Science.gov

Sample records for mock galaxy catalogues

  1. An algorithm to build mock galaxy catalogues using MICE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.

    2015-02-01

    We present a method to build mock galaxy catalogues starting from a halo catalogue that uses halo occupation distribution (HOD) recipes as well as the subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) technique. Combining both prescriptions we are able to push the absolute magnitude of the resulting catalogue to fainter luminosities than using just the SHAM technique and can interpret our results in terms of the HOD modelling. We optimize the method by populating with galaxies friends-of-friends dark matter haloes extracted from the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai dark matter simulations and comparing them to observational constraints. Our resulting mock galaxy catalogues manage to reproduce the observed local galaxy luminosity function and the colour-magnitude distribution as observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also reproduce the observed galaxy clustering properties as a function of luminosity and colour. In order to achieve that, the algorithm also includes scatter in the halo mass-galaxy luminosity relation derived from direct SHAM and a modified Navarro-Frenk-White mass density profile to place satellite galaxies in their host dark matter haloes. Improving on general usage of the HOD that fits the clustering for given magnitude limited samples, our catalogues are constructed to fit observations at all luminosities considered and therefore for any luminosity subsample. Overall, our algorithm is an economic procedure of obtaining galaxy mock catalogues down to faint magnitudes that are necessary to understand and interpret galaxy surveys.

  2. Constructing mock catalogues for the REFLEX II galaxy cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the construction of a suite of galaxy cluster mock catalogues from N-body simulations, based on the properties of the new ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. Our procedure is based on the measurements of the cluster abundance, and involves the calibration of the underlying scaling relation linking the mass of dark matter haloes to the cluster X-ray luminosity determined in the ROSAT energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. In order to reproduce the observed abundance in the luminosity range probed by the REFLEX II X-ray luminosity function [0.01 < LX/(1044 erg s-1 h-2) < 10], a mass-X-ray luminosity relation deviating from a simple power law is required. We discuss the dependence of the calibration of this scaling relation on the X-ray luminosity and the definition of halo masses and analyse the one- and two-point statistical properties of the mock catalogues. Our set of mock catalogues provides samples with self-calibrated scaling relations of galaxy clusters together with inherent properties of flux-limited surveys. This makes them a useful tool to explore different systematic effects and statistical methods involved in constraining both astrophysical and cosmological information from present and future galaxy cluster surveys.

  3. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass haloes, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realizations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate-mass galaxies in 1012 M⊙ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k ≤ 0.15 h Mpc-1, and with only 3-per cent error for k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at github.com/junkoda/cola_halo.

  4. The REFLEX II Galaxy Cluster sample: mock catalogues and clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolinez, Andres; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Bohringer, Hans

    2012-09-01

    We present results of the analysis of abundance and clustering from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX) II galaxy cluster catalogue. To model the covariance matrix of the different statistics, we have created a set of 100 mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite large volume LambdaCDM N-Body simulations (L-BASICC and calibrated with the X-ray luminosity function. We discuss the calibration scheme and some implications regarding the cluster scaling relations, particularly, the link between mass and luminosity. Similarly we show the behavior of the clustering signal as a function of the X-ray luminosity and some cosmological implications.

  5. nIFTy cosmology: Galaxy/halo mock catalogue comparison project on clustering statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Munari, Emiliano; Avila, Santiago; Izard, Albert; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Manera, Marc; Monaco, Pierluigi; Murray, Steven; Knebe, Alexander; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Yepes, Gustavo; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Marín, Felipe A.; Müller, Volker; Skibba, Ramin; Crocce, Martin; Fosalba, Pablo; Gottlöber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Power, Chris; Tao, Charling; Turchaninov, Victor

    2015-09-01

    We present a comparison of major methodologies of fast generating mock halo or galaxy catalogues. The comparison is done for two-point (power spectrum and two-point correlation function in real and redshift space), and the three-point clustering statistics (bispectrum and three-point correlation function). The reference catalogues are drawn from the BigMultiDark N-body simulation. Both friend-of-friends (including distinct haloes only) and spherical overdensity (including distinct haloes and subhalos) catalogues have been used with the typical number density of a large volume galaxy surveys. We demonstrate that a proper biasing model is essential for reproducing the power spectrum at quasi-linear and even smaller scales. With respect to various clustering statistics, a methodology based on perturbation theory and a realistic biasing model leads to very good agreement with N-body simulations. However, for the quadrupole of the correlation function or the power spectrum, only the method based on semi-N-body simulation could reach high accuracy (1 per cent level) at small scales, i.e. r < 25 h-1 Mpc or k > 0.15 h Mpc-1. Full N-body solutions will remain indispensable to produce reference catalogues. Nevertheless, we have demonstrated that the more efficient approximate solvers can reach a few per cent accuracy in terms of clustering statistics at the scales interesting for the large-scale structure analysis. This makes them useful for massive production aimed at covariance studies, to scan large parameter spaces, and to estimate uncertainties in data analysis techniques, such as baryon acoustic oscillation reconstruction, redshift distortion measurements, etc.

  6. Redshift weights for baryon acoustic oscillations: application to mock galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fangzhou; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gongbo

    2016-09-01

    Large redshift surveys capable of measuring the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal have proven to be an effective way of measuring the distance-redshift relation in cosmology. Building off the work in Zhu et al., we develop a technique to directly constrain the distance-redshift relation from BAO measurements without splitting the sample into redshift bins. We apply the redshift weighting technique in Zhu et al. to the clustering of galaxies from 1000 Quick particle mesh (QPM) mock simulations after reconstruction and achieve a 0.75 per cent measurement of the angular diameter distance DA at z = 0.64 and the same precision for Hubble parameter H at z = 0.29. These QPM mock catalogues mimic the clustering and noise level of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12). We compress the correlation functions in the redshift direction on to a set of weighted correlation functions. These estimators give unbiased DA and H measurements across the entire redshift range of the combined sample. We demonstrate the effectiveness of redshift weighting in improving the distance and Hubble parameter estimates. Instead of measuring at a single `effective' redshift as in traditional analyses, we report our DA and H measurements at all redshifts. The measured fractional error of DA ranges from 1.53 per cent at z = 0.2 to 0.75 per cent at z = 0.64. The fractional error of H ranges from 0.75 per cent at z = 0.29 to 2.45 per cent at z = 0.7. Our measurements are consistent with a Fisher forecast to within 10-20 per cent depending on the pivot redshift. We further show the results are robust against the choice of fiducial cosmologies, galaxy bias models, and redshift-space distortions streaming parameters.

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: mock galaxy catalogues for the BOSS Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Guo, Hong; Yepes, Gustavo; Klypin, Anatoly; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Tinker, Jeremy; McBride, Cameron; Reid, Beth; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Neyrinck, Mark; Beutler, Florian; Comparat, Johan; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    We reproduce the galaxy clustering catalogue from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Final Data Release (BOSS DR11&DR12) with high fidelity on all relevant scales in order to allow a robust analysis of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions. We have generated (6000) 12 288 MultiDark PATCHY BOSS (DR11) DR12 light cones corresponding to an effective volume of ˜192 000 [h-1 Gpc]3 (the largest ever simulated volume), including cosmic evolution in the redshift range from 0.15 to 0.75. The mocks have been calibrated using a reference galaxy catalogue based on the halo abundance matching modelling of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy clustering data and on the data themselves. The production follows three steps. First, we apply the PATCHY code to generate a dark matter field and an object distribution including non-linear stochastic galaxy bias. Secondly, we run the halo/stellar distribution reconstruction HADRON code to assign masses to the various objects. This step uses the mass distribution as a function of local density and non-local indicators (i.e. tidal field tensor eigenvalues and relative halo exclusion separation for massive objects) from the reference simulation applied to the corresponding patchy dark matter and galaxy distribution. Finally, we apply the SUGAR code to build the light cones. The resulting MultiDarkPATCHY mock light cones reproduce the number density, selection function, survey geometry, and in general within 1σ, for arbitrary stellar mass bins, the power spectrum up to k = 0.3 h Mpc-1, the two-point correlation functions down to a few Mpc scales, and the three-point statistics of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy samples.

  8. HALOGEN: a tool for fast generation of mock halo catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Santiago; Murray, Steven G.; Knebe, Alexander; Power, Chris; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple method of generating approximate synthetic halo catalogues: HALOGEN. This method uses a combination of second-order Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (2LPT) in order to generate the large-scale matter distribution, analytical mass functions to generate halo masses, and a single-parameter stochastic model for halo bias to position haloes. HALOGEN represents a simplification of similar recently published methods. Our method is constrained to recover the two-point function at intermediate (10 h-1 Mpc < r < 50 h-1 Mpc) scales, which we show is successful to within 2 per cent. Larger scales (˜100 h-1 Mpc) are reproduced to within 15 per cent. We compare several other statistics (e.g. power spectrum, point distribution function, redshift space distortions) with results from N-body simulations to determine the validity of our method for different purposes. One of the benefits of HALOGEN is its flexibility, and we demonstrate this by showing how it can be adapted to varying cosmologies and simulation specifications. A driving motivation for the development of such approximate schemes is the need to compute covariance matrices and study the systematic errors for large galaxy surveys, which requires thousands of simulated realizations. We discuss the applicability of our method in this context, and conclude that it is well suited to mass production of appropriate halo catalogues. The code is publicly available at https://github.com/savila/halogen.

  9. Catalogue of radial velocities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, G.G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Galaxies is a survey of radial velocities of redshifts of the galaxies in the universe. It lists all available measurements for each galaxy (including Russian citations) from the measurement of the first radial velocity by Slipher in 1914 through December 1980. It includes optical and radio measurements for all galaxies in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In bringing together uniformly and concisely all published references, the catalogue affords readers the opportunity to evaluate the data and determine which measurement for the radical velocity of each galaxy.

  10. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    There are six topics to my thesis, which are: (1) slow rotator production in varied simulation schemes and kinematically decoupled cores and twists in those simulations, (2) the change in number of clumps in radiation pressure and no-radiation pressure simulations, (3) Sunrise experiments and failures including UVJ color-color dust experiments and UVbeta slopes, (4) the Sunrise image pipeline and algorithms. Cosmological simulations of have typically produced too many stars at early times. We find that the additional radiation pressure (RP) feedback suppresses star formation globally by a factor of ~ 3. Despite this reduction, the simulation still overproduces stars by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to the predictions provided by abundance matching methods. In simulations with RP the number of clumps falls dramatically. However, only clumps with masses Mclump/Mdisk ≤ 8% are impacted by the inclusion of RP, and clump counts above this range are comparable. Above this mass, the difference between and RP and no-RP contrast ratios diminishes. If we restrict our selection to galaxies hosting at least a single clump above this mass range then clump numbers, contrast ratios, survival fractions and total clump masses show little discrepancy between RP and no-RP simulations. By creating mock Hubble Space Telescope observations we find that the number of clumps is slightly reduced in simulations with RP. We demonstrate that clumps found in any single gas, stellar, or mock observation image are not necessarily clumps found in another map, and that there are few clumps common to multiple maps. New kinematic observations from ATLAS3D have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanism leading to a spectrum of fast-rotator and slow-rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamic simulations sampling idealized galaxy merger formation scenarios constructed from model

  11. Testing cosmology with a catalogue of voids in the BOSS galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadathur, Seshadri

    2016-09-01

    We present a public catalogue of voids in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 11 LOWZ and CMASS galaxy surveys. This catalogue contains information on the location, sizes, densities, shapes and bounding surfaces of 8956 independent, disjoint voids, making it the largest public void catalogue to date. Voids are identified using a version of the ZOBOV algorithm, the operation of which has been calibrated though tests on mock galaxy populations in N-body simulations, as well as on a suite of 4096 mock catalogues which fully reproduce the galaxy clustering, survey masks and selection functions. Based on this, we estimate a false positive detection rate of 3 per cent. Comparison with mock catalogues limits deviations of the void size distribution from that predicted in the ΛCDM model to be less than 6 per cent for voids with effective radius 8 < Rv < 60 h-1Mpc and in the redshift range 0.15 < z < 0.7. This could tightly constrain modified gravity scenarios and models with a varying equation of state, but we identify systematic biases which must be accounted for to reduce the theoretical uncertainty in the predictions for these models to the current level of precision attained from the data. We also examine the distribution of void densities and identify a deficit of the deepest voids relative to ΛCDM expectations, which is significant at more than the 3σ equivalent level. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy but at present its cause remains unknown.

  12. Testing cosmology with a catalogue of voids in the BOSS galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadathur, Seshadri

    2016-06-01

    We present a public catalogue of voids in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 11 LOWZ and CMASS galaxy surveys. This catalogue contains information on the location, sizes, densities, shapes and bounding surfaces of 8956 independent, disjoint voids, making it the largest public void catalogue to date. Voids are identified using a version of the ZOBOV algorithm, the operation of which has been calibrated though tests on mock galaxy populations in N-body simulations, as well as on a suite of 4096 mock catalogues which fully reproduce the galaxy clustering, survey masks and selection functions. Based on this, we estimate a false positive detection rate of 3%. Comparison with mock catalogues limits deviations of the void size distribution from that predicted in the ΛCDM model to be less than 6% for voids with effective radius 8 < Rv < 60 h-1Mpc and in the redshift range 0.15 < z < 0.7. This could tightly constrain modified gravity scenarios and models with a varying equation of state, but we identify systematic biases which must be accounted for to reduce the theoretical uncertainty in the predictions for these models to the current level of precision attained from the data. We also examine the distribution of void densities and identify a deficit of the deepest voids relative to ΛCDM expectations, which is significant at more than the 3σ equivalent level. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy but at present its cause remains unknown.

  13. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-based Mock Galaxy Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H.; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Hegarty, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires expert knowledge of galaxy modeling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalog suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, and compute absolute and/or apparent magnitudes; and (3) produce mock images of the sky. All of TAO’s features can be accessed without any programming requirements. The modular nature of TAO opens it up for further expansion in the future.

  14. Probing the Stellar Content of Galaxy Groups with Value-Added Group Catalogues in the SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Victor; Berlind, Andreas A.; Sinha, Manodeep; McBride, Cameron; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We present galaxy group catalogues from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7). Specifically, we use the Berlind et. al. (2006) Friends-of-Friends group finding algorithm to identify galaxy groups and clusters in three volume-limited samples. We assign group masses, Mgroup, to the galaxy groups via abundance matching based on their total luminosity, and we designate galaxies as centrals or satellites, where each central galaxy is the brightest member of its group. Additionally, we assign stellar masses, Mstar, and star formation rates, SFRs, to the galaxies from the MPA-JHU value- added catalogue. We explore the relationships between Mstar, SFR, and Mgroup for central and satellite galaxies, as well as for galaxy groups as a whole. We also present a set of mock group catalogues that are constructed from N-body simulations and we use them to estimate the impact of group-finding errors on our results. The SDSS and mock group catalogues will be made publicly available.

  15. Taking advantage of photometric galaxy catalogues to determine the halo occupation distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Merchán, M.; Sgró, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Halo occupation distribution (HOD) is a powerful statistic that allows the study of several aspects of the matter distribution in the Universe, such as evaluating semi-analytic models of galaxy formation or imposing constraints on cosmological models. Consequently, it is important to have a reliable method for estimating this statistic, taking full advantage of the available information on current and future galaxy surveys. Aims: The main goal of this project is to combine photometric and spectroscopic information using a discount method of background galaxies in order to extend the range of absolute magnitudes and to increase the upper limit of masses in which the HOD is estimated. We also evaluate the proposed method and apply it to estimating the HOD on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) galaxy survey. Methods: We propose the background subtraction technique to mel information provided by spectroscopic galaxy groups and photometric survey of galaxies. To evaluate the feasibility of the method, we implement the proposed technique on a mock catalogue built from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. Furthermore, we apply the method to the SDSS DR7 using a galaxy group catalogue taken from spectroscopic version and the corresponding photometric galaxy survey. Results: We demonstrated the validity of the method using the mock catalogue. We applied this technique to obtain the SDSS DR7 HOD in absolute magnitudes ranging from M = -21.5 to M = -16.0 and masses up to ≃1015 M⊙ throughout this range. On the brighter extreme, we found that our results are in excellent agreement with those obtained in previous works.

  16. The EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation: Public release of halo and galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, S.; Helly, J. C.; Schaller, M.; Trayford, J. W.; Qu, Y.; Furlong, M.; Bower, R. G.; Crain, R. A.; Schaye, J.; Theuns, T.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Frenk, C. S.; McCarthy, I. G.; Jenkins, A.; Rosas-Guevara, Y.; White, S. D. M.; Baes, M.; Camps, P.; Lemson, G.

    2016-04-01

    We present the public data release of halo and galaxy catalogues extracted from the EAGLE suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. These simulations were performed with an enhanced version of the GADGET code that includes a modified hydrodynamics solver, time-step limiter and subgrid treatments of baryonic physics, such as stellar mass loss, element-by-element radiative cooling, star formation and feedback from star formation and black hole accretion. The simulation suite includes runs performed in volumes ranging from 25 to 100 comoving megaparsecs per side, with numerical resolution chosen to marginally resolve the Jeans mass of the gas at the star formation threshold. The free parameters of the subgrid models for feedback are calibrated to the redshift z = 0 galaxy stellar mass function, galaxy sizes and black hole mass-stellar mass relation. The simulations have been shown to match a wide range of observations for present-day and higher-redshift galaxies. The raw particle data have been used to link galaxies across redshifts by creating merger trees. The indexing of the tree produces a simple way to connect a galaxy at one redshift to its progenitors at higher redshift and to identify its descendants at lower redshift. In this paper we present a relational database which we are making available for general use. A large number of properties of haloes and galaxies and their merger trees are stored in the database, including stellar masses, star formation rates, metallicities, photometric measurements and mock gri images. Complex queries can be created to explore the evolution of more than 105 galaxies, examples of which are provided in the Appendix. The relatively good and broad agreement of the simulations with a wide range of observational datasets makes the database an ideal resource for the analysis of model galaxies through time, and for connecting and interpreting observational datasets.

  17. Mocking the ECO and RESOLVE Surveys: Probing the Environmental Dependencies of Galaxy Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlind, Andreas A.; Florez, Jonathan; Calderon, Victor; Sinha, Manodeep; Moffett, Amanda J.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Stark, David; Baker, Ashley; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We present mock catalogs for the RESOLVE survey and the associated Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog. The mock catalogs are constructed by populating dark matter halos in cosmological N-body simulations with galaxies using prescriptions that yield the same joint distributions of galaxy properties and overall clustering strength as seen in the ECO catalog. Specifically, we use a combination of Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD), Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF), and abundance matching techniques to connect mock galaxies to halos and we adopt different assumptions of how observable properties correlate with the properties of the underlying halos. We use the resulting mock catalogs to assess systematic errors in environmental metrics, such as errors in the inferred masses of galaxy groups that are due to group over-merging or fragmentation. We also use the mock catalogs to compare to an interesting trend that we find for galaxies that live in the 10% lowest density environments in ECO and RESOLVE. In the observations, we find that, at fixed stellar or baryonic mass, these galaxies in low density regions are bluer, more star forming, and more gas rich than galaxies residing in higher density environments. Some mock-making prescriptions are more successful than others in matching this observed trend, highlighting the power of mock catalogs to connect observations to the underlying relationships between galaxies and their dark matter halos. The RESOLVE survey is supported by NSF grant AST-0955368.

  18. Galaxy triplets in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 - I. Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mill, Ana Laura; Duplancic, Fernanda; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; Sodré, Laerte

    2012-04-01

    We present a new catalogue of galaxy triplets derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The identification of systems was performed considering galaxies brighter than Mr=-20.5 and imposing constraints over the projected distances, radial velocity differences of neighbouring galaxies and isolation. To improve the identification of triplets, we employed a data pixelization scheme, which allows us to handle large amounts of data as in the SDSS photometric survey. Using spectroscopic and photometric data in the redshift range 0.01 ≤z≤ 0.40, we obtain 5901 triplet candidates. We have used a mock catalogue to analyse the completeness and contamination of our methods. The results show a high level of completeness (˜80 per cent) and low contamination (˜5 per cent). By using photometric and spectroscopic data, we have also addressed the effects of fibre collisions in the spectroscopic sample. We have defined an isolation criterion considering the distance of the triplet brightest galaxy to the closest neighbour cluster, to describe a global environment, as well as the galaxies within a fixed aperture, around the triplet brightest galaxy, to measure the local environment. The final catalogue comprises 1092 isolated triplets of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01 ≤z≤ 0.40. Our results show that photometric redshifts provide very useful information, allowing us to complete the sample of nearby systems whose detection is affected by fibre collisions, as well as extending the detection of triplets to large distances, where spectroscopic redshifts are not available.

  19. The HIPASS catalogue - III. Optical counterparts and isolated dark galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, M. T.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Rohde, D. J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Read, M.; Meyer, M. J.; Zwaan, M. A.; Ryan-Weber, E.; Stevens, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Webster, R. L.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Barnes, D. G.; Howlett, M.; Kilborn, V. A.; Waugh, M.; Pierce, M. J.; Bhathal, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Garcia, D. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Harnett, J.; Henning, P. A.; Jerjen, H.; Kesteven, M. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Minchin, R. F.; O'Brien, J.; Oosterloo, T.; Price, R. M.; Putman, M. E.; Ryder, S. D.; Sadler, E. M.; Stewart, I. M.; Stootman, F.; Wright, A. E.

    2005-07-01

    We present the largest catalogue to date of optical counterparts for HI radio-selected galaxies, HOPCAT. Of the 4315 HI radio-detected sources from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) catalogue, we find optical counterparts for 3618 (84 per cent) galaxies. Of these, 1798 (42 per cent) have confirmed optical velocities and 848 (20 per cent) are single matches without confirmed velocities. Some galaxy matches are members of galaxy groups. From these multiple galaxy matches, 714 (16 per cent) have confirmed optical velocities and a further 258 (6 per cent) galaxies are without confirmed velocities. For 481 (11 per cent), multiple galaxies are present but no single optical counterpart can be chosen and 216 (5 per cent) have no obvious optical galaxy present. Most of these `blank fields' are in crowded fields along the Galactic plane or have high extinctions. Isolated `dark galaxy' candidates are investigated using an extinction cut of ABj < 1mag and the blank-fields category. Of the 3692 galaxies with an ABj extinction <1mag, only 13 are also blank fields. Of these, 12 are eliminated either with follow-up Parkes observations or are in crowded fields. The remaining one has a low surface brightness optical counterpart. Hence, no isolated optically dark galaxies have been found within the limits of the HIPASS survey.

  20. Optimal Weights For Measuring Redshift Space Distortions in Multi-tracer Galaxy Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David W.; Samushia, Lado; Gagrani, Praful

    2016-08-01

    Since the volume accessible to galaxy surveys is fundamentally limited, it is extremely important to analyse available data in the most optimal fashion. One way of enhancing the cosmological information extracted from the clustering of galaxies is by weighting the galaxy field. The most widely used weighting schemes assign weights to galaxies based on the average local density in the region (FKP weights) and their bias with respect to the dark matter field (PVP weights). They are designed to minimize the fractional variance of the galaxy power-spectrum. We demonstrate that the currently used bias dependent weighting scheme can be further optimized for specific cosmological parameters. We develop a procedure for computing the optimal weights and test them against mock catalogues for which the values of all fitting parameters, as well as the input power-spectrum are known. We show that by applying these weights to the joint power-spectrum of Emission Line Galaxies and Luminous Red Galaxies from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument survey, the variance in the measured growth rate parameter can be reduced by as much as 36 per cent.

  1. The morphological catalogue of galaxies equatorial survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huchra, John; Latham, David W.; Da Costa, L. N.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Willmer, C. N. A.

    1993-01-01

    We present 865 redshifts of galaxies located in the equatorial strip delta between -17.5 deg and -2.5 deg in the right ascension range between 20 h and 5 h. Redshifts have been obtained for the complete sample of all 833 galaxies in the Morphological Catalog of Galaxies with magnitudes brighter than m = 14.5 (corresponding approximately to m(Zwicky) = 15.0). This sample also includes three galaxies from other sources with more reliable magnitudes, satisfying this limit, and 29 fainter galaxies, usually companions of the galaxies in the magnitude limited sample. Our maps of a very large volume of nearby space demonstrate a variety of coherent large scale structures which include large voids, 20-50/h Mpc in diameter and large walls at least 70/h Mpc across.

  2. The MICE Grand Challenge light-cone simulation - III. Galaxy lensing mocks from all-sky lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosalba, P.; Gaztañaga, E.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.

    2015-02-01

    In Paper I of this series, we presented a new N-body light-cone simulation from the MICE Collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC), containing about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 h-1 Gpc)3 comoving volume, from which we built halo and galaxy catalogues using a Halo Occupation Distribution and Halo Abundance Matching technique, as presented in the companion Paper II. Given its large volume and fine mass resolution, the MICE-GC simulation also allows an accurate modelling of the lensing observables from upcoming wide and deep galaxy surveys. In the last paper of this series (Paper III), we describe the construction of all-sky lensing maps, following the `Onion Universe' approach, and discuss their properties in the light-cone up to z = 1.4 with sub-arcminute spatial resolution. By comparing the convergence power spectrum in the MICE-GC to lower mass-resolution (i.e. particle mass ˜1011 h-1 M⊙) simulations, we find that resolution effects are at the 5 per cent level for multipoles ℓ ˜ 103 and 20 per cent for ℓ ˜ 104. Resolution effects have a much lower impact on our simulation, as shown by comparing the MICE-GC to recent numerical fits by Takahashi. We use the all-sky lensing maps to model galaxy lensing properties, such as the convergence, shear, and lensed magnitudes and positions, and validate them thoroughly using galaxy shear auto and cross-correlations in harmonic and configuration space. Our results show that the galaxy lensing mocks here presented can be used to accurately model lensing observables down to arcminute scales. Accompanying this series of papers, we make a first public data release of the MICE-GC galaxy mock, the MICECAT v1.0, through a dedicated web-portal for the MICE simulations, http://cosmohub.pic.es, to help developing and exploiting the new generation of astronomical surveys.

  3. The analysis of realistic stellar Gaia mock catalogues - I. Red clump stars as tracers of the central bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja, T.; Abedi, H.; Aguilar, L.

    2015-02-01

    In this first paper, we simulate the population of disc red clump stars to be observed by Gaia. We generate a set of test particles and we evolve it in a 3D barred Milky Way like galactic potential. We assign physical properties of the red clump trace population and a realistic 3D interstellar extinction model. We add Gaia observational constraints and an error model according to the pre-commissioning scientific performance assessments. We present and analyse two mock catalogues, offered to the community, that are an excellent test bed for testing tools being developed for the future scientific exploitation of Gaia data. The first catalogue contains stars up to Gaia G˜20, while the second is the subset containing Gaia radial velocity data with a maximum error of σ _{V_r}=10 km s-1. Here, we present first attempts to characterize the density structure of the Galactic bar in the Gaia space of observables. The Gaia large errors in parallax and the high interstellar extinction in the inner parts of the Galactic disc prevent us to model the bar overdensity. This result suggests the need to combine Gaia and IR data to undertake such studies. We find that IR photometric distances for this Gaia sample allow us to recover the Galactic bar orientation angle with an accuracy of ˜5°.

  4. Revised coordinates for 373 selected objects in the Southern Galaxy Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spellman, Kathleen; Madore, Barry F.; Helou, George

    1989-01-01

    Improved positions have been determined for 373 galaxies listed in the Southern Galaxy Catalogue of Corwin et al. (1985) as having poor coordinates. The revised coordinates are expected to be good to 6 arcsec (rms) in each coordinate.

  5. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) blended spectra catalogue: strong galaxy-galaxy lens and occulting galaxy pair candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Baldry, I. K.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Conselice, C.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M. J.; Moffett, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high-resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its AUTOZ automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km s-1, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter `Ef' classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g. strong gravitational lens surveys.

