Science.gov

Sample records for mobile helium-jet transport

  1. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  2. Space station mobile transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.

    1988-01-01

    The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space station that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space station, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the station, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work Station. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the station itself. The Transporter involved in station construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.

  3. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Visualization of an Oscillating Helium Jet Undergoing Gravitational Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow schlieren deflectometry combined with high-speed digital imaging was used to study buoyancy effects on flow structure of a helium jet discharged vertically into air. The experimental data were taken using the 2.2-sec drop tower facility at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The test conditions pertained to jet Reynolds number of 490 and jet Richardson number of 0.11, for which buoyancy is often considered unimportant. Experimental results show global oscillations at a frequency of 27 Hz in Earth gravity. In microgravity, the jet oscillations vanished and the jet width increased. Results provide a direct physical evidence of the importance of buoyancy on the flow structure of low-density gas jets at a Richardson number considered too small to account for gravity.

  4. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry Analysis of Helium Jets Flowing into Air for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The flow phenomena of buoyant jets have been analyzed by many researchers in recent years. Few, however have studied jets in microgravity conditions, and the exact nature of the flow under these conditions has until recently been unknown. This study seeks to extend the work done by researchers at the university of Oklahoma in examining and documenting the behavior of helium jets in micro-gravity conditions. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry data have been obtained for helium jets discharging vertically into quiescent ambient air from tubes of several diameters at various flow rates using a high-speed digital camera. These data have obtained before, during and after the onset of microgravity conditions. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry has been developed for this study with the installation and use of a high-speed digital camera and modifications to the optical setup. Higher temporal resolution of the transitional phase between terrestrial and micro-gravity conditions has been obtained which has reduced the averaging effect of longer exposure times used in all previous schlieren studies. Results include color schlieren images, color time-space images (temporal evolution images), frequency analyses, contour plots of hue and contour plots of helium mole fraction. The results, which focus primarily on the periods before and during the onset of microgravity conditions, show that the pulsation of the jets normally found in terrestrial gravity ("earth"-gravity) conditions cease, and the gradients in helium diminish to produce a widening of the jet in micro-gravity conditions. In addition, the results show that the disturbance propagate upstream from a downstream source.

  5. Full-Field Measurements of Self-Excited Oscillations in Momentum-Dominated Helium Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildirim, B. S.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Flow structure of momentum-dominated helium jets discharged vertically into ambient air was investigated using a high-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) apparatus operated at up to 2000 Hz. The operating parameters, i.e., Reynolds number and Richardson number were varied independently to examine the self-excited, flow oscillatory behavior over a range of experimental conditions. Measurements revealed highly periodic oscillations in the laminar region at a unique frequency as well as high regularity in the flow transition and initial turbulent regions. The buoyancy was shown to affect the oscillation frequency and the distance from the jet exit to the flow transition plane. Instantaneous helium concentration contours across the field of view revealed changes in the jet flow structure and the evolution of the vortical structures during an oscillation cycle. A cross-correlation technique was applied to track the vortices and to find their convection velocity. Time-traces of helium concentration at different axial locations provided detailed information about the oscillating flow.

  6. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  7. Concentration Measurements in Self-Excited, Momentum-Dominated Helium Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildirim, Bekir Sedat

    2004-01-01

    Flow structure of momentum-dominated pure helium jets discharged vertically into ambient air was investigated using high-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) technique. Effects of the operating parameters, i.e., Reynolds number (Re) and Richardson number (Ri), on the oscillatory behavior of the flow were examined over a range of experimental conditions. To seek the individual effect of these parameters, one of them was fixed and the other was varied with certain constraints. Measurements revealed highly periodic oscillations in the laminar region as well as high regularity in transition and turbulent regions. Maximum spectral power profiles at different axial locations indicated the oscillation amplitude increasing until the breakdown of the jet in the turbulent regime. The transition from the laminar to turbulent flow was also investigated. Fast Fourier transform analysis performed in the transition regime showed that the flow oscillates at a unique frequency, which was the same in the upstream laminar flow region. Measured deflection angle data were used in Abel inversion algorithm to construct the helium concentration fields. Instantaneous helium concentration contours revealed changes in the flow structure and evolution of vortical structures during an oscillation cycle. Temporal evolution plots of helium concentration at different axial location showed repeatable oscillations at all axial and radial locations up to the turbulent regime. A cross-correlation technique, applied to find the spatial displacements of the vortical structures, provided correlation coefficient peaks between consecutive schlieren images. Results show that the vortical structure convected and accelerated only in the axial direction.

  8. Modeling Facilitated Contaminant Transport by Mobile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Kim, Seunghyun

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of exogenous biocolloids such as genetically engineered bacteria in a bioremediation operation can enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater by reducing the retardation effects. Because of their colloidal size and favorable surface conditions, bacteria are efficient contaminant carriers. In cases where contaminants have a low mobility in porous media because of their high partition with solid matrix, facilitated contaminant transport by mobile bacteria can create high contaminant fluxes. When metabolically active mobile bacteria are present in a subsurface environment, the system can be treated as consisting of three phases: water phase, bacterial phase, and stationary solid matrix phase. In this work a mathematical model based on mass balance equations is developed to describe the facilitated transport and fate of a contaminant and bacteria in a porous medium. Bacterial partition between the bulk solution and the stationary solid matrix and contaminant partition among three phases are represented by expressions in terms of measurable quantities. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of contaminant and bacterial concentrations. A dimensional analysis of the transport model was utilized to estimate model parameters from the experimental data and to assess the effect of several parameters on model behavior. The model results matched favorably with experimental data of Jenkins and Lion (1993). The presence of mobile bacteria enhances the contaminant transport. However, bacterial consumption of the contaminant, which serves as a bacterial nutrient, can attenuate the contaminant mobility. The work presented in this paper is the first three-phase model to include the effects of substrate metabolism on the fate of groundwater contaminants.

  9. Choices for Mobility Independence: Transportation Options for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... In addition to the services described above, some communities have mobility managers who can guide you through the transportation resources and services that are available. Mobility managers know the community-wide transportation service network and understand how it ...

  10. Full Field Scalar Measurements in a Pulsating Helium Jet using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.

    2000-01-01

    The flow structure of a pulsating helium jet was investigated using quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry. The operating parameters included the tube inside diameter, the jet Reynolds number and the jet Richardson number. The jet structure was characterized by the frequency spectrum, temporal evolution of the oscillations and mean and root-mean-square profiles of the species mole fraction, which in this case, was helium. Experiments were conducted using a variable nozzle facility. Angular deflection data were obtained using rainbow schlieren deflectometry across full field of color images taken at a temporal resolution of 60Hz. The flicker cycle was analyzed by instantaneous rainbow schlieren images, contour plots of deflection angle and helium mole fraction placed sequentially in time. Two observe the flow downstream, the tube was lowered with respect to the optical setup and images were taken at different axial planes. In this way, the laminar, transition and turbulent regions of the jet flow were observed. Abel inversion algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the refractive index field from the measurements of the beam deflection angle. The concentration field was then generated from the refractive index field. The phenomenon of vortex initiation and propagation in the flicker cycle was described by correlating the ray deflection angle and concentration contour plots. Experiments in the flickering jet reveal global oscillation in the flow field. The effect of jet exit Reynolds number and jet Richardson number on the flickering frequency was analyzed. The effect of jet Richardson number was more pronounced than that of the jet exit Reynolds number. The flow field was studies quantitatively in terms of temporal evolution and statistical description of helium mole fraction.

  11. Scalar Measurements and Analysis of Helium Jets in Earth Gravity and Microgravity using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze Wing

    2001-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that low-density gas jets injected into a high-density gas undergo an instability mode leading to highly periodic oscillations in the flow field. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in these jets is abrupt, without a gradual change in scales. Although this type of instability at high Richardson numbers has been attributed to buoyancy, direct physical evidence was not acquired through experiments. In this study, several experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire qualitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The operating parameters of this study included the tube inside diameter, the jet Reynolds number, and the jet Richardson number. Tubes with inside diameters of 19.05 mm and 31.75 mm were used in the experiments conducted in the drop tower. The jet flow was analyzed using quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of sight measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and the resulting helium mole fraction obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Three sets of experimental data with respect to three schlieren fields of view were acquired for each tube. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The global jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low-density jet was buoyancy-induced. This study provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiments undergo change in gravity in the drop tower.

  12. A mobile transporter concept for EVA assembly of future spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Judith J.; Bush, Harold G.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.; Jensen, J. Kermit

    1990-01-01

    This paper details the ground test program for the NASA Langley Research Center Mobile Transporter concept. The Mobile Transporter would assist EVA astronauts in the assembly of the Space Station Freedom. 1-g and simulated O-g (neutral buoyancy) tests were conducted to evaluate the use of the Mobile Transporter. A three-bay (44 struts) orthogonal tetrahedral truss configuration with a 15-foot-square cross section was repeatedly assembled by a single pair of pressure suited test subjects working from the Mobile Transporter astronaut positioning devices. The average unit assembly time was 28 seconds/strut. The results of these tests indicate that the use of a Mobile Transporter for EVA assembly of Space Station size structure is viable and practical. Additionally, the Mobile Transporter could be used to construct other spacecraft such as the submillimeter astronomical laboratory, space crane, and interplanetary (i.e., Mars and lunar) spacecraft.

  13. Helpmate: A Mobile Robot For Transport Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Bala; Barrows, Bruce; King, Steve; Stewis, Tim; Pong, Will; Weiman, Carl

    1989-03-01

    HelpMate is a mobile robotic materials transport system that performs fetch and carry tasks at Danbury Hospital. It navigates along the main arteries of the hospital, crossing between buildings via interconnecting corridors and uses infrared communication links to communicate with the elevator controller. HelpMate has been designed to work safely around humans, smoothly rerouting its local path to avoid obstacles while maintaining its mission. Safety features include both non-contact and contact obstacle sensing, emergency stop switches, auto/manual mode switches, flashing warning lights, turn indicators, and a failsafe controls design. HelpMate uses odometry, sonar and infrared proximity sensors, and vision as navigation inputs. An onboard card reader provides authorized personnel access to run time control and cargo transfer. Sensor information collected en route is used to build and maintain local navigation maps. A general knowledge of the structured properties of the world is assumed, and used both in collecting and rationalizing the sensor information and updating the robot's local knowledge base. All navigation and path planning is conducted under the direction of onboard processors.

  14. Fluctuating mobility generation and transport in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisitsorasak, Apiwat; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2013-08-01

    In the context of the random first order transition theory we use an extended mode coupling theory of the glass transition that includes activated events to account for spatiotemporal structures in rejuvenating glasses. We numerically solve fluctuating dynamical equations for mobility and fictive temperature fields which capture both mobility generation through activated events and facilitation effects. Upon rejuvenating, a source of high mobility at a glass surface initiates a growth front of mobility which propagates into the unstable low mobility region. The speed of the front quantitatively agrees with experiments on the rejuvenation of ultrastable glasses, which “melt” from their surface.

  15. Efficient Mobility Summit: Transportation and the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    On October 27, 2015, The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity, vehicle automation, and transportation infrastructure investments at the Future Energy Efficient Mobility Workshop. The half-day workshop was held in conjunction with the Colorado Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications. Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications.

  16. Location Management in a Transport Layer Mobility Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Ishac, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Mobility architectures that place complexity in end nodes rather than in the network interior have many advantageous properties and are becoming popular research topics. Such architectures typically push mobility support into higher layers of the protocol stack than network layer approaches like Mobile IP. The literature is ripe with proposals to provide mobility services in the transport, session, and application layers. In this paper, we focus on a mobility architecture that makes the most significant changes to the transport layer. A common problem amongst all mobility protocols at various layers is location management, which entails translating some form of static identifier into a mobile node's dynamic location. Location management is required for mobile nodes to be able to provide globally-reachable services on-demand to other hosts. In this paper, we describe the challenges of location management in a transport layer mobility architecture, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions proposed in the literature. Our conclusion is that, in principle, secure dynamic DNS is most desirable, although it may have current operational limitations. We note that this topic has room for further exploration, and we present this paper largely as a starting point for comparing possible solutions.

  17. Urban transportation: Perspectives on mobility and choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (Editor); Dajani, J. S. (Editor); Arnold, G. R.; Bird, J. W.; Brooks, C. M. (Editor); Cobb, W. E.; Cross, J. E.; Darby, L. F.; Erb, N. H.; Ficht, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study of urban transportation systems are presented characterized by intensive scrutiny of many ideas, philosophies, and academic perspectives. This report is intended to communicate some dimensions of the urban transportation problem to the general public.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Flow Evolution in a Helium Jet Injected into Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satti, Rajani P.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational model to study the stability characteristics of an evolving buoyant helium gas jet in ambient air environment is presented. Numerical formulation incorporates a segregated approach to solve for the transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum using a staggered grid method. The operating parameters correspond to the Reynolds number varying from 30 to 300 to demarcate the flow dynamics in oscillating and non-oscillating regimes. Computed velocity and concentration fields were used to analyze the flow structure in the evolving jet. For Re=300 case, results showed that an instability mode that sets in during the evolution process in Earth gravity is absent in zero gravity, signifying the importance of buoyancy. Though buoyancy initiates the instability, below a certain jet exit velocity, diffusion dominates the entrainment process to make the jet non-oscillatory as observed for the Re=30 case. Initiation of the instability was found to be dependent on the interaction of buoyancy and momentum forces along the jet shear layer.

  19. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models. PMID:26199424

  20. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... transport a mobile home over water? Yes, you may transport a mobile home over water when both the points...

  1. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... transport a mobile home over water? Yes, you may transport a mobile home over water when both the points...

  2. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... transport a mobile home over water? Yes, you may transport a mobile home over water when both the points...

  3. Transportation during periods of mobilization: a historical review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, D.P.; Johnson, L.R.

    1984-07-01

    The effects of the US transportation system of military preparations for war are compounded by the concurrent transportation requirements of economic mobilization to support a war effort. Several studies of military logistics have concluded that the transportation system may be the limiting factor in determining whether there is a successful operation. The responsiveness of the US transportation system during recent military conflicts is reviewed, beginning with the Spanish-American War and continuing through the Korean War. The nature and scope of each war is characterized, and the associated mobilization is described. Technological developments and regulatory changes in the transportation system since World War II are also reviewed in terms of their implications for the response capability of the nation. The dominant theme that emerges from this study is the overriding need for close coordination between modes and appropriate setting of priorities for shipments. The lack of an efficient system ultimately results in severe congestion at ports and terminals. The critical importance of the merchant marine fleet in overseas conflicts during the previous wars is also identified.

  4. Improving transportation data for mobile source emission estimates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Miller, T.L.; Philpot, J.W.; Wholley, T.F.; Guensler, R.

    1997-12-31

    The report provides an overview of federal statutes and policies which form the foundation for air quality planning related to transportation systems development. It also provides a detailed presentation regarding the use of federally mandated air quality models in estimating mobile source emissions resulting from transportation development and operations. The authors suggest ways in which current practice and analysis tools can be improved to increase the accuracy of their results. They also suggest some priorities for additional related research. Finally, the report should assist federal agency practitioners in their efforts to improve analytical methods and tools for determining conformity. The report also serves as a basic educational resource for current and future transportation and air quality modeling.

  5. Polar Transport Related to Mobilization of Plant Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Zaerr, J. B.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1967-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), sucrose, and mannitol, were tested for polar transport through 5-mm hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. Pinto) seedlings. All 4 compounds were transported in a polar direction. Autoradiographs of segments through which 14C-labeled compounds were transported indicated areas of 14C concentration near the morphological base of segments. There was a direct correlation of IAA transport with the ability to initiate roots as well as with the degree of 14C accumulation in the morphological base of segments. Unlabeled IAA in lanolin applied to segments appeared to reduce transport of IAA-14C through those segments when measured by the accumulation of 14C in a receiver-block of agar, caused an increase in 14C accumulation in the region to which the unlabeled IAA was applied, and also caused a decrease in accumulation of 14C at the morphological base of upright segments. Histological studies showed that IAA accelerated cell division and the formation of root primordia particularly at the basal ends, and that these responses sometimes occurred at the expense of cell proliferation at the apical ends of segments. The data presented support the hypothesis that polar movement of IAA, and other endogenous and exogenous substances, in isolated stem segments was controlled by mobilization and utilization of plant constituents at the growth centers. Images PMID:16656584

  6. Object Transportation by Two Mobile Robots with Hand Carts.

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Takuya; Figueroa Heredia, Jorge David; Ogata, Taiki; Hara, Tatsunori; Ota, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology by which two small mobile robots can grasp, lift, and transport large objects using hand carts. The specific problems involve generating robot actions and determining the hand cart positions to achieve the stable loading of objects onto the carts. These problems are solved using nonlinear optimization, and we propose an algorithm for generating robot actions. The proposed method was verified through simulations and experiments using actual devices in a real environment. The proposed method could reduce the number of robots required to transport large objects with 50-60%. In addition, we demonstrated the efficacy of this task in real environments where errors occur in robot sensing and movement. PMID:27433499

  7. Object Transportation by Two Mobile Robots with Hand Carts

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tatsunori

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology by which two small mobile robots can grasp, lift, and transport large objects using hand carts. The specific problems involve generating robot actions and determining the hand cart positions to achieve the stable loading of objects onto the carts. These problems are solved using nonlinear optimization, and we propose an algorithm for generating robot actions. The proposed method was verified through simulations and experiments using actual devices in a real environment. The proposed method could reduce the number of robots required to transport large objects with 50–60%. In addition, we demonstrated the efficacy of this task in real environments where errors occur in robot sensing and movement. PMID:27433499

  8. Electrokinetic transport phenomena: Mobility measurement and electrokinetic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddy, Michael Huson

    Miniaturization and integration of traditional bioassay procedures into microfabricated on-chip assay systems, commonly referred to as "Micro Total Analysis" (muTAS) systems, may have a significant impact on the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical analysis. These bioanalytical microsystems leverage electroosmosis and electrophoresis for sample transport, mixing, manipulation, and separation. This dissertation addresses the following three topics relevant to such systems: a new diagnostic for measuring the electrophoretic mobility of sub-micron, fluorescently-labeled particles and the electroosmotic mobility of a microchannel; a novel method and device for rapidly stirring micro- and nanoliter volume solutions for microfluidic bioanalytical applications; and a multiple-species electrokinetic instability model. Accurate measurement of the electrophoretic particle mobility and the electroosmotic mobility of microchannel surfaces is crucial to understanding the stability of colloidal suspensions, obtaining particle tracking-based velocimetry measurements of electroosmotic flow fields, and the quantification of electrokinetic bioanalytical device performance. A method for determining these mobilities from alternating and direct current electrokinetic particle tracking measurements is presented. The ability to rapidly mix fluids at low Reynolds numbers is important to the functionality of many bioanalytical, microfluidic devices. We present an electrokinetic process for rapidly stirring microflow streams by initiating an electrokinetic flow instability. The design, fabrication and performance analysis of two micromixing devices capable of rapidly stirring two low Reynolds number fluid streams are presented. Electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport in the presence of conductivity mismatches between reagent streams and the background electrolytes, can lead to an unstable flow field generating significant sample dispersion. In the multiple

  9. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS...

  10. Conceptual design proposal: HUGO global range/mobility transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Tom; Perretta, Dave; Mcbane, Doug; Morin, Greg; Thomas, Greg; Woodward, Joe; Gulakowski, Steve

    1993-01-01

    With the collapse of the former Soviet Union and the emergence of the United Nations actively pursuing a peace keeping role in world affairs, the United States has been forced into a position as the world's leading peace enforcer. It is still a very dangerous world with seemingly never ending ideological, territorial, and economic disputes requiring the U.S. to maintain a credible deterrent posture in this uncertain environment. This has created an urgent need to rapidly transport large numbers of troops and equipment from the continental United States (CONUS) to any potential world trouble spot by means of a global range/mobility transport aircraft. The most recent examples being Operation Desert Shield/Storm and Operation Restore Hope. To meet this challenge head-on, a request for proposal (RFP) was developed and incorporated into the 1992/1993 AIAA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation Graduate Team Aircraft Design Competition. The RFP calls for the conceptual design and justification of a large aircraft capable of power projecting a significant military force without surface transportation reliance.

  11. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  12. On mobile element transport in heated Abee. [chondrite thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikramuddin, M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Abee chondrite samples were heated at 700 C for one week at 0.00001 to 0.001 atm Ne or at 0.00001 atm H2. Samples heated in Ne showed greater loss of Bi and Se and greater retention of Zn than those heated in H2. An inverse relationship between Zn retention and ambient Ne pressure was found. Seven trace elements (Ag, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Te, and Tl) were retained or lost to the same extent regardless of the heating conditions. Variations in the apparent activation energy for C above and below 700 C suggest that diffusive loss from different hosts and/or different mobile transport processes over the temperature range may have been in effect.

  13. 41 CFR 302-10.400 - What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home? 302-10.400 Section 302-10.400 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE... mobile home? You must establish policies for authorizing transportation of a mobile home that...

  14. 41 CFR 302-10.400 - What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home? 302-10.400 Section 302-10.400 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE... mobile home? You must establish policies for authorizing transportation of a mobile home that...

  15. 30 CFR 36.4 - Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment... REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 36.4 Mobile... of approval will be granted for completely assembled mobile diesel-powered transportation...

  16. 30 CFR 36.4 - Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment for which certificates of approval may be granted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile diesel-powered transportation equipment... REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 36.4 Mobile... of approval will be granted for completely assembled mobile diesel-powered transportation...

  17. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization. PMID:24897130

  18. Phonon-limited low-field mobility in silicon: Quantum transport vs. linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhyner, Reto; Luisier, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    We propose to check and validate the approximations made in dissipative quantum transport (QT) simulations solved in the Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalism by comparing them with the exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation (LB) in the stationary regime. For that purpose, we calculate the phonon-limited electron and hole mobility in bulk Si and ultra-scaled Si nanowires for different crystal orientations ⟨100⟩, ⟨110⟩, and ⟨111⟩. In both QT and LB simulations, we use the same sp3d5s* tight-binding model to describe the electron/hole properties and the same valence-force-field approach to account for the phonon properties. It is found that the QT simplifications work well for electrons, but are less accurate for holes, where a renormalization of the phonon scattering strength is proved useful to improve the results.

  19. 41 CFR 302-10.1 - May I be reimbursed for transporting my mobile home instead of an HHG shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... transporting my mobile home instead of an HHG shipment? 302-10.1 Section 302-10.1 Public Contracts and Property...-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Eligibility and Limitations § 302-10.1 May I be reimbursed for transporting my mobile home instead of an HHG shipment? Yes,...

  20. 41 CFR 302-10.402 - What costs must we pay a commercial carrier for transporting a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... commercial carrier for transporting a mobile home? 302-10.402 Section 302-10.402 Public Contracts and... PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Agency Responsibilities § 302-10.402 What costs must we pay a commercial carrier for transporting a mobile home? The...

  1. 41 CFR 302-10.402 - What costs must we pay a commercial carrier for transporting a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... commercial carrier for transporting a mobile home? 302-10.402 Section 302-10.402 Public Contracts and... PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Agency Responsibilities § 302-10.402 What costs must we pay a commercial carrier for transporting a mobile home? The...

  2. 41 CFR 302-10.4 - Are there any geographic limitations for transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limitations for transportation of a mobile home? 302-10.4 Section 302-10.4 Public Contracts and Property...-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Eligibility and Limitations § 302-10.4 Are there any geographic limitations for transportation of a mobile home?...

  3. 41 CFR 302-10.1 - May I be reimbursed for transporting my mobile home instead of an HHG shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transporting my mobile home instead of an HHG shipment? 302-10.1 Section 302-10.1 Public Contracts and Property...-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Eligibility and Limitations § 302-10.1 May I be reimbursed for transporting my mobile home instead of an HHG shipment? Yes,...

  4. 41 CFR 302-10.4 - Are there any geographic limitations for transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limitations for transportation of a mobile home? 302-10.4 Section 302-10.4 Public Contracts and Property...-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Eligibility and Limitations § 302-10.4 Are there any geographic limitations for transportation of a mobile home?...

  5. Transportation and Aging: A Research Agenda for Advancing Safe Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Anne E.; Molnar, Lisa J.; Eby, David W.; Adler, Geri; Bedard, Michel; Berg-Weger, Marla; Classen, Sherrilene; Foley, Daniel; Horowitz, Amy; Kerschner, Helen; Page, Oliver; Silverstein, Nina M.; Staplin, Loren; Trujillo, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We review what we currently know about older driver safety and mobility, and we highlight important research needs in a number of key areas that hold promise for achieving the safety and mobility goals for the aging baby boomers and future generations of older drivers. Design and Methods: Through the use of a framework for transportation…

  6. Assessment of a Regional Transportation Education Alliance To Improve Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Beverly T.

    This report examines issues related to transportation education, with the objective of developing and packaging transportation-related materials for use in college and university transportation education programs. The study was conducted by the Southwest Region University Transportation Center (SWUTC) region, but it is expected that the results…

  7. Mobile bacteria and transport of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in porous media.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M B; Lion, L W

    1993-01-01

    Sorption of hydrophobic pollutants such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to soil and aquifer materials can severely retard their mobility and the time course of their removal. Because mobile colloids may enhance the mobility of hydrophobic pollutants in porous media and indigenous bacteria are generally colloidal in size, bacterial isolates from soil and subsurface environments were tested for their ability to enhance the transport of phenanthrene, a model PAH, in aquifer sand. Batch isotherm experiments were performed to measure the ability of selected bacteria, including 14 isolates from a manufactured gas plant waste site, to sorb 14C-phenanthrene and to determine whether the presence of the suspended cells would reduce the distribution coefficient (Kd) for phenanthrene with the sand. Column experiments were then used to test the mobility of isolates that reduced the Kd for phenanthrene and to test the most mobile isolate for its ability to enhance the transport of phenanthrene. All of the isolates tested passively sorbed phenanthrene, and most but not all of the isolates reduced the Kd for phenanthrene. Some, but not all, of those isolates were mobile in column experiments. The most mobile isolate significantly enhanced the transport of phenanthrene in aquifer sand, reducing its retardation coefficient by 25% at a cell concentration of approximately 5 x 10(7) ml-1. The experimental results demonstrated that mobile bacteria may enhance the transport of PAHs in the subsurface. PMID:8250555

  8. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport. PMID:26687028

  9. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES...

  10. Simulation of Molecular Transport in Systems Containing Mobile Obstacles.

    PubMed

    Polanowski, Piotr; Sikorski, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the movement of molecules in crowded environments with obstacles undergoing Brownian motion by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Our investigations were performed using the dynamic lattice liquid model, which was based on the cooperative movement concept and allowed to mimic systems at high densities where the motion of all elements (obstacles as well as moving particles) were highly correlated. The crowded environments are modeled on a two-dimensional triangular lattice containing obstacles (particles whose mobility was significantly reduced) moving by a Brownian motion. The subdiffusive motion of both elements in the system was analyzed. It was shown that the percolation transition does not exist in such systems in spite of the cooperative character of the particles' motion. The reduction of the obstacle mobility leads to the longer caging of liquid particles by mobile obstacles. PMID:27387448

  11. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  12. Transportation Electrification Education Partnership for Green Jobs and Sustainable Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Huei; Mi, Chris; Gover, James

    2013-06-28

    This collaborative educational project between the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, University of Michigan—Dearborn and the Kettering University successfully executed almost all the elements we proposed to do. In the original proposal, we proposed to develop four graduate courses, six undergraduate courses, four professional short courses, a K-12 electric vehicle education kit, a Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material to support the advancement of transportation electrification. The first four deliverables were all successfully developed and offered. When we held the kick-off meeting in NETL in Morgantown back in early 2010 with all the ten ARRA education teams, however, it quickly became clear that among the ten ARRA education grantee teams, our proposed “consume education” activities are not better or with the potential to create bigger impact than some of activities proposed in other teams. For example, the Odyssey 2010 event held by the West Virginia University team had planned and successfully reached to more than 230,000 attendees, which is way more than what our proposed 100k event could ever reach. It was under the suggestion of Joseph Quaranta, the ARRA education Program Director at that time, that we should coordinate and eliminate redundancy. The resources should then be focused on activities that have less overlap. Therefore, the originally proposed activities: Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material were dropped from our scope. We expanded the scope of our “education kit” activity to include some educational materials, mainly in the form of videos. The target audience also changed from general public to K-12 students. The majority of the project cost (~70%) goes toward the establishment of three undergraduate laboratories, which provides critically needed hands-on learning experience for next-generation green mobility engineers. We are very proud that the ARRA money

  13. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    1993-06-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed.

  14. Theory of transport phenomena in polycrystalline lead chalcogenide films. Mobility. Nondegenerate statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Atakulov, Sh. B. Zaynolobidinova, S. M.; Nabiev, G. A.; Nabiyev, M. B.; Yuldashev, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    The mobility of nondegenerate electrons in quasi-single-crystal and polycrystalline PbTe films is experimentally investigated. The results obtained are compared with the data for bulk crystals at the same charge-carrier concentration. Under the assumption of limitation of the charge-carrier mobility by intercrystallite potential barriers, electron transport in an electric field is theoretically considered. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experiment.

  15. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users' preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one's trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings. PMID:26828797

  16. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users’ preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one’s trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings. PMID:26828797

  17. Origin of the relatively low transport mobility of graphene grown through chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Song, H. S.; Li, S. L.; Miyazaki, H.; Sato, S.; Hayashi, K.; Yamada, A.; Yokoyama, N.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2012-01-01

    The reasons for the relatively low transport mobility of graphene grown through chemical vapor deposition (CVD-G), which include point defect, surface contamination, and line defect, were analyzed in the current study. A series of control experiments demonstrated that the determinant factor for the low transport mobility of CVD-G did not arise from point defects or surface contaminations, but stemmed from line defects induced by grain boundaries. Electron microscopies characterized the presence of grain boundaries and indicated the polycrystalline nature of the CVD-G. Field-effect transistors based on CVD-G without the grain boundary obtained a transport mobility comparative to that of Kish graphene, which directly indicated the detrimental effect of grain boundaries. The effect of grain boundary on transport mobility was qualitatively explained using a potential barrier model. Furthermore, the conduction mechanism of CVD-G was also investigated using the temperature dependence measurements. This study can help understand the intrinsic transport features of CVD-G. PMID:22468224

  18. Enhancing Transportation Education Using Mobile Devices and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallup, Jennifer; Lamothe, Saron N.; Gallup, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The most salient aspect of independent living and successful post-high school transition to employment is having the ability to independently use transportation. Adolescents and young adults with disabilities continue to experience significantly lower employment rates than their peers without disabilities (Wagner et al., 2003). One way to support…

  19. PLANT RHIZOSPHERE EFFECTS ON METAL MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Teresa W.-M; Higashi, Richard M.; Crowley, David E.

    2000-12-31

    The myriad of human activities including strategic and energy development at various DOE installations have resulted in the contamination of soils and waterways that can seriously threaten human and ecosystem health. Development of efficacious and economical remediation technologies is needed to ameliorate these immensely costly problems. Bioremediation (both plant and microbe-based) has promising potential to meet this demand but still requires advances in fundamental knowledge. For bioremediation of heavy metals, the three-way interaction of plant root, microbial community, and soil organic matter (SOM) in the rhizosphere is critically important for long-term sustainability but often underconsidered. Particularly urgent is the need to understand processes that lead to metal ion stabilization in soils, which is crucial to all of the goals of bioremediation: removal, stabilization, and transformation. We have developed the tools for probing the chemistry of plant rhizosphere and generated information regarding the role of root exudation and metabolism for metal mobilization and sequestration.

  20. Plant Rhizosphere Effects on Metal Mobilization and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Teresa W.-M; Crowley, David; Higashi, Richard M.

    1999-06-01

    A mechanistic understanding of mobilization or immobilization of nutrient and pollutant metal ions by plants is largely lacking. It begins with a lack of knowledge on the chemical nature of rhizosphere components that are reactive with metal ions. This fundamental knowledge is critical to the design and implementation of phytoremediation for metal-contaminated DOE sites. Therefore, the objectives of this project include (1) To obtain a comprehensive composition of major organic components in plant root exudates as a function of different metal ions and plant species; (2) To examine plant metabolic response(s) to these metal ion treatments, with emphasis on production of metal reactive compounds; (3) To investigate the effect(s) of soil microbial (e.g. mycorrhizae) association on (1) and (2).

  1. The Sustainable Mobility Learning Laboratory: Interactive Web-Based Education on Transportation and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Lisa A.; Marr, Linsey C.; Linford, John C.; Darby, Mary Ashburn

    2008-01-01

    The transportation field has for many years been dominated by engineers and other technical specialists. This article describes the Sustainable Mobility Learning Lab (SMLL), a Web-based tool designed to support classroom and university outreach activities to help initiate a more inclusive, nontechnical discussion about the role of transportation…

  2. 41 CFR 302-10.206 - May my agency assume direct responsibility for the costs of preparing and transporting my mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... direct responsibility for the costs of preparing and transporting my mobile home? 302-10.206 Section 302... ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS... responsibility for the costs of preparing and transporting my mobile home? Yes, your agency may assume...

  3. 41 CFR 302-10.3 - What is the maximum amount my agency may authorize me to receive for transporting a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount my agency may authorize me to receive for transporting a mobile home? 302-10.3 Section 302-10.3... TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A... authorize me to receive for transporting a mobile home? The maximum amount your agency may authorize you...

  4. 41 CFR 302-10.206 - May my agency assume direct responsibility for the costs of preparing and transporting my mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... direct responsibility for the costs of preparing and transporting my mobile home? 302-10.206 Section 302... ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS... responsibility for the costs of preparing and transporting my mobile home? Yes, your agency may assume...

  5. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FIELD EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING (EPA/600/S-99/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  6. AllAboard: Visual Exploration of Cellphone Mobility Data to Optimise Public Transport.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, G; Sbodio, M; Calabrese, F; Berlingerio, M; Pinelli, F; Nair, R

    2016-02-01

    The deep penetration of mobile phones offers cities the ability to opportunistically monitor citizens' mobility and use data-driven insights to better plan and manage services. With large scale data on mobility patterns, operators can move away from the costly, mostly survey based, transportation planning processes, to a more data-centric view, that places the instrumented user at the center of development. In this framework, using mobile phone data to perform transit analysis and optimization represents a new frontier with significant societal impact, especially in developing countries. In this paper we present AllAboard, an intelligent tool that analyses cellphone data to help city authorities in visually exploring urban mobility and optimizing public transport. This is performed within a self contained tool, as opposed to the current solutions which rely on a combination of several distinct tools for analysis, reporting, optimisation and planning. An interactive user interface allows transit operators to visually explore the travel demand in both space and time, correlate it with the transit network, and evaluate the quality of service that a transit network provides to the citizens at very fine grain. Operators can visually test scenarios for transit network improvements, and compare the expected impact on the travellers' experience. The system has been tested using real telecommunication data for the city of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and evaluated from a data mining, optimisation and user prospective. PMID:26731450

  7. Explaining the power-law distribution of human mobility through transportation modality decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Musolesi, Mirco; Hui, Pan; Rao, Weixiong; Tarkoma, Sasu

    2015-01-01

    Human mobility has been empirically observed to exhibit Lévy flight characteristics and behaviour with power-law distributed jump size. The fundamental mechanisms behind this behaviour has not yet been fully explained. In this paper, we propose to explain the Lévy walk behaviour observed in human mobility patterns by decomposing them into different classes according to the different transportation modes, such as Walk/Run, Bike, Train/Subway or Car/Taxi/Bus. Our analysis is based on two real-life GPS datasets containing approximately 10 and 20 million GPS samples with transportation mode information. We show that human mobility can be modelled as a mixture of different transportation modes, and that these single movement patterns can be approximated by a lognormal distribution rather than a power-law distribution. Then, we demonstrate that the mixture of the decomposed lognormal flight distributions associated with each modality is a power-law distribution, providing an explanation to the emergence of Lévy Walk patterns that characterize human mobility patterns. PMID:25779306

  8. Conditions for charge transport without recombination in low mobility organic solar cells and photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolterfoht, Martin; Armin, Ardalan; Philippa, Bronson; White, Ronald D.; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Juška, Gytis; Pivrikas, Almantas

    2015-10-01

    Organic semiconductors typically possess low charge carrier mobilities and Langevin-type recombination dynamics, which both negatively impact the performance of organic solar cells and photodetectors. Charge transport in organic solar cells is usually characterized by the mobility-lifetime product. Using newly developed transient and steady state photocurrent measurement techniques we show that the onset of efficiency limiting photocarrier recombination is determined by the charge that can be stored on the electrodes of the device. It is shown that significant photocarrier recombination can be avoided when the total charge inside the device, defined by the trapped, doping-induced and mobile charge carriers, is less than the electrode charge. Based upon this physics we propose the mobility-recombination coefficient product as an alternative and more convenient figure of merit to minimize the recombination losses. We validate the results in 3 different organic semiconductor-based light harvesting systems with very different charge transport properties. The findings allow the determination of the charge collection efficiency in fully operational devices. In turn, knowing the conditions under which non-geminate recombination is eliminated enables one to quantify the generation efficiency of free charge carriers. The results are relevant to a wide range of light harvesting systems, particularly those based upon disordered semiconductors, and require a rethink of the critical parameters for charge transport.

  9. Explaining the power-law distribution of human mobility through transportation modality decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Musolesi, Mirco; Hui, Pan; Rao, Weixiong; Tarkoma, Sasu

    2015-03-01

    Human mobility has been empirically observed to exhibit Lévy flight characteristics and behaviour with power-law distributed jump size. The fundamental mechanisms behind this behaviour has not yet been fully explained. In this paper, we propose to explain the Lévy walk behaviour observed in human mobility patterns by decomposing them into different classes according to the different transportation modes, such as Walk/Run, Bike, Train/Subway or Car/Taxi/Bus. Our analysis is based on two real-life GPS datasets containing approximately 10 and 20 million GPS samples with transportation mode information. We show that human mobility can be modelled as a mixture of different transportation modes, and that these single movement patterns can be approximated by a lognormal distribution rather than a power-law distribution. Then, we demonstrate that the mixture of the decomposed lognormal flight distributions associated with each modality is a power-law distribution, providing an explanation to the emergence of Lévy Walk patterns that characterize human mobility patterns.

  10. Results of EVA/mobile transporter space station truss assembly tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Judith J.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Bush, Harold G.; Lake, M. S.; Jensen, J. K.; Wallsom, R. E.; Phelps, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Underwater neutral buoyance tests were conducted to evaluate the use of a Mobile Transporter concept in conjunction with EVA astronauts to construct the Space Station Freedom truss structure. A three-bay orthogonal tetrahedral truss configuration with a 15 foot square cross section was repeatedly assembled by a single pair of pressure suited test subjects working from the Mobile Transporter astronaut positioning devices (mobile foot restraints). The average unit assembly time (which included integrated installation of utility trays) was 27.6 s/strut, or 6 min/bay. The results of these tests indicate that EVA assembly of space station size structures can be significantly enhanced when using a Mobile Transporter equipped with astronaut positioning devices. Rapid assembly time can be expected and are dependent primarily on the rate of translation permissible for on-orbit operations. The concept used to demonstate integrated installation of utility trays requires minimal EVA handling and consequentially, as the results show, has little impact on overall assembly time.

  11. Device structures and carrier transport properties of advanced CMOS using high mobility channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Tezuka, T.; Irisawa, T.; Nakaharai, S.; Numata, T.; Usuda, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Shichijo, M.; Nakane, R.; Sugahara, S.

    2007-04-01

    Mobility enhancement technologies have currently been recognized as mandatory for future scaled MOSFETs. In this paper, the recent mobility enhancement technologies including application of strain and new channel materials such as SiGe, Ge and III-V materials are reviewed. These carrier transport enhancement technologies can be classified into three categories; global enhancement techniques, local enhancement techniques and global/local-merged techniques. We present our recent results on MOSFETs using these three types of the technologies with an emphasis on the global strained-Si/SiGe/Ge substrates and the combination with the local techniques. Finally, issues on device structures merged with III-V materials are briefly described.

  12. In situ mobilization of colloids and transport of cesium in Hanford sediments.

    PubMed

    Flury, Markus; Mathison, Jon B; Harsh, James B

    2002-12-15

    Radioactive waste, accumulated during Pu production, has leaked into the subsurface from underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site. The leaking solutions contained 137Cs and were of high ionic strength. Such a tank leak was simulated experimentally in steady-state flow experiments with packed Hanford sediments. The initial leak was simulated by a 1 M NaNO3 solution, followed by a decrease of ionic strength to 1 mM NaNO3. Cesium breakthrough curves were determined in both 1 M and 1 mM NaNO3 background. Colloidal particles were mobilized during the change of ionic strength. Mobilized colloids consisted mainly of quartz, mica, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite. Electrophoretic mobilities of colloids in the eluent solution were -3(microm/s)(V/cm) and increased to less negative values during later stages of mobilization. Mobilized colloids carried a fraction of the cesium along. While transport of cesium in 1 M NaNO3 background was much faster than in 1 mM NaNO3, cesium attached to colloids moved almost unretarded through the sediments. Cesium attached to mobilized colloids was likely associated with high affinity sorption sites on micas and illites. PMID:12521158

  13. Tuning carrier mobility without spin transport degrading in copper-phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. W.; Wang, P.; Chen, B. B.; Zhou, Y.; Ding, H. F.; Wu, D.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate more than one order of magnitude of carrier mobility tuning for the copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) without spin transport degrading in organic spin valve devices. Depending on the preparation conditions, organic spin valves with the CuPc film mobility of 5.78 × 10-3 and 1.11 × 10-4 cm2/V s are obtained for polycrystalline and amorphous CuPc, respectively. Strikingly, the spin diffusion lengths are almost the same regardless of their mobilities that are ˜50 times different, which is in sharp contrast with previous prediction. These findings directly support that the spin relaxation in CuPc is dominated by the spin-orbit coupling.

  14. Tuning carrier mobility without spin transport degrading in copper-phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S. W.; Wang, P.; Chen, B. B.; Zhou, Y.; Ding, H. F. E-mail: dwu@nju.edu.cn; Wu, D. E-mail: dwu@nju.edu.cn

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate more than one order of magnitude of carrier mobility tuning for the copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) without spin transport degrading in organic spin valve devices. Depending on the preparation conditions, organic spin valves with the CuPc film mobility of 5.78 × 10{sup −3} and 1.11 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/V s are obtained for polycrystalline and amorphous CuPc, respectively. Strikingly, the spin diffusion lengths are almost the same regardless of their mobilities that are ∼50 times different, which is in sharp contrast with previous prediction. These findings directly support that the spin relaxation in CuPc is dominated by the spin-orbit coupling.

  15. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  16. 41 CFR 302-10.202 - Am I entitled to any other allowances when I transport my mobile home by POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other allowances when I transport my mobile home by POV? 302-10.202 Section 302-10.202 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Computation of Allowances § 302-10.202 Am I entitled to any other allowances when I transport my mobile...

  17. 41 CFR 302-10.202 - Am I entitled to any other allowances when I transport my mobile home by POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... other allowances when I transport my mobile home by POV? 302-10.202 Section 302-10.202 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Computation of Allowances § 302-10.202 Am I entitled to any other allowances when I transport my mobile...

  18. 41 CFR 302-10.201 - What is the mileage allowance when you transport a mobile home overland by a POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... allowance when you transport a mobile home overland by a POV? 302-10.201 Section 302-10.201 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Computation of Allowances § 302-10.201 What is the mileage allowance when you transport a mobile home...

  19. 41 CFR 302-10.201 - What is the mileage allowance when you transport a mobile home overland by a POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowance when you transport a mobile home overland by a POV? 302-10.201 Section 302-10.201 Public Contracts... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Computation of Allowances § 302-10.201 What is the mileage allowance when you transport a mobile home...

  20. Temperature and Hydrological Controls on Dissolved Organic Matter Mobilization and Transport within forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N.; Saiers, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences nutrients cycling and contaminants mobility, provides an energy source for heterotrophic production, and regulates soil and water pH. The objectives of this laboratory study were (i) to investigate the relative influence of temperature and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization and transport of DOM (quantity and composition) in forest soils; (ii) to evaluate the possible difference between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) dynamics; and (iii) to elucidate the importance of biotic and physico-chemical mechanisms that govern DOM mobilization and transport during rainfall events. We applied intermittent rainfalls to unsaturated topsoil columns. The experimental treatments were distinguished on the basis of rainfall intensity, rainfall frequency, temperature, soil biotic activity (i.e., sterile vs unsterile soil), and soil storage time before rainfall initiation. A mathematical model incorporating reversible linear kinetics expressions for DOC release at soil-water interfaces closely describes the DOC breakthrough-curve data. Our results show that temperature significantly affects the release rate and composition of leached DOM, while changes in rainfall intensity and frequency only affect the quantity of mobilized DOM. Effluent concentrations of DON showed broadly similar temporal patterns with DOC during rainfall events. Differences between the quantity of DOC and DON were reflected in the C:N ratios of effluent DOM. Our results also indicate the relative importance of physico-chemical mechanisms for the DOM export process.

  1. The design and development of a mobile transporter system for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    The analyses, selection process, and conceptual design of potential candidate Mobile Transporter (MT) systems to move the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) about the exposed faces of the Space Station truss structure are described. The actual requirements for a manipulator system on the space station are discussed, including potential tasks to be performed. The SSRMS operating environment and control methods are analyzed with potential design solutions highlighted. Three general categories of transporter systems are identified and analyzed. Several design solution have emerged that will satisfy these requirements. Their relative merits are discussed, and unique variations in each system are rated for functionality.

  2. Hall effect and band-like carrier transport in high mobility polymer transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yu; Hinkel, Felix; Marszalek, Tomasz; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Pisula, Wojciech; Baumgarten, Martin; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Müllen, Klaus; Takeya, Jun; Takeya group Team, Prof.; Müllen group Team, Prof.

    A microscopic understanding of charge carrier transport in polymeric semiconductors is essential to improve the state of the art of flexible or printed electronic devices. In particular, thin-film field-effect transistors based on donor-acceptor polymers are in the focus of current literature reaching high charge-carrier mobility. In this work, we demonstrate the Hall effect and the temperature dependence of the charge carrier mobility based on uniaxially ordered CDT-BTZ donor-acceptor copolymer films. Uniaxially ordered films of CDT-BTZ with hexadecyl (C16) and eicosyl (C20) sidechains showed mobility of 5.6 cm2/Vs and 11.4 cm2/Vs respectively. The activation energy of the mobility decreased with the increasing carrier density, and finally the negative temperature dependence of the mobility was observed. Both polymers showed Hall effect, which also indicates the presence of extended electronic states. The temperature and carrier density dependence will be further discussed in the presentation.

  3. Hydrologic Controls on Dissolved Organic Matter Mobilization and Transport within Undisturbed Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N.; Saiers, J.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils plays an important role in the transport of nutrients and contaminants through the terrestrial environment. Subsurface pathways deliver a significant portion of carbon to streams that drain forested and agricultural watersheds. Although the importance of rainfall events to the DOM soil-water flux is well known, the hydrologic factors that govern this flux have not been fully examined. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the soil and rainfall characteristics controlling the mobilization and transport of DOM in undisturbed soils. Intact soil columns including topsoil and subsoil layers were taken from the Harvard forest in Petersham, MA. Unsaturated flow conditions were maintained by applying suction to the bottom of the soil columns. The columns were irrigated by series of interrupted rainfall events using the same total volume of artificial rain water. Preliminary experiments showed continuous leaching of DOM (measured by dissolved organic carbon) with an initial peak in concentration that coincided with the passage of the wetting front. The leached DOM was also characterized by UV absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission mode, and additional spectroscopic derived indexes such as the humification index. Ongoing column experiments are focusing on the effects of rainfall intensity, frequency, and rainfall history on DOM mobilization and transport through natural, structured soils. These investigations can elucidate the influence of factors that are associated with climate change on DOC dynamics. Results of our analyses should also provide insight into the mechanisms that govern DOM mobilization in soils.

  4. Charge transport and mobility engineering in two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals semiconductors represent the thinnest, air stable semiconducting materials known. Their unique optical, electronic and mechanical properties hold great potential for harnessing them as key components in novel applications for electronics and optoelectronics. However, the charge transport behavior in 2D semiconductors is more susceptible to external surroundings (e.g. gaseous adsorbates from air and trapped charges in substrates) and their electronic performance is generally lower than corresponding bulk materials due to the fact that the surface and bulk coincide. In this article, we review recent progress on the charge transport properties and carrier mobility engineering of 2D transition metal chalcogenides, with a particular focus on the markedly high dependence of carrier mobility on thickness. We unveil the origin of this unique thickness dependence and elaborate the devised strategies to master it for carrier mobility optimization. Specifically, physical and chemical methods towards the optimization of the major factors influencing the extrinsic transport such as electrode/semiconductor contacts, interfacial Coulomb impurities and atomic defects are discussed. In particular, the use of ad hoc molecules makes it possible to engineer the interface with the dielectric and heal the vacancies in such materials. By casting fresh light on the theoretical and experimental studies, we provide a guide for improving the electronic performance of 2D semiconductors, with the ultimate goal of achieving technologically viable atomically thin (opto)electronics. PMID:26593874

  5. Mobilization and transport of naturally occurring enterococci in beach sands subject to transient infiltration of seawater.

    PubMed

    Russell, Todd L; Yamahara, Kevan M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2012-06-01

    This study explores the transport of enterococci (ENT) from naturally contaminated beach sands to the groundwater table via infiltrating seawater using field, laboratory, and modeling experiments. ENT were readily mobilized and transported through the unsaturated zone during infiltration events in both the field and laboratory column experiments. Detachment mechanisms were investigated using a modified version of HYDRUS-1D. Three models for detachment kinetics were tested. Detachment kinetics that are first order with respect to the rate of change in the water content and attached surface bacterial concentrations were found to provide a best fit between predicted and observed data. From these experimental and model results we conclude that detachment mechanisms associated with the rapid increases in pore water content such as air-water interface scouring and thin film expansion are likely drivers of ENT mobilization in the investigated system. These findings suggest that through-beach transport of ENT may be an important pathway through which ENT from beach sands are transported to beach groundwater where they may be discharged to coastal waters via submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:22533299

  6. Effects of Hydrology and Temperature on Dissolved Organic Matter Mobilization and Transport within forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N.; Saiers, J.

    2008-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils plays an important role in surface water and groundwater quality. Higher concentrations of DOM may enhance the transport of nutrients and associated pollutants to freshwaters and coastal zones. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of temperature and hydrologic factors on the mobilization and transport of DOM in unsaturated soils. Laboratory columns were packed with soils taken from the Harvard forest in Petersham, MA. Unsaturated flow conditions were maintained by applying suction to the bottom of the soil columns. Columns packed with topsoil (A horizon) were irrigated by series of rainfall events using the same total volume of artificial rain water. The experiments were distinguished on the basis of the period of time between successive rainfall events and the rainfall intensity. In all experiments, DOM (measured by dissolved organic carbon) concentration peaked simultaneously with the passage of wetting front and then rapidly declined as flow stabilized during each rainfall event. In all cases, DOC concentrations declined with successive rainfall events. The results show greater DOM mobilization under rainfall with lower intensity. The interruption interval between successive rainfall events also significantly affected the DOM leaching. Higher DOC concentrations were observed within treatments with longer interruption intervals. The leached DOM was also characterized by UV absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission mode, and additional spectroscopic-based indices, such as the humification index. Ongoing experiments are focusing on the transport and adsorptive fractionation of DOM in subsoils (B horizon). The effects of flow rate and temperature on these processes are being investigated. The information gained will provide insight into predicting the environmental fate of DOM-associated pollutants and in understanding the mechanisms that govern DOM mobilization and transport in soils.

  7. Transport of Organic Contaminants Mobilized from Coal through Sandstone Overlying a Geological Carbon Sequestration Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-02-01

    Column experiments were conducted using a wetted sandstone rock installed in a tri-axial core holder to study the flow and transport of organic compounds mobilized by scCO2 under simulated geologic carbon storage (GCS) conditions. The sandstone rock was collected from a formation overlying a deep saline reservoir at a GCS demonstration site. Rock core effluent pressures were set at 0, 500, or 1000 psig and the core temperature was set at 20 or 50°C to simulate the transport to different subsurface depths. The concentrations of the organic compounds in the column effluent and their distribution within the sandstone core were monitored. Results indicate that the mobility though the core sample was much higher for BTEX compounds than for naphthalene. Retention of organic compounds from the vapor phase to the core appeared to be primarily controlled by partitioning from the vapor phase to the aqueous phase. Adsorption to the surfaces of the wetted sandstone was also significant for naphthalene. Reduced temperature and elevated pressure resulted in greater partitioning of the mobilized organic contaminants into the water phase.

  8. Mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles during infiltration: A core-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Michel, Eric; di Pietro, Liliana; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Rousseau, Marine

    2007-05-01

    Understanding particle movement in soils is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regard to environmental protection and water resources management. This paper describes a model for mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles through structured soils. The approach combines a kinematic-dispersive wave model for preferential water flow with a convective-dispersive equation subject to a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Particle detachment from macropore walls is considered during both the steady and transient water flow regimes. It is assumed to follow first-order kinetics with a varying detachment efficiency, which depends on the history of the detachment process. Estimates of model parameters are obtained by comparing simulations with experimental particle breakthrough curves obtained during infiltrations through undisturbed soil columns. Both water flux and particle concentrations are satisfactorily simulated by the model. Particle mobilization parameters favoring both attachment and detachment of particles are related to the incoming solution ionic strength by a Fermi-type function.

  9. Engineering monitoring of rockfall hazards along transportation corridors: using mobile terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lato, M.; Hutchinson, J.; Diederichs, M.; Ball, D.; Harrap, R.

    2009-06-01

    Geotechnical hazards along linear transportation corridors are challenging to identify and often require constant monitoring. Inspecting corridors using traditional, manual methods requires the engineer to be unnecessarily exposed to the hazard. It also requires closure of the corridor to ensure safety of the worker from passing vehicles. This paper identifies the use of mobile terrestrial LiDAR data as a compliment to traditional field methods. Mobile terrestrial LiDAR is an emerging remote data collection technique capable of generating accurate fully three-dimensional virtual models while driving at speeds up to 100 km/h. Data is collected from a truck that causes no delays to active traffic nor does it impede corridor use. These resultant georeferenced data can be used for geomechanical structural feature identification and kinematic analysis, rockfall path identification and differential monitoring of rock movement or failure over time. Comparisons between mobile terrestrial and static LiDAR data collection and analysis are presented. As well, detailed discussions on workflow procedures for possible implementation are discussed. Future use of mobile terrestrial LiDAR data for corridor analysis will focus on repeated surveys and developing dynamic four-dimensional models, higher resolution data collection. As well, computationally advanced, spatially accurate, geomechanically controlled three-dimensional rockfall simulations should be investigated.

  10. Release and transport of mobile organic matter and biocolloids: A combined physicochemical and microbiological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, Katharina; Schaefer, Sabine; Babin, Doreen; Smalla, Konny; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Biogeochemical interfaces within the aggregate system of soils are "hot spots" of microbial activity and turnover of organic matter. We explore turnover, release and transport of mobile organic matter (MOM), micro-organisms (bio-colloids) and organo-mineral associations using a novel experimental approach employing two-layer columns experiment with matured soil under unsaturated flow conditions. The top layer was spiked with phenanthrene as a tracer for studying the decomposer communities involved in the decomposition of aromatic compounds that derive from lignin in natural systems. Columns were irrigated with artificial rain water with several flow interrupts of different durations. Physicochemical and chemical parameters as well as the microbial community composition were analysed in effluent samples and in soil slices. Release of MOM from the columns was in general controlled by non-equilibrium. Export of total and dissolved organic matter differed significantly in response to the flow interrupts. Effluent comprised organic and organo-mineral components as well as vital competent cells. By molecular biological methods we were even able to show that bacterial consortia exported are rather divers. Depth distribution of the bacterial communities associated with the immobile solid phase indicated high similarities in bacterial communities of the different depth layers and treatments. According to phenanthrene high affinity to the immobile phases, only a small fraction was subject to downstream transport with a strong decrease of the amount residing at the solid phase Our experiments directly prove that intact and competent microorganisms and even communities can be transported under unsaturated flow conditions. Moreover, we found that the dominant carbon source will impact not only the activity of specific microbial taxa but also their mobilization and transport. While total contribution of microbial organism to the mobile organic matter pool seems to be small, the

  11. 41 CFR 302-10.300 - May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home? 302-10.300 Section 302-10.300 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE... mobile home? Yes, you may receive an advance of funds when you are responsible for arranging and paying...

  12. 41 CFR 302-10.300 - May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home? 302-10.300 Section 302-10.300 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE... mobile home? Yes, you may receive an advance of funds when you are responsible for arranging and paying...

  13. The versatility of a truss mounted mobile transporter for in-space construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G.; Lake, Mark S.; Watson, Judith J.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Transporter (MT) evolution from early erectable structures assembly activities is detailed. The MT operational features which are required to support astronauts performing on-orbit structure construction or spacecraft assembly functions are presented and discussed. Use of the MT to perform a variety of assembly functions is presented. Estimated EVA assembly times for a precision segmented reflector approximately 20 m in diameter are presented. The EVA/MT technique under study for construction of the reflector (and the entire spacecraft) is illustrated. Finally, the current status of development activities and test results involving the MT and Space Station structural assembly are presented.

  14. Influence of oval defects on transport properties in high-mobility two-dimensional electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockhorn, L.; Velieva, A.; Hakim, S.; Wagner, T.; Rugeramigabo, E. P.; Schuh, D.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Haug, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Rare macroscopic growth defects next to a two-dimensional electron gas influence transport properties and cause a negative magnetoresistance. On the basis of this, we show that the number of oval defects seen on the material surface is comparable with the density of macroscopic growth defects determined from the negative magnetoresistance. We examine several materials with different densities of oval defects nS which were grown in one cycle under the same conditions to verify our observations. Paradoxically, the material with the largest number of oval defects has also the highest electron mobility.

  15. MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT OF SOIL PARTICLES DURING INFILTRATION EXPERIMENTS IN AN AGRICULTURAL FIELD, SHENANDOAH VALLEY, VIRGINIA. (R824772)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence that fine particles mobilized and transported in
    soils and aquifers can have a profound influence on
    contaminant migration has spawned much interest recently
    in understanding colloid transport in natural materials.
    Repeated infiltration experiments on an i...

  16. Mobile sediment in an urbanizing karst aquifer: Implications for contaminant transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Lynch, L.; Bennett, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Here we investigate geochemical characteristics of sediment in different compartments of a karst aquifer and demonstrate that mobile sediments in a karst aquifer can exhibit a wide range of properties affecting their contaminant transport potential. Sediment samples were collected from surface streams, sinkholes, caves, wells, and springs of a karst aquifer (the Barton Springs portion of the Edwards (Balcones Fault Zone) Aquifer, Central Texas) and their mineralogy, grain-size distribution, organic carbon content, and specific surface area analyzed. Statistical analysis of the sediments separated the sampling sites into three distinct groups: (1) streambeds, sinkholes, and small springs; (2) wells; and (3) caves. Sediments from the primary discharge spring were a mix of these three groups. High organic carbon content and increased potential to transport contaminants; the volume of these sediments is likely to increase with continued urbanization of the watershed.

  17. Cooperating Mobile GIS and Wireless Sensor Networks for Managing Transportation Infrastructures in Urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shad, R.; Abazari, N.; Alizadeh, A.; Choghooni, M.

    2013-10-01

    Time management is a major subject which, in order to optimize trip conditions, emphasizes on interpreting processes and classifying individual's information. In this paper, with the aim of providing an optimal system for urban commuting in proper time in Mashhad, each user using SMS and introducing some of his/her mental priorities to the system, will be able to select the best option depending on the timing of movement of the available public transport system. The present study adopts a newly developed method of time management which is evaluated for urban transportation considering dynamic conditions of a spatial database. For this purpose, regarding time management, processed data such as bus lines, taxi networks, and the subway system are combined in a spatial framework of a designed Mobile GIS based on a wireless network. So, multiple potential paths which end to a desirable destination.

  18. Superior transport properties of InGaN channel heterostructure with high channel electron mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yachao; Zhou, Xiaowei; Xu, Shengrui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-06-01

    A high-quality AlGaN/InGaN heterostructure is grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition on a sapphire substrate. A two-step AlN interlayer is adopted to improve the interface morphology and protect the high-quality InGaN channel. Temperature-dependent Hall measurement shows superior transport properties compared with the traditional GaN channel heterostructure at elevated temperatures. Further, a record highest channel electron mobility of 1681 cm2/(V·s) at room temperature for an InGaN channel heterostructure is obtained. We attribute the excellent transport properties to the improvement in the material quality, as well as the rationally designed epitaxial structure and well-controlled growth condition.

  19. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenogin, Sergei; Lee, Jonghoon; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2014-12-01

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  20. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Shenogin, Sergei; Lee, Jonghoon; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2014-12-21

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)–polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  1. Hydrothermal Processes and Mobile Element Transport in Martian Impact Craters - Evidence from Terrestrial Analogue Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Dressler, B. L.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrothermal alteration and chemical transport involving impact craters probably occurred on Mars throughout its history. Our studies of alteration products and mobile element transport in ejecta blanket and drill core samples from impact craters show that these processes may have contributed to the surface composition of Mars. Recent work on the Chicxulub Yaxcopoil-1 drill core has provided important information on the relative mobility of many elements that may be relevant to Mars. The Chicxulub impact structure in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and offshore in the Gulf of Mexico is one of the largest impact craters identified on the Earth, has a diameter of 180-200 km, and is associated with the mass extinctions at the K/T boundary. The Yax-1 hole was drilled in 2001 and 2002 on the Yaxcopoil hacienda near Merida on the Yucatan Peninsula. Yax-1 is located just outside of the transient cavity, which explains some of the unusual characteristics of the core stratigraphy. No typical impact melt sheet was encountered in the hole and most of the Yax-1 impactites are breccias. In particular, the impact melt and breccias are only 100 m thick which is surprising taking into account the considerably thicker breccia accumulations towards the center of the structure and farther outside the transient crater encountered by other drill holes.

  2. High conductance 2D transport around the Hall mobility peak in electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Shun; Zhang, Xin; Leighton, C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2014-12-12

    We report the observation of the Hall effect at hole densities up to 6×10¹³ cm⁻² (0.3  holes/molecule) on the surface of electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals. The perplexing peak in the conductance as a function of gate voltage is confirmed to result from a maximum in mobility, which reaches 4  cm² V⁻¹ s⁻¹ at 2.5×10¹³ cm⁻². Measurements to liquid helium temperatures reveal that this peak is markedly asymmetric, with bandlike and hopping-type transport occurring on the low density side, while unconventional, likely electrostatic-disorder-affected transport dominates the high density side. Most significantly, near the mobility peak the temperature coefficient of the resistance remains positive to as low as 120 K, the low temperature resistance becomes weakly temperature dependent, and the conductance reaches within a factor of 2 of e²/h, revealing conduction unprecedentedly close to a two-dimensional metallic state. PMID:25541790

  3. The extreme mobility of debris avalanches: A new model of transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinotto, Hélène; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Bachèlery, Patrick; Le Bourdonnec, François-Xavier; Famin, Vincent; Michon, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Large rockslide-debris avalanches, resulting from flank collapses that shape volcanoes and mountains on Earth and other object of the solar system, are rapid and dangerous gravity-driven granular flows that travel abnormal distances. During the last 50 years, numerous physical models have been put forward to explain their extreme mobility. The principal models are based on fluidization, lubrication, or dynamic disintegration. However, these processes remain poorly constrained. To identify precisely the transport mechanisms during debris avalanches, we examined morphometric (fractal dimension and circularity), grain size, and exoscopic characteristics of the various types of particles (clasts and matrix) from volcanic debris avalanche deposits of La Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). From these data we demonstrate for the first time that syn-transport dynamic disintegration continuously operates with the increasing runout distance from the source down to a grinding limit of 500 µm. Below this limit, the particle size reduction exclusively results from their attrition by frictional interactions. Consequently, the exceptional mobility of debris avalanches may be explained by the combined effect of elastic energy release during the dynamic disintegration of the larger clasts and frictional reduction within the matrix due to interactions between the finer particles.

  4. Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Yongzhai; Feng, Zhili; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  5. Impact of river regulation on potential sediment mobilization and transport in an Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter; Lane, Stuart N.; Bakker, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The upper Rhône basin (upstream of Lake Geneva) has been heavily affected by human activities during the last century. The most evident impacts are related to river regulation, specifically flow impoundement, flow abstraction and channelization. In the last century and mainly since 1960, several large dams have been built along the main tributaries of the Rhône River, resulting in the water storage of a volume equal to 20% of the total annual river flow. The dams are part of hydropower systems which abstract water from streams and transfer it through complex networks (intakes, tunnels and pumping stations) to the reservoirs. Hydropower production leads to regulated flow in the Rhône: mostly an increase of winter flows, a reduction of summer flows, and a decrease of flood peaks. The sediment supply into Lake Geneva has decreased following dam construction (Loizeau & Dominik, 2000) due to the storage of sediment in upstream reservoirs, in rivers with reduced sediment transport capacity due to flow abstraction, and due to the development of sediment mining. Our hypothesis is that streamflow regulation itself has dramatically impacted the sediment transport dynamics of the system. We investigate the impacts of flow regulation on the sediment transport regime, by analysing the effects on potential sediment transport capacity (bedload). By the use of different bedload transport formulae (Meyer-Peter Müller, Wilcock and Crowe), the potential sediment transport capacity is computed at different cross sections within the basin. Potential sediment mobility occurs when the applied bed shear stress exceeds a critical value, τ>τc. The applied bed shear stress is computed as τ=ρghS, with water depth (h) measured from rating curves. We obtain an estimate of the energy slope (S) from the analysis of the river cross section, assuming uniform flow. The critical value of bed shear stress τc is computed using empirical formulae as a function of the grain diameter (ds). To

  6. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... State or local law. (b) When transporting over water cost must include, but not limited to the cost of... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs...

  7. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... State or local law. (b) When transporting over water cost must include, but not limited to the cost of... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs...

  8. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... State or local law. (b) When transporting over water cost must include, but not limited to the cost of... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs...

  9. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  10. A Car Transportation System in Cooperation by Multiple Mobile Robots for Each Wheel: iCART II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwazaki, Koshi; Yonezawa, Naoaki; Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Sugahara, Yusuke; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Shinozuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Koki; Ono, Yuki

    The authors proposed a car transportation system, iCART (intelligent Cooperative Autonomous Robot Transporters), for automation of mechanical parking systems by two mobile robots. However, it was difficult to downsize the mobile robot because the length of it requires at least the wheelbase of a car. This paper proposes a new car transportation system, iCART II (iCART - type II), based on “a-robot-for-a-wheel” concept. A prototype system, MRWheel (a Mobile Robot for a Wheel), is designed and downsized less than half the conventional robot. First, a method for lifting up a wheel by MRWheel is described. In general, it is very difficult for mobile robots such as MRWheel to move to desired positions without motion errors caused by slipping, etc. Therefore, we propose a follower's motion error estimation algorithm based on the internal force applied to each follower by extending a conventional leader-follower type decentralized control algorithm for cooperative object transportation. The proposed algorithm enables followers to estimate their motion errors and enables the robots to transport a car to a desired position. In addition, we analyze and prove the stability and convergence of the resultant system with the proposed algorithm. In order to extract only the internal force from the force applied to each robot, we also propose a model-based external force compensation method. Finally, proposed methods are applied to the car transportation system, the experimental results confirm their validity.

  11. Controls on the Mobilization and Transport of Hfse in Ore-Forming Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Valle, C.; Louvel, M.

    2015-12-01

    The genesis of economical rare metals (Zr, Nb, REE) ore deposits in largegranitic complexes (e.g., Strange Lake and Thor Lake Nechalacho deposit, Canada; Galineiro complex, Spain) is related to the intrusion of alkaline halogen-rich magmatic bodies. Although the role of exolved magmatic fluids in the mobilization and transport of HFSE is widely recognized, the physico-chemical conditions and atomic-scale mechanisms that control the formation of the ore deposits remain poorly understood. We present new experimental constraints on behavior of HFSE during the exsolution of aqueous fluids from peralkaline granitic magmas at crustal conditions. In situ partitioning and speciation studies of Zr in the haplogranite-(F)-H2O systems using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopies provide evidence for large controls of fluid chemistry and temperature on the mobilization and transport of HFSE in crustal settings. At shallow crustal pressure conditions (> 800 °C and 0.3 GPa), Zr preferentially partitions into the exolved aqueous fluid in the presence of fluorine (Df/mZr = 1.40 ± 0.10) as previously reported for Nb in F- (and Cl-) bearing metaluminous granitic systems at similar conditions. The reverse partitioning of HFSE (Zr and Nb) into the aqueous phase at temperature above 800 °C contrast with the behavior observed at lower temperatures, where the Df/mZr remain lower than 1 at all pressures. The enrichment of the aqueous phase in HFSE (Zr, Nb) in the earlier stages of the magmatic evolution is likely related to the enhanced peralkalinity of low pressure (< 0.4 GPa), F-bearing aqueous fluid coexisting with granitic melts as temperature increases. This particular fluid chemistry provides the favorable conditions for the mobilization of HFSE via the formation of HFSE-O-Si/Na clusters in the fluid as shown by the in situ Zr speciation data. Our results show that the exsolution of highly alkaline early magmatic fluid at pressures below 0.4 GPa has the potential to extract HFSE from F

  12. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  13. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  14. A role for vesicular glutamate transporter 1 in synaptic vesicle clustering and mobility.

    PubMed

    Siksou, Léa; Silm, Kätlin; Biesemann, Christoph; Nehring, Ralf B; Wojcik, Sonja M; Triller, Antoine; El Mestikawy, Salah; Marty, Serge; Herzog, Etienne

    2013-05-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) from excitatory synapses carry vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) that fill the vesicles with neurotransmitter. Although the essential function of VGLUTs as glutamate transporters has been well established, the evidence for additional cell-biological functions is more controversial. Both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 disruptions in mice result in a reduced number of SVs away from release sites, flattening of SVs, and the appearance of tubular structures. Therefore, we analysed the morphology, biochemical composition and trafficking of SVs at synapses of VGLUT1(-/-) mice in order to test for a function of VGLUTs in the formation or clustering of SVs. Analyses with high-pressure freezing immobilisation and electron tomography pointed to a role of VGLUT1 transport function in the tonicity of excitatory SVs, explaining the aldehyde-induced flattening of SVs observed in VGLUT1(-/-) synapses. We confirmed the steep reduction in the number of SVs previously observed in VGLUT1(-/-) presynaptic terminals, but did not observe accumulation of endocytotic intermediates. Furthermore, SV proteins of adult VGLUT1(-/-) mouse brain tissue were expressed at normal levels in all subcellular fractions, suggesting that they were not displaced to another organelle. We thus assessed the mobility of the recently documented superpool of SVs. Synaptobrevin2-enhanced green fluorescent protein time lapse experiments revealed an oversized superpool of SVs in VGLUT1(-/-) neurons. Our results support the idea that, beyond glutamate loading, VGLUT1 enhances the tonicity of excitatory SVs and stabilises SVs at presynaptic terminals. PMID:23581566

  15. Approaching disorder-free transport in high-mobility conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Nikolka, Mark; Sadhanala, Aditya; Lemaur, Vincent; Zelazny, Mateusz; Kepa, Michal; Hurhangee, Michael; Kronemeijer, Auke Jisk; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Nasrallah, Iyad; Romanov, Igor; Broch, Katharina; McCulloch, Iain; Emin, David; Olivier, Yoann; Cornil, Jerome; Beljonne, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-11-20

    Conjugated polymers enable the production of flexible semiconductor devices that can be processed from solution at low temperatures. Over the past 25 years, device performance has improved greatly as a wide variety of molecular structures have been studied. However, one major limitation has not been overcome; transport properties in polymer films are still limited by pervasive conformational and energetic disorder. This not only limits the rational design of materials with higher performance, but also prevents the study of physical phenomena associated with an extended π-electron delocalization along the polymer backbone. Here we report a comparative transport study of several high-mobility conjugated polymers by field-effect-modulated Seebeck, transistor and sub-bandgap optical absorption measurements. We show that in several of these polymers, most notably in a recently reported, indacenodithiophene-based donor-acceptor copolymer with a near-amorphous microstructure, the charge transport properties approach intrinsic disorder-free limits at which all molecular sites are thermally accessible. Molecular dynamics simulations identify the origin of this long sought-after regime as a planar, torsion-free backbone conformation that is surprisingly resilient to side-chain disorder. Our results provide molecular-design guidelines for 'disorder-free' conjugated polymers. PMID:25383522

  16. Investigation of the mobile granular layer in bed-load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Aussillous, Pascale; Chauchat, Julien; Pailha, Mickael; Medale, Marc; Aix Marseille Université, Cnrs, Iusti Umr 7343 Team; Legi, Ujf/Inpg/Cnrs Team; Locie, Cnrs-Université de Savoie Team

    2012-11-01

    The mobile layer of a granular bed composed of spherical particles is experimentally investigated in a laminar rectangular-channel flow. Both particle and fluid velocity profiles are obtained using particle image velocimetry for different index-matched combinations of particles and fluid. While the Shields number controls incipient motion, it is not the most appropriate parameter for describing bed-load transport. The experimental observations suggest that the appropriate length-scale is the fluid height and that the proper control parameter is the dimensionless fluid flow-rate. A two-phase continuum model having a frictional rheology to describe particle-particle interactions can capture most of the experimental observations. Rheological constitutive laws having increasing degree of sophistication are discussed. Funding from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (Project Dunes ANR-07-3 18-3892) is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Band-like transport, high electron mobility and high photoconductivity in all-inorganic nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Huang, Jing; Chung, Dae Sung; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2011-06-01

    Flexible, thin-film electronic and optoelectronic devices typically involve a trade-off between performance and fabrication cost. For example, solution-based deposition allows semiconductors to be patterned onto large-area substrates to make solar cells and displays, but the electron mobility in solution-deposited semiconductor layers is much lower than in semiconductors grown at high temperatures from the gas phase. Here, we report band-like electron transport in arrays of colloidal cadmium selenide nanocrystals capped with the molecular metal chalcogenide complex In(2)Se(4)(2-), and measure electron mobilities as high as 16 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which is about an order of magnitude higher than in the best solution-processed organic and nanocrystal devices so far. We also use CdSe/CdS core-shell nanoparticles with In(2)Se(4)(2-) ligands to build photodetectors with normalized detectivity D* > 1 × 10(13) Jones (I Jones = 1 cm Hz(1/2) W(-1)), which is a record for II-VI nanocrystals. Our approach does not require high processing temperatures, and can be extended to different nanocrystals and inorganic surface ligands. PMID:21516091

  18. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    During the initial project period, we have pursued several activities with the overall goal of characterizing the roles of colloid in groundwater. First, we have collected soil cores from a site where we have previously found large quantities of kaolinite colloids in the groundwater. We have intensely investigated these cores to test our hypothesis that the colloids have been mobilized as a result of iron oxide dissolution. Next, we have constructed a soil core system in our laboratory with which we are attempting to mimic the factors that we think are governing colloid transport in the subsurface. Finally, we have pursued the issue of how well organic chemicals bind to the kinds of colloids that we are seeing at field sites. Together, with our knowledge of colloid mobility, we anticipate that this sorption data will enable us to predict the influence of groundwater colloids on contaminant fates in the subsurface. Our progress in each of these activities is described in this report. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Contaminant transport in dual-porosity media with dissolved organic matter and bacteria present as mobile colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Bae; Corapcioglu, M Yavuz

    2002-12-01

    In riverbank filtration, contaminant transport is affected by colloidal particles such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacterial particles. In addition, the subsurface heterogeneity influences the behavior of contaminant transport in riverbank filtration. A mathematical model is developed to describe the contaminant transport in dual-porosity media in the presence of DOM and bacteria as mobile colloids. In the model development, a porous medium is divided into the mobile and immobile regions to consider the presence of ineffective micropores in physically heterogeneous riverbanks. We assume that the contaminant transport in the mobile region is controlled by the advection and dispersion while the contaminant transport in the immobile region occurs due to the molecular diffusion. The contaminant transfer between the mobile and immobile regions takes place by diffusive mass transfer. The mobile region is conceptualized as a four-phase system: two mobile colloidal phases, an aqueous phase, and a solid matrix. The complete set of governing equations is solved numerically with a fully implicit finite difference method. The model results show that in riverbank filtration, the contaminant can migrate further than expected due to the presence of DOM and bacteria. In addition, the contaminant mobility increases further in the presence of the immobile region in aquifers. A sensitivity analysis shows that in dual-porosity media, earlier breakthrough of the contaminant takes place as the volumetric fraction of the mobile region decreases. It is also demonstrated that as the contaminant mass transfer rate coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions increases, the contaminant concentration gradient between the two regions reverses at earlier pore volumes. The contaminant mass transfer coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions mainly controls the tailing effect of the contaminant breakthrough. The contaminant breakthrough curves are sensitive to changes in

  20. Linking aquifer spatial properties and non-Fickian transport in mobile-immobile like alluvial settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Baeumer, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Time-nonlocal transport models can describe non-Fickian diffusion observed in geological media, but the physical meaning of parameters can be ambiguous, and most applications are limited to curve-fitting. This study explores methods for predicting the parameters of a temporally tempered Lévy motion (TTLM) model for transient sub-diffusion in mobile-immobile like alluvial settings represented by high-resolution hydrofacies models. The TTLM model is a concise multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT) model that describes a linear mass transfer process where the transfer kinetics and late-time transport behavior are controlled by properties of the host medium, especially the immobile domain. The intrinsic connection between the MRMT and TTLM models helps to estimate the main time-nonlocal parameters in the TTLM model (which are the time scale index, the capacity coefficient, and the truncation parameter) either semi-analytically or empirically from the measurable aquifer properties. Further applications show that the TTLM model captures the observed solute snapshots, the breakthrough curves, and the spatial moments of plumes up to the fourth order. Most importantly, the a priori estimation of the time-nonlocal parameters outside of any breakthrough fitting procedure provides a reliable “blind” prediction of the late-time dynamics of subdiffusion observed in a spectrum of alluvial settings. Predictability of the time-nonlocal parameters may be due to the fact that the late-time subdiffusion is not affected by the exact location of each immobile zone, but rather is controlled by the time spent in immobile blocks surrounding the pathway of solute particles. Results also show that the effective dispersion coefficient has to be fitted due to the scale effect of transport, and the mean velocity can differ from local measurements or volume averages. The link between medium heterogeneity and time-nonlocal parameters will help to improve model predictability for non

  1. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-05-01

    Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

  2. Nondispersive hole transport in a polyfluorene copolymer with a mobility of 0.01 cm2 V-1 s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, H. H.; Papadimitratos, Alexios; Malliaras, George G.

    2006-10-01

    The hole mobility in the fluorene copolymer poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(4,4'-(N-(4-sec-butylphenyl)) diphenylamine)] (TFB) was measured using the time-of-flight technique. Transport was found to be nondispersive throughout the temperature range between 220 and 350K, indicating the absence of intrinsic traps in this material. At room temperature, TFB shows a hole mobility of 0.01cm2V-1s-1, with a weak field dependence. The hole mobility is independent of sample thickness in the range between 0.9 and 6.4μm. These results are in agreement with a narrow transport manifold, with a width of 65.9±0.5meV.

  3. Estimating mobilization and transport of arsenic using Hydrogeochemical modelling in Guandu geothermal spring area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Liu, C.; Kao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the environmental contaminants, widely distributed in geothermal ecosystem. Previous studies indicated that As concentration of Beitou geothermal spring was up to 4.32 mg/L and significantly exceeded the drinking water (0.01 mg/L) guideline of WHO. Moreover, in this study area, including the Beitou geothermal valley, Guandu Plain and Guandu Wetland, which may be influenced by toxicological effects of As. The probable path of As distribution is from Beitou geothermal spring to downstream of alluvial aquifer and wetland, via the stream flow and groundwater flow. This study following 3 cases aims to establish the spatial distribution of arsenic in this study area and develop a hydrogeochemical model using HYDROGEOCHEM 5.0 and PHREEQC. Total of 1960 nodes and 895 elements were consisted in groundwater flow direction (Case 1) and As transport (Case 2) of this conceptual model using HYDROGEOCHEM 5.0. In addition, dissolve/ precipitation , adsorption/ desorption and exchange reactions were also considered. In the case 1, the simulated results of groundwater flow direction show that the flow direction is from the northeast to the southwest, which water table decrease with variation of terrain. In the case 2, the results of As transport show that As distribution are gradually decrease from geothermal valley to downstream region. However, a slowly rising in the wetland. The illustrates conceptual diagram of As that high As contents released from geothermal spring transport into wetland ecosystem along stream flow and wetland particularly easily accumulated As. Furthermore, the geochemical parameters of pore water samples in the Guandu Wetland are applied to establish As mobility with different depth using PHREEQC program(Case 3). The simulated results show that the predominant species of As in the shallow layer and deep layer are As(V) and As(III), respectively. The likely mechanisms of As mobility is former probably adsorbed on the Ferric hydroxide (S

  4. Electron Transport in a High Mobility Free-Standing GaN Substrate Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L.; Kurdak, C.; Yun, F.; Morkoc, H.; Rode, D. L.; Tsen, K. T.; Park, S. S.; Lee, K. Y.

    2001-03-01

    We studied electron transport properties in a high quality free-standing GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The GaN, with a thickness of more than 200 μm, was lifted off the sapphire substrate and mechanically polished. At room temperature the carrier density is 1.3x10^16cm-3 and the Hall mobility is 1200 cm^2/V-s, which is the highest reported electron mobility for GaN with a wurtzite structure. Transport properties are studied using a van der Pauw geometry in a temperature range of 20 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. Electron mobility is found to increase at lower temperatures with a peak mobility of 7400 cm^2/V-s at 48 K. The carrier density decreases exponentially at temperatures below 80 K with an activation energy of 28 meV. The electron transport measurements were used to examine the contributions of different scattering mechanisms. Numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation was carried out, including non-parabolic conduction bands and wavefunction admixture, along with lattice scattering and ionized-impurity scattering. LO and TO phonon energies were determined by Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  6. A two-tiered approach to reactive transport: Application to Sr mobility under variable pH

    SciTech Connect

    Toran, L.; Bryant, S.; Wheeler, M.F.; Saunders, J.

    1998-05-01

    One benefit of a coupled geochemistry/transport approach is that interactions between chemical constituents that can change the mobility of species (such as pH) can be treated explicitly, rather than lumping all of the geochemistry into a single term (i.e., the retardation factor). A two-tiered approach to modeling coupled geochemistry/transport is presented here, which allows a comparison of the results of different methods as well as better efficiency in modeling time. The codes ParSSim, a coupled transport code for supercomputers, and PHREEQC, an advective geochemistry code, were used to model Sr mobility under varying pH. The problem was based on liquid low level radioactive waste that was disposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) in a highly alkaline solution to try to enhance precipitation and sorption. Interactions with carbonate rock and ground water lowered the pH and led to mobilization of radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr. Simulation of contaminant migration in this mixing environment requires a coupled geochemistry and transport model. The interplay between propagation of a pH front (which was retarded) and propagation of the Sr front leads to a fast-moving pulse of Sr as well as a strongly retarded front of Sr. This behavior could not have been predicted by a geochemistry or a transport code alone.

  7. Subsurface Transport and Mobilization of Pathogenic Microbes and Microspheres: Effect of Microbe Size, Soil Physical Heterogeneity, and Intermittent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulicek, M. C.; Metge, D. W.; Mohanty, S. K.; Harvey, R. W.; Ryan, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Intermittent flows of rainwater frequently mobilize pathogenic microbes attached to subsurface soils, thereby causing groundwater contamination. The potential of intermittent rainfall to mobilize diverse pathogens (e.g., size, shape, taxa) remains understudied for heterogeneous soil systems. This study investigates the combined effects of microbe size and shape, intermittent flow, and soil physical heterogeneity on the transport, retention and mobilization of microbes through an intact, fractured shale saprolite core. Microbes, including MS-2 bacteriophage (~26 nm), Pseudomonas stutzeri bacteria (~1 μm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (3.6 μm), and 0.5 μm fluorescent microspheres (FMS), preceded by a bromide tracer, were applied to the core to obtain breakthrough. After breakthrough, the core was subjected to intermittent rainfalls to mobilize the attached microbes and FMS. Water samples were collected using 19 spatially-arranged outlet ports at the core base to resolve the effect of soil physical heterogeneity. Water infiltrated through only eight of 19 total sampling ports, which indicated water partially bypassed soil matrices and infiltrated through macropores. Bromide recovery was less than 100%, which indicated diffusion of bromide into the soil matrix. Macropores and the soil matrix dominated flow were characterized based on the cumulative bromide recovery within individual sampling ports. Thus, lower recovery was attributed to increased matrix diffusion and higher recovery indicated the presence of macropores. Intermittent flow mobilized previously sequestered microbes and FMS; however, mobilization varied with the size of microbes/FMS and sampling ports. Greater mobilization occurred through macropores compared to soil matrices. Mobilization of larger, spherical C. parvum oocysts was greater than that of the smaller, spherical MS-2 bacteriophage and the rod-shaped P. stutzeri bacteria during intermittent flow. This suggested shear forces mobilize

  8. Symmetric caging formation for convex polygonal object transportation by multiple mobile robots based on fuzzy sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanyan; Kim, YoonGu; Wee, SungGil; Lee, DongHa; Lee, SukGyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of object caging and transporting is considered for multiple mobile robots. With the consideration of minimizing the number of robots and decreasing the rotation of the object, the proper points are calculated and assigned to the multiple mobile robots to allow them to form a symmetric caging formation. The caging formation guarantees that all of the Euclidean distances between any two adjacent robots are smaller than the minimal width of the polygonal object so that the object cannot escape. In order to avoid collision among robots, the parameter of the robots radius is utilized to design the caging formation, and the A⁎ algorithm is used so that mobile robots can move to the proper points. In order to avoid obstacles, the robots and the object are regarded as a rigid body to apply artificial potential field method. The fuzzy sliding mode control method is applied for tracking control of the nonholonomic mobile robots. Finally, the simulation and experimental results show that multiple mobile robots are able to cage and transport the polygonal object to the goal position, avoiding obstacles. PMID:26704719

  9. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  10. Semi-analytical Solution for the Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media with Mobile-Immobile Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Zhan, H.

    2015-12-01

    With the consideration of advection, dispersion, adsorption and first order decay in the fracture and rock matrix in a single fracture model, a new semi-analytical solution is derived using the Mobile-Immobile Method. It can be used to estimate the concentration at any location at any time precisely within the fracture and rock matrix. Most fractures found underground are filled with the conglomerate, sand, clay and other kinds of possible porous media. The existence of those filling ingredients leads to the isolated pore space within the fracture, which is also called immobile zone. Certain assumptions have be made: the diffusion is the only way that the contamination travels from the fracture to the matrix as the large permeability difference between them; the diffusive transport is dominant in the rock matrix while the advective-dispersive transport plays the major role in the fracture. Experimental data have been collected from literatures to compare the performance of this semi-analytical solution from the classical analytical solution. The comparison shows that the semi-analytical solution simulates it better when the mobile zone percentage is limited. Also, the effects of matrix diffusion, dispersivity and Darcy velocity in the fracture, fracture aperture, first order mass transfer rate and mobile zone percentage on solute transport are demonstrated through the sensitivity analysis, concentration profiles and breakthrough curves. By modifying the boundary conditions and adding an advection term in the rock matrix governing equation, this model can be extended to a two-layer solute transport model.

  11. Wheeled mobility device transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive public transit vehicles within the United States.

    PubMed

    Frost, Karen L; van Roosmalen, Linda; Bertocci, Gina; Cross, Douglas J

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current status of wheelchair transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive, non-rail, public transportation vehicles within the US is presented. A description of each mode of transportation is provided, followed by a discussion of the primary issues affecting safety, accessibility, and usability. Technologies such as lifts, ramps, securement systems, and occupant restraint systems, along with regulations and voluntary industry standards have been implemented with the intent of improving safety and accessibility for individuals who travel while seated in their wheeled mobility device (e.g., wheelchair or scooter). However, across both fixed route and demand-responsive transit systems a myriad of factors such as nonuse and misuse of safety systems, oversized wheeled mobility devices, vehicle space constraints, and inadequate vehicle operator training may place wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users at risk of injury even under non-impact driving conditions. Since WhMD-related incidents also often occur during the boarding and alighting process, the frequency of these events, along with factors associated with these events are described for each transit mode. Recommendations for improving WhMD transportation are discussed given the current state of PMID:22876731

  12. Mechanism of lipid mobilization by the small intestine after transport blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J.; Tso, P.; Mansbach, C.M. II

    1988-07-01

    The nonionic detergent, Pluronic L-81 (L-81) has been shown to block the transport of intestinal mucosal triacylglycerol (TG) in chylomicrons. This results in large lipid masses within the enterocyte that are greater in diameter than chylomicrons. On removal of L-81, mucosal TG is rapidly mobilized and appears in the lymph. We questioned whether the blocked TG requires partial or complete hydrolysis before its transport. Rats were infused intraduodenally with (3H)glyceryl, (14C)oleoyl trioleate (TO) and 0.5 mg L-81/h for 8 h, followed by 120 mumol/h linoleate for 18 h. Mesenteric lymph was collected and analyzed for TG content and radioactivity. An HPLC method was developed to separate TG on the basis of its acyl group species. The assumed acyl group composition was confirmed by gas liquid chromatography analysis. TG lymphatic output was low for the first 8 h but increased to 52 mumol/h at the 11th h of infusion (3 h after stopping L-81). 38% of the infused TO was retained in the mucosa after the 8-h infusion. 95% of mucosal TG was TO, 92% of the radioactivity was in TG, and 2.4% of the 14C disintegrations per minute was in fatty acid. HPLC analysis of lymph at 6, 10, 12, and 14.5 h of infusion showed a progressive rise in TG composed of one linoleate and two oleates, to 39%; and in TG composed of two linoleates and one oleate to 20% at 14.5 h of infusion. On a mass basis, however, 80% of the TG acyl groups were oleate. 3H/14C ratios in the various TG acyl group species reflected the decrease in oleate. We conclude that first, unlike liver, most mucosal TG is not hydrolyzed before transport. The mechanism of how the large lipid masses present in mucosal cells after L-81 infusion are converted to the much smaller chylomicrons is unknown. Second, the concomitant infusion of linoleate did not impair lymph TG delivery after L-81 blockade.

  13. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations.

    PubMed

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated. PMID:25956086

  14. Double path integral method for obtaining the mobility of the one-dimensional charge transport in molecular chain.

    PubMed

    Yoo-Kong, Sikarin; Liewrian, Watchara

    2015-12-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation concerning the polaronic effect on the transport properties of a charge carrier in a one-dimensional molecular chain. Our technique is based on the Feynman's path integral approach. Analytical expressions for the frequency-dependent mobility and effective mass of the carrier are obtained as functions of electron-phonon coupling. The result exhibits the crossover from a nearly free particle to a heavily trapped particle. We find that the mobility depends on temperature and decreases exponentially with increasing temperature at low temperature. It exhibits large polaronic-like behaviour in the case of weak electron-phonon coupling. These results agree with the phase transition (A.S. Mishchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 146401 (2015)) of transport phenomena related to polaron motion in the molecular chain. PMID:26701710

  15. Electron transport in bulk-Si NMOSFETs in presence of high-kappa gate insulator: Charge trapping and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Kingsuk

    Recent advancements in gate stack engineering has led to the development of aggressively scaled, high mobility, high-kappa dielectric based NMOSFETs with metal gates. Most of the current literature on the subject also stressed on the need for a high temperature process step to attain the high mobility under minimal change of effective oxide thickness. However, the physical origin of high mobility is not well understood. In this work, fundamental insight into the necessity of the high temperature process step is provided. Novel experimental strategies are developed to understand the impact of interface states and bulk traps separately and exclusively on channel mobility. It is conjectured that the interface states at the SiO2/(100) bulk-Si interface are identical in nature (as far as coupling with the channel electrons is concerned) to those at the high-kappa/SiO2/(100) bulk-Si interface. Thus, the response of interface states on channel electrons in high-kappa insulator based NMOSFETs is properly calibrated by a novel thermal desorption of hydrogen experiment on SiO2/(100) bulk-Si NMOSFETs to yield a highly accurate parameterized equation. The value of interface state response parameter determined by the aforementioned experiment is compared with theoretical predictions, and independently determined projections from electrical stress measurements. The impact of transient charging on transport in the channel is investigated. It is conclusively shown that remote charge has minimal impact on mobility in the channel. The role of nitrogen induced fixed oxide charge is studied on a set of Hf-silicate samples. Role of soft optical phonon scattering and the beneficial impact of metal gates on soft optical phonon limited mobility are thoroughly investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Conclusions are drawn on the fundamental limit of mobility attainable in high-kappa dielectric based NMOSFETs.

  16. Transnational Sea-Ice Transport in a Warmer, More Mobile Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R.; Tremblay, B.; Pfirman, S. L.; DeRepentigny, P.

    2015-12-01

    As the Arctic sea ice thins, summer ice continues to shrink in its area, and multi-year ice becomes rarer, winter ice is not disappearing from the Arctic Basin. Rather, it is ever more dominated by first year ice. And each summer, as the total coverage withdraws, the first year ice is able travel faster and farther, carrying any ice-rafted material with it. Micro-organisms, sediments, pollutants and river runoff all move across the Arctic each summer and are deposited hundreds of kilometers from their origins. Analyzing Arctic sea ice drift patterns in the context of the exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of the Arctic nations raises concerns about the changing fate of "alien" ice which forms within one country's EEZ, then drifts and melts in another country's EEZ. We have developed a new data set from satellite-based ice-drift data that allows us to track groups of ice "pixels" forward from their origin to their destination, or backwards from their melting location to their point of formation. The software has been integrated with model output to extend the tracking of sea ice to include climate projections. Results indicate, for example, that Russian sea ice dominates "imports" to the EEZ of Norway, as expected, but with increasing ice mobility it is also is exported into the EEZs of other countries, including Canada and the United States. Regions of potential conflict are identified, including several national borders with extensive and/or changing transboundary sea ice transport. These data are a starting point for discussion of transborder questions raised by "alien" ice and the material it may import from one nation's EEZ to another's.

  17. The role of regioregularity, crystallinity, and chain orientation on electron transport in a high-mobility n-type copolymer.

    PubMed

    Steyrleuthner, Robert; Di Pietro, Riccardo; Collins, Brian A; Polzer, Frank; Himmelberger, Scott; Schubert, Marcel; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Shiming; Salleo, Alberto; Ade, Harald; Facchetti, Antonio; Neher, Dieter

    2014-03-19

    We investigated the correlation between the polymer backbone structural regularity and the charge transport properties of poly{[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)} [P(NDI2OD-T2)], a widely studied semiconducting polymer exhibiting high electron mobility and an unconventional micromorphology. To understand the influence of the chemical structure and crystal packing of conventional regioregular P(NDI2OD-T2) [RR-P(NDI2OD-T2)] on the charge transport, the corresponding regioirregular polymer RI-P(NDI2OD-T2) was synthesized. By combining optical, X-ray, and transmission electron microscopy data, we quantitatively characterized the aggregation, crystallization, and backbone orientation of all of the polymer films, which were then correlated to the electron mobilities in electron-only diodes. By carefully selecting the preparation conditions, we were able to obtain RR-P(NDI2OD-T2) films with similar crystalline structure along the three crystallographic axes but with different orientations of the polymer chains with respect to the substrate surface. RI-P(NDI2OD-T2), though exhibiting a rather similar LUMO structure and energy compared with the regioregular counterpart, displayed a very different packing structure characterized by the formation of ordered stacks along the lamellar direction without detectible π-stacking. Vertical electron mobilities were extracted from the space-charge-limited currents in unipolar devices. We demonstrate the anisotropy of the charge transport along the different crystallographic directions and how the mobility depends on π-stacking but is insensitive to the degree or coherence of lamellar stacking. The comparison between the regioregular and regioirregular polymers also shows how the use of large planar functional groups leads to improved charge transport, with mobilities that are less affected by chemical and structural disorder with respect to classic semicrystalline polymers such

  18. Effective ADE models for first-order mobile-immobile solute transport: Limits on validity and modeling implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-1D mobile-immobile transport processes which have exponentially distributed random waiting times in both mobile and immobile states are common in hydrologic models (for example, of transport subject to kinetic sorption). The central limit theorem implies that eventually such transport will be expressible with an effective ADE (i.e. a generalization of the common retardation factor approach with an added Fickian dispersion coefficient accounting for the effect of trapping). Previous works have determined formulae for the value of this coefficient based on the transport properties. However, the time until convergence to Gaussian behavior has not previously been quantified. To this end, exact Green's functions characterizing the transport at all times are derived for the case of pure advection. The Green's functions are expressed in terms of three dimensionless parameters, representing location, time, and capacity coefficient. In the pre-Gaussian regime, a parametric study characterizing concentration profile asymmetry as a function of the capacity coefficient is performed. Next, heuristics are presented in terms of the dimensionless parameters for the time until the effective ADE adequately reflects reality. For strongly retarded solute, the time until effective ADE validity is found inversely proportional to release (e.g., desorption) rate. The nature of the effective dispersion coefficient is examined, and the possibility of large trapping-driven dispersion even in cases where batch experiments would detect negligible trapping is demonstrated. Collectively, these results call into question reliance on retardation factors derived from batch experiments for many practical transport modeling efforts; knowledge of both the trapping and release kinetics appears essential.

  19. Mobilization and co-transport of pyrene in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 biosurfactants in sandy soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance, P.; Lapointe, M.

    1998-12-31

    Washing technologies are currently applied for the remediation of contaminated soils. The efficiency of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to mobilize some hydrocarbons sorbed on soils has already been demonstrated. However, few studies have been made to define optimal procedures for the injection of these rhamnolipids in soil. This study examines (1) the efficiency of the biosurfactants produced by P. aeruginosa UG2 to mobilize pyrene from a contaminated sandy loam as compared to that of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS); (2) the injection procedures that might affect the efficiency of pyrene mobilization using UG2 biosurfactants; and (3) the co-transport of UG2 biosurfactants and pyrene. Based on the experimental results, it would be advantageous to use a high UG2 biosurfactant concentration, a high pore water velocity, and possibly a flow interruption of more than 15 h in order to reduce the injected volume and the duration of the treatment required. The 0.25% UG2 biosurfactant concentration greatly enhanced pyrene transport and could facilitate contaminant recovery.

  20. Understanding arsenic mobilization using reactive transport modeling of groundwater hydrochemistry in the Datong basin study plot, China.

    PubMed

    Mapoma, Harold Wilson Tumwitike; Xie, Xianjun; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Yaqing; Zhu, Yapeng

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the reactive transport and evolution of arsenic along a selected flow path in a study plot within the central part of Datong basin. The simulation used the TOUGHREACT code. The spatial and temporal trends in hydrochemistry and mineral volume fraction along a flow path were observed. Furthermore, initial simulation of major ions and pH fits closely to the measured data. The study shows that equilibrium conditions may be attained at different stress periods for each parameter simulated. It is noted that the variations in ionic chemistry have a greater impact on arsenic distribution while reducing conditions drive the mobilization of arsenic. The study concluded that the reduction of Fe(iii) and As(v) and probably SO4/HS cycling are significant factors affecting localized mobilization of arsenic. Besides cation exchange and water-rock interaction, incongruent dissolution of silicates is also a significant control mechanism of general chemistry of the Datong basin aquifer. PMID:26857449

  1. Sediment mobility and bedload transport rates in a high-elevation glacier-fed stream (Saldur river, Eastern Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agnese, A.; Mao, L.; Comiti, F.

    2012-04-01

    bedload transport rate. The coarsest particles collected reached the median diameter of the bed surface (around 100 mm), and exponent of the relationship between the dimensionless critical shear stress and the relative transported size is about -0.80. This indicates that size-selective mobility conditions dominate within the range of explored discharges, and this evidence is confirmed by the analysis of the fractional transport rates of the collected sediment samples. The mobility of coarser (from 50 to 500 mm) sediment particles was explored using 360 PITs; the passage of 176 of them (from 50 to 250 mm in size) have been recorded by the fixed antennas. However, clasts up to about the D84 of the bed surface were seen mobilized after the larger snow/ice melt flows, but relevant morphological changes were observed only after a rainfall flood (favored by a preceding high ice-melt flow) featuring a peak discharge of about 14 m3s-1 (above bankfull stage). A preliminary analysis of PITs data shows a lesser degree of transport selectivity, suggesting that at medium to high flow rates sediments are transported at conditions closer to equal-mobility.

  2. Electrical transport in a disordered medium: NMR measurement of diffusivity and electrical mobility of ionic charge carriers.

    PubMed

    Heil, S R; Holz, M

    1998-11-01

    Electrical transport in porous media plays an important role in many fields of pure and applied science. The basic microscopic processes of the charge transport have attracted considerable theoretical interest for a long time. However, on a microscopic level there was up to now no experimental access to this problem. In the present paper we demonstrate, by using a suited porous system, that two combined NMR methods can offer such a first experimental access. We apply common PFG NMR methods and the special electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) technique for the measurement of self-diffusion coefficient D+ and electric mobility u+ of a cation ((C4H9)+4) in a disordered gel-like medium (Sephadex LH-20) filled with electrolyte solution. We find a, qualitatively expected, observation time-dependence of D+, but for the first time such a time-dependence is also observed for u+, which means the detection of the phenomenon of "anomalous field assisted diffusion" or "anomalous mobility." For the measurement of the short-time behavior of the mobility a new pulse sequence is presented. The time-dependent mobilities were measured at three different external electrical fields E. From the long-time behavior of D+, u+, and DH2O three independent values for the tortuosity T of the porous system could be derived. We find equality of the tortuosities T(D+) and T(u+), which represents a first experimental proof of the validity of the Einstein relation (D+ approximately u+) in a disordered medium. Finally, we discuss advantages of the possible use of "anomalous field assisted diffusion" over the commonly used "anomalous diffusion" in morphology studies by dynamic imaging in porous media. PMID:9799669

  3. Devices using ballistic transport of two dimensional electron gas in delta doped gallium arsenide high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungmu

    In this thesis, devices using the ballistic transport of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistor(HEMT) structure is fabricated and their dc and ac properties are characterized. This study gives insight on operation and applications of modern submicron devices with ever reduced gate length comparable to electron mean free path. The ballistic transport is achieved using both temporal and spatial limits in this thesis. In temporal limit, when frequency is higher than the scattering frequency (1/(2pitau)), ballistic transport can be achieved. At room temperature, generally the scattering frequency is around 500 GHz but at cryogenic temperature (≤4K) with high mobility GaAs HEMT structure, the frequency is much lower than 2 GHz. On this temporal ballistic transport regime, effect of contact impedance and different dc mobility on device operation is characterized with the ungated 2DEG of HEMT structure. In this ballistic regime, impedance and responsivity of plasma wave detector are investigated using the gated 2DEG of HEMT at different ac boundary conditions. Plasma wave is generated at asymmetric ac boundary conditions of HEMTs, where source is short to ground and drain is open while rf power is applied to gate. The wave velocity can be tuned by gate bias voltage and induced drain to source voltage(Vds ) shows the resonant peak at odd number of fundamental frequency. Quantitative power coupling to plasma wave detector leads to experimental characterization of resonant response of plasma wave detector as a function of frequency. Because plasma wave resonance is not limited by transit time, the physics learned in this study can be directly converted to room temperature terahertz detection by simply reducing gate length(Lgate) to submicron for the terahertz application such as non destructive test, bio medical analysis, homeland security, defense and space. In same HEMT structure, the dc and rf characterization on device is also

  4. Electronic transport characterization of AlGaN /GaN heterostructures using quantitative mobility spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisesivdin, S. B.; Yildiz, A.; Acar, S.; Kasap, M.; Ozcelik, S.; Ozbay, E.

    2007-09-01

    Resistivity and Hall effect measurements in nominally undoped Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are carried out as a function of temperature (20-350K) and magnetic field (0-1.5T). The measurement results are analyzed using the quantitative mobility spectrum analysis techniques. It is found that there is strong two-dimensional electron gas localization below 100K, while the thermally activated minority carriers with the activation energies of ˜58 and ˜218meV contribute to the electron transport at high temperatures.

  5. Improvement in Mobility and Stability of n-Type Organic Field-Effect Transistors with a Hole Transporting Interfacial Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Motomi; Yokoyama, Masaaki

    2009-02-01

    Field-effect electron mobility and stability of N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI-C8H) improved when a hole-transporting layer, used in organic light-emitting diodes, was inserted between the gate insulator and the channel layer. This result suggests that insertion of an electronically active interfacial layer of an organic semiconductor is more effective in eliminating electron traps of the insulator surface compared to conventional surface treatment to obtain an inert surface.

  6. Influence of oxidation states on plutonium mobility during long-term transport through an unsaturated subsurface environment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Powell, Brian A; Demirkanli, Deniz I; Fjeld, Robert A; Molz, Fred J; Serkiz, Steven M; Coates, John T

    2004-10-01

    Lysimeter and laboratory studies were conducted to identify the controlling chemical processes influencing Pu(IV) mobility through the vadose zone. A 52-L lysimeter containing sediment from the Savannah River Site, South Carolina and solid PuIV(NO3)4 was left exposed to natural wetting and drying cycles for 11 years before the lysimeter sediment was sampled. Pu had traveled 10 cm, with >95% of the Pu remaining within 1.25 cm of the source. Laboratory studies showed that the sediment quickly reduced Pu(V) to Pu(IV) (the pseudo-first-order reduction rate constant, Kobs, was 0.11 h(-1)). Of particular interest was that this same sediment could be induced to release very low concentrations of sorbed Pu under oxidizing conditions, presumably by oxidation of sorbed Pu(IV) to the more mobile Pu(V) species. Transport modeling supported the postulation that Pu oxidation occurred in the lysimeter sediment; the inclusion of an oxidation term in the model produced simulations that capture the Pu depth profile data. By not including the oxidation process in the model, Pu mobility was grossly underestimated by a factor of 3.5. It is concluded that both oxidation and reduction mechanisms can play an important role in Pu transportthrough the vadose zone and should be considered when evaluating disposal of Pu-bearing wastes. PMID:15506198

  7. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  8. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buliung, Ron; Faulkner, Guy; Beesley, Theresa; Kennedy, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active school transport (AST), school travel using an active mode like walking, may be important to children's overall physical activity. A "school travel plan" (STP) documents a school's transport characteristics and provides an action plan to address school and neighborhood barriers to AST. Methods: We conducted a pilot STP…

  9. Disordered RuO2 exhibits two dimensional, low-mobility transport and a metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osofsky, M. S.; Krowne, C. M.; Charipar, K. M.; Bussmann, K.; Chervin, C. N.; Pala, I. R.; Rolison, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of low-dimensional metallic systems such as high-mobility metal oxide field-effect transistors, the cuprate superconductors, and conducting oxide interfaces (e.g., LaAlO3/SrTiO3) has stimulated research into the nature of electronic transport in two-dimensional systems given that the seminal theory for transport in disordered metals predicts that the metallic state cannot exist in two dimensions (2D). In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) in highly disordered RuO2 nanoskins with carrier concentrations that are one-to-six orders of magnitude higher and with mobilities that are one-to-six orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously for 2D oxides. The presence of an MIT and the accompanying atypical electronic characteristics place this form of the oxide in a highly diffusive, strong disorder regime and establishes the existence of a metallic state in 2D that is analogous to the three-dimensional case.

  10. Disordered RuO2 exhibits two dimensional, low-mobility transport and a metal–insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Osofsky, M. S.; Krowne, C. M.; Charipar, K. M.; Bussmann, K.; Chervin, C. N.; Pala, I. R.; Rolison, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of low-dimensional metallic systems such as high-mobility metal oxide field-effect transistors, the cuprate superconductors, and conducting oxide interfaces (e.g., LaAlO3/SrTiO3) has stimulated research into the nature of electronic transport in two-dimensional systems given that the seminal theory for transport in disordered metals predicts that the metallic state cannot exist in two dimensions (2D). In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a metal–insulator transition (MIT) in highly disordered RuO2 nanoskins with carrier concentrations that are one-to-six orders of magnitude higher and with mobilities that are one-to-six orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously for 2D oxides. The presence of an MIT and the accompanying atypical electronic characteristics place this form of the oxide in a highly diffusive, strong disorder regime and establishes the existence of a metallic state in 2D that is analogous to the three-dimensional case. PMID:26915411

  11. Beyond Accessible Mobility: Insights into Psychosocial Inclusivity Dimensions in Personal Transport.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yonghun; Nickpour, Farnaz; Giacomin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial aspects has been gradually recognised in the field of inclusive design. A critical review of existing literature, however, such as design, healthcare, psychology, and sociology, on psychosocial aspects of inclusivity identifies a two-fold research gap which is a limited understanding of both definition and dimensions of psychosocial inclusivity in the field of inclusive design. Such concept of psychosocial inclusivity is an inherently context-dependent and multi-faceted concept. Accordingly, a 'personal mobility' was focused on in this paper as one key context to explore psychosocial inclusivity to facilitate thorough and in-depth study of this concept. In this study, therefore, the interviews with 37 mobility-challenged participants were performed, and then the interview data was analysed by using a coding analyses to identify key psychosocial factors of inclusive design based on participants' lived-experiences. PMID:27534352

  12. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring surface iron oxides'' which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  13. Transport dynamics of superparamagnetic microbeads trapped by mobile magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, E.; Beach, G. S. D.

    2013-05-01

    The dynamics of fluid-borne superparamagnetic bead transport by field-driven domain walls (DWs) in submicrometer ferromagnetic tracks is studied experimentally together with numerical and analytical modeling. A combination of micromagnetic modeling and numerical calculation is used to determine the strength of bead-DW interaction for a range of track geometries and bead sizes. The maximum DW velocity for continuous bead transport is predicted from these results and shown to be supported by experimental measurements. Enhancement of the maximum velocity by appropriate material selection or field application is demonstrated, and an analysis of the source of statistical variation is presented. Finally, the dynamics of bead-DW interaction and bead transport above the maximum DW velocity for continuous DW-mediated bead transport is characterized.

  14. Mobilization and transport of metal-rich colloidal particles from mine tailings into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Raza, Muhammad Ali; Fu, Yilin

    2016-04-01

    Exposed mine tailing wastes with considerable heavy metals can release hazardous colloidal particles into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions. Two-layered packed columns with tailings above and soils below were established to investigate mobilization and transport of colloidal particles from metal-rich mine tailings into soil under transient infiltration ionic strength (IS: 100, 20, 2 mM) and flow rate (FR: 20.7, 41, and 62.3 mm h(-1)), with Cu and Pb as representatives of the heavy metals. Results show that the tailing particles within the colloidal size (below 2 μm) were released from the columns. A step-decrease in infiltration IS and FR enhanced, whereas a step-increase in the IS and FR restrained the release of tailing particles from the column. The effects of step-changing FR were unexpected due to the small size of the released tailing particles (220-342 nm, being not sensitive to hydrodynamic shear force), the diffusion-controlled particle release process and the relatively compact pore structure. The tailing particles present in the solution with tested IS were found negatively charged and more stable than soil particles, which provides favorable conditions for tailing particles to be transported over a long distance in the soil. The mobilization and transport of Cu and Pb from the tailings into soil were mediated by the tailing particles. Therefore, the inherent toxic tailing particles could be considerably introduced into soil under certain conditions (IS reduction or FR decrease), which may result in serious environmental pollution. PMID:26780043

  15. Electron Mobility Exceeding 10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and Band-Like Charge Transport in Solution-Processed n-Channel Organic Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomin; Yao, Yifan; Shan, Bowen; Gu, Xiao; Liu, Danqing; Liu, Jinyu; Xu, Jianbin; Zhao, Ni; Hu, Wenping; Miao, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Solution-processed n-channel organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) that exhibit a field-effect mobility as high as 11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature and a band-like temperature dependence of electron mobility are reported. By comparison of solution-processed OTFTs with vacuum-deposited OTFTs of the same organic semiconductor, it is found that grain boundaries are a key factor inhibiting band-like charge transport. PMID:27151777

  16. Interplay between group function of kinesin based transport and lipid bilayer mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Joseph; Hirst, Linda; Xu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Motor proteins, discovered in recent decades, are important building blocks to life. These molecular machines transport cargo and although indispensable to cell function, are not well understood at present. Single kinesin transport properties have been documented, but their group function remains unknown. In this project, the properties of kinesin-based transport by multiple motors are investigated in-vitro to establish a link between travel distance and lipid diffusion in the vesicle membrane. In the experiments, silica beads coated in a supported lipid membrane and giant lipid vesicles are transported along a microtubule by embedded kinesin motors. In an alternate geometry, this system can be inverted, whereby motors are bound to a surface of a lipid bilayer and microtubules are deposited. We have characterized motor function with respect to the fluidity of the membrane. To measure the diffusion properties of different membranes, planar lipid bilayers are prepared on silica slides and supported by bovine serum albumin protein. To establish a diffusion constant at room temperature for the lipid membrane we use the FRAP technique (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). Using this method we can investigate if there is any interplay between group travel function and membrane fluidity.

  17. Salinity mobilization and transport from rangelands: assessment, recommendations, and knowledge gaps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the salinity project is to improve the understanding of sources and transport mechanisms in rangeland catchments that deliver dissolved solids (salts) to streams within the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) through a review of relevant literature on what is known about the impact of r...

  18. An exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation and its application to mobility calculations in graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paussa, A.; Esseni, D.

    2013-03-01

    This paper revisits the problem of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), or, equivalently, of the momentum relaxation time, momentum relaxation time (MRT), for the calculation of low field mobility, which in previous works has been almost universally solved in approximated forms. We propose an energy driven discretization method that allows an exact determination of the relaxation time by solving a linear, algebraic problem, where multiple scattering mechanisms are naturally accounted for by adding the corresponding scattering rates before the calculation of the MRT, and without resorting to the semi-empirical Matthiessen's rule for the relaxation times. The application of our rigorous solution of the linearized BTE to a graphene bilayer reveals that, for a non monotonic energy relation, the relaxation time can legitimately take negative values with no unphysical implications. We finally compare the mobility calculations provided by an exact solution of the MRT problem with the results obtained with some of the approximations most frequently employed in the literature and so discuss their accuracy.

  19. Enzyme kinetics and transport in a system crowded by mobile macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-11-21

    The dynamics of an elastic network model for the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase is studied in a system crowded by mobile macromolecules, also modeled by elastic networks. The system includes a large number of solvent molecules, as well as substrate and product molecules which undergo catalytic reactions with this hexameric protein. The time evolution of the entire system takes place through a hybrid dynamics that combines molecular dynamics for solute species and multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is shown that crowding leads to subdiffusive dynamics for the protein, in accord with many studies of diffusion in crowded environments, and increases orientational relaxation times. The enzyme reaction kinetics is also modified by crowding. The effective Michaelis constant decreases with crowding volume fraction, and this decrease is attributed to excluded volume effects, which dominate over effects due to reduced substrate diffusion that would cause the Michaelis constant to increase. PMID:26465099

  20. Plant rhizosphere effects on metal mobilization and transport. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.W.M.

    1998-06-01

    'Information on the mechanism of how plants mobilize, uptake, and metabolize metal ions is very limited. Especially deficient is the understanding of these processes involving pollutant metal ions and interactions among these ions. Based on the current knowledge regarding nutrient ions, it is clear that elucidation of rhizospheric processes such as exudation of organic ligands by plant roots and plant metabolism/adaptation involving these biogenic chelators is critically important. A mechanistic insight into these processes will advance knowledge in microbe-plant host interactions and how metal ions are mobilized, immobilized, and sequestered by these interactions. This, in turn, is essential to applications such as phytobioremediation and microbioremediation of metal ion pollution. Root exudation also serves many other important rhizosphere functions including energy supply for microbial degradation of organic pollutants, structuring of microbial community, and the formation of soil humic materials which are considered to be a major sink for both organic and inorganic pollutants. How root exudates function is critically dependent on the chemical nature of exudate components. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of all major exudate components, regardless of their chemical class, should facilitate the development and implementation of bioremediation for both organic and inorganic pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this project are: (1) To obtain a comprehensive composition of major organic components in plant root exudates as a function of different metal ions; (2) To examine plant metabolic response(s) to these metal ion treatments, with emphasis on biosynthetic pathways of organic ligands; and (3) To investigate the effect(s) of soil microbial (e.g. mycorrhizae) association on (1) and (2).'

  1. Mobilization of ectopic yolk in Gallus gallus domesticus: a novel reverse lipid transport process.

    PubMed

    Cornax, Ingrid; Walzem, Rosemary L; Larner, Craig; Macfarlane, Ronald D; Klasing, Kirk C

    2013-05-15

    In many oviparous animals, bursting type atresia of ovarian follicles occurs during the reproductive cycle, resulting in the escape of yolk into the extracellular compartment. In birds, this ectopic yolk is rapidly cleared by an unknown process that involves the appearance of yolk-engorged macrophage-like cells. To study this unique type of lipid transport, we injected young male chickens intra-abdominally with egg yolk. Absorption of egg yolk from the body cavity markedly increased the triacylglyceride-rich fraction (TRL) of plasma lipoproteins and was coincident with increased levels of plasma triacylglycerides (TAGs) but not non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). Thus, the transport of yolk lipids from the abdominal cavity appears to occur in lipoproteins and be more similar to the transport of hepatic TAGs to the periphery via lipoproteins than to transport of adipose TAGs to the periphery via NEFAs released by the action of lipases. When macrophages were exposed to yolk in vitro, they quickly phagocytized yolk; however, it is unclear whether this level of phagocytosis contributes significantly to total yolk clearance. Instead, the chicken macrophage may function more as a facilitator of yolk clearance through the modification of yolk lipoproteins and the regulation of the local and systemic immune response to ectopic yolk. Yolk appears to be anti-inflammatory in nature. Yolk did not increase levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and IFNγ either in vivo or in vitro; in fact, yolk dampened many inflammatory changes caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Conversely, LPS-induced inflammation retarded yolk clearance from the abdominal cavity and plasma TAG levels. PMID:23348941

  2. First experience with the ultra compact mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system Cardiohelp in interhospital transport.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Alois; Arlt, Matthias; Amann, Matthias; Lunz, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Graf, Bernhard; Schmid, Christof

    2011-06-01

    In patients with severe cardiopulmonary failure extracorporeal assist devices are to support patients during resuscitation, for transportation, until organ recovery, and as bridge to further therapeutic modalities. We report on our first experience with the new Cardiohelp system for interhospital transfer of cardiopulmonarily compromised patients. The Cardiohelp system was used for transportation and in-house treatment in six male patients with a mean age of 41±17 years. Five patients suffered respiratory failure; one patient with acute myocardial infarction was in profound cardiogenic shock. Accordingly, the Cardiohelp system was implanted as a venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in five patients and as a venoarterial system in one patient. The preECMO ventilation time was 0.5-4 days. The patients were transported to our institution by car (n=1) or helicopter (n=5) over a distance of 80-5850 km. The subsequent in-house ECMO support was continued with the Cardiohelp and lasted for 5-13 days. PostECMO ventilation was one to 25 days. A 100% survival was achieved. The portable Cardiohelp system allows location-independent stabilization of cardiopulmonary compromised patients with consecutive interhospital transfer and in-house treatment. The integrated sensors, which register arterial and venous line pressure, blood temperature, hemoglobin as well as SvO(2), greatly alleviate its management and considerably increase safety. PMID:21388980

  3. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION...

  4. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION...

  5. Betatron Application in Mobile and Relocatable Inspection Systems for Freight Transport Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhlov, S. V.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.; Osipov, S. P.; Stein, M. M.; Stein, A. M.; Xiaoming, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerators with energy level up to 4 MeV having high level of penetration ability by steel equivalent are the popular to control oversize cargo transported by road, by railway and by river. Betatron's usage as cyclic induction accelerator has some advantages in comparison with linear accelerators and other sources. Tomsk Polytechnic University has developed many types of betatrons, most of them are being produced by separate affiliated company " Foton ". Article is shown the results of application of the betatrons in inspection custom systems.

  6. Understanding the poor iontophoretic transport of lysozyme across the skin: when high charge and high electrophoretic mobility are not enough.

    PubMed

    Dubey, S; Kalia, Y N

    2014-06-10

    The original aim of the study was to investigate the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of lysozyme and to gain further insight into the factors controlling protein electrotransport. Initial experiments were done using porcine skin. Lysozyme transport was quantified by using an activity assay based on the lysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus and was corrected for the release of endogenous enzyme from the skin during current application. Cumulative iontophoretic permeation of lysozyme during 8h at 0.5mA/cm(2) (0.7mM; pH6) was surprisingly low (5.37±3.46μg/cm(2) in 8h) as compared to electrotransport of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and ribonuclease A (RNase A) under similar conditions (923.0±496.1 and 170.71±92.13μg/cm(2), respectively) - despite its having a higher electrophoretic mobility. The focus of the study then became to understand and explain the causes of its poor iontophoretic transport. Lowering formulation pH to 5 increased histidine protonation in the protein and decreased the ionisation of fixed negative charges in the skin (pI ~4.5) and resulted in a small but statistically significant increase in permeation. Co-iontophoresis of acetaminophen revealed a significant inhibition of electroosmosis; inhibition factors of 12-16 were indicative of strong lysozyme binding to skin. Intriguingly, lidocaine electrotransport, which is due almost exclusively to electromigration, was also decreased (approximately 2.7-fold) following skin pre-treatment by lysozyme iontophoresis (cf. iontophoresis of buffer solution) - suggesting that lysozyme was also able to influence subsequent cation electromigration. In order to elucidate the site of skin binding, different porcine skin models were tested (dermatomed skin with thicknesses of 250 and 750μm, tape-stripped skin and heat-separated dermis). Although no difference was seen between permeation across 250 and 750μm dermatomed skin (13.57±12.20 and 5.37±3.46μg/cm(2), respectively), there was a statistically significant

  7. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Fendorf, Scott; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    The spatial distribution of reactive minerals in the subsurface is often a primary factor controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater systems. However, direct measurement and estimation of heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While previous studies have shown the utility of using hydrologic measurements combined with inverse modeling techniques for tomography of physical properties including hydraulic conductivity, these methods have seldom been used to image reactive geochemical heterogeneities. In this study, we focus on As-bearing reactive minerals as aquifer contaminants. We use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques combined with mechanistic reactive transport models to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured groundwater parameters. Specifically, we simulate the mobilization of arsenic via kinetic oxidative dissolution of As-bearing pyrite due to dissolved oxygen in the ambient groundwater, which is an important mechanism for arsenic release in groundwater both under natural conditions and engineering applications such as managed aquifer recharge and recovery operations. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a 1D lab-scale column (80 cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (60 cm × 30 cm) and (iii) a 2D field-scale domain (20 m × 4 m). In these setups, synthetic dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport simulations are used to image the spatial distribution of As-bearing pyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling.

  8. Impact of immobile porosity architecture on reactive transport in mobile/immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; De Dreuzy, J.; Rapaport, A.; Casenave, C.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusive porosity structures in aquifers can display a large diversity of topologies, from intergranular porosity to the ';dead-ends' of fracture networks. Here we study numerically the influence of this topology on solute transport parameters, such as dispersion coefficient, and on a simple equilibrium reaction. We build a model where diffusive structures of variable topology (with junctions, loops...) exchange with a fast, advective zone. We show that the internal organization of volumes of the diffusive structure has a strong and non-trivial influence on transport and reactivity. We also show, through Multi-Rate Mass Transfer framework, that the signature of this topology on residence times is often sufficient to reproduce the initial reaction rates. We thus propose new ways to determine the appropriate MRMT models for a wide range of porosity types. However, more complex chemical / physical processes (kinetic-limited reactions, gravity effects...) may diminish this relevance of MRMT models to reproduce reaction rates, and additional parameters linked to the topology of diffusive structures may be required.

  9. Impact of immobile porosity architecture on reactive transport in mobile/immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; De Dreuzy, J.; Rapaport, A.; Casenave, C.

    2013-12-01

    Diffusive porosity structures in aquifers can display a large diversity of topologies, from intergranular porosity to the ';dead-ends' of fracture networks. Here we study numerically the influence of this topology on solute transport parameters, such as dispersion coefficient, and on a simple equilibrium reaction. We build a model where diffusive structures of variable topology (with junctions, loops...) exchange with a fast, advective zone. We show that the internal organization of volumes of the diffusive structure has a strong and non-trivial influence on transport and reactivity. We also show, through Multi-Rate Mass Transfer framework, that the signature of this topology on residence times is often sufficient to reproduce the initial reaction rates. We thus propose new ways to determine the appropriate MRMT models for a wide range of porosity types. However, more complex chemical / physical processes (kinetic-limited reactions, gravity effects...) may diminish this relevance of MRMT models to reproduce reaction rates, and additional parameters linked to the topology of diffusive structures may be required.

  10. Radiation Effects on Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclides during Transport through Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.; Hayes, K.F.

    2002-03-14

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste generated at DOE facilities involve working with and within various types and levels of radiation fields. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance material properties. The principal sources of radiation at the DOE sites are the actinides and fission-products contained in high-level wastes currently in storage. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic scale changes in the material (radiation damage and transmutation). During site restoration, materials will be exposed to radiation fields that exceed 104 rad/hr. The radiation exposure due to the release and sorption of long-lived actinides (e.g., 237Np) and fission products (e.g., 137Cs and 90Sr) may cause changes in important properties (e.g., cation exchange capacity) in geological materials (e.g., clays and zeolites) along transport pathways. Among these materials, clays and zeolites, which are expected to sorb and immobilize radionuclides, are known to be extremely susceptible to radiation-induced structure changes (e.g., bubble formation and solid state amorphization) through both collisional displacement and ionization processes. These changes will inevitably affect (either negatively or positively) the further sorption and the migration of radionuclides at waste sites (e.g., vadose zone at Hanford). Current models used for the longterm prediction of radionuclide transport have proven to be inadequate and unrealistic; however, these previous models did not take radiation effects into consideration.

  11. Removing traffic emissions from CO2 time series measured at a tall tower using mobile measurements and transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andres; Rella, Chris W.; Göckede, Mathias; Hanson, Chad; Yang, Zhenlin; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide with high precision and accuracy have become increasingly important for climate change research, in particular to inform terrestrial biosphere models. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning have long been recognized to contribute a significant portion of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Here, we present an approach to remove the traffic related carbon dioxide emissions from mole fractions measured at a tall tower by using the corresponding carbon monoxide measurements in combination with footprint analyses and transport modeling. This technique improves the suitability of the CO2 data to be used in inverse modeling approaches of atmosphere-biosphere exchange that do not account for non-biotic portions of CO2. In our study region in Oregon, road traffic emissions are the biggest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. A three-day mobile campaign covering 1700 km of roads in northwestern Oregon was performed during summer of 2012 using a laser-based Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer. The mobile measurements incorporated different roads including main highways, urban streets, and back-roads, largely within the typical footprint of a tall CO/CO2 observation tower in Oregon's Willamette Valley. For the first time, traffic related CO:CO2 emission ratios were measured directly at the sources during an on-road campaign under a variety of different driving conditions. An average emission ratio of 7.43 (±1.80) ppb CO per ppm CO2 was obtained for the study region and applied to separate the traffic related portion of CO2 from the mole fraction time series. The road traffic related portion of the CO2 mole fractions measured at the tower site reached maximum values ranging from 9.8 to 12 ppm, depending on the height above the surface, during summer 2012.

  12. Assessing the impact of hazardous constituents on the mobilization, transport, and fate of radionuclides in RCRA waste disposal units.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Orlandini, K. A.; Cheng, J. -J.; Biwer, B. M.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses the impact that hazardous organic chemical constituents could have on the mobilization, transport, and fate of radionuclides in disposal units regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The effect on a radionuclide's distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) is used as an indicator. Many factors can affect K{sub d}, including the chemical form of the radionuclide, pH of the leachate, nature of the organic constituents, porosity of the soil, amount of water in the landfill, infiltration rate of the water, presence of a chelating agent or other chemical species, and age of the landfill. A total of 19 radionuclides were studied. Of these, nine (H-3, C-14, Se-79, Sr-90, Tc-99, I-129, U-238, Np-237, and Am-241) were found to have the potential to reach groundwater and cause contamination; the remaining 10 (Co-60, Ni-63, Sb-125,Cs-137, Sm-151, Eu-152, Eu-154, Th-230, Th-232, and Pu-239) were considered less likely to cause groundwater contamination. It was also found that when organic material is in solution, it tends to lower a radionuclide's K{sub d} (and enhance transport), whereas when it is in a solid phase, it tends to increase the K{sub d}. The study introduces a simple model to estimate effective K{sub d} values on the basis of total organic carbon concentrations in landfill leachate. However, given the fact that the effective K{sub d} values of radionuclides in RCRA disposal units can either increase or decrease as the result of many factors, including the form of the organic matter (solid or in solution), the study concludes that whenever they are available, actual (measured) K{sub d} values rather than modeled values should be used to conduct dose and risk assessments of radionuclides in RCRA disposal units.

  13. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  14. Imaging reactive minerals in the subsurface using inverse reactive transport modeling: an example relevant for arsenic mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhreddine, S.; Lee, J. H.; Kitanidis, P. K.; Fendorf, S. E.; Rolle, M.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial distribution of naturally occurring, arsenic-bearing minerals in the subsurface is a key factor for determining the fate and transport of arsenic in groundwater systems. However, the direct measurement and estimation of these heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While previous studies have shown the utility of using indirect measurements combined with inverse modeling techniques for tomography of physical properties including hydraulic conductivity, these methods have seldom been used to image geochemical properties. In this study, we use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured groundwater parameters. Specifically, we simulate the mobilization of arsenic via kinetic oxidative dissolution of arsenopyrite due to dissolved oxygen in the ambient groundwater. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a 1D lab-scale column (80 cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (30 cm x 60 cm) and (iii) a 2D field-scale domain (4 m x 20 m). Next, the simulated dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport model are used to image the spatial distribution of arsenopyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling. The PCGA is a matrix-free geostatistical inversion approach that uses the leading principal components of the prior information to save computational costs and can be easily linked with any simulation software. Our results show that the PCGA can be used to image randomly distributed arsenopyrite lenses at various scales and has the potential to be employed at the field-scale to map complex distributions of reactive minerals in the subsurface based on the measurement of dissolved constituents in groundwater.

  15. Tests of an alternate mobile transporter and extravehicular activity assembly procedure for the Space Station Freedom truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Lake, Mark S.; Bush, Harold G.; Jensen, J. Kermit; Wallsom, Richard E.; Phelps, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a ground test program of an alternate mobile transporter (MT) concept and extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly procedure for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) truss keel. A three-bay orthogonal tetrahedral truss beam consisting of 44 2-in-diameter struts and 16 nodes was assembled repeatedly in neutral buoyancy by pairs of pressure-suited test subjects working from astronaut positioning devices (APD's) on the MT. The truss bays were cubic with edges 15 ft long. All the truss joint hardware was found to be EVA compatible. The average unit assembly time for a single pair of experienced test subjects was 27.6 sec/strut, which is about half the time derived from other SSF truss assembly tests. A concept for integration of utility trays during truss assembly is introduced and demonstrated in the assembly tests. The concept, which requires minimal EVA handling of the trays, is shown to have little impact on overall assembly time. The results of these tests indicate that by using an MT equipped with APD's, rapid EVA assembly of a space station-size truss structure can be expected.

  16. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  17. Connexin-43 hemichannels mediate cyclic ADP-ribose generation and its Ca2+-mobilizing activity by NAD+/cyclic ADP-ribose transport.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Kyung; Rah, So-Young; Lee, Young-Rae; Yoo, Chae-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Suk; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Han, Myung-Kwan

    2011-12-30

    The ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 whose catalytic domain resides in outside of the cell surface produces the second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD(+). cADPR increases intracellular Ca(2+) through the intracellular ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+) release channel (RyR). It has been known that intracellular NAD(+) approaches ecto-CD38 via its export by connexin (Cx43) hemichannels, a component of gap junctions. However, it is unclear how cADPR extracellularly generated by ecto-CD38 approaches intracellular RyR although CD38 itself or nucleoside transporter has been proposed to import cADPR. Moreover, it has been unknown what physiological stimulation can trigger Cx43-mediated export of NAD(+). Here we demonstrate that Cx43 hemichannels, but not CD38, import cADPR to increase intracellular calcium through RyR. We also demonstrate that physiological stimulation such as Fcγ receptor (FcγR) ligation induces calcium mobilization through three sequential steps, Cx43-mediated NAD(+) export, CD38-mediated generation of cADPR and Cx43-mediated cADPR import in J774 cells. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation also induced calcium mobilization in the same way as FcγR stimulation. FcγR stimulation-induced calcium mobilization was blocked by PKA inhibition, indicating that PKA is a linker between FcγR stimulation and NAD(+)/cADPR transport. Cx43 knockdown blocked extracellular cADPR import and extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization in J774 cells. Cx43 overexpression in Cx43-negative cells conferred extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization by the mediation of cADPR import. Our data suggest that Cx43 has a dual function exporting NAD(+) and importing cADPR into the cell to activate intracellular calcium mobilization. PMID:22033928

  18. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  19. Literature review for Texas Department of Transportation Research Project 0-4695: Guidance for design in areas of extreme bed-load mobility, Edwards Plateau, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.; Fang, Xing; Thompson, David B.; Wang, Keh-Han

    2005-01-01

    A review of the literature addressing sediment transport in gravel-bed river systems and structures designed to control bed-load mobility is provided as part of Texas Department of Transportation research project 0–4695: Guidance for Design in Areas of Extreme Bed-Load Mobility. The study area comprises the western half of the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. Three primary foci of the literature review are journal articles, edited volumes, and government publications. Major themes within the body of literature include deterministic sediment transport theory and equations, development of methods to measure and analyze fluvial sediment, applications and development of theory in natural channels and flume experiments, and recommendations for river management and structural design. The literature review provides an outline and foundation for the research project to characterize extreme bed-load mobility in rivers and streams across the study area. The literature review also provides a basis upon which potential modifications to low-water stream-crossing design in the study area can be made.

  20. Parental perceived neighborhood attributes: associations with active transport and physical activity among 10–12 year old children and the mediating role of independent mobility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During the last decades, the use of active travel modes declined in all age groups. Childhood is a critical time to establish lifelong healthy patterns. To develop effective interventions in this age group, insight in the correlates of health behaviors and the possible mediating factors is necessary. Among children, the role of parents may not be overlooked. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the associations of parental perceptions of neighborhood environmental attributes with active transport and total physical activity in 10–12 year old Belgian boys and girls. Furthermore, this study examined the potential mediating effect of independent mobility on these associations. Methods In the present study, 736 10–12 year old children and their parents from 44 elementary schools in Flanders, Belgium, participated. The children were asked to wear an activity monitor and to fill in a survey questioning demographic factors and the Flemish Physical Activity Questionnaire. The parents filled in a survey concerning demographic factors, the child’s level of independent mobility and environmental perceptions (Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale). Results Overall, boys reported more active transport when parents perceived more land use mix diversity, shorter distances to school, good land use mix access, higher residential density and less pleasing neighborhood aesthetics. Higher total physical activity levels were reported when parents perceived shorter distances to school and availability of walking/cycling infrastructure. None of the associations was mediated by independent mobility in boys. Girls reported more active transport when parents perceived higher residential density, more land use mix diversity, shorter distances to school, good land use mix access, available walking/cycling infrastructure and convenient recreational facilities. Girls reported higher total physical activity levels when parents perceived high residential density, good

  1. IMPROVING CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ORGANIC AEROSOL: MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM MOBILE AND NON-MOBILE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic material contributes a significant fraction of PM2.5 mass across all regions of the United States, but state-of-the-art chemical transport models often substantially underpredict measured organic aerosol concentrations. Recent revisions to these models that...

  2. Interplay between hopping and band transport in high-mobility disordered semiconductors at large carrier concentrations: The case of the amorphous oxide InGaZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishchuk, I. I.; Kadashchuk, A.; Bhoolokam, A.; de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Gavrilyuk, M. M.; Köhler, A.; Bässler, H.; Heremans, P.; Genoe, J.

    2016-05-01

    We suggest an analytic theory based on the effective medium approximation (EMA) which is able to describe charge-carrier transport in a disordered semiconductor with a significant degree of degeneration realized at high carrier concentrations, especially relevant in some thin-film transistors (TFTs), when the Fermi level is very close to the conduction-band edge. The EMA model is based on special averaging of the Fermi-Dirac carrier distributions using a suitably normalized cumulative density-of-state distribution that includes both delocalized states and the localized states. The principal advantage of the present model is its ability to describe universally effective drift and Hall mobility in heterogeneous materials as a function of disorder, temperature, and carrier concentration within the same theoretical formalism. It also bridges a gap between hopping and bandlike transport in an energetically heterogeneous system. The key assumption of the model is that the charge carriers move through delocalized states and that, in addition to the tail of the localized states, the disorder can give rise to spatial energy variation of the transport-band edge being described by a Gaussian distribution. It can explain a puzzling observation of activated and carrier-concentration-dependent Hall mobility in a disordered system featuring an ideal Hall effect. The present model has been successfully applied to describe experimental results on the charge transport measured in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). In particular, the model reproduces well both the conventional Meyer-Neldel (MN) compensation behavior for the charge-carrier mobility and inverse-MN effect for the conductivity observed in the same a-IGZO TFT. The model was further supported by ab initio calculations revealing that the amorphization of IGZO gives rise to variation of the conduction-band edge rather than to the creation of localized states. The obtained changes agree with the one we

  3. The Human ABCG1 Transporter Mobilizes Plasma Membrane and Late Endosomal Non-Sphingomyelin-Associated-Cholesterol for Efflux and Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Edward B.; O’Brien, Katherine; Walts, Avram D.; Stonik, John A.; Malide, Daniela; Combs, Christian A.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that GFP-tagged human ABCG1 on the plasma membrane (PM) and in late endosomes (LE) mobilizes sterol on both sides of the membrane lipid bilayer, thereby increasing cellular cholesterol efflux to lipid surfaces. In the present study, we examined ABCG1-induced changes in membrane cholesterol distribution, organization, and mobility. ABCG1-GFP expression increased the amount of mobile, non-sphingomyelin(SM)-associated cholesterol at the PM and LE, but not the amount of SM-associated-cholesterol or SM. ABCG1-mobilized non-SM-associated-cholesterol rapidly cycled between the PM and LE and effluxed from the PM to extracellular acceptors, or, relocated to intracellular sites of esterification. ABCG1 increased detergent-soluble pools of PM and LE cholesterol, generated detergent-resistant, non-SM-associated PM cholesterol, and increased resistance to both amphotericin B-induced (cholesterol-mediated) and lysenin-induced (SM-mediated) cytolysis, consistent with altered organization of both PM cholesterol and SM. ABCG1 itself resided in detergent-soluble membrane domains. We propose that PM and LE ABCG1 residing at the phase boundary between ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) membrane lipid domains alters SM and cholesterol organization thereby increasing cholesterol flux between Lo and Ld, and hence, the amount of cholesterol available for removal by acceptors on either side of the membrane bilayer for either efflux or esterification. PMID:25485894

  4. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.

    2014-01-29

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. In addition, there are numerous sites around the world that are contaminated with a mixture of organic and inorganic contaminants. In most sites, over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals, radionuclides and other contaminants causing transport into the surrounding environment. We investigated the role of fermentative microorganisms in such sites that may control metal, radionuclide and organics migration from source zones. The project was initiated based on the following overarching hypothesis: Metals, radionuclides and other contaminants can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic acids and alcohols can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms. We demonstrated that fermentative organisms capable of affecting the fate of Cr6+, U6+ and trinitrotoluene can be isolated from organic-rich low level waste sites as well as from less organic rich subsurface environments. The mechanisms, pathways and extent of contaminant transformation depend on a variety of factors related to the type of organisms present, the aqueous chemistry as well as the geochemistry and mineralogy. This work provides observations and quantitative data across multiple scales that identify and predict the coupled effects of fermentative carbon and electron flow on the transport of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic contaminants in

  5. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  6. Effect of Clay Nanoparticle Transport, Desorption Kinetics and Redox Equilibrium on Radionuclide Mobility in Fractured Rock investigated at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Huber, F. M.; Lagos, M.; Quinto, F.; Heck, S.; Martin, A. J.; Blechschmidt, I.; Lanyon, G. W.; Reiche, T.; Noseck, U.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of contaminants in crystalline environments might occur through dissolved species or attached to colloidal or nanoparticulate phases being mobile in water conducting features of the host rock. In this presentation we will discuss the mobility of clay nanoparticles as detected by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) as a function of fracture surface roughness and groundwater chemistry. The on site observed Tc-99, U-233, Np-237, Pu-242 and Am-243 sorption/desorption kinetics with and without natural or synthetic clay minerals (smectites) are compared to laboratory studies under similar groundwater conditions. The desorption or redox kinetics were monitored over a duration of up to 426 days using natural fracture filling material as a concurrence ligand and monitoring the colloid attachment via detection of Al, Si, Ni and Zn as smectite structural elements. For trivalent actinides smectite desorption rates in the range of 1.2-3.7E-3 per hour could be determined and significantly lower desorption rates for tetravalent actinides were found. This results will be compared with field data of migration experiments performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, Switzerland) using the same radionuclides and clay colloidal phases varying the fracture residence time by flow rate adjustment. Furthermore, the long-term actinide mobility will be addressed by presenting AMS/RIMS measurements of (a) samples collected several months into the tailing of the breakthrough curves not any longer detectable by HR-ICP-MS and (b) background samples of different GTS ground waters showing fallout U-236, whereas fallout Pu could not be detected indicating a much lower mobility under the given conditions.

  7. Mn-euvering manganese: the role of transporter gene family members in manganese uptake and mobilization in plants.

    PubMed

    Socha, Amanda L; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), an essential trace element, is important for plant health. In plants, Mn serves as a cofactor in essential processes such as photosynthesis, lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Mn deficient plants exhibit decreased growth and yield and are more susceptible to pathogens and damage at freezing temperatures. Mn deficiency is most prominent on alkaline soils with approximately one third of the world's soils being too alkaline for optimal crop production. Despite the importance of Mn in plant development, relatively little is known about how it traffics between plant tissues and into and out of organelles. Several gene transporter families have been implicated in Mn transport in plants. These transporter families include NRAMP (natural resistance associated macrophage protein), YSL (yellow stripe-like), ZIP (zinc regulated transporter/iron-regulated transporter [ZRT/IRT1]-related protein), CAX (cation exchanger), CCX (calcium cation exchangers), CDF/MTP (cation diffusion facilitator/metal tolerance protein), P-type ATPases and VIT (vacuolar iron transporter). A combination of techniques including mutant analysis and Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy can assist in identifying essential transporters of Mn. Such knowledge would vastly improve our understanding of plant Mn homeostasis. PMID:24744764

  8. Mn-euvering manganese: the role of transporter gene family members in manganese uptake and mobilization in plants

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Amanda L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), an essential trace element, is important for plant health. In plants, Mn serves as a cofactor in essential processes such as photosynthesis, lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Mn deficient plants exhibit decreased growth and yield and are more susceptible to pathogens and damage at freezing temperatures. Mn deficiency is most prominent on alkaline soils with approximately one third of the world's soils being too alkaline for optimal crop production. Despite the importance of Mn in plant development, relatively little is known about how it traffics between plant tissues and into and out of organelles. Several gene transporter families have been implicated in Mn transport in plants. These transporter families include NRAMP (natural resistance associated macrophage protein), YSL (yellow stripe-like), ZIP (zinc regulated transporter/iron-regulated transporter [ZRT/IRT1]-related protein), CAX (cation exchanger), CCX (calcium cation exchangers), CDF/MTP (cation diffusion facilitator/metal tolerance protein), P-type ATPases and VIT (vacuolar iron transporter). A combination of techniques including mutant analysis and Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy can assist in identifying essential transporters of Mn. Such knowledge would vastly improve our understanding of plant Mn homeostasis. PMID:24744764

  9. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring ``surface iron oxides`` which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  10. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  11. Water resources planning for rivers draining into Mobile Bay. Part 2: Non-conservative species transport models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    April, G. C.; Liu, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    Total coliform group bacteria were selected to expand the mathematical modeling capabilities of the hydrodynamic and salinity models to understand their relationship to commercial fishing ventures within bay waters and to gain a clear insight into the effect that rivers draining into the bay have on water quality conditions. Parametric observations revealed that temperature factors and river flow rate have a pronounced effect on the concentration profiles, while wind conditions showed only slight effects. An examination of coliform group loading concentrations at constant river flow rates and temperature shows these loading changes have an appreciable influence on total coliform distribution within Mobile Bay.

  12. The transport mechanism of gate leakage current in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. F.; Wang, X. L.; Xiao, H. L.; Wang, C. M.; Jiang, L. J.; Feng, C.; Chen, H.; Hou, Q. F.; Deng, Q. W.; Bi, Y.; Kang, H.

    2011-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the I-V characteristics on Au/Ni-HEMT Schottky contacts was measured and analyzed. Large deviations from the thermionic emission and thermionic-field emission model were observed in the I-V-T characteristics. The thin surface barrier model only fits the measured curves in the high bias region, but deviates drastically in the low bias region. Using a revised thin surface barrier model, the calculated curves match well with the measured curves. It is also found that tunneling emission model is the dominant current transport mechanism at low temperature, yet thermionic-field emission model is the dominant current transport mechanism at high temperature.

  13. Effect of annealing on electronic carrier transport properties of gamma-irradiated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anupama; Schwarz, Casey; Shatkhin, Max; Wang, Luther; Flitsiyan, Elena; Chernyak, Leonid; Liu, Lu; Hwang, Ya; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Department of Physics, University of Central Florida Collaboration; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida Collaboration; Department of Materials Science; Engineering, University of Florida Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors were irradiated with 60Co gamma-ray doses from 100Gy to 1000Gy, in order to analyze the effects of irradiation on the devices' transport properties. Temperature dependent Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) measurements, conducted on the devices before and after exposure to gamma-irradiation, allowed for the obtaining of activation energy related to radiation-induced defects due to nitrogen vacancies. Later, the devices were annealed at 200o C for 25 minutes. All the measurements were performed again to study the effect of annealing on the gamma-irradiated devices. Annealing of gamma-irradiated transistors shows that partial recovery of device performance is possible at this temperature. DC current-voltage measurements were also conducted on the transistors to assess the impact of gamma-irradiation and annealing on transfer, gate and drain characteristics.

  14. Investigating Uranium Mobility Using Stable Isotope Partitioning of 238U/235U and a Reactive Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizjack, M.; Johnson, T. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Shiel, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    We report a numerical reactive transport model which explicitly incorporates the effectively stable isotopes of uranium (U) and the factors that influence their partitioning in bioactive systems. The model reproduces trends observed in U isotope ratios and concentration measurements from a field experiment, thereby improving interpretations of U isotope ratios as a tracer for U reactive transport. A major factor contributing to U storage and transport is its redox state, which is commonly influenced by the availability of organic carbon to support metal-reducing microbial communities. Both laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that biogenic reduction of U(VI) fractionates the stable isotope ratio 238U/235U, producing an isotopically heavy solid U(IV) product. It has also been shown that other common reactive transport processes involving U do not fractionate isotopes to a consistently measurable level, which suggests the capacity to quantify the extent of bioreduction occurring in groundwater containing U using 238U/235U ratios. A recent study of a U bioremediation experiment at the Rifle IFRC site (Colorado, USA) applied Rayleigh distillation models to quantify U stable isotope fractionation observed during acetate amendment. The application of these simplified models were fit to the observations only by invoking a "memory-effect," or a constant source of low-concentration, unfractionated U(VI). In order to more accurately interpret the measured U isotope ratios, we present a multi-component reactive transport model using the CrunchTope software. This approach is capable of quantifying the cycling and partitioning of individual U isotopes through a realistic network of transport and reaction pathways including reduction, oxidation, and microbial growth. The model incorporates physical heterogeneity of the aquifer sediments through zones of decreased permeability, which replicate the observed bromide tracer, major ion chemistry, U concentration, and U

  15. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 × 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides — in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  16. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, Jon; Mueller, Karl T.; O'Day, Peggy; Serne, R. Jeff; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl

    2006-06-01

    Our work is aimed at developing a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering from caustic waste release and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) fate and transport in waste-impacted sediments across space, time and geochemical gradients that encompass the process-level heterogeneity observed at the Hanford DOE site. Our specific objectives are: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts through sedimentary media; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments (from (1) and (2)) that accurately simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption at the bench-scale, and that can be applied to--and validated at--field sites such as Hanford.

  17. Description of bipolar charge transport in polyethylene using a fluid model with a constant mobility: model prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeRoy, S.; Segur, P.; Teyssedre, G.; Laurent, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conduction model aimed at describing bipolar transport and space charge phenomena in low density polyethylene under dc stress. In the first part we recall the basic requirements for the description of charge transport and charge storage in disordered media with emphasis on the case of polyethylene. A quick review of available conduction models is presented and our approach is compared with these models. Then, the bases of the model are described and related assumptions are discussed. Finally, results on external current, trapped and free space charge distributions, field distribution and recombination rate are presented and discussed, considering a constant dc voltage, a step-increase of the voltage, and a polarization-depolarization protocol for the applied voltage. It is shown that the model is able to describe the general features reported for external current, electroluminescence and charge distribution in polyethylene.

  18. Effect of mixed hole transporting host on the mobility, Gaussian density of states and efficiencies of a heterojunction phosphorescent organic light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talik, N. A.; Woon, K. L.; Yap, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present an in-depth study of the hole transport in poly(vinylcarbazole) PVK films blended with small molecule tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TcTa). Doping TcTa in PVK introduces shallow hole traps when the doping concentration is lower than 20 wt%. It becomes percolative at higher concentrations. The energetic disorder σ of the blended system reduces from ~72 meV at 0 wt% TcTa to ~41 meV at 50 wt% TcTa. A correlation between σ and the film morphologies suggests that the blending of TcTa molecules in the film does not only change the film homogeneity and roughness but also the energetic disorder. In addition to the mobility study, we fabricated a red phosphorescent organic light emitting diode with the same blending system. By doping merely 5 wt% of TcTa into PVK as mixed hole-transporting hosts, the efficiency of the deep red heterojunction phosphorescent organic light emitting diode increased from 2 cd A-1 to 4 cd A-1, suggesting that TcTa molecules assist in hole injection.

  19. Redesigning local transportation service for improved suburban mobility: The problem of accessibility for the elderly and low-income residents. Final report, 1 January 1989-31 May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Nwokolo, B.N.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the research was to investigate the problem associated with suburban mobility and accessibility of transportation services for the elderly, the handicapped, and the socio-economically disadvantaged residents of the tri-cities of Grambling, Ruston, and Monroe, all of which are cities located within Northeast Louisiana.

  20. The high-mobility group box 1 cytokine induces transporter-mediated release of glutamate from glial subcellular particles (gliosomes) prepared from in situ-matured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giambattista; Raiteri, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Zappettini, Simona; Melloni, Edon; Pedrazzi, Marco; Passalacqua, Mario; Tacchetti, Carlo; Usai, Cesare; Sparatore, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is expressed in restricted areas of adult brain where it can act as a proinflammatory cytokine. We report here that HMGB1 affects CNS transmission by inducing glutamatergic release from glial (gliosomes) but not neuronal (synaptosomes) resealed subcellular particles isolated from mouse cerebellum and hippocampus. Confocal microscopy showed that gliosomes are enriched with glia-specific proteins such as GFAP and S-100, but not with neuronal proteins such as PSD-95, MAP-2, and beta-tubulin III. Furthermore, gliosomes exhibit labeling neither for integrin-alphaM nor for myelin basic protein, specific for microglia and oligodendrocytes, respectively. The gliosomal fraction contains proteins of the exocytotic machinery coexisting with GFAP. Consistent with ultrastructural analysis, several approximately 30-nm nonclustered vesicles are present in the gliosome cytoplasm. Finally, gliosomes represent functional organelles that actively export glutamate when subjected to releasing stimuli, such as ionomycin or ATP, by mechanisms involving extracellular Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. HMGB1-induced release of the stable glutamate analogue [(3)H]d-aspartate and endogenous glutamate form gliosomes, whereas nerve terminals were insensitive to the protein. The HMGB1-evoked release of glutamate was independent on modifications of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, but it was blocked by dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, suggesting the involvement of transporter-mediated release mechanisms. Moreover, dihydrokainic acid, a selective inhibitor of glutamate transporter 1 does not block the HMGB1 effect, indicating a role for the glial glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST) subtype in this response. HMGB1 bind to gliosomes but not to synaptosomes and can physically interact with GLAST and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Taken together, these results suggest that the HMGB1 cytokine

  1. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, J.; Mueller, K. T.; O'Day, P. A.; Serne, R. J.; Steefel, C. I.

    2009-10-30

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed below. We observed unique molecular mechanisms for sequestration of Sr, Cs and I during native silicate weathering in caustic waste. Product solids, which included poorly crystalline aluminosilicates and well-crystallized zeolites and feldspathoids, accumulate contaminant species during crystal growth.

  2. Transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor with SiN passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xue-Feng; Fan, Shuang; Chen, Yong-He; Kang, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kun; Wang, Chong; Mo, Jiang-Hui; Li, Liang; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2015-02-01

    The transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in the AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) becomes one of the most important reliability issues with the downscaling of feature size. In this paper, the research results show that the reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT with SiN passivation increases with the enhancement of temperature in the range from 298 K to 423 K. Three possible transport mechanisms are proposed and examined to explain the generation of reverse surface leakage current. By comparing the experimental data with the numerical transport models, it is found that neither Fowler-Nordheim tunneling nor Frenkel-Poole emission can describe the transport of reverse surface leakage current. However, good agreement is found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH) model. Therefore, it is concluded that the reverse surface leakage current is dominated by the electron hopping through the surface states at the barrier layer. Moreover, the activation energy of surface leakage current is extracted, which is around 0.083 eV. Finally, the SiN passivated HEMT with a high Al composition and a thin AlGaN barrier layer is also studied. It is observed that 2D-VRH still dominates the reverse surface leakage current and the activation energy is around 0.10 eV, which demonstrates that the alteration of the AlGaN barrier layer does not affect the transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002, 61106106, and 61474091), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201206), the New Experiment Development Funds for Xidian University, China (Grant No. SY1213), the 111 Project, China (Grant No. B12026), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars

  3. Walk Score, Transportation Mode Choice, and Walking Among French Adults: A GPS, Accelerometer, and Mobility Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Méline, Julie; Kestens, Yan; Day, Kristen; Elbel, Brian; Trasande, Leonardo; Chaix, Basile

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have used GPS data to analyze the relationship between Walk Score, transportation choice and walking. Additionally, the influence of Walk Score is understudied using trips rather than individuals as statistical units. The purpose of this study is to examine associations at the trip level between Walk Score, transportation mode choice, and walking among Paris adults who were tracked with GPS receivers and accelerometers in the RECORD GPS Study. Methods: In the RECORD GPS Study, 227 participants were tracked during seven days with GPS receivers and accelerometers. Participants were also surveyed with a GPS-based web mapping application on their activities and transportation modes for all trips (6969 trips). Walk Score, which calculates neighborhood walkability, was assessed for each origin and destination of every trip. Multilevel logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted to estimate associations between Walk Score and walking in the trip or accelerometry-assessed number of steps for each trip, after adjustment for individual/neighborhood characteristics. Results: The mean overall Walk Scores for trip origins were 87.1 (SD = 14.4) and for trip destinations 87.1 (SD = 14.5). In adjusted trip-level associations between Walk Score and walking only in the trip, we found that a walkable neighborhood in the trip origin and trip destination was associated with increased odds of walking in the trip assessed in the survey. The odds of only walking in the trip were 3.48 (95% CI: 2.73 to 4.44) times higher when the Walk Score for the trip origin was “Walker’s Paradise” compared to less walkable neighborhoods (Very/Car-Dependent or Somewhat Walkable), with an identical independent effect of trip destination Walk Score on walking. The number of steps per 10 min (as assessed with accelerometry) was cumulatively higher for trips both originating and ending in walkable neighborhoods (i.e., “Very Walkable”). Conclusions: Walkable

  4. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  5. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount

  6. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance Time in the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter,David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, robert; Zande, Chris Vande

    2012-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR - Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post- Shuttle 6-year service life.

  7. 3-Dimensional ZnO/CdS nanocomposite with high mobility as an efficient electron transport layer for inverted polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Fu, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Tan, Licheng; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-04-28

    The inclusions of solution-processed ZnO electron transport layers (ETLs) of inverted polymer solar cells can lead to various surface defects, which can act as interfacial recombination centers for photogenerated charges and thereby can lead to degradation of the device performance. Three-dimensional (3D) CdS with different morphologies, such as flower-like CdS (F-CdS), branched CdS (B-CdS), and spherical CdS (S-CdS), are synthesized to modify ZnO ETLs, by effectively removing the intragap states of the ZnO nanocrystal films by forming ZnO/F-CdS, ZnO/B-CdS, and ZnO/S-CdS composite ETLs, respectively. Moreover, ZnO/CdS possesses higher electron mobility and provides a larger interface between the ETL and active layer, which is beneficial for enhancing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the inverted organic solar cells. In particular, a device based on a ZnO/S-CdS ETL and thieno[3,4-b]-thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) active layer achieved a PCE of 8.0%, together with better long-term stability. PMID:27074904

  8. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  9. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  10. Monitoring of event-based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport in field and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Egner, Marius; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to mobilization of suspended particles which typically occurs during floods. Since the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants such as PAHs, PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. Online turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) would then also allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics if once calibrated against TSS and total pollutant concentrations for a given catchment. In this study, distinct flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting sub-catchments of the River Neckar in Southwest Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar itself and investigated for the total amount of PAHs and TSS in water; turbidity (NTU) and grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined as well. Laboratory experiments were performed with natural river bed sediments from different locations (Ammer) to investigate PAH concentrations, TSS and turbidity during sedimentation of suspended particles under controlled conditions (yielding smaller and smaller suspended particles and TSS with time). Laboratory and field results agreed very well and showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the field samples and up to 8000 NTU in lab experiments. This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on turbidity measurements and TSS vs. PAHs relationships - even for high turbidity values observed during flood events (>2000 NTU). Total PAH concentrations on suspended solids were independent of grain size of suspended particles. This implies that for the rivers investigated the sorption capacity of particles did not change significantly during the observed events. PMID:24858216

  11. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  12. FINAL REPORT: Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Peggy A.; Chorover, Jon; Mueller, Karl; Steefel, Carl; Serne, R. Jeff

    2009-03-21

    The goal of our project is a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments at the Hanford Site. Through bench-scale experiments, we have identified geochemical transformations that alter the mobility of priority pollutants (Cs, Sr, I) in subsurface environments characteristic of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW)-impacted DoE sites. Our studies are designed to model the unique chemistry of this subsurface contamination, to quantify rates of contaminant uptake and release, and to identify molecular mechanisms of time-dependent, irreversible sequestration of contaminants into the solid phase. Our approach is to link quantitative macroscopic measures of contaminant mobility and partitioning to the molecular-scale mechanisms that mediate them. We have found that the molecular mechanisms themselves change with time and system composition in response to the evolving chemistry of contaminant-solution-mineral interactions. Specifically, our results show that contaminant fate is closely coupled to the major silicate incongruent weathering reactions that occur when soil solids are contacted with aqueous solutions under conditions that are far from equilibrium. Neoformed precipitates - including carbonate, feldspathoid and zeolite phases, have been observed to sequester Cs and Sr under caustic waste conditions. In contrast, iodide is less effectively sequestered into the neoformed precipitates. In any case, the long-term stability of these co-precipitates must be assessed, particularly in respect to the site closure scenario wherein sediment pore water is expected to return to a “natural” pH and ionic strength fed by rainwater recharge after removal of the caustic source. Our research centers on a series of saturated and unsaturated column studies conducted on Hanford Formation sediments that had been previously reacted in batch or column systems with synthetic tank

  13. Mobile Lunar Base Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marc M.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes three innovative concepts for a mobile lunar base. These concept combine design research for habitat architecture, mobility systems, habitability, radiation protection, human factors, and living and working environments on the lunar surface. The mobile lunar base presents several key advantages over conventional static base notions. These advantages concern landing zone safety, the requirement to move modules over the lunar surface, and the ability to stage mobile reconnaissance with effective systemic redundancy. All of these concerns lead to the consideration of a mobile walking habitat module and base design. The key issues involve landing zone safety, the ability to transport habitat modules across the surface, and providing reliability and redundancy to exploration traverses in pressurized vehicles. With self-ambulating lunar base modules, it will be feasible to have each module separate itself from its retro-rocket thruster unit, and walk five to ten km away from the LZ to a pre-selected site. These mobile modules can operate in an autonomous or teleoperated mode to navigate the lunar surface. At the site of the base, the mobile modules can combine together; make pressure port connections among themselves, to create a multi-module pressurized lunar base.

  14. 49 CFR 38.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.125 Section 38.125 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.125 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All...

  15. 49 CFR 38.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.159 Section 38.159 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 38.159 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All...

  16. 49 CFR 38.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.95 Section 38.95 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.95 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All new...

  17. 49 CFR 38.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.83 Section 38.83 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.83 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All new...

  18. 49 CFR 38.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.23 Section 38.23 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.23 Mobility aid accessibility. (a) General. All vehicles covered...

  19. Segway robotic mobility platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Morrell, John; Mullens, Katherine D.; Burmeister, Aaron B.; Miles, Susan; Farrington, Nathan; Thomas, Kari M.; Gage, Douglas W.

    2004-12-01

    The Segway Robotic Mobility Platform (RMP) is a new mobile robotic platform based on the self-balancing Segway Human Transporter (HT). The Segway RMP is faster, cheaper, and more agile than existing comparable platforms. It is also rugged, has a small footprint, a zero turning radius, and yet can carry a greater payload. The new geometry of the platform presents researchers with an opportunity to examine novel topics, including people-height sensing and actuation modalities. This paper describes the history and development of the platform, its characteristics, and a summary of current research projects involving the platform at various institutions across the United States.

  20. Mobility-Based Mobile Relay Selection in MANETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gilnam; Lee, Hyoungjoo; Lee, Kwang Bok

    The future wireless mobile communication networks are expected to provide seamless wireless access and data exchange to mobile users. In particular, it is expected that the demand for ubiquitous data exchange between mobile users will increase with the widespread use of various wireless applications of the intelligent transportation system (ITS) and intelligent vehicles. Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are one of the representative research areas pursuing the technology needed to satisfy the increasing mobile communication requirements. However, most of the works on MANET systems do not take into account the continuous and dynamic changes of nodal mobility to accommodate system design and performance evaluation. The mobility of nodes limits the reliability of communication between the source and the destination node since a link between two continuously moving nodes is established only when one node enters the transmission range of the other. To alleviate this problem, mobile relay has been studied. In particular, it is shown that relay selection is an efficient way to support nodal mobility in MANET systems. In this paper, we propose a mobility-based relay selection algorithm for the MANET environment. Firstly, we define the lifetime as the maximum link duration for which the link between two nodes remains active. Therefore, the lifetime indicates the reliability of the relay link which measures its capability to successfully support relayed communication when requested by the source node. Furthermore, we consider a series of realistic scenarios according to the randomness of nodal mobility. Thus, the proposed algorithm can be easily applied in practical MANET systems by choosing the appropriate node mobility behavior. The numerical results show that the improved reliability of the proposed algorithm's relayed communication is achieved with a proper number of mobile relay nodes rather than with the conventional selection algorithm. Lastly, we show that random

  1. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  2. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  3. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measured by confocal microscopy as a tool for the analysis of vesicular lipid transport and plasma membrane mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Gerd; Goetz, Alexandra; Orso, Evelyn; Rothe, Gregor

    1998-04-01

    The vesicular transport of lipids from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus affects the composition of the plasma membrane. The purpose of our study was to develop an in vitro test system for characterization of vesicular lipid transport kinetics by using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Fibroblasts from two patients homozygous for the hypercatabolic HDL deficiency syndrome Tangier disease and 4 control subjects were pulsed with the C6-NBD-ceramide for 30 minutes. Chase incubation at room temperature resulted in the metabolic accumulation of fluorescent C6-NBD-sphingolyelin and C6-NBD-glycosylceramides in the medial- and trans-Golgi region. Cells were analyzed with an inverted Leica TCS microscope. Calibration was performed through the analysis of diffusion of 50 nm microparticles embedded in media of different viscosity. An acousto optical tunable filter (AOTF) was used for the selective bleaching of the medial- and trans- Golgi region followed by analysis of the fluorescence recovery for 4 minutes. Post-bleach fluorescence recovery through the trans-Golgi-oriented transport of NBD-sphingomyelin was calculated from 2-dimensional scans. Tangier fibroblasts displayed a retarded recovery of fluorescence in the trans- Golgi region. This suggests that the vesicular transport of sphingomyelin and cholesterol is disturbed in Tangier disease confirming data from our laboratory generated with radiometabolites on whole cells. Our data suggest that FRAP analysis allows a sensitive kinetic and spatially resolved analysis of disturbances of vesicular lipid transport.

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobility and Transport of Elderly and Handicapped Persons (3rd, Orlando, Florida, October 29-31, 1984). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, William G., Ed.; Ashford, Norman J., Ed.

    These conference proceedings contain the texts of 62 papers. The first 17 papers include 4 keynote presentations as well as reviews of: major developments in several countries (Brazil, Canada, Great Britain, Jordan, Netherlands, Sweden, United States) and Hong Kong; handicapped travelers' access to air transport; and application of microcomputer…

  5. Mobile robot for a ham industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalama, Eduardo; Mendez, Guillermo; Lopez-Coronado, Juan; Peran, Jose R.

    1994-02-01

    A mobile robot for a ham industry has been developed. The features of the factory, limited environment, sliding floor, and the necessity for a high storage flexibility makes impossible the usage of conventional transport systems, conveyors, automatic guided vehicles, etc. The developed system permits us to integrate the pervious transport system, that was based on fork lift trucks, with the advantage that in the case of contingency an operator can drive the mobile robot as a fork lift truck. In this way, the transport and storage can be done using fork lift trucks, mobile robots, or both, and all of them controlled by a planning program running in a Sun Sparcstation10.

  6. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  7. FINAL REPORT: Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T; Chorover, John C; ODay, Peggy A; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl I

    2009-10-05

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed in this Final Report.

  8. Social Mobility and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    Social mobility is generally studied in three different ways: stratum mobility, intergenerational social mobility, and intragenerational or career mobility. This paper deals with the first two types of mobility and more with intergenerational mobility than with stratum mobility. The working hypothesis of both discussions is that, in general, a…

  9. Mobile Router Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, under a NASA Space Act Agreement with Cisco Systems, has been performing joint networking research to apply Internet-based technologies and protocols to space-based communications. As a result of this research, NASA performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and the transport-level protocol. In addition, Cisco Systems developed the mobile router for both commercial and Government markets. The code has become part of the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) as of release 12.2 (4) T--which will make this capability available to the community at large. The mobile router is software code that resides in a network router and enables entire networks to roam while maintaining connectivity to the Internet. This router code is pertinent to a myriad of applications for both Government and commercial sectors, including the "wireless battlefield." NASA and the Department of Defense will utilize this technology for near-planetary observation and sensing spacecraft. It is also a key enabling technology for aviation-based information applications. Mobile routing will make it possible for information such as weather, air traffic control, voice, and video to be transmitted to aircraft using Internet-based protocols. This technology shows great promise in reducing congested airways and mitigating aviation disasters due to bad weather. The mobile router can also be incorporated into emergency vehicles (such as ambulances and life-flight aircraft) to provide real-time connectivity back to the hospital and health-care experts, enabling the timely application of emergency care. Commercial applications include entertainment services, Internet protocol (IP) telephone, and Internet connectivity for cruise ships, commercial shipping, tour buses, aircraft, and eventually cars. A mobile router, which is based on mobile IP, allows hosts (mobile nodes) to seamlessly "roam" among various IP

  10. Mobility and Orientation Instruction of Blind Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luini, Eugene; Ryder, James

    A peripatologist taught 102 blind and partially sighted individuals of all ages mobility and orientation techniques. Volunteers assisted with transportation, followup, consultation, and direct teaching of mobility. Over a 3-year period, the number of lessons per client varied from one to 86, and the number of hours spent by the instructor in…

  11. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-06-01

    Predicting the potential migration of metals and radionuclides from waste pits and trenches will require understanding the effects of carbon and electron flow through these environments. Important aspects of this flow include the physiological activity of cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microbial populations, as well as the subsequent activity of metal and radionuclide reducing bacteria. The activity of subsurface fermentative microbial populations is significantly understudied even though these organisms can affect contaminant migration by at least two mechanisms. In the first mechanism, products of the fermentation process can act as chelators for metals and radionuclides increasing their transport through underlying geological media. The second mechanism is the reduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides since some fermentative bacteria have been shown to directly reduce metals and radionuclides, while their fermentation products can provide carbon and energy for respiratory metal reducing bacteria that can also reduce oxidized metals and radionuclides.

  12. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  13. Manned Mars mission surface transportation elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, S. Gregg; Mulqueen, Jack

    1986-01-01

    The necessity and advantage of surface transportation was well demonstrated by the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions. Baseline surface transportation elements for further studies are Lunar Rover, Elastic Loop Mobility System, Mobile Laboratory, Airplane, and Rocket Powered Flying Vehicles. These types of surface transportation are discussed. Starting points for further in-depth studies are identified.

  14. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions. PMID:2208684

  15. 49 CFR 193.2019 - Mobile and temporary LNG facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2019 Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. (a) Mobile and temporary LNG facilities for peakshaving application, for service maintenance... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mobile and temporary LNG facilities....

  16. 49 CFR 193.2019 - Mobile and temporary LNG facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2019 Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. (a) Mobile and temporary LNG facilities for peakshaving application, for service maintenance... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mobile and temporary LNG facilities....

  17. 49 CFR 193.2019 - Mobile and temporary LNG facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2019 Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. (a) Mobile and temporary LNG facilities for peakshaving application, for service maintenance... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobile and temporary LNG facilities....

  18. 49 CFR 193.2019 - Mobile and temporary LNG facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2019 Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. (a) Mobile and temporary LNG facilities for peakshaving application, for service maintenance... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mobile and temporary LNG facilities....

  19. 49 CFR 193.2019 - Mobile and temporary LNG facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2019 Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. (a) Mobile and temporary LNG facilities for peakshaving application, for service maintenance... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobile and temporary LNG facilities....

  20. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  5. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  6. Graphene mobility mapping

    PubMed Central

    Buron, Jonas D.; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Caridad, José M.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties. PMID:26204815

  7. Graphene mobility mapping.

    PubMed

    Buron, Jonas D; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U; Petersen, Dirch H; Caridad, José M; Jessen, Bjarke S; Booth, Timothy J; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties. PMID:26204815

  8. Graphene mobility mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buron, Jonas D.; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Caridad, José M.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties.

  9. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.

  10. Correlation of phase resolved current, emission and surface charge measurements in an atmospheric pressure helium jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Torsten; Wild, Robert; Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Wilke, Christian; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Stollenwerk, Lars

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with two different surfaces (conducting and dielectric) is investigated using a setup with two ring electrodes around a dielectric capillary. For diagnostics, phase resolved ICCD-imaging, current measurements and surface charge measurements are applied. The results show the correlation of plasma dynamics with the deposition of surface charge and electrical current signals. Further, the influence of the distance between surface and jet capillary on the surface charge distribution is presented. A complex discharge dynamic is found with a dielectric barrier discharge between the ring electrodes and back-and-forth bullet propagation outside the capillary. A conducting channel connecting the jet nozzle and the surface is found. This correlates well with the observed charge exchange on the surface. The number of formed channels and the average deposited charge density on the surface is found to be strongly sensitive to the jet distance from the surface. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark