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Sample records for mobility spectrometry faims

  1. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS

    PubMed Central

    A. Shvartsburg, Alexandre; A. Anderson, Gordon; D. Smith, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) separates ions in gases based on the difference between their mobilities in strong and weak electric fields, captured directly employing a periodic waveform with dissimilar profiles in opposite polarities. As that difference is not tightly correlated with the ion size or mass, FAIMS separations are generally quite orthogonal to both conventional IMS (based on the absolute ion mobility that reflects the physical ion size) and mass spectrometry (based on mass). Until a few years ago, that advantage was largely offset by poor FAIMS resolving power (∼10–20), an order of magnitude below that achieved with conventional (drift-tube) IMS. This article summarizes the major recent technical developments that have raised FAIMS resolving power up to ∼500. These include use of higher and more stable voltages provided by new waveform generators, novel buffer gas compositions comprising high helium or hydrogen fractions, and extended filtering times up to ∼1 s. These advances have enabled previously unthinkable analyses such as broad baseline separations of peptide sequence inversions, localization variants (post-translationally modified peptides with differing PTM attachment sites) even for the larger “middle-down” peptides and smallest PTMs, and lipid regioisomers. PMID:24349930

  2. Peak deconvolution in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) to characterize macromolecular conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Errol W.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated poly(ethylene glycol), produced by electrospray ionization (ESI), with molecular weights ranging from 0.3 to 5 kDa and charge states from 1+ to 7+ were characterized using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). Results for all but some of the 3+ and 4+ charge states are consistent with a single gas-phase conformer or family of unresolved conformers for each of these charge states. The FAIMS compensation voltage scans resulted in peaks that could be accurately fit with a single Gaussian for each peak. The peak widths increase linearly with compensation voltage for maximum ion transmission but do not depend on m/z or molecular weight. Fitting parameters obtained from the poly(ethylene glycol) data were used to analyze conformations of oxidized and reduced lysozyme formed from different solutions. For oxidized lysozyme formed from a buffered aqueous solution, a single conformer (or group of unresolved conformers) was observed for the 7+ and 8+ charge states. Two conformers were observed for the 9+ and 10+ charge states formed from more denaturing solutions. Data for the fully reduced form indicate the existence of up to three different conformers for each charge state produced directly by ESI and a general progression from a more extended to a more folded structure with decreasing charge state. These results are consistent with those obtained previously by proton-transfer reactivity and drift tube ion mobility experiments, although more conformers were identified for the fully reduced form of lysozyme using FAIMS.

  3. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass SpectrometryFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  4. Enhancement of mass spectrometry performance for proteomic analyses using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS).

    PubMed

    Bonneil, Eric; Pfammatter, Sibylle; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Remarkable advances in mass spectrometry sensitivity and resolution have been accomplished over the past two decades to enhance the depth and coverage of proteome analyses. As these technological developments expanded the detection capability of mass spectrometers, they also revealed an increasing complexity of low abundance peptides, solvent clusters and sample contaminants that can confound protein identification. Separation techniques that are complementary and can be used in combination with liquid chromatography are often sought to improve mass spectrometry sensitivity for proteomics applications. In this context, high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), a form of ion mobility that exploits ion separation at low and high electric fields, has shown significant advantages by focusing and separating multiply charged peptide ions from singly charged interferences. This paper examines the analytical benefits of FAIMS in proteomics to separate co-eluting peptide isomers and to enhance peptide detection and quantitative measurements of protein digests via native peptides (label-free) or isotopically labeled peptides from metabolic labeling or chemical tagging experiments. PMID:26505763

  5. LESA FAIMS Mass Spectrometry for the Spatial Profiling of Proteins from Tissue.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Rian L; Creese, Andrew J; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2016-07-01

    We have shown previously that coupling of high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility, with liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry of tissue results in significant improvements in the resulting protein mass spectra. Here, we demonstrate LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging of proteins in sections of mouse brain and liver tissue. The results are compared with LESA mass spectrometry images obtained in the absence of FAIMS. The results show that the number of different protein species detected can be significantly increased by incorporating FAIMS into the workflow. A total of 34 proteins were detected by LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging of mouse brain, of which 26 were unique to FAIMS, compared with 15 proteins (7 unique) detected by LESA mass spectrometry imaging. A number of proteins were identified including α-globin, 6.8 kDa mitochondrial proteolipid, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, ubiquitin, β-thymosin 4, and calmodulin. A total of 40 species were detected by LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging of mouse liver, of which 29 were unique to FAIMS, compared with 24 proteins (13 unique) detected by LESA mass spectrometry imaging. The spatial distributions of proteins identified in both LESA mass spectrometry imaging and LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging were in good agreement indicating that FAIMS is a suitable tool for inclusion in mass spectrometry imaging workflows. PMID:27228471

  6. Using the FAIMS Mobile App for field data recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballsun-Stanton, Brian; Klump, Jens; Ross, Shawn

    2016-04-01

    Multiple people creating data in the field poses a hard technical problem: our ``web 2.0'' environment presumes constant connectivity, data ``authority'' held by centralised servers, and sees mobile devices as tools for presentation rather than origination. A particular design challenge is the remoteness of the sampling locations, hundreds of kilometres away from network access. The alternative, however, is hand collection with a lengthy, error prone, and expensive digitisation process. This poster will present a field-tested open-source solution to field data recording. This solution, originally created by a community of archaeologists, needed to accommodate diverse recording methodologies. The community could not agree on standard vocabularies, workflows, attributes, or methodologies, but most agreed that at app to ``record data in the field'' was desirable. As a result, the app is generalised for field data collection; not only can it record a range of data types, but it is deeply customisable. The NeCTAR / ARC funded FAIMS Project, therefore, created an app which allows for arbitrary data collection in the field. In order to accomplish this ambitious goal, FAIMS relied heavily on OSS projects including: spatialite and gdal (for GIS support), sqlite (for a lightweight key-attribute-value datastore), Javarosa and Beanshell (for UI and scripting), Ruby, and Linux. Only by standing on the shoulders of giants, FAIMS was able to make a flexible and highly generalisable field data collection system that CSIRO geoscientists were able to customise to suit most of their completely unanticipated needs. While single-task apps (i.e. those commissioned by structural geologists to take strikes and dips) will excel in their domains, other geoscientists (palaeoecologists, palaeontologists, anyone taking samples) likely cannot afford to commission domain- and methodology-specific recording tools for their custom recording needs. FAIMS shows the utility of OSS software

  7. Improving FAIMS Sensitivity Using a Planar Geometry with Slit Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouki, Ridha; Kelly, Ryan T.; Prior, David C.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is gaining broad acceptance for analyses of gas-phase ions, especially in conjunction with largely orthogonal separation methods such as mass spectrometry (MS) and/or conventional (drift tube) ion mobility spectrometry. In FAIMS, ions are filtered while passing through a gap between two electrodes that may have planar or curved (in particular, cylindrical) geometry. Despite substantial inherent advantages of the planar configuration and its near-universal adoption in current stand-alone FAIMS devices, commercial FAIMS/MS systems have employed curved FAIMS geometries that could be interfaced to MS more effectively. Here we report a new planar (p-) FAIMS design with slit-shaped entrance and exit apertures that substantially increase ion transmission in and out of the analyzer. The front slit interface effectively couples p-FAIMS to multi-emitter electrospray ionization (ESI) sources, improving greatly the ion current introduced to the device and allowing liquid flow rates up to ~50 μL/min. The back slit interface increases the transmission of ribbon-shaped ion beams output by the p-FAIMS to downstream stages such as a MS. Overall, the ion signal in ESI/FAIMS/MS analyses increases by over an order of magnitude without affecting FAIMS resolution. PMID:19616967

  8. To What Extent is FAIMS Beneficial in the Analysis of Proteins?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility spectrometry, is emerging as a tool for biomolecular analysis. In this article, the benefits and limitations of FAIMS for protein analysis are discussed. The principles and mechanisms of FAIMS separation of ions are described, and the differences between FAIMS and conventional ion mobility spectrometry are detailed. Protein analysis is considered from both the top-down (intact proteins) and the bottom-up (proteolytic peptides) perspective. The roles of FAIMS in the analysis of complex mixtures of multiple intact proteins and in the analysis of multiple conformers of a single protein are assessed. Similarly, the application of FAIMS in proteomics and targeted analysis of peptides are considered. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26843211

  9. To What Extent is FAIMS Beneficial in the Analysis of Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Helen J.

    2016-04-01

    High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility spectrometry, is emerging as a tool for biomolecular analysis. In this article, the benefits and limitations of FAIMS for protein analysis are discussed. The principles and mechanisms of FAIMS separation of ions are described, and the differences between FAIMS and conventional ion mobility spectrometry are detailed. Protein analysis is considered from both the top-down (intact proteins) and the bottom-up (proteolytic peptides) perspective. The roles of FAIMS in the analysis of complex mixtures of multiple intact proteins and in the analysis of multiple conformers of a single protein are assessed. Similarly, the application of FAIMS in proteomics and targeted analysis of peptides are considered.

  10. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  11. On an Aerodynamic Mechanism to Enhance Ion Transmission and Sensitivity of FAIMS for Nano-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Satendra; Belford, Michael W.; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; Purves, Randy W.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations show that significant ion losses occur within the commercial electrospray ionization-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (ESI-FAIMS) interface owing to an angular desolvation gas flow and because of the impact of the FAIMS carrier gas onto the inner rf (radio frequency) electrode. The angular desolvation gas flow diverts ions away from the entrance plate orifice while the carrier gas annihilates ions onto the inner rf electrode. A novel ESI-FAIMS interface is described that optimizes FAIMS gas flows resulting in large improvements in transmission. Simulations with the bromochloroacetate anion showed an improvement of ~9-fold to give ~70% overall transmission). Comparable transmission improvements were attained experimentally for six peptides (2+) in the range of m/z 404.2 to 653.4 at a chromatographic flow rate of 300 nL/min. Selected ion chromatograms (SIC) from nano-LC-FAIMS-MS analyses showed 71% (HLVDEPQNLIK, m/z 653.4, 2+) to 95% (LVNELTEFAK, m/z 582.3, 2+) of ion signal compared with ion signal in the SIC from LC-MS analysis. IGSEVYHNLK (580.3, 2+) showed 24% more ion signal compared with LC-MS and is explained by enhanced desolvation in FAIMS. A 3-10 times lower limits of quantitation (LOQ) (<15% RSD) was achieved for chemical noise limited peaks with FAIMS. Peaks limited by ion statistics showed subtle improvement in RSD and yielded comparable LOQ to that attained with nano-LC-MS (without FAIMS). These improvements were obtained using a reduced FAIMS separation gap (from 2.5 to 1.5 mm) that results in a shorter residence time (13.2 ms ± 3.9 ms) and enables the use of a helium free transport gas (100% nitrogen).

  12. Decreased Gap Width in a Cylindrical High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Device Improves Protein Discovery.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Winget, Jason M; Hoopmann, Michael R; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-12-15

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas phase ions according to their characteristic dependence of ion mobility on electric field strength. FAIMS can be implemented as a means of automated gas-phase fractionation in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments. We modified a commercially available cylindrical FAIMS device by enlarging the inner electrode, thereby narrowing the gap and increasing the effective field strength. This modification provided a nearly 4-fold increase in FAIMS peak capacity over the optimally configured unmodified device. We employed the modified FAIMS device for on-line fractionation in a proteomic analysis of a complex sample and observed major increases in protein discovery. NanoLC-FAIMS-MS/MS of an unfractionated yeast tryptic digest using the modified FAIMS device identified 53% more proteins than were identified using an unmodified FAIMS device and 98% more proteins than were identified with unaided nanoLC-MS/MS. We describe here the development of a nanoLC-FAIMS-MS/MS protocol that provides automated gas-phase fractionation for proteomic analysis of complex protein digests. We compare this protocol against prefractionation of peptides with isoelectric focusing and demonstrate that FAIMS fractionation yields comparable protein recovery while significantly reducing the amount of sample required and eliminating the need for additional sample handling. PMID:26560994

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  14. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Melanson, Jeremy E; Purves, Randy W

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their high polarity, large number of analogues and the complex matrix in which they occur. Here we investigate the potential utility of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) as a gas-phase ion separation tool for analysis of PSTs by mass spectrometry. We investigate the separation of PSTs using FAIMS with two divergent goals: using FAIMS as a primary separation tool for rapid screening by electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS or combined with LC in a multidimensional LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS separation. First, a survey of the parameters that affect the sensitivity and selectivity of PST analysis by FAIMS was carried out using ESI-FAIMS-MS. In particular, the use of acetonitrile as a gas additive in the carrier gas flow offered good separation of all PST epimeric pairs. A second set of FAIMS conditions was also identified, which focussed PSTs to a relatively narrow CV range allowing development of an LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS method for analysis of PST toxins in complex mussel tissue extracts. The quantitative capabilities of this method were evaluated by analysing a PST containing mussel tissue matrix material. Results compared favourably with analysis by an established LC-post-column oxidation-fluorescence method with recoveries ranging from 70 to 106%, although sensitivity was somewhat reduced. The current work represents the first successful separation of PST isomers using ion mobility and shows the promise of FAIMS as a tool for analysis of algal biotoxins in complex samples and outlines some critical requirements for its future improvement. PMID:25619987

  15. Nontarget analysis of urine by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2011-12-01

    Nearly a decade after first commercialization, high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has yet to find its place in routine chemical analysis. Prototypes have been used to demonstrate the utility of this separation technique combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Unfortunately, first generation commercial FAIMS instruments have gone practically unused by early adopters. Here, we show this to be due to poor ion transmission in the FAIMS-MS source interface. We present simple instrumental modifications and optimization of experimental conditions to achieve good performance from the first generation commercial FAIMS device (the Ionalytics Selectra) coupled to a high resolution Q-TOF-MS. In combination with nanospray ionization, we demonstrate for the first time the nontarget analysis of urine by FAIMS with minimal sample preparation. We show the unique suitability of electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS for identification of low abundance species such as urinary biomarkers of damage of nucleic acids in a complex biological matrix. The elimination of electrospray noise and matrix components by FAIMS and the continuous flow of analytes through FAIMS for accurate and tandem mass analysis produce high quality spectral data suitable for structural identification of unknowns. These characteristics make ESI-FAIMS-MS ideal for nontarget identification, even when compared to high efficiency LC-ESI-MS. PMID:21978137

  16. Online LC-FAIMS-MS/MS for the Analysis of Phosphorylation in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2016-01-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is a gas-phase separation technique which, when coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, offers benefits for analysis of complex proteomics samples such as those encountered in phosphoproteomics experiments. Results from LC-FAIMS-MS/MS are typically complementary, in terms of proteome coverage and isomer identification, to those obtained by use of solution-phase separation methods, such as prefractionation with strong cation-exchange chromatography. Here, we describe the protocol for large-scale phosphorylation analysis by LC-FAIMS-MS/MS. PMID:26584930

  17. Liquid extraction surface analysis field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry for the analysis of dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Rian L; Dexter, Alex; Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2015-10-21

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) is a surface sampling technique that allows electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of a wide range of analytes directly from biological substrates. Here, we present LESA mass spectrometry coupled with high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for the analysis of dried blood spots on filter paper. Incorporation of FAIMS in the workflow enables gas-phase separation of lipid and protein molecular classes, enabling analysis of both haemoglobin and a range of lipids (phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin species) from a single extraction sample. The work has implications for multiplexed clinical assays of multiple analytes. PMID:26198596

  18. Optimization of the design and operation of FAIMS analyzers.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2005-01-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) holds significant promise for post-ionization separations in conjunction with mass-spectrometric analyses. However, a limited understanding of fundamentals of FAIMS analyzers has made their design and operation largely an empirical exercise. Recently, we developed an a priori simulation of FAIMS that accounts for both ion diffusion (including anisotropic components) and Coulomb repulsion, and validated it by extensive comparisons with FAIMS/MS data. Here it is corroborated further by FAIMS-only measurements, and applied to explore how key instrumental parameters (analytical gap width and length, waveform frequency and profile, the identity and flow speed of buffer gas) affect FAIMS response. We find that the trade-off between resolution and sensitivity can be managed by varying gap width, RF frequency, and (in certain cases) buffer gas, with equivalent outcome. In particular, the resolving power can be approximately doubled compared to "typical" conditions. Throughput may be increased by either accelerating the gas flow (preferable) or shortening the device, but below certain minimum residence times performance deteriorates. Bisinusoidal and clipped-sinusoidal waveforms have comparable merit, but switching to rectangular waveforms would improve resolution and/or sensitivity. For any waveform profile, the ratio of two between voltages in high and low portions of the cycle produces the best performance. PMID:15653358

  19. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  20. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Kayleigh L; Eiceman, Gary A; Reynolds, James C; Creaser, Colin S

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na(+), K(+)) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26914231

  1. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-02-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  2. Separation and Classification of Lipids Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Isaac, Giorgis; Leveque, Nathalie; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    Correlations between the dimensions of a 2-D separation create trend lines that depend on structural or chemical characteristics of the compound class and thus facilitate classification of unknowns. This broadly applies to conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)/mass spectrometry (MS), where the major biomolecular classes (e.g., lipids, peptides, nucleotides) occupy different trend line domains. However, strong correlation between the IMS and MS separations for ions of same charge has impeded finer distinctions. Differential IMS (or FAIMS) is generally less correlated to MS and thus could separate those domains better. We report the first observation of chemical class separation by trend lines using FAIMS, here for lipids. For lipids, FAIMS is indeed more independent of MS than conventional IMS, and subclasses (such as phospho-, glycero-, or sphingolipids) form distinct, often non-overlapping domains. Even finer categories with different functional groups or degrees of unsaturation are often separated. As expected, resolution improves in He-rich gases: at 70% He, glycerolipid isomers with different fatty acid positions can be resolved. These results open the door for application of FAIMS to lipids, particularly in shotgun lipidomics and targeted analyses of bioactive lipids.

  3. Separation and Classification of Lipids Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Isaac, Giorgis; Leveque, Nathalie; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Correlations between the dimensions of a 2-D separation create trend lines that depend on structural or chemical characteristics of the compound class and thus facilitate classification of unknowns. This broadly applies to conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)/mass spectrometry (MS), where the major biomolecular classes (e.g., lipids, peptides, nucleotides) occupy different trend line domains. However, strong correlation between the IMS and MS separations for ions of same charge has impeded finer distinctions. Differential IMS (or FAIMS) is generally less correlated to MS and thus could separate those domains better. We report the first observation of chemical class separation by trend lines using FAIMS, here for lipids. For lipids, FAIMS is indeed more independent of MS than conventional IMS, and subclasses (such as phospho-, glycero-, or sphingolipids) form distinct, often non-overlapping domains. Even finer categories with different functional groups or degrees of unsaturation are often separated. As expected, resolution improves in He-rich gases: at 70% He, glycerolipid isomers with different fatty acid positions can be resolved. These results open the door for application of FAIMS to lipids, particularly in shotgun lipidomics and targeted analyses of bioactive lipids. PMID:21953096

  4. Simultaneous FRAP, FLIM and FAIM for measurements of protein mobility and interaction in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, James A.; Morton, Penny E.; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O.; Santis, George; Chung, Pei-Hua; Parsons, Maddy; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel integrated multimodal fluorescence microscopy technique for simultaneous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and fluorescence anisotropy imaging (FAIM). This approach captures a series of polarization-resolved fluorescence lifetime images during a FRAP recovery, maximizing the information available from a limited photon budget. We have applied this method to analyse the behaviour of GFP-labelled coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in living human epithelial cells. Our data reveal that CAR exists in oligomeric states throughout the cell, and that these complexes occur in conjunction with high immobile fractions of the receptor at cell-cell junctions. These findings shed light on previously unknown molecular associations between CAR receptors in intact cells and demonstrate the power of combined FRAP, FLIM and FAIM microscopy as a robust method to analyse complex multi-component dynamics in living cells. PMID:26504635

  5. Probing the Complementarity of FAIMS and Strong Cation Exchange Chromatography in Shotgun Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creese, Andrew J.; Shimwell, Neil J.; Larkins, Katherine P. B.; Heath, John K.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-03-01

    High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility spectrometry, coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers benefits for the analysis of complex proteomics samples. Advantages include increased dynamic range, increased signal-to-noise, and reduced interference from ions of similar m/ z. FAIMS also separates isomers and positional variants. An alternative, and more established, method of reducing sample complexity is prefractionation by use of strong cation exchange chromatography. Here, we have compared SCX-LC-MS/MS with LC-FAIMS-MS/MS for the identification of peptides and proteins from whole cell lysates from the breast carcinoma SUM52 cell line. Two FAIMS approaches are considered: (1) multiple compensation voltages within a single LC-MS/MS analysis (internal stepping) and (2) repeat LC-MS/MS analyses at different and fixed compensation voltages (external stepping). We also consider the consequence of the fragmentation method (electron transfer dissociation or collision-induced dissociation) on the workflow performance. The external stepping approach resulted in a greater number of protein and peptide identifications than the internal stepping approach for both ETD and CID MS/MS, suggesting that this should be the method of choice for FAIMS proteomics experiments. The overlap in protein identifications from the SCX method and the external FAIMS method was ~25 % for both ETD and CID, and for peptides was less than 20 %. The lack of overlap between FAIMS and SCX highlights the complementarity of the two techniques. Charge state analysis of the peptide assignments showed that the FAIMS approach identified a much greater proportion of triply-charged ions.

  6. Control of Ion Distortion in Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Variation of Dispersion Field and Gas Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Errol W.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has emerged as an analytical tool of broad utility, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Of particular promise is the use of FAIMS and 2-D ion mobility methods that combine FAIMS with conventional IMS to resolve and characterize protein and other macromolecular conformers. However, FAIMS operation requires a strong electric field and ions are inevitably heated by energetic collisions with buffer gas molecules. This may induce ion isomerization or dissociation that distort the separation properties of FAIMS (and subsequent stages) and/or reduce instrumental sensitivity. As FAIMS employs a periodic waveform, whether those processes are controlled by ion temperature at maximum or average field intensity has been debated. Here we address this issue by measuring the unfolding of compact ubiquitin ion geometries as a function of waveform amplitude (dispersion field, ED) and gas temperature, T. The field heating is quantified by matching the dependences of structural transitions on ED and T: increasing ED from 12 to 16 or from 16 to 20 kV/cm is equivalent to heating the (N2) gas by ∼15 – 25 °C. The magnitude of field heating for any ED can be estimated using the two-temperature theory, and raising ED by 4 kV/cm augments heating by ∼15 – 30 °C for maximum and ∼4 – 8 °C for average field in the FAIMS cycle. Hence, isomerization of ions in FAIMS appears to be determined by the excitation at waveform peaks. PMID:18729473

  7. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library. PMID:23646896

  8. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  9. Control of Ion Distortion in Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Variation of Dispersion Field and Gas Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Errol W.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has emerged as an analytical tool of broad utility, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Of particular promise is the use of FAIMS and 2-D ion mobility methods that combine it with conventional IMS to resolve and characterize protein and other macromolecular conformers. However, FAIMS operation requires high electric fields and ions are inevitably heated by above-thermal collisions with buffer gas molecules. This may induce ion isomerization and dissociation that distort separation properties determined by FAIMS and subsequent stages and/or reduce instrumental sensitivity. As FAIMS employs a periodic waveform, the ion temperature can be characterized at the maximum or average field intensity (E). Which method is most applicable to temperature sensitive ions, such as protein ions, has been debated. Here we address this issue by measuring the unfolding of compact ubiquitin ion geometries as a function of waveform amplitude (dispersion field, ED) and gas temperature, T. The field heating is quantified by matching the dependences of structural transitions on ED and T. Increasing ED from 12 to 16 or from 16 to 20 kV/cm is equivalent to heating the (N2) gas by ~15 - 25 oC. The magnitude of field heating for any E can be calculated using the two-temperature theory, and raising ED by 4 kV/cm augments heating by ~15 - 30 oC for maximum and ~4 - 8 oC for average E in the FAIMS cycle. Hence, isomerization of ions in FAIMS appears to be governed by the maximum internal temperature at waveform peaks.

  10. A laser-based FAIMS detector for detection of ultra-low concentrations of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmalov, Artem E.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.; Sychev, Alexey V.; Tugaenko, Anton V.; Bogdanov, Artem S.; Perederiy, Anatoly N.; Spitsyn, Eugene M.

    2014-06-01

    A non-contact method for analyzing of explosives traces from surfaces was developed. The method is based on the laser desorption of analyzed molecules from the surveyed surfaces followed by the laser ionization of air sample combined with the field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The pulsed radiation of the fourth harmonic of a portable GSGG: Cr3+ :Nd3+ laser (λ = 266 nm) is used. The laser desorption FAIMS analyzer have been developed. The detection limit of the analyzer equals 40 pg for TNT. The results of detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are presented. It is shown that laser desorption of nitro-compounds from metals is accompanied by their surface decomposition. A method for detecting and analyzing of small concentrations of explosives in air based on the laser ionization and the FAIMS was developed. The method includes a highly efficient multipass optical scheme of the intracavity fourthharmonic generation of pulsed laser radiation (λ = 266 nm) and the field asymmetric ion mobility (FAIM) spectrometer disposed within a resonator. The ions formation and detection proceed inside a resonant cavity. The laser ion source based on the multi-passage of radiation at λ = 266 nm through the ionization region was elaborated. On the basis of the method the laser FAIMS analyzer has been created. The analyzer provides efficient detection of low concentrations of nitro-compounds in air and shows a detection limit of 10-14 - 10-15 g/cm3 both for RDX and TNT.

  11. Mass spectrometric characterization of a high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purves, Randy W.; Guevremont, Roger; Day, Stephen; Pipich, Charles W.; Matyjaszczyk, Matthew S.

    1998-12-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has become an important method for the detection of many compounds because of its high sensitivity and amenability to miniaturization for field-portable monitoring; applications include detection of narcotics, explosives, and chemical warfare agents. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) differs from IMS in that the electric fields are applied using a high-frequency periodic asymmetric waveform, rather than a dc voltage. Furthermore, in FAIMS the compounds are separated by the difference in the mobility of ions at high electric field relative to low field, rather than by compound to compound differences in mobility at low electric field (IMS). We report here the first cylindrical-geometry-FAIMS interface with mass spectrometry (FAIMS-MS) and the MS identification of the peaks observed in a FAIMS compensation voltage (CV) spectrum. Using both an electrometer-based-FAIMS (FAIMS-E) and FAIMS-MS, several variables that affect the sensitivity of ion detection were examined for two (polarity reversed) asymmetric waveforms (modes 1 and 2) each of which yields a unique spectrum. An increase in the dispersion voltage (DV) was found to improve the sensitivity and separation observed in the FAIMS CV spectrum. This increase in sensitivity and the unexpected dissimilarity in modes 1 and 2 suggest that atmospheric pressure ion focusing is occurring in the FAIMS analyzer. The sensitivity and peak locations in the CV spectra were affected by temperature, gas flow rates, operating pressure, and analyte concentration.

  12. Separation of a Set of Peptide Sequence Isomers Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2011-08-15

    Protein identification in bottom-up proteomics requires disentangling isomers of proteolytic peptides, a major class of which are sequence inversions. Separation of sequence isomers using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been reported, but limited to pairs of species. Here we demonstrate baseline separation of all seven sequences for a tryptic peptide with eight residues using differential IMS or FAIMS. Evaluations of peak capacity of the method indicate that even larger libraries should generally be separated for heavier peptides with higher charge states.

  13. Improvement of phosphoproteome analyses using FAIMS and decision tree fragmentation. application to the insulin signaling pathway in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bridon, Gaëlle; Bonneil, Eric; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    This report examines the analytical benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) coupled to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for phosphoproteomics analyses. The ability of FAIMS to separate multiply charged peptide ions from chemical interferences confers a unique advantage in phosphoproteomics by enhancing the detection of low abundance phosphopeptides. LC-FAIMS-MS experiments performed on TiO(2)-enriched tryptic digests from Drosophila melanogaster provided a 50% increase in phosphopeptide identification compared to conventional LC-MS analysis. Also, FAIMS can be used to select different population of multiply charged phosphopeptide ions prior to their activation with either collision activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Importantly, FAIMS enabled the resolution of coeluting phosphoisomers of different abundances to facilitate their unambiguous identification using conventional database search engines. The benefits of FAIMS in large-scale phosphoproteomics of D. melanogaster are further investigated using label-free quantitation to identify differentially regulated phosphoproteins in response to insulin stimulation. PMID:22059388

  14. Pendular Proteins in Gases and New Avenues for Characterization of Macromolecules by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Noskov, Sergei; Purves, Randy; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-04-21

    Polar molecules align in electric fields when the dipole energy (proportional to field intensity E × dipole moment p) exceeds the thermal rotational energy. Small molecules have low p and align only at inordinately high E or upon extreme cooling. Many biomacromolecules and ions are strong permanent dipoles and may align at E achievable in gases and room temperature. The collision cross sections of aligned ions with gas molecules generally differ from orientationally averaged quantities, affecting ion mobilities measured in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) separates ions by the difference between mobilities at high and low E and hence can resolve and identify macroion conformers based on the mobility difference between pendular and free rotor states. An exceptional sensitivity of that difference to the ion geometry and charge distribution holds the potential for a powerful new method for separation and characterization of macromolecular species. Theory predicts that the pendular alignment of ions in gases at any E requires a minimum p depending on the ion mobility, gas pressure, and temperature. At ambient conditions used in current FAIMS systems, the p for realistic ions must exceed ~300 - 400 Debye. The dipole moments of proteins statistically increase with increasing mass, and such values are typical above ~30 kDa. FAIMS analyses of protein ions and complexes of ~30 - 130 kDa show an order-of-magnitude expansion of separation space compared to smaller proteins and other ions, consistent with expectations for the dipole-aligned regime.

  15. Pendular proteins in gases and new avenues for characterization of macromolecules by ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Noskov, Sergei Y.; Purves, Randy W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Polar molecules align in electric fields when the dipole energy (proportional to field intensity E × dipole moment p) exceeds the thermal rotational energy. Small molecules have low p and align only at inordinately high E or upon extreme cooling. Many biomacromolecules and ions are strong permanent dipoles that align at E achievable in gases and room temperature. The collision cross-sections of aligned ions with gas molecules generally differ from orientationally averaged quantities, affecting ion mobilities measured in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) separates ions by the difference between mobilities at high and low E and hence can resolve and identify macroion conformers based on the mobility difference between pendular and free rotor states. The exceptional sensitivity of that difference to ion geometry and charge distribution holds the potential for a powerful method for separation and characterization of macromolecular species. Theory predicts that the pendular alignment of ions in gases at any E requires a minimum p that depends on the ion mobility, gas pressure, and temperature. At ambient conditions used in current FAIMS systems, p for realistic ions must exceed ≈300–400 Debye. The dipole moments of proteins statistically increase with increasing mass, and such values are typical above ≈30 kDa. As expected for the dipole-aligned regime, FAIMS analyses of protein ions and complexes of ≈30–130 kDa show an order-of-magnitude expansion of separation space compared with smaller proteins and other ions. PMID:19351899

  16. Simulation of Ion Motion in FAIMS through Combined Use of SIMION and Modified SDS

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Satendra; Tang, Keqi; Manura, David; Papanastasiou, Dimitris; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-11-01

    Over the years, the use of Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) has grown with applications spanning from explosives detection to separation of complex biological mixtures. Although, the principles of ion separation in FAIMS is understood and comprehensively characterized, little effort has been made in developing commercially available computational tools that can simulate ion motion in FAIMS. Such a tool could be of great value for refining theory, optimizing the performance of the instrument for specific applications, and in modeling the fringe-fields caused by rf decay at the entrance and exit of FAIMS which can significantly affect ion transmission. An algorithm using SIMIONTM as its core structure was developed in this study to realistically compute ion trajectory at different ratios of electric field to buffer gas number density (E/N). The E/N can vary from a few Td to ~80 Td in FAIMS as created by an asymmetric square waveform. The Statistical Diffusion Simulation (SDS) model was further incorporated in the algorithm to simulate the ion diffusion in the FAIMS gap. The algorithm was validated using a FAIMS analyzer model similar to the Sionex Corporation model SVAC in terms of its dimensions and geometry. Hydroxyproline and Leucine ions with similar reduced mobility Ko (2.17 and 2.18 cm2.V-1.s-1, respectively) were used as model ions to test the new algorithm and demonstrate the effects of gas flow and waveform (voltage pulse amplitude and frequency) on peak shape and ion current transmission. Simulation results from three ion types: O2-(H2O)3, (A type), (C3H6O)2H+ (B type), and (C12H24O)2H+ (C type) were then compared with the experimental data (available in the literature). The SIMION-SDS-Field Dependent Mobility Calculation (FDMC) algorithm provided good agreement with experimental measurements of the ion peak position in FAIMS compensation voltage (CV) spectrum, peak width, and the ion transmission over a broad range of E/N.

  17. Differential Ion Mobility Separations of Peptides with Resolving Power Exceeding 50

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) sorts gas-phase ions by mobility differences with respect to the electric field intensity. A major emerging FAIMS application is the fractionation of proteolytic digests. Using a planar FAIMS unit with helium/nitrogen mixtures, we have increased FAIMS resolving powers for peptide analyses from the prior maximum of ~20 – 30 to ~50 – 70. The resolution improved nearly 3-fold, allowing, in particular, separation of previously unresolved conformers. PMID:19938817

  18. Developing Fieldable Systems for Chemical Sensing Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kyle, Stephan Weeks, R. Trainham

    2008-03-01

    Currently, there is an urgent need for field-rugged and field-programmable sensor systems that provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. These devices must be portable, low cost, robust, and provide accurate measurements to avoid both false positive and negative results. Furthermore, the information provided by the devices must be received in a timely manner so that informed decisions can be immediately made and the appropriate actions taken. Two technologies that are unparalleled in their sensitivity, selectivity, and trace-level detection capabilities are field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry. Here, we will show progress that has been made toward developing fieldable FAIMS systems and mass spectrometers. Working in collaboration with Sionex Corporation, the microDMx detector was equipped with a continuous air sampling system to develop selective methods for the analysis of compounds of interest. A microdiaphragm pump (KNF Neuberger, Inc.) is used to pull in gas-phase analytes directly from the air for separation and detection with the FAIMS system. The FAIMS evaluation platform (SVAC) unit currently measures 9.8-inch x 4.6-inch x 3.2-inch, weighs 3.1 lb, and utilizes a {sup 63}Ni source to ionize incoming compounds. Analytes entering the unit are separated and identified by their characteristic response to the compensation voltage (V{sub c}) at a given rf field strength (V{sub rf}). This response has been observed to be unique for a wide range of substances studied. If additional verification were required or a targeted analyte present in a complex chemical matrix, a FAIMS unit equipped with a fast gas chromatography column has been evaluated. The unit combines the separation capabilities of gas chromatography with the selectivity of FAIMS. It measures 9.5-inch x 5.25-inch x 3.5-inch

  19. High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Electron Detachment Dissociation of Isobaric Mixtures of Glycosaminoglycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailemia, Muchena J.; Park, Melvin; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is shown to be capable of resolving isomeric and isobaric glycosaminoglycan negative ions and to have great utility for the analysis of this class of molecules when combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry. Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and other ion activation methods for tandem mass spectrometry can be used to determine the sites of labile sulfate modifications and for assigning the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, mixtures with overlapping mass-to-charge values present a challenge, as their precursor species cannot be resolved by a mass analyzer prior to ion activation. FAIMS is shown to resolve two types of mass-to-charge overlaps. A mixture of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) oligomers with 4-10 saccharides units produces ions of a single mass-to-charge by electrospray ionization, as the charge state increases in direct proportion to the degree of polymerization for these sulfated carbohydrates. FAIMS is shown to resolve the overlapping charge. A more challenging type of mass-to-charge overlap occurs for mixtures of diastereomers. FAIMS is shown to separate two sets of epimeric GAG tetramers. For the epimer pairs, the complexity of the separation is reduced when the reducing end is alkylated, suggesting that anomers are also resolved by FAIMS. The resolved components were activated by EDD and the fragment ions were analyzed by FTICR-MS. The resulting tandem mass spectra were able to distinguish the two epimers from each other.

  20. High-Definition Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Resolving Power up to 500

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Seim, Thomas A.; Danielson, William F.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-20

    As the resolution of analytical methods improve, further progress tends to be increasingly limited by instrumental parameter instabilities that could be ignored before. This is now the case with differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), where fluctuations of the voltages and gas pressure have become critical. A new high-definition generator for FAIMS compensation voltage reported here provides a stable and accurate output than can be scanned with negligible steps. This reduces the spectral drift and peak width, thus improving the resolving power (R) and resolution. The gain for multiply-charged peptides that have narrowest peaks is up to ~40%, and R ~ 400 - 500 is achievable using He/N2 or H2/N2 gas mixtures.

  1. Ultrahigh-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Extended Separation Times

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and particularly differential IMS or FAIMS, is emerging as a versatile tool for separation and identification of gas-phase ions, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. For over two decades since its inception, the utility of FAIMS was constrained by resolving power (R) of less than ~20. Stronger electric fields and optimized gas mixtures have recently raised achievable R to ~200, but further progress with such approaches is impeded by electrical breakdown. However, the resolving power of planar FAIMS devices using any gas and field intensity scales as the square root of separation time (t). Here, we extended t from the previous maximum of 0.2 s up to fourfold by reducing the carrier gas flow and increased the resolving power by up to twofold as predicted, to >300 for multiply-charged peptides. The resulting resolution gain has enabled separation of previously “co-eluting” peptide isomers, including folding conformers and localization variants of modified peptides. More broadly, a peak capacity of ~200 has been reached in tryptic digest separations. PMID:21117630

  2. Gridless overtone mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Steven M; Ewing, Michael A; Clemmer, David E

    2013-11-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions toward the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  3. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  4. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2010-10-01

    Many proteins and proteolytic peptides incorporate the same post-translational modification (PTM) at different sites, creating multiple localization variants with different functions or activities that may coexist in cells. Current analytical methods based on liquid chromatography (LC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are challenged by such isomers that often co-elute in LC and/or produce non-unique fragments. Application of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has previously been explored, but success was limited by insufficient resolution. We show that the recently developed high-resolution differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) using helium-rich gases can readily separate phosphopeptides with variant modified sites. Specifically, use of He/N2 mixtures containing up to 74% He has allowed separating to >95% three monophosphorylated peptides of identical sequence. Similar separation was achieved at 50% He, using an elevated electric field. Bisphosphorylated isomers that differ in only one modification site were separated to the same extent. We anticipate the FAIMS capabilities for such separations to extend to other PTMs.

  5. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins and proteolytic peptides incorporate the same post-translational modification (PTM) at different sites, creating multiple localization variants with different functions or activities that may coexist in cells. Current analytical methods based on liquid chromatography (LC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are challenged by such isomers that often co-elute in LC and/or produce non-unique fragment ions. The application of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was explored, but success has been limited by insufficient resolution. We show that high-resolution differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) employing helium-rich gases can readily separate phosphopeptides with variant modification sites. Use of He/N2 mixtures containing up to 74% He has allowed separating to >95% three monophosphorylated peptides of identical sequence. Similar separation was achieved at 50% He, using an elevated electric field. Bisphosphorylated isomers that differ in only one modification site were separated to the same extent. We anticipate FAIMS capabilities for such separations to extend to other PTMs. PMID:20843012

  6. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  7. Review on ion mobility spectrometry. Part 2: hyphenated methods and effects of experimental parameters.

    PubMed

    Cumeras, R; Figueras, E; Davis, C E; Baumbach, J I; Gràcia, I

    2015-03-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and 'well-known' technique of ion separation in the gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, specifically mass spectrometry as an identification approach and a multi-capillary column as a pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data sets are treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters on both conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The present review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and contains the sections that configure both conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. These reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  8. Hooked differential mobility spectrometry apparatus and method therefore

    DOEpatents

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A [Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2009-02-17

    Disclosed are a device and method for improved interfacing of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzers of substantially planar geometry to subsequent or preceding instrument stages. Interfacing is achieved using curved DMS elements, where a thick ion beam emitted by planar DMS analyzers or injected into them for ion filtering is compressed to the gap median by DMS ion focusing effect in a spatially inhomogeneous electric field. Resulting thinner beams are more effectively transmitted through necessarily constrained conductance limit apertures to subsequent instrument stages operated at a pressure lower than DMS, and/or more effectively injected into planar DMS analyzers. The technology is synergetic with slit apertures, slit aperture/ion funnels, and high-pressure ion funnel interfaces known in the art which allow for increasing cross-sectional area of MS inlets. The invention may be used in integrated analytical platforms, including, e.g., DMS/MS, LC/DMS/MS, and DMS/IMS/MS that could replace and/or enhance current LC/MS methods, e.g., for proteomics research.

  9. Separation of Variant Methylated Histone Tails by Differential Ion Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Zheng, Yupeng; Smith, Richard D.; Kelleher, Neil

    2012-07-18

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is emerging as a broadly useful tool for separation of isomeric modified peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs) attached to alternative residues. Such separations were anticipated to become more challenging for smaller PTMs and longer peptides. Here we show that FAIMS can fully resolve localization variants involving a PTM as minuscule as methylation, even for larger peptides in the middle-down range.

  10. Comprehensive mapping of O‐glycosylation in flagellin from Campylobacter jejuni 11168: A multienzyme differential ion mobility mass spectrometry approach

    PubMed Central

    Ulasi, Gloria N.; Creese, Andrew J.; Hui, Sam Xin; Penn, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of flagellin is essential for the virulence of Campylobacter jejuni, a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. Here, we demonstrate comprehensive mapping of the O‐glycosylation of flagellin from Campylobacter jejuni 11168 by use of a bottom‐up proteomics approach that incorporates differential ion mobility spectrometry (also known as high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry or FAIMS) together with proteolysis with proteinase K. Proteinase K provides complementary sequence coverage to that achieved following trypsin proteolysis. The use of FAIMS increased the number of glycopeptides identified. Novel glycans for this strain were identified (pseudaminic acid and either acetamidino pseudaminic acid or legionaminic acid), as were novel glycosylation sites: Thr208, Ser343, Ser348, Ser349, Ser395, Ser398, Ser423, Ser433, Ser436, Ser445, Ser448, Ser451, Ser452, Ser454, Ser457 and Thr465. Multiply glycosylated peptides were observed, as well as variation at individual residues in the nature of the glycan and its presence or absence. Such extreme heterogeneity in the pattern of glycosylation has not been reported previously, and suggests a novel dimension in molecular variation within a bacterial population that may be significant in persistence of the organism in its natural environment. These results demonstrate the usefulness of differential ion mobility in proteomics investigations of PTMs. PMID:25884275

  11. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Wilson, Derek J

    2016-06-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (<1 000 Da). With the exception of a handful of studies that employ an analogue of DMS-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)-the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26965162

  12. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J. Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J. C. Yves; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-03-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (<1 000 Da). With the exception of a handful of studies that employ an analogue of DMS—field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)—the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development.

  13. Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange (DMS-HDX) as a Probe of Protein Conformation in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaolong; Campbell, J. Larry; Chernushevich, Igor; Le Blanc, J. C. Yves; Wilson, Derek J.

    2016-06-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is an ion mobility technique that has been adopted chiefly as a pre-filter for small- to medium-sized analytes (<1 000 Da). With the exception of a handful of studies that employ an analogue of DMS—field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS)—the application of DMS to intact biomacromolecules remains largely unexplored. In this work, we employ DMS combined with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (DMS-HDX) to probe the gas-phase conformations generated from proteins that were initially folded, partially-folded, and unfolded in solution. Our findings indicate that proteins with distinct structural features in solution exhibit unique deuterium uptake profiles as function of their optimal transmission through the DMS. Ultimately we propose that DMS-HDX can, if properly implemented, provide rapid measurements of liquid-phase protein structural stability that could be of use in biopharmaceuticals development.

  14. Detection, identification, and occurrence of thiotetronic acids in drinking water from underground sources by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lyczko, Jadwiga; Beach, Daniel; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that electrospray ionization (ESI) with differential ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS) and "soft" mass spectrometry (MS) provide unique analytical capabilities that led to the discovery of sulfur-containing polar congeners of thiotetronic acid (TA) in drinking water from underground sources in Canada and the United States. Polar TAs accumulate in underground aquifers and appear to be the most abundant class of organic compounds in bottled water but cannot be detected by conventional mass spectrometry methods. We show that normally stable TAs are converted into very reactive ions in ESI which have to be analyzed using special conditions in ESI-FAIMS-MS to avoid extensive dissociation and ion/molecule reactions. De novo identification of 10 TAs was accomplished by the comparative tandem mass spectrometry analysis of authentic TA derivatives from groundwater samples and synthetic TA analogues prepared for this study. We present highlights of gas phase ion chemistry of polar TAs to explain their unique properties and reactivity. TA derivatives were originally isolated from soil bacteria and are of interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to their potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and negligible toxicity to mammals. We suspect that TAs are natural disinfection agents protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination, but these compound undergo modifications or decompose during an ozonation water treatment. PMID:26340067

  15. Feasibility of Higher-Order Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using New Asymmetric Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Mashkevich, Stefan V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Technologies for separating and characterizing ions based on their transport properties in gases have been around for three decades. The early method of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) distinguished ions by absolute mobility that depends on the collision cross section with buffer gas atoms. The more recent technique of field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) measures the difference between mobilities at high and low electric fields. Coupling IMS and FAIMS to soft ionization sources and mass spectrometry (MS) has greatly expanded their utility, enabling new applications in biomedical and nanomaterials research. Here, we show that time-dependent electric fields comprising more than two intensity levels could, in principle, effect an infinite number of distinct differential separations based on the higher-order terms of expression for ion mobility. These analyses could employ the hardware and operational procedures similar to those utilized in FAIMS. Methods up to the 4th or 5th order (where conventional IMS is 1st order and FAIMS is 2nd order) should be practical at field intensities accessible in ambient air, with still higher orders potentially achievable in insulating gases. Available experimental data suggest that higher-order separations should be largely orthogonal to each other and to FAIMS, IMS, and MS. PMID:16494377

  16. Developments in ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Collins, D C; Lee, M L

    2002-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used for over 30 years as a sensitive detector of organic compounds. The following is a brief review of IMS and its principles with an emphasis on its usage when coupled to mass spectrometry. Since its inception, IMS has been interfaced with quadrupole, time-of-flight, and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These hybrid instruments have been employed for the analysis of a variety of target analytes, including biomolecules, explosives, chemical warfare degradation products, and illicit drugs. PMID:11939214

  17. Third International Workshop on Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Basic research in ion mobility spectrometry has given rise to rapid advancement in hardware development and applications. The Third International Workshop on Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was held October 16-19, 1994, at Johnson Space Center to provide a forum for investigators to present the most recent results of both basic and applied IMS research. Presenters included manufacturers and various users, including military research organizations and drug enforcement agencies. Thirty papers were given in the following five sessions: Fundamental IMS Studies, Instrument Development, Hyphenated IMS Techniques, Applications, and Data Reduction and Signal Processing. Advances in hardware development, software development, and user applications are described.

  18. The Detection of Patients at Risk of Gastrointestinal Toxicity during Pelvic Radiotherapy by Electronic Nose and FAIMS: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Covington, James A.; Wedlake, Linda; Andreyev, Jervoise; Ouaret, Nathalie; Thomas, Matthew G.; Nwokolo, Chuka U.; Bardhan, Karna D.; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the electronic nose can be used to identify differences between human health and disease for a range of disorders. We present a pilot study to investigate if the electronic nose and a newer technology, FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry), can be used to identify and help inform the treatment pathway for patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy, which frequently causes gastrointestinal side-effects, severe in some. From a larger group, 23 radiotherapy patients were selected where half had the highest levels of toxicity and the others the lowest. Stool samples were obtained before and four weeks after radiotherapy and the volatiles and gases emitted analysed by both methods; these chemicals are products of fermentation caused by gut microflora. Principal component analysis of the electronic nose data and wavelet transform followed by Fisher discriminant analysis of FAIMS data indicated that it was possible to separate patients after treatment by their toxicity levels. More interestingly, differences were also identified in their pre-treatment samples. We believe these patterns arise from differences in gut microflora where some combinations of bacteria result to give this olfactory signature. In the future our approach may result in a technique that will help identify patients at “high risk” even before radiation treatment is started. PMID:23201982

  19. Chemical standards in ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Maestre, Robert; Harden, Charles S.; Ewing, Robert G.; Crawford, Christina L.; Hill, Jr, Herbert H.

    2010-08-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K0) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match with those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-Dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di- tertbutylpyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion–molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer as, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound’s mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values.

  20. Chemical Standards in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Harden, Charles Steve; Ewing, Robert Gordon; Crawford, Christina Lynn; Hill, Herbert Henderson

    2010-01-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K0) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion-molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer gas, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound’s mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values. PMID:20369157

  1. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A.; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility ( K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance ( R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/ K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  2. An excimer-based FAIMS detector for detection of ultra-low concentration of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.; Sychev, Alexey V.; Perederiy, Anatoly N.; Budovich, V. L.; Budovich, D. V.

    2014-05-01

    A new method of explosives detection based on the field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and ionization by an excimer emitter has been developed jointly with a portable detector. The excimer emitter differs from usual UVionizing lamps by mechanism of emitting, energy and spectral characteristics. The developed and applied Ar2-excimer emitter has the working volume of 1 cm3, consuming power 0.6 W, the energy of photons of about 10 eV (λ=126 nm), the FWHM radiation spectrum of 10 nm and emits more than 1016 photon per second that is two orders of magnitude higher than UV-lamp of the same working volume emits. This also exceeds by an order of magnitude the quantity of photons per second for 10-Hz solid state YAG:Nd3+ - laser of 1mJ pulse energy at λ=266 nm that is also used to ionize the analyte. The Ar2-excimer ionizes explosives by direct ionization mechanism and through ionization of organic impurities. The developed Ar2-excimer-based ion source does not require cooling due to low level discharge current of emitter and is able to work with no repair more than 10000 hrs. The developed excimer-based explosives detector can analyze both vapors and traces of explosives. The FAIMS spectra of the basic types of explosives like trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), nitroglycerine (NG), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) under Ar2-excimer ionization are presented. The detection limit determined for TNT vapors equals 1x10-14 g/cm3, for TNT traces- 100 pg.

  3. Process analysis using ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, J I

    2006-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry, originally used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives and illegal drugs, is now frequently applied in the field of process analytics. The method combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng to pg per liter and ppb(v)/ppt(v) ranges) and relatively low technical expenditure with a high-speed data acquisition. In this paper, the working principles of IMS are summarized with respect to the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Different ionization techniques, sample introduction methods and preseparation methods are considered. Proven applications of different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) used at ISAS will be discussed in detail: monitoring of gas insulated substations, contamination in water, odoration of natural gas, human breath composition and metabolites of bacteria. The example applications discussed relate to purity (gas insulated substations), ecology (contamination of water resources), plants and person safety (odoration of natural gas), food quality control (molds and bacteria) and human health (breath analysis). PMID:16132133

  4. Environment applications for ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Rudolph, Andreas

    1995-01-01

    The detection of environmentally important polychlorinated aromatics by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was investigated. Single polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) isomers (congeners) having five or more chlorine atoms were reliably detected in isooctane solution at levels of 35 ng with a Barringer IONSCAN ion mobility spectrometer operating in negative mode; limits of detection (LOD) were extrapolated to be in the low ng region. Mixtures of up to four PCB congeners, showing characteristic multiple peaks, and complex commercial mixtures of PCBs (Aroclors) were also detected. Detection of Aroclors in transformer oil was suppressed by the presence of the antioxidant BHT (2,6-di-t-butyl4-methylphenol) in the oil. The wood preservative pentachlorophenol (PCP) was easily detected in recycled wood shavings at levels of 52 ppm with the IONSCAN; the LOD was extrapolated to be in the low ppm region.

  5. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers.

    PubMed

    Kaszycki, Julia L; Bowman, Andrew P; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A

    2016-05-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26944281

  6. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszycki, Julia L.; Bowman, Andrew P.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-03-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling.

  7. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszycki, Julia L.; Bowman, Andrew P.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-05-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling.

  8. Accelerated High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The resolving power of differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) was dramatically increased recently by carrier gases comprising up to 75% He or various vapors, enabling many new applications. However, the need for resolution of complex mixtures is virtually open-ended and many topical analyses demand yet finer separations. Also, the resolving power gains are often at the expense of speed, in particular making high-resolution FAIMS incompatible with online liquid-phase separations. Here, we report FAIMS employing hydrogen, specifically in mixtures with N2 containing up to 90% H2. Such compositions raise the mobilities of all ions and thus the resolving power beyond that previously feasible, while avoiding the electrical breakdown inevitable in He-rich mixtures. The increases in resolving power and ensuing peak resolution are especially significant at H2 fractions above ~50%. Higher resolution can be exchanged for acceleration of the analyses by up to ~4 times, at least. For more mobile species such as multiply-charged peptides, this exchange is presently forced by the constraints of existing FAIMS devices, but future designs optimized for H2 should consistently improve resolution for all analytes. PMID:22074292

  9. High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Planar Analyzers at Elevated Dispersion Field

    PubMed Central

    Prior, David C.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    The ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) methods are grouped into conventional IMS, based on the absolute ion mobility, and differential or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), based on the mobility difference in strong and weak electric fields. A key attraction of FAIMS is substantial orthogonality to mass spectrometry (MS). Although several FAIMS/MS platforms were commercialized, their utility was limited by FAIMS resolving power, typically ∼10 - 20. Recently, gas mixtures comprising up to 75% He has enabled resolving power >100 that permits separation of numerous heretofore “co-eluting” isomers. This performance opens major new proteomic and other biological applications. Here, we show that raising the separation field by ∼35% over the previous 21 kV/cm provides similar or better resolution (with resolving powers of >200 for multiply-charged peptides) using only 50% He, which avoids problems due to elevated pressure and He content in the mass spectrometer. The heating of ions by the separation field in this regime exceeds that at higher He content but weaker field, inducing greater izomerization of labile species. PMID:20666414

  10. A Method of Highly Sensitive Detecting of Explosives on the Basis of FAIMS Analyzer with Laser Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakov, A. A.; Kotkovskii, G. E.; Odulo, I. P.; Spitsyn, E. M.; Shestakov, A. V.

    In this work comparison of the desorption effectiveness of picosecond and nanosecond laser sources (λ=266, 532 nm) were carried out to investigate the possibility of creating a non-contact sampling device for detectors of explosives on the principles of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). The results of mass spectrometric studies of TNT (2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), RDX (1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane) laser desorption from a quartz substrate are presented. It is shown that the most effective laser source is a Nd:YAG3+ laser (λ = 266 nm; E = 1 mJ; τ = 5-10 ns; q = 108 W/cm2). The typical desorbed mass is 2 ng for RDX, 4-6 ng for TNT and 0.02 ng HMX per single laser pulse. The results obtained make it possible to create a non-contact portable laser sampling device operating in frequency mode with high efficiency.

  11. Field applications of ion-mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Patricia A.

    1997-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an excellent tool for detection of controlled substances under field conditions. Plasmagrams and tables showing the results of field applications will be discussed. Residues of drugs, such as cocaine and heroin, can be left anywhere including vehicles, boats, and houses. In houses, the carpets, walls, and floors are good locations for residues to adhere. Individual clothing can also be contaminated with drug residue. Vehicles that are suspected of having previously smuggled illegal substances can be vacuumed and screened. Tablets that look similar and respond the same when screened with the Marquis reagent can be differentiated by IMS. With Southern California being the 'methamphetamine capital of the world' and the resurgence of phencyclidine, IMS has proven extremely valuable in the screening of abandoned clandestine laboratory sites and vehicles in which the clandestine laboratories; chemicals and glassware were transported. IMS is very responsive to ephedrine/pseudophedrine, a precursor of methamphetamine and 1-piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile, an intermediate of phencyclidine. Once residues are detected, vacuum samples, and/or methanol wipes are collected and analyzed at the DEA Laboratory for confirmation of the suspected substance using GC-IRD or Mass Spectrometry.

  12. Coulombic Effects in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Clowers, Brian H.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been increasingly employed in a number of applications. When coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), IMS becomes a powerful analytical tool for separating complex samples and investigating molecular structure. Therefore, improvements in IMS-MS instrumentation, e.g. IMS resolving power and sensitivity, are highly desirable. Implementation of an ion trap for accumulation and pulsed ion injection to IMS based on the ion funnel has provided considerably increased ion currents, and thus a basis for improved sensitivity and measurement throughput. However, large ion populations may manifest Coulombic effects contributing to the spatial dispersion of ions traveling in the IMS drift tube, and reduction in the IMS resolving power. In this study, we present an analysis of Coulombic effects on IMS resolution. Basic relationships have been obtained for the spatial evolution of ion packets due to Coulombic repulsion. The analytical relationships were compared with results of a computer model that simulates IMS operation based on a first principles approach. Initial experimental results reported here are consistent with the computer modeling. A noticeable decrease in the IMS resolving power was observed for ion populations of >10,000 elementary charges. The optimum IMS operation conditions which would minimize the Coulombic effects are discussed. PMID:19438247

  13. Analysis of a series of chlorogenic acid isomers using differential ion mobility and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Khamis, Mona M; Mohammed Saeid, Waleed; Purves, Randy W; Katselis, George; Low, Nicholas H; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-08-24

    Chlorogenic acids are among the most abundant phenolics found in the human diet. Of these, the mono-caffeoylquinic acids are the predominant phenolics found in fruits, such as apples and pears, and products derived from them. In this research, a comprehensive study of the electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) dissociation behavior of the three most common mono-caffeoylquinic acids, namely 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA) and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4-CQA), were determined using both positive and negative ionization. All proposed structures of the observed product ions were confirmed with second-generation MS(3) experiments. Similarities and differences between the dissociation pathways in the positive and negative ion modes are discussed, confirming the proposed structures and the established MS/MS fingerprints. MS/MS dissociation was primarily driven via the cleavage of the ester bond linking the quinic acid moiety to the caffeic acid moiety within tested molecules. Despite being structural isomers with the same m/z values and dissociation behaviors, the MS/MS data in the negative ion mode was able to differentiate the three isomers based on ion intensity for the major product ions, observed at m/z 191, 179 and 173. This differentiation was consistent among various MS instruments. In addition, ESI coupled with high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-FAIMS-MS) was employed for the separation of these compounds for the first time. By combining MS/MS data and differential ion mobility, a method for the separation and identification of mono-caffeoylquinic in apple/pear juice samples was developed with a run time of less than 1 min. It is envisaged that this methodology could be used to identify pure juices based on their chlorogenic acid profile (i.e., metabolomics), and could also be used to detect juice-to-juice adulteration (e.g., apple juice addition to pear juice

  14. Detection of potato storage disease via gas analysis: a pilot study using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rutolo, Massimo; Covington, James A; Clarkson, John; Iliescu, Daciana

    2014-01-01

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection) and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection). A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis) that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation). PMID:25171118

  15. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rutolo, Massimo; Covington, James A.; Clarkson, John; Iliescu, Daciana

    2014-01-01

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection) and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection). A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis) that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation). PMID:25171118

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Ilbeigi, Vahideh; Valadbeigi, Younes; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-07-19

    A simple, fast, and inexpensive method was developed for detecting heavy metals via the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) in the negative mode. In this method, Cl(-) ion produced by the thermal ionization of NaCl is employed as the dopant or the ionizing reagent to ionize heavy metals. In practice, a solution of mixed heavy metals and NaCl salts was directly deposited on a Nichrome filament and electrically heated to vaporize the salts. This produced the IMS spectra of several heavy-metal salts, including CdCl2, ZnSO4, NiCl2, HgSO4, HgCl2, PbI2, and Pb(Ac)2. For each heavy metal (M), one or two major peaks were observed, which were attributed to M·Cl(-) or [M·NaCl]Cl(-)complexes. The method proved to be useful for the analysis of mixed heavy metals. The absolute detection limits measured for ZnSO4 and HgSO4 were 0.1 and 0.05 μg, respectively. PMID:27321408

  17. Total hydrocarbon analysis by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts must be alerted quickly to chemical leaks that compromise their health and the success of their missions. An ideal leak detector would be equally sensitive to all compounds that might constitute a hazard and insensitive to nontoxic compounds. No ideal sensor exists; thus, selection of a methodology is a series of compromises. The commonly used methods are either insensitive at the low exposure levels set by OSHA, NASA, and other organizations or are selectively insensitive to important classes of chemicals such as Freons. After extensive study and experience, the Toxicology Group at JSC has selected ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for development into a broad range, sensitive detector. In addition to the sensing method, signal processing is important leak detection because a background signal can be expected at all times. The leak-detecting instrument must be programmed to discriminate between authentic leaks and background fluctuations caused by routine operations. The results of an evaluation of the prototype THA is presented in terms related to spacecraft operations. The evaluation included determination of instrumental parameters such as stability and response times. We also included responses to some common components of spacecraft atmospheres in pure form and in binary and ternary mixtures. The output of the four algorithms to the mixtures was found to be noticeably different. These responses are compared on the basis of their utility for signaling a chemical leak. As a means of evaluating its resistance to a falsely positive response, the THA was challenged with carbon dioxide and methane, compounds whose concentrations normally increase in spacecraft air during human habitation. The instrument showed virtually no response to these interferences. Although the prototype THA is designed for space flight, this detector is expected to be useful for field screening at chemical waste dumps and other environmentally sensitive locations.

  18. Ion Mobility Separation of Variant Histone Tails Extending to the “Middle-down” Range

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Zheng, Yupeng; Smith, Richard D.; Kelleher, Neil

    2012-05-15

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) can baseline-resolve multiple variants of post-translationally modified peptides extending to the 3 - 4 kDa range, which differ in the localization of a PTM as small as acetylation. Essentially orthogonal separations for different charge states expand the total achievable peak capacity in proportion to the number of observed states that increases for longer polypeptides. This might enable resolving localization variants for even larger peptides and intact proteins.

  19. Modeling vapor uptake induced mobility shifts in peptide ions observed with transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Vivek K; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-10-21

    Low field ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques exhibit low orthogonality, as inverse mobility often scales with mass to charge ratio. This inadequacy can be mitigated by adding vapor dopants, which may cluster with analyte ions and shift their mobilities by amounts independent of both mass and mobility of the ion. It is therefore important to understand the interactions of vapor dopants with ions, to better quantify the extent of dopant facilitated mobility shifts. Here, we develop predictive models of vapor dopant facilitated mobility shifts, and compare model calculations to measurements of mobility shifts for peptide ions exposed to variable gas phase concentrations of isopropanol. Mobility measurements were made at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a recently developed transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometer (TMIMS). Results are compared to three separate models, wherein mobility shifts due to vapor dopants are attributed to changes in gas composition and (I) no vapor dopant uptake is assumed, (II) site-specific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a Langmuir adsorption model), and (III) site-unspecific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a classical nucleation model). We find that mobility shifts in peptide ions are in excellent agreement with model II, site-specific binding predictions. Conversely, mobility shifts of tetraalkylammonium ions from previous measurements were compared with these models and best agreement was found with model III predictions, i.e. site-unspecific dopant uptake. PMID:26051323

  20. A method for detecting ultra-low quantities of explosives with use a picosecond laser FAIMS analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Kotkovskii, Gennadii E.; Odulo, Ivan P.; Sychev, Alexey V.; Bogdanov, Artem S.; Perederiy, Anatoly N.; Spitsyn, Evgeny M.; Shestakov, Alexander V.

    2015-05-01

    A method for detecting ultralow quantities of explosives in air with use a state-of-the-art picosecond chip Nd3+:YAG laser has been developed. The method combines field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) with laser ionization of examined air samples. Radiation of λ = 266nm, τpulse = 300ps, Epulse = 30-150μJ, ν = 20-300Hz was used. Processes in the ion source for the use both picosecond and nanosecond ionization modes were analyzed. Parameters of the laser ion source have been specially optimized. The dependences on frequency, pulse energy, peak intensity, and average power for trinitrotoluene (TNT) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) were obtained. It was shown that the optimal peak intensity should be no less 3·106 W/cm2. The detected ion signals for all explosives were shown to be threefold higher for picosecond excitation in comparison with use a nanosecond laser of the same average power. The estimated detection threshold of the prototype equals 1. 10-15 g/cm3. The results are promising for the development of a highly sensitive, portable laser explosive detector.

  1. On the structural denaturation of biological analytes in trapped ion mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanny C; Kirk, Samuel R; Bleiholder, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Key to native ion mobility/mass spectrometry is to prevent the structural denaturation of biological molecules in the gas phase. Here, we systematically assess structural changes induced in the protein ubiquitin during a trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiment. Our analysis shows that the extent of structural denaturation induced in ubiquitin ions is largely proportional to the amount of translational kinetic energy an ion gains from the applied electric field between two collisions with buffer gas particles. We then minimize the efficiency of the structural denaturation of ubiquitin ions in the gas phase during a TIMS experiment. The resulting "soft" TIMS spectra of ubiquitin are found largely identical to those observed on "soft" elevated-pressure ion mobility drift tubes and the corresponding calibrated cross sections are consistent with structures reported from NMR experiments for the native and A-state of ubiquitin. Thus, our analysis reveals that TIMS is useful for native ion mobility/mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26998732

  2. Coulomb Repulsion in Miniature Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1999-08-08

    We have undertaken a study of ion mobility resolution in a miniature ion mobility spectrometer with a drift channel 1.7 mm in diameter and 35 mm in length. The device attained a maximum resolution of 14 in separating ions of NO, O{sub 2}, and methyl iodine. The ions were generated by pulses from a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. Broadening due to Coulomb repulsion was modeled theoretically and shown experimentally to have a major effect on the resolution of the miniature device.

  3. LABORATORY DETECTION OF PLASTICS IN SEEDCOTTON WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  4. Ion mobility spectrometers and methods for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, David A; Scott, Jill R; Appelhans, Anthony D; McJunkin, Timothy R; Olson, John E

    2009-04-14

    An ion mobility spectrometer may include an inner electrode and an outer electrode arranged so that at least a portion of the outer electrode surrounds at least a portion of the inner electrode and defines a drift space therebetween. The inner and outer electrodes are electrically insulated from one another so that a non-linear electric field is created in the drift space when an electric potential is placed on the inner and outer electrodes. An ion source operatively associated with the ion mobility spectrometer releases ions to the drift space defined between the inner and outer electrodes. A detector operatively associated with at least a portion of the outer electrode detects ions from the drift space.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometry after supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, a Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometer (FT-IMS) was constructed and evaluated as a detector for supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The FT-IMS provides both quantitative and qualitative data of a wide range of compounds, selective and nonselective modes of chromatographic detection, and it is compatible with a wide range of SFC mobile phases. Drift spectra are presented for a number of samples, including polymers, lipids, herbicides, antibiotics, and pharmaceuticals. The unique properties of supercritical fluids made it possible to introduce these compounds into the spectrometer. While the drift spectra presented are generally simple, showing only a quasi-molecular ion, a few are surprising complex. Examples of selective and non-selective detection demonstrate the usefulness of the detector. Examples are presented for fish oil concentrate, bacon grease extract, soil extract, and polymer mixtures. In the case of Triton X-100, a non-ionic surfactant, the FT-IMS was able to selectively detect individual oligomers in the polymer mixture. In the case of a polydimethylsilicone mixture the detector isolated a contaminant in the mixture.

  6. Direct Liquid Sampling for Corona Discharge Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Harmathová, Olga; Hradski, Jasna; Masár, Marián; Radjenovic, Branislav; Matejčík, Štefan

    2015-07-21

    We present a new technique suitable for direct liquid sampling and analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The technique is based on introduction of a droplet stream to the IMS reaction region. The technique was successfully used to detect explosives dissolved in methanol and oil as well as to analyze amino acids and dipeptides. One of the main advantages of this technique is its ability to analyze liquid samples without the requirement of any special solution. PMID:26154532

  7. Detection of gunpowder stabilizers with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    West, C; Baron, G; Minet, J-J

    2007-03-01

    This study is the first reported ion mobility detection of ethyl centralite and diphenylamine (DPA) smokeless gunpowder stabilizers, together with the nitroso and nitro derivatives of diphenylamine. First, the applicability of the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the substances of interest was determined. The existence of numerous peaks, both in positive and negative modes, clearly demonstrates the success of these experiments. All mono and di-nitro derivatives of DPA tested were detected with this method. Unfortunately, many of the ions generated were not accurately identified. However, reduced mobility constants representative of each ion generated under defined operating conditions could be used for purpose of compound identification. The method was then successfully tested on real gunpowder samples. By the use of IMS, we managed to establish a rapid, simple and sensitive screening method for the detection and identification of smokeless gunpowder organic components. PMID:16828537

  8. Review on ion mobility spectrometry. Part 1: current instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Cumeras, R; Figueras, E; Davis, C E; Baumbach, J I; Gràcia, I

    2015-03-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and 'well-known' technique of ion separation in the gaseous phase based on the differences in ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow that provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrumentation and have become available to be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). For each of the eight types of IMS instruments reviewed it is mentioned whether they can be hyphenated with MS and whether they are commercially available. Finally, out of the described devices, the six most-consolidated ones are compared. The current review article is followed by a companion review article which details the IMS hyphenated techniques (mainly gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) and the factors that make the data from an IMS device change as a function of device parameters and sampling conditions. These reviews will provide the reader with an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465076

  9. Review on Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Part 1: Current Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow which provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrumentation has become available to be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). For each of the eight types of IMS instruments reviewed it is mentioned whether they can be hyphenated with MS and whether they are commercially available. Finally, out of the described devices, the six most-consolidated ones are compared. The current review article is followed by a companion review article which details the IMS hyphenated techniques (mainly gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) and the factors that make the data from an IMS device change as function of device parameters and sampling conditions. These reviews will provide the reader with an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465076

  10. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  11. Separation of Protein Conformers by Differential Ion Mobility in Hydrogen-Rich Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-06-25

    Proteins in solution or the gas phase tend to exhibit multiple conformational families, each comprising distinct structures. Separation methods have generally failed to resolve these, with their convolution producing wide peaks. Here we report full separation of >10 conformers for most ubiquitin charge states by the new approach of differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) employing H2/N2 gas mixtures with up to 85% H2. The resolving power (up to 400) is five times the highest previously achieved (using He/N2 buffers), greatly increasing the separation specificity. The peak widths match the narrowest obtained by FAIMS for any species under same conditions and scale with the protein charge state (z) and ion residence time (t) as z-1/2 and t-1/2, as prescribed for instrumental (diffusional) broadening. This suggests resolution of specific geometries rather than broader ensembles.

  12. Separation of Protein Conformers by Differential Ion Mobility in Hydrogen-Rich Gases

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins in solution or the gas phase tend to exhibit multiple conformational families, each comprising distinct structures. Separation methods have generally failed to resolve these, with their convolution producing wide peaks. Here we report full separation of >10 conformers for most ubiquitin charge states by the new approach of differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) employing H2/N2 gas mixtures with up to 85% H2. The resolving power (up to 400) is five times the highest previously achieved (using He/N2 buffers), greatly increasing the separation specificity. The peak widths match the narrowest obtained by FAIMS for any species under same conditions and scale with the protein charge state (z) and ion residence time (t) as z−1/2 and t−1/2, as prescribed for instrumental (diffusional) broadening. This suggests resolution of specific geometries rather than broader ensembles. PMID:23855890

  13. Ion mobility spectrometry for pharmacokinetic studies – exemplary application

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, V.

    2013-01-01

    Breath analysis is an attractive non-invasive method for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. It uses endogenously produced compounds and metabolites of isotopically labelled precursors. In order to make such tests clinically useful, it is important to have relatively small portable instruments detecting volatile compounds within short time. A particularly promising analytical technique is ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to a multicapillary column (MCC). The present paper focuses on demonstrating the suitability of breath analysis for pharmacokinetic applications using MCC-IMS with respect to practicability and reproducibility testing the model substrate eucalyptol. Validation of the MCC-IMS measurements were performed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and resulted in an excellent correspondence of the time-dependent concentrations presented by the two different analytical techniques. Moreover, the good accordance in variance of kinetic parameters with repeated measures, and the determined inter-subject differences indicate the eligibility of the analysis method. PMID:24287589

  14. Separation of steroid isomers by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Linda; Fasciotti, Maíra; Gennäs, Gustav Boije Af; Kotiaho, Tapio; Daroda, Romeu J; Eberlin, Marcos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-10-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry performed in a compact traveling wave cell (TWIM-MS) is shown to provide a reliable, fast and repeatable method to separate derivatized steroid isomers. Three steroid isomer pairs were analyzed in their native form and as their p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate derivatives. The native steroids were separated from each other, but no separation could be attained for the isomers. The derivatized steroid isomers were, however, properly separated by TWIM-MS with peak-to-peak resolutions close to or as high as baseline resolution (Rp-p=0.77-1.08). PMID:23992881

  15. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  16. Differential Mobility Spectrometry: Preliminary Findings on Determination of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti; Boyd, John

    2007-01-01

    The electron capture detector (ECD) has been used for 40+ years (1) to derive fundamental constants such as a compound's electron affinity. Given this historical perspective, it is not surprising that differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) might be used in a like manner. This paper will present data from a gas chromatography (GC)-DMS instrument that illustrates the potential capability of this device to derive fundamental constants for electron-capturing compounds. Potential energy curves will be used to provide possible explanation of the data.

  17. Wireless Data Acquisition of Transient Signals for Mobile Spectrometry Applications.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Peter; Weagant, Scott; Karanassios, Vassili

    2016-05-01

    Wireless data acquisition using smartphones or handhelds offers increased mobility, it provides reduced size and weight, it has low electrical power requirements, and (in some cases) it has an ability to access the internet. Thus, it is well suited for mobile spectrometry applications using miniaturized, field-portable spectrometers, or detectors for chemical analysis in the field (i.e., on-site). There are four main wireless communications standards that can be used for wireless data acquisition, namely ZigBee, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and UWB (ultra-wide band). These are briefly reviewed and are evaluated for applicability to data acquisition of transient signals (i.e., time-domain) in the field (i.e., on-site) from a miniaturized, field-portable photomultiplier tube detector and from a photodiode array detector installed in a miniaturized, field-portable fiber optic spectrometer. These are two of the most widely used detectors for optical measurements in the ultraviolet-visible range of the spectrum. A miniaturized, 3D-printed, battery-operated microplasma-on-a-chip was used for generation of transient optical emission signals. Elemental analysis from liquid microsamples, a microplasma, and a handheld or a smartphone will be used as examples. Development and potential applicability of wireless data acquisition of transient optical emission signals for taking part of the lab to the sample types of mobile, field-portable spectrometry applications will be discussed. The examples presented are drawn from past and ongoing work in the authors' laboratory. A handheld or a smartphone were used as the mobile computing devices of choice. PMID:27006023

  18. External Second Gate-Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, Edward E., III

    2005-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and versatile techniques for the detection of trace levels of organic vapors. IMS is widely used for detecting contraband narcotics, explosives, toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agents. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts has mandated that equal importance be placed on the analysis time as well as the quality of the analytical data. (1) IMS is unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity has to be considered. (2) With conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal to less than 1%. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations decreasing resolution. With external second gate Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS), the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters to increase the spectral resolution. The FT-IMS entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a 7 to 10-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  19. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin. PMID:25893550

  20. Combining ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and photoelectron spectroscopy in a high-transmission instrument.

    PubMed

    Vonderach, Matthias; Ehrler, Oli T; Weis, Patrick; Kappes, Manfred M

    2011-02-01

    We have developed a novel instrument that combines ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectro-metry, and photoelectron spectroscopy. The instrument couples an electrospray ion source, a high-transmission ion mobility cell based on ion funnels, a quadrupole mass filter, and a time-of-flight (magnetic bottle) photoelectron spectrometer operated with a pulsed detachment laser. We show that the instrument can resolve highly structured anion arrival time distributions and at the same time provide corresponding photoelectron spectra-using the DNA oligonucleotide ion [dC(6) - 5H](5-) as a test case. For this multianion we find at least four different, noninterconverting isomers (conformers) simultaneously present in the gas phase at room temperature. For each of these we record well-resolved and remarkably different photoelectron spectra at each of three different detachment laser wavelengths. Two-dimensional ion mobility/electron binding energy plots can be acquired with an automated data collection procedure. We expect that this kind of instrument will significantly improve the capabilities for structure determination of (bio)molecular anions in the gas phase. PMID:21214198

  1. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Jennifer E; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K; Monroe, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Moore, Ronald J; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J; Metz, Thomas O; Dey, Sudhansu K; Smith, Richard D; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Baker, Erin S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids' biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are often unresolvable using present approaches. Here we show that combining liquid chromatography (LC) and structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurement with MS analyses distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes. PMID:26734689

  2. Rapid Analysis of Isobaric Exogenous Metabolites by Differential Mobility Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Whitney B; Schneider, Bradley B; Kertesz, Vilmos; Corr, Jay; Covey, Thomas R.; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    The direct separation of isobaric glucuronide metabolites from propranolol dosed tissue extracts by differential mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) with the use of a polar gas-phase chemical modifier was demonstrated. The DMS gas-phase separation was able to resolve the isobaric metabolites with separation times on the order of ms instead of mins to hrs typically required when using pre-ionization chromatographic separation methods. Direct separation of isobaric metabolites from the complex tissue extract was validated using standards as well as implementing an HPLC separation prior to the DMS-MS analysis to pre-separate the species of interest. The ability to separate isobaric exogenous metabolites directly from a complex tissue extract is expected to facilitate the drug development process by increasing analytical throughput without the requirement for pre-ionization cleanup or separation strategies.

  3. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are unresolvable using present LC-MS approaches. Here we show that combining structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with LC-MS measurements distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes.

  4. Analysis of biogenic amines using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Z; Mardihallaj, A; Khayamian, T

    2010-05-15

    A new method based on corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was developed for the analysis of biogenic amines including spermidine, spermine, putrescine, and cadaverine. The ion mobility spectra of the compounds were obtained with and without n-Nonylamine used as the reagent gas. The high proton affinity of n-Nonylamine prevented ion formation from compounds with a proton affinity lower than that of n-Nonylamine and, therefore, enhanced its selectivity. It was also realized that the ion mobility spectrum of n-Nonylamine varied with its concentration. A sample injection port of a gas chromatograph was modified and used as the sample introduction system into the CD-IMS. The detection limits, dynamic ranges, and analytical parameters of the compounds with and without using the reagent gas were obtained. The detection limits and dynamic ranges of the compounds were about 2ng and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively. The wide dynamic range of CD-IMS originates from the high current of the corona discharge. The results revealed the high capability of the CD-IMS for the analysis of biogenic amines. PMID:20298897

  5. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe; Chirot, Fabien

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  6. On-site analysis of old deposited chemical warfare agents by combined use of ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, J.; Adler, J.; Brodacki, M.; Doering, H.R.; Flachowsky, J.; Loudon, A.

    1995-12-31

    The factory site of an old mustard gas plant was investigated with on-site analysis methods. Using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry a lot of degradation products of mustard gas could be detected. Sulfur mustard was found in one soil sample and in ceramic material of a bunker used for storage of the produced warfare agents. Concentrations of the mustard gas are in the sub ppb level. The results of ion mobility and mass spectrometry agreed in 95 % of the investigated samples.

  7. Development of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Humphry, Donald E.; Shao, Maxine; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) can provide gas chromatography with sample identification independent of sample retention time, with minimal interface. Initial commercial methods of IMS however, did not possess sufficient analytical capabilities and presented operational parameters which were unsuitable for exobiology missions. Subsequent development of IMS technology, with the focus on exobiology analytical requirements and mission imposed operational limitations, has produced an IMS interfaced with a GC capable of fulfilling the analytical requirements of several exobiology missions. Future exobiology missions will require further development of the IMS, particularly in the areas of overall instrument miniaturization and complex sample identification. The evolution of the exobiology focused IMS will be presented up to the current prototype design, which is a component of several proposed exobiology instruments. Areas of future development will also be discussed.

  8. Interrogating viral capsid assembly with ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetrecht, Charlotte; Barbu, Ioana M.; Shoemaker, Glen K.; van Duijn, Esther; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2011-02-01

    Most proteins fulfil their function as part of large protein complexes. Surprisingly, little is known about the pathways and regulation of protein assembly. Several viral coat proteins can spontaneously assemble into capsids in vitro with morphologies identical to the native virion and thus resemble ideal model systems for studying protein complex formation. Even for these systems, the mechanism for self-assembly is still poorly understood, although it is generally thought that smaller oligomeric structures form key intermediates. This assembly nucleus and larger viral assembly intermediates are typically low abundant and difficult to monitor. Here, we characterised small oligomers of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and norovirus under equilibrium conditions using native ion mobility mass spectrometry. This data in conjunction with computational modelling enabled us to elucidate structural features of these oligomers. Instead of more globular shapes, the intermediates exhibit sheet-like structures suggesting that they are assembly competent. We propose pathways for the formation of both capsids.

  9. Electron Attachment Studies for CHCl3 Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hai-yan; Feng, Hong-tao; Li, Hu; Wang, Hong-mei; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan

    2011-04-01

    The dissociative electron attachment process for CHCl3 at different electric field have been studied with nitrogen as drift and carrier gas using corona discharge ionization source ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS). The corresponding electron attachment rate constants varied from 1.26×10-8 cm3/(molecules s) to 8.24×10-9 cm3/(molecules s) as the electric field changed from 200 V/cm to 500 V/cm. At a fixed electric field in the drift region, the attachment rate constants are also detected at different sample concentration. The ion-molecule reaction rate constants for the further reaction between Cl- and CHCl3 are also detected, which indicates that the technique maybe becomes a new method to research the rate constants between ions and neural molecules. And the reaction rate constants between Cl- and CHCl3 are the first time detected using CD-IMS.

  10. Determination of ammonia in ethylene using ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. H.; Limero, T. F.; Lane, J. L.; Wang, F.

    1997-01-01

    A simple procedure to analyze ammonia in ethylene by ion mobility spectrometry is described. The spectrometer is operated with a silane polymer membrane., 63Ni ion source, H+ (H2O)n reactant ion, and nitrogen drift and source gas. Ethylene containing parts per billion (ppb) (v/v) concentrations of ammonia is pulled across the membrane and diffuses into the spectrometer. Preconcentration or preseparation is unnecessary, because the ethylene in the spectrometer has no noticeable effect on the analytical results. Ethylene does not polymerize in the radioactive source. Ethylene's flammability is negated by the nitrogen inside the spectrometer. Response to ammonia concentrations between 200 ppb and 1.5 ppm is near linear, and a detection limit of 25 ppb is calculated.

  11. Anomerization of Acrylated Glucose During Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chendo, Christophe; Moreira, Guillaume; Tintaru, Aura; Posocco, Paola; Laurini, Erik; Lefay, Catherine; Gigmes, Didier; Viel, Stéphane; Pricl, Sabrina; Charles, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Anomerization of simple sugars in the liquid phase is known as an acid- and base-catalyzed process, which highly depends on solvent polarity. This reaction is reported here to occur in the gas phase, during traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) experiments aimed at separating α- and β-anomers of penta-acrylated glucose generated as ammonium adducts in electrospray ionization. This compound was available in two samples prepared from glucose dissolved in solvents of different polarity, namely tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC), and analyzed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) as well as traveling wave ion mobility (ESI-TWIMS-MS). In MS/MS, an anchimerically-assisted process was found to be unique to the electrosprayed α-anomer, and was only observed for the THF sample. In ESI-TWIMS-MS, a signal was measured at the drift time expected for the α-anomer for both the THF and DMAC samples, in apparent contradiction to the MS/MS results, which indicated that the α-anomer was not present in the DMAC sample. However, MS/MS experiments performed after TWIMS separation revealed that ammonium adducts of the α-anomer produced from each sample, although exhibiting the same collision cross section, were clearly different. Indeed, while the α-anomer actually present in the THF sample was electrosprayed with the ammonium adducted at the C2 acrylate, its homologue only observed when the DMAC sample was subjected to TWIMS hold the adducted ammonium at the C1 acrylate. These findings were explained by a β/α inter-conversion upon injection in the TWIMS cell, as supported by theoretical calculation and dynamic molecular modeling.

  12. Detection of Huanglongbing disease using differential mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Pasamontes, Alberto; Peirano, Daniel J; Zhao, Weixiang; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Fiehn, Oliver; Ehsani, Reza; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-03-01

    The viability of the multibillion dollar global citrus industry is threatened by the "green menace", citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing, HLB), caused by the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter. The long asymptomatic stage of HLB makes it challenging to detect emerging regional infections early to limit disease spread. We have established a novel method of disease detection based on chemical analysis of released volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that emanate from infected trees. We found that the biomarkers "fingerprint" is specific to the causal pathogen and could be interpreted using analytical methods such as gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography/differential mobility spectrometry (GC/DMS). This VOC-based disease detection method has a high accuracy of ∼90% throughout the year, approaching 100% under optimal testing conditions, even at very early stages of infection where other methods are not adequate. Detecting early infection based on VOCs precedes visual symptoms and DNA-based detection techniques (real-time polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR) and can be performed at a substantially lower cost and with rapid field deployment. PMID:24484549

  13. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Matthew S.; Dilger, Jonathan M.; Acton, Matthew D.; Arnold, Randy J.; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences.

  14. Analysis of explosives using corona discharge ionization combined with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyeon; Park, Sehwan; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sung-Suk; Kim, Jeongkwon

    2014-03-01

    Corona discharge ionization combined with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) was utilized to investigate five common explosives: cyclonite (RDX), trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). The MS scan and the selected ion IMS analyses confirmed the identities of the existing ion species and their drift times. The ions observed were RDX·NO3(-), TNT(-), PETN·NO3(-), HMX·NO3(-), and DNT(-), with average drift times of 6.93 ms, 10.20 ms, 9.15 ms, 12.24 ms, 11.30 ms, and 8.89 ms, respectively. The reduced ion mobility values, determined from a standard curve calculated by linear regression of (normalized drift times)(-1) versus literature K0 values, were 2.09, 1.38, 1.55, 1.15, 1.25, and 1.60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 ng for RDX, 10 ng for TNT, 0.5 ng for PETN, 5.0 ng for HMX, and 10 ng for DNT. Simplified chromatograms were observed when nitrogen, as opposed to air, was used as the drift gas, but the detection limits were approximately 10 times worse (i.e., less sensitivity of detection). PMID:24468343

  15. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Glover, Matthew S; Dilger, Jonathan M; Acton, Matthew D; Arnold, Randy J; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E

    2016-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26860087

  16. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Matthew S.; Dilger, Jonathan M.; Acton, Matthew D.; Arnold, Randy J.; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/ trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences.

  17. Structures of Metallosupramolecular Coordination Assemblies Can Be Obtained by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Erin R.; Anderson, Stanley E.; Northrop, Brian H.; Stang, Peter J.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Rigid rectangular, cyclobis[(2,9-bis[trans-Pt(PEt3)2(PF6)]anthracene)(4,4′-dipyridyl)], triangular, cyclotris[(2,9-bis[trans-Pt(PEt3)2(PF6)]phenanthrene)(4,4′-dipyridyl)], and prismatic, cyclotris[bis-[cis-Pt(PEt3)2)(CF3SO3)2](tetrakis(4-pyridyl)cyclobutadienecyclopentadienylcobalt(I))] supramolecular assemblies, based on dipyridyl ligands and square planar platinum coordination, have been investigated by ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). ESI-quadrupole and TOF spectra have been obtained and fragmentation pathways assigned. Ion mobility studies give cross sections that compare very well with cross sections of the supramolecular rectangle and triangle species based on X-ray bond distances. For the larger prism structures, agreement of experimental and calculated cross sections from molecular modeling is very good, indicating IMS-MS methods can be used to characterize complex self-assembled structures where X-ray or other spectroscopic structures are not available. PMID:20815390

  18. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  19. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  20. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26864793

  1. Dynamically multiplexed ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, Mikhail E; Clowers, Brian H; Prior, David C; Danielson, William F; Liyu, Andrei V; Petritis, Brianne O; Smith, Richard D

    2008-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity, high-throughput platform, for example, for proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, including efficient ion accumulation in an ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube, and signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter, into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of, for example, blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have developed and rigorously evaluated a novel dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity throughout the experiment. The MP IMS-TOFMS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in the presence of a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a 3 orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features were found to yield approximately 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of approximately 7.5%. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of approximately 4%. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80%, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were <15%. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min that constitutes almost 1 order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach. PMID:18582088

  2. Electrospray Ionization Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry of Human Brain Gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Mirela; Robu, Adrian C; Ghiulai, Roxana M; Vukelić, Željka; Clemmer, David E; Zamfir, Alina D

    2016-05-17

    The progress of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), together with its association to mass spectrometry (MS), opened new directions for the identification of various metabolites in complex biological matrices. However, glycolipidomics of the human brain by IMS MS represents an area untouched up to now, because of the difficulties encountered in brain sampling, analyte extraction, and IMS MS method optimization. In this study, IMS MS was introduced in human brain ganglioside (GG) research. The efficiency of the method in clinical glycolipidomics was demonstrated on a highly complex mixture extracted from a normal fetal frontal lobe (FL37). Using this approach, a remarkably rich molecular ion pattern was discovered, which proved the presence of a large number of glycoforms and an unpredicted diversity of the ceramide chains. Moreover, the results showed for the first time the occurrence of GGs in the human brain with a much higher degree of sialylation than previously reported. Using IMS MS, the entire series starting from mono- up to octasialylated GGs was detected in FL37. These findings substantiate early clinical reports on the direct correlation between GG sialylation degree and brain developmental stage. Using IMS CID MS/MS, applied here for the first time to gangliosides, a novel, tetrasialylated O-GalNAc modified species with a potential biomarker role in brain development was structurally characterized. Under variable collision energy, a high number of sequence ions was generated for the investigated GalNAc-GQ1(d18:1/18:0) species. Several fragment ions documented the presence of the tetrasialo element attached to the inner Gal, indicating that GalNAc-GQ1(d18:1/18:0) belongs to the d series. PMID:27088833

  3. Ion Mobility Spectrometry Reveals Duplex DNA Dissociation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Gabelica, Valérie; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) soft desolvation is widely used to investigate fragile species such as nucleic acids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) gives access to the gas phase energetics of the intermolecular interactions in the absence of solvent, by following the dissociation of mass-selected ions. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) provides indications on the tridimensional oligonucleotide structure by attributing a collision cross section (CCS) to the studied ion. Electrosprayed duplexes longer than eight bases pairs retain their helical structure in a solvent-free environment. However, the question of conformational changes under activation in MS/MS studies remains open. The objective of this study is to probe binding energetics and characterize the unfolding steps occurring prior to oligonucleotide duplex dissociation. Comparing the evolution of CCS with collision energy and breakdown curves, we characterize dissociation pathways involved in CID-activated DNA duplex separation into single strands, and we demonstrate here the existence of stable dissociation intermediates. At fixed duplex length, dissociation pathways were found to depend on the percentage of GC base pairs and on their position in the duplex. Our results show that pure GC sequences undergo a gradual compaction until reaching the dissociation intermediate: A-helix. Mixed AT-GC sequences were found to present at least two conformers: a classic B-helix and an extended structure where the GC tract is a B-helix and the AT tract(s) fray. The dissociation in single strands takes place from both conformers when the AT base pairs are enclosed between two GC tracts or only from the extended conformer when the AT tract is situated at the end(s) of the sequence.

  4. High-Sensitivity Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry Using Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Lee, Hak-No; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Li, Fumin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-15

    The utility of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for separation of mixtures and structural characterization of ions has been demonstrated extensively, including in the biological and nanoscience contexts. A major attraction of IMS is its speed, several orders of magnitude above that of condensed-phase separations. Nonetheless, IMS combined with mass spectrometry (MS) has remained a niche technique, substantially due to limited sensitivity resulting from ion losses at the IMS-MS junction. We have developed a new electrospray ionization (ESI)-IMS-QToF MS instrument that incorporates electrodynamic ion funnels at both front ESI-IMS and back IMS-QToF interfaces. The front funnel is of the novel ''hourglass'' design that efficiently accumulates ions and pulses them into the IMS drift tubes. Even for drift tubes of two meter length, ion transmission through IMS and on to QToF is essentially lossless across the range of ion masses relevant to most applications. The RF ion focusing at IMS terminus does not degrade IMS resolving power, which exceeds 100 (for singly-charged ions) and is close to the theoretical limit. The overall sensitivity of present ESI-IMS-MS system is shown to be comparable to that of commercial ESI-MS, which should make IMS-MS suitable for analyses of complex mixtures with ultra-high sensitivity and exceptional throughput.

  5. High-Sensitivity Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry Using Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Lee, Hak-No; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Li, Fumin; Tolmachev, Aleksey; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The utility of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for separation of mixtures and structural characterization of ions has been demonstrated extensively, including in the biological and nanoscience contexts. A major attraction of IMS is its speed, several orders of magnitude greater than that of condensed-phase separations. Nonetheless, IMS combined with mass spectrometry (MS) has remained a niche technique, substantially because of limited sensitivity resulting from ion losses at the IMS-MS junction. We have developed a new electrospray ionization (ESI)-IMS-QToF MS instrument that incorporates electrodynamic ion funnels at both front ESI-IMS and rear IMS-QToF interfaces. The front funnel is of the novel “hourglass” design that efficiently accumulates ions and pulses them into the IMS drift tubes. Even for drift tubes of two meter length, ion transmission through IMS and on to QToF is essentially lossless across the range of ion masses relevant to most applications. The RF ion focusing at the IMS terminus does not degrade IMS resolving power, which exceeds 100 (for singly-charged ions) and is close to the theoretical limit. The overall sensitivity of present ESI-IMS-MS system is comparable to that of commercial ESI-MS, which should make IMS-MS suitable for analyses of complex mixtures with ultra-high sensitivity and exceptional throughput. PMID:15889926

  6. Profiling of phospholipids and related lipid structures using multidimensional ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Tan, Bo; Bohrer, Brian C.; O'Dell, David K.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Pazos, Mauricio X.; Clemmer, David E.; Walker, J. Michael

    2009-10-01

    Increasingly comprehensive questions related to the biosynthesis of lipids relevant to understanding new signaling pathways have created daunting tasks for their chemical analysis. Here, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques combined with electrospray ionization have been used to examine mixtures of closely related lipid structures. The drift time distributions of sphingomyelins show baseline separations for ethylene chain length differences ([Delta] ~ 1.2 ms) and partial separations in single unsaturation differences ([Delta] ~ 0.3 ms) revealing that the most compact structures are observed with shorter chains and increasing unsaturation. Drift time distributions of different ionizations frequently fall into families with the same drift times (isodrifts) indicating that the ion attached to the lipid has little structural influence. The present data show that phospholipids, especially phosphatidylinositol, aggregate to form inverted micelles. Phospholipids (phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol) are effectively separated according to their polar head groups. This method also provides information about the mixture composition of the chemically different lipids N-palmitoyl glycine, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide, and phosphatidylcholine existing over an array of charge states and sizes (inverted micelles) depending on mixture concentration. Multidimensional IMS3-MS introduces an additional dimension to fragmentation analysis by separating the fragmented ions into groups related to size, shape and charge and allows determination of sn-1 and sn-2 substitution as is shown for phosphatidylglycerols. This contribution provides evidence for extending the targeted approach to global lipidomics analysis using the high-efficiency gas-phase separation afforded by multidimensional IMS-MS.

  7. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  8. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. PMID:26851088

  9. Detection and characterization of smokeless powders with ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Neiza M.; Rosario, Santa V.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen

    2005-05-01

    Smokeless Powders are a class of propellants that were developed in the late 19th century to replace black powder; it has been used as an explosive in shotguns, rifles, firearms and many other larger caliber weapons. These propellants can be placed into one of three different classes according to the chemical composition of their primary energetic ingredients. Advance equipment have been designed and used for the detection of explosives devices and compounds potentially energetic. In this research we are developing an analytical methodology to detect different formulation of smokeless powders: Alliant-American Select, Alliant-Bullseye, and Alliant-Red Dot using the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) technique. We used different surfaces like computer diskettes, CD"s, book covers and plastics to study their adsorption/desorption process. Using micropipettes, we delivered solutions with different amounts of Smokeless Powders from a 1000 ppm solution and deposit it on various types of filters to make a calibration curve. Several amounts of Smokeless Powder were deposited to the different surfaces and collected with filter paper. The samples were desorbed directly from the filter to the instrument inlet port. Subsequently, the percentage of explosive recovered was calculated.

  10. Low-temperature plasma ionization differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuklya, Andriy; Engelhard, Carsten; Uteschil, Florian; Kerpen, Klaus; Marks, Robert; Telgheder, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    A low-temperature plasma (LTP) was used as an ionization source for differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the first time. This ionization source enhances the potential of DMS as a miniaturized system for on-site rapid monitoring. The effects of experimental parameters (e.g., discharge/carrier gas composition and flow rate, applied voltage) on the analysis of model aromatic compounds were investigated and discussed. It was found that the nature of reactant ion positive (RIP) is dependent on the discharge/carrier gas composition. The best response to the analyte was achieved when pure nitrogen was used as the discharge/carrier gas. The ability to perform analysis with zero helium consumption is especially attractive in view of the potential application of LTP-DMS for online (and on-site) monitoring. Analytical performance was determined with six environmentally relevant model compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and naphthalene) using LTP and directly compared to APPI and APCI ((63)Ni) ionization sources. When LTP was coupled to DMS, calculated LOD values were found to be in the range of 35-257 ng L(-1) (concentration in the carrier gas). These values are competitive with those calculated for two DMS equipped with traditional ionization sources (APPI, (63)Ni). The obtained results are promising enough to ensure the potential of LTP as ionization source for DMS. PMID:26266836

  11. Total residue analysis of swabs by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strege, Mark A

    2009-06-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a technique attractive for use within the pharmaceutical industry for at-line determination of residues on swabs taken from the surfaces of manufacturing equipment for the purposes of cleaning validation or verification. In this study, the development of a novel IMS method to provide a measurement of total residue present on a swab is described. The technique is based upon quantitation of charged atmospheric gas reactant ion consumption (RIC) within the instrument as a direct measure of the mass of total ionizable residue. Coupled with the conventional analysis of the active pharmaceutical ingredient within a single 2 min analysis, RIC determination provided the benefit of a single measure representative of the presence of multiple residue components or unknown components. To account for differences in response between components of a model drug product (Cymbalta) and its associated cleaning agents, a strategy was proposed to determine a "worst case" total residue test result based on RIC. A limitation of the IMS method was its incompatibility with cleaners containing a high concentration of inorganic components. The methodology provided a range from 5-50 microg per 25 cm(2) surface area and acceptable analyte recovery (50-100%). PMID:19476393

  12. Characterization of triacetone triperoxide by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.

    2011-04-28

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) with subsequent separation and detection by ion mobility spectrometry has been studied. Positive ionization with hydronium reactant ions produced only fragments of the TATP molecule, with m/z 91 ion being the most predominant species. Ionization with ammonium reactant ions produced a molecular adduct at m/z 240. The reduced mobility value of this ion was constant at 1.36 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1} across the temperature range from 60 to 140 C. The stability of this ion was temperature dependent and did not exist at temperatures above 140 C, where only fragment ions were observed. The introduction of ammonia vapors with TATP resulted in the formation of m/z 58 ion. As the concentration of ammonia increased, this smaller ion appeared to dominate the spectra and the TATP-ammonium adduct decreased in intensity. The ion at m/z 58 has been noted by several research groups upon using ammonia reagents in chemical ionization, but the identity was unknown. Evidence presented here supports the formation of protonated 2-propanimine. A proposed mechanism involves the addition of ammonia to the TATP-ammonium adduct followed by an elimination reaction. A similar mechanism involving the chemical ionization of acetone with excess ammonia also showed the formation of m/z 58 ion. TATP vapors from a solid sample were detected with a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer operated at room temperature. The TATP-ammonium molecular adduct was observed in the presence of ammonia and TATP vapors with this spectrometer.

  13. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  14. Dynamically Multiplexed Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry–Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity high-throughput platform for e.g. proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, including efficient ion accumulation in the ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube and signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of e.g. blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have developed and rigorously evaluated a novel dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function, and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity throughout the experiment. The MP IMS-TOF MS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in the presence of highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a three orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features were found to yield ~ 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of ~ 7.5 %. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of ~ 4 %. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80 %, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were < 15 %. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min that constitutes almost an order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach. PMID:18582088

  15. Dynamically Multiplexed Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry–Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity high-throughput platform for e.g. proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, enabling (1) efficient ion accumulation in the ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, (2) multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube and (3) signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of e.g. blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have additionally developed and rigorously evaluated a new dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function, and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity. The MP IMS-TOF MS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a four orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features yielded ~ 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of ~ 7.5 %. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of ~ 4 %. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80 %, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were < 15 %. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min, corresponding to approximately an order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach.

  16. Differential mobility spectrometry of isomeric protonated dipeptides: modifier and field effects on ion mobility and stability.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Chramow, Alexander; Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Bohme, Diethard K

    2011-05-01

    The ability to resolve isomeric protonated dipeptides was investigated with the new technique of differential ion mobility mass spectrometry that uses "modifier" molecules to enhance differential mobility. Two pairs of protonated peptides [glycine-alanine (GlyAla) and alanine-glycine (AlaGly), glycine-serine (GlySer) and serine-glycine (SerGly)] and eight different modifiers (water, 2-propanol, 1,5-hexadiene, 2-chloropropane, chlorobenzene, dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and cyclohexane) were used in the initial study. Separation of the protonated peptides was found to be dependent on the mass and proton affinity of the modifier and combinations of functionalities present in the modifier and the analyte ion. Six of the eight modifiers (water, 2-propanol, chlorobenzene, cyclohexane, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile) were able to separate the protonated isomeric peptide pairs, and generally, modifiers with electron-rich groups performed the best. In the presence of some modifiers, a reduction of ion current was observed under the highest field conditions (>115 Td). Dopant-catalyzed isomerization, likely by proton-transport catalysis, and field-induced fragmentation may have contributed to these losses. Two high vapor pressure modifiers, 1,5-hexadiene and 2-chloropropane, significantly influenced ion formation leading to the formation of stable cluster populations that could be observed in the mass spectrometer. Although not a major concern, both fragmentation and influence of modifier evaporation warrant further studies in order to fully understand and possibly eliminate them. PMID:21504141

  17. Structurally selective imaging mass spectrometry by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLean, John A; Fenn, Larissa S; Enders, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the utility of structurally based separations combined with imaging mass spectrometry (MS) by ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) approaches. The unique capabilities of combining rapid (mus-ms) IM separations with imaging MS are detailed for an audience ranging from new to potential practitioners in IM-MS technology. Importantly, imaging IM-MS provides the ability to rapidly separate and elucidate various types of endogenous and exogenous biomolecules (e.g., nucleotides, carbohydrates, peptides, and lipids), including isobaric species. Drift tube and traveling wave IM-MS instrumentation are described and specific protocols are presented for calculating ion-neutral collision cross sections (i.e., apparent ion surface area or structure) from experimentally obtained IM-MS data. Special emphasis is placed on the use of imaging IM-MS for the analysis of samples in life sciences research (e.g., thin tissue sections), including selective imaging for peptide/protein and lipid distributions. Future directions for rapid and multiplexed imaging IM-MS/MS are detailed. PMID:20680602

  18. Increasing Confidence of LC-MS Identifications by Utilizing Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Payne, Samuel H.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Danielson, William F.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    Ion mobility spectrometry in conjunction with liquid chromatography separations and mass spectrometry offers a range of new possibilities for analyzing complex biological samples. To fully utilize the information obtained from these three measurement dimensions, informatics tools based on the accurate mass and time tag methodology were modified to incorporate ion mobility spectrometry drift times for peptides observed in human serum. A reference human serum database was created using 12,139 peptides, tracking the monoisotopic mass, liquid chromatography normalized elution time, and ion mobility spectrometry drift time(s) for each peptide. We demonstrate that the use of three dimensions for peak matching during the peptide identification process resulted in increased numbers of identifications and lower false discovery rates relative to the use of only the mass and normalized elution time dimensions.

  19. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  20. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Carly N; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26988372

  1. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Chapter 1. Chapter 2 presents the first investigations into the atmospheric pressure ion transport phenomena during DART analysis. Chapter 3 provides a comparison on the internal energy deposition processes during DART and pneumatically assisted-ESI. Chapter 4 investigates the complex spatially-dependent sampling sensitivity, dynamic range and ion suppression effects present in most DART experiments. New implementations and applications with DART are shown in Chapters 5 and 6. In Chapter 5, DART is coupled to multiplexed drift tube ion mobility spectrometry as a potential fieldable platform for the detection of toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents simulants. In Chapter 6, transmission-mode DART is shown to be an effective method for reproducible sampling from materials which allow for gas to flow through it. Also, Chapter 6 provides a description of a MS imaging platform coupling infrared laser ablation and DART-like phenomena. Finally, in Chapter 7 I will provide perspective on the work completed with DART and the tasks and goals that future studies should focus on.

  2. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  3. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-02-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  4. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  5. Rapid profiling and identification of anthocyanins in fruits with Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H; Yin, Dulin

    2015-06-15

    The use of Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry (HT-IMMS) in the profiling of anthocyanins from different fruits is presented. Samples extracted with acidic methanol and purified with solid phase extraction were analyzed with direct IMMS infusion. The separation of various anthocyanins was achieved within 30s with resolving powers up to 110. The ion mobility drift times correlated with their mass-to-charge ratios with a correlation coefficient of 0.979 to produce a trend line that was characteristic for anthocyanins. Isomers with the same anthocyanidin but different hexoses were differentiated by ion mobility spectrometry. Furthermore, mobility separated ions underwent collision induced dissociation at the IMMS interface to provide MS/MS spectra. These fragmentation spectra aided in the identification of anthocyanidins via the loss of the saccharide groups. IMMS appears to be a rapid and efficient approach for profiling and identifying anthocyanins. PMID:25660880

  6. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26914233

  7. Protein mixture analysis by MALDI/mobility/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, David H.; Gillig, Kent J.; Stone, Earle; Park, Zee-Yong; Fuhrer, K.; Gonon, M.; Schultz, A. J.

    2000-03-01

    Progress in the development of ion mobility (IM) orthogonal time-of-flight (oTOF) mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of biological samples is presented. The IM-oTOF apparatus described consists of a short drift tube (1 to 15 cm) designed for ion mobility measurement in the low-field limit and a low resolution linear (20 cm) TOF mass spectrometer. Proof of concept is demonstrated by analysis of peptide mixtures generated by proteolytic digestion of proteins.

  8. Analysis of Ultra-Pure Gases by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimac, Robert M.; Wernlund, Roger F.; Cohen, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    Work has continued with the evaluation of the Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) for the analysis of gases having low parts-per-billion (10(exp -9)) water concentration. A modified PCP, inc. MMS-160 Mobility Mass Spectrometer System was used for the analysis of ultra-pure argon and nitrogen. The MMS-160 system permits the mass-identification of unique reactant and product ions observed in the reduced-water host gases. When the water is removed to low ppb levels, higher energy reactant ions are observed. In nitrogen, distinct odd- and even-numbered nitrogen cluster ion mobility peaks are observed, as well as adduct ion peaks from the trace contaminants in the gas. Argon also produces a cluster ion mobility peak and adduct ion peaks from trace components in the gas. Levels of contaminants in these ultra-pure gases can be determined from the ion mobility spectra. A calibrated source was used to provide variable known quantities of water to the pure gas supply of the IMS.

  9. Structural insights into interactions between ubiquitin specific protease 5 and its polyubiquitin substrates by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and ion mobility-mass spectrometry have been used to study the interactions of the large, multidomain, and conformationally flexible deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 5 (USP5) with mono- and poly-ubiquitin (Ub) substrates. Employing a C335A active site mutant, mass spectrometry was able to detect the stable and cooperative binding of two mono-Ub molecules at the Zinc-finger ubiquitin binding protein (ZnF-UBP) and catalytic site domains of USP5. Tetra-ubiquitin, in contrast, bound to USP5 with a stoichiometry of 1 : 1, and formed additional interactions with USP5's two ubiquitin associated domains (UBAs). Charge-state distribution and ion mobility analysis revealed that both mono- and tetra-ubiquitin bound to the compact conformation of USP5 only, and that tetra-ubiquitin binding was able to shift the conformational distribution of USP5 from a mixture of extended and compact forms to a completely compact conformation. PMID:25970461

  10. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Isomeric Disaccharide Precursor, Product and Cluster Ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Bendiak, Brad; Siems, William F.; Gang, David R.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Carbohydrates are highly variable in structure owing to differences in their anomeric configurations, monomer stereochemistry, inter-residue linkage positions and general branching features. The separation of carbohydrate isomers poses a great challenge for current analytical techniques. METHODS The isomeric heterogeneity of disaccharide ions and monosaccharideglycolaldehyde product ions evaluated using electrospray traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (Synapt G2 high definition mass spectrometer) in both positive and negative ion modes investigation. RESULTS The separation of isomeric disaccharide ions was observed but not fully achieved based on their mobility profiles. The mobilities of isomeric product ions, the monosaccharide-glycolaldehydes, derived from different disaccharide isomers were measured. Multiple mobility peaks were observed for both monosaccharide-glycolaldehyde cations and anions, indicating that there was more than one structural configuration in the gas phase as verified by NMR in solution. More importantly, the mobility patterns for isomeric monosaccharide-glycolaldehyde product ions were different, which enabled partial characterization of their respective disaccharide ions. Abundant disaccharide cluster ions were also observed. The Results showed that a majority of isomeric cluster ions had different drift times and, moreover, more than one mobility peak was detected for a number of specific cluster ions. CONCLUSIONS It is demonstrated that ion mobility mass spectrometry is an advantageous method to assess the isomeric heterogeneity of carbohydrate compounds. It is capable of differentiating different types of carbohydrate ions having identical m/z values as well as multiple structural configurations of single compounds. PMID:24591031

  11. Development of rapid methodologies for the isolation and quantitation of drug metabolites by differential mobility spectrometry – mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Stephen L.; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Vouros, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories are inundated with thousands of samples requiring lengthy chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometry. Here, we employ differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) interfaced to nano-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to provide a rapid ion filtration technique for the separation of ions in gas phase media prior to mass spectral analysis on a DMS-integrated AB SCIEX API 3000 triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. DMS is efficient at the rapid separation of ions under ambient conditions and provides many advantages when used as an ion filtration technique in tandem with mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS. Our studies evaluated DMS-MS/MS as a rapid, quantitative platform for the analysis of drug metabolites isolated from urine samples. In targeted applications, five metabolites of common drugs of abuse were effectively and rapidly separated using isopropanol and ethyl acetate as transport gas modifiers, eliminating the gas chromatography or liquid chromatography-based separations commonly employed in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories. Calibration curves were prepared for the selected drug metabolites utilizing deuterated internal standards for quantitative purposes. The feasibility of separating and quantitating drug metabolites in a rapid fashion was evaluated by compensation voltage stepping followed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection. Rapid profiling of clinical and forensic toxicology samples could help to address an urgent need within the scientific community by developing high-throughput analytical methodologies, which could reduce significant case backlogs present within these laboratories. PMID:24311968

  12. MYCN repression of Lifeguard/FAIM2 enhances neuroblastoma aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Planells-Ferrer, L; Urresti, J; Soriano, A; Reix, S; Murphy, D M; Ferreres, J C; Borràs, F; Gallego, S; Stallings, R L; Moubarak, R S; Segura, M F; Comella, J X

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common solid tumor in infants and accounts for 15% of all pediatric cancer deaths. Several risk factors predict NBL outcome: age at the time of diagnosis, stage, chromosome alterations and MYCN (V-Myc Avian Myelocytomatosis Viral Oncogene Neuroblastoma-Derived Homolog) amplification, which characterizes the subset of the most aggressive NBLs with an overall survival below 30%. MYCN-amplified tumors develop exceptional chemoresistance and metastatic capacity. These properties have been linked to defects in the apoptotic machinery, either by silencing components of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (e.g. caspase-8) or by overexpression of antiapoptotic regulators (e.g. Bcl-2, Mcl-1 or FLIP). Very little is known on the implication of death receptors and their antagonists in NBL. In this work, the expression levels of several death receptor antagonists were analyzed in multiple human NBL data sets. We report that Lifeguard (LFG/FAIM2 (Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 2)/NMP35) is downregulated in the most aggressive and undifferentiated tumors. Intringuingly, although LFG has been initially characterized as an antiapoptotic protein, we have found a new association with NBL differentiation. Moreover, LFG repression resulted in reduced cell adhesion, increased sphere growth and enhanced migration, thus conferring a higher metastatic capacity to NBL cells. Furthermore, LFG expression was found to be directly repressed by MYCN at the transcriptional level. Our data, which support a new functional role for a hitherto undiscovered MYCN target, provide a new link between MYCN overexpression and increased NBL metastatic properties. PMID:25188511

  13. Recent developments in ion mobility spectrometry detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Kuja, Frank J.; Jackson, Ronald A.; Loveless, Arthur J.; Danylewich-May, Lucy L.

    1994-03-01

    Barringer's new IONSCANTM model 350 provides improved operational flexibility, reliability, and effectiveness in the rapid on-site detection and identification of narcotics and explosives. The model 350 is a modular integrated design, with DC-power capabilities, and wheels or vehicle mounts to facilitate transportation to and operation in a variety of operational locations. Recent developments in IONSCAN ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) technology in the model 350 include a long-life air dryer/purification system and new software for improved substance detection and false alarm rate performance. New multiple peak detection capabilities for more reliable substance identification are described. Studies on IMS temperature and pressure effects are reported and their possible future use to further improve peak detection performance are discussed. Some recent applications in narcotics interdiction are described.

  14. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  16. Modulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 regulatory protein 2 (Faim2) in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis. PMID:24335530

  17. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Serum N-linked Glycans from Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gaye, M. M.; Valentine, S. J.; Hu, Y.; Mirjankar, N.; Hammoud, Z. T.; Mechref, Y.; Lavine, B. K.; Clemmer, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Three disease phenotypes, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), high-grade dysplasia (HGD), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and a set of normal control (NC) serum samples are examined using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), mass spectrometry (MS) and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. Samples from a total of 136 individuals were examined, including: 7 characterized as BE, 12 as HGD, 56 as EAC and 61 as NC. In typical datasets it was possible to assign ~20 to 30 glycan ions based on MS measurements. Ion mobility distributions for these ions show multiple features. In some cases, such as the [S1H5N4+3Na]3+ and [S1F1H5N4+3Na]3+ glycan ions, the ratio of intensities of high-mobility features to low-mobility features vary significantly for different groups. The degree to which such variations in mobility profiles can be used to distinguish phenotypes is evaluated for eleven N-linked glycan ions. An outlier analysis on each sample class followed by an unsupervised PCA using a genetic algorithm for pattern recognition reveals that EAC samples are separated from NC samples based on 46 features originating from the 11-glycan composite IMS distribution. PMID:23126309

  18. Structural Characterization of Unsaturated Phosphatidylcholines Using Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hugh I.; Kim, Hyungjun; Pang, Eric S.; Ryu, Ernest K.; Beegle, Luther W.; Loo, Joseph A.; Goddard, William A.; Kanik, Isik

    2009-01-01

    A number of phosphatidylcholine (PC) cations spanning a mass range of 400 to 1000 Da are investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). A high correlation between mass and mobility is demonstrated with saturated phosphatidylcholine cations in N2. A significant deviation from this mass-mobility correlation line is observed for the unsaturated PC cation. We found that the double bond in the acyl chain causes a 5% reduction in drift time. The drift time is reduced at a rate of ~1% for each additional double bond. Theoretical collision cross sections of PC cations exhibit good agreement with experimentally evaluated values. Collision cross sections are determined using the recently derived relationship between mobility and drift time in TWIMS stacked ring ion guide (SRIG) and compared to estimate collision cross-sections using empiric calibration method. Computational analysis was performed using the modified trajectory (TJ) method with nonspherical N2 molecules as the drift gas. The difference between estimated collision cross-sections and theoretical collision cross-sections of PC cations is related to the sensitivity of the PC cation collision cross-sections to the details of the ion-neutral interactions. The origin of the observed correlation and deviation between mass and mobility of PC cations is discussed in terms of the structural rigidity of these molecules using molecular dynamic simulations. PMID:19764704

  19. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  20. Ion mobility tandem mass spectrometry enhances performance of bottom-up proteomics.

    PubMed

    Helm, Dominic; Vissers, Johannes P C; Hughes, Christopher J; Hahne, Hannes; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Pachl, Fiona; Grzyb, Arkadiusz; Richardson, Keith; Wildgoose, Jason; Maier, Stefan K; Marx, Harald; Wilhelm, Mathias; Becher, Isabelle; Lemeer, Simone; Bantscheff, Marcus; Langridge, James I; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    One of the limiting factors in determining the sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry using hybrid quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight instruments is the duty cycle of the orthogonal ion injection system. As a consequence, only a fraction of the generated fragment ion beam is collected by the time-of-flight analyzer. Here we describe a method utilizing postfragmentation ion mobility spectrometry of peptide fragment ions in conjunction with mobility time synchronized orthogonal ion injection leading to a substantially improved duty cycle and a concomitant improvement in sensitivity of up to 10-fold for bottom-up proteomic experiments. This enabled the identification of 7500 human proteins within 1 day and 8600 phosphorylation sites within 5 h of LC-MS/MS time. The method also proved powerful for multiplexed quantification experiments using tandem mass tags exemplified by the chemoproteomic interaction analysis of histone deacetylases with Trichostatin A. PMID:25106551

  1. Ion Mobility Tandem Mass Spectrometry Enhances Performance of Bottom-up Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Dominic; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Hughes, Christopher J.; Hahne, Hannes; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Pachl, Fiona; Grzyb, Arkadiusz; Richardson, Keith; Wildgoose, Jason; Maier, Stefan K.; Marx, Harald; Wilhelm, Mathias; Becher, Isabelle; Lemeer, Simone; Bantscheff, Marcus; Langridge, James I.; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    One of the limiting factors in determining the sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry using hybrid quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight instruments is the duty cycle of the orthogonal ion injection system. As a consequence, only a fraction of the generated fragment ion beam is collected by the time-of-flight analyzer. Here we describe a method utilizing postfragmentation ion mobility spectrometry of peptide fragment ions in conjunction with mobility time synchronized orthogonal ion injection leading to a substantially improved duty cycle and a concomitant improvement in sensitivity of up to 10-fold for bottom-up proteomic experiments. This enabled the identification of 7500 human proteins within 1 day and 8600 phosphorylation sites within 5 h of LC-MS/MS time. The method also proved powerful for multiplexed quantification experiments using tandem mass tags exemplified by the chemoproteomic interaction analysis of histone deacetylases with Trichostatin A. PMID:25106551

  2. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  3. Tandem mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry for the analysis of molecular sequence and architecture of hyperbranched glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiumin; Cool, Lydia R.; Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional mass spectrometry techniques, combining matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) or electrospray ionization (ESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS2), multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) or ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), have been employed to gain precise structural insight on the compositions, sequences and architectures of small oligomers of a hyperbranched glycopolymer, prepared by atom transfer radical copolymerization of an acrylate monomer (A) and an acrylate inimer (B), both carrying mannose ester pendants. The MS data confirmed the incorporation of multiple inimer repeat units, which ultimately lead to the hyperbranched material. The various possible structures of n-mers with the same composition were subsequently elucidated based on MS2 and MSn studies. The characteristic elimination of bromomethane molecule provided definitive information about the comonomer connectivity in the copolymeric AB2 trimer and A2B2 tetramer, identifying as present only one of the three possible trimeric isomers (viz. sequence BBA) and only two of the six possible tetrameric isomers (viz. sequences BBA2 and BABA). Complementary IM-MS studies confirmed that only one of the tetrameric structures is formed. Comparison of the experimentally determined collision cross-section of the detected isomer with those predicted by molecular simulations for the two possible sequences ascertained BBA2 as the predominant tetrameric architecture. The multidimensional MS approaches presented provide connectivity information at the atomic level without requiring high product purity (due to the dispersive nature of MS) and, hence, should be particularly useful for the microstructure characterization of novel glycopolymers and other types of complex copolymers. PMID:25519163

  4. Advances in ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry reveal key insights into amyloid assembly☆

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L.A.; Radford, S.E.; Ashcroft, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacing ion mobility spectrometry to mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) has enabled mass spectrometric analyses to extend into an extra dimension, providing unrivalled separation and structural characterization of lowly populated species in heterogeneous mixtures. One biological system that has benefitted significantly from such advances is that of amyloid formation. Using IMS–MS, progress has been made into identifying transiently populated monomeric and oligomeric species for a number of different amyloid systems and has led to an enhanced understanding of the mechanism by which small molecules modulate amyloid formation. This review highlights recent advances in this field, which have been accelerated by the commercial availability of IMS–MS instruments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mass spectrometry in structural biology. PMID:23063533

  5. Overtone Mobility Spectrometry: Part 5. Simulations and Analytical Expressions Describing Overtone Limits

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Michael A.; Zucker, Steven M.; Valentine, Stephen J.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical expressions for the analytical duty cycle associated with different overtones in overtone mobility spectrometry are derived from the widths of the transmitted packets of ions under different instrumental operating conditions. Support for these derivations is provided through ion trajectory simulations. The outcome of the theory and simulations indicates that under all operating conditions there exists a limit or maximum observable overtone that will result in ion transmission. Implications of these findings on experimental design are discussed. PMID:23468094

  6. Using gas modifiers to significantly improve sensitivity and selectivity in a cylindrical FAIMS device.

    PubMed

    Purves, Randy W; Ozog, Allison R; Ambrose, Stephen J; Prasad, Satendra; Belford, Michael; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Recent reports describing enhanced performance when using gas additives in a DMS device (planar electrodes) have indicated that comparable benefits are not attainable using FAIMS (cylindrical electrodes), owing to the non-homogeneous electric fields within the analyzer region. In this study, a FAIMS system (having cylindrical electrodes) was modified to allow for controlled delivery of gas additives. An experiment was carried out that illustrates the important distinction between gas modifiers present as unregulated contaminants and modifiers added in a controlled manner. The effect of contamination was simulated by adjusting the ESI needle position to promote incomplete desolvation, thereby permitting ESI solvent vapor into the FAIMS analyzer region, causing signal instability and irreproducible CV values. However, by actively controlling the delivery of the gas modifier, reproducible CV spectra were obtained. The effects of adding different gas modifiers were examined using 15 positive ions having mass-to-charge (m/z) values between 90 and 734. Significant improvements in peak capacity and increases in ion transmission were readily attained by adding acetonitrile vapor, even at trace levels (≤0.1%). Increases in signal intensity were greatest for the low m/z ions; for the six lowest molecular weight species, signal intensities increased by ∼10- to over 100-fold compared with using nitrogen without gas additives, resulting in equivalent or better signal intensities compared with ESI without FAIMS. These results confirm that analytical benefits derived from the addition of gas modifiers reported with a uniform electric field (DMS) also are observed using a non-homogenous electric field (FAIMS) in the analyser region. PMID:24796261

  7. Using a Buffer Gas Modifier to Change Separation Selectivity in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The mobilities of a set of common α-amino acids, four tetraalkylammonium ions, 2,4-dimethyl pyridine (2,4-lutidine), 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and valinol were determined using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-QMS) while introducing 2-butanol into the buffer gas. The mobilities of the test compounds decreased by varying extents with 2-butanol concentration in the mobility spectrometer. When the concentration of 2-butanol increased from 0.0 to 6.8 mmol m−3 (2.5×102 ppmv), percentage reductions in mobilities were: 13.6% (serine), 12.2% (threonine), 10.4% (methionine), 10.3% (tyrosine), 9.8% (valinol), 9.2% (phenylalanine), 7.8% (tryptophan), 5.6% (2,4-lutidine), 2.2% (DTBP), 1.0% (tetramethylammonium ion, TMA, and tetraethylammonium ion, TEA), 0.0% (tetrapropylammonium ion, TPA), and 0.3% (tetrabutylammonium ion, TBA). These variations in mobility depended on the size and steric hindrance on the charge of the ions, and were due to formation of large ion-2-butanol clusters. This selective variation in mobilities was applied to the resolution of a mixture of compounds with similar reduced mobilities such as serine and valinol, which overlapped in N2-only buffer gas in the IMS spectrum. The relative insensitivity of tetraalkylammonium ions and DTBP to the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas was explained by steric hindrance of the four alkyl substituents in tetraalkylammonium ions and the two tert-butyl groups in DTBP, which shielded the positive charge of the ion from the attachment of 2-butanol molecules. Low buffer gas temperatures (100 °C) produced the largest reductions in mobilities by increasing ion-2-butanol interactions and formation of clusters; high temperatures (250 °C) prevented the formation of clusters, and no reduction in ion mobility was obtained with the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas. Low temperatures and high concentrations of 2-butanol produced a series of

  8. Modular calibrant sets for the structural analysis of nucleic acids by ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lippens, Jennifer L; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V; D'Esposito, Rebecca J; Fabris, Daniele

    2016-06-20

    This study explored the use of modular nucleic acid (NA) standards to generate calibration curves capable of translating primary ion mobility readouts into corresponding collision cross section (CCS) data. Putative calibrants consisted of single- (ss) and double-stranded (ds) oligo-deoxynucleotides reaching up to ∼40 kDa in size (i.e., 64 bp) and ∼5700 Å(2) in CCS. To ensure self-consistency among reference CCS values, computational data obtained in house were preferred to any experimental or computational data from disparate sources. Such values were obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and either the exact hard sphere scattering (EHSS) or the projection superposition approximation (PSA) methods, and then plotted against the corresponding experimental values to generate separate calibration curves. Their performance was evaluated on the basis of their correlation coefficients and ability to provide values that matched the CCS of selected test samples mimicking typical unknowns. The results indicated that the predictive power benefited from the exclusion of higher charged species that were more susceptible to the destabilizing effects of Coulombic repulsion. The results revealed discrepancies between EHSS and PSA data that were ascribable to the different approximations used to describe the ion mobility process. Within the boundaries defined by these approximations and the challenges of modeling NA structure in a solvent-free environment, the calibrant sets enabled the experimental determination of CCS with excellent reproducibility (precision) and error (accuracy), which will support the analysis of progressively larger NA samples of biological significance. PMID:27152369

  9. Identity Efficiency for High-Performance Ambient Pressure Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Leal, Anne

    2016-03-15

    A new approach to reduce the false-positive responses commonly encountered in the field when drugs and explosives are detected is reported for an electrospray ionization high-performance ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-HPIMS). In this article, we report on the combination of reduced mobility and the width-at-half-height of a peak to give a new parameter called conditional reduced mobility (CRM). It was found that the CRM was capable of differentiating between real drugs peaks from that of a false-positive peak and may help to reduce false-positive rates. This effect was demonstrated using 11 drugs (amphetamine, cannabidiol, cocaine, codeine, heroine, methamphetamine, morphine, phentermine, L-phenylepherine, proglitazone, and rosiglitazone) and seven interferences chosen from off-the-shelf products. This report determined and compared CRM, resolving power (R(m)), and diffusion-limited conditional theoretical reduced mobility (DLCTRM) for ESI-HPIMS. The most important parameters for determining CRM are reduced mobility and width-at-half-height of a peak. There is a specific optimum voltage, gate pulse width, resolving power, and now CRM for each ion. DLCTRM indicate the optimum reduced mobility that is not normally possible under field conditions. CRM predicts the condition at which a target compound can be differentiated from a false-positive response. This was possible because different ions exhibits different drifting patterns and hence a different peak broadening phenomenon inside an ion mobility tube. Reduced mobility for target compounds reported were reproducible to within 2% for ESI-HPIMS. The estimated resolving power for the ESI-HPIMS used in this study was 61 ± 0.22. Conditional reduced mobility introduced in this paper show differences between target compounds and false-positive peaks as high as 74%, as was the case for cannabidiol and interference #1 at 70 μs gate pulse width. PMID:26919030

  10. Sizing Large Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis, Catherine S.; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Yin, Sheng; Berhane, Beniam; Apostol, Marcin I.; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility with electrospray ionization (ESI) have the capability to measure and detect large noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Using an ion mobility method termed GEMMA (Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis), protein particles representing a range of sizes can be separated by their electrophoretic mobility in air. Highly charged particles produced from a protein complex solution using electrospray can be manipulated to produce singly charged ions which can be separated and quantified by their electrophoretic mobility. Results from ESI-GEMMA analysis from our laboratory and others were compared to other experimental and theoretically determined parameters, such as molecular mass and cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystal structure dimensions. There is a strong correlation between the electrophoretic mobility diameter determined from GEMMA analysis and the molecular mass for protein complexes up to 12 MDa, including the 93 kDa enolase dimer, the 480 kDa ferritin 24-mer complex, the 4.6 MDa cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the 9 MDa MVP-vault assembly. ESI-GEMMA is used to differentiate a number of similarly sized vault complexes that are composed of different N-terminal protein tags on the MVP subunit. The average effective density of the proteins and protein complexes studied was 0.6 g/cm3. Moreover, there is evidence that proteins and protein complexes collapse or become more compact in the gas phase in the absence of water. PMID:17434746

  11. Corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry with orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry for monitoring of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan

    2012-06-19

    We demonstrate the application of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry with orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry (CD IMS-oaTOF) for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) monitoring. Two-dimensional (2D) IMS-oaTOF spectra of VOCs were recorded in nearly real time. The corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source was operated in positive mode in nitrogen and air. The CD ion source generates in air H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(n) and NO(+). The NO(+) offers additional possibility for selective ionization and for an increase of the sensitivity of monoaromatic compounds. In addition to H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(n) and NO(+), we have carried out ionization of VOCs using acetone as dopant gas ((CH(3))(2)COH(+)). Sixteen model VOCs (tetrahydrofuran, butanol, n-propanol, iso-propano, acetone, methanol, ethanol, toluene, benzene, amomnia, dioxan, triethylamine, acetonitrile, formaldehyde, m-xylene, 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine) were tested using these ionization techniques. PMID:22594852

  12. Structural Elucidation of Enzymatically Synthesized Galacto-oligosaccharides Using Ion-Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carević, Milica; Bezbradica, Dejan; Banjanac, Katarina; Milivojević, Ana; Fanuel, Mathieu; Rogniaux, Hélène; Ropartz, David; Veličković, Dušan

    2016-05-11

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) represent a diverse group of well-characterized prebiotic ingredients derived from lactose in a reaction catalyzed with β-galactosidases. Enzymatic transgalactosylation results in a mixture of compounds of various degrees of polymerization and types of linkages. Because structure plays an important role in terms of prebiotic activity, it is of crucial importance to provide an insight into the mechanism of transgalactosylation reaction and occurrence of different types of β-linkages during GOS synthesis. Our study proved that a novel one-step method, based on ion-mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (IMS-MS/MS), enables complete elucidation of GOS structure. It has been shown that β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae has the highest affinity toward formation of β-(1→3) or β-(1→6) linkages. Additionally, it was observed that the occurrence of different linkages varies during the reaction course, indicating that tailoring favorable GOS structures with improved prebiotic activity can be achieved by adequate control of enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27109424

  13. Resolving Structural Isomers of Monosaccharide Methyl Glycosides Using Drift Tube and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Giles, Kevin; Bendiak, Brad; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    Monosaccharide structural isomers including sixteen methyl-D-glycopyranosides and four methyl-N-acetylhexosamines were subjected to ion mobility measurements by electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. Two ion mobility-MS systems were employed: atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a Synapt G2 HDMS system which incorporates a low pressure traveling wave ion mobility separator. All the compounds were investigated as [M+Na]+ ions in the positive mode. A majority of the monosaccharide structural isomers exhibited different mobility drift times in either system, depending on differences in their anomeric and stereochemical configurations. In general, drift time patterns (relative drift times of isomers) matched between the two instruments. Higher resolving power was observed using the atmospheric pressure drift tube. Collision cross section values of monosaccharide structural isomers were directly calculated from the atmospheric pressure ion mobility experiments and a collision cross section calibration curve was made for the traveling wave ion mobility instrument. Overall, it was demonstrated that ion mobility-mass spectrometry using either drift tube or traveling wave ion mobility is a valuable technique for resolving subtle variations in stereochemistry among the sodium adducts of monosaccharide methyl glycosides. PMID:22339760

  14. Analysis of heterogeneous uptake by nanoparticles via differential mobility analysis-drift tube ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oberreit, Derek R; McMurry, Peter H; Hogan, Christopher J

    2014-04-21

    Improved methods are needed to study sorption of vapor molecules by particles in the gas phase (heterogeneous uptake), which is an important process in both natural and engineered environments. Here, a new measurement system, composed of a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (DTIMS) in series, is used to examine the heterogeneous uptake of water vapor by 2.85-7.6 nm particles composed of lithium and sodium iodide. The extent of heterogeneous uptake is determined by controlling the relative humidity of the drift region in the DTIMS in the 0-30% range (in air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature), and is quantified via the dimensionless growth factor (GF), i.e. the ratio of the mobility diameter of particles at a prescribed relative humidity relative to their mobility diameter under dry conditions. The precision in GF estimation of the DMA-DTIMS system is shown to be below 0.2%. An analytical equation to calculate the growth factor, based upon predictions of the equilibrium constants for the successive uptake of vapor molecules by particles, is also presented. While the equation is sufficiently general to enable comparison between measured GFs and predictions from any theoretical expression for equilibrium constants, we specifically compare measurements to GF predictions based on the classical Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model for the vapor pressure of a small particle, with consideration of the influence of the ion-dipole potential on water vapor-nanoparticle collisions. It is shown that KTR calculations drastically underpredict the extent of heterogeneous uptake for the examined nanoparticles. PMID:24600691

  15. Structural Characterization of Anticancer Drug Paclitaxel and Its Metabolites Using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hong Hee; Hong, Areum; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a popular anticancer drug used in the treatment of various types of cancers. PTX is metabolized in the human liver by cytochrome P450 to two structural isomers, 3'- p-hydroxypaclitaxel (3 p-OHP) and 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel (6α-OHP). Analyzing PTX and its two metabolites, 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP, is crucial for understanding general pharmacokinetics, drug activity, and drug resistance. In this study, electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) and collision induced dissociation (CID) are utilized for the identification and characterization of PTX and its metabolites. Ion mobility distributions of 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP indicate that hydroxylation of PTX at different sites yields distinct gas phase structures. Addition of monovalent alkali metal and silver metal cations enhances the distinct dissociation patterns of these structural isomers. The differences observed in the CID patterns of metalated PTX and its two metabolites are investigated further by evaluating their gas-phase structures. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the observed structural changes and dissociation pathways are the result of the interactions between the metal cation and the hydroxyl substituents in PTX metabolites.

  16. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-01-01

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility ‘tag”. Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than that provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS. PMID:21692493

  17. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-05-28

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility "tag". Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS.

  18. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  19. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Sandilya V B; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K; Baker, Erin S; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27052738

  20. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e. peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species. This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, and which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. PMID:27052738

  1. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  2. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  3. Advancing the High Throughput Identification of Liver Fibrosis Protein Signatures Using Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purdy, David E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Sandoval, John D.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Simons, Brenna C.; McMahon, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Strom, Susan; Self, Steven; Katze, Michael G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    Rapid diagnosis of disease states using less invasive, safer, and more clinically acceptable approaches than presently employed is an imperative goal for the field of medicine. While mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have attempted to meet these objectives, challenges such as the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in clinically relevant biofluid samples coupled with the need to address human biodiversity have slowed their employment. Herein, we report on the use of a new platform that addresses these challenges by coupling technical advances in rapid gas phase multiplexed ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations [1, 2] with liquid chromatography (LC) and MS to dramatically increase measurement sensitivity and throughput, further enabling future MS-based clinical applications. An initial application of the LC-IMS-MS platform for the analysis of blood serum samples from stratified post-liver transplant patients with recurrent fibrosis progression illustrates its potential utility for disease characterization and use in personalized medicine [3, 4].

  4. Site-Specific Mapping of Sialic Acid Linkage Isomers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-05-17

    Detailed structural elucidation of protein glycosylation is a tedious process often involving several techniques. Glycomics and glycoproteomics approaches with mass spectrometry offer a rapid platform for glycan profiling but are limited by the inability to resolve isobaric species such as linkage and positional isomers. Recently, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been shown to effectively resolve isobaric oligosaccharides, but the utility of IMS to obtain glycan structural information on a site-specific level with proteomic analyses has yet to be investigated. Here, we report that the addition of IMS to conventional glycoproteomics platforms adds additional information regarding glycan structure and is particularly useful for differentiation of sialic acid linkage isomers on both N- and O-linked glycopeptides. With further development IMS may hold the potential for rapid and complete structural elucidation of glycan chains at a site-specific level. PMID:27089023

  5. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  6. Gas phase ion chemistry of an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Levine, Lauren A; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase ion chemistry for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) based explosive detector has been elucidated using tandem mass spectrometry. The IMS system, which is operated with hexachloroethane and isobutyramide reagent gases and an ion shutter type gating scheme, is connected to the atmospheric pressure interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS). Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values for a collection of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide explosives measured with the IMS/MS/MS instrument are reported. The mass and mobility data together with targeted isotopic labeling experiments and information about sample composition and reaction environment are leveraged to propose molecular formulas, structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions. The major product ions are identified as [DNT-H](-) for DNT, [TNT-H](-) for TNT, [RDX+Cl](-) and [RDX+NO2](-) for RDX, [HMX+Cl](-) and [HMX+NO2](-) for HMX, [NO3](-) for EGDN, [NG+Cl](-) and [NG+NO3](-) for NG, [PETN+Cl](-) and [PETN+NO3](-) for PETN, [HNO3+NO3](-) for NH4NO3, [NO2](-) for DMNB, [HMTD-NC3H6O3+H+Cl](-) and [HMTD+H-CH2O-H2O2](+) for HMTD, and [(CH3)3CO2](+) for TATP. In general, the product ions identified for the IMS system studied here are consistent with the product ions reported previously for an ion trap mobility spectrometer (ITMS) based explosive trace detector, which is operated with dichloromethane and ammonia reagent gases and an ion trap type gating scheme. Differences between the explosive trace detectors include the [NG+Cl](-) and [PETN+Cl](-) product ions being major ions in the IMS system compared to minor ions in the ITMS system as well as the major product ion for TATP being [(CH3)3CO2](+) for the IMS system and [(CH3)2CNH2](+) for the ITMS system. PMID:26048817

  7. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry strategies for untargeted systems, synthetic, and chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; Goodwin, Cody R.; McLean, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary strategies that concentrate on only one or a handful of molecular targets limits the utility of the information gained for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Recent advances in the sensitivity, speed, and precision of measurements obtained from ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have accelerated the utility of IM-MS in untargeted, discovery-driven studies in biology. Perhaps most evident is the impact that such wide-scale discovery capabilities have yielded in the areas of systems, synthetic, and chemical biology, where the need for comprehensive, hypothesis-driving studies from multidimensional and unbiased data is required. PMID:25462629

  8. Demonstrated Potential of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Detection of Adulterated Perfumes and Plant Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jared Matthew; Daum, Keith Alvin; Kalival, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This initial study evaluates the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a rapid test procedure for potential detection of adulterated perfumes and speciation of plant life. Sample types measured consist of five genuine perfumes, two species of sagebrush, and four species of flowers. Each sample type is treated as a separate classification problem. It is shown that discrimination using principal component analysis with K-nearest neighbors can distinguish one class from another. Discriminatory models generated using principal component regressions are not as effective. Results from this examination are encouraging and represent an initial phase demonstrating that perfumes and plants possess characteristic chemical signatures that can be used for reliable identification.

  9. Design and implementation of embedded ion mobility spectrometry instrument based on SOPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genwei; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yanwei; Yang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    On the hardware platform with single CYCLONE IV FPGA Chip based on SOPC technology, the control functions of IP cores of a Ion Mobility Spectrometry instrument was tested, including 32 bit Nios II soft-core processor, high-voltage module, ion gate switch, gas flow, temperature and pressure sensors, signal acquisition and communication protocol. Embedded operating system μCLinux was successfully transplanted to the hardware platform, used to schedule all the tasks, such as system initialization, parameter setting, signal processing, recognition algorithm and results display. The system was validated using the IMS diagram of Acetone reagent, and the instrument was proved to have a strong signal resolution.

  10. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  11. A novel approach to increasing cocaine detection confidence utilizing ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadamec, J. Richard; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen; Norwood, Lavan

    1995-01-01

    When a positive detection of a narcotic occurs during the search of a vessel, a decision has to be made whether further intensive search is warranted. In terms of unwarranted delays of vessels and possible property damage, the accuracy of the analytical determination is very important. Analytical accuracy becomes critical when the data may be used in court actions as evidence. For this purpose, the U.S. Coast Guard has been investigating several confirmatory ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field methods for the detection and identification of cocaine. This paper presents the findings of our investigations on the use of catalytic pyrolysis and base hydrolysis as confirmatory methods. The catalytic effects of various metals on the pyrolysis reaction are reported. In addition, the effects of several different ion mobility spectrometer sample transfer mediums and varying laboratory conditions on the base hydrolysis of the cocaine molecule are also be reported.

  12. Measurement of drug facilitated sexual assault agents in simulated sweat by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Demoranville, Leonard T; Verkouteren, Jennifer R

    2013-03-15

    Ion mobility spectrometry has found widespread use for the detection of explosives and illicit drugs. The technique offers rapid results with high sensitivity and little sample preparation. As such, it is well suited for field deployed screening settings. Here the response of ion mobility spectrometers for three drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) agents - flunitrazepam, ketamine, and MDMA - and related metabolites has been studied in the presence of a simulated sweat. While all three DFSA agents present certain challenges for qualitative identification, IMS can provide useful information to guide the early treatment and investigation of sexual assault cases. Used as a presumptive test, the identification of DFSA agents would later require confirmatory analysis by other techniques. PMID:23598140

  13. Detection of Radiation-Exposure Biomarkers by Differential Mobility Prefiltered Mass Spectrometry (DMS-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Brenner, David J.; Tyburski, John B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kris W.; Fornace, Albert J.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2010-01-01

    Technology to enable rapid screening for radiation exposure has been identified as an important need, and, as a part of a NIH / NIAD effort in this direction, metabolomic biomarkers for radiation exposure have been identified in a recent series of papers. To reduce the time necessary to detect and measure these biomarkers, differential mobility spectrometry – mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) systems have been developed and tested. Differential mobility ion filters preselect specific ions and also suppress chemical noise created in typical atmospheric-pressure ionization sources (ESI, MALDI, and others). Differential-mobility-based ion selection is based on the field dependence of ion mobility, which, in turn, depends on ion characteristics that include conformation, charge distribution, molecular polarizability, and other properties, and on the transport gas composition which can be modified to enhance resolution. DMS-MS is able to resolve small-molecule biomarkers from nearly-isobaric interferences, and suppresses chemical noise generated in the ion source and in the mass spectrometer, improving selectivity and quantitative accuracy. Our planar DMS design is rapid, operating in a few milliseconds, and analyzes ions before fragmentation. Depending on MS inlet conditions, DMS-selected ions can be dissociated in the MS inlet expansion, before mass analysis, providing a capability similar to MS/MS with simpler instrumentation. This report presents selected DMS-MS experimental results, including resolution of complex test mixtures of isobaric compounds, separation of charge states, separation of isobaric biomarkers (citrate and isocitrate), and separation of nearly-isobaric biomarker anions in direct analysis of a bio-fluid sample from the radiation-treated group of a mouse-model study. These uses of DMS combined with moderate resolution MS instrumentation indicate the feasibility of field-deployable instrumentation for biomarker evaluation. PMID:20305793

  14. Separation and Identification of Isomeric Glycans by Selected Accumulation-Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Electron Activated Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi; Ridgeway, Mark E; Glaskin, Rebecca S; Park, Melvin A; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    One of the major challenges in structural characterization of oligosaccharides is the presence of many structural isomers in most naturally occurring glycan mixtures. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has shown great promise in glycan isomer separation, conventional IMS separation occurs on the millisecond time scale, largely restricting its implementation to fast time-of-flight (TOF) analyzers which often lack the capability to perform electron activated dissociation (ExD) tandem MS analysis and the resolving power needed to resolve isobaric fragments. The recent development of trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) provides a promising new tool that offers high mobility resolution and compatibility with high-performance Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers when operated under the selected accumulation-TIMS (SA-TIMS) mode. Here, we present our initial results on the application of SA-TIMS-ExD-FTICR MS to the separation and identification of glycan linkage isomers. PMID:26959868

  15. Machine learning based prediction for peptide drift times in ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anuj R.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Baker, Erin S.; Singhal, Mudita; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Kangas, Lars J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Zhao, Rui; Belov, Mikhail E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has gained significant traction over the past few years for rapid, high-resolution separations of analytes based upon gas-phase ion structure, with significant potential impacts in the field of proteomic analysis. IMS coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) affords multiple improvements over traditional proteomics techniques, such as in the elucidation of secondary structure information, identification of post-translational modifications, as well as higher identification rates with reduced experiment times. The high throughput nature of this technique benefits from accurate calculation of cross sections, mobilities and associated drift times of peptides, thereby enhancing downstream data analysis. Here, we present a model that uses physicochemical properties of peptides to accurately predict a peptide's drift time directly from its amino acid sequence. This model is used in conjunction with two mathematical techniques, a partial least squares regression and a support vector regression setting. Results: When tested on an experimentally created high confidence database of 8675 peptide sequences with measured drift times, both techniques statistically significantly outperform the intrinsic size parameters-based calculations, the currently held practice in the field, on all charge states (+2, +3 and +4). Availability: The software executable, imPredict, is available for download from http:/omics.pnl.gov/software/imPredict.php Contact: rds@pnl.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20495001

  16. Amyloid-β / Neuropeptide Interactions Assessed by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Molly T.; DeToma, Alaina S.; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Lim, Mi Hee; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, small peptides have been shown to modulate aggregation and toxicity of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ). As such, these new scaffolds may help discover a new class of biotherapeutics useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Many of these inhibitory peptide sequences have been derived from natural sources or from Aβ itself (e.g., C-terminal Aβ fragments). In addition, much earlier work indicates that tachykinins, a broad class of neuropeptides, display neurotrophic properties, presumably through direct interactions with either Aβ or its receptors. Based on this work, we undertook a limited screen of neuropeptides using ion mobility-mass spectrometry to search for similar such peptides with direct Aβ binding properties. Our results reveal that the neuropeptides leucine enkephalin (LE) and galanin interact with both the monomeric and small oligomeric forms of Aβ1-40 to create a range of complexes having diverse stoichiometries, while some tachyknins (i.e., substance P) do not. LE interacts with Aβ more strongly than galanin, and we utilized ion mobility-mass spectrometry, molecular dynamics simulations, gel electrophoresis/Western blot, and transmission electron microscopy to study the influence of this peptide on the structure of Aβ monomer, small Aβ oligomers, as well as the eventual formation of Aβ fibrils. We find that LE binds selectively within a region of Aβ between its N-terminal tail and hydrophobic core. Furthermore, our data indicate that LE modulates fibril generation, producing shorter fibrillar aggregates when added in stoichiometric excess relative to Aβ. PMID:23612608

  17. Electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry of positively charged sodium bis[2-ethythexyl)sulfosuccinate aggregates.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Indelicato, Serena; Giorgi, Gianluca; Scarpella, Simona; Liveri, Vincenzo Turco; Ceraulo, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    Collision cross-sections (CCS) of positively singly and multiply charged aggregates of the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOTNa) in the gas phase have been measured by quadrupole ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Calibration of the observed drift times to the CCS of the AOTNa non-covalent aggregates was achieved by collecting, under the same experimental conditions, the drift times of a range of singly and multiply charged polyalanine peptides whose CCS had been obtained by conventional ion mobility spectrometry. Together with an obvious increase of the aggregate cross-section with the aggregation number, it was found that the aggregate cross-section increases with the charge state due to the sodium counterions steric effect and the augmented electrostatic repulsion. This finding is consistent with the result of a previous molecular dynamics study on positively charged AOTNa aggregates in the gas phase showing that, by increasing the charge state, the aggregates become progressively more oblate; implying a rise of their CCS. Moreover, the occurrence at each aggregation number and extra charge of a unique value of cross section points toward aggregates whose conformations do not show discernible shape change in the experiment time scale. PMID:24895777

  18. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R; Hopkins, W Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)-a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry-actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27094827

  19. T-wave Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometry: Basic Experimental Procedures for Protein Complex Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michaelevski, Izhak; Kirshenbaum, Noam; Sharon, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility (IM) is a method that measures the time taken for an ion to travel through a pressurized cell under the influence of a weak electric field. The speed by which the ions traverse the drift region depends on their size: large ions will experience a greater number of collisions with the background inert gas (usually N2) and thus travel more slowly through the IM device than those ions that comprise a smaller cross-section. In general, the time it takes for the ions to migrate though the dense gas phase separates them, according to their collision cross-section (Ω). Recently, IM spectrometry was coupled with mass spectrometry and a traveling-wave (T-wave) Synapt ion mobility mass spectrometer (IM-MS) was released. Integrating mass spectrometry with ion mobility enables an extra dimension of sample separation and definition, yielding a three-dimensional spectrum (mass to charge, intensity, and drift time). This separation technique allows the spectral overlap to decrease, and enables resolution of heterogeneous complexes with very similar mass, or mass-to-charge ratios, but different drift times. Moreover, the drift time measurements provide an important layer of structural information, as Ω is related to the overall shape and topology of the ion. The correlation between the measured drift time values and Ω is calculated using a calibration curve generated from calibrant proteins with defined cross-sections1. The power of the IM-MS approach lies in its ability to define the subunit packing and overall shape of protein assemblies at micromolar concentrations, and near-physiological conditions1. Several recent IM studies of both individual proteins2,3 and non-covalent protein complexes4-9, successfully demonstrated that protein quaternary structure is maintained in the gas phase, and highlighted the potential of this approach in the study of protein assemblies of unknown geometry. Here, we provide a detailed description of IMS-MS analysis of protein

  20. Analysis of new synthetic drugs by ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Poteshin, Sergey S; Chernyshev, Denis M; Karpov, Alexander V; Tuzkov, Yuriy B; Kyzmin, Vyacheslav V; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    Characteristic ion mobility mass spectrometry data, reduced mobility, and limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) were determined for six synthetic drugs and cocaine by ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IM-TOF-MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI). The studied synthetic illicit drugs recently appeared on the recreational drug market as designer drugs and were methylone, 4-MEC (4'-methylethcathinone), 3,4-MDPV (3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), JWH-210 [4-ethylnaphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone], JWH-250 [2-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanone], and JWH-203 [1-pentyl-3-(2'-chlorophenylacetyl) indole]. Absolute reduced mobilities in nitrogen were 1.35, 1.28, 1.41, 1.30, 1.18, 0.98, 1.09, and 1.07 cm2V(-1)s(-1), for methylone [M-H]+, methylone [M+H]+, 4-MEC [M-H]+, 4-MEC [M+H]+, 3,4-MDPV [M+H]+, JWH-210 [M+H]+, JWH-250 [M+H]+, and JWH-203 [M+H]+, respectively. Selected illicit drugs are easily identified by IM-TOF-MS during a 100s analysis. Relative Limits of detection ranged from 4 to 400 nM are demonstrated for these compounds. Such relative limits of detection correspond to 14 pg to 2 ng absolute limits of detection. Better detection limits are obtained in APCI mode for all the illicit drugs except cocaine. ESI mode was found to be preferable for the IM-TOF-MS detection of cocaine at trace levels. A single sample analysis is completed in an order of magnitude less time than that for conventional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry approach. The application allows one to consider IM-TOF-MS as a good candidate for a method to determine quickly the recently surfaced designer drugs marketed on the internet as "bath salts," "spice," and "herbal blends". PMID:24895779

  1. Ultrahigh-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations of Conformers for Proteins above 10 kDa: Onset of Dipole Alignment?

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2014-11-04

    Biomacromolecules tend to assume numerous structures in solution or the gas phase. It has been possible to resolve disparate conformational families but not unique geometries within each, and drastic peak broadening has been the bane of protein analyses by chromatography, electrophoresis, and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The new differential IMS (FAIMS) approach using hydrogen-rich gases was recently found to separate conformers of a small protein ubiquitin with same peak width and resolving power up to ~400 as for peptides. Present work explores the reach of this approach for larger proteins, exemplified by cytochrome c and myoglobin. Resolution similar to that for ubiquitin was largely achieved with longer separations, while the onset of peak broadening and coalescence with shorter separations suggests the limitation of present technique to proteins under ~20 kDa. This capability may enable distinguishing whole proteins with differing residue sequences or localizations of posttranslational modifications. Small features at negative compensation voltages that markedly grow from cytochrome c to myoglobin indicate the dipole alignment of rare conformers in accord with theory, further supporting the concept of pendular macroions in FAIMS.

  2. Real-time 2D separation by LC × differential ion mobility hyphenated to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Varesio, Emmanuel; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-03-01

    The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of complex samples such as biological fluid extracts is widespread when searching for new biomarkers as in metabolomics. The success of this hyphenation resides in the orthogonality of both separation techniques. However, there are frequent cases where compounds are co-eluting and the resolving power of mass spectrometry (MS) is not sufficient (e.g., isobaric compounds and interfering isotopic clusters). Different strategies are discussed to solve these cases and a mixture of eight compounds (i.e., bromazepam, chlorprothixene, clonapzepam, fendiline, flusilazol, oxfendazole, oxycodone, and pamaquine) with identical nominal mass (i.e., m/z 316) is taken to illustrate them. Among the different approaches, high-resolution mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography (i.e., UHPLC) can easily separate these compounds. Another technique, mostly used with low resolving power MS analyzers, is differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), where analytes are gas-phase separated according to their size-to-charge ratio. Detailed investigations of the addition of different polar modifiers (i.e., methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol) into the transport gas (nitrogen) to enhance the peak capacity of the technique were carried out. Finally, a complex urine sample fortified with 36 compounds of various chemical properties was analyzed by real-time 2D separation LC×DMS-MS(/MS). The addition of this orthogonal gas-phase separation technique in the LC-MS(/MS) hyphenation greatly improved data quality by resolving composite MS/MS spectra, which is mandatory in metabolomics when performing database generation and search. PMID:22006241

  3. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  4. Digitally-multiplexed nanoelectrospray ionization atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwasnik, Mark; Caramore, Joe; Fernández, Facundo M

    2009-02-15

    One of the shortcomings of atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) is its intrinsically low duty cycle (approximately 0.04-1%) caused by the rapid pulsing of the ion gate (25-400 micros) followed by a comparatively long drift time (25-100 ms), which translates into a loss of sensitivity. Multiplexing approaches via Hadamard and Fourier-type gating techniques have been reported for increasing the sensitivity of DTIMS. Here, we report an extended multiplexing approach which encompasses arbitrary binary ion injection waveforms with variable duty cycles ranging from 0.5 to 50%. In this approach, ion mobility spectra can be collected using conventional signal averaging, arbitrary, standard Hadamard and/or "extended" Hadamard operation modes. Initial results indicate signal-to-noise gains ranging from 2-7-fold for both arbitrary and "extended" Hadamard sequences. Standard Hadamard transform IMS provided increased sensitivity, with gains ranging from 9-12-fold, however, mobility spectra suffered from defects that appeared as false peaks, which were reduced or eliminated when using arbitrary or "extended" Hadamard waveforms for multiplexing. Digital multiplexing enables variation of the duty cycle in a continuous manner, minimizing the contribution of imperfect modulation on spectral defects without the need for complex spectral correction methods. By reducing the frequency of gating events employed in the variable duty cycle sequences, the contributions of factors such as ion depletion prior to gating, interaction of successively injected ion packets, and the cumulative effect of imperfect gating events were mitigated. PMID:19133785

  5. Ion mobility spectrometry for the rapid analysis of over-the-counter drugs and beverages

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, there are increasing requirements for analytical methods in quality assessment for the production of drugs. In this investigation, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was used for the rapid qualitative separation and identification of active ingredients in generic over-the-counter drugs and food additives in beverages. The active ingredients determined in drugs were acetaminophen, aspartame, bisacodyl, caffeine, dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, famotidine, glucosamine, guaifenesin, loratadine, niacin, phenylephrine, pyridoxine, thiamin, and tetrahydrozoline. Aspartame and caffeine were determined in beverages. Fourteen over-the-counter drugs and beverages were analyzed. Analysis times below 10 s were obtained for IMS, and reduced mobilities were reported for the first time for 12 compounds. A quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to a mobility spectrometer was used to assure a correct peak assignation. The combination of fast analysis, low cost, and inexpensive maintenance of IMS instruments makes IMS an attractive technique for the qualitative determination of the active ingredients in over-the-counter drugs and food additives in manufacture quality control and cleaning verification for the drug and food industries. PMID:20835390

  6. Quantitative determination of residual active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates on equipment surfaces by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, C; Granger, A; Papov, V; McCaffrey, J; Norwood, D L

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an analytical technique that separates ions based on their gas phase mobility at atmospheric pressure. Since gas phase ion mobility is a function of the shape and structure of the ion, this technique has the potential to provide unique specificity and selectivity. Furthermore, IMS is very sensitive (subnanogram detection limits for many small molecules), and a single analysis is typically completed within 1 min. In principle, these features of IMS should make it an ideal choice for use in cleaning verification analysis of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment. This report describes the successful development and validation of three different equipment cleaning verification methods using IMS. The methods were developed for a specific intermediate (Compound A) in the synthetic route for a drug substance as well as for final drug substances (active pharmaceutical ingredients Compounds B and C). The cleaning verification methods were validated with respect to specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, stability, and limit-of-quantitation. In all cases, the limits-of-quantitation were determined to be at the nanogram or sub-nanogram level. Both swab and rinse samples collected from the equipment surfaces were successfully analyzed and manufacturing equipment down-time was significantly minimized due to the reduction in cleaning verification analysis time (for example, the total analysis time for more than 30 samples using IMS was reduced to less than 2h). PMID:19758781

  7. Direct analysis of pharmaceutical drug formulations using ion mobility spectrometry/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Weston, Daniel J; Bateman, Robert; Wilson, Ian D; Wood, Tim R; Creaser, Colin S

    2005-12-01

    A novel approach to the rapid analysis of pharmaceutical drug formulations using hyphenated ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS) that requires no sample pretreatment or chromatographic separation is described. A modified quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer containing an ion mobility drift cell was used for gas-phase electrophoretic separation of ions prior to ToF-MS detection. The generation of sample ions directly from tablets and cream formulations was effected by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) using a modified electrospray ion source. The analysis of a range of over-the-counter and prescription tablet formulations is described, including histamine H2 receptor antagonist (ranitidine), analgesic (paracetamol), opiate (codeine), and aromatase inhibitor anticancer (anastrozole) drugs. The successful determination of active drugs from soft formulations, such as an antiseptic cream (chlorhexidine) and a nicotine-containing skin patch, is also presented. Limits of detection for the active drugs using the DESI/IMS/ToF-MS method fell within the high-picomole to nanomole range. In all cases, the use of ion mobility drift tube separation showed increased selectivity for active drug responses (present as low as 0.14% w/w) over excipient responses such as poly(ethylene glycol). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of precursor ions separated by IMS allowed positive confirmation of active drugs with little loss of ion mobility efficiency. The ability to analyze hard or soft pharmaceutical formulations directly by DESI combined with ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry in approximately 2 min demonstrates the potential applicability of this novel method to pharmaceutical screening of low-molecular-weight drug formulations with high selectivity over the formulation vehicle. PMID:16316164

  8. Ion mobility spectrometry fingerprints: A rapid detection technology for adulteration of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Shuai, Qian; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    A simple and rapid detection technology was proposed based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) fingerprints to determine potential adulteration of sesame oil. Oil samples were diluted by n-hexane and analyzed by IMS for 20s. Then, chemometric methods were employed to establish discriminant models for sesame oils and four other edible oils, pure and adulterated sesame oils, and pure and counterfeit sesame oils, respectively. Finally, Random Forests (RF) classification model could correctly classify all five types of edible oils. The detection results indicated that the discriminant models built by recursive support vector machine (R-SVM) method could identify adulterated sesame oil samples (⩾ 10%) with an accuracy value of 94.2%. Therefore, IMS was shown to be an effective method to detect the adulterated sesame oils. Meanwhile, IMS fingerprints work well to detect the counterfeit sesame oils produced by adding sesame oil essence into cheaper edible oils. PMID:26304320

  9. Resolving Interferences in Negative Mode Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Selective Reactant Ion Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, Keith Alvin; Atkinson, David Alan; Ewing, Robert Gordon; Knighton, W. B.; Grimsrud, E. P

    2001-04-01

    During the investigation of the degradation products of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) were found to have IMS responses which overlapped those of the TNT degradation products. It was observed that the Cl- reactant ion chemistry, often used for explosives analysis, was not always successful in resolving peak overlap of analytes and interferents. It is shown here that resolution of the analytes and interferences can sometimes be achieved using only air for the formation of reactant ions, at other times through the use of Br- as an alternative to Cl- for producing reactant ions, and also through the promotion of adduct stability by lowering the IMS temperature.

  10. The use of difference spectra with a filtered rolling average background in mobile gamma spectrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, A. J.; Sanderson, D. C. W.

    2009-08-01

    The use of difference spectra, with a filtering of a rolling average background, as a variation of the more common rainbow plots to aid in the visual identification of radiation anomalies in mobile gamma spectrometry systems is presented. This method requires minimal assumptions about the radiation environment, and is not computationally intensive. Some case studies are presented to illustrate the method. It is shown that difference spectra produced in this manner can improve signal to background, estimate shielding or mass depth using scattered spectral components, and locate point sources. This approach could be a useful addition to the methods available for locating point sources and mapping dispersed activity in real time. Further possible developments of the procedure utilising more intelligent filters and spatial averaging of the background are identified.

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  12. Ion mobility spectrometry as a high-throughput analytical tool in occupational pyrethroid exposure.

    PubMed

    Armenta, S; Blanco, M

    2012-08-01

    The capabilities of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a high throughput and green analytical tool in the occupational health and safety control, using pyrethroids as models has been evidenced. The method used for dermal and inhalation exposure assessment is based on the passive pyrethroid sampling using Teflon membranes, direct thermal extraction of the pyrethroids, and measurement of the vaporized analytes by IMS without reagent and solvent consumption. The IMS signatures of the studied synthetic pyrethroids under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by investigating the formed negative ion products have been obtained. The main advantages of the proposed procedure are related to the obtained limits of detection, ranging from 0.08 to 5 ng, the simplicity of measurement, the lack of sample treatment, and therefore, solvent consumption and waste generation, and finally, the speed of analysis. PMID:22159370

  13. Laser desorption with corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct surface detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Sabo, M; Malásková, M; Matejčík, S

    2014-10-21

    We present a new highly sensitive technique for the detection of explosives directly from the surface using laser desorption-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (LD-CD-IMS). We have developed LD based on laser diode modules (LDM) and the technique was tested using three different LDM (445, 532 and 665 nm). The explosives were detected directly from the surface without any further preparation. We discuss the mechanism of the LD and the limitations of this technique such as desorption time, transport time and desorption area. After the evaluation of experimental data, we estimated the potential limits of detection of this method to be 0.6 pg for TNT, 2.8 pg for RDX and 8.4 pg for PETN. PMID:25118619

  14. Direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, M T; Khayamian, T

    2008-09-15

    In this study, direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen residues in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was investigated. Pyridine was used as an alternate reagent gas to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of the method. The results indicate that the limit of detection (LOD) was about 9.2x10(-3)mugmL(-1) and the linear dynamic range was obtained from 0.03 to 2.00mugmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was about 11%. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to the direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in river and tap water samples and the results were compared with the Nessler method. The comparison of the results validates the potential of the proposed method as an alternative technique for the analysis of the ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples. PMID:18761176

  15. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts andmore » noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.« less

  16. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin S.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-12-01

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm employs an analytical approach to identify and remove artifacts from the data, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. Following application of the algorithm, IMS-MS measurement sensitivity is greatly increased and artifacts that previously limited the utility of applying the Hadamard transform to IMS are avoided. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-12-01

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  18. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  19. Field screening of soils contaminated with explosives using ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, A.B.; Atkinson, D.A.; Jenkins, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    Soils contaminated with explosives constitute a problem at DOE facilities and Army installations. Because explosives in soil are often heterogeneously distributed and require high density sampling, field screening is essential to characterize sites more quickly, economically and accurately. Current immunoassay and colorimetric field screening procedures have proven useful, but have significant per sample costs and limited throughput. At present, several field screening are available for TNT in soil, three procedures for RDX, and one procedure for 2,4-DNTand ammonium picrate/picric acid (AP/PA). Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used to detect explosives in air at ppt levels, but limited work has been done to apply the technique to quantify explosives in soils. The objective of this study has been to evaluate the utility of IMS as a screening technique for quantifying explosive residues in soils.

  20. GlycoMob: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry collision cross section database for glycomics.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Benesch, Justin L P; Harvey, David J; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a promising analytical technique for glycomics that separates glycan ions based on their collision cross section (CCS) and provides glycan precursor and fragment masses. It has been shown that isomeric oligosaccharide species can be separated by IM and identified on basis of their CCS and fragmentation. These results indicate that adding CCSs information for glycans and glycan fragments to searchable databases and analysis pipelines will increase identification confidence and accuracy. We have developed a freely accessible database, GlycoMob ( http://www.glycomob.org ), containing over 900 CCSs values of glycans, oligosaccharide standards and their fragments that will be continually updated. We have measured the absolute CCSs of calibration standards, biologically derived and synthetic N-glycans ionized with various adducts in positive and negative mode or as protonated (positive ion) and deprotonated (negative ion) ions. PMID:26314736

  1. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E; Glover, Matthew S; Ewing, Michael A; Russell, David H; Clemmer, David E

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all-cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all-trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment. PMID:26362047

  2. High Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2005-11-22

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing a device for transmitting ions from an ion source which allows the transmission of ions without significant delay to an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  3. High-Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2004-11-16

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  4. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Glover, Matthew S.; Ewing, Michael A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/ trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all- cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all- trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment.

  5. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  6. Determination of N-linked glycosylation in viral glycoproteins by negative ion mass spectrometry and ion mobility

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, David; Harvey, David J.; Halldorsson, Steinar; Doores, Katie J.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glycan analysis of virion-derived glycoproteins is challenging due to the difficulties in glycoprotein isolation and low sample abundance. Here, we describe how ion mobility mass spectrometry can be used to obtain spectra from virion samples. We also describe how negative ion fragmentation of glycans can be used to probe structural features of virion glycans. PMID:26169737

  7. Shift reagents in ion mobility spectrometry: the effect of the number of interaction sites, size and interaction energies on the mobilities of valinol and ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-05-01

    Overlapping peaks interfere in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), but they are separated introducing mobility shift reagents (SR) in the buffer gas forming adducts with different collision cross-sections (size). IMS separations using SR depend on the ion mobility shifts which are governed by adduct's size and interaction energies (stabilities). Mobility shifts of valinol and ethanolamine ions were measured by electrospray-ionization ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MS). Methyl-chloro propionate (M) was used as SR; 2-butanol (B) and nitrobenzene (N) were used for comparison. Density functional theory was used for calculations. B produced the smallest mobility shifts because of its small size. M and N have two strong interaction sites (oxygen atoms) and similar molecular mass, and they should produce similar shifts. For both ethanolamine and valinol ions, stabilities were larger for N adducts than those of M. With ethanolamine, M produced a 68% shift, large compared to that using N, 61%, because M has a third weak interaction site on the chlorine atom and, therefore, M has more interaction possibilities than N. This third site overrode the oxygen atoms' interaction energy that favored the adduction of ethanolamine with N over that with M. On the contrary, with valinol mobility shifts were larger with N than with M (21 vs 18%) because interaction energy favored even more adduction of valinol with N than with M; that is, the interaction energy difference between adducts of valinol with M and N was larger than that between those adducts with ethanolamine, and the third M interaction could not override this larger difference. Mobility shifts were explained based on the number of SR's interaction sites, size of ions and SR, and SR-ion interaction energies. This is the first time that the number of interaction sites is used to explain mobility shifts in SR-assisted IMS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194523

  8. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  9. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control. PMID:25197771

  10. Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics by Structurally Selective Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kliman, Michal; May, Jody C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry approaches to the analysis of lipids include the ability to incorporate both lipid class identification with lipid structural information for increased characterization capabilities. The detailed examination of lipids and their biosynthetic and biochemical pathways made possible by novel instrumental and bioinformatics approaches is advancing research in fundamental cellular and medical studies. Recently, high-throughput structural analysis has been demonstrated through the use of rapid gas-phase separation on the basis of the ion mobility (IM) analytical technique combined with mass spectrometry (IM-MS). While IM-MS has been extensively utilized in biochemical research for peptide, protein and small molecule analysis, the role of IM-MS in lipid research is still an active area of development. In this review of lipid-based IM-MS research, we begin with an overview of three contemporary IM techniques which show great promise in being applied towards the analysis of lipids. Fundamental concepts regarding the integration of IM-MS are reviewed with emphasis on the applications of IM-MS towards simplifying and enhancing complex biological sample analysis. Finally, several recent IM-MS lipid studies are highlighted and the future prospects of IM-MS for integrated omics studies and enhanced spatial profiling through imaging IM-MS are briefly described. PMID:21708282

  11. Early stages of insulin fibrillogenesis examined with ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Cole, Harriet; Porrini, Massimiliano; Morris, Ryan; Smith, Tom; Kalapothakis, Jason; Weidt, Stefan; Mackay, C Logan; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-10-21

    A prevalent type of protein misfolding causes the formation of β-sheet-rich structures known as amyloid fibrils. Research into the mechanisms of fibril formation has implications for both disease prevention and nanoscale templating technologies. This investigation into the aggregation of insulin utilises ion mobility mass spectrometry coupled with molecular modelling to identify and characterise oligomers formed during the 'lag' phase that precedes fibril growth. High resolution mass spectrometry and collision induced dissociation is used to unequivocally assign species as m/z coincident multimers or confomers, providing a robust analytical approach that supports the use of molecular dynamics to atomistically resolve the observed oligomers. We show that insulin oligomerises to form species In where 2 ≤ n ≤ 12 and within this set of oligomers we delineate over 60 distinct conformations, the most dominant of which are compact species. Modelling trained with experimental data suggests that the dominant compact dimers are enriched in β-sheet secondary structure and dominated by hydrophobic interactions, and provides a linear relationship between Rg and collision cross section. This approach provides detailed insight to the early stages of assembly of this much studied amyloidogenic protein, and can be used to inform models of nucleation and growth. PMID:26369607

  12. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  13. Differential mobility spectrometry with nanospray ion source as a compact detector for small organics and inorganics

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kidd, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is an important tool in chemical and biochemical survey and targeted analysis in many applications. For chemical detection and identification electrospray is usually used with mass spectrometry (MS). However, for screening and monitoring of chemicals of interest in light, low power field-deployable instrumentation, an alternative detection technology with chemical selectivity would be highly useful, especially since small, lightweight, chip-based gas and liquid chromatographic technologies are being developed. Our initial list of applications requiring portable instruments includes chemical surveys on Mars, medical diagnostics based on metabolites in biological samples, and water quality analysis. In this report, we evaluate ESI-Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) as a compact, low-power alternative to MS detection. Use of DMS for chemically-selective detection of ESI suffers in comparison with mass spectrometry because portable MS peak capacity is greater than that of DMS by 10X or more, but the development of light, fast chip chromatography offers compensating resolution. Standalone DMS provides the chemical selectivity familiar from DMS-MS publications, and exploits the sensitivity of ion detection. We find that sub-microliter-per-minute flows and a correctly-designed interface prepare a desolvated ion stream that enables DMS to act as an effective ion filter. Results for a several small organic biomarkers and metabolites, including citric acid, azelaic acid, n-hexanoylglycine, thymidine, and caffeine, as well as compounds such as dinitrotoluene and others, have been characterized and demonstrate selective detection. Water-quality-related halogen-containing anions, fluoride through bromate, contained in liquid samples are also isolated by DMS. A reaction-chamber interface is highlighted as most practical for portable ESI-DMS instrumentation. PMID:23914140

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  15. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is adding new dimensions, that is, structure and dynamics, to the field of biological mass spectrometry. There is increasing evidence that gas-phase ions produced by ESI can closely resemble their solution-phase structures, but correlating these structures can be complicated owing to the number of competing effects contributing to structural preferences, including both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Ions encounter unique hydration environments during the transition from solution to the gas phase that will likely affect their structure(s), but many of these structural changes will go undetected because ESI-IM-MS analysis is typically performed on solvent-free ions. Cryogenic ion mobility-mass spectrometry (cryo-IM-MS) takes advantage of the freeze-drying capabilities of ESI and a cryogenically cooled IM drift cell (80 K) to preserve extensively solvated ions of the type [M + xH](x+)(H2O)n, where n can vary from zero to several hundred. This affords an experimental approach for tracking the structural evolution of hydrated biomolecules en route to forming solvent-free gas-phase ions. The studies highlighted in this Account illustrate the varying extent to which dehydration can alter ion structure and the overall impact of cryo-IM-MS on structural studies of hydrated biomolecules. Studies of small ions, including protonated water clusters and alkyl diammonium cations, reveal structural transitions associated with the development of the H-bond network of water molecules surrounding the charge carrier(s). For peptide ions, results show that water networks are highly dependent on the charge-carrying species within the cluster. Specifically, hydrated peptide ions containing lysine display specific hydration behavior around the ammonium ion, that is, magic number clusters with enhanced stability, whereas peptides containing arginine do not display specific hydration around the

  16. Application of a nonradioactive pulsed electron source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunzer, Frank; Zimmermann, Stefan; Baether, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well-known method for detecting hazardous compounds in air. Typical applications are the detection of chemical warfare agents, highly toxic industrial compounds, explosives, and drugs of abuse. Detection limits in the low part per billion range, fast response times, and simple instrumentation make this technique more and more popular. Common ion mobility spectrometers work by employing a radioactive source to provide electrons with high energy to ionize analytes in a series of chemical reactions. General security as well as regulatory concerns related to radioactivity result in the need for a different ionization source which on the other hand produces ions in a similar manner as a radioactive source since the ion chemistry is well-known. Here we show the application of a novel nonradioactive source that produces spectra similar to those obtained with radioactive tritium sources. Using this source in a pulsed mode offers the additional advantage of selecting certain analytes by their recombination time and thus significantly increasing the selectivity. The successful isolation of a target signal in the presence of contaminants using a pulsed electron beam or more precisely the difference in recombination times will be demonstrated for the case of dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) showing the potential of this source to reduce the possibility for false-positive detection of corresponding chemical warfare agents (CWA) by IMS. PMID:20353158

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of a microplasma used as ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Antje; Tombrink, Sven; Vautz, Wolfgang; Miclea, Manuela; Franzke, Joachim

    2007-11-01

    We report a miniaturized excitation source for soft ionization of molecules based on a dielectric barrier discharge. An atmospheric plasma is established at the end of a 500 μm diameter capillary using He as buffer gas. The plasma jet which comes out of the capillary is dependent on the gas flow rate. The mechanism of the production of N 2+ outside the capillary, which is relevant for the protonation of molecules and sustains the production of primary ions, is investigated by spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements throughout the plasma. Possible application of such miniaturized plasmas is the ionization of gaseous compounds under atmospheric pressure as an alternative to traditional APCI (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization). The miniaturized plasma was applied as ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry where the common sources are radioactive, thus limiting the place of installation. First measurements of gaseous compounds with such a plasma ion mobility spectrometer with promising results showed detection limits comparable or even better than those obtained using common radioactive ionization sources.

  18. Specific O₂⁻ generation in corona discharge for ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Matúška, Ján; Matejčík, Stefan

    2011-07-15

    This study deals with O(2)(-) generation in corona discharge (CD) in point to plane geometry for single flow ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with gas outlet located behind the ionization source. We have designed CD of special geometry in order to achieve the high O(2)(-) yield. Using this ion source we have achieved in zero air conditions that up to 74% all negative ions were O(2)(-) or O(2)(-)(H(2)O). It has been demonstrated that the non-electronegative nitrogen positively influences the efficiency of O(2)(-) generation in O(2)/N(2) mixtures. The reduced ion mobility of 2.27 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) has been measured for O(2)(-)/O(2)(-)(H(2)O) ions in zero air. Additional ions detected in zero air (less than 200 ppb CO(2)) using the mass spectrometric and IMS technique were, NO(2)(-), N(2)O(2)(-) (2.37 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), NO(3)(-), N(2)O(3)(-) and N(2)O(3)(-)(H(2)O). The CO(3)(-) and CO(4)(-) ions have been detected after the introduction of 5 ppm CO(2) into zero air. PMID:21645716

  19. Multiplicative effects model with internal standard in mobile phase for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Chen, Yao; Jin, Jing-Wen

    2014-07-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays suffer from signal instability caused by the gradual fouling of the ion source, vacuum instability, aging of the ion multiplier, etc. To address this issue, in this contribution, an internal standard was added into the mobile phase. The internal standard was therefore ionized and detected together with the analytes of interest by the mass spectrometer to ensure that variations in measurement conditions and/or instrument have similar effects on the signal contributions of both the analytes of interest and the internal standard. Subsequently, based on the unique strategy of adding internal standard in mobile phase, a multiplicative effects model was developed for quantitative LC-MS assays and tested on a proof of concept model system: the determination of amino acids in water by LC-MS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method could efficiently mitigate the detrimental effects of continuous signal variation, and achieved quantitative results with average relative predictive error values in the range of 8.0-15.0%, which were much more accurate than the corresponding results of conventional internal standard method based on the peak height ratio and partial least squares method (their average relative predictive error values were as high as 66.3% and 64.8%, respectively). Therefore, it is expected that the proposed method can be developed and extended in quantitative LC-MS analysis of more complex systems. PMID:24840455

  20. Native mass spectrometry and ion mobility characterize the orange carotenoid protein functional domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Lu, Yue; Wolf, Nathan R; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) plays a unique role in protecting many cyanobacteria from light-induced damage. The active form of OCP is directly involved in energy dissipation by binding to the phycobilisome (PBS), the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria. There are two structural modules in OCP, an N-terminal domain (NTD), and a C-terminal domain (CTD), which play different functional roles during the OCP-PBS quenching cycle. Because of the quasi-stable nature of active OCP, structural analysis of active OCP has been lacking compared to its inactive form. In this report, partial proteolysis was used to generate two structural domains, NTD and CTD, from active OCP. We used multiple native mass spectrometry (MS) based approaches to interrogate the structural features of the NTD and the CTD. Collisional activation and ion mobility analysis indicated that the NTD releases its bound carotenoid without forming any intermediates and the CTD is resistant to unfolding upon collisional energy ramping. The unfolding intermediates observed in inactive intact OCP suggest that it is the N-terminal extension and the NTD-CTD loop that lead to the observed unfolding intermediates. These combined approaches extend the knowledge of OCP photo-activation and structural features of OCP functional domains. Combining native MS, ion mobility, and collisional activation promises to be a sensitive new approach for studies of photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes. PMID:26921809

  1. Oversampling Selective Accumulation Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to FT-ICR MS: Fundamentals and Applications.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Paolo; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-07-19

    In the present paper, we describe the fundamentals and analytical advantages of Oversampling Selective Accumulation Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry (OSA-TIMS) when coupled to ultrahigh resolution mass analyzers (e.g., FT-ICR MS). During TIMS analysis, ion packages are spatially resolved based on their mobilities along the TIMS analyzer axis and multiple strategies can be utilized during the trapping and elution of the ion population of interest. In the case of OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS, the TIMS operation sequence, trapping conditions, and operations are optimized to increase the signal-to-noise and the number of points across the mobility domain, which leads to more accurate mobility and mass measurements. Experimental results show that accurate ion-neutral collision cross sections (<1%) can be measured using OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS with high mobility resolving powers (RIMS up to 250), high mass accuracy (<1 ppm), and ultrahigh mass resolution (RMS up to 600-1200k at m/z 400) in a single analysis. The analytical advantages of OSA-TIMS over SA-TIMS were illustrated for the analysis of structural peptide isomers (SDGRG and GRGDS [M + H](+)), conformational isomers (AT-hook peptide 3 KRGRGRPRK [M + 2H](+2)), and a complex mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from coal tar. Baseline separation of the structural peptide isomers SDGRG and GRGDS, [M + H](+), was observed, and three conformations were identified for the AT-hook peptide 3 KRGRGRPRK [M + 2H](+2) during OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS. A 2-fold increase in the number of molecular features and a 2-6-fold signal-to-noise increase was observed for OSA-TIMS when compared with SA-TIMS during the PAH analysis. This work provides the proof-of-principle for further application of OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS for the unsupervised analysis of complex mixtures based on the characterization of the conformational space and the assignment of chemical formulas in a single analysis. PMID:27340830

  2. A Critical Review of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for the Detection of Explosives and Explosive Related Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert Gordon; Atkinson, David Alan; Eiceman, G. A.; Ewing, G. J.

    2001-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry has become the most successful and widely used technology for the detection of trace levels of nitro-organic explosives on handbags and carry on-luggage in airports throughout the US. The low detection limits are provided by the efficient ionization process, namely, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) reactions in negative polarity. An additional level of confidence in a measurement is imparted by characterization of ions for mobilities in weak electric fields of a drift tube at ambient pressure. Findings from over 30 years of investigations into IMS response to these explosives have been collected and assessed to allow a comprehensive view of the APCI reactions characteristic of nitro-organic explosives. Also, the drift tube conditions needed to obtain particular mobility spectra have been summarized. During the past decade, improvements have occurred in IMS on the understanding of reagent gas chemistries, the influence of temperature on ion stability, and sampling methods. In addition, commercial instruments have been refined to provide fast and reliable measurements for on-site detection of explosives. The gas phase ion chemistry of most explosives is mediated by the fragile C---ONO2 bonds or the acidity of protons. Thus, M- or M·Cl- species are found with only a few explosives and loss of NO2, NO3 and proton abstraction reactions are common and complicating pathways. However, once ions are formed, they appear to have stabilities on time scales equal to or longer than ion drift times from 5–20 ms. As such, peak shapes in IMS are suitable for high selectivity and sensitivity.

  3. Optimization of a Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds: Application to Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Giri, Anupam; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Fast market penetration of electronic cigarettes is leading to an exponentially growing number of electronic refill liquids with different nicotine contents and an endless list of flavors. Therefore, rapid and simple methods allowing a fast screening of these products are necessary to detect harmful substances which can negatively impact the health of consumers. In this regard, the present work explores the capabilities of differential ion mobility spectrometry coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of nicotine and 11 related compounds in commercial refill liquids for electronic cigarettes. The influence of main factors affecting the ion mobility separation, such as modifier types and concentration, separation voltage, and temperature, was systematically investigated. Despite small molecular weight differences among the studied compounds, a good separation was achieved in the ion mobility cell under the optimized conditions, which involved the use of ethanol as a polar gas-phase chemical modifier. Indeed, differential ion mobility was able to resolve (resolution >4) nicotine from its structural isomer anabasine without the use of any chromatographic separation. The quantitative performance of the proposed method was then evaluated, showing satisfactory precision (RSD ≤ 16%) and recoveries ranging from 85 to 100% for nicotine, and from 84 to 126% for the rest of the target analytes. Several commercial electronic cigarette refill liquids were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. In some cases, significant differences were found between labeled and measured levels of nicotine. Anatabine, cotinine, myosmine, and nornicotine were also found in some of the analyzed samples. PMID:27173877

  4. Chemical Effects in the Separation Process of a Differential Mobility / Mass Spectrometer System

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2013-01-01

    In differential mobility spectrometry (DMS, also referred to as high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry, FAIMS), ions are separated on the basis of the difference in their mobility under high and low electric fields. The addition of polar modifiers to the gas transporting the ions through a DMS enhances the formation of clusters in a field-dependent way and thus amplifies the high and low field mobility difference resulting in increased peak capacity and separation power. Observations of the increase in mobility field dependence are consistent with a cluster formation model, also referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. The uniqueness of chemical interactions that occur between an ion and cluster-forming neutrals increases the selectivity of the separation and the depression of low-field mobility relative to high-field mobility increases the compensation voltage and peak capacity. The effect of polar modifiers on the peak capacity across a broad range of chemicals has been investigated. We discuss the theoretical underpinnings which explain the observed effects. In contrast to the result from polar modifiers, we find that using mixtures of inert gases as the transport gas improve resolution by reducing peak width but has very little effect on peak capacity or selectivity. Inert gases do not cluster and thus do not reduce low field mobility relative to high-field mobility. The observed changes in the differential mobility α parameter exhibited by different classes of compounds when the transport gas contains polar modifiers or has a significant fraction of inert gas can be explained on the basis of the physical mechanisms involved in the separation processes. PMID:20121077

  5. An ion mobility-mass spectrometry investigation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenauer, Matthew R.; Leary, Julie A.

    2009-10-01

    In the present article we describe the gas-phase dissociation behavior of the dimeric form of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) using quadrupole-traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-time of flight mass spectrometry (q-TWIMS-TOF MS) (Waters Synapt(TM)). Through investigation of the 9+ charge state of the dimer, we were able to monitor dissociation product ion (monomer) formation as a function of activation energy. Using ion mobility, we were able to observe precursor ion structural changes occurring throughout the activation process. Arrival time distributions (ATDs) for the 5+ monomeric MCP-1 product ions, derived from the gas-phase dissociation of the 9+ dimer, were then compared with ATDs obtained for the 5+ MCP-1 monomer isolated directly from solution. The results show that the dissociated monomer is as compact as the monomer arising from solution, regardless of the trap collision energy (CE) used in the dissociation. The solution-derived monomer, when collisionally activated, also resists significant unfolding within measure. Finally, we compared the collisional activation data for the MCP-1 dimer with an MCP-1 dimer non-covalently bound to a single molecule of the semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analog Arixtra(TM); the latter a therapeutic anti-thrombin III-activating pentasaccharide. We observed that while dimeric MCP-1 dissociated at relatively low trap CEs, the Arixtra-bound dimer required much higher energies, which also induced covalent bond cleavage in the bound Arixtra molecule. Both the free and Arixtra-bound dimers became less compact and exhibited longer arrival times with increasing trap CEs, albeit the Arixtra-bound complex at slightly higher energies. That both dimers shifted to longer arrival times with increasing activation energy, while the dissociated MCP-1 monomers remained compact, suggests that the longer arrival times of the Arixtra-free and Arixtra-bound dimers may represent a partial breach of non

  6. Understanding gas phase modifier interactions in rapid analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility- mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using mucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab-initio thermochemical results we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry in mobility differences, but at lower temperatures multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects. PMID:24452298

  7. Nanomaterial size distribution analysis via liquid nebulization coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (LN-IMS).

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Oberreit, Derek R; Van Schooneveld, Gary; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-02-21

    We apply liquid nebulization (LN) in series with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS, using a differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter) to measure the size distribution functions (the number concentration per unit log diameter) of gold nanospheres in the 5-30 nm range, 70 nm × 11.7 nm gold nanorods, and albumin proteins originally in aqueous suspensions. In prior studies, IMS measurements have only been carried out for colloidal nanoparticles in this size range using electrosprays for aerosolization, as traditional nebulizers produce supermicrometer droplets which leave residue particles from non-volatile species. Residue particles mask the size distribution of the particles of interest. Uniquely, the LN employed in this study uses both online dilution (with dilution factors of up to 10(4)) with ultra-high purity water and a ball-impactor to remove droplets larger than 500 nm in diameter. This combination enables hydrosol-to-aerosol conversion preserving the size and morphology of particles, and also enables higher non-volatile residue tolerance than electrospray based aerosolization. Through LN-IMS measurements we show that the size distribution functions of narrowly distributed but similarly sized particles can be distinguished from one another, which is not possible with Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis in the sub-30 nm size range. Through comparison to electron microscopy measurements, we find that the size distribution functions inferred via LN-IMS measurements correspond to the particle sizes coated by surfactants, i.e. as they persist in colloidal suspensions. Finally, we show that the gas phase particle concentrations inferred from IMS size distribution functions are functions of only of the liquid phase particle concentration, and are independent of particle size, shape, and chemical composition. Therefore LN-IMS enables characterization of the size, yield, and polydispersity of sub-30 nm particles. PMID:26750519

  8. Structural Characterization of Methylenedianiline Regioisomers by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Strategies: I. Electrospray Spectra of 2-Ring Isomers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purified methylenedianiline (MDA) regioisomers were structurally characterized and differentiated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), and IM-MS/MS in conjunction with computational methods. It was determined that protonation sites on the isomers can vary depending on the position of amino groups, and the resulting protonation sites play a role in the gas-phase stability of the isomer. We also observed differences in the relative distributions of protonated conformations depending on experimental conditions and instrumentation, which is consistent with previous studies on aniline in the gas phase. This work demonstrates the utility of a multifaceted approach for the study of isobaric species and elucidates why previous MDA studies may have been unable to detect and/or differentiate certain isomers. Such analysis may prove useful in the characterization of larger MDA multimeric species, industrial MDA mixtures, and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) mixtures used in polyurethane synthesis. PMID:24678803

  9. Micro-machined planar field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometer as a gas chromatographic detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Nazarov, E. G.; Miller, R. A.; Krylov, E. V.; Zapata, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    A planar high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer (PFAIMS) with a micro-machined drift tube was characterized as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. The performance of the PFAIMS was compared directly to that of a flame ionization detector (FID) for the separation of a ketone mixture from butanone to decanone. Effluent from the column was continuously sampled by the detector and mobility scans could be obtained throughout the chromatographic analysis providing chemical inforrmation in mobility scans orthogonal to retention time. Limits of detection were approximately I ng for measurement of positive ions and were comparable or slightly better than those for the FID. Direct comparison of calibration curves for the FAIMS and the FID was possible over four orders of magnitude with a semi-log plot. The concentration dependence of the PFAIMS mobility scans showed the dependence between ion intensity and ion clustering, evident in other mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization technologies. Ions were identified using mass spectrometry as the protonated monomer and the proton bound dimer of the ketones. Residence time for column effluent in the PFAIMS was calculated as approximately 1 ms and a 36% increase in extra-column broadening versus the FID occurred with the PFAIMS.

  10. Fast detection of coliform bacteria by means of gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saptalena, Lena Ganda; Kuklya, Andriy; Telgheder, Ursula

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of an enzymatic method (based on Colilert-18 medium) and gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) can reduce the time required for detection of coliform bacteria (including Escherichia coli) from 18 to 2.5 h. The presented method includes the incubation (~2.5 h) of the sample containing coliform bacteria in Colilert-18 medium. The incubation time of 2.5 h is required for the activation of the β-galactosidase enzyme. Produced during the incubation biomarker o-nitrophenol (ONP) can be detected by means of GC-DMS within just 200 s. The detection limit for ONP was 45 ng (on-column). The method developed in this work provides significantly shorter analysis time compared with standard methods, and can be potentially adapted to the field conditions. Therefore, this method is a promising tool for an early detection of coliform bacteria (including E. coli). Graphical Abstract Fast detection of coliform bacteria by means of GC-DMS. PMID:27002609