  6. An extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies in the nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalogue of 1715 early-type galaxies from the literature, spanning the luminosity range from faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to giant elliptical galaxies. The aim of this catalogue is to be one of the most comprehensive and publicly available collections of data on early-type galaxies. The emphasis in this catalogue lies on dwarf elliptical galaxies, for which some samples with detailed data have been published recently. For almost all of the early-type galaxies included in it, this catalogue contains data on their locations, distances, redshifts, half-light radii, the masses of their stellar populations and apparent magnitudes in various passbands. Data on metallicity and various colours are available for a majority of the galaxies presented here. The data on magnitudes, colours, metallicities and masses of the stellar populations are supplemented with entries that are based on fits to data from simple stellar population models and existing data from observations. Also, some simple transformations have been applied to the data on magnitudes, colours and metallicities in this catalogue, in order to increase the homogeneity of these data. Estimates on the Sérsic profiles, internal velocity dispersions, maximum rotational velocities, dynamical masses and ages are listed for several hundreds of the galaxies in this catalogue. Finally, each quantity listed in this catalogue is accompanied with information on its source, so that users of this catalogue can easily exclude data that they do not consider as reliable enough for their purposes.

  7. Apples to apples A2 - I. Realistic galaxy simulated catalogues and photometric redshift predictions for next-generation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Benítez, N.

    2015-11-01

    We present new mock catalogues for two of the largest Stage IV next-generation surveys in the optical and infrared: Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid, based on an N-body simulation+semi-analytical cone with a posterior modification with PHOTREAL. This technique modifies the original photometry by using an empirical library of spectral templates to make it more realistic. The reliability of the catalogues is confirmed by comparing the obtained colour-magnitude relation, the luminosity and mass function and the angular correlation function with those of real data. Consistent comparisons between the expected photometric redshifts for different surveys are also provided. Very deep near-infrared surveys such as Euclid will provide very good performance (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.025-0.053) down to H ˜ 24 AB mag and up to z ˜ 3 depending on the optical observations available from the ground, whereas extremely deep optical surveys such as LSST will obtain an overall lower photometric redshift resolution (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.045) down to i ˜ 27.5 AB mag, being considerably improved (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.035) if we restrict the sample down to i ˜ 24 AB mag. Those numbers can be substantially upgraded by selecting a subsample of galaxies with the best quality photometric redshifts. We finally discuss the impact that these surveys will have for the community in terms of photometric redshift legacy. This is the first of a series of papers where we set a framework for comparability between mock catalogues and observations with a particular focus on cluster surveys. The Euclid and LSST mocks are made publicly available.

  8. An extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies in the nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalogue of 1715 early-type galaxies from the literature, spanning the luminosity range from faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to giant elliptical galaxies. The aim of this catalogue is to be one of the most comprehensive and publicly available collections of data on early-type galaxies. The emphasis in this catalogue lies on dwarf elliptical galaxies, for which some samples with detailed data have been published recently. For almost all of the early-type galaxies included in it, this catalogue contains data on their locations, distances, redshifts, half-light radii, the masses of their stellar populations and apparent magnitudes in various passbands. Data on metallicity and various colours are available for a majority of the galaxies presented here. The data on magnitudes, colours, metallicities and masses of the stellar populations is supplemented with entries that are based on fits to data from simple stellar population models and existing data from observations. Also, some simple transformations have been applied to the data on magnitudes, colours and metallicities in this catalog, in order to increase the homogeneity of this data. Estimates on the S\\'{e}rsic profiles, internal velocity dispersions, maximum rotational velocities, dynamical masses and ages are listed for several hundreds of the galaxies in this catalogue. Finally, each quantity listed in this catalogue is accompanied with information on its source, so that users of this catalogue can easily exclude data that they do not consider as reliable enough for their purposes.

  9. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HDF-South catalogue of galaxies (Volonteri+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, M.; Saracco, P.; Chincarini, G.

    2000-05-01

    We present a catalogue of galaxies in the HDF-S, created using the public version 1 images of the WFPC2 data. We created a catalogue with 4 pass-band (I(814), V(606), B(450), U(300). In V(606), B(450), U(300) and I(814), for each galaxy the catalogue gives photometric parameters. For the I(814), we estimated also the colours and for I(814)<26, the petrosian radius, the mean surface brightness within the petrosian radius, light concentration indexes, that is Ceta and Cabr, and the asymmetry index as computed by Abraham software. (3 data files).

  11. Measuring the neutrino mass from future wide galaxy cluster catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea; Fedeli, Cosimo E-mail: cosimo.fedeli@astro.ufl.edu E-mail: a.cimatti@unibo.it

    2012-03-01

    We present forecast errors on a wide range of cosmological parameters obtained from a photometric cluster catalogue of a future wide-field Euclid-like survey. We focus in particular on the total neutrino mass as constrained by a combination of the galaxy cluster number counts and correlation function. For the latter we consider only the shape information and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), while marginalising over the spectral amplitude and the redshift space distortions. In addition to the cosmological parameters of the standard ΛCDM+ν model we also consider a non-vanishing curvature, and two parameters describing a redshift evolution for the dark energy equation of state. For completeness, we also marginalise over a set of ''nuisance'' parameters, representing the uncertainties on the cluster mass determination. We find that combining cluster counts with power spectrum information greatly improves the constraining power of each probe taken individually, with errors on cosmological parameters being reduced by up to an order of magnitude. In particular, the best improvements are for the parameters defining the dynamical evolution of dark energy, where cluster counts break degeneracies. Moreover, the resulting error on neutrino mass is at the level of σ(M{sub ν}) ∼ 0.9 eV, comparable with that derived from present Lyα forest measurements and Cosmic Microwave background (CMB) data in the framework of a non-flat Universe. Further adopting Planck priors and reducing the number of free parameters to a ΛCDM+ν cosmology allows to place constraints on the total neutrino mass of σ(M{sub ν}) ∼ 0.08 eV, close to the lower bound enforced by neutrino oscillation experiments. Finally, in the optimistic case where uncertainties in the calibration of the mass-observable relation were so small to be neglected, the combination of Planck priors with cluster counts and power spectrum would constrain the total neutrino mass down to σ(M{sub ν}) ∼ 0.034 eV, i

  12. Direct Minkowski Functional analysis of large redshift surveys: a new high-speed code tested on the luminous red galaxy Sloan Digital Sky Survey-DR7 catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Alexander; Buchert, Thomas; Ostermann, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    As deeper galaxy catalogues are soon to come, it becomes even more important to measure large-scale fluctuations in the catalogues with robust statistics that cover all moments of the galaxy distribution. In this paper, we reinforce a direct analysis of galaxy data by employing the Germ-Grain method to calculate the family of Minkowski Functionals. We introduce a new code, suitable for the analysis of large data sets without smoothing and without the construction of excursion sets. We provide new tools to measure correlation properties, putting emphasis on explicitly isolating non-Gaussian correlations with the help of integral-geometric relations. As a first application, we present the analysis of large-scale fluctuations in the luminous red galaxy sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7 data. We find significant deviations from the Λ cold dark matter mock catalogues on samples as large as 500 h- 1 Mpc (more than 3σ) and slight deviations of around 2σ on 700 h- 1 Mpc, and we investigate possible sources of these deviations.

  13. Estimating the power spectrum covariance matrix with fewer mock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David W.; Samushia, Lado

    2016-03-01

    The covariance matrices of power-spectrum (P(k)) measurements from galaxy surveys are difficult to compute theoretically. The current best practice is to estimate covariance matrices by computing a sample covariance of a large number of mock catalogues. The next generation of galaxy surveys will require thousands of large volume mocks to determine the covariance matrices to desired accuracy. The errors in the inverse covariance matrix are larger and scale with the number of P(k) bins, making the problem even more acute. We develop a method of estimating covariance matrices using a theoretically justified, few-parameter model, calibrated with mock catalogues. Using a set of 600 BOSS DR11 mock catalogues, we show that a seven parameter model is sufficient to fit the covariance matrix of BOSS DR11 P(k) measurements. The covariance computed with this method is better than the sample covariance at any number of mocks and only ˜100 mocks are required for it to fully converge and the inverse covariance matrix converges at the same rate. This method should work equally well for the next generation of galaxy surveys, although a demand for higher accuracy may require adding extra parameters to the fitting function.

  14. E+A and companion galaxies - I. A catalogue and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Chisato; Yagi, Masafumi; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2008-10-01

    Based on our intensive spectroscopic campaign with the GoldCam spectrograph on the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 2.1-m telescope, we have constructed the first catalogue of E+A galaxies with spectroscopic companion galaxies, and investigated a probability that an E+A galaxy has close companion galaxies. We selected 660 E+A galaxies with 4.0 Å < Hδ EW at a redshift of <0.167 from the Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We selected their companion candidates from the SDSS imaging data, and classified them into true companions, fore/background galaxies and companion candidates using the SDSS and our KPNO spectra. We observed 26 companion candidates of E+A galaxies at the KPNO to measure their redshifts. Their spectra showed that 17 targets are true companion galaxies. The number of spectroscopically confirmed E+A's companions is now 34. This becomes the first catalogue of E+A galaxies with spectroscopic companion systems. We found that E+A galaxies have 54 per cent larger probability of having companion galaxies (7.88 per cent) as compared to the comparison sample of normal galaxies (5.12 per cent). A statistical test shows that the probabilities are different with 99.7 per cent significance. Our results based on spectroscopy tighten the connection between the dynamical merger/interaction and the origin of E+A galaxies.

  15. Groups and clusters of galaxies in the SDSS DR8. Value-added catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Tago, E.; Liivamägi, L. J.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: We intend to compile a new galaxy group and cluster sample of the latest available SDSS data, adding several parameter for the purpose of studying the supercluster network, galaxy and group evolution, and their connection to the surrounding environment. Methods: We used a modified friends-of-friends (FoF) method with a variable linking length in the transverse and radial directions to eliminate selection effects and to find reliably as many groups as possible. Using the galaxies as a basis, we calculated the luminosity density field. Results: We create a new catalogue of groups and clusters for the SDSS data release 8 sample. We find and add environmental parameters to our catalogue, together with other galaxy parameters (e.g., morphology), missing from our previous catalogues. We take into account various selection effects caused by a magnitude limited galaxy sample. Our final sample contains 576 493 galaxies and 77 858 groups. The group catalogue is available at http://www.aai.ee/~elmo/dr8groups/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/540/A106

  16. Superclusters of galaxies from the 2df redshift survey. 1. the catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    Einasto, Jaan; Einasto, M.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Huetsi, G.; Joeveer, M.; Liivamagi, L.J.; Suhhonenko, I.; Jaaniste, J.; Heinamaki, P.; Mueller, V.; Knebe, A.; Tucker, D. /Tartu Observ. /Estonian U. /Tuorla Observ. /Potsdam, Astrophys. Inst. /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    We use the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey data to compile catalogues of superclusters for the Northern and Southern regions of the 2dFGRS, altogether 543 superclusters at redshifts 0.009 {le} z {le} 0.2. We analyze methods of compiling supercluster catalogues and use results of the Millennium Simulation to investigate possible selection effects and errors. We find that the most effective method is the density field method using smoothing with an Epanechnikov kernel of radius 8 h{sup -1} Mpc. We derive positions of the highest luminosity density peaks and find the most luminous cluster in the vicinity of the peak, this cluster is considered as the main cluster and its brightest galaxy the main galaxy of the supercluster. In catalogues we give equatorial coordinates and distances of superclusters as determined by positions of their main clusters. We also calculate the expected total luminosities of the superclusters.

  17. Populating dark matter haloes with galaxies: comparing the 2dFGRS with mock galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Jing, Y. P.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Chu, YaoQuan

    2004-06-01

    In two recent papers, we developed a powerful technique to link the distribution of galaxies to that of dark matter haloes by considering halo occupation numbers as a function of galaxy luminosity and type. In this paper we use these distribution functions to populate dark matter haloes in high-resolution N-body simulations of the standard ΛCDM cosmology with Ωm= 0.3, ΩΛ= 0.7 and σ8= 0.9. Stacking simulation boxes of 100 h-1 Mpc and 300 h-1 Mpc with 5123 particles each we construct mock galaxy redshift surveys out to a redshift of z= 0.2 with a numerical resolution that guarantees completeness down to 0.01L*. We use these mock surveys to investigate various clustering statistics. The predicted two-dimensional correlation function ξ(rp, π) reveals clear signatures of redshift space distortions. The projected correlation functions for galaxies with different luminosities and types, derived from ξ(rp, π), match the observations well on scales larger than ~3 h-1 Mpc. On smaller scales, however, the model overpredicts the clustering power by about a factor two. Modelling the `finger-of-God' effect on small scales reveals that the standard ΛCDM model predicts pairwise velocity dispersions (PVD) that are ~400 km s-1 too high at projected pair separations of ~1 h-1 Mpc. A strong velocity bias in massive haloes, with bvel≡σgal/σdm~ 0.6 (where σgal and σdm are the velocity dispersions of galaxies and dark matter particles, respectively) can reduce the predicted PVD to the observed level, but does not help to resolve the overprediction of clustering power on small scales. Consistent results can be obtained within the standard ΛCDM model only when the average mass-to-light ratio of clusters is of the order of 1000 (M/L)solar in the B-band. Alternatively, as we show by a simple approximation, a ΛCDM model with σ8~= 0.75 may also reproduce the observational results. We discuss our results in light of the recent WMAP results and the constraints on σ8 obtained

  18. The MICE Grand Challenge lightcone simulation - II. Halo and galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocce, M.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Fosalba, P.; Carretero, J.

    2015-10-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers in which we present an end-to-end simulation from the MICE collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC) run. The N-body contains about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 h-1 Gpc)3 comoving volume spanning five orders of magnitude in dynamical range. Here, we introduce the halo and galaxy catalogues built upon it, both in a wide (5000 deg2) and deep (z < 1.4) lightcone and in several comoving snapshots. Haloes were resolved down to few 1011 h-1 M⊙. This allowed us to model galaxies down to absolute magnitude Mr < -18.9. We used a new hybrid halo occupation distribution and abundance matching technique for galaxy assignment. The catalogue includes the spectral energy distributions of all galaxies. We describe a variety of halo and galaxy clustering applications. We discuss how mass resolution effects can bias the large-scale two-pt clustering amplitude of poorly resolved haloes at the ≲5 per cent level, and their three-pt correlation function. We find a characteristic scale-dependent bias of ≲6 per cent across the BAO feature for haloes well above M⋆ ˜ 1012 h-1 M⊙ and for luminous red galaxy like galaxies. For haloes well below M⋆ the scale dependence at 100 h-1 Mpc is ≲2 per cent. Lastly, we discuss the validity of the large-scale Kaiser limit across redshift and departures from it towards non-linear scales. We make the current version of the lightcone halo and galaxy catalogue (MICECATv1.0) publicly available through a dedicated web portal to help develop and exploit the new generation of astronomical surveys.

  19. X-ray morphological study of galaxy cluster catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Democles, Jessica; Pierre, Marguerite; Arnaud, Monique

    2016-07-01

    Context : The intra-cluster medium distribution as probed by X-ray morphology based analysis gives good indication of the system dynamical state. In the race for the determination of precise scaling relations and understanding their scatter, the dynamical state offers valuable information. Method : We develop the analysis of the centroid-shift so that it can be applied to characterize galaxy cluster surveys such as the XXL survey or high redshift cluster samples. We use it together with the surface brightness concentration parameter and the offset between X-ray peak and brightest cluster galaxy in the context of the XXL bright cluster sample (Pacaud et al 2015) and a set of high redshift massive clusters detected by Planck and SPT and observed by both XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories. Results : Using the wide redshift coverage of the XXL sample, we see no trend between the dynamical state of the systems with the redshift.

  20. Kinematic modeling of the Galaxy. I - The Yale Bright Star Catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Bahcall, John N.; Casertano, Stefano

    1989-01-01

    A code has been developed to investigate the kinematic properties of stellar populations of the Galaxy by modeling the distributions of proper motion and line-of-sight velocity. The coordinate frames of reference are discussed in detail and the general matrix transformations valid beyond the solar neighborhood are given. As a first application, the kinematic properties of the magnitude-selected sample of 3993 stars in the Bright Star Catalogue with V less than 6.0 and (B-V) greater than 0 are selected. The observed kinematic distributions are compared with a conventional model that has an exponential disk with scale heights, components of velocity dispersion ellipsoid, and asymmetric drift taken from the literature and defined as functions of spectral type. The comparisons suggest that a significant fraction of the Bright Star Catalogue belongs to a relatively young population that is not properly represented in the model.

  1. Redshift Distributions of Galaxies in the DES Science Verification Shear Catalogue and Implications for Weak Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.

    2015-07-21

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties δz ≲ 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  2. A sample of X-ray emitting normal galaxies from the BMW-HRI Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajer, M.; Trinchieri, G.; Wolter, A.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2005-06-01

    We obtained a sample of 143 normal galaxies with X-ray luminosity in the range 1038{-}1043 erg s-1 from the cross-correlation of the ROSAT HRI Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW-HRI) Catalogue with the Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database (LEDA). We find that the average X-ray properties of this sample are in good agreement with those of other samples of galaxies in the literature. We selected a complete flux limited serendipitous sample of 32 galaxies from which we derived the log N-log S distribution of normal galaxies in the flux range 1.1{-} 110 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1. The resulting distribution is consistent with the Euclidean -1.5 slope. Comparisons with other samples, such as the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, the ROSAT All Sky Survey, the XMM-Newton/2dF survey, and the Chandra Deep Field Survey indicate that the log N -log S distribution of normal galaxies is consistent with a Euclidean slope over a flux range of about 6 decades.

  3. Additional spectroscopic redshift measurements for galaxy clusters from the first Planck catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, V. S.; Burenin, R. A.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Khamitov, I. M.; Dodonov, S. N.; Zhuchkov, R. Ya.; Irtuganov, E. N.; Mescheryakov, A. V.; Melnikov, S. S.; Semena, A. N.; Tkachenko, A. Yu.; Aghanim, N.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic redshift measurements for the galaxy clusters from the first all-sky Planck catalogue that have been mostly identified based on the optical observations performed previously by our team (Planck Collaboration 2015a). Data on 13 galaxy clusters at redshifts from z ≈ 0.2 to z ≈ 0.8, including the improved identification and redshift measurement for the cluster PSZ1 G141.73+14.22 at z = 0.828, are provided. We have performed the measurements based on data from the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT-150), the 2.2-m Calar Alto Observatory telescope, and the 6-m SAO RAS telescope (Bolshoy Teleskop Azimutalnyi, BTA).

  4. The ALHAMBRA survey: reliable morphological catalogue of 22 051 early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Huertas-Company, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Husillos, C.; Molino, A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Perea, J.; Benítez, N.; Olmo, A. del; Fernández-Soto, A.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Moles, M.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Ascaso, B.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Fernandez Lorenzo, M.; Cerviño, M.; Delgado, R. M. González; Infante, L.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Martínez, V. J.; Matute, I.; Oteo, I.; Pérez-García, A. M.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Advanced Large Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) is photometric survey designed to trace the cosmic evolution and cosmic variance. It covers a large area of ˜4 deg2 in eight fields, where seven fields overlap with other surveys, allowing us to have complementary data in other wavelengths. All observations were carried out in 20 continuous, medium band (30 nm width) optical and 3 near-infrared (JHK) bands, providing the precise measurements of photometric redshifts. In addition, morphological classification of galaxies is crucial for any kind of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution studies, providing the information about star formation histories, their environment and interactions, internal perturbations, etc. We present a morphological classification of >40 000 galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey. We associate to every galaxy a probability to be early type using the automated Bayesian code GALSVM. Despite of the spatial resolution of the ALHAMBRA images (˜1 arcsec), for 22 051 galaxies, we obtained the contamination by other type of less than 10 per cent. Of those, 1640 and 10 322 galaxies are classified as early- (down to redshifts ˜0.5) and late-type (down to redshifts ˜1.0), respectively, with magnitudes F613W ≤ 22.0. In addition, for magnitude range 22.0 < F613W ≤ 23.0, we classified other 10 089 late-type galaxies with redshifts ≤1.3. We show that the classified objects populate the expected regions in the colour-mass and colour-magnitude planes. The presented data set is especially attractive given the homogeneous multiwavelength coverage available in the ALHAMBRA fields, and is intended to be used in a variety of scientific applications. The low-contamination catalogue (<10 per cent) is made publicly available with this paper.

  5. A comprehensive HST BVI catalogue of star clusters in five Hickson compact groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, K.; Gallagher, S. C.; Durrell, P. R.; Bastian, N.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Charlton, J.; Johnson, K. E.; Chandar, R.

    2015-05-01

    We present a photometric catalogue of star cluster candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 7, 31, 42, 59, and 92, based on observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogue contains precise cluster positions (right ascension and declination), magnitudes, and colours in the BVI filters. The number of detected sources ranges from 2200 to 5600 per group, from which we construct the high-confidence sample by applying a number of criteria designed to reduce foreground and background contaminants. Furthermore, the high-confidence cluster candidates for each of the 16 galaxies in our sample are split into two subpopulations: one that may contain young star clusters and one that is dominated by globular older clusters. The ratio of young star cluster to globular cluster candidates varies from group to group, from equal numbers to the extreme of HCG 31 which has a ratio of 8 to 1, due to a recent starburst induced by interactions in the group. We find that the number of blue clusters with MV < -9 correlates well with the current star formation rate in an individual galaxy, while the number of globular cluster candidates with MV < -7.8 correlates well (though with large scatter) with the stellar mass. Analyses of the high-confidence sample presented in this paper show that star clusters can be successfully used to infer the gross star formation history of the host groups and therefore determine their placement in a proposed evolutionary sequence for compact galaxy groups.

  6. A catalogue of photometric redshifts for the SDSS-DR9 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; De Stefano, V.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Accurate photometric redshifts for large samples of galaxies are among the main products of modern multiband digital surveys. Over the last decade, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has become a sort of benchmark against which to test the various methods. Aims: We present an application of a new method to the estimation of photometric redshifts for the galaxies in the SDSS Data Release 9 (SDSS-DR9). Photometric redshifts for more than 143 million galaxies were produced. Methods: The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE), is an interpolative method derived from machine learning models. Results: The obtained redshifts have an overall uncertainty of σ = 0.023 with a very small average bias of ~3 × 10-5, and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 2σ) of ~5%. This result is slightly better than what was already available in the literature in terms of the smaller fraction of catastrophic outliers as well. The produced catalogue, composed by 58 tables is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A126

  7. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  8. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; et al

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  9. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12: galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; White, Martin; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. The code used, designated MKSAMPLE, is released with this paper.

  10. Clusters and groups of galaxies in the 2dF galaxy redshift survey: A new catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago, E.; Einasto, J.; Saar, E.; Einasto, M.; Suhhonenko, I.; Jõeveer, M.; Vennik, J.; Heinämäki, P.; Tucker, D. L.

    2006-05-01

    We create a new catalogue of groups and clusters, applying the friends-of-friends method to the 2dF GRS final release. We investigate various selection effects due to the use of a magnitude limited sample. For this purpose we follow the changes in group sizes and mean galaxy number densities within groups when shifting nearby observed groups to larger distances. We study the distribution of sizes of dark matter haloes in N-body simulations and compare properties of these haloes and the 2dF groups. We show that at large distances from the observer luminous and intrinsically greater groups dominate, but in these groups only very bright members are seen, which form compact cores of the groups. These two effects almost cancel each other, so that the mean sizes and densities of groups do not change considerably with distance. Our final sample contains 10750 groups in the Northern part, and 14465 groups in the Southern part of the 2dF survey with membership N_gal ≥ 2. We estimate the total luminosities of our groups, correcting for group members fainter than the observational limit of the survey. The cluster catalogue is available at our web-site (\\texttt{http://www.aai.ee/˜maret/2dfgr.html}).

  11. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Morphological Catalogue of Galaxies (MCG) of Vorontsov-Velyaminov et al, 1962-1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications, corrections, and the record format are provided for the machine-readable version of the "Morphological Catalogue of Galaxies.' In addition to hundreds of individual corrections, a detailed comparison of the machine-readable with the published catalogue resulted in the addition of 116 missing objects, the deletion of 10 duplicate records, and a format modification to increase storage efficiency.

  12. Large-scale power spectrum and structures from the ENEAR galaxy peculiar velocity catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroubi, S.; Bernardi, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Hoffman, Y.; Alonso, M. V.; Wegner, G.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Pellegrini, P. S.

    2001-09-01

    We estimate the mass density fluctuations power spectrum (PS) on large scales by applying a maximum likelihood technique to the peculiar velocity data of the recently completed redshift-distance survey of early-type galaxies (hereafter ENEAR). Parametric cold dark matter (CDM)-like models for the PS are assumed, and the best-fitting parameters are determined by maximizing the probability of the model given the measured peculiar velocities of the galaxies, their distances and estimated errors. The method has been applied to CDM models with and without COBE normalization. The general results are in agreement with the high-amplitude power spectra found from similar analyses of other independent all-sky catalogue of peculiar velocity data such as MARK III and SFI, in spite of the differences in the way these samples were selected, the fact that they probe different regions of space and galaxy distances are computed using different distance relations. For example, at k=0.1hMpc-1 the power spectrum value is P(k)Ω1.2=(6.5+/-3)×103(h- 1Mpc)3 and η8≡σ8Ω0.6=1.1- 0.35+0.2 the quoted uncertainties refer to 3σ error level. We also find that, for ΛCDM and OCDM COBE-normalized models, the best-fitting parameters are confined by a contour approximately defined by Ωh1.3=0.377+/-0.08 and Ωh0.88=0.517+/-0.083 respectively. Γ-shape models, free of COBE normalization, result in the weak constraint of Γ>=0.17 and in the rather stringent constraint of η8=1.0+/-0.25. All quoted uncertainties refer to 3σ confidence level (c.l.). The calculated PS has been used as a prior for Wiener reconstruction of the density field at different resolutions and the three-dimensional velocity field within a volume of radius ~80h-1Mpc. All major structures in the nearby Universe are recovered and are well matched to those predicted from all-sky redshift surveys. The robustness of these features has been tested with constrained realizations (CR). Analysis of the reconstructed three

  13. Strong bimodality in the host halo mass of central galaxies from galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Wang, Wenting; Zu, Ying; White, Simon; Henriques, Bruno; More, Surhud

    2016-04-01

    We use galaxy-galaxy lensing to study the dark matter haloes surrounding a sample of locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We measure mean halo mass as a function of the stellar mass and colour of the central galaxy. Mock catalogues constructed from semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations demonstrate that most LBGs are the central objects of their haloes, greatly reducing interpretation uncertainties due to satellite contributions to the lensing signal. Over the full stellar mass range, 10.3 < log [M*/M⊙] < 11.6, we find that passive central galaxies have haloes that are at least twice as massive as those of star-forming objects of the same stellar mass. The significance of this effect exceeds 3σ for log [M*/M⊙] > 10.7. Tests using the mock catalogues and on the data themselves clarify the effects of LBG selection and show that it cannot artificially induce a systematic dependence of halo mass on LBG colour. The bimodality in halo mass at fixed stellar mass is reproduced by the astrophysical model underlying our mock catalogue, but the sign of the effect is inconsistent with recent, nearly parameter-free age-matching models. The sign and magnitude of the effect can, however, be reproduced by halo occupation distribution models with a simple (few-parameter) prescription for type dependence.

  14. Catalogue of the morphological features in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Endoqui, M.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. A catalogue of the features for the complete Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), including 2352 nearby galaxies, is presented. The measurements are made using 3.6 μm images, largely tracing the old stellar population; at this wavelength the effects of dust are also minimal. The measured features are the sizes, ellipticities, and orientations of bars, rings, ringlenses, and lenses. Measured in a similar manner are also barlenses (lens-like structures embedded in the bars), which are not lenses in the usual sense, being rather the more face-on counterparts of the boxy/peanut structures in the edge-on view. In addition, pitch angles of spiral arm segments are measured for those galaxies where they can be reliably traced. More than one pitch angle may appear for a single galaxy. All measurements are made in a human-supervised manner so that attention is paid to each galaxy. Aims: We create a catalogue of morphological features in the complete S4G. Methods: We used isophotal analysis, unsharp masking, and fitting ellipses to measured structures. Results: We find that the sizes of the inner rings and lenses normalized to barlength correlate with the galaxy mass: the normalized sizes increase toward the less massive galaxies; it has been suggested that this is related to the larger dark matter content in the bar region in these systems. Bars in the low mass galaxies are also less concentrated, likely to be connected to the mass cut-off in the appearance of the nuclear rings and lenses. We also show observational evidence that barlenses indeed form part of the bar, and that a large fraction of the inner lenses in the non-barred galaxies could be former barlenses in which the thin outer bar component has dissolved. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A86

  15. A catalogue of two-dimensional photometric decompositions in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic main galaxy sample: extension to g and i bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, Alan; Vikram, Vinu; Bernardi, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    We extend the catalogue of two-dimensional, Point-Spread-Function-corrected de Vacouleurs, Sérsic, de Vacouleurs+Exponential, and Sérsic+Exponential fits of ˜7 × 105galaxies presented in Meert et al. to include the g and i bands. Fits are analysed using the physically motivated flagging system presented in the original text, making adjustments for the differing signal to noise when necessary. We compare the fits in each of the g, r, and i bands. Fixed aperture magnitudes and colours are also provided for all galaxies. The catalogues are available in electronic format.

  16. A derivation of masses and total luminosities of galaxy groups and clusters in the maxBCG catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Azanha, Luiz; Dupke, Renato; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of a multiwaveband analysis of the masses and luminosities of ˜600 galaxy groups and clusters identified in the maxBCG catalogue. These data are intended to form the basis of future work on the formation of the `m12 gap' in galaxy groups and clusters. We use SDSS spectroscopy and g-, r- and i-band photometry to estimate galaxy group/cluster virial radii, masses and total luminosities. In order to establish the robustness of our results, we compare them with literature studies that utilize a variety of mass determinations techniques (dynamical, X-ray and weak lensing) and total luminosities estimated in the B, r, i and K wavebands. We also compare our results to predictions derived from the Millennium Simulation. We find that, once selection effects are properly accounted for, excellent agreement exists between our results and the literature with the exception of a single observational study. We also find that the Millennium Simulation does an excellent job of predicting the effects of our selection criteria. Our results show that, over the mass range ˜1013-1015 M⊙, variations in the slope of the mass-luminosity scaling relation with mass detected in this and many other literature studies is in part the result of selection effects. We show that this can have serious ramifications on attempts to determine how the mass-to-light ratio of galaxy groups and cluster varies with mass.

  17. A catalogue of 2D photometric decompositions in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic main galaxy sample: preferred models and systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, Alan; Vikram, Vinu; Bernardi, Mariangela

    2015-02-01

    We present a catalogue of 2D, point spread function-corrected de Vacouleurs, Sérsic, de Vacouleurs+Exponential, and Sérsic+Exponential fits of ˜7 × 105 spectroscopically selected galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. Fits are performed for the SDSS r band utilizing the fitting routine GALFIT and analysis pipeline PYMORPH. We compare these fits to prior catalogues. Fits are analysed using a physically motivated flagging system. The flags suggest that more than 90 per cent of two-component fits can be used for analysis. We show that the fits follow the expected behaviour for early and late galaxy types. The catalogues provide a robust set of structural and photometric parameters for future galaxy studies. We show that some biases remain in the measurements, e.g. the presence of bars significantly affect the bulge measurements although the bulge ellipticity may be used to separate barred and non-barred galaxies, and about 15 per cent of bulges of two-component fits are also affected by resolution. The catalogues are available in electronic format. We also provide an interface for generating postage stamp images of the 2D model and residual as well as the 1D profile. These images can be generated for a user-uploaded list of galaxies on demand.

  18. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Uppsala general catalogue of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog containing descriptions of galaxies, their surrounding areas, and position angles for flattened galaxies is described. In addition to the correction of several errors discovered in a previous computerized version, a few duplicate records were removed and the record structure was revised slightly to accommodate a large data value and to remove superfluous blanks.

  19. ICE-COLA: towards fast and accurate synthetic galaxy catalogues optimizing a quasi-N-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izard, Albert; Crocce, Martin; Fosalba, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Next generation galaxy surveys demand the development of massive ensembles of galaxy mocks to model the observables and their covariances, what is computationally prohibitive using N-body simulations. COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) is a novel method designed to make this feasible by following an approximate dynamics but with up to three orders of magnitude speed-ups when compared to an exact N-body. In this paper, we investigate the optimization of the code parameters in the compromise between computational cost and recovered accuracy in observables such as two-point clustering and halo abundance. We benchmark those observables with a state-of-the-art N-body run, the MICE Grand Challenge simulation. We find that using 40 time-steps linearly spaced since zi ˜ 20, and a force mesh resolution three times finer than that of the number of particles, yields a matter power spectrum within 1 per cent for k ≲ 1 h Mpc-1 and a halo mass function within 5 per cent of those in the N-body. In turn, the halo bias is accurate within 2 per cent for k ≲ 0.7 h Mpc-1 whereas, in redshift space, the halo monopole and quadrupole are within 4 per cent for k ≲ 0.4 h Mpc-1. These results hold for a broad range in redshift (0 < z < 1) and for all halo mass bins investigated (M > 1012.5 h-1 M⊙). To bring accuracy in clustering to one per cent level we study various methods that re-calibrate halo masses and/or velocities. We thus propose an optimized choice of COLA code parameters as a powerful tool to optimally exploit future galaxy surveys.

  20. A Catalogue of Galaxies Having Radial Velocities: Volume 15: Part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrick, L. W.; Gutsch, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A tabulation of galaxies which have radial velocities is presented. The parameters of each galaxy are: (1) an abbreviation for the catalog designation, (2) RA(1950), (3) Dec. (1950), (4) new galactic longitude, (5) new galactic latitude, (6) morphological type, (7) magnitude, (8) observed radial velocity in kilometers per second (9) radial velocity corrected for solar motion, and (10) estimated error in radial velocity in kilometers per second.

  1. The MeSsI (Merging Systems Identification) Algorithm & Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Rios, Martín; Domínguez, R. Mariano J.; Paz, Dante; Merchán., Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Merging galaxy systems provide observational evidence of the existence of dark matter and constraints on its properties. Therefore, statisticaly uniform samples of merging systems would be a powerful tool for several studies. In this work we present a new methodology for the identification of merging systems and the results of its application to galaxy redshift surveys. We use as a starting point a mock catalogue of galaxy systems, identified using FoF algorithms, which experienced a major merger as indicated by its merger tree. Applying machine learning techniques in this training sample, and using several features computed from the observable properties of galaxy members, it is possible to select galaxy groups with a high probability of having experienced a major merger. Next we apply a mixture of Gaussian technique on galaxy members in order to reconstruct the properties of the haloes involved in such merger. This methodology provides a highly reliable sample of merging systems with low contamination and precisely recovered properties. We apply our techniques to samples of galaxy systems obtained from SDSS-DR7, WINGS and HeCS. Our results recover previously known merging systems and provide several new candidates. We present their measured properties and discuss future analysis on current and forthcoming samples.

  2. Utah Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Linda, Comp.

    Background materials and guidelines for secondary students and educators in Utah who wish to participate in the state-wide mock trial competition are provided. Many parts of the publication can be used by educators in other states who are using mock trials in their classrooms or who are developing a state-wide mock trial competition. The manual…

  3. Box/peanut and bar structures in edge-on and face-on nearby galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - I. Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Akira; Yamauchi, Chisato

    2015-02-01

    We investigate box/peanut and bar structures in image data of edge-on and face-on nearby galaxies taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to present catalogues containing the surface brightness parameters and the morphology classification. About 1700 edge-on galaxies and 2600 face-on galaxies are selected from SDSS DR7 in the g, r and i-bands. The images of each galaxy are fitted with the model of two-dimensional surface brightness of the Sérsic bulge and exponential disk. After removing some irregular data, the box/peanut, bar and other structures are easily distinguished by eye using residual (observed minus model) images. We find 292 box/peanut structures in the 1329 edge-on samples and 630 bar structures in 1890 face-on samples in the i-band, after removing some irregular data. The fraction of box/peanut galaxies is about 22 per cent against the edge-on samples, and that of bar galaxies is about 33 per cent (about 50 per cent if 629 elliptical galaxies are removed) against the face-on samples. Furthermore the strengths of the box/peanuts and bars are evaluated as strong, standard or weak. We find that the strength increases slightly with increasing B/T (bulge-to-total flux ratio), and that the fraction of box/peanuts is generally about a half of that of bars, irrespective of the strength and B/T. Our result supports the idea that a box/peanut is a bar seen edge-on.

  4. Total magnitudes of Virgo galaxies - III. Scale errors in the Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies T system and light-profile distortion by resolution-degrading and differential-distance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher Ke-shih

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the BT magnitude scales of the Second and Third Reference Catalogues of Bright Galaxies, finding both scales to be reasonably reliable for 11.5 <~Bt<~ 14.0. However, large-scale errors of 0.26 and 0.24mag per unit mag interval respectively are uncovered for early-type galaxies at the bright ends, whilst even larger ones of 0.74 and 0.36mag per unit mag interval are found for galaxies of all morphological types at the faint ends. We attribute this situation to several effects already discussed by Young et al. and Young (Paper I), including the application of relatively inflexible growth-curve models that are only in a few specific cases appropriate to the galaxies concerned. Of particular interest to this study though, we find that the apparent profile shapes of giant galaxies in the Virgo direction of cz < 15000 km s-1 tend to be less centrally concentrated the greater their distance. This demonstrates that even for relatively nearby galaxies, the distortion of the overall shapes of light profiles by resolution-degrading effects such as seeing and data smoothing, as originally predicted and modelled by Young & Currie and Young et al., is a significant effect. It is, therefore, not good practice simply to extrapolate the profiles of galaxies of identical intrinsic size and intrinsic profile shape (i.e. identical morphology) by means of the same growth-curve model, unless the galaxies are known a priori to be at the same distance and unless their photometry is of the same angular resolution. We also investigate the total-magnitude scale of the catalogue of photometric types of Prugniel & Héraudeau, finding it to be much more reliable than the BT one. However, we argue that photometric type is really a measure of apparent profile shape (i.e. intrinsic profile shape after scale reduction on account of distance followed by convolution with a seeing disc and often a smoothing function as well). Strictly, it should therefore only be applicable to

  5. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  6. On the evolution of the star formation rate function of massive galaxies: constraints at 0.4 < z < 1.8 from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanot, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano; Santini, Paola; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-03-01

    We study the evolution of the star formation rate function (SFRF) of massive (M★ > 1010 M⊙) galaxies over the 0.4 < z < 1.8 redshift range and its implications for our understanding of the physical processes responsible for galaxy evolution. We use multiwavelength observations included in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-Multiwavelength Southern Infrared Catalog (GOODS-MUSIC) catalogue, which provides a suitable coverage of the spectral region from 0.3 to 24 ?m and either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for each object. Individual SFRs have been obtained by combining ultraviolet and 24-?m observations, when the latter were available. For all other sources a 'spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting' SFR estimate has been considered. We then define a stellar mass limited sample, complete in the M★ > 1010 M⊙ range and determine the SFRF using the 1/Vmax algorithm. We thus define simulated galaxy catalogues based on the predictions of three different state-of-the-art semi-analytical models (SAMs) of galaxy formation and evolution, and compare them with the observed SFRF. We show that the theoretical SFRFs are well described by a double power law functional form and its redshift evolution is approximated with high accuracy by a pure evolution of the typical SFR (SFR★). We find good agreement between model predictions and the high-SFR end of the SFRF, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, the observational SFRF is characterized by a double-peaked structure, which is absent in its theoretical counterparts. At z > 1.0 the observed SFRF shows a relevant density evolution, which is not reproduced by SAMs, due to the well-known overprediction of intermediate-mass galaxies at z˜ 2. SAMs are thus able to reproduce the most intense SFR events observed in the GOODS-MUSIC sample and their redshift distribution. At the same time, the agreement at the low-SFR end is poor: all models overpredict the space density of

  7. Catalogue of HI PArameters (CHIPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, J.; Benaglia, P.; Koribalski, B.; Andruchow, I.

    2015-08-01

    The catalogue of HI parameters of galaxies HI (CHIPA) is the natural continuation of the compilation by M.C. Martin in 1998. CHIPA provides the most important parameters of nearby galaxies derived from observations of the neutral Hydrogen line. The catalogue contains information of 1400 galaxies across the sky and different morphological types. Parameters like the optical diameter of the galaxy, the blue magnitude, the distance, morphological type, HI extension are listed among others. Maps of the HI distribution, velocity and velocity dispersion can also be display for some cases. The main objective of this catalogue is to facilitate the bibliographic queries, through searching in a database accessible from the internet that will be available in 2015 (the website is under construction). The database was built using the open source `` mysql (SQL, Structured Query Language, management system relational database) '', while the website was built with ''HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)'' and ''PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)''.

  8. Mock Trials for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, M. Gail

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates how role-playing in a mock trial situation allows children to view critically both sides of an issue and introduce them to trial procedure. Offers pre-trial activities, ways to teach students to see both sides of a situation, themes for mock trials, and supporting resources. (GG)

  9. Correlating galaxy colour and halo concentration: a tunable halo model of galactic conformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Kovač, Katarina; Hartley, William G.; Pahwa, Isha

    2015-12-01

    We extend the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework to generate mock galaxy catalogues exhibiting varying levels of `galactic conformity', which has emerged as a potentially powerful probe of environmental effects in galaxy evolution. Our model correlates galaxy colours in a group with the concentration of the common parent dark halo through a `group quenching efficiency' ρ which makes older, more concentrated haloes at fixed mass preferentially host redder galaxies. We find that, for a specific value of ρ, this 1-halo conformity matches corresponding measurements in a group catalogue based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our mocks also display conformity at large separations from isolated objects, potentially an imprint of halo assembly bias. A detailed study - using mocks with assembly bias erased while keeping 1-halo conformity intact - reveals a rather nuanced situation, however. At separations ≲4 Mpc, conformity is mainly a 1-halo effect dominated by the largest haloes and is not a robust indicator of assembly bias. Only at very large separations (≳8 Mpc) does genuine 2-halo conformity, driven by the assembly bias of small haloes, manifest distinctly. We explain all these trends in standard halo model terms. Our model opens the door to parametrized HOD analyses that self-consistently account for galactic conformity at all scales.

  10. The Mock Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carlton

    2008-01-01

    The mock research paper combines creative writing with academic writing and, in the process, breaks down that binary. This article describes a writing assignment that offers an introduction to the college research paper genre. This assignment helps students focus on crafting an argument and learning genre conventions while postponing until the…

  11. Bibliography of Mock Trial Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    This catalog lists general articles on mock trials, information for arranging mock trial competitions, mock trial problem sets, and video tapes. The problem sets contain introductory material, applicable law, statements of facts, witness statements, and documents. The cases include issues in family, consumer, criminal, and immigration law. Several…

  12. Synthetic galaxy images and spectra from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrey, Paul; Snyder, Gregory F.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hayward, Christopher C.; Genel, Shy; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; Nelson, Dylan; Kriek, Mariska; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sales, Laura V.; McBride, Cameron K.

    2015-03-01

    We present our methods for generating a catalogue of 7000 synthetic images and 40 000 integrated spectra of redshift z = 0 galaxies from the Illustris simulation. The mock data products are produced by using stellar population synthesis models to assign spectral energy distributions (SED) to each star particle in the galaxies. The resulting synthetic images and integrated SEDs therefore properly reflect the spatial distribution, stellar metallicity distribution, and star formation history of the galaxies. From the synthetic data products, it is possible to produce monochromatic or colour-composite images, perform SED fitting, classify morphology, determine galaxy structural properties, and evaluate the impacts of galaxy viewing angle. The main contribution of this paper is to describe the production, format, and composition of the image catalogue that makes up the Illustris Simulation Observatory. As a demonstration of this resource, we derive galactic stellar mass estimates by applying the SED fitting code FAST to the synthetic galaxy products, and compare the derived stellar masses against the true stellar masses from the simulation. We find from this idealized experiment that systematic biases exist in the photometrically derived stellar mass values that can be reduced by using a fixed metallicity in conjunction with a minimum galaxy age restriction.

  13. The same with less: the cosmic web of warm versus cold dark matter dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Darren S.; Schneider, Aurel; Smith, Robert E.; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2015-08-01

    We explore fundamental properties of the distribution of low-mass dark matter haloes within the cosmic web using warm dark matter (WDM) and cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulations. Using self-abundance-matched mock galaxy catalogues, we show that the distribution of dwarf galaxies in a WDM universe, wherein low-mass halo formation is heavily suppressed, is nearly indistinguishable to that of a CDM universe whose low-mass haloes are not seen because galaxy formation is suppressed below some threshold halo mass. However, if the scatter between dwarf galaxy luminosity and halo properties is large enough, low-mass CDM haloes would sometimes host relatively bright galaxies thereby populating CDM voids with the occasional isolated galaxy and reducing the numbers of completely empty voids. Otherwise, without high mass to light scatter, all mock galaxy clustering statistics that we consider - the auto-correlation function, the numbers and radial profiles of satellites, the numbers of isolated galaxies, and the probability distribution function of small voids - are nearly identical in CDM and WDM. WDM voids are neither larger nor emptier than CDM voids, when constructed from abundance-matched halo catalogues. It is thus a challenge to determine whether the CDM problem of the overabundance of small haloes with respect to the number density of observed dwarf galaxies has a cosmological solution or an astrophysical solution. However, some clues about the dark matter particle and the scatter between the properties of dwarf galaxies and their dark matter halo hosts might be found in the cosmic web of galaxies in future surveys of the local volume.

  14. Understanding the nature of luminous red galaxies (LRGs): connecting LRGs to central and satellite subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Shogo; Hikage, Chiaki; Takada, Masahiro; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2013-08-01

    We develop a novel abundance matching method to construct a mock catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using catalogues of haloes and subhaloes in N-body simulations for a Λ-dominated cold dark matter model. Motivated by observations suggesting that LRGs are passively evolving, massive early-type galaxies with a typical age ≳5 Gyr, we assume that simulated haloes at z = 2 (z2-halo) are progenitors for LRG-host subhaloes observed today, and we label the most tightly bound particles in each progenitor z2-halo as LRG `stars'. We then identify the subhaloes containing these stars to z = 0.3 (SDSS redshift) in descending order of the masses of z2-haloes until the comoving number density of the matched subhaloes becomes comparable to the measured number density of SDSS LRGs, bar{n}_LRG=10^{-4} h^3 Mpc^{-3}. Once the above prescription is determined, our only free parameter is the number density of haloes identified at z = 2 and this parameter is fixed to match the observed number density at z = 0.3. By tracing subsequent merging and assembly histories of each progenitor z2-halo, we can directly compute, from the mock catalogue, the distributions of central and satellite LRGs and their internal motions in each host halo at z = 0.3. While the SDSS LRGs are galaxies selected by the magnitude and colour cuts from the SDSS images and are not necessarily a stellar-mass-selected sample, our mock catalogue reproduces a host of SDSS measurements: the halo occupation distribution for central and satellite LRGs, the projected autocorrelation function of LRGs, the cross-correlation of LRGs with shapes of background galaxies (LRG-galaxy weak lensing) and the non-linear redshift-space distortion effect, the Finger-of-God effect, in the angle-averaged redshift-space power spectrum. The mock catalogue generated based on our method can be used for removing or calibrating systematic errors in the cosmological interpretation of LRG clustering

  15. Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael; Ono, Ken; Rolen, Larry

    2013-04-01

    In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. Recent work by Zwegers [Zwegers S (2001) Contemp Math 291:268-277 and Zwegers S (2002) PhD thesis (Univ of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] has elucidated the theory encompassing these examples. They are holomorphic parts of special harmonic weak Maass forms. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here, we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his original definition. PMID:23536292

  16. An 80 Mpc Filament of Galaxies at Redshift z=2.38

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B.; Palunas, P.; Francis, P.; Williger, G.; Teplitz, H.

    2004-01-01

    We present the detection of 34 Lyman-alpha emission-line galaxy candidates in a 80 x 80 x 60 co-moving Mpc region surrounding the known z=2.38 galaxy cluster J2143-4423. We have confirmed 15 of these candidates in followup spectroscopy with 2dF at the AAT. The peak space density is a factor of 4 greater than that found by field samples at similar redshifts. The distribution of these galaxy candidates contains several 5-10 Mpc scale voids. We compare our observations with mock catalogs derived from the VIRGO consortium Lambda-CDM N-body simulations. Fewer than 1\\% of the mock catalogues contains voids as large as we observe. Our observations thus tentatively suggest that the galaxy distribution at redshift 2.38 contains larger voids than predicted by current models. The distribution of galaxies suggests a filament or cross-section of a great wall at least 80 x 10 Mpc in transverse extent. Three of the candidate galaxies and one previously discovered galaxy have the large luminosities and extended morphologies of "Lyman-alpha blobs". X-ray properties and physical characteristics of those blobs will be discussed in an accompanying poster by Williger et al.

  17. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  18. Creation of a Mock Universe: Photometric Astronomy on Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nene, Ajinkya; Rodriguez, Aldo; Primack, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    A major focus in astronomy is to understand how galaxies form and evolve in the Universe. The current model known as ΛCDM explains that galaxies form and evolve in halos composed of cold dark matter. In an effort to understand galactic processes in relation to halos, researchers have developed statistical methods to connect galaxies to their halos. One of these approaches is abundance matching: a technique in which the galaxy number density of a property is connected to a theoretical halo number density. In this study, we exploit the abundance matching technique and create a massive photometric mock catalog. We populate millions of dark matter halos in the Bolshoi-Planck Simulation with highly defined galaxies that each has: luminosities, magnitudes, fluxes, masses, and Sérsic profiles. Our catalog acts as an interface between cold dark matter theory and observations: astronomers can use this mock galaxy catalog to compare ΛCDM predictions to observations as well as constrain galaxy formation models. Using our catalog, we can make powerful predictions about both theoretical data and about future astronomical surveys. We demonstrate the usability of our catalog through angular power spectra. Specifically, we shed light on the controversial intrahalo light phenomena. We emphasize that this is the first catalog of this accuracy and size and has incredible potential for application.

  19. Synthetic data products for future H I galaxy surveys: a tool for characterizing source confusion in spectral line stacking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Blyth, S. L.; Baker, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    Much of our current understanding of neutral, atomic gas in galaxies comes from radio observations of the nearby Universe. Until the next generation of instruments allow us to push to much higher redshifts, we must rely mostly upon theoretical models of galaxy formation to provide us with key insights into the likely cosmic evolution of HI in the Universe, and its links to molecular clouds and star formation. In this work, we present a new set of methods to convert mock galaxy catalogues into synthetic data cubes containing model galaxies with realistic spatial and spectral HI distributions over large cosmological volumes. Such synthetic data products can be used to guide observing and data handling/analysis strategies for forthcoming HI galaxy surveys. As a demonstration of the potential use of our simulated products we use them to conduct several mock HI stacking experiments for both low and high-redshift galaxy samples. The stacked spectra can be accurately decomposed into contributions from target and non-target galaxies, revealing in all co-added spectra large fractions of contaminant mass due to source confusion. Our results are consistent with similar estimates extrapolated from z=0 observational data. The amount of confused mass in a stacked spectrum grows almost linearly with the size of the observational beam, suggesting potential over-estimates of Omega_HI by some recent HI stacking experiments. Our simulations will allow the study of subtle redshift-dependent effects in future stacking analyses.

  20. Synthetic data products for future H I galaxy surveys: a tool for characterising source confusion in spectral line stacking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Blyth, S. L.; Baker, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Much of our current understanding of neutral, atomic gas in galaxies comes from radio observations of the nearby Universe. Until the next generation of instruments allow us to push to much higher redshifts, we must rely mostly upon theoretical models of galaxy formation to provide us with key insights into the likely cosmic evolution of H I in the Universe, and its links to molecular clouds and star formation. In this work, we present a new set of methods to convert mock galaxy catalogues into synthetic data cubes containing model galaxies with realistic spatial and spectral H I distributions over large cosmological volumes. Such synthetic data products can be used to guide observing and data handling/analysis strategies for forthcoming H I galaxy surveys. As a demonstration of the potential use of our simulated products we use them to conduct several mock H I stacking experiments for both low and high-redshift galaxy samples. The stacked spectra can be accurately decomposed into contributions from target and non-target galaxies, revealing in all co-added spectra large fractions of contaminant mass due to source confusion. Our results are consistent with similar estimates extrapolated from z = 0 observational data. The amount of confused mass in a stacked spectrum grows almost linearly with the size of the observational beam, suggesting potential over-estimates of ΩHI by some recent H I stacking experiments. Our simulations will allow the study of subtle redshift-dependent effects in future stacking analyses.

  1. Synthetic data products for future H I galaxy surveys: a tool for characterizing source confusion in spectral line stacking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Blyth, S. L.; Baker, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    Much of our current understanding of neutral, atomic gas in galaxies comes from radio observations of the nearby Universe. Until the next generation of instruments allow us to push to much higher redshifts, we must rely mostly upon theoretical models of galaxy formation to provide us with key insights into the likely cosmic evolution of H I in the Universe, and its links to molecular clouds and star formation. In this work, we present a new set of methods to convert mock galaxy catalogues into synthetic data cubes containing model galaxies with realistic spatial and spectral H I distributions over large cosmological volumes. Such synthetic data products can be used to guide observing and data handling/analysis strategies for forthcoming H I galaxy surveys. As a demonstration of the potential use of our simulated products we use them to conduct several mock H I stacking experiments for both low and high-redshift galaxy samples. The stacked spectra can be accurately decomposed into contributions from target and non-target galaxies, revealing in all co-added spectra large fractions of contaminant mass due to source confusion. Our results are consistent with similar estimates extrapolated from z = 0 observational data. The amount of confused mass in a stacked spectrum grows almost linearly with the size of the observational beam, suggesting potential overestimates of Ω _{H I} by some recent H I stacking experiments. Our simulations will allow the study of subtle redshift-dependent effects in future stacking analyses.

  2. Formation, evolution and properties of isolated field elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias; Heinämäki, Pekka; Nurmi, Pasi; Saar, Enn

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties, evolution and formation mechanisms of isolated field elliptical (IfE) galaxies. We create a `mock' catalogue of IfE galaxies from the Millennium Simulation Galaxy Catalogue, and trace their merging histories. The formation, identity and assembly redshifts of simulated isolated and non-isolated elliptical galaxies are studied and compared. Observational and numerical data are used to compare age, mass and the colour-magnitude relation. Our results, based on simulation data, show that almost 7 per cent of all elliptical galaxies brighter than -19mag in B band can be classified as IfE galaxies. Results also show that isolated elliptical galaxies have a rather flat luminosity function; a number density of ~3 × 10-6h3Mpc-3mag-1, throughout their B-band magnitudes. IfE galaxies show bluer colours than non-isolated elliptical galaxies and they appear younger, in a statistical sense, according to their mass-weighted age. IfE galaxies also form and assemble at lower redshifts compared to non-isolated elliptical galaxies. About 46 per cent of IfE galaxies have undergone at least one major merging event in their formation history, while the same fraction is only ~33 per cent for non-isolated ellipticals. Almost all (~98 per cent) isolated elliptical galaxies show merging activity during their evolution, pointing towards the importance of mergers in the formation of IfE galaxies. The mean time of the last major merging is at z ~ 0.6 or 6Gyr ago for isolated ellipticals, while non-isolated ellipticals experience their last major merging significantly earlier at z ~ 1.1 or 8Gyr ago. After inspecting merger trees of simulated IfE galaxies, we conclude that three different, yet typical, formation mechanisms can be identified: solitude, coupling and cannibalism. Our results also predict a previously unobserved population of blue, dim and light galaxies that fulfil observational criteria to be classified as IfE galaxies. This separate population comprises

  3. IMCAT: Image and Catalogue Manipulation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick

    2011-08-01

    The IMCAT software was developed initially to do faint galaxy photometry for weak lensing studies, and provides a fairly complete set of tools for this kind of work. Unlike most packages for doing data analysis, the tools are standalone unix commands which you can invoke from the shell, via shell scripts or from perl scripts. The tools are arranges in a tree of directories. One main branch is the 'imtools'. These deal only with fits files. The most important imtool is the 'image calculator' 'ic' which allows one to do rather general operations on fits images. A second branch is the 'catools' which operate only on catalogues. The key cattool is 'lc'; this effectively defines the format of IMCAT catalogues, and allows one to do very general operations on and filtering of such catalogues. A third branch is the 'imcattools'. These tend to be much more specialised than the cattools and imcattools and are focussed on faint galaxy photometry.

  4. Inference of Dim Gamma-Ray Point Sources Using Probabilistic Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2016-01-01

    Poisson regression of the Fermi-LAT data in the inner Milky Way reveals an extended gamma-ray excess. The anomalous emission falls steeply away from the galactic center and has an energy spectrum that peaks at 1-2 GeV. An important question is whether the signal is coming from a collection of unresolved point sources, possibly recycled pulsars, or constitutes a truly diffuse emission component. Previous analyses have relied on non-Poissonian template fits or wavelet decomposition of the Fermi-LAT data, which find evidence for a population of dim point sources just below the 3FGL flux limit. In order to be able to make conclusions about such a dim population we propose to sample from the catalogue space of point sources in the inner galaxy, where the model dimensionality, i.e., the number of sources, is unknown. Although being a computationally expensive sampling problem, this approach allows us to infer the number, luminosity and radial distribution of the point source population that is consistent with the data while providing a Bayesian evidence for the point source hypothesis, which is independent of the model indicator. This talk will focus on the method of trans-dimensional sampling using the reversible-jump formalism and its application to the inference of a mock point source population. See the poster by Stephen K. N. Portillo for the inferred catalogue using the high latitude Fermi-LAT data.

  5. Users and Union Catalogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, R. J.; Booth, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Union catalogues have had an important place in libraries for many years. Their use has been little investigated. Recent interest in the relative merits of physical and virtual union catalogues and a recent collaborative project between a physical and several virtual union catalogues in the United Kingdom led to the opportunity to study how users…

  6. ZFOURGE catalogue of AGN candidates: an enhancement of 160-μm-derived star formation rates in active galaxies to z = 3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Michael J.; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Rees, Glen A.; Labbé, Ivo; Allen, Rebecca J.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Mullaney, James R.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Papovich, Casey; Quadri, Ryan F.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Tomczak, Adam R.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates within the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) to determine the impact they have on star formation in their host galaxies. We first identify a population of radio, X-ray, and infrared-selected AGN by cross-matching the deep Ks-band imaging of ZFOURGE with overlapping multiwavelength data. From this, we construct a mass-complete (log(M_{{*}}/M_{{⊙}}) ≥9.75), AGN luminosity limited sample of 235 AGN hosts over z = 0.2-3.2. We compare the rest-frame U - V versus V - J (UVJ) colours and specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of the AGN hosts to a mass-matched control sample of inactive (non-AGN) galaxies. UVJ diagnostics reveal AGN tend to be hosted in a lower fraction of quiescent galaxies and a higher fraction of dusty galaxies than the control sample. Using 160 μm Herschel PACS data, we find the mean specific star formation rate of AGN hosts to be elevated by 0.34 ± 0.07 dex with respect to the control sample across all redshifts. This offset is primarily driven by infrared-selected AGN, where the mean sSFR is found to be elevated by as much as a factor of ˜5. The remaining population, comprised predominantly of X-ray AGN hosts, is found mostly consistent with inactive galaxies, exhibiting only a marginal elevation. We discuss scenarios that may explain these findings and postulate that AGN are less likely to be a dominant mechanism for moderating galaxy growth via quenching than has previously been suggested.

  7. The Northern HIPASS catalogue - data presentation, completeness and reliability measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, O. I.; Ryan-Weber, E. V.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Webster, R. L.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zwaan, M. A.; Meyer, M. J.; Barnes, D. G.; Kilborn, V. A.; Bhathal, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Disney, M. J.; Doyle, M. T.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gurovich, S.; Harnett, J.; Henning, P. A.; Jerjen, H.; Kesteven, M. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Koribalski, B. S.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Minchin, R. F.; O'Brien, J.; Putman, M. E.; Ryder, S. D.; Sadler, E. M.; Stevens, J.; Stewart, I. M.; Stootman, F.; Waugh, M.

    2006-10-01

    The Northern HIPASS catalogue (NHICAT) is the northern extension of the HIPASS catalogue, HICAT. This extension adds the sky area between the declination (Dec.) range of +2° < δ < +25°30' to HICAT's Dec. range of -90° < δ < +2°. HIPASS is a blind HI survey using the Parkes Radio Telescope covering 71 per cent of the sky (including this northern extension) and a heliocentric velocity range of -1280 to 12700kms-1. The entire Virgo Cluster region has been observed in the Northern HIPASS. The galaxy catalogue, NHICAT, contains 1002 sources with vhel > 300kms-1. Sources with -300 < vhel < 300kms-1 were excluded to avoid contamination by Galactic emission. In total, the entire HIPASS survey has found 5317 galaxies identified purely by their HI content. The full galaxy catalogue is publicly available at http://hipass.aus-vo.org.

  8. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  9. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ˜116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in four photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2-0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4-0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6-0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  10. The Herschel Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Schulz, Bernhard; Altieri, Bruno; Calzoletti, Luca; Kiss, Csaba; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Paladini, Roberta; Papageorgiou, Andreas; Pearson, Chris; Rector, John; Shupe, David; Valtchanov, Ivan; Verebélyi, Erika; Xu, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the submillimetre and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinized and still has potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments that scanned >10% of the sky at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns. Some source catalogs have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that would never be analyzed for their full source content. To maximize the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, our international team of instrument experts is in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalog (HPSC) from all scan map observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The extracted point sources will contain individual YSOs of our Galaxy, unresolved YSO clusters in resolved nearby galaxies and unresolved galaxies of the local and distant Universe that are related to star formation. Such a huge dataset will help scientists better understand the evolution from interstellar clouds to individual stars. Furthermore the analysis of stellar clusters and the star formation on galactic scales will add more details to the understanding of star formation laws through time.We present our findings on comparison of different source detection and photometric tools. First results of the extractions are shown along with the description of our pipelines and catalogue entries. We also provide an additional science product, the structure noise map, that is used for the quality assessment of the catalogue in

  11. Galaxy Clusters and Properties in the CFHTLS/VIPERS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Gallego, Sofia Carolina; Murphy, David; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    We present our analysis of clusters in the CFHTLS Wide fields using a red-sequence based cluster finding code. The deep five-band photometry and panoramic coverage permits detection of galaxy clusters between z=0 and z~1 over 132 square degrees. We present a cluster catalogue and optical richness estimates as mass proxies, derived cluster properties from a novel template-fitting analysis and cluster redshift measurements utilizing data from the VLT/VIPERS spectroscopic survey.We complement our analysis with studies of mock cluster catalogues generated from N-body simulation lightcones featuring semi-analytic prescriptions of galaxy formation. These provide us with an insight into the performance of the cluster-finding technique, uncertainties in the derived properties of the detected cluster populations and an important comparison of the popular “lambda” optical richness estimator to known dark matter halo properties.This study serves as the perfect precursor to LSST-depth cluster science, providing an important input into how models describe the evolution of clusters and their members as a function of redshift and mass, and the role high-density environments play in galaxy evolution over half the Hubble time.

  12. Algorithm for the direct reconstruction of the dark matter correlation function from weak lensing and galaxy clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baldauf, Tobias; Smith, Robert E.; Seljak, Uros; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2010-03-15

    The clustering of matter on cosmological scales is an essential probe for studying the physical origin and composition of our Universe. To date, most of the direct studies have focused on shear-shear weak lensing correlations, but it is also possible to extract the dark matter clustering by combining galaxy-clustering and galaxy-galaxy-lensing measurements. In order to extract the required information, one must relate the observable galaxy distribution to the underlying dark matter distribution. In this study we develop in detail a method that can constrain the dark matter correlation function from galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy-lensing measurements, by focusing on the correlation coefficient between the galaxy and matter overdensity fields. Our goal is to develop an estimator that maximally correlates the two. To generate a mock galaxy catalogue for testing purposes, we use the halo occupation distribution approach applied to a large ensemble of N-body simulations to model preexisting SDSS luminous red galaxy sample observations. Using this mock catalogue, we show that a direct comparison between the excess surface mass density measured by lensing and its corresponding galaxy clustering quantity is not optimal. We develop a new statistic that suppresses the small-scale contributions to these observations and show that this new statistic leads to a cross-correlation coefficient that is within a few percent of unity down to 5h{sup -1} Mpc. Furthermore, the residual incoherence between the galaxy and matter fields can be explained using a theoretical model for scale-dependent galaxy bias, giving us a final estimator that is unbiased to within 1%, so that we can reconstruct the dark matter clustering power spectrum at this accuracy up to k{approx}1h Mpc{sup -1}. We also perform a comprehensive study of other physical effects that can affect the analysis, such as redshift space distortions and differences in radial windows between galaxy clustering and weak

  13. Galaxy triplets in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 - III. Analysis of configuration and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplancic, Fernanda; Alonso, Sol; Lambas, Diego G.; O'Mill, Ana Laura

    2015-02-01

    We analyse the spatial configuration and the dynamical properties of a sample of 92 galaxy triplets obtained from the Data Release 7 of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7; SDSS-triplets) restricted to have members with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.14 and absolute r-band luminosities brighter than Mr = -20.5. The configuration analysis was performed through Agekyan & Anosova map (AA-map). We estimated dynamical parameters, namely the radius of the system, the velocity dispersion, a dimensionless crossing-time and the virial mass. We compared our results with those obtained for a sample of triplets from the catalogue `Isolated Triplets of Galaxies' (K-triplets) and a sample of Compact Groups. We have also studied a mock catalogue in order to compare real and projected configurations, and to estimate the three-dimensional dynamical parameters of the triple systems. We found that the SDSS-triplets prefer alignment configurations while K-triplets present a uniform distribution in the AA-map. From the dynamical analysis we conclude that the SDSS-triplets, K-triplets and Compact Groups present a similar behaviour comprising compact systems with low crossing-time values, with velocity dispersions and virial masses similar to those of low-mass loose groups. Moreover, we found that observed and simulated triplets present similar dynamical parameters. We also performed an analysis of the dark matter content of galaxy triplets finding that member galaxies of mock triplets belong to the same dark matter halo, showing a dynamical co-evolution of the system. These results suggest that the configuration and dynamics of triple systems favour galaxy interactions and mergers.

  14. On Ramanujan's definition of mock theta function.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Robert C

    2013-05-01

    In his famous "deathbed" letter, Ramanujan "defined" the notion of a mock theta function and offered some examples of functions he believed satisfied his definition. Very recently, Griffin et al. established for the first time that Ramanujan's mock theta functions actually satisfy his own definition. On the other hand, Zwegers' 2002 doctoral thesis [Zwegers S (2002) Mock theta functions. PhD thesis (Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] showed that all of Ramanujan's examples are holomorphic parts of harmonic Maass forms. This has led to an alternate definition of a mock theta function. This paper shows that Ramanujan's definition of mock theta function is not equivalent to the modern definition. PMID:23625007

  15. Towards an ALHAMBRA quasar catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves-Montero, J.; Bonoli, S.

    2015-05-01

    We present the steps towards the identification of quasars in the ALHAMBRA fields using only the ALHAMBRA photospectra. The ALHAMBRA survey (Moles et al. 2005, 2008) uses a set of 20 contiguous optical filters and three infrared filtes (J, H, and Ks). The entire coverage of the optical range and the width of the filters (˜ 300 Å) allowed us to detect emission line quasars and to compute their accurate redshifts. Starting from ˜430 000 sources we ended up with a catalogue of 524 quasar candidates with z>0.8 in an area of 2.79 deg^2. To determine the level of galaxy contamination in our sample and the accuracy of the photo-z we performed a crossmatch between spectroscopically identified objects in another surveys and the ALHAMBRA sources, detecting 1 058 galaxies and 205 quasars. After applying our algorithm none of the galaxies was classified as quasar, the accuracy of the quasar photo-z was σ_{NMAD}=0.010, and the level of quasars with photo-z significantly different to their spec-z (outliers) was 3.12 %.

  16. CSTAR star catalogue development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Continuous Stellar Tracking Attitude Reference (CSTAR) system is an in-house project for the Space Station to provide high accuracy, drift free attitude and angular rate information for the GN&C system. Constraints exist on the star catalogue incorporated in the system. These constraints include the following: mass memory allocated for catalogue storage, star tracker imaging sensitivity, the minimum resolvable separation angle between stars, the width of the field of view of the star tracker, and the desired number of stars to be tracked in a field of view. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) catalogue is the basis reference for this study. As it stands, the SAO does not meet the requirements of any of the above constraints. Star selection algorithms have been devised for catalogue optimization. Star distribution statistics have been obtained to aid in the development of these rules. VAX based software has been developed to implement the star selection algorithms. The software is modular and provides a design tool to tailor the catalogue to available star tracker technology. The SAO catalogue has been optimized for the requirements of the present CSTAR system.

  17. A catalogue of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Toth, L. Viktor; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos

    2015-08-01

    We combined photometric data of about 70 thousand point sources from the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor Bright Source Catalogue with AllWISE catalogue data to identify galaxies. We used Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) to classify our sources. The classification was based on a 6D parameter space that contained AKARI [F65/F90], [F90/F140], [F140/F160] and WISE W1-W2 colours along with WISE W1 magnitudes and AKARI [F140] flux values. Sources were classified into 3 main objects types: YSO candidates, evolved stars and galaxies. The training samples were SIMBAD entries of the input point sources wherever an associated SIMBAD object was found within a 30 arcsecond search radius. The QDA resulted more than 5000 AKARI galaxy candidate sources. The selection was tested cross-correlating our AKARI extragalactic catalogue with the Revised IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (RIFSCz). A very good match was found. A further classification attempt was also made to differentiate between extragalactic subtypes using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The results of the various methods showed that we can confidently separate cirrus dominated objects (type 1 of RIFSCz). Some of our “galaxy candidate” sources are associated with 2MASS extended objects, and listed in the NASA Extragalactic Database so far without clear proofs of their extragalactic nature. Examples will be presented in our poster. Finally other AKARI extragalactic catalogues will be also compared to our statistical selection.

  18. High-redshift galaxy populations and their descendants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; White, Simon D. M.

    2009-06-01

    We study predictions in the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmology for the abundance and clustering of high-redshift galaxies and for the properties of their descendants. We focus on three high-redshift populations: Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3, optically selected star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 (BXs) and distant red galaxies (DRGs) at z ~ 2. We select galaxies from mock catalogues based on the Millennium Simulation using the observational colour and apparent magnitude criteria. With plausible dust assumptions, our galaxy formation model can simultaneously reproduce the abundances, redshift distributions and clustering of all three observed populations. The star formation rates (SFRs) of model LBGs and BXs are lower than those quoted for the real samples, reflecting differing initial mass functions and scatter in model dust properties. About 85 per cent of model galaxies selected as DRGs are star forming, with SFRs in the range 1 to ~100Msolaryr-1. Model LBGs, BXs and DRGs together account for less than half of all star formation over the range 1.5 < z < 3.2; many massive, star-forming galaxies are predicted to be too heavily obscured to appear in these populations. Model BXs have metallicities which agree roughly with observation, but model LBGs are only slightly more metal poor, in disagreement with recent observational results. The model galaxies are predominantly disc dominated. Stellar masses for LBGs and BXs are ~109.9Msolar, and for DRGs are ~1010.7Msolar. Only about 30 per cent of model galaxies with M* > 1011Msolar are classified as LBGs or BXs at the relevant redshifts, while 65 per cent are classified as DRGs. Almost all model LBGs and BXs are the central galaxies of their dark haloes, but fewer than half of the haloes of any given mass have an LBG or BX central galaxy. Half of all LBG descendants at z = 2 would be identified as BXs, but very few as DRGs. Clustering increases with decreasing redshift for descendants of all three populations

  19. Quantifying correlations between galaxy emission lines and stellar continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the correlations between continuum properties and emission line equivalent widths of star-forming and active galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Since upcoming large sky surveys will make broad-band observations only, including strong emission lines into theoretical modelling of spectra will be essential to estimate physical properties of photometric galaxies. We show that emission line equivalent widths can be fairly well reconstructed from the stellar continuum using local multiple linear regression in the continuum principal component analysis (PCA) space. Line reconstruction is good for star-forming galaxies and reasonable for galaxies with active nuclei. We propose a practical method to combine stellar population synthesis models with empirical modelling of emission lines. The technique will help generate more accurate model spectra and mock catalogues of galaxies to fit observations of the new surveys. More accurate modelling of emission lines is also expected to improve template-based photometric redshift estimation methods. We also show that, by combining PCA coefficients from the pure continuum and the emission lines, automatic distinction between hosts of weak active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quiescent star-forming galaxies can be made. The classification method is based on a training set consisting of high-confidence starburst galaxies and AGNs, and allows for the similar separation of active and star-forming galaxies as the empirical curve found by Kauffmann et al. We demonstrate the use of three important machine learning algorithms in the paper: k-nearest neighbour finding, k-means clustering and support vector machines.

  20. Intensity mapping cross-correlations: connecting the largest scales to galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, L.; Tonini, C.; Blake, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    Intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen (H I) is a new observational tool to efficiently map the large-scale structure over wide redshift ranges. The cross-correlation of intensity maps with galaxy surveys is a robust measure of the cosmological power spectrum and the H I content of galaxies which diminishes systematics caused by instrumental effects and foreground removal. We examine the cross-correlation signature at redshift 0.9 using a semi-analytical galaxy formation model in order to model the H I gas of galaxies as well as their optical magnitudes. We determine the scale-dependent clustering of the cross-correlation power for different types of galaxies determined by their colours, which act as a proxy for their star formation activity. We find that the cross-correlation coefficient with H I density for red quiescent galaxies falls off more quickly on smaller scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1 than for blue star-forming galaxies. Additionally, we create a mock catalogue of highly star-forming galaxies to mimic the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, and use this to predict existing and future measurements using data from the Green Bank telescope and Parkes telescope. We find that the cross-power of highly star-forming galaxies shows a higher clustering on small scales than any other galaxy type and that this significantly alters the power spectrum shape on scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1. We show that the cross-correlation coefficient is not negligible when interpreting the cosmological cross-power spectrum and additionally contains information about the H I content of the optically selected galaxies.

  1. Mock Libel Trial Provides Unique Educational Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiele, Norma

    1988-01-01

    Describes a mock libel trial held at North Side High School in Fort Wayne, Indiana, involving a question of whether a school newspaper may properly comment on a teacher's performance. Describes how the mock trial was integrated into various subjects, such as journalism, social studies, English, physics, art, and business. (SR)

  2. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  3. Marine Science Film Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Frank L.

    Forty-eight motion picture films and filmstrips in the field of marine science are catalogued in this booklet. Following the alphabetical index, one page is devoted to each film indicating its type, producer, recommended grade level, running time, and presence of color and/or sound. A summary of film content, possible uses, and outstanding…

  4. SCOPE in Cataloguing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, Ellen; Reed, Sue

    This report describes the Systematic Computerized Processing in Cataloguing system (SCOPE), an automated system for the catalog department of a university library. The system produces spine labels, pocket labels, book cards for the circulation system, catalog cards including shelf list, main entry, subject and added entry cards, statistics, an…

  5. Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The palaearctic weevils of the subfamily Baridinae are catalogued. Two subgenera are raised to full generic rank, 12 genera are transferred from incertae sedis to tribes and subtribes, 25 species names are transferred to other genera and nine are synonymized. A total of 215 primary references were c...

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The ENACS Catalogue. V. (Katgert+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, P.; Mazure, A.; den Hartog, R.; Adami, C.; Biviano, A.; Perea, J.

    1998-04-01

    Table enacs presents the full ENACS catalogue: i.e. redshifts and photometry of 5634 galaxies in the directions of 107 rich Southern cluster candidates from the ACO catalogue. Table 2 of this paper lists additional redshifts from the literature for 33 galaxies contained within the Optopus areas of 4 clusters observed in the ENACS. Table 5 of this paper lists the centre of the Optopus plates and the dates of the Optopus observations (3 data files).

  7. Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Torppa, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Warner, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (APC) is now in its fifth update with over 8600 lightcurves of more than 1000 asteroids in the database. The APC also has references of over one thousand lightcurves not in digital format. The catalogue has been published by Uppsala University Observatory and is distributed by request (contact: classe@astro.uu.se). The new update also includes a list of known asteroid rotational periods and a CD-ROM containing all the existing digital data in the APC. The total number of observed lightcurves is growing rapidly, not the least because of the new state-of-the-art equipment and growing interest among amateur astronomers. The photometric database is now so large that the present format must be altered to facilitate a user-friendly on-line service for the down- and uploading of data. We are proposing (and have started to construct) a new Internet-based Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (SAPC). The website is planned to open during the first half of the year 2002. In addition to the data files, the site would contain the index and guide to the catalogue, a web-form for reporting observations, and some general observing guidelines (e.g., on filters, timing, etc.). There would also be a list of asteroids for which more observations are needed, together with recommended observing periods. This would be accompanied by an up-to-date collection of physical asteroid models based on photometric data, as well as links to observer network pages and other sites that work in collaboration with the catalogue project. Our aim is to develop this site into a global standard service used by everyone involved in asteroid photometry.

  8. Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Materne, J.

    1980-09-01

    Among the 338 exotic, intriguing and/or fascinating objects contained in Arp's catalogue of peculiar galaxies, two, Arp 146 and 147, are calling special attention as a presumably separate class of objects displaying closed rings with almost empty interior. It is difficult to find out when, historically speaking, attention was called first to this type of object as a peculiar class, but certainly ga1axies with rings were widely found and recognized in the early sixties, ul}der others by Vorontsov-Velyaminov (1960), Sandage (1961) in the Hubble Atlas or de Vaucouleurs (1964) in the first reference catalogue of ga1axies. The most recent estimates by Arp and Madore (1977) from a search on about 200 Schmidt plates covering 7,000 square degrees give 3.6 per cent of ring galaxies among 2,784 peculiar galaxies found. However, despite the mythological perfection associated with a circle, some ordering is necessary before trying to understand the nature of such objects. This is particularly true because a large fraction of those galaxies with rings are probably normal spiral galaxies of type RS or S(r) as defined by de Vaucouleurs, where the spiral arms are simply "closing the circle". A good example of such "ordinary" galaxy is NGC 3081 in the Hubble Atlas .

  9. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  10. Merged infrared catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Brown, L. W.; Mead, J. M.; Nagy, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    A compilation of equatorial coordinates, spectral types, magnitudes, and fluxes from five catalogues of infrared observations is presented. This first edition of the Merged Infrared Catalogue contains 11,201 oservations from the Two-Micron Sky Survey, Observations of Infrared Radiation from Cool Stars, the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory four Color Infrared Sky Survey and its Supplemental Catalog, and from Catalog of 10 micron Celestial Objects (HALL). This compilation is a by-product of a computerized infrared data base under development at Goddard Space Flight Center; the objective is to maintain a complete and current record of all infrared observations from 1 micron m to 1000 micron m of nonsolar system objects. These observations are being placed into a standardized system.

  11. Technology Catalogue. First edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for remediating its contaminated sites and managing its waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste management programs within EM`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Office of Waste Management. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers assessing and recommending technical solutions within the Department`s clean-up and waste management programs, as well as to industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. OTD`s applied research and demonstration activities are conducted in programs referred to as Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and Integrated Programs (IPs). The IDs test and evaluate.systems, consisting of coupled technologies, at specific sites to address generic problems, such as the sensing, treatment, and disposal of buried waste containers. The IPs support applied research activities in specific applications areas, such as in situ remediation, efficient separations processes, and site characterization. The Technology Catalogue is a means for communicating the status. of the development of these innovative technologies. The FY93 Technology Catalogue features technologies successfully demonstrated in the field through IDs and sufficiently mature to be used in the near-term. Technologies from the following IDs are featured in the FY93 Technology Catalogue: Buried Waste ID (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho); Mixed Waste Landfill ID (Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico); Underground Storage Tank ID (Hanford, Washington); Volatile organic compound (VOC) Arid ID (Richland, Washington); and VOC Non-Arid ID (Savannah River Site, South Carolina).

  12. The BOSS-WiggleZ overlap region - II. Dependence of cosmic growth on galaxy type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Felipe A.; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Koda, Jun; Kazin, Eyal; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-02-01

    The anisotropic galaxy two-point correlation function (2PCF) allows measurement of the growth of large-scale structures from the effect of peculiar velocities on the clustering pattern. We present new measurements of the auto- and cross-correlation function multipoles of 69 180 WiggleZ and 46 380 Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS galaxies sharing an overlapping volume of ˜0.2 (h-1 Gpc)3. Analysing the redshift-space distortions (RSD) of galaxy two-point statistics for these two galaxy tracers, we test for systematic errors in the modelling depending on galaxy type and investigate potential improvements in cosmological constraints. We build a large number of mock galaxy catalogues to examine the limits of different RSD models in terms of fitting scales and galaxy type, and to study the covariance of the measurements when performing joint fits. For the galaxy data, fitting the monopole and quadrupole of the WiggleZ 2PCF on scales 24 < s < 80 h-1Mpc produces a measurement of the normalized growth rate fσ8(z = 0.54) = 0.409 ± 0.055, whereas for the CMASS galaxies we found a consistent constraint of fσ8(z = 0.54) = 0.466 ± 0.069, When combining the measurements, accounting for the correlation between the two surveys, we obtain fσ8(z = 0.54) = 0.413 ± 0.048, in agreement with the Λ Cold Dark Matter of structure growth and with other survey measurements.

  13. Fingers-of-God effect of infalling satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear redshift-space distortion known as the Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect is a major systematic uncertainty in redshift-space distortion studies conducted to test gravity models. The FoG effect has been usually attributed to the random motion of galaxies inside their clusters. When the internal galaxy motion is not well virialized, however, the coherent infalling motion towards the cluster centre generates the FoG effect. Here, we derive an analytical model of the satellite velocity distribution due to the infall motion combined with the random motion. We show that the velocity distribution becomes far from Maxwellian when the infalling motion is dominant. We use simulated subhalo catalogues to find that the contribution of infall motion is important to massive subhaloes and that the velocity distribution has a top-hat like shape as expected from our analytic model. We also study the FoG effect due to infall motion on the redshift-space power spectrum. Using simulated mock samples of luminous red galaxies constructed from haloes and massive subhaloes in N-body simulations, we show that the redshift-space power spectra can differ from expectations when the infall motion is ignored.

  14. The DES Science Verification weak lensing shear catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  15. The DES Science Verification weak lensing shear catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies, respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-yr DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  16. The DES Science Verification Weak Lensing Shear Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  17. NREL Information Resources Catalogue 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-04-03

    This is the sixth annual catalogue listing documents produced by NREL during the last fiscal year. Each year the catalogue is mailed to state energy offices, DOE support offices, and to anyone looking to find out more information about NREL's activities and publications.

  18. Technology catalogue. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for remediating DOE contaminated sites and managing the DOE waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste-management programs within EM. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to: (a) provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers responsible for preparing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) and other compliance documents for the DOE`s clean-up and waste-management programs; and (b) identify partnering and commercialization opportunities with industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community.

  19. Detection of satellite remnants in the Galactic halo with Gaia- III. Detection limits for ultrafaint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoja, T.; Mateu, C.; Aguilar, L.; Figueras, F.; Antiche, E.; Hernández-Pérez, F.; Brown, A. G. A.; Valenzuela, O.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.; Velázquez, H.

    2015-10-01

    We present a method to identify ultrafaint dwarf galaxies (UFDGs) candidates in the halo of the Milky Way using the future Gaia catalogue and we explore its detection limits and completeness. The method is based on the Wavelet Transform and searches for overdensities in the combined space of sky coordinates and proper motions, using kinematics in the search for the first time. We test the method with a Gaia mock catalogue that has the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot as a background, and use a library of around 30 000 UFDGs simulated as Plummer spheres with a single stellar population. For the UFDGs, we use a wide range of structural and orbital parameters that go beyond the range spanned by real systems, where some UFDGs may remain undetected. We characterize the detection limits as function of the number of observable stars by Gaia in the UFDGs with respect to that of the background and their apparent sizes in the sky and proper motion planes. We find that the addition of proper motions in the search improves considerably the detections compared to a photometric survey at the same magnitude limit. Our experiments suggest that Gaia will be able to detect UFDGs that are similar to some of the known UFDGs even if the limit of Gaia is around 2 mag brighter than that of SDSS, with the advantage of having a full-sky catalogue. We also see that Gaia could even find some UFDGs that have lower surface brightness than the SDSS limit.

  20. A First Look at Creating Mock Catalogs with Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoying; Ho, Shirley; Trac, Hy; Schneider, Jeff; Poczos, Barnabas; Ntampaka, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    We investigate machine learning (ML) techniques for predicting the number of galaxies (N gal) that occupy a halo, given the halo's properties. These types of mappings are crucial for constructing the mock galaxy catalogs necessary for analyses of large-scale structure. The ML techniques proposed here distinguish themselves from traditional halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling as they do not assume a prescribed relationship between halo properties and N gal. In addition, our ML approaches are only dependent on parent halo properties (like HOD methods), which are advantageous over subhalo-based approaches as identifying subhalos correctly is difficult. We test two algorithms: support vector machines (SVM) and k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) regression. We take galaxies and halos from the Millennium simulation and predict N gal by training our algorithms on the following six halo properties: number of particles, M 200, σ v , v max, half-mass radius, and spin. For Millennium, our predicted N gal values have a mean-squared error (MSE) of ~0.16 for both SVM and kNN. Our predictions match the overall distribution of halos reasonably well and the galaxy correlation function at large scales to ~5%-10%. In addition, we demonstrate a feature selection algorithm to isolate the halo parameters that are most predictive, a useful technique for understanding the mapping between halo properties and N gal. Lastly, we investigate these ML-based approaches in making mock catalogs for different galaxy subpopulations (e.g., blue, red, high M star, low M star). Given its non-parametric nature as well as its powerful predictive and feature selection capabilities, ML offers an interesting alternative for creating mock catalogs.

  1. A FIRST LOOK AT CREATING MOCK CATALOGS WITH MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoying; Ho, Shirley; Trac, Hy; Schneider, Jeff; Ntampaka, Michelle; Poczos, Barnabas

    2013-08-01

    We investigate machine learning (ML) techniques for predicting the number of galaxies (N{sub gal}) that occupy a halo, given the halo's properties. These types of mappings are crucial for constructing the mock galaxy catalogs necessary for analyses of large-scale structure. The ML techniques proposed here distinguish themselves from traditional halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling as they do not assume a prescribed relationship between halo properties and N{sub gal}. In addition, our ML approaches are only dependent on parent halo properties (like HOD methods), which are advantageous over subhalo-based approaches as identifying subhalos correctly is difficult. We test two algorithms: support vector machines (SVM) and k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) regression. We take galaxies and halos from the Millennium simulation and predict N{sub gal} by training our algorithms on the following six halo properties: number of particles, M{sub 200}, {sigma}{sub v}, v{sub max}, half-mass radius, and spin. For Millennium, our predicted N{sub gal} values have a mean-squared error (MSE) of {approx}0.16 for both SVM and kNN. Our predictions match the overall distribution of halos reasonably well and the galaxy correlation function at large scales to {approx}5%-10%. In addition, we demonstrate a feature selection algorithm to isolate the halo parameters that are most predictive, a useful technique for understanding the mapping between halo properties and N{sub gal}. Lastly, we investigate these ML-based approaches in making mock catalogs for different galaxy subpopulations (e.g., blue, red, high M{sub star}, low M{sub star}). Given its non-parametric nature as well as its powerful predictive and feature selection capabilities, ML offers an interesting alternative for creating mock catalogs.

  2. X-ray selected stars in HRC and BHRC catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A joint HRC/BHRC Catalogue has been created based on merging of Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both have been made by optical identifications of X-ray sources based on low-dispersion spectra of the Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) using ROSAT Catalogues. As a result, the largest sample of 8132 (5341+2791) optically identified X-ray sources was created having count rate (CR) of photons ≤ 0.04 ct/s in the area with galactic latitudes |b|≤ 20° and declinations d≤ 0°.There are 4253 AGN, 492 galaxies, 1800 stars and 1587 unknown objects in the sample. All stars have been found in GSC 2.3.2, as well as most of them are in GALEX, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS and WISE catalogues. In addition, 1429 are in SDSS DR9 and 204 have SDSS spectra. For these stars we have carried out spectral classification and along with the bright stars, many new cataclysmic variables (CV), white dwarfs (WD) and late-type stars (K-M and C) have been revealed. For all stars, statistical studies of their multiwavelength properties have been made. An attempt to find a connection between the radiation fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and identify their characteristics was made as well.

  3. Observing Handbook and Catalogue of Deep-Sky Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Skiff, Brian A.

    1998-09-01

    List of charts, tables and figures; Prolegomenon; Part I. Amateur Observing: Telescopes; Eyepieces; Finderscopes and finding; Star atlases; Gadgets; Looking through the telescope; Lighting and the recording of notes; Observing locations; Instruments used in the survey of deep-sky objects; Observing sites for the survey; Part II. Deep-Sky Data Sources: Galaxies; Open clusters; Globular clusters; Planetary nebulae; Galactic nebulae; Double stars; Part III. Observations: Notes on references for deep-sky observers; Catalogue; Appendix of double stars.

  4. HyperLEDA. III. The catalogue of extragalactic distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry; Prugniel, Philippe; Terekhova, Nataliya; Courtois, Hélène; Vauglin, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    We present the compilation catalogue of redshift-independent distances included in the HyperLEDA database. It is actively maintained to be up-to-date, and the current version counts 6640 distance measurements for 2335 galaxies compiled from 430 published articles. Each individual series is recalibrated onto a common distance scale based on a carefully selected set of high-quality measurements. This information together with data on H i line width, central velocity dispersion, magnitudes, diameters, and redshift is used to derive a homogeneous distance estimate and physical properties of galaxies, such as their absolute magnitudes and intrinsic size.

  5. Functional Mock-up Unit Export of EnergyPlus

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-01

    The Functional Mock-up Unit Export of EnergyPlus is a software package that allows EnergyPlus to be exported as a Functional Mock-up Unit. This allows other software tools to run EnergyPlus as part of a larger simulation. To do so, the outside software needs to implement the Functional Mock-up interface standard (http://www.modelisar.com/), and be able to import Functional Mock-up Units for co-simulation.

  6. The BeppoSAX WFC source catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    Verrecchia, F.; Giommi, P.; Santolamazza, P.; Granata, S.

    2007-08-21

    We present the catalogue of X-ray sources detected by the two Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) on board BeppoSAX during its 6 years of operational lifetime (April 1996 - April 2002). At the ASI Science Date Center (ASDC) we carried out a first systematic processing of all public data in the BeppoSAX WFC archive and the complete scientific results data base (images, spectra and light-curves) is available on-line. The procedure developed makes use of the post mission WFC analysis software and calibration and incorporates the full experience gained during the BeppoSAX operational phase. The catalogue of X-ray sources detected with the Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) includes 7209 detections of 232 sources, in particular 86 Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), 49 High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), 9 Cataclismic Variables (CVs), 40 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) and 8 clusters of galaxies. Here we present some statistical and spectral properties of the sample.

  7. Connecting massive galaxies to dark matter haloes in BOSS - I. Is galaxy colour a stochastic process in high-mass haloes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shun; Leauthaud, Alexie; Hearin, Andrew P.; Bundy, Kevin; Zentner, Andrew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Reid, Beth A.; Sinha, Manodeep; Coupon, Jean; Tinker, Jeremy L.; White, Martin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    We use subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) to model the stellar mass function (SMF) and clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) `CMASS' sample at z ˜ 0.5. We introduce a novel method which accounts for the stellar mass incompleteness of CMASS as a function of redshift, and produce CMASS mock catalogues which include selection effects, reproduce the overall SMF, the projected two-point correlation function wp, the CMASS dn/dz, and are made publicly available. We study the effects of assembly bias above collapse mass in the context of `age matching' and show that these effects are markedly different compared to the ones explored by Hearin et al. at lower stellar masses. We construct two models, one in which galaxy colour is stochastic (`AbM' model) as well as a model which contains assembly bias effects (`AgM' model). By confronting the redshift dependent clustering of CMASS with the predictions from our model, we argue that that galaxy colours are not a stochastic process in high-mass haloes. Our results suggest that the colours of galaxies in high-mass haloes are determined by other halo properties besides halo peak velocity and that assembly bias effects play an important role in determining the clustering properties of this sample.

  8. Efficient construction of mock catalogs for baryon acoustic oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Rangel, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Precision measurements of the large scale structure of the Universe require large numbers of high fidelity mock catalogs to accurately assess, and account for, the presence of systematic effects. We introduce and test a scheme for generating mock catalogs rapidly using suitably derated N-body simulations. Our aim is to reproduce the large scale structure and the gross properties of dark matter halos with high accuracy, while sacrificing the details of the halo's internal structure. By adjusting global and local time-steps in an N-body code, we demonstrate that we recover halo masses to better than 0.5% and the power spectrum to better than 1% both in real and redshift space for k=1hMpc‑1, while requiring a factor of 4 less CPU time. We also calibrate the redshift spacing of outputs required to generate simulated light cones. We find that outputs separated by Δ z=0.05 allow us to interpolate particle positions and velocities to reproduce the real and redshift space power spectra to better than 1% (out to k=1hMpc‑1). We apply these ideas to generate a suite of simulations spanning a range of cosmologies, motivated by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) but broadly applicable to future large scale structure surveys including eBOSS and DESI. As an initial demonstration of the utility of such simulations, we calibrate the shift in the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak position as a function of galaxy bias with higher precision than has been possible so far. This paper also serves to document the simulations, which we make publicly available.

  9. The PASTEL catalogue: 2016 version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, Caroline; Le Campion, Jean-François; Brouillet, Nathalie; Chemin, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    The bibliographical compilation of stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) relying on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy started in the eighties with the so-called [Fe/H] catalogue, and was continued in 2010 with the PASTEL catalogue, which also includes determinations of Teff alone, based on various methods. Here we present an update of the PASTEL catalogue. The main journals and the CDS database have been surveyed to find relevant publications presenting new determinations of atmospheric parameters. As of February 2016, PASTEL includes 64 082 determinations of either Teff or (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) for 31 401 stars, corresponding to 1142 bibliographical references. Some 11 197 stars have a determination of the three parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) with a high-quality spectroscopic metallicity. The PASTEL catalogue is available in electronic form at the CDS (http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR?-source=B/pastel).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HIPASS catalogue. III. (Doyle+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, M. T.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Rohde, D. J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Read, M.; Meyer, M. J.; Zwaan, M. A.; Ryan-Weber, E.; Stevens, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Webster, R. L.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Barnes, D. G.; Howlett, M.; Kilborn, V. A.; Waugh, M.; Pierce, M. J.; Bhathal, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Garcia, D. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Harnett, J.; Henning, P. A.; Jerjen, H.; Kesteven, M. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Minchin, R. F.; O'Brien, J.; Oosterloo, T.; Price, R. M.; Putman, M. E.; Ryder, S. D.; Sadler, E. M.; Stewart, I. M.; Stootman, F.; Wright, A. E.

    2013-06-01

    We present the largest catalogue to date of optical counterparts for H i radio-selected galaxies, HOPCAT. Of the 4315 H i radio-detected sources from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) catalogue, we find optical counterparts for 3618 (84 per cent) galaxies. Of these, 1798 (42 per cent) have confirmed optical velocities and 848 (20 per cent) are single matches without confirmed velocities. Some galaxy matches are members of galaxy groups. From these multiple galaxy matches, 714 (16 per cent) have confirmed optical velocities and a further 258 (6 per cent) galaxies are without confirmed velocities. For 481 (11 per cent), multiple galaxies are present but no single optical counterpart can be chosen and 216 (5 per cent) have no obvious optical galaxy present. Most of these "blank fields" are in crowded fields along the Galactic plane or have high extinctions. Isolated "dark galaxy" candidates are investigated using an extinction cut of ABj<1mag and the blank-fields category. Of the 3692 galaxies with an A+Bj_ extinction <1mag, only 13 are also blank fields. Of these, 12 are eliminated either with follow-up Parkes observations or are in crowded fields. The remaining one has a low surface brightness optical counterpart. Hence, no isolated optically dark galaxies have been found within the limits of the HIPASS survey. (1 data file).

  11. Catalogue of Texas spiders.

    PubMed

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the "Bibliography of Texas Spiders" published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated "Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks." This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  12. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  13. Mock Climate Summit: Teaching and Assessing Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, D.; Gautier, C.; Bazerman, C.

    2003-04-01

    This paper will demonstrate the effectiveness of a Mock Climate Summit as a pedagogical for teaching the science and policy aspects of global climate change. The Mock Climate Summit is a student-centered course simulating the Conference of the Parties (COP) where international environmental protocols are negotiated. Compared to traditional lecture-based methods common in the geoscience classroom, the Mock Climate Summit uses negotiations and arguments to teach the interactions between these two "spheres" and demonstrate the depth and breadth of these interactions. Through a detailed assessment of students' dialogue transcribed from video and audio tapes, we found that the nature of the student dialogue matures rapidly as they are given multiple opportunities to present, negotiate and argue a specific topic. Students' dialogue progress from hypothetical (what-if) scenarios to action-oriented scenarios and implementation plans. The progression of the students' dialogue shows increased comfort with the communities' discourse as they take ownership of the point-of-view associated with their assumed roles.

  14. Mock climate summit: teaching and assessing learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, D.; Gautier, C.; Bazerman, C.

    2003-04-01

    This paper will demonstrate the effectiveness of a Mock Climate Summit as a pedagogical approach for teaching the science and policy aspects of global climate change. The Mock Climate Summit is a student-centered course simulating the Conference of the Parties (COP) where international environmental protocols are negotiated. Compared to traditional lecture-based methods common in the geoscience classroom, the Mock Climate Summit uses negotiations and arguments to teach the interactions between these two “spheres” and demonstrate the depth and breadth of these interactions. Through a detailed assessment of students’ dialogue transcribed from video and audio tapes, we found that the nature of the student dialogue matures rapidly as they are given multiple opportunities to present, negotiate and argue a specific topic. Students’ dialogue progress from hypothetical (what-if) scenarios to action-oriented scenarios and implementation plans. The progression of the students’ dialogue shows increased comfort with the communities’ discourse as they take ownership of the point-of-view associated with their assumed roles.

  15. Machine learning etudes in astrophysics: selection functions for mock cluster catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Amir; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Bond, J. Richard E-mail: malvarez@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-01-01

    Making mock simulated catalogs is an important component of astrophysical data analysis. Selection criteria for observed astronomical objects are often too complicated to be derived from first principles. However the existence of an observed group of objects is a well-suited problem for machine learning classification. In this paper we use one-class classifiers to learn the properties of an observed catalog of clusters of galaxies from ROSAT and to pick clusters from mock simulations that resemble the observed ROSAT catalog. We show how this method can be used to study the cross-correlations of thermal Sunya'ev-Zeldovich signals with number density maps of X-ray selected cluster catalogs. The method reduces the bias due to hand-tuning the selection function and is readily scalable to large catalogs with a high-dimensional space of astrophysical features.

  16. CMB-galaxy correlation in Unified Dark Matter scalar field cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Raccanelli, Alvise; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide; Giannantonio, Tommaso E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the ΛCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c{sub ∞} (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c{sub ∞}{sup 2} ≤ 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the ΛCDM model, for which c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 10{sup −4} . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from ΛCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.

  17. Reconstructing cosmological initial conditions from galaxy peculiar velocities - I. Reverse Zeldovich Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumler, Timur; Hoffman, Yehuda; Courtois, Hélène; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new method to recover the cosmological initial conditions of the presently observed galaxy distribution, which can serve to run constrained simulations of the Local Universe. Our method, the Reverse Zeldovich Approximation (RZA), can be applied to radial galaxy peculiar velocity data and extends the previously used constrained realizations (CR) method by adding a Lagrangian reconstruction step. The RZA method consists of applying the Zeldovich approximation in reverse to galaxy peculiar velocities to estimate the cosmic displacement field and the initial linear matter distribution from which the present-day Local Universe evolved. We test our method with a mock survey taken from a cosmological simulation. We show that the halo peculiar velocities at z = 0 are close to the linear prediction of the Zeldovich approximation, if a grouping is applied to the data to remove virial motions. We find that the addition of RZA to the CR method significantly improves the reconstruction of the initial conditions. The RZA is able to recover the correct initial positions of the velocity tracers with a median error of only 1.36 Mpc h-1 in our test simulation. For realistic sparse and noisy data, this median increases to 5 Mpc h-1. This is a significant improvement over the previous approach of neglecting the displacement field, which introduces errors on a scale of 10 Mpc h-1 or even higher. Applying the RZA method to the upcoming high-quality observational peculiar velocity catalogues will generate much more precise constrained simulations of the Local Universe.

  18. Computing the three-point correlation function of galaxies in O(N^2) time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an algorithm that computes the multipole coefficients of the galaxy three-point correlation function (3PCF) without explicitly considering triplets of galaxies. Rather, centring on each galaxy in the survey, it expands the radially binned density field in spherical harmonics and combines these to form the multipoles without ever requiring the relative angle between a pair about the central. This approach scales with number and number density in the same way as the two-point correlation function, allowing run-times that are comparable, and 500 times faster than a naive triplet count. It is exact in angle and easily handles edge correction. We demonstrate the algorithm on the LasDamas SDSS-DR7 mock catalogues, computing an edge corrected 3PCF out to 90 Mpc h-1 in under an hour on modest computing resources. We expect this algorithm will render it possible to obtain the large-scale 3PCF for upcoming surveys such as Euclid, Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument.

  19. The XMM Cluster Survey: The Halo Occupation Number of BOSS galaxies in X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtens, Nicola; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Collins, Chris A.; Sahlén, Martin; Rooney, Philip J.; Mayers, Julian A.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Bristow, Martyn; Capozzi, Diego; Christodoulou, L.; Comparat, Johan; Hilton, Matt; Hoyle, Ben; Kay, Scott T.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mann, Robert G.; Masters, Karen; Miller, Christopher J.; Parejko, John K.; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Ashley J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Stott, John P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Viana, Pedro T. P.; White, Martin; Wilcox, Harry; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-08-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: 0.2 < z < 0.4) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: 0.43 < z < 0.7) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark-matter halos of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between log10(M180/M⊙) = 13 - 15. Our directly-measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. (2013) for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. (2011) for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fit alpha-index of 0.91±0.08 and 1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04} for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. (2011) and Parejko et al. (2013). In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD-models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.

  20. An accurate tool for the fast generation of dark matter halo catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, P.; Sefusatti, E.; Borgani, S.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Sheth, R. K.; Theuns, T.

    2013-08-01

    We present a new parallel implementation of the PINpointing Orbit Crossing-Collapsed HIerarchical Objects (PINOCCHIO) algorithm, a quick tool, based on Lagrangian Perturbation Theory, for the hierarchical build-up of dark matter (DM) haloes in cosmological volumes. To assess its ability to predict halo correlations on large scales, we compare its results with those of an N-body simulation of a 3 h-1 Gpc box sampled with 20483 particles taken from the MICE suite, matching the same seeds for the initial conditions. Thanks to the Fastest Fourier Transforms in the West (FFTW) libraries and to the relatively simple design, the code shows very good scaling properties. The CPU time required by PINOCCHIO is a tiny fraction (˜1/2000) of that required by the MICE simulation. Varying some of PINOCCHIO numerical parameters allows one to produce a universal mass function that lies in the range allowed by published fits, although it underestimates the MICE mass function of Friends-of-Friends (FoF) haloes in the high-mass tail. We compare the matter-halo and the halo-halo power spectra with those of the MICE simulation and find that these two-point statistics are well recovered on large scales. In particular, when catalogues are matched in number density, agreement within 10 per cent is achieved for the halo power spectrum. At scales k > 0.1 h Mpc-1, the inaccuracy of the Zel'dovich approximation in locating halo positions causes an underestimate of the power spectrum that can be modelled as a Gaussian factor with a damping scale of d = 3 h-1 Mpc at z = 0, decreasing at higher redshift. Finally, a remarkable match is obtained for the reduced halo bispectrum, showing a good description of non-linear halo bias. Our results demonstrate the potential of PINOCCHIO as an accurate and flexible tool for generating large ensembles of mock galaxy surveys, with interesting applications for the analysis of large galaxy redshift surveys.

  1. Galaxy shapes and alignments in the MassiveBlack-II hydrodynamic and dark matter-only simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Ananth; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Kiessling, Alina; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-10-01

    We compare the shapes and intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II (MBII) cosmological hydrodynamic simulation to those in an identical dark matter-only (DMO) simulation. Understanding the impact of baryonic physics on galaxy shapes should prove useful for creating mock galaxy catalogues based on DMO simulations that mimic intrinsic alignments in hydrodynamic simulations. The dark matter subhaloes are typically rounder in MBII, and the shapes of stellar matter in low-mass galaxies are more misaligned with the shapes of dark matter of the corresponding subhaloes in the DMO simulation. At z = 0.06, the fractional difference in the mean misalignment angle between MBII and DMO simulations varies from ˜28to12 per cent in the mass range 1010.8-6.0 × 1014 h-1 M⊙. We study the dark matter halo shapes and alignments as a function of radius, and find that while galaxies in MBII are more aligned with the inner parts of their dark matter subhaloes, there is no radial trend in their alignments with the corresponding subhalo in the DMO simulation. This result highlights the importance of baryonic physics in determining galaxy alignments with inner parts of their halo. Finally, we find that the stellar-dark matter misalignment suppresses the ellipticity-direction (ED) correlation of galaxies in comparison to that of dark matter haloes. In the projected shape-density correlation (wδ +), higher mean ellipticities of the stellar component reduce this effect, but differences of the order of 30-40 per cent remain on scales >1 Mpc.

  2. Sunset science. I. The mock mirage.

    PubMed

    Young, A T; Kattawar, G W; Parviainen, P

    1997-04-20

    A previously unrecognized phenomenon, which we call the mock mirage, produces inverted images of the Sun and Moon near the horizon when the observer looks downward through a thermal inversion. No ducting is involved; the rays can be concave toward the Earth throughout their length, with a radius of curvature larger than the radius of the Earth. Quite mild inversions produce surprisingly large effects, which increase with the height of the observer. Although the phenomenon has frequently been photographed, published pictures have been misinterpreted. Finally, we distinguish between features that are due to waves on inversion layers and the larger features that are due to the inversions themselves. PMID:18253261

  3. The XMM-Newton serendipitous ultraviolet source survey catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Brindle, C.; Talavera, A.; Still, M.; Rosen, S. R.; Yershov, V. N.; Ziaeepour, H.; Mason, K. O.; Cropper, M. S.; Breeveld, A. A.; Loiseau, N.; Mignani, R.; Smith, A.; Murdin, P.

    2012-10-01

    The XMM-Newton Serendipitous Ultraviolet Source Survey (XMM-SUSS) is a catalogue of ultraviolet (UV) sources detected serendipitously by the Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The catalogue contains UV-detected sources collected from 2417 XMM-OM observations in one to six broad-band UV and optical filters, made between 2000 February 24 and 2007 March 29. The primary contents of the catalogue are source positions, magnitudes and fluxes in one to six passbands, and these are accompanied by profile diagnostics and variability statistics. XMM-SUSS is populated by 753 578 UV source detections above a 3σ signal-to-noise ratio threshold limit which relate to 624 049 unique objects. Taking account of substantial overlaps between observations, the net sky area covered is 29-54 deg2, depending on UV filter. The magnitude distributions peak at mAB = 20.2, 20.9 and 21.2 in UVW2 (λeff = 2120 Å), UVM2 (λeff = 2310 Å) and UVW1 (λeff = 2910 Å), respectively. More than 10 per cent of the sources have been visited more than once using the same filter during XMM-Newton operation, and >20 per cent of sources are observed more than once per filter during an individual visit. Consequently, the scope for science based on temporal source variability on time-scales of hours to years is broad. By comparison with other astrophysical catalogues we test the accuracy of the source measurements and define the nature of the serendipitous UV XMM-OM source sample. The distributions of source colours in the UV and optical filters are shown together with the expected loci of stars and galaxies, and indicate that sources which are detected in multiple UV bands are predominantly star-forming galaxies and stars of type G or earlier.

  4. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  5. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Caniego, Marcos

    2015-12-01

    The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources is a catalogue of sources observed over the entire sky at nine different frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz. It consists of Galactic and extragalactic objects detected in the Planck single-frequency full mission total intensity maps. Compact sources detected in the lower frequency channels are assigned to the PCCS2, while at higher frequencies they are assigned to one of two sub·catalogues, the PCCS2 or PCCS2E, depending on their location on the sky. The PCCS2 covers most of the sky and can be used to produce subsamples at higher reliabilities than the target 80% integral reliability of the catalogue. The PCCS2E contains sources located in certain regions where the complex background makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections. Both the PCCS2 and PCCS2E include polarization measurements, in the form of polarized flux densities, or upper limits, and orientation angles for all seven polarization-sensitive Planck channels.

  6. The Classified Catalogue: LU Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, C.-C.; Mount, Joan

    1971-01-01

    The Laurentian University Library has evolved a bilingual classified catalogue consisting of a public shelflist supplement by a French/English subject index. This produces an effective tool for locating all materials pertaining to a given topic in either or both of two languages. (Author/NH)

  7. Catalogue of Australian Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A catalogue of all families, subfamilies, genera, and species of Cynipoidea present in Australia is presented here. The Australian cynipoid fauna is very poorly known, with 37 genera cited: one each for Austrocynipidae, Ibaliidae, Liopteridae, two for Cynipidae, and 32 for Figitidae. The first Austr...

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Enhanced 3XMM catalogue (3XMMe) (Rosen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.

    2016-04-01

    The construction of the enhanced 3XMM catalogue involves 3 main elements: 1. The cleaning (ejection) of detections that are considered to be of lower scientific reliability or quality. 2. Application of criteria to identify detections that are considered potential candidates for the 3 main science themes (i.e. active galactic nuclei (AGN), clusters of galaxies and the galactic plane) of the Arches project. The constituent detections of unique sources on the sky are examined to decide which unique sources, overall, meet the criteria to be assigned to each science theme. 3. Addition of other information that augments the scientific value of the catalogue. The primary publicly released version of the catalogue is based on unique sources rather than separate detections. However, a detection-based catalogue will also be made available. (2 data files).

  9. Planck early results. VII. The Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Haissinski, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Huynh, M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sajina, A.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    A brief description of the methodology of construction, contents and usage of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC), including the Early Cold Cores (ECC) and the Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich (ESZ) cluster catalogue is provided. The catalogue is based on data that consist of mapping the entire sky once and 60% of the sky a second time by Planck, thereby comprising the first high sensitivity radio/submillimetre observations of the entire sky. Four source detection algorithms were run as part of the ERCSC pipeline. A Monte-Carlo algorithm based on the injection and extraction of artificial sources into the Planck maps was implemented to select reliable sources among all extracted candidates such that the cumulative reliability of the catalogue is ≥90%. There is no requirement on completeness for the ERCSC. As a result of the Monte-Carlo assessment of reliability of sources from the different techniques, an implementation of the PowellSnakes source extraction technique was used at the five frequencies between 30 and 143GHz while the SExtractor technique was used between 217 and 857GHz. The 10σ photometric flux density limit of the catalogue at |b| > 30° is 0.49, 1.0, 0.67, 0.5, 0.33, 0.28, 0.25, 0.47 and 0.82 Jy at each of the nine frequencies between 30 and 857GHz. Sources which are up to a factor of ~2 fainter than this limit, and which are present in "clean" regions of the Galaxy where the sky background due to emission from the interstellar medium is low, are included in the ERCSC if they meet the high reliability criterion. The Planck ERCSC sources have known associations to stars with dust shells, stellar cores, radio galaxies, blazars, infrared luminous galaxies and Galactic interstellar medium features. A significant fraction of unclassified sources are also present in the catalogs. In addition, two early release catalogs that contain 915 cold molecular cloud core candidates and 189 SZ cluster candidates that have been generated using

  10. The first British illustrated surgical catalogue.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, N H

    2004-06-01

    Surgical instrument catalogues are valuable documents, which help in both the identification and dating of instruments. A rare copy of the first British illustrated surgical catalogue was offered for sale in 2003. This paper gives brief details of the catalogue and its author, JH Savigny. PMID:15386890

  11. Spectral classification of emission-line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Pindao, M.; Maeder, A.; Kunth, D.

    2000-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to further investigate the classification of emission-line galaxies from the ``Spectrophotometric Catalogue of H II galaxies'' by Terlevich et al. (1991) in a homogeneous and objective way, using the three line-ratio diagrams, called diagnostic diagrams, of Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987). On the basis of the resulting catalogue, we critically discuss the classification methods in the optical range. In particular we compare our classification scheme to the one done by Rola et al. (1997) which is efficient for the classification of redshifted galaxies. We also propose a new diagnostic diagram involving the known intensity ratio R23=([O II],l 3727+[O III] l 4959+{[O III] l 5007)/Hb which appears to be a very good criterion allowing to discriminate the Seyfert 2 from H ii galaxies. The revised catalogue including 314 narrow-emission-line galaxies contains H II galaxies, Seyfert 2 galaxies, Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-Line Regions (hereafter LINERs) galaxies and some particular types of galaxies with the most intriguing ones, called ``ambiguous'', due to the ambiguity of their location in the diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies appear as H II galaxies and as active galactic nuclei (hereafter AGNs) in different diagrams of Veilleux & Osterbrock and constitute certainly a sample of particularly interesting candidates for a thorough study of connections between starbursts and AGNs. Available in electronic form only via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  12. The Joint IRAS PSC/FSC catalogue as a tool for efficient studies for extragalactic IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Harutyunyan, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    To increase the efficiency of using IRAS PSC and FSC, which contain a lot of common sources, one needs a joint catalogue of all IRAS point sources with improved data based on both catalogues. We have combined these two catalogs and obtained 345,163 sources, including 73,770 common associations with improved data. In addition, we have made cross-correlations with AKARI/IRC, AKARI/FIS and WISE catalogues. As a result we created a catalogue with high positional accuracy and with 17 photometric measurements from 1.25m to 160mwavelength range (based on 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and AKARI). At least half of all sources are extragalactic ones, which include bright galaxies, AGN and especially many Starburst galaxies that are important for star-formation phenomena and in many cases for study of the interrelationship between starburst, interactions and nuclear activity.

  13. Tickling, Punching, and Poking: Mock Aggressive Behavior in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Mary E.; Green, Shavonda

    Several hypotheses have been generated about the functions of mock aggression, including its association with dominance. This paper describes a study that expanded this line of research by interviewing college students about a broad array of mock aggressive behaviors and their contexts, targets, benefits, and functions. The hypotheses were that:…

  14. How to Plan and Conduct a Mock Trial: Civil Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Bar Association, Jefferson City.

    This document contains resources and suggested steps to help secondary teachers organize and conduct a mock trial. Although written specifically for use in Missouri, the document can easily be used and adapted by teachers in other states. The authors believe that a mock trial is a valuable learning experience in many ways. It may be used to help…

  15. Assessing the Mock Viva: The Experiences of British Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James; Fox, Claire

    2004-01-01

    Many postgraduate students in Britain experience a "mock" viva some time before their "rea" one, but little has been published on this aspect of gaining a Ph.D. or professional doctorate. In this study questionnaire data on the experiences and feelings of 29 UK postgraduate students concerning their mock vivas are summarized. The results suggest…

  16. How type of excuse defense, mock juror age, and defendant age affect mock jurors' decisions.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Pamela L; Heath, Wendy P; Grannemann, Bruce D

    2007-08-01

    The authors investigated the effects of mock juror age (younger vs. older), defendant age (22 vs. 65), and type of excuse defense used by defendants (a highly self-inflicted condition, Cocaine Dependency Disorder, vs. a less self-inflicted condition, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder) on mock juror decisions. Ninety-six younger and 96 older adults read a scenario and answered a questionnaire. Results indicated that the defendant using the highly self-inflicted excuse was more likely to receive a guilty verdict and a longer sentence than was the defendant using the less self-inflicted excuse. Older jurors were more certain of their verdicts and saw the defendant as more responsible for his condition than did younger jurors. Defendant age did not affect juror decisions. In addition, excuse type and juror age affected the jurors' perceptions of the victim's responsibility for the attack. The authors discuss the potential influence of juror age on perceptions of defendant responsibility. PMID:17955749

  17. Testing of actively cooled high heat flux mock-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödig, M.; Duwe, R.; Kühnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Scheerer, M.; Smid, I.; Wiechers, B.

    1998-10-01

    Several un-irradiated CFC monoblock mock-ups have been loaded in thermal fatigue tests up to 1000 cycles at power densities <25 MW/m 2. No indication of failure was observed for these loading conditions. Two of the mock-ups were inspected by ultra-sonic methods before thermal cycling. It could be proved that the voids found in the post-mortem metallography existed before and had no effect on the integrity of the mock-up. For the first time, neutron-irradiated CFC monoblock mock-ups have been tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH. These mock-ups had been irradiated before in the High Flux Reactor at Petten up to 0.3 dpa at 320°C and 770°C. All samples showed a significant increase of surface temperature, due to the irradiation induced decrease in thermal conductivity of the CFC materials.

  18. Galaxy coordinates. III. Accurate positions for 17124 galaxies including 3301 new companions of UGC galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturel, G.; Petit, C.; Garnier, R.; Prugniel, P.

    2000-06-01

    This paper gives accurate coordinates and diameters for 3301 galaxies, companions of UGC galaxies. (about 2764 companions were not yet available in electronic form). In addition previously poor equatorial coordinates are re-measured for 13823 galaxies. These coordinates which have an accuracy of 5'' or better will be used for facilitating the cross-identification with forthcoming catalogues of millions of galaxies. Full Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  19. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time

  20. Identification of stars in a J1744.0 star catalogue Yixiangkaocheng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.-H.

    2012-05-01

    The stars in the Chinese star catalogue, Yixiangkaocheng, which were edited by the Jesuit astronomer Kögler in AD 1744 and published in AD 1756, are identified with their counterparts in the Hipparcos catalogue. The equinox of the catalogue is confirmed to be J1744.0. By considering the precession of equinox, proper motions and nutation, the star closest to the location of each star in Yixiangkaocheng, having a proper magnitude, is selected as the corresponding identified star. I identified 2848 stars and 13 nebulosities out of 3083 objects in Yixiangkaocheng, and so the identification rate reached 92.80 per cent. I find that the magnitude classification system in Yixiangkaocheng agrees with the modern magnitude system. The catalogue includes dim stars, whose visual magnitudes are larger than 7, but most of these stars have Flamsteed designations. I find that the stars whose declination is lower than -30° have relatively larger offsets and different systematic behaviour from other stars. This indicates that there might be two different sources of stars in Yixiangkaocheng. In particular, I find that μ1 Sco and γ1 Sgr approximately mark the boundary between two different source catalogues. The observer's location, as estimated from these facts, agrees with the latitude of Greenwich where Flamsteed made his observations. The positional offsets between the Yixiangkaocheng stars and the Hipparcos stars are 0.6 arcmin, which implies that the source catalogue of stars with δ > -30° must have come from telescopic observations. Nebulosities in Yixiangkaocheng are identified with a few double stars, o Cet (the variable star, Mira), the Andromeda galaxy, ω Cen and NGC6231. These entities are associated with listings in Halley's Catalogue of the Southern Stars of AD 1679 as well as Flamsteed's catalogue of AD 1690.

  1. Boeing CST-100 Mock-Up Undergoes Airbag Stabilization Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Boeing Company's mock-up CST-100 spacecraft was put through water landing development tests Oct. 1-5, 2012, at Bigelow Aerospace's headquarters outside of Las Vegas. Engineers with Bigelow have...

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Nearby early-type galaxies catalog (Dabringhausen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a catalogue of 1715 early-type galaxies from the literature, spanning the luminosity range from faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to giant elliptical galaxies. The aim of this catalogue is to be one of the most comprehensive and publicly available collections of data on early-type galaxies. The emphasis in this catalogue lies on dwarf elliptical galaxies, for which some samples with detailed data have been published recently. For almost all of the early-type galaxies included in it, this catalogue contains data on their locations, distances, redshifts, half-light radii, the masses of their stellar populations and apparent magnitudes in various passbands. Data on metallicity and various colours are available for a majority of the galaxies presented here. The data on magnitudes, colours, metallicities and masses of the stellar populations is supplemented with entries that are based on fits to data from simple stellar population models and existing data from observations. Also, some simple transformations have been applied to the data on magnitudes, colours and metallicities in this catalog, in order to increase the homogeneity of this data. Estimates on the Sersic profiles, internal velocity dispersions, maximum rotational velocities, dynamical masses and ages are listed for several hundreds of the galaxies in this catalogue. Finally, each quantity listed in this catalogue is accompanied with information on its source, so that users of this catalogue can easily exclude data that they do not consider as reliable enough for their purposes. (10 data files).

  3. The IRAS PSC/FSC Combined Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, H. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Knyazyan, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    Optical identifications of a few thousands of IRAS sources showed that IRAS Point Source and IRAS Faint Source catalogues (PSC and FSC, respectively) contain many quasars and active galactic nuclei, late-type stars, planetary nebulae, variables, etc. To increase the efficiency of using IRAS PSC and FSC, which contain a lot of common sources, one needs a joint catalogue of all IRAS point sources with improved data based on both catalogues. However, cross-correlation of the catalogues is not so easy, as the association of many sources is relative, and not always it is obvious, whose source from one catalogue corresponds to the other one in the second catalogue. This problem exists in case of using standard cross-correlation tools like VizieR. Therefore, we have created a tool for cross-matching astronomical catalogues and we have applied it to IRAS PSC and FSC. Using this tool we have carried out identifications with a search radius corresponding to 3 σ of errors for each source individually rather than a standard radius for all sources. As a result, we obtained 73,770 associations. We showed that in case of cross-correlation of these catalogues by VizieR, we had to take 161.95 arcseconds radius not to lose any association; however, in this case a lot of false associations appear for many sources. In addition, we have made cross-correlations with AKARI-IRC, AKARI-FIS and WISE catalogues. As a result we created a catalogue with high positional accuracy and with 17 photometric measurements from 1.25 to 160 μm range, providing a detailed catalogue for IRAS point sources.

  4. Why Appoint Professionals? A Student Cataloguing Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    Students have provided cheap successful labour for routine retrospective cataloguing projects. The current article examines a library project which went further, using university students with minimum training to catalogue its undergraduate stock from the book in hand to AACR2, level 2, allegedly to professional standard. The article discusses the…

  5. Measuring Reader Failure at the Catalogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Carol A.; Schofield, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The Library Management Research Unit tested a survey design to measure and evaluate author catalogue use in four varying libraries. Readers were asked to note details of items not found in the catalogue and the source of the reference. Items were checked to discover the cause of failure.'' (9 references) (Author/DH)

  6. ESO Catalogue Facility Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moins, C.; Retzlaff, J.; Arnaboldi, M.; Zampieri, S.; Delmotte, N.; Forchí, V.; Klein Gebbinck, M.; Lockhart, J.; Micol, A.; Vera Sequeiros, I.; Bierwirth, T.; Peron, M.; Romaniello, M.; Suchar, D.

    2013-10-01

    The ESO Phase 3 Catalogue Facility provides investigators with the possibility to ingest catalogues resulting from ESO public surveys and large programs and to query and download their content according to positional and non-positional criteria. It relies on a chain of tools that covers the complete workflow from submission to validation and ingestion into the ESO archive and catalogue repository and a web application to browse and query catalogues. This repository consists of two components. One is a Sybase ASE relational database where catalogue meta-data are stored. The second one is a Sybase IQ data warehouse where the content of each catalogue is ingested in a specific table that returns all records matching a user's query. Spatial indexing has been implemented in Sybase IQ to speed up positional queries and relies on the Spherical Geometry Toolkit from the Johns Hopkins University which implements the Hierarchical Triangular Mesh (HTM) algorithm. It is based on a recursive decomposition of the celestial sphere in spherical triangles and the assignment of an index to each of them. It has been complemented with the use of optimized indexes on the non-positional columns that are likely to be frequently used as query constraints. First tests performed on catalogues such as 2MASS have confirmed that this approach provides a very good level of performance and a smooth user experience that are likely to facilitate the scientific exploitation of catalogues.

  7. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  8. Exploring the 2MASS extended and point source catalogues with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    The Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has mapped out the low-redshift Universe down to KS ˜ 14 mag. As its near-infrared photometry primarily probes the featureless Rayleigh-Jeans tail of galaxy spectral energy distributions, colour-based redshift estimation is rather uninformative. Until now, redshift estimates for this data set have relied on optical follow-up suffering from selection biases. Here, we use the newly developed technique of clustering-based redshift estimation to infer the redshift distribution of the 2MASS sources regardless of their optical properties. We characterize redshift distributions of objects from the Extended Source Catalogue as a function of near-infrared colours and brightness and report some observed trends. We also apply the clustering redshift technique to dropout populations, sources with non-detections in one or more near-infrared bands, and present their redshift distributions. Combining all extended sources, we confirm with clustering redshifts that the distribution of this sample extends up to z ˜ 0.35. We perform a similar analysis with the Point Source Catalogue and show that it can be separated into stellar and extragalactic contributions with galaxies reaching z ˜ 0.7. We estimate that the Point Source Catalogue contains 1.6 million extragalactic objects: as many as in the Extended Source Catalogue but probing a cosmic volume 10 times larger.

  9. An analysis of the first three catalogues of southern star clusters and nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glendyn John

    2008-06-01

    of the Lacaille and Herschel catalogues. In order to identify and compare the catalogues, positions given for an object by each astronomer were precessed to J2000.0 coordinates. These modern positions for an object could then be plotted onto modern photographic star atlases and digital images of the sky, to determine the accuracy of the original positions. Analysis of the three non-stellar catalogues included the determination of the radial distance of each object from its "correct" position and diagrams of both difference in Right Ascension and difference in Declination against Right Ascension and Declination, in order to identify any trends. Each catalogue contained some copy or printing errors, but these were omitted from the statistical calculations performed. The results for the three catalogues, from the astrometric perspective, showed that the Herschel catalogue contained the most accurate positions, followed closely by the Lacaille catalogue with no obvious or systematic trends in their inaccuracies. In contrast, the Dunlop catalogue showed some clear trends in the positional inaccuracies which, regardless of mitigating circumstances, to some extent warranted John Herschel's criticism. Finally an examination of the completeness of each catalogue was undertaken to determine the thoroughness of each astronomer. Firstly the effective aperture and theoretical magnitude limit for each telescope was calculated. Next the non-stellar objects were grouped into five types, open clusters, globular clusters, diffuse nebulae, planetary nebulae and galaxies, and a single working magnitude limit was found for each catalogue. A number of indicators were used to determine the working magnitude limit. The number of faint objects of each type which were seen, and the number of bright objects which were missed by the three astronomers, was assessed. In both the Dunlop and Herschel catalogues galaxies gave the best indicator of the working magnitude limit. Globular clusters

  10. Intercomparison of kinematics derived from catalogues UCAC4, PPMXL and XPM with vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vityazev, V. V.; Tsvetkov, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    We present the first application of the vector spherical harmonics technique to the proper motions of the catalogues UCAC4, XPM and PPMXL for stars in the 11 to 17 mag range. The results obtained from the all-sky and from the Northern and Southern Galactic hemispheres solutions are discussed. The all-sky solution gave the parameters of the standard Ogorodnikov-Milne model (coordinates of the solar motion apex, the Oort constants, the angular speed of the local Galactic rotation, the slope of the local rotational velocity curve) which practically coincide with the traditional least-squares estimates. Essentially new is the fact that the all-sky vector spherical harmonics analysis detected the same strong and reliable extra-model harmonics in all the catalogues under consideration. In addition, the Northern and Southern hemisphere solutions (again in all the catalogues) gave the sign changes of the same Ogorodnikov-Milne parameters. It was shown that both effects are generated by the retardation of the Galaxy rotation with the increase of the distance from the principal Galactic plane. Each catalogue shows small decrease of the gradient estimates towards the faint stars, but the mean values of the gradient derived from the catalogues are in good agreement, namely - UCAC4: 40.1 ± 0.2; PPMXL: 36.2 ± 0.4 and XPM: 37.7 ± 0.1 km s-1 kpc-1.

  11. Measurements of H(z) and DA(z) from the two-dimensional two-point correlation function of Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Wang, Yun

    2012-10-01

    We present a method for measuring the Hubble parameter, H(z), and angular diameter distance, DA(z), from the two-dimensional two-point correlation function and validate it using LasDamas mock galaxy catalogues. Applying our method to the sample of luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we measure H(z=0.35)≡H(0.35)=82.1-4.9+4.8 km s-1 Mpc -1 and DA(z=0.35)≡DA(0.35)=1048-58+60 Mpc without assuming a dark energy model or a flat universe. We find that the derived measurements of H(0.35) rs(zd)/c and DA(0.35)/rs(zd) [where rs(zd) is the sound horizon at the drag epoch] are nearly uncorrelated, have tighter constraints and are more robust with respect to possible systematic effects. Our galaxy clustering measurements of {H(0.35) rs(zd)/c,DA(0.35)/rs(zd)}={0.0434±0.0018,6.60±0.26} (with the correlation coefficient r = 0.0604) can be used to combine with cosmic microwave background and any other cosmological data sets to constrain dark energy. Our results represent the first measurements of H(z) and DA(z) (or H(z) rs(zd)/c and DA(0.35)/rs(zd)) from galaxy clustering data. Our work has significant implications for future surveys in establishing the feasibility of measuring both H(z) and DA(z) from galaxy clustering data.

  12. Gas in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn Joyce

    . We find that the void galaxies are ! generally gas rich, low luminosity, blue disk galaxies, but identify three as early type galaxies. The void galaxy optical and H I properties are not unusual for their luminosity and morphology. The small scale clustering in the void is similar to that in higher density regions, and we identify 18 H I rich neighboring galaxies in the voids. Two of these are systems of three galaxies linearly aligned and joined by a H I bridge, suggestive of filamentary formation within the void. We find no population of H I rich low luminosity galaxies within the observed voids that are not close companions of the targeted sample. Finally, to put these observations in a theoretical context, we analyze a (120 h^-1 Mpc)^3 adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulation that contains a high resolution subvolume centered on a ~30 Mpc diameter void. We construct mock observations with ~1 kpc resolution of the stellar and gas properties of these systems which reproduce the range of colors and luminosities observed in the SDSS for nearby galaxies, however we find no strong trends with density. We also make predictions for a significant population of low luminosity (M_r = -14) dwarf galaxies that is preferentially located in low density regions and specifically in the void center.

  13. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  14. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE VORONOI-DELAUNAY METHOD CATALOG OF GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Noeske, Kai; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2012-05-20

    We present a public catalog of galaxy groups constructed from the spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fourth data release from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Galaxy Redshift Survey, including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The catalog contains 1165 groups with two or more members in the EGS over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.5 and 1295 groups at z > 0.6 in the rest of DEEP2. Twenty-five percent of EGS galaxies and fourteen percent of high-z DEEP2 galaxies are assigned to galaxy groups. The groups were detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) after it has been optimized on mock DEEP2 catalogs following similar methods to those employed in Gerke et al. In the optimization effort, we have taken particular care to ensure that the mock catalogs resemble the data as closely as possible, and we have fine-tuned our methods separately on mocks constructed for the EGS and the rest of DEEP2. We have also probed the effect of the assumed cosmology on our inferred group-finding efficiency by performing our optimization on three different mock catalogs with different background cosmologies, finding large differences in the group-finding success we can achieve for these different mocks. Using the mock catalog whose background cosmology is most consistent with current data, we estimate that the DEEP2 group catalog is 72% complete and 61% pure (74% and 67% for the EGS) and that the group finder correctly classifies 70% of galaxies that truly belong to groups, with an additional 46% of interloper galaxies contaminating the catalog (66% and 43% for the EGS). We also confirm that the VDM catalog reconstructs the abundance of galaxy groups with velocity dispersions above {approx}300 km s{sup -1} to an accuracy better than the sample variance, and this successful reconstruction is not strongly dependent on cosmology. This makes the DEEP2 group catalog a promising probe of the growth of cosmic structure that can potentially be used for cosmological tests.

  15. Cosmology with void-galaxy correlations.

    PubMed

    Hamaus, Nico; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Sutter, P M; Lavaux, Guilhem; Warren, Michael S

    2014-01-31

    Galaxy bias, the unknown relationship between the clustering of galaxies and the underlying dark matter density field is a major hurdle for cosmological inference from large-scale structure. While traditional analyses focus on the absolute clustering amplitude of high-density regions mapped out by galaxy surveys, we propose a relative measurement that compares those to the underdense regions, cosmic voids. On the basis of realistic mock catalogs we demonstrate that cross correlating galaxies and voids opens up the possibility to calibrate galaxy bias and to define a static ruler thanks to the observable geometric nature of voids. We illustrate how the clustering of voids is related to mass compensation and show that volume-exclusion significantly reduces the degree of stochasticity in their spatial distribution. Extracting the spherically averaged distribution of galaxies inside voids from their cross correlations reveals a remarkable concordance with the mass-density profile of voids. PMID:24580436

  16. Galaxy 'Hunting' Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Galaxies found under the Glare of Cosmic Flashlights Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have discovered in a single pass about a dozen otherwise invisible galaxies halfway across the Universe. The discovery, based on a technique that exploits a first-class instrument, represents a major breakthrough in the field of galaxy 'hunting'. ESO PR Photo 40a/07 ESO PR Photo 40a/07 Newly Found Galaxies (SINFONI/VLT) The team of astronomers led by Nicolas Bouché have used quasars to find these galaxies. Quasars are very distant objects of extreme brilliance, which are used as cosmic beacons that reveal galaxies lying between the quasar and us. The galaxy's presence is revealed by a 'dip' in the spectrum of the quasar - caused by the absorption of light at a specific wavelength. The team used huge catalogues of quasars, the so-called SDSS and 2QZ catalogues, to select quasars with dips. The next step was then to observe the patches of the sky around these quasars in search for the foreground galaxies from the time the Universe was about 6 billion years old, almost half of its current age. "The difficulty in actually spotting and seeing these galaxies stems from the fact that the glare of the quasar is too strong compared to the dim light of the galaxy," says Bouché. This is where observations taken with SINFONI on ESO's VLT made the difference. SINFONI is an infrared 'integral field spectrometer' that simultaneously delivers very sharp images and highly resolved colour information (spectra) of an object on the sky. ESO PR Photo 32e/07 ESO PR Photo 40b/07 Chasing 'Hidden' Galaxies (Artist's Impression) With this special technique, which untangles the light of the galaxy from the quasar light, the team detected 14 galaxies out of the 20 pre-selected quasar patches of sky, a hefty 70% success rate. "This high detection rate alone is a very exciting result," says Bouché. "But, these are not just ordinary galaxies: they are most notable ones, actively forming a lot of

  17. Magnitude systems in old star catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Tomoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    The current system of stellar magnitudes originally introduced by Hipparchus was strictly defined by Norman Pogson in 1856. He based his system on Ptolemy's star catalogue, the Almagest, recorded in about AD137, and defined the magnitude-intensity relationship on a logarithmic scale. Stellar magnitudes observed with the naked eye recorded in seven old star catalogues were analyzed in order to examine the visual magnitude systems. Although psychophysicists have proposed that human visual sensitivity follows a power-law scale, it is shown here that the degree of agreement is far better for a logarithmic scale than for a power-law scale. It is also found that light ratios in each star catalogue are nearly equal to 2.512, if the brightest (1st magnitude) and the faintest (6th magnitude and dimmer) stars are excluded from the study. This means that the visual magnitudes in the old star catalogues agree fully with Pogson's logarithmic scale.

  18. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  19. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Luminosity Function in the ECO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Hayley; Andreas A. Berlind, Victor Calderon, Kathleen D. Eckert, Sheila J. Kannappan, Amanda J. Moffett, David V. Stark

    2016-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy luminosity function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy luminosity distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that luminous galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low luminosity galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the correlation of galaxy luminosity and dark matter halo mass combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the luminosity of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo's larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign luminosities to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect luminosity to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO luminosity function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. Though our mock catalog luminosity functions display similar qualitative trends as those from the ECO data, the trends are not in agreement quantitatively. Our results thus suggest that the simple models used to build the mocks are incomplete and that galaxy luminosity is possibly correlated with the larger scale density field.

  20. The History of Ptolemy's Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graßhoff, Gerd

    Table of contents

    Contents: Introduction.- The Stars of the Almagest.- Accusations.- The Rehabilitation of Ptolemy.- The Analysis of the Star Catalogue.- Structures in Ptolemy's Star Catalogue.- Theory and Observation.- Appendix A.- Stars and Constellations.- Identifications.- Appendix B.- Transformation Formulae.- Column Headings.- Appendix C.- Column Headings.- Literature.- Index.

  1. Vitesses radiales - catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    Les auteurs ont réuni, en une seule version, les catalogues de vitesses radiales moyennes de Wilson (1963) et de Evans (1978), qui ont de nombreuses étoiles en commun. Les étoiles doubles spectroscopiques, dont l'orbite est déterminée (catalogue de Batten et al. 1989), ont également été associées à ce travail.

  2. Cluster galaxies die hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; von der Linden, Anja; De Lucia, Gabriella

    2010-08-01

    We investigate how the specific star formation rates of galaxies of different masses depend on cluster-centric radius and on the central/satellite dichotomy in both field and cluster environments. Recent data from a variety of sources, including the cluster catalogue of von der Linden et al., are compared to the semi-analytic models of De Lucia & Blaizot. We find that these models predict too many passive satellite galaxies in clusters, too few passive central galaxies with low stellar masses and too many passive central galaxies with high masses. We then outline a series of modifications to the model necessary to solve these problems: (a) instead of instantaneous stripping of the external gas reservoir after a galaxy becomes a satellite, the gas supply is assumed to decrease at the same rate that the surrounding halo loses mass due to tidal stripping and (b) the active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback efficiency is lowered to bring the fraction of massive passive centrals in better agreement with the data. We also allow for radio mode AGN feedback in satellite galaxies. (c) We assume that satellite galaxies residing in host haloes with masses below 1012h-1Msolar do not undergo any stripping. We highlight the fact that in low-mass galaxies, the external reservoir is composed primarily of gas that has been expelled from the galactic disc by supernovae-driven winds. This gas must remain available as a future reservoir for star formation, even in satellite galaxies. Finally, we present a simple recipe for the stripping of gas and dark matter in satellites that can be used in models where subhalo evolution is not followed in detail.

  3. Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 disk galaxies brighter than BT = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies, which are confined within a volume located in the outer part of the Local Supercluster.

  4. Catalogue of bright IDS stars with extensive cross-identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipaeva, N. A.; Sementsov, V. N.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    A new catalogue of bright binary stars is presented. The catalogue1 includes bright IDS systems and bright spectroscopic binaries. Besides IDS data (coordinates, relative positions, magnitudes and spectral classification), the catalogue contains extensive cross-identification and comments for 27452 systems. The catalogue is complete to the 9th mag, but also contains stars down to about 16th mag.

  5. A Mock U.N. Game: Teaching Global Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenbogen, Joe

    1988-01-01

    Describes a classroom simulation that has students role play membership in the United Nations. Students are assigned countries and through research and debate learn that country's position on international issues. The culminating activity has students participate in a mock United Nations Assembly vote. Argues that this method encourages students…

  6. A mock circulation model for cardiovascular device evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schampaert, S; Pennings, K A M A; van de Molengraft, M J G; Pijls, N H J; van de Vosse, F N; Rutten, M C M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an integrated mock circulation system that functions in a physiological manner for testing cardiovascular devices under well-controlled circumstances. In contrast to previously reported mock loops, the model includes a systemic, pulmonary, and coronary circulation, an elaborate heart contraction model, and a realistic heart rate control model. The behavior of the presented system was tested in response to changes in left ventricular contractile states, loading conditions, and heart rate. For validation purposes, generated hemodynamic parameters and responses were compared to literature. The model was implemented in a servo-motor driven mock loop, together with a relatively simple lead-lag controller. The pressure and flow signals measured closely mimicked human pressure under both physiological and pathological conditions. In addition, the system's response to changes in preload, afterload, and heart rate indicate a proper implementation of the incorporated feedback mechanisms (frequency and cardiac function control). Therefore, the presented mock circulation allows for generic in vitro testing of cardiovascular devices under well-controlled circumstances. PMID:24622168

  7. Understanding Pretrial Publicity: Predecisional Distortion of Evidence by Mock Jurors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Lorraine; Memon, Amina; McGeorge, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Prejudicial pretrial publicity (PTP) constitutes a serious source of juror bias. The current study examined differences in predecisional distortion for mock jurors exposed to negative PTP (N-PTP) versus nonexposed control participants. According to work by K. A. Carlson and J. E. Russo (2001), predecisional distortion occurs when jurors bias new…

  8. Holomorphic projections and Ramanujan’s mock theta functions

    PubMed Central

    Imamoğlu, Özlem; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K.

    2014-01-01

    We use spectral methods of automorphic forms to establish a holomorphic projection operator for tensor products of vector-valued harmonic weak Maass forms and vector-valued modular forms. We apply this operator to discover simple recursions for Fourier series coefficients of Ramanujan’s mock theta functions. PMID:24591582

  9. Mock Trial: A Window to Free Speech Rights and Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    This article provides some strategies to alleviate the current tensions between personal responsibility and freedom of speech rights in the public school classroom. The article advocates the necessity of making sure students understand the points and implications of the first amendment by providing a mock trial unit concerning free speech rights.…

  10. Complainant Sexual History Evidence: Its Impact on Mock Jurors' Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Regina A.; Hastings, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of complainant sexual history evidence on mock jurors' judgements in a sexual assault trial. One hundred and sixty-nine undergraduates listened to an audiotape of a sexual assault trial in which the sexual history between the complainant and defendant was systematically varied to include either sexual…

  11. The Implementation of Mock Negotiations in Teaching International Business Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    Mock negotiations are used as part of an undergraduate course in international business management at Lebanon Valley College (Pennsylvania) in order to introduce students to the process of negotiating for advantage in foreign countries and to emphasize the importance of an individual nation's customs, culture, and ways of transacting business in…

  12. Hamilton Jeffers and the Double Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Court reporter and amateur astronomer Shelburne Wesley Burnham (1838-1921) published a massive double star catalogue containing more than 13,000 systems in 1906. The next keeper of the double stars was Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken (1864-1951), who produced a much larger catalogue in 1932. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham’s records of observations on handwritten file cards, eventually turning them over to Lick Observatory astrometrist Hamilton Moore Jeffers (1893-1976). Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby (1921-2002), he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford (1905-2002) had the new 120-inch reflector, the world’s second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the U.S. Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley (1935-1997), and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,000,000 measures of more than 100,000 pairs.

  13. Star formation rates in isolated galaxies selected from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, O.; Karachentseva, V.; Karachentsev, I.

    2015-08-01

    We have considered the star formation properties of 1616 isolated galaxies from the 2MASS XSC (Extended Source Catalog) selected sample (2MIG) with the far-ultraviolet GALEX magnitudes. This sample was then compared with corresponding properties of isolated galaxies from the Local Orphan Galaxies (LOG) catalogue and paired galaxies. We found that different selection algorithms define different populations of isolated galaxies. The population of the LOG catalogue, selected from non-clustered galaxies in the Local Supercluster volume, mostly consists of low-mass spiral and late-type galaxies. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) upper limit in isolated and paired galaxies does not exceed the value of ˜dex(-9.4). This is probably common for galaxies of differing activity and environment (at least at z < 0.06). The fractions of quenched galaxies are nearly twice as high in the paired galaxy sample as in the 2MIG isolated galaxy sample. From the behaviour of (S)SFR versus M* relations we deduced that the characteristic value influencing evolutionary processes is the galaxy mass. However, the environmental influence is notable: paired massive galaxies with logM* > 11.5 have higher (S)SFR than isolated galaxies. Our results suggest that the environment helps to trigger the star formation in the highest mass galaxies. We found that the fraction of AGN in the paired sample is only a little higher than in our isolated galaxy sample. We assume that AGN phenomenon is probably defined by secular galaxy evolution.

  14. New Generation of Catalogues for the New Generation of Users: A Comparison of Six Library Catalogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercun, Tanja; Zumer, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the problems and issues faced by online library catalogues. It aims to establish how libraries have undertaken the mission of developing the next generation catalogues and how they compare to new tools such as Amazon. Design/methodology/approach: An expert study was carried out in January…

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Isolated galaxies, pairs and triplets (Argudo-Fernandez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernandez, M.; Verley, S.; Bergond, G.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Ramos Carmona, E.; Sabater, J.; Fernandez, Lorenzo M.; Espada, D.; Sulentic, J.; Ruiz, J. E.; Leon, S.

    2015-04-01

    Catalogues of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets in the local Universe with positions, redshifts, and degrees of relation with their physical and large-scale environments. (5 data files).

  16. A Revised Earthquake Catalogue for South Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, Francesco; Zechar, J. Douglas; Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Eberhard, David A. J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1991, a new seismic monitoring network named SIL was started in Iceland with a digital seismic system and automatic operation. The system is equipped with software that reports the automatic location and magnitude of earthquakes, usually within 1-2 min of their occurrence. Normally, automatic locations are manually checked and re-estimated with corrected phase picks, but locations are subject to random errors and systematic biases. In this article, we consider the quality of the catalogue and produce a revised catalogue for South Iceland, the area with the highest seismic risk in Iceland. We explore the effects of filtering events using some common recommendations based on network geometry and station spacing and, as an alternative, filtering based on a multivariate analysis that identifies outliers in the hypocentre error distribution. We identify and remove quarry blasts, and we re-estimate the magnitude of many events. This revised catalogue which we consider to be filtered, cleaned, and corrected should be valuable for building future seismicity models and for assessing seismic hazard and risk. We present a comparative seismicity analysis using the original and revised catalogues: we report characteristics of South Iceland seismicity in terms of b value and magnitude of completeness. Our work demonstrates the importance of carefully checking an earthquake catalogue before proceeding with seismicity analysis.

  17. The HIPASS catalogue - I. Data presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. J.; Zwaan, M. A.; Webster, R. L.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Ryan-Weber, E.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Barnes, D. G.; Howlett, M.; Kilborn, V. A.; Stevens, J.; Waugh, M.; Pierce, M. J.; Bhathal, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Garcia, D. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Harnett, J.; Henning, P. A.; Jerjen, H.; Kesteven, M. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Koribalski, B. S.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Minchin, R. F.; O'Brien, J.; Oosterloo, T.; Price, R. M.; Putman, M. E.; Ryder, S. D.; Sadler, E. M.; Stewart, I. M.; Stootman, F.; Wright, A. E.

    2004-06-01

    The HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) catalogue forms the largest uniform catalogue of HI sources compiled to date, with 4315 sources identified purely by their HI content. The catalogue data comprise the southern region δ < + 2° of HIPASS, the first blind HI survey to cover the entire southern sky. The rms noise for this survey is 13 mJy beam-1 and the velocity range is -1280 to 12 700 km s-1. Data search, verification and parametrization methods are discussed along with a description of measured quantities. Full catalogue data are made available to the astronomical community including positions, velocities, velocity widths, integrated fluxes and peak flux densities. Also available are on-sky moment maps, position-velocity moment maps and spectra of catalogue sources. A number of local large-scale features are observed in the space distribution of sources, including the super-Galactic plane and the Local Void. Notably, large-scale structure is seen at low Galactic latitudes, a region normally obscured at optical wavelengths.

  18. Tsunami Catalogues for the Eastern Mediterranean - Revisited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambraseys, N.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    We critically examine examine tsunami catalogues of tsunamis in the Eastern Mediterranean published in the last decade, by reference to the original sources, see Ambraseys (2008). Such catalogues have been widely used in the aftermath of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami for probabilistic hazard analysis, even to make projections for a ten year time frame. On occasion, such predictions have caused panic and have reduced the credibility of the scientific community in making hazard assessments. We correct classification and other spurious errors in earlier catalogues and posit a new list. We conclude that for some historic events, any assignment of magnitude, even on a six point intensity scale is inappropriate due to lack of information. Further we assert that any tsunami catalogue, including ours, can only be used in conjunction with sedimentologic evidence to quantitatively infer the return period of larger events. Statistical analyses correlating numbers of tsunami events derived solely from catalogues with their inferred or imagined intensities are meaningless, at least when focusing on specific locales where only a handful of tsunamis are known to have been historically reported. Quantitative hazard assessments based on scenario events of historic tsunamis for which -at best- only the size and approximate location of the parent earthquake is known should be undertaken with extreme caution and only with benefit of geologic studies to enhance the understanding of the local tectonics. Ambraseys N. (2008) Earthquakes in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East: multidisciplinary study of 2000 years of seimicity, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge (ISBN 9780521872928).

  19. STS 61-B crewmembers participate in egress training using shuttle mock-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 61-B crewmembers participate in egress training using shuttle mock-up. Views include Payload specialist Rudolfo Neri using a Sky Genie to exit the Shuttle mock-up (43579); Close-up of Mary Cleve using a Sky Genie to exit the Shuttle mock-up (43580).

  20. Using Controversial Mock Trials in "Psychology and Law" Courses: Suggestions from Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Harvey, James; McNamara, Rebecca; Svoboda, Andrea; Gulbrandson, Raina; Hendren, Jennifer; Greedy, Tiffany; Leybold, Christie

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mock trial focused on Jack Kevorkian and an euthanasia case that was included in a psychology and law course. Discusses the course format, provides the reactions to the mock trial by students and consultants, and includes suggestions for improving the mock trial. (CMK)

  1. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  2. Hipparcos to deliver its final results catalogue soon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    them, almost 30 years ago, to propose carrying out these observations from the relatively benign environment of space. Hipparcos is, by present standards, a medium-sized satellite, with a 30 cm telescope sensing simply ordinary light. But it has been described as the most imaginative in the short history of space astronomy. This foresight has been amply repaid. In the long history of stargazing it ranks with the surveys by Hipparchus the Greek in the 2nd Century BC and by Tichy Brahe the Dane in the 16th Century AD, both of which transformed human perceptions of the Universe. Positions derived from the Hipparcos satellite are better than a millionth of a degree, and newly a thousand times more accurate than star positions routinely determined from he ground. This accuracy makes it possible to measure directly the distances to the stars. While it took 250 years between astronomers first setting out on the exacting task of measuring the distance to a star, and a stellar distance being measured for the first time, ESA's Hipparcos mission has revolutionised this long, painstaking, and fundamental task by measuring accurate distances and movements of more than one hundred thousand. The measurement concept involved he satellite triangulating its way between he stars all wound the sky, building up a celestial map in much the same way as land surveyors use triangulation between hill-tops to measure distances accurately. Only the angles involved are much smaller : the accuracy that has been achieved with the Hipparcos Catalogue is such that he two edges of a coin, viewed from he other side of the Atlantic Ocean, could be distinguished. The results from Hipparcos will deliver scientists with long-awaited details of our place in he Milky Way Galaxy. Most of he stars visible to the naked eye are, to a large extent, companions of the Sun, in a great orbital march around the centre of the Galaxy, a journey so long that it takes individual stars 250 million years to complete, in

  3. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  4. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky and reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond the Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is assembled from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's All-Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog,; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The colors represent how the many galaxies appear at three distinct wavelengths of infrared light (blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns). Quite evident are the many galactic clusters and superclusters, as well as some streamers composing the large-scale structure of the nearby universe. The blue overlay represents the very close and bright stars from our own Milky Way galaxy. In this projection, the bluish Milky Way lies predominantly toward the upper middle and edges of the image.

  5. The Most Bound Halo Particle–Galaxy Correspondence Model: Comparison between Models with Different Merger Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Park, Changbom; Kim, Juhan

    2016-06-01

    We develop a galaxy assignment scheme that populates dark matter halos with galaxies by tracing the most bound member particles (MBPs) of simulated halos. Several merger timescale models based on analytic calculations and numerical simulations are adopted as the survival times of mock satellite galaxies. We build mock galaxy samples from halo merger data of the Horizon Run 4 N-body simulation from z = 12–0. We compare group properties and two-point correlation functions (2pCFs) of mock galaxies with those of volume-limited SDSS galaxies, with r-band absolute magnitudes of {{ M }}r-5{log}h\\lt -21 and ‑20 at z = 0. It is found that the MBP-galaxy correspondence scheme reproduces the observed population of SDSS galaxies in massive galaxy groups (M\\gt {10}14 {h}-1 {M}ȯ ) and the small-scale 2pCF ({r}{{p}}\\lt 10 {h}-1 {Mpc}) quite well for the majority of the merger timescale models adopted. The new scheme outperforms the previous subhalo-galaxy correspondence scheme by more than 2σ.

  6. An Overview of the Mock LISA Data Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Keith A.; Babak, Stanislav; Baker, John G.; Benacquista, Matthew J.; Cornish, Neil J.; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane L.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Vallisneri, Michele; Vecchio, Alberto; Vinet, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    The LISA International Science Team Working Group on Data Analysis (LIST-WG1B) is sponsoring several rounds of mock data challenges, with the purpose of fostering the development of LISA data-analysis capabilities, and of demonstrating technical readiness for the maximum science exploitation of the LISA data. The first round of challenge data sets were released at this Symposium. We describe the objectives, structure, and timeline of this program.

  7. Mock Nuclear Processing Facility-Safeguards Training Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Hasty, Tim; Johns, Rissell; Baum, Gregory

    2014-08-31

    This document outlines specific training requirements in the topical areas of Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and Physical Protection(PP) which are to be used as technical input for designing a mock Integrated Security Facility (ISF) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The overall project objective for these requirements is to enhance the ability to deliver training on Material Protection Control and Accounting (MC&A) concepts regarding hazardous material such as irradiated materials with respect to bulk processing facilities.

  8. Galaxy populations in rich environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy Huu

    2002-11-01

    Combining two color HST/WFPC2 mosaics with extensive Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we derive physical properties for over 400 confirmed cluster members at z = 0.33, 0.58, and 0.83 to provide key tests of current CDM models of hierarchical galaxy formation. Morphological characteristics such as bulge to total luminosity, half-light radius, bulge/disk scale length, and galaxy asymmetry are measured by determining the best-fit 2D bulge + disk model for each galaxy. We rigorously test these measurements using extensive mock galaxy catalogs to quantify systematic and random errors. Utilizing quantitative structural parameters, spectral indices ([OII] λ3727, HS, and H-γ), Hubble types, internal velocity dispersions (for a subset), and galaxy colors, we find that: (1)Galaxies spanning the range of Hubble type (-5 ≤ T ≤ 8) are well-fit by a de Vaucouleurs bulge with exponential disk profile; (2)The average [OII] equivalent width of the most disk-dominated members (B/T < 0.25) is significantly higher than the average of the bulge-dominated members (B/T ≥ 0.4); (3)The physical properties, e.g. half-light radii, bulge-to-total luminosities, and bulge ellipticities, of cluster elliptical and S0 galaxies (-17.3 ≥ MBz - 5log h 70 ≥ -19.3) are consistent with the two types sharing a common parent galaxy population; (4)In these three clusters, the distributions of cluster disk sizes are indistinguishable, a result contrary to predictions from current hierarchical formation models; (5)Post- starburst (“E + A”) galaxies are a non- negligible fraction (˜5 20%) of the cluster population at these redshifts; (6)We find compelling evidence that the E + A mass distribution evolves with redshift (“downsizing”) such that E + A galaxies span the range in mass at high redshift but only low mass E + A's exist in nearby clusters.

  9. A Coupled THMC model of FEBEX mock-up test

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier

    2008-09-15

    FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) is a demonstration and research project for the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository in granite. It includes two full-scale heating and hydration tests: the in situ test performed at Grimsel (Switzerland) and a mock-up test operating at CIEMAT facilities in Madrid (Spain). The mock-up test provides valuable insight on thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) behavior of EBS because its hydration is controlled better than that of in situ test in which the buffer is saturated with water from the surrounding granitic rock. Here we present a coupled THMC model of the mock-up test which accounts for thermal and chemical osmosis and bentonite swelling with a state-surface approach. The THMC model reproduces measured temperature and cumulative water inflow data. It fits also relative humidity data at the outer part of the buffer, but underestimates relative humidities near the heater. Dilution due to hydration and evaporation near the heater are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species while surface complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation and cation exchanges affect significantly reactive species as well. Results of sensitivity analyses to chemical processes show that pH is mostly controlled by surface complexation while dissolved cations concentrations are controlled by cation exchange reactions.

  10. Thermal hydraulic modeling of the mock fuel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jacob

    The major focus of this thesis was to make improved three dimensional models of the Mock Fuel Facility. Three distinct experiment types run with the Mock Fuel Facility (MFF) were the main focus of this thesis. Two of the experiments were modeled and an in-depth analysis of the model results was performed to gain a better understanding of the Mock Fuel Facility. For the third experiment the process of creating a model was begun. There were multiple purposes for the work completed in this thesis. The work was done partially to gain a greater understanding of the UMass Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR). There is minimal instrumentation within the UMLRR to measure localized temperatures within the UMLRR. It is hoped that the work done in this thesis will provide a basis for future modeling work which will give insight into the temperature profiles within the UMLRR. This work is also being done to gain insight into the capabilities of the COMSOL multiphysics modelling software and evaluate its potential for future modelling work. Finally this work is also being done for its potential as an educational tool. The MFF and COMSOL have potential to be used for experimental lab work by students to learn about computer modeling and validation.

  11. The one-point PDF of the initial conditions of our local Universe from the IRAS PSC redshift catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, P.; Efstathiou, G.; Maddox, S. J.; Branchini, E.; Frenk, C. S.; McMahon, R. G.; Oliver, S. J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; Sutherland, W. J.; Tadros, H.; White, S. D. M.

    2000-11-01

    The algorithm ztrace of Monaco & Efstathiou is applied to the IRAS PSCz catalogue to reconstruct the initial conditions of our local Universe with a resolution down to ~5h-1Mpc. The one-point probability distribution function (PDF) of the reconstructed initial conditions is consistent with the assumptions that: (i) IRAS galaxies trace mass on scales of ~5h-1Mpc and (ii) the statistics of the primordial density fluctuations are Gaussian. We use simulated PSCz catalogues, constructed from N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions, to show that local non-linear bias can cause the recovered initial PDF (assuming no bias) to be non-Gaussian. However, for plausible bias models, the distortions of the recovered PDF would be difficult to detect using the volume finely sampled by the PSCz catalogue. So, for Gaussian initial conditions, a range of bias models remain compatible with our PSCz reconstruction results.

  12. Massive relic galaxies prefer dense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta de Arriba, Luis; Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio; Cebrián, María; Balcells, Marc

    2016-09-01

    We study the preferred environments of z ˜ 0 massive relic galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies with little or no growth from star formation or mergers since z ˜ 2). Significantly, we carry out our analysis on both a large cosmological simulation and an observed galaxy catalogue. Working on the Millennium I-WMAP7 simulation we show that the fraction of today massive objects which have grown less than 10 per cent in mass since z ˜ 2 is ˜0.04 per cent for the whole massive galaxy population with M⋆ > 1010 M⊙. This fraction rises to ˜0.18 per cent in galaxy clusters, confirming that clusters help massive galaxies remain unaltered. Simulations also show that massive relic galaxies tend to be closer to cluster centres than other massive galaxies. Using the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue, and defining relics as M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ early-type galaxies with colours compatible with single-stellar population ages older than 10 Gyr, and which occupy the bottom 5-percentile in the stellar mass-size distribution, we find 1.11 ± 0.05 per cent of relics among massive galaxies. This fraction rises to 2.4 ± 0.4 per cent in high-density environments. Our findings point in the same direction as the works by Poggianti et al. and Stringer et al. Our results may reflect the fact that the cores of the clusters are created very early on, hence the centres host the first cluster members. Near the centres, high-velocity dispersions and harassment help cluster core members avoid the growth of an accreted stellar envelope via mergers, while a hot intracluster medium prevents cold gas from reaching the galaxies, inhibiting star formation.

  13. The 6dF Galaxy Survey: bulk flows on 50-70 h-1 Mpc scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Morag I.; Davis, Tamara M.; Blake, Chris; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Magoulas, Christina; Springob, Christopher M.; Beutler, Florian; Colless, Matthew; Johnson, Andrew; Jones, D. Heath; Koda, Jun; Lucey, John R.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Mould, Jeremy; Poole, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the bulk flow of the local Universe using the 6dF Galaxy Survey peculiar velocity sample (6dFGSv), the largest and most homogeneous peculiar velocity sample to date. 6dFGSv is a Fundamental Plane sample of ˜104 peculiar velocities covering the whole Southern hemisphere for galactic latitude |b| > 10°, out to redshift z = 0.0537. We apply the `minimum variance' bulk flow weighting method, which allows us to make a robust measurement of the bulk flow on scales of 50 and 70 h-1 Mpc. We investigate and correct for potential bias due to the lognormal velocity uncertainties, and verify our method by constructing Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) 6dFGSv mock catalogues incorporating the survey selection function. For a hemisphere of radius 50 h-1 Mpc we find a bulk flow amplitude of U = 248 ± 58 km s-1 in the direction (l, b) = (318° ± 20°, 40° ± 13°), and for 70 h-1 Mpc we find U = 243 ± 58 km s-1, in the same direction. Our measurement gives us a constraint on σ8 of 1.01^{+1.07}_{-0.58}. Our results are in agreement with other recent measurements of the direction of the bulk flow, and our measured amplitude is consistent with a ΛCDM prediction.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Accurate positions for 17124 galaxies (Paturel+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturel, G.; Petit, C.; Garnier, R.; Prugniel, P.

    2000-04-01

    This paper gives accurate coordinates and diameters for 3301 galaxies, companions of UGC galaxies. (about 2764 companions were not yet available in electronic form). In addition previously poor equatorial coordinates are re-measured for 13823 galaxies. These coordinates which have an accuracy of 5'' or better will be used for facilitating the cross-identification with forthcoming catalogues of millions of galaxies. (2 data files).

  15. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  16. The fraction of BL Lacertae objects in groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, H.

    2016-06-01

    Context. BL Lac objects are a rare class of active galactic nuclei that typically show featureless optical spectra that make it difficult to estimate the redshift. A novel method for estimating the redshift of BL Lac objects has recently been proposed which assumes that these objects typically reside in groups of galaxies. Aims: The aim of this work is to estimate the fraction of BL Lac objects that reside in groups of galaxies. Methods: We use a sample of groups (M12 catalogue) selected by applying a friends-of-friends algorithm in the SDSS DR12. Galaxies in the M12 sample were cross-correlated with the sample of blazars in the BZCAT. We found that 121 galaxies in the M12 catalogue are blazars in the BZCAT sample, all but one are BL Lac objects, and a large fraction are classified as BL Lac-galaxy dominated. Results: Analysing the fraction of galaxies in groups as a function of redshift we have estimated a correction factor that takes into account the typical incompleteness of the catalogues based on the friends-of-friends algorithm. Once this factor was applied to the sample of BL Lac objects with a counterpart in the M12 catalogue, we found that the percentage of BL Lac objects in groups is ≳ 67 ± 8%. Conclusions: The high rate of BL Lac objects in groups found in this work strongly supports a recent method that has successfully estimated the redshift of BL Lac objects with featureless spectra.

  17. Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of site information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This document represents a catalogue of site information for the Crustal Dynamics Project. It contains information and descriptions of those sites used by the Project as observing stations for making the precise geodetic measurements useful for studies of the Earth's crustal movements and deformation.

  18. Nontraditional Resources Catalogue: Opening Trade Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jeanne Harber, Ed.

    This catalogue provides a list of resources relevant to non-traditional careers, including work pattern information on flextime, job sharing, and industry-supported child care. The printed and audiovisual materials highlight journal articles, films, publications, test preparations, slides, cassettes, apprenticeship information centers, and Women's…

  19. Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, M.; Figon, P.; Meyssonnier, N.

    1995-12-01

    We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocities by Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogue of spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star, when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set of Identifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) of the CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the number HIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number (Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) by Dommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study has been done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out the problems we have had to deal with.

  20. Multiwavelength studies of Markarian galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.

    2013-10-01

    Markarian galaxies are the result of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) conducted in 1965-1980 by B.E. Markarian et al. The sample consists of 1515 UV-excess galaxies containing many active galaxies, both AGN and starburst (SB) galaxies that are interesting from the point of view of galaxy evolution and multiwavelength studies. Several catalogs of Markarian galaxies have been published; however, multiwavelength (MW) data were not provided and matched for more efficient investigations. Moreover, SDSS spectra now give possibility for better classification by activity types, and we have accomplished fine classification obtaining new types and subtypes for most of the objects. We have cross-correlated the Markarian catalogue with all available large-area MW catalogues at various wavelengths, from X-ray to radio: ROSAT BSC and FSC, GALEX, APM, MAPS, USNO B1.0, GSC 2.3.2, SDSS, 2MASS PSC and ESC, WISE, AKARI-IRC, IRAS PSC, FSC, and SSSC, AKARI-FIS, GB6, NVSS, FIRST, SUMSS, WENSS, and 7C providing 35 photometric data-points, as well as the Digitized FBS (DFBS, http://byurakan.phys.uniroma1.it/) and Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) low-dispersion spectra. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) services have been used for cross-correlations and extraction of DFBS spectra; MW SEDs have been built using the IVOA tools, and MW classification has been accomplished. Diagrams with MW flux ratios have been built to reveal objects with extreme characteristics. The classifications have been matched with these flux ratios. A MW catalog of Markarian galaxies has been compiled.

  1. A 1500 deg2 near infrared proper motion catalogue from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh; Lucas, P. W.; Burningham, B.; Jones, H. R. A.; Smart, R. L.; Andrei, A. H.; Catalán, S.; Pinfield, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) began in 2005, with the start of the UKIDSS programme as a 7 year effort to survey roughly 4000 deg2 at high Galactic latitudes in Y, J, H and K bands. The survey also included a significant quantity of two epoch J band observations, with an epoch baseline greater than 2 years to calculate proper motions. We present a near-infrared proper motion catalogue for the 1500 deg2 of the two epoch LAS data, which includes 135 625 stellar sources and a further 88 324 with ambiguous morphological classifications, all with motions detected above the 5σ level. We developed a custom proper motion pipeline which we describe here. Our catalogue agrees well with the proper motion data supplied for a 300 deg2 subset in the current Wide Field Camera Science Archive (WSA) 10th data release (DR10) catalogue, and in various optical catalogues, but it benefits from a larger matching radius and hence a larger upper proper motion detection limit. We provide absolute proper motions, using LAS galaxies for the relative to absolute correction. By using local second-order polynomial transformations, as opposed to linear transformations in the WSA, we correct better for any local distortions in the focal plane, not including the radial distortion that is removed by the UKIDSS pipeline. We present the results of proper motion searches for new brown dwarfs and white dwarfs. We discuss 41 sources in the WSA DR10 overlap with our catalogue with proper motions >300 mas yr-1, several of which are new detections. We present 15 new candidate ultracool dwarf binary systems.

  2. Unusual flux-distance relationship for pulsars suggested by analysis of the Australia national telescopy facility pulsar catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Perez, M R; Singleton, J; Ardavan, H; Ardavan, A

    2009-01-01

    We analyze pulsar fluxes at 1400 MHz (S(1400)) and distances d taken from the Australia National Telescope Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue. Under the assumption that pulsar populations in different parts of the Galaxy are similar, we find that either (a) pulsar fluxes diminish with distance according to a non-standard power law (we suggest S(1400){proportional_to} 1/d rather than {proportional_to} 1/d{sup 2}) or (b) that there are very significant (i.e. order of magnitude) errors in the distance estimates quoted in the ATNF Catalogue. The former conclusion (a) supports a recent model for pulsar emission that has also successfully explained the frequency spectrum of the Crab pulsar over 16 orders of magnitude of frequency, whilst alternative (b) would necessitate a radical re-evaluation of both the dispersion method for estimating pulsar distances and current ideas about the distribution of pulsars within our Galaxy.

  3. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  4. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  5. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  6. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  7. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  8. A Comparative Study of the Guo Shoujing Star Catalogue and the Ulugh Beg Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    The Chinese Star Catalogue by Guo Shoujing (1231-1316) contained equatorial coordinates of 678 stars, more than doubled the number of stars in previous Chinese star catalogues. In the period 1420-1437, using astronomical instruments at Samarkand Observatory, Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) made independent observations and determined star positions of 1018 stars. An analysis of two star catalogues will show the observational techniques behind them and their accuracies. Both astronomers tried to increase accuracy of measurement by enlarging the astronomical instruments. The Chinese catalogue gives equatorial coordinates of stars. The coordinates were directly read off the armillary sphere, which was mounted equatorially mounted. Sun Xiaochun (1996) suggested that the data of the existent Guo Shoujing catalogue was actually observed around 1380, at the beginning of the Ming dynasty. The Ulugh Beg catalogue gives ecliptic coordinates of stars. Does this mean they were directly measured using an ecliptic instrument? Using Fourier analysis we discover a 3 arc minute systematic error in the declinations, which are derived from the ecliptic coordinates, suggesting the data might be first measured equatorially and then converted to ecliptic coordinates, following Ptolemaic tradition. The 3 arc minute systematic error was caused by the misalignment of the instrument's pole and celestial north pole. And the Our comparative study might throw some light on transmission of astronomical knowledge and techniques between China and Central Asia in medieval times.

  9. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except

  10. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS nearby galaxies morphologies (Yoshino+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, A.; Yamauchi, C.

    2015-01-01

    These catalogues are intended to study statistically Box/Peanut or Bar structures in edge-on or face-on nearby galaxies, containing values of surface brightness parameters of model galaxy, coordinate, redshift, morphology and matched PGC number for edge-on or face-on nearby galaxies in g, r and i-band selected from SDSS DR7. table1[gri].dat are the catalogues for edge-on galaxies in g, r and i-band, respectively. table2[gri].dat are those for face-on galaxies. table3[gri].dat contain only Box/Peanut galaxies extracted from table1[gri].dat. table4[gri].dat contain only Barred galaxies extracted from table2[gri].dat. (12 data files).

  12. RECONSTRUCTING THE INITIAL DENSITY FIELD OF THE LOCAL UNIVERSE: METHODS AND TESTS WITH MOCK CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang Xiaohu; Van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2013-07-20

    Our research objective in this paper is to reconstruct an initial linear density field, which follows the multivariate Gaussian distribution with variances given by the linear power spectrum of the current cold dark matter model and evolves through gravitational instabilities to the present-day density field in the local universe. For this purpose, we develop a Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to obtain the linear density field from a posterior probability function that consists of two components: a prior of a Gaussian density field with a given linear spectrum and a likelihood term that is given by the current density field. The present-day density field can be reconstructed from galaxy groups using the method developed in Wang et al. Using a realistic mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, obtained by populating dark matter halos in the Millennium simulation (MS) with galaxies, we show that our method can effectively and accurately recover both the amplitudes and phases of the initial, linear density field. To examine the accuracy of our method, we use N-body simulations to evolve these reconstructed initial conditions to the present day. The resimulated density field thus obtained accurately matches the original density field of the MS in the density range 0.3{approx}<{rho}/ {rho}-bar {approx}<20 without any significant bias. In particular, the Fourier phases of the resimulated density fields are tightly correlated with those of the original simulation down to a scale corresponding to a wavenumber of {approx}1 h Mpc{sup -1}, much smaller than the translinear scale, which corresponds to a wavenumber of {approx}0.15 h Mpc{sup -1}.

  13. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  14. Neutron spectrum from the little boy mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Robba, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Most of the human exposure data used for setting radiation protection guidelines have been obtained by following the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Proper evaluation of these data requires estimates of the radiation exposure received by those survivors. Until now neutron dose estimates have relied primarily on calculations as no measurements of the leakage neutron flux or neutron spectrum were available. We have measured the high-energy leakage neutron spectrum from a mock-up of the Little Boy device operating at delayed critical. The measurements are compared with Monte Carlo calculations of the leakage neutron spectrum.

  15. Automated physical classification in the SDSS DR10. A catalogue of candidate quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss whether modern machine learning methods can be used to characterize the physical nature of the large number of objects sampled by the modern multiband digital surveys. In particular, we applied the MLPQNA (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm) method to the optical data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10, investigating whether photometric data alone suffice to disentangle different classes of objects as they are defined in the SDSS spectroscopic classification. We discuss three groups of classification problems: (i) the simultaneous classification of galaxies, quasars and stars; (ii) the separation of stars from quasars; (iii) the separation of galaxies with normal spectral energy distribution from those with peculiar spectra, such as starburst or star-forming galaxies and AGN. While confirming the difficulty of disentangling AGN from normal galaxies on a photometric basis only, MLPQNA proved to be quite effective in the three-class separation. In disentangling quasars from stars and galaxies, our method achieved an overall efficiency of 91.31 per cent and a QSO class purity of ˜95 per cent. The resulting catalogue of candidate quasars/AGNs consists of ˜3.6 million objects, of which about half a million are also flagged as robust candidates, and will be made available on CDS VizieR facility.

  16. Seachable Solar Feature Catalogues in EGSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Aboudarham, J.; Zharkov, S. I.; Ipson, S. S.; Benkhalil, A. K.; Fuller, N.

    2004-12-01

    The searchable Solar Feature Catalogues (SFC) developed using automated pattern recognition techniques from digitized solar images are presented. The techniques were applied for detection of sunspots, active regions, filaments and line-on-sight magnetic neutral lines in the automatically standardized full disk solar images in Ca II K1, Ca II K3 and Ha taken at the Meudon Observatory and white light images and magnetograms from SOHO/MDI. The results of automated recognition were verified with the manual synoptic maps and available statistical data that revealed good detection accuracy. Based on the recognized parameters a structured database of the Solar Feature Catalogues was built on a mysql server for every feature and published with various pre-designed search pages on the Bradford University web site. The SFCs with 10 year coverage (1996-2005) is to be used for deeper investigation of the solar activity, activity feature classification and forecast.

  17. Grid Enabled Geospatial Catalogue Web Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ai-Jun; Di, Li-Ping; Wei, Ya-Xing; Liu, Yang; Bui, Yu-Qi; Hu, Chau-Min; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    Geospatial Catalogue Web Service is a vital service for sharing and interoperating volumes of distributed heterogeneous geospatial resources, such as data, services, applications, and their replicas over the web. Based on the Grid technology and the Open Geospatial Consortium (0GC) s Catalogue Service - Web Information Model, this paper proposes a new information model for Geospatial Catalogue Web Service, named as GCWS which can securely provides Grid-based publishing, managing and querying geospatial data and services, and the transparent access to the replica data and related services under the Grid environment. This information model integrates the information model of the Grid Replica Location Service (RLS)/Monitoring & Discovery Service (MDS) with the information model of OGC Catalogue Service (CSW), and refers to the geospatial data metadata standards from IS0 19115, FGDC and NASA EOS Core System and service metadata standards from IS0 191 19 to extend itself for expressing geospatial resources. Using GCWS, any valid geospatial user, who belongs to an authorized Virtual Organization (VO), can securely publish and manage geospatial resources, especially query on-demand data in the virtual community and get back it through the data-related services which provide functions such as subsetting, reformatting, reprojection etc. This work facilitates the geospatial resources sharing and interoperating under the Grid environment, and implements geospatial resources Grid enabled and Grid technologies geospatial enabled. It 2!so makes researcher to focus on science, 2nd not cn issues with computing ability, data locztic, processir,g and management. GCWS also is a key component for workflow-based virtual geospatial data producing.

  18. The HIPASS catalogue - II. Completeness, reliability and parameter accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwaan, M. A.; Meyer, M. J.; Webster, R. L.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Barnes, D. G.; Bhathal, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Garcia, D. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Harnett, J.; Henning, P. A.; Howlett, M.; Jerjen, H.; Kesteven, M. J.; Kilborn, V. A.; Knezek, P. M.; Koribalski, B. S.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Minchin, R. F.; O'Brien, J.; Oosterloo, T.; Pierce, M. J.; Price, R. M.; Putman, M. E.; Ryan-Weber, E.; Ryder, S. D.; Sadler, E. M.; Stevens, J.; Stewart, I. M.; Stootman, F.; Waugh, M.; Wright, A. E.

    2004-06-01

    The HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) is a blind extragalactic HI 21-cm emission-line survey covering the whole southern sky from declination -90° to +25°. The HIPASS catalogue (HICAT), containing 4315 HI-selected galaxies from the region south of declination +2°, is presented in Meyer et al. (Paper I). This paper describes in detail the completeness and reliability of HICAT, which are calculated from the recovery rate of synthetic sources and follow-up observations, respectively. HICAT is found to be 99 per cent complete at a peak flux of 84 mJy and an integrated flux of 9.4 Jy km s-1. The overall reliability is 95 per cent, but rises to 99 per cent for sources with peak fluxes >58 mJy or integrated flux >8.2 Jy km s-1. Expressions are derived for the uncertainties on the most important HICAT parameters: peak flux, integrated flux, velocity width and recessional velocity. The errors on HICAT parameters are dominated by the noise in the HIPASS data, rather than by the parametrization procedure.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered into a mock-up of the Shuttle payload bay on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left. To the right is another simulation of the Hubble Telescope.

  20. Mock-ups of USSR Soyuz spacecraft on display at Star City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Two mock-ups of the USSR Soyuz spacecraft which are on display at the Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City) near Moscow. The spherical-shaped section of the Soyuz is called the orbital module. The middle section with the lettering 'CCCP' (USSR) on it is called the descent vehicle. Two solar panels extend out from the instrument-assembly module. A docking module mock-up is atop the Soyuz training mock-up on the left.

  1. An infrared imaging study of galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Albert D.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Mcleod, Kim K.

    1995-01-01

    This poster was a preliminary report on a survey of galaxies in the local universe at J and K using a NICMOS3 256 x 256 infrared photometric camera attached to the 61 inch telescope on Mt. Bigelow. Deep images are being obtained for a representative sample of galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalogue. Structural and color parameters are determined for a wide variety of galactic types. These data should prove to be valuable in characterizing stellar populations within disks and bulges, determining if IR-active galaxies have unusual global as well as- nuclear properties, and understanding the effects of evolution and redshift dimming in distant galaxies.

  2. Introducing GRACE Follow-On mock data challenge project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbeheshti, Neda; Naeimi, Majid; Hewitson, Martin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Flury, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    GRACE Follow-On satellites will be launched in 2017. Equipped with the additional Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) sensor, GRACE Follow-On is expected to reach even better spatial and temporal resolution for the Earth's gravity field. GRACE Follow-On mock data challenge project is part of the geo-Q project at Leibniz Universität Hannover and plans several runs of data challenges for GRACE Follow-On. The challenges are coordinated from simple gravity field recovery in 2015 to more advanced forms when LRI noise model will be added in 2016 challenge. The aim of these challenges is to engage different research centers around the world to test their methods for gravity field recovery from simulated data which will lead to develop data analysis tools and capabilities for GRACE follow-On data. In this contribution we introduce the mock data challenge project for GRACE and GRACE Follow-On. The highlights and objectives of the challenges will be given, with the details about the webpage and data exchange for the participants.

  3. The star catalogue of Hevelius. Machine-readable version and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    The catalogue by Johannes Hevelius with the positions and magnitudes of 1564 entries was published by his wife Elisabeth Koopman in 1690. We provide a machine-readable version of the catalogue, and briefly discuss its accuracy on the basis of comparison with data from the modern Hipparcos Catalogue. We compare our results with an earlier analysis by Rybka (1984), finding good overall agreement. The magnitudes given by Hevelius correlate well with modern values. The accuracy of his position measurements is similar to that of Brahe, with σ = 2´ for longitudes and latitudes, but with more errors >5´ than expected for a Gaussian distribution. The position accuracy decreases slowly with magnitude. The fraction of stars with position errors larger than a degree is 1.5%, rather smaller than the fraction of 5% in the star catalogue of Brahe. Star catalogue of Hevelius is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/516/A29

  4. Lyman-α emitters in the context of hierarchical galaxy formation: predictions for VLT/MUSE surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, T.; Guiderdoni, B.; Blaizot, J.

    2016-02-01

    The VLT/Multi Unit Spectrograph Explorer (MUSE) integral-field spectrograph can detect Lyα emitters (LAE) in the redshift range 2.8 ≲ z ≲ 6.7 in a homogeneous way. Ongoing MUSE surveys will notably probe faint Lyα sources that are usually missed by current narrow-band surveys. We provide quantitative predictions for a typical wedding-cake observing strategy with MUSE based on mock catalogues generated with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation coupled to numerical Lyα radiation transfer models in gas outflows. We expect ≈1500 bright LAEs (FLyα ≳ 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2) in a typical shallow field (SF) survey carried over ≈100 arcmin2 , and ≈2000 sources as faint as 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 in a medium-deep field (MDF) survey over 10 arcmin2 . In a typical deep field (DF) survey of 1 arcmin2 , we predict that ≈500 extremely faint LAEs (FLyα ≳ 4 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2) will be found. Our results suggest that faint Lyα sources contribute significantly to the cosmic Lyα luminosity and SFR budget. While the host haloes of bright LAEs at z ≈ 3 and 6 have descendants with median masses of 2 × 1012 and 5 × 1013 M⊙, respectively, the faintest sources detectable by MUSE at these redshifts are predicted to reside in haloes which evolve into typical sub-L* and L* galaxy haloes at z = 0. We expect typical DF and MDF surveys to uncover the building blocks of Milky Way-like objects, even probing the bulk of the stellar mass content of LAEs located in their progenitor haloes at z ≈ 3.

  5. Matching radio catalogues with realistic geometry: application to SWIRE and ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Dongwei; Budavári, Tamás; Norris, Ray P.; Hopkins, Andrew M.

    2015-08-01

    Cross-matching catalogues at different wavelengths is a difficult problem in astronomy, especially when the objects are not point-like. At radio wavelengths, an object can have several components corresponding, for example, to a core and lobes. Considering not all radio detections correspond to visible or infrared sources, matching these catalogues can be challenging. Traditionally, this is done by eye for better quality, which does not scale to the large data volumes expected from the next-generation of radio telescopes. We present a novel automated procedure, using Bayesian hypothesis testing, to achieve reliable associations by explicit modelling of a particular class of radio-source morphology. The new algorithm not only assesses the likelihood of an association between data at two different wavelengths, but also tries to assess whether different radio sources are physically associated, are double-lobed radio galaxies, or just distinct nearby objects. Application to the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic and Australia Telescope Large Area Survey CDF-S catalogues shows that this method performs well without human intervention.

  6. The BMW (Brera-Multiscale-Wavelet) Catalogue of Serendipitous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzati, Davide; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Israel, Gian L.; Guzzo, Luigi; Mignani, Roberto; Moretti, Alberto; Panzera, Maria R.; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    In collaboration with the Observatories of Palermo and Rome and the SAX-SDC we are constructing a multi-site interactive archive system featuring specific analysis tools. In this context we developed a detection algorithm based on the Wavelet Transform (WT) and performed a systematic analysis of all ROSATHRI public data (˜3100 observations +1000 to come). The WT is specifically suitable to detect and characterize extended sources while properly detecting point sources in very crowded fields. Moreover, the good angular resolution of HRI images allows the source extension and position to be accurately determined. This effort has produced the BMW (Brera Multiscale Wavelet) catalogue, with more than 19,000 sources detected at the ˜4.2σ level. For each source detection we have information on the X-ray flux and extension, allowing for instance to select complete samples of extended X-ray sources such as candidate clusters of galaxies or SNR's. Details about the detection algorithm and the catalogue can be found in Lazzati et al. 1999 and Campana et al. 1999. Here we shall present an overview of first results from several undergoing projects which make use of the BMW catalogue.

  7. Void galaxy properties depending on void filament straightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the properties of galaxies belonging to the filaments in cosmic void regions, using the void catalogue constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the SDSS DR7. To identify galaxy filaments within a void, voids with 30 or more galaxies are selected as a sample. We identify 3172 filaments in 1055 voids by applying the filament finding algorithm utilizing minimal spanning tree (MST) which is an unique linear pattern into which connects all the galaxies in a void. We study the correlations between galaxy properties and the specific size of filament which quantifies the degree of the filament straightness. For example, the average magnitude and the magnitude of the faintest galaxy in filament decrease as the straightness of the filament increases. We also find that the correlations become stronger in rich filaments with many member galaxies than in poor ones. We discuss a physical explanation to our findings and their cosmological implications.

  8. The Far-Infrared Properties of the Most Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sulentic, J.; Leon, S.; Espada, D.; Bergond, G.; García, E.; Sabater, J.; Santander-Vela, J. D.; Verley, S.

    2007-05-01

    A long-standing question in galaxy evolution involves the role of nature (self-regulation) vs. nurture (environment) on the observed properties (and evolution) of galaxies. A collaboration centreed at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (Granada, Spain) is trying to address this question by producing a observational database for a sample of 1050 isolated galaxies from the catalogue of Karachentseva (1973) with the overarching goal being the generation of a "zero-point" sample against which effects of environment on galaxies can be assessed. The AMIGA (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies) database (see www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html) will include optical, IR and radio line and continuum measures. The galaxies in the sample represent the most isolated galaxies in the local universe. In the present contribution, we will present the project, as well as the results of an analysis of the far-infrared (FIR) and molecular gas properties of this sample.

  9. The infrared database of extragalactic observables from Spitzer - I. The redshift catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Rupke, David S. N.; Barry, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of a series of papers on the Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS). In this work, we describe the identification of optical counterparts of the infrared sources detected in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations, and the acquisition and validation of redshifts. The IDEOS sample includes all the spectra from the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources (CASSIS) of galaxies beyond the Local Group. Optical counterparts were identified from correlation of the extraction coordinates with the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED). To confirm the optical association and validate NED redshifts, we measure redshifts with unprecedented accuracy on the IRS spectra (σ(Δz/(1+z)) ˜ 0.0011) by using an improved version of the maximum combined pseudo-likelihood method (MCPL). We perform a multistage verification of redshifts that considers alternate NED redshifts, the MCPL redshift, and visual inspection of the IRS spectrum. The statistics is as follows: the IDEOS sample contains 3361 galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 6.42 (mean: 0.48, median: 0.14). We confirm the default NED redshift for 2429 sources and identify 124 with incorrect NED redshifts. We obtain IRS-based redshifts for 568 IDEOS sources without optical spectroscopic redshifts, including 228 with no previous redshift measurements. We provide the entire IDEOS redshift catalogue in machine-readable formats. The catalogue condenses our compilation and verification effort, and includes our final evaluation on the most likely redshift for each source, its origin, and reliability estimates.

  10. A photometric catalogue of quasars and other point sources in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Sheelu; Philip, Ninan Sajeeth; Kembhavi, Ajit; Wadadekar, Yogesh G.; Sinha, Rita

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalogue of about six million unresolved photometric detections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release, classifying them into stars, galaxies and quasars. We use a machine learning classifier trained on a subset of spectroscopically confirmed objects from 14th to 22nd magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our catalogue consists of 2 430 625 quasars, 3 544 036 stars and 63 586 unresolved galaxies from 14th to 24th magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our algorithm recovers 99.96 per cent of spectroscopically confirmed quasars and 99.51 per cent of stars to i ˜ 21.3 in the colour window that we study. The level of contamination due to data artefacts for objects beyond i = 21.3 is highly uncertain and all mention of completeness and contamination in the paper are valid only for objects brighter than this magnitude. However, a comparison of the predicted number of quasars with the theoretical number counts shows reasonable agreement.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometric Classification Catalogue of SDSS DR7 (Abraham+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, S.; Philip, N. S.; Kembhavi, A.; Wadadekar, Y. G.; Sinha, R.

    2012-04-01

    We present a catalogue of about six million unresolved photometric detections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release, classifying them into stars, galaxies and quasars. We use a machine learning classifier trained on a subset of spectroscopically confirmed objects from 14th to 22nd magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our catalogue consists of 2430625 quasars, 3544036 stars and 63586 unresolved galaxies from 14th to 24th magnitude in the SDSS i-band. Our algorithm recovers 99.96 per cent of spectroscopically confirmed quasars and 99.51 per cent of stars to i~21.3 in the colour window that we study. The level of contamination due to data artefacts for objects beyond i=21.3 is highly uncertain and all mention of completeness and contamination in the paper are valid only for objects brighter than this magnitude. However, a comparison of the predicted number of quasars with the theoretical number counts shows reasonable agreement. (2 data files).

  12. Morphology of galaxies in the WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, G.; Vanzella, E.; Dressler, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moles, M.; Bettoni, D.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Varela, J.; Couch, W. J.; Kjærgaard, P.; Fritz, J.; Omizzolo, A.; Cava, A.

    2012-02-01

    We present the morphological catalogue of galaxies in nearby clusters of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-clusters Survey (WINGS). The catalogue contains a total number of 39 923 galaxies, for which we provide the automated estimates of the morphological type, applying the purposely devised tool MORPHOT to the V-band WINGS imaging. For ˜3000 galaxies we also provide visual estimates of the morphological type. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the description of the MORPHOT tool, whose application is limited, at least for the moment, to the WINGS imaging only. The approach of the tool to the automation of morphological classification is a non-parametric and fully empirical one. In particular, MORPHOT exploits 21 morphological diagnostics, directly and easily computable from the galaxy image, to provide two independent classifications: one based on a maximum likelihood (ML), semi-analytical technique and the other one on a neural network (NN) machine. A suitably selected sample of ˜1000 visually classified WINGS galaxies is used to calibrate the diagnostics for the ML estimator and as a training set in the NN machine. The final morphological estimator combines the two techniques and proves to be effective both when applied to an additional test sample of ˜1000 visually classified WINGS galaxies and when compared with small samples of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified by Fukugita et al. and Nair et al. Finally, besides the galaxy morphology distribution (corrected for field contamination) in the WINGS clusters, we present the ellipticity (ɛ), colour (B-V) and Sersic index (n) distributions for different morphological types, as well as the morphological fractions as a function of the clustercentric distance (in units of R200).

  13. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : Looking at the early stages of star-formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.I will briefly describe the colour detection method used to extract the Galactic cold sources, i.e., the Cold Core Colour Detection Tool (CoCoCoDeT, Montier et al. 2010), and its application to the Planck data. I will discuss the statistical distribution of the properties of the PGCC sources (in terms of dust temperature, distance, mass, density and luminosity), which illustrates that the PGCC catalogue spans a large variety of environments and objects, from molecular clouds to cold cores, and covers various stages of evolution. The Planck catalogue is a very powerful tool to study the formation and the evolution of prestellar objects and star-forming regions.I will finally present an overview of the Herschel Key Program Galactic Cold Cores (PI. M.Juvela), which allowed us to follow-up about 350 Planck Galactic Cold Clumps, in various stages of evolution and environments. With this program, the nature and the composition of the 5' Planck sources have been revealed at a sub-arcmin resolution, showing very different configurations, such as starless cold cores or multiple Young Stellar objects still embedded in their cold envelope.

  14. The first mock data challenge for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsky, A.; Hewitson, M.; Ferraioli, L.; Wanner, G.; Nofrarias, M.; Hueller, M.; Diepholz, I.; Grynagier, A.; Armano, M.; Benedetti, M.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Cavalleri, A.; Ciani, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Dolesi, R.; Fauste, J.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; García, A.; García, C.; Guzmán, F.; Fitzsimons, E.; Heinzel, G.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Jennrich, O.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Lobo, A.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Racca, G. D.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Robertson, D.; Sanjuan, J.; Schulte, M. O.; Shaul, D. N. A.; Smit, M.; Stagnaro, L.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Tateo, N.; Tombolato, D.; Vischer, G.; Vitale, S.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2009-05-01

    The data analysis of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) will comprise a series of discrete experiments, each focusing on a particular noise measurement or characterization of the instrument in various operating modes. Each of these experiments must be analysed and planned in advance of the mission because the results of a given experiment will have an impact on those that follow. As such, a series of mock data challenges (MDCs) will be developed and carried out with the aim of preparing the analysis tools and optimizing the various planned analyses. The first of these MDCs (MDC1) is a simplified treatment of the dynamics along the axis joining the two test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder. The validation of the dynamical model by predicting the spectra of the interferometer output data is shown, a prediction for the data analysis is calculated and, finally, several simulated interferometer data sets are analysed and calibrated to equivalent out-of-loop test mass acceleration.

  15. Mock LISA data challenge for the Galactic white dwarf binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Blaut, Arkadiusz; Babak, Stanislav; Krolak, Andrzej

    2010-03-15

    We present data analysis methods used in the detection and estimation of parameters of gravitational-wave signals from the white dwarf binaries in the mock LISA data challenge. Our main focus is on the analysis of challenge 3.1, where the gravitational-wave signals from more than 6x10{sup 7} Galactic binaries were added to the simulated Gaussian instrumental noise. The majority of the signals at low frequencies are not resolved individually. The confusion between the signals is strongly reduced at frequencies above 5 mHz. Our basic data analysis procedure is the maximum likelihood detection method. We filter the data through the template bank at the first step of the search, then we refine parameters using the Nelder-Mead algorithm, we remove the strongest signal found and we repeat the procedure. We detect reliably and estimate parameters accurately of more than ten thousand signals from white dwarf binaries.

  16. Project W-314 performance mock-up test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    CARRATT, R.T.

    1999-06-24

    The purpose of this Procedure is to assist construction in the pre-operational fabrication and testing of the pit leak detection system and the low point drain assembly by: (1) Control system testing of the pit leak detection system will be accomplished by actuating control switches and verifying that the control signal is initiated, liquid testing and overall operational requirements stated in HNF-SD-W314-PDS-003, ''Project Development Specification for Pit Leak Detection''. (2) Testing of the low point floor drain assembly by opening and closing the drain to and from the ''retracted'' and ''sealed'' positions. Successful operation of this drain will be to verify that the seal does not leak on the ''sealed'' position, the assembly holds liquid until the leak detector actuates and the assembly will operate from on top of the mock-up cover block.

  17. Advanced smile diagnostics using CAD/CAM mock-ups.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostics are essential for predictable restorative dentistry. Both patient and clinician must agree on a treatment goal before the final restorations are delivered to avoid future disappointments. However, fully understanding the patient's desires is difficult. A useful tool to overcome this problem is the diagnostic wax-up and mock-up. A potential treