two metals for the case where multiple IMC phases are observed. The model explicitly accounts for the effect of grain boundary diffusion through the IMC layer, and can thus be used to explore the effect of IMC grain size on the thickening of the reaction layer. The model has been applied to the industrially important case of aluminum to magnesium alloy diffusion couples in which several different IMC phases are possible. It is demonstrated that there is a transition from grain boundary-dominated diffusion to lattice-dominated diffusion at a critical grain size, which is different for each IMC phase. The varying contribution of grain boundary diffusion to the overall thickening kinetics with changing grain size helps explain the large scatter in thickening kinetics reported for diffusion couples produced under different conditions.

  18. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

  19. Plastic deformation of ordered intermetallic alloys: Fundamental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.

    1994-10-01

    Fundamental aspects of plastic deformation in ordered intermetallic alloys are reviewed by directly comparing the temperature-dependent yield stresses of Ni{sub 3}Al and Ni{sub 3}Si (the L1{sub 2} structure), NiAl and FeAl (the B2 structure), and TiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al (non-cubic L1{sub 0} and D0{sub 19} structures, respectively). While the yield strength anomaly observed in Ni{sub 3}Al is consistent with the prevailing dislocation models, that found in stoichiometric Ni{sub 3}Si is not. The strong plastic anisotropy observed in NiAl stems from the high antiphase boundary energy, and that found in two-phase {gamma}-TiAl/{alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al is due to the exceptionally high compressive yield strength along the c-axis of Ti{sub 3}Al.

  20. The oxidation of Ni-rich Ni-Al intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.; Smialek, J. L.; Barrett, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    The oxidation of Ni-Al intermetallic alloys in the beta-NiAl phase field and in the two phase beta-NiAl/gamma'-Ni3Al phase field has been studied between 1000 and 1400 C. The stoichiometric beta-NiAl alloy doped with Zr was superior to other alloy compositions under cyclic and isothermal oxidation. The isothermal growth rates did not increase monotonically as the alloy Al content was decreased. The characteristically ridged alpha-Al203 scale morphology, consisting of cells of thin, textured oxide with thick growth ridges at cell boundaries, forms on oxidized beta-NiAl alloys. The correlation of scale features with isothermal growth rates indicates a predominant grain boundary diffusion growth mechanism. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation resistance decreases near the lower end of the beta-NiAl phase field.

  1. The oxidation of Ni-rich Ni-Al intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph; Smialek, James L.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation of Ni-Al intermetallic alloys in the beta-NiAl phase field and in the two phase beta-NiAl/gamma'-Ni3Al phase field has been studied between 1000 and 1400 C. The stoichiometric beta-NiAl alloy doped with Zr was superior to other alloy compositions under cyclic and isothermal oxidation. The isothermal growth rates did not increase monotonically as the alloy Al content was decreased. The characteristically ridged alpha-Al2O3 scale morphology, consisting of cells of thin, textured oxide with thick growth ridges at cell boundaries, forms on oxidized beta-NiAl alloys. The correlation of scale features with isothermal growth rates indicates a predominant grain boundary diffusion growth mechanism. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation resistance decreases near the lower end of the beta-NiAl phase field.

  2. Effects of elastic anisotropy on mechanical behavior of intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of the deformation and fracture behavior of ordered intermetallic compounds are examined within the framework of linear anisotropic elasticity theory of dislocations and cracks. The orientation dependence and the tension/compression asymmetry of yield stress are explained in terms of the anisotropic coupling effect of non-glide stresses to the glide strain. The anomalous yield behavior is related to the disparity (edge/screw) of dislocation mobility and the critical stress required for the dislocation multiplication mechanism of Frank-Read type. The slip-twin conjugate relationship, extensive faulting, and pseudo-twinning (martensitic transformation) at a crack tip can be enhanced also by the anisotropic coupling effect, which may lead to transformation toughening of shear type.

  3. Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, V.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2011-10-20

    The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti{sub 3}Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am{sup 241} source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

  4. Intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic steels for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials required are strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe 2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. This research starts with microstructural and microchemical analyses of these intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic steels in a scanning electron microscope. The microchemistry of precipitates, as determined by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope, is also studied. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were carried out to these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The microstructural and microchemical analyses were again performed after the thermo-mechanical processing. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameters of these steels after different thermo-mechanical treatments. Tensile tests at both room and elevated temperatures were performed to study mechanical behaviors of this novel alloy system; the deformation mechanisms were studied by strain rate jump tests at elevated temperatures. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these alumina-forming austenitic steels after creep tests. Experiments were carried out to study the effects of boron and carbon additions in the aged alumina-forming austenitic steels.

  5. The role of ALCHEMI in understanding the properties of ordered intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.

    1998-11-01

    After one and one-half decades of development, ALCHEMI is approaching the status of an established analytical technique. Many of the problems that have plagued ALCHEMI, especially for the analysis of ordered intermetallic alloys, are now well understood, and accurate site-distributions can be extracted from a variety of intermetallic alloys. This paper begins with an overview of the factors that can lead to large systematic errors or gross misinterpretations of ALCHEMI data, with illustrations from a variety of ordered intermetallic alloys. The paper concludes with a discussion of ALCHEMI in the broader context of understanding the properties of ordered intermetallic alloys. The results of systematic studies are used to illustrate the role of ALCHEMI in determining the competing effects of thermodynamic and kinetic factors during alloy processing and the correlation of alloy properties with the atomic site distributions on which the properties ultimately depend.

  6. Nanocrystalline Pd alloy films coated by electroless deposition.

    PubMed

    Strukov, G V; Strukova, G K; Batov, I E; Sakharov, M K; Kudrenko, E A; Mazilkin, A A

    2011-10-01

    The structures of palladium and palladium alloys thin films deposited from organic electrolytes onto metallic substrates by electroless plating method have been investigated. The coatings are dense, pore-free 0.005-1 microm thick films with high adhesive strength to the substrate surface. EDX, XRD, SEM and TEM methods were used to determine the composition and structure of alloy coatings of the following binary systems: Pd-Au, Pd-Ag, Pd-Ni, Pd-Pb, and ternary system Pd-Au-Ni. The coatings of Pd-Au, Pd-Ag and Pd-Ni have a solid solution structure, whereas Pd-Pb is intermetallic compound. It has been found that the deposited films consist of nanocrystalline grains with sizes in the range of 11-35 nm. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations reveal the existence of clusters formed by nanocrystalline grains. The origin for the formation of nanocrystalline structures of coating films is discussed. PMID:22400291

  7. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  8. Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A black chrome coating, originally developed for spacecraft solar cells, led to the development of an efficient flat plate solar collector. The coating, called Chromonyx, helps the collector absorb more heat. Olympic Solar Corporation was formed to electroplate the collector. The coating technique allows 95% of the sun's energy to be utilized. The process is widely used.

  9. Intermetallics as Novel Supports for Pt Monolayer O2 Reduction Electrocatalysts: Potential for Significantly Improving Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, T.; Vukmirovic, M.; DiSalvo, F.J.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-01-27

    We report on a new class of core-shell electrocatalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction. These electrocatalysts comprise a Pt monolayer shell and ordered intermetallic compounds cores and have enhanced activity and stability compared with conventional ones. These advantages are derived from combining the unique properties of Pt monolayer catalysts (high activity, low metal content) and of the intermetallic compounds (high stability and, possibly, low price). This method holds excellent potential for creating efficient fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  10. Modeling of crack tip dislocation emission in B2 intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeusz, Michael F.; Wert, John A.

    1992-04-01

    A model has been previously proposed to describe the energy associated with emission of dissociated superlattice dislocations from crack tips in ordered intermetallic alloys. In the present paper, the model is applied to several B2 intermetallic alloys. The results of the analysis reveal a correlation between the range of slip system orientations for which emission of a dislocation from a crack tip is energetically favorable and the macroscopic fracture mode of the alloy.

  11. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  12. Zintl and intermetallic phases grown from calcium/lithium flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, Trevor

    Metal flux synthes is a useful alternative method to high temperature solid state synthesis; it allows easy diffusion of reactants at lower temperatures, and presents favorable conditions for crystal growth. A mixed flux of calcium and lithium in a 1:1 ratio was explored in this work; this mixture melts at 300°C and is an excellent solvent for main group elements and CaH 2. Reactions of p-block elements in a 1:1 Ca/Li flux have produced several new intermetallic and Zintl phases. Electronegative elements from groups 14 and 15 are reduced to anions in this flux, yielding charge-balanced products. More electropositive metals from group 13 are not fully reduced; the resulting products are complex intermetallics. The reactions of tin or lead and carbon in Ca/Li flux produced the analogous phases Ca11Tt3C8 (Tt = Sn, Pb) in the monoclinic C21/c space group (a = 13.2117(8) A, b =10.7029(7) A, c = 14.2493(9) A, beta = 105.650(1)° for the Sn analog). These compounds are carbide Zintl phases that includes the rare combination of C3 4- and C22- units as well as Sn4- or Pb4- anions. Ca/Li flux reactions of CaH2 and arsenic have produced the Zintl phases LiCa3As 2H in orthorhombic Pnma (a = 11.4064(7), b = 4.2702(3), c = 11.8762(8) A), and Ca 13As6C0.46N1.155H6.045in tetragonal P4/mbm (a = 15.7493(15), c = 9.1062(9) A). The complex stoichiometry of the latter phase was caused by incorporation of light element contaminants and was studied by neutron diffraction, showing mixing of anionic sites to achieve charge balance. Ca/Li flux reactions with group 13 metals have resulted in several new intermetallic phases. Reactions of indium and CaH2 in the Ca/Li flux (with or without boron) formed Ca53In13B4-x H23+x(2.4 < x < 4.0) in cubic space group Im-3 (a = 16.3608(6) A) which features metallic indium atoms and ionic hydride sites. The electronic properties of this "subhydride" were confirmed by 1H and 115In NMR spectroscopy. Attempts to replace boron with carbon yielded Ca12InC13-x

  13. Deformation-Induced Amorphization of Copper-Titanium Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenazy, Philip Douglas

    Two methods of inducing amorphization in Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds by mechanical means have been investigated. Ingots of compositions Cu_{35}Ti _{65} and Cu_ {33.3}Ti_{66.7} were rapidly quenched into ribbons. The microstructure consisted largely of microcrystals in an amorphous matrix, which were either quenched in or grown by annealing. The ribbons were cold-rolled, which reduced their effective thickness by a factor of about 8. The status of the intermetallic compound CuTi_2 was monitored by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystals were found to amorphize as rolling progressed. This behavior was not reproduced in polycrystalline samples that had no amorphous matrix present initially. The presence of the amorphous phase is thus necessary for amorphization of the crystal: it eliminates the need to nucleate the new glass, and it prevents the ribbon from disintegrating at high deformation stages. It may also change the deformation mechanism that occurs in the crystals, retarding the onset of amorphization. Diffuse scattering in close-packed directions is similar to that seen in electron irradiation experiments. It is postulated that the chemical disorder present in antiphase boundaries caused by deformation raises the free energy of the crystal higher than that of the amorphous phase. Ingots of the same compound were worn against each other in a custom-built wear apparatus. The design eliminates iron contamination of the wear sample and requires relatively small quantities of material. Alteration of the surface structure was monitored by plane-view and cross -sectional TEM. Larger subsurface crystals exhibit diffuse scattering, similar to that found in the rolled samples. A wide range of grain sizes was observed, due to the inhomogeneous nature of the wear process. An unusual phase was observed at the surface, consisting of a nanometer-scale mixture of aligned nanocrystalline regions and disordered areas. Some amorphous phase is

  14. Reaction synthesis of Ni-Al based particle composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    SUSAN,DONALD F.; MISIOLEK,WOICECK Z.; MARDER,ARNOLD R.

    2000-02-11

    Electrodeposited metal matrix/metal particle composite (EMMC) coatings were produced with a nickel matrix and aluminum particles. By optimizing the process parameters, coatings were deposited with 20 volume percent aluminum particles. Coating morphology and composition were characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was employed to study reactive phase formation. The effect of heat treatment on coating phase formation was studied in the temperature range 415 to 1,000 C. Long-time exposure at low temperature results in the formation of several intermetallic phases at the Ni matrix/Al particle interfaces and concentrically around the original Al particles. Upon heating to the 500--600 C range, the aluminum particles react with the nickel matrix to form NiAl islands within the Ni matrix. When exposed to higher temperatures (600--1,000 C), diffusional reaction between NiAl and nickel produces ({gamma})Ni{sub 3}Al. The final equilibrium microstructure consists of blocks of ({gamma}{prime})Ni{sub 3}Al in a {gamma}(Ni) solid solution matrix, with small pores also present. Pore formation is explained based on local density changes during intermetallic phase formation and microstructural development is discussed with reference to reaction synthesis of bulk nickel aluminides.

  15. Interfacial reaction of intermetallic compounds of ultrasonic-assisted brazed joints between dissimilar alloys of Ti6Al4V and Al4Cu1Mg.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhipeng; Zhao, Weiwei; Yan, Jiuchun; Li, Dacheng

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted brazing of Al4Cu1Mg and Ti6Al4V using Zn-based filler metal (without and with Si) has been investigated. Before brazing, the Ti6Al4V samples were pre-treated by hot-dip aluminizing and ultrasonic dipping in a molten filler metal bath in order to control the formation of intermetallic compounds between the Ti6Al4V samples and the filler metal. The results show that the TiAl(3) phase was formed in the interface between the Ti6Al4V substrate and the aluminized coating. For the Zn-based filler metal without Si, the Ti6Al4V interfacial area of the brazed joint did not change under the effect of the ultrasonic wave, and only consisted of the TiAl(3) phase. For the Zn-based filler metal with Si, the TiAl(3) phase disappeared and a Ti(7)Al(5)Si(12) phase was formed at the interfacial area of the brazed joints under the effect of the ultrasonic wave. Due to the TiAl(3) phase completely changing to a Ti(7)Al(5)Si(12) phase, the morphology of the intermetallic compounds changed from a block-like shape into a lamellar-like structure. The highest shear strength of 138MPa was obtained from the brazed joint free of the block-like TiAl(3) phase. PMID:21489846

  16. Effect of La2O3 addition on interface chemistry between 4YSZ top layer and Ni based alloy bond coat in thermal barrier coating by EB PVD.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Young; Yang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Seong-Won; Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Jang, Byung-Koog; Lim, Dae-Soon; Oh, Yoon-Suk

    2014-11-01

    The effect of a 5 mol% La2O3 addition on the forming behavior and compositional variation at interface between a 4 mol% Yttria (Y2O3) stabilized ZrO2 (4YSZ) top coat and bond coat (NiCrAlY) as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been investigated. Top coats were deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB PVD) onto a super alloy (Ni-Cr-Co-Al) substrate without pre-oxidation of the bond coat. Top coats are found to consist of dense columnar grains with a thin interdiffusion layer between metallic bond coats. In the as-received 4YSZ coating, a thin interdiffusion zone at the interface between the top and bond coats was found to consist of a Ni-Zr intermetallic compound with a reduced quantity of Y, Al or O elements. On the other hand, in the case of an interdiffusion area of 5 mol% La2O3-added 4YSZ coating, it was found that the complicated composition and structure with La-added YSZ and Ni-Al rich compounds separately. The thermal conductivity of 5 mol% La2O3-added 4YSZ coating (- 1.6 W/m x k at 1100 degrees C) was lower than a 4YSZ coating (- 3.2 W/m x k at 1100 degrees C) alone. PMID:25958580

  17. Griffiths phase behaviour in a frustrated antiferromagnetic intermetallic compound

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Krishanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.; Mukherjee, S.

    2015-01-01

    The rare coexistence of a Griffiths phase (GP) and a geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetism in the non-stoichiometric intermetallic compound GdFe0.17Sn2 (the paramagnetic Weiss temperature θp ~ −59 K) is reported in this work. The compound forms in the Cmcm space group with large structural anisotropy (b/c ~ 4). Interestingly, all the atoms in the unit cell possess the same point group symmetry (Wycoff position 4c), which is rather rare. The frustration parameter, f = |θp|/TN has been established as 3.6, with the Néel temperature TN and Griffiths temperature TG being 16.5 and 32 K, respectively. The TG has been determined from the heat capacity measurement and also from the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). It is also shown that substantial difference in GP region may exist between zero field and field cooled measurements - a fact hitherto not emphasized so far. PMID:26515256

  18. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.K.; Sensmeier, M.D.; Kupperman, D.S.; Wadley, H.N.G.

    1993-09-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  19. A magnetization study of RCo 12B 6 intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, M.; Rosenberg, M.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1989-11-01

    The magnetic properties of polycrystalline intermetallics RCo 12B 6 with R = Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Tm have been studied in the temperature range 3-300 K and in fields up to 2 T. All compounds order magnetically between Tc=134.3 K for CeCo 12B 6 and Tc=162 K for GdCo 12B 6. YCo 12B 6 has an average Co moment of 0.42μ B. Since the Co moment is constant for all samples the R moments can be easily obtained and they are in good agreement with free R 3+ ion values. Ce is quadripositive in CeCo 12B 6 and therefore nonmagnetic. All light rare-earth compounds are ferromagnetic, while all heavy rare-earth compounds are ferrimagnetic with compensation points between Tcomp=11.6 K ( TmCo12B6) and Tcomp=82.8 K ( TbCo12B6). In the paramagnetic state an effective magnetic moment of 1.94μ B per Co atom has been found. The mean-field approximation yields a 3d-3d exchange integral of {J CoCo}/{k B}=110 K . The 3d-4f exchange integral is much smaller and equal to about {J RCo}/{k B}=6 K .

  20. Intermetallic compound formation at Cu-Al wire bond interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, In-Tae; Young Jung, Dae; Chen, William T.; Du Yong

    2012-12-15

    Intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and evolution at Cu-Al wire bond interface were studied using focused ion beam /scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED) and structure factor (SF) calculation. It was found that discrete IMC patches were formed at the Cu/Al interface in as-packaged state and they grew toward Al pad after high temperature storage (HTS) environment at 150 Degree-Sign C. TEM/EDS and NBED results combined with SF calculation revealed the evidence of metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} IMC phase (tetragonal, space group: I4m2, a = 0.404 nm, c= 0.580 nm) formed at Cu/Al interfaces in both of the as-packaged and the post-HTS samples. Two feasible mechanisms for the formation of the metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} phase are discussed based on (1) non-equilibrium cooling of wire bond that is attributed to highly short bonding process time and (2) the epitaxial relationships between Cu and {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2}, which can minimize lattice mismatch for {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} to grow on Cu.

  1. Excitonic correlations in the intermetallic Fe2VAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weht, Ruben; Pickett, W. E.

    1998-09-01

    The intermetallic compound Fe2VAl looks nonmetallic in transport and strongly metallic in thermodynamic and photoemission data. It has in its band structure a highly differentiated set of valence and conduction bands leading to a semimetallic system with a very low density of carriers. The pseudogap itself is sensitive to the presence of Al states, but the resulting carriers have only minor Al character. The effects of generalized gradient corrections to the local density band structure are shown to be important, reducing the carrier density by a factor of 3. Spin-orbit coupling results in a redistribution of the holes among pockets at the Brillouin zone center. Doping of this nonmagnetic compound by 0.5 electrons per cell in a virtual crystal fashion results in a moment of 0.5μB and destroys the pseudogap. We assess the tendencies toward the formation of an excitonic condensate and toward an excitonic Wigner crystal and find both to be unlikely. We propose a model in which the observed properties result from excitonic correlations arising from two interpenetrating lattices of distinctive electrons (eg on V) and holes (t2g on Fe) of low density (one carrier of each sign per 350 formula units).

  2. Determination of site-occupancies in aluminide intermetallics by ALCHEMI

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.; Duncan, A.J.

    1995-04-01

    The site-distributions of Fe in four B2-ordered NiAl-based alloys with Fe concentrations of 10%, 2%, and 0.5% have been determined by ALCHEMI (atom-location by channeling-enhanced microanalysis). Site-distributions have been extracted with standard errors between {approximately} 1.5% (10% Fe concentration) and {approximately} 6% (0.5% Fe concentration). The results show that Fe has no strong site-preference in NiAl and tends to reside on the site of the stoichiometrically deficient host element. An improved ALCHEMI analysis procedure is outlined. The analysis explicitly addresses the phenomenon of ionization delocalization, which previously complicated the determination of site-distributions in aluminide intermetallics, leading to inaccurate and oftentimes nonphysical results. The improved ALCHEMI analysis also addresses the presence of anti-site defects. The data acquisition conditions have been optimized to minimize the sources of statistical and systematic error. This optimized procedure should be suitable for all analyses of B2-ordered alloys. Several analyses at different channeling orientations show that the extracted site-occupancies are robust as long as the data are acquired at orientations that are remote from any major pole of the crystal.

  3. Processing and properties of molybdenum silicide intermetallics containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    Molybdenum-silicon-boron intermetallics with the composition Mo-10.5 Si-1.1 B, wt% (Mo-26.7 Si-7.3 B, at. %) were fabricated by several processing techniques. Powder processing (PM) resulted in macrocrack-free material containing no or only few microcracks. The PM materials contained quasi-equilibrium pores and large concentrations of oxygen. Average room temperature flexure strengths of 270 MPa were obtained. At 1,200 C in air, flexure strengths as high as 600 MPa were observed. These high values are attributed to crack healing and incipient plasticity. Ingot metallurgy (IM) materials contained much less oxygen than their PM counterparts. Depending on the cooling rate during solidification, they developed either mostly macrocracks or mostly microcracks. Due to the high flaw densities, the room temperature flexure strengths were only of the order of 100 MPa. However, the flexure strengths at 1,200 C were up to 3 times higher than those at room temperature. Again, this is attributed to crack healing and incipient plasticity. The IM materials will require secondary processing to develop their full potential. A preliminary examination of secondary processing routes included isothermal forging and hot extrusion.

  4. Molecular assembly and organic film growth on complex intermetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; Sharma, Hem Raj; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Ledieu, Julian; Fournée, Vincent; McGrath, Ronan

    We extensively studied the role of molecular symmetry and symmetry/structures of wide ranges of substrate-surfaces from non-periodic to periodic to quasi-crystalline in nucleation, growth and phase transition in films made of organic molecular materials. Recently, most interest in quasicrystals is due to the generalization of aperiodic ordering to several classes of systems. Compared to periodic materials, these provide a closer approximation to an isotropic first Brillouin zone, which is of great importance to the design of new functional materials. Here, we present results obtained from our ongoing study of interface mediated molecular assembly extended on complex intermetallic surfaces with specific examples of C60 and Zn-phthalocyanine on quasicrystalline and approximant surfaces. We employed in-situ real-time low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) for investigation of the processes in assembly and film growth and post-growth STM study and DFT calculations to understand structural details and growth mechanism. Research were carried out in part at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Lab, USA; partly at Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, France; and partly at the Surface Science Research Centre, University of Liverpool, UK.

  5. Magnetic Anisotropy and Crystalline Electric Field in Quaternary Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.

    All isostructural compounds RNi2B2C (R =Er, Ho, Dy) show some magnetic transitions in magnetization isotherms at certain applied magnetic fields and temperatures above and below Neel and superconducting temperatures (TN, TC) where TN/TC varies from 0.57 to 1.66 for ErNi2B2C and DyNi2B2C. By using theoretical group analysis of D4h (I4/mmm) to the energy level scheme of crystalline electric field of magnetization isotherms anisotropy at various temperatures, we have obtained some possible ground state energy levels such as singlet Γ4 and first excited doublet state Γ5 in addition to another excited singlet Γ1 . Our crystalline electric field energy scheme analysis shows some qualitative agreement between theoretical calculation and experiments at high magnetic fields regime only, which means the interplay between antiferromagnetsm and superconductivity should be included. Magnetic Anisotropy and Crystalline Electric Field in Quaternary Intermetallic Compounds.

  6. Sealing Treatment of Aluminum Coating on S235 Steel with Thermal Diffusion of Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Timing; Zhao, Weimin; Tang, Xiuyan

    2015-08-01

    The study introduced a thermal diffusion sealing treatment for arc-sprayed aluminum coating on S235 carbon steel. The sprayed aluminum-zinc duplex coating was heated to 420 °C, so that the low-melting-point zinc could diffuse into the pores of the aluminum coating. Optical microscope, microhardness, electron probe microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction were used to evaluate the sealing treatment. The calculated diffusion coefficient for zinc in the arc-sprayed aluminum coating was approximately 7.735 × 10-9 cm2/s. The diffused zinc could increase the compactness and microhardness of the aluminum coating. Nevertheless, adverse interface reactions could destroy the coating if the zinc made contact with the steel substrate. FeZn10 could form initially, and then the heat from the exothermic reactions between zinc and iron would initiate the reactions among iron, aluminum, and zinc. FeAl-Zn x , FeAl2-Zn x , and Fe2Al5-Zn x were generated following FeZn10. The defected structures were mainly composed of Fe2Al5-Zn x and FeZn10. All of these formed tough, brittle, intermetallics that have a negative effect on the coating performance. Thus, the contact between zinc and the steel substrate should be avoided, and the holding time should be restricted to 8.16 × 106 L 2 to prevent the generation of intermetallics.

  7. Morbus Coats

    PubMed Central

    Förl, B.; Schmack, I.; Grossniklaus, H.E.; Rohrschneider, K.

    2010-01-01

    Der fortgeschrittene Morbus Coats stellt im Kleinkindalter eine der schwierigsten Differenzialdiagnosen zum Retinoblastom dar. Wir beschreiben die klinischen und histologischen Befunde zweier Jungen im Alter von 9 und 21 Monaten mit einseitiger Leukokorie. Trotz umfassender Diagnostik mittels Narkoseuntersuchung, MRT und Ultraschall konnte ein Retinoblastom nicht sicher ausgeschlossen werden, und es erfolgte eine Enukleation. Histologisch wurde die Diagnose eines Morbus Coats gesichert. Da eine differenzialdiagnostische Abgrenzung zwischen Morbus Coats und Retinoblastom schwierig sein kann, halten wir in zweifelhaften Fällen auch angesichts der eingeschränkten Visusprognose und potenzieller Sekundärkomplikationen beim fortgeschrittenen Morbus Coats eine Enukleation für indiziert. PMID:18299842

  8. Modeling non-isothermal intermetallic layer growth in the 63Sn-37Pb/Cu system

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Hopkins, P.L.; Erickson, K.L.; Frear, D.R.; Davidson, R.

    1996-12-31

    A model describing diffusion-controlled growth of multiple intermetallic layers and the displacement of the interfaces between layers was developed and implemented in a 1-D computer code based on method-of-lines. The code was applied to analysis of intermetallic layer growth in isothermal solder aging experiments performed with 100 Sn/Cu and 63Sn-37Pb/Cu solder-substrate systems. Analyses indicated that intermetallic layer growth was consistent with a bulk diffusion mechanism involving Cu and/or Sn. In this work, nonisothermal solder-aging experiments were done with the 63Sn- 37Pb/Cu system using two temperature histories (4 cycles/day between 223-443 K, and 72 cycles/day between 223-443 K). Isothermal experiments were also done at 443 K. Thickness of Cu{sub 3}Sn and Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic layers were determined vs time for each temperature history. An updated version of the model and code were used to predict the intermetallic layer growth. Arrhenius expressions for diffusion coefficients in both Cu3Sn and Cu6Sn5 layers were determined. Agreement between prediction and experiment was generally good. In some cases, predicted layer growth was less than experiment, but within error. This paper describes the nonisothermal experiments and a comparison of predicted and observed layer growth vs time.

  9. Thermal Stability of Intermetallic Phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to alloy design and application of Mo-containing austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, the thermal stability of intermetallic Chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys was investigated at 1273 K, 1123 K, and 973 K (1000 °C, 850 °C, and 700 °C) for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions, and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with the decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, and Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. The thermodynamic models that were developed were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  10. The Structure-Phase Compositions of Powder Ni - based Coatings after Modification by DC Plasma Jet Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alontseva, D.; Ghassemieh, E.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the results of investigation of the structure-phase compositions of Ni-based coatings deposited by plasma jet on steel substrates after modification by direct current (DC) plasma jet irradiation. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) are used in the current study. The phase structures and morphology of precipitation of strengthening phases from solid solution are defined. The irradiation of the coatings leads to the evolution of the structural-phase state of coatings: an increase in the volume fraction of hardening intermetallic phases, the formation of sufficiently homogeneous fine-grained structure in the irradiated coatings. There is a mutual penetration of the substrate main element Fe into the coating and base coating elements Ni into the substrate as a result of the coating treatment by a pulse DC plasma jet.

  11. Synthesis of cerium rich intermetallics using molten metal eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Patricia Christine

    Metal eutectic fluxes are useful for exploratory synthesis of new intermetallic phases. In this work the use of cerium/transition metal eutectics such as: Ce/Co, Ce/Ni, and Ce/Fe have yielded many new synthetically and magnetically complex phases. Structural units that were previously observed in phases grown in La/Ni eutectic reactions have also been observed in new structures and analogs grown from cerium/transition metal eutectics. These structural units include a main group element coordinated by 9 rare-earth atoms (such as the Al Ce9 clusters seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6) B13C4), trigonal planar FeC3 units (also seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6)B 13C4), iron clusters capped by light elements (Fe4C 6 frustrated tetrahedral in Ce21Fe8M7C 14, and larger Fe clusters in Ce33Fe14B25 C34). Variants of these building blocks were observed in Ce10Co2B7C16 with square Co units and chains of B and C connected to them, Fe2C8 units observed in Ce7Fe2C9, and FeC4 observed in Ce4FeGa0.85Al0.15C4 and Ce4FeAlC4. Two new phases were grown from Ce/Fe eutectic, Ce33Fe 14B25C34 and Ce33Fe13B 18C34 which exhibits very similar structures, but significantly different magnetic behavior. Structurally these two phases are similar. Both crystallize in the Im-3m space group, but differ by the centering of the Fe clusters. Ce33Fe14B25C34 contains Fe clusters centered by B atoms and Al doped on the Fe2 site. In Ce33Fe13B18C34, the Fe cluster is a perfect cuboctahedron. Ce33Fe14B25 C34 exhibits mixed valent behavior of cerium at 75K and no magnetic moment on iron, where-as Ce33Fe13B18C 34 exhibits tetravalent cerium and its iron clusters undergo a ferromagnetic transition at 180K. Another borocarbide, Ce10Co2B7C 16 was synthesized from Ce/Co eutectic flux. This structure features squares of Co surrounded by chains of C and B and a sea of cerium atoms. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements at 1 Tesla were fit to a modified Curie-Weiss law and a moment per Ce was

  12. Crystal plasticity aspects of a lamellar intermetallic microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Schloegl, S.M.; Fischer, F.D.; Minchev, O.I.; Rammerstorfer, F.G.

    1995-12-31

    Two-phase TiAl intermetallics consisting of {gamma} (TiAl) and {alpha}{sub 2} (Ti{sub 3}Al) lamellae possess mechanical properties which significantly differ from that of single-phase alloys. There are many experimental results of polysynthetically twinned (PST) TiAl crystals, which contain only a single set of lamellae with a specific orientation. Their yield stress at room temperature depends strongly on the angle {theta} between the orientation of the lamellae and the load axis. Furthermore, when compression loads are applied in the direction of the lamellae some sort of {open_quote}microbuckling{close_quote} could be observed, especially at high temperature during the primary forming process. In the paper this nonlinear anisotropic behavior is simulated by micromechanical computational methods with regard to finding a constitutive law for a polycrystal with lamellar grains. The modeling is based on the unit-cell techniques using the finite element method. Because of the orientation relationship of (111){sub {gamma}} {parallel} (0001){sub {alpha}2} and {l_angle}1{rvec 1}0{r_angle}{sub {gamma}} {parallel} {l_angle}11{rvec 2}0{r_angle}{sub {alpha}2}, is necessary to use crystal plasticity. The major deformation modes of the -Y phase at room temperature are ordinary slip along (110) and deformation twinning, i.e., true twinning of the (111){l_angle}11{rvec 2} type. These two modes are simulated in the unit-cell analyses. Using the micromechanical models, stress-strain curves are calculated for orientation angles {theta} varying in the range of 0{degrees} {le} {theta} {le} 90{degrees}, and the computed yield stresses are compared with experimental results. The {open_quote}microbuckling{close_quote} of the lamellae under compression loading is studied as well.

  13. Magnetic and crystallographic structures in UTX intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.A.; Lawson, A.C.; Sechovsky, V.; Havela, L.; Kergadallan, Y.; Nakotte, H.; de Boer, F.R.

    1993-08-01

    Uranium, along with other actinides and lanthanides, forms a large group of ternary intermetallic compounds of stoichiometry UTX (T = transition metal, X = p-electron metal). These compounds are formed in several structure types and the occurrence and stability of particular structures with respect to the transition metal content suggests reasonable systematics. The authors have also investigated the magnetic structures of selected UTX compounds and it is revealing to relate the crystallographic and magnetic structures, because of the relationship between the magnetic symmetry and that of the U-atom environment produced by the 5f-ligand hybridization, and the consequent anisotropic exchange. Those of ZrNiAl structure type are collinear, with moments along the hexagonal c-axis. In the orthorhombic NiSiTi structure type, the moments are confined to the b- c plane (perpendicular to the uranium chains) and the structures are often incommensurate. In the hexagonal CaIn{sub 2} (or GaGeLi) structure type, the magnetic structures form in an orthorhombic cell, and at least in the disordered centric group, again the moments lie perpendicular to the nearest-neighbor uranium spacing. This work presents a phenomenology of trends in UTX ternary compounds. It is shown that there is an apparent strong hybridization parallel to nearest neighbor U-U directions, with ferromagnetic coupling in the same directions. There may be a systematic relationship between the hybridization anisotropy and the magnetic anisotropy, in which the quantization axes are the same and the moments point along directions of relatively weak hybridization.

  14. Modeling of Substitutional Site Preference in Ordered Intermetallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Honecy, Frank

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the site substitution scheme of specific alloying elements in ordered compounds and the dependence of site occupancy on compound stoichiometry, alloy concentration. This basic knowledge, and the interactions with other alloying additions are necessary in order to predict and understand the effect of various alloying schemes on the physical properties of a material, its response to various temperature treatments, and the resulting mechanical properties. Many theoretical methods can provide useful but limited insight in this area, since most techniques suffer from constraints in the type of elements and the crystallographic structures that can be modeled. With this in mind, the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys was designed to overcome these limitations, with the intent of providing an useful tool for the theoretical prediction of fundamental properties and structure of complex systems. After a brief description of the BFS method, its use for the determination of site substitution schemes for individual as well as collective alloying additions to intermetallic systems is described, including results for the concentration dependence of the lattice parameter. Focusing on B2 NiAl, FeAl and CoAl alloys, the energetics of Si, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Hf, Ta and W alloying additions are surveyed. The effect of single additions as well as the result of two simultaneous additions, discussing the interaction between additions and their influence on site preference schemes is considered. Finally, the BFS analysis is extended to ternary L1(sub 2) (Heusler phase) alloys. A comparison between experimental and theoretical results for the limited number of cases for which experimental data is available is also included.

  15. Identification and control of grinding processes for intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Hosein Ali

    2000-10-01

    An intermetallic compound (IMC) is a combination of two or more metals with a particular atomic formula by having either ionic and covalent bonds, or metallic bonds with specific crystal structures. They may be thought of as the intermediate between metals and ceramics. These new materials may combine the best of each class: the ductility, heat and electric conductivity of metals with the strength and oxidation resistance of ceramics. Previous study has proposed that the depth of plastic deformation can be used as a parameter to describe the influence of grinding conditions on other physical properties of subsurface layers. Accordingly, the indentation model has been developed to correlate the depth of plastic deformation with the normal component of grinding force. It has been reported that the under certain grinding conditions the depth of plastic deformation does not follow the indentation model. The primary objective of this research is to explain such deviations and to demonstrate that this model can be used to control and predict the depth of plastic deformation. Elements of this research include the development of an open architecture platform to study grinding process, a signal processing algorithm for gap elimination, introducing and implementation of model reference unfalsification and learning concept, development of a mathematical model for grinding gamma-TiAl, a comparison between conventional and superabrasive grinding, control and prediction of the depth of plastic deformation, and initiation of one of the first databases for grinding gamma-TiAl. This work not only serves as a step toward the use of IMCs in future technology but also serves as a step toward autonomous machining systems using intelligent control and advanced monitoring which is a feature of the future abrasive technology.

  16. New Interest in Intermetallic Compound ZnSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. I.; Prokof'eva, L. V.; Pshenay-Severin, D. A.; Shabaldin, A. A.; Konstantinov, P. P.

    2014-06-01

    The intermetallic compound ZnSb has been known since the 1830s. It has semiconductor properties, but its mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties are very close to those of a metallic alloy. When thermoelectrics based on (BiSb)2(TeSe)3 solid solutions were created, interest in ZnSb subsided. However, the current situation is different, as tellurium has become expensive and rare. Moreover, its compounds are too toxic, and it is too difficult to produce such materials and devices from these solid solutions. Recently, n-type material based on Mg2(SnSi) solid solution was proposed in the Laboratory of Physics for Thermoelements of the Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute. This material together with ZnSb may form a promising couple for creating various thermoelectric modules. In this paper, various properties (Hall and Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal conductivities) are reported in the temperature range from 80 K to 797 K. Different acceptor impurities have been tested. The Hall concentration at room temperature varied from 1.5 × 1018 cm-3 to 2.7 × 1019 cm-3. Some features have been discovered in the behavior of the thermoelectric parameters of double-doped ZnSb samples at temperatures above 500 K. Their nature points to a temperature-dependent increase of the Hall concentration. The existence of two temperature ranges with additional doping is revealed by Hall coefficient and electrical conductivity measurements in the range from 80 K to 797 K. The experimental data are discussed based on a model of the energy spectrum with impurity and native defect states localized in the energy gap. It is shown that the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit of ZnSb: Cd, Ag, Sn is not less than 1.0 at 600 K.

  17. An MHD heat source based on intermetallic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sadjian, H.; Zavitsanos, P. ); Marston, C.H. )

    1991-05-06

    The main objective of this program was the development of an MHD heat source of potential use in Space - Based Multi Megawatt, MHD Power Systems. The approach is based on extension of high temperature chemical/ion release technology developed by the General Sciences, Incorporated (GSI) team and successfully applied in other Space Applications. Solid state reactions have been identified which can deliver energy densities and electrons in excess of those from high energy explosives as well as other conventional fuels. The use of intermetallic reactions can be used to generate hot hydrogen plasma from the reaction, to create a high level of seedant ionization, can be packaged as a cartridge type fuels for discrete pulses. The estimated weight for energizing a (100 MW - 1000 sec) Pulsed MHD Power System can range from 12 to 25 {times} 10{sup 3} kg depending on reaction system and strength of the magnetic field. The program consisted of two major tasks with eight subtasks designed to systematically evaluate these concepts in order to reduce fuel weight requirements. Laboratory measurements on energy release, reaction product identification and levels of ionization were conducted in the first task to screen candidate fuels. The second task addressed the development of a reaction chamber in which conductivity, temperature and pressure were measured. Instrumentation was developed to measure these parameters under high temperature pulsed conditions in addition to computer programs to reduce the raw data. Measurements were conducted at GSI laboratories for fuel weights of up to 120 grams and at the Franklin Research Center* for fuel weights up to 1 kilogram. The results indicate that fuel weight can be scaled using modular packaging. Estimates are presented for fuel weight requirements. 15 refs.

  18. Coatings Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coatings Guide is a free online information resource that focuses on alternative, low-emission coatings for metal, plastic, and architectural substrates. Developed cooperatively by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Interna...

  19. The preparation of the Ti-Al alloys based on intermetallic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosova, N.; Sachkov, V.; Kurzina, I.; Pichugina, A.; Vladimirov, A.; Kazantseva, L.; Sachkova, A.

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with a method of obtaining materials in the Ti-Al system. Research was carried out in accordance with the phase diagram of the system state. It was established, that both single-phase and multiphase systems, containing finely dispersed intermetallic compositions of phases Ti3Al, TiAl and TiAl3, are formed. Additionally, it was found that the pure finely dispersed (coherent-scattering region (CSR) up to 100 nm) intermetallic compound TiAl3 is formed at molar ratio of Ti:Al = 1:3. Experimentally proved the possibility of produce the complex composition of alloys and intermetallic compounds and products based on them.

  20. Intermetallic negative electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Fransson, Linda M.; Edstrom, Ester Kristina; Henriksen, Gary

    2004-05-04

    A method of operating an electrochemical cell is disclosed. The cell has an intermetallic negative electrode of Cu.sub.6-x M.sub.x Sn.sub.5, wherein x is .ltoreq.3 and M is one or more metals including Si and a positive electrode containing Li in which Li is shuttled between the positive electrode and the negative electrode during charge and discharge to form a lithiated intermetallic negative electrode during charge. The voltage of the electrochemical cell is controlled during the charge portion of the charge-discharge cycles so that the potential of the lithiated intermetallic negative electrode in the fully charged electrochemical cell is less than 0.2 V but greater than 0 V versus metallic lithium.

  1. Effect of intermetallic phases on the anodic oxidation and corrosion of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song-mei; Li, Ying-dong; Zhang, You; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    Intermetallic phases were found to influence the anodic oxidation and corrosion behavior of 5A06 aluminum alloy. Scattered intermetallic particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after pretreatment. The anodic film was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and its corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization in NaCl solution. The results show that the size of Al-Fe-Mg-Mn particles gradually decreases with the iron content. During anodizing, these intermetallic particles are gradually dissolved, leading to the complex porosity in the anodic film beneath the particles. After anodizing, the residual particles are mainly silicon-containing phases, which are embedded in the anodic film. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the porous anodic film layer is easily penetrated, and the barrier plays a dominant role in the overall protection. Meanwhile, self-healing behavior is observed during the long immersion time.

  2. On the micromechanics of low temperature strength and toughness of intermetallic/metallic microlaminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Heathcote, J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Rowe, R.G.; Skelly, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    Tensile strength and fracture resistance curves were measured for different combination of brittle intermetallic/ductile metallic microlaminates. Metal layer bridging, characterized by the closure stress ({sigma})-crack opening (u) displacement function, produced toughening by factors of 2--5. The key composite property, {sigma}(u), was evaluated by fitting resistance curves using a large scale bridging code coupled with independent estimates of the maximum stress and ligament height. These functions were used in a bridging-crack stability analysis of tensile strength controlled by pre-existing processing defects. Assuming similar flaws, the composites are roughly 4--6 times stronger than the intermetallic, with predicted strengths in agreement with experiment within a standard deviation of 45 MPa. Composite strength is primarily sensitive to the intermetallic toughness and the constrained strength of the metal layer. Greater strength can also be achieved by better control of the growth defects.

  3. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  4. Regulatory Aspects of Coatings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a history of the development and uses of edible coating regulations, detailed chapters on coating caracteristics, determination of coating properties, methods for making coatings, and discription of coating film formers (polysaccharieds, lipids, resins, proteins). The chapter also...

  5. Massive spalling of intermetallic compounds in solder-substrate reactions due to limited supply of the active element

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. C.; Ho, C. E.; Chang, C. W.; Kao, C. R.

    2007-04-15

    Massive spalling of intermetallic compounds has been reported in the literature for several solder/substrate systems, including SnAgCu soldered on Ni substrate, SnZn on Cu, high-Pb PbSn on Cu, and high-Pb PbSn on Ni. In this work, a unified thermodynamic argument is proposed to explain this rather unusual phenomenon. According to this argument, two necessary conditions must be met. The number one condition is that at least one of the reactive constituents of the solder must be present in a limited amount, and the second condition is that the soldering reaction has to be very sensitive to its concentration. With the growth of intermetallic, more and more atoms of this constituent are extracted out of the solder and incorporated into the intermetallic. As the concentration of this constituent decreases, the original intermetallic at the interface becomes a nonequilibrium phase, and the spalling of the original intermetallic occurs.

  6. Intermetallic NaAu2 as a heterogeneous catalyst for low-temperature CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaoxian; Wang, Lin-Lin; Maligal-Ganesh, Raghu V; Smetana, Volodymyr; Walen, Holly; Thiel, Patricia A; Miller, Gordon J; Johnson, Duane D; Huang, Wenyu

    2013-07-01

    The enhanced stability and modified electronic structure of intermetallic compounds provide discovery of superior catalysts for chemical conversions with high activity, selectivity, and stability. We find that the intermetallic NaAu2 is an active catalyst for CO oxidation at low temperatures. From density functional theory calculations, a reaction mechanism is suggested to explain the observed low reaction barrier of CO oxidation by NaAu2, in which a CO molecule reacts directly with an adsorbed O2 to form an OOCO* intermediate. The presence of surface Na increases the binding energy of O2 and decreases the energy barrier of the transition states. PMID:23758405

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of the Ti-45Al-5Fe Intermetallic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, T. I.; Imayev, V. M.; Imayev, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure including changes in the phase composition and mechanical compression properties of the Ti-45Al-5Fe (at.%) intermetallic alloy manufactured by casting and subjected to homogenization annealing are investigated as functions of the temperature. The initial alloy has a homogeneous predominantly lamellar structure with relatively small size of colonies of three intermetallic phases: γ(TiAl), τ2(Al2FeTi), and α2(Ti3Al) in the approximate volume ratio 75:20:5. Compression tests have revealed the enhanced strength at room temperature and the improved hot workability at 800°C compared to those of TNM alloys of last generation.

  8. Sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H. D.

    1980-03-01

    Thermal spraying is shown to be an efficient means for the protection of surface areas against elevated temperature, wear, corrosion, hot gas corrosion, and erosion in structural aircraft components. Particularly in jet engines, numerous parts are coated by flame, detonation, or plasma spraying techniques. The applied methods of flame, detonation, and plasma spraying are explained, as well as electric arc spraying. Possibilities for spray coatings which meet aircraft service requirements are discussed, as well as methods for quality control, especially nondestructive test methods. In particular, coating characteristics and properties obtained by different spray methods are described, and special attention is paid to low pressure plasma spraying.

  9. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ameron International Protective Coatings Group developed a special coating for NASA that would withstand the high temperatures generated by the Space Shuttle rocket engines. The coating remains intact for at least 10 minutes, and insulates the launch pad so that it does not exceed 150 degrees and buckle. The NASA formulation was from Ameron's Engineered Siloxane (PSX) chemistry, which employs an inorganic silicon-oxygen structure which the company states is stronger and more reliable than organic polymers. Some of Ameron's PSX product line is based on the NASA technology, used for everything from industrial equipment to bridges.

  10. Surface integrity on grinding of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagian, Gregorio Roberto

    Gamma-TiAl is an ordered intermetallic compound characterized by high strength to density ratio, good oxidation resistance, and good creep properties at elevated temperatures. However, it is intrinsically brittle at room temperature. This thesis investigates the potential for the use of grinding to process TiAl into useful shapes. Grinding is far from completely understood, and many aspects of the individual mechanical interactions of the abrasive grit with the material and their effect on surface integrity are unknown. The development of new synthetic diamond superabrasives in which shape and size can be controlled raises the question of the influence of those variables on the surface integrity. The goal of this work is to better understand the fundamentals of the abrasive grit/material interaction in grinding operations. Experimental, analytical, and numerical work was done to characterize and predict the resultant deformation and surface integrity on ground lamellar gamma-TiAl. Grinding tests were carried out, by analyzing the effects of grit size and shape, workpiece speed, wheel depth of cut, and wear on the subsurface plastic deformation depth (PDD). A practical method to assess the PDD is introduced based on the measurement of the lateral material flow by 3D non-contact surface profilometry. This method combines the quantitative capabilities of the microhardness measurement with the sensitivity of Nomarski microscopy. The scope and limitations of this technique are analyzed. Mechanical properties were obtained by quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar compression tests. Residual stress plots were obtained by x-ray, and surface roughness and cracking were evaluated. The abrasive grit/material interaction was accounted by modeling the force per abrasive grit for different grinding conditions, and studying its correlation to the PDD. Numerical models of this interaction were used to analyze boundary conditions, and abrasive size effects on the PDD. An explicit 2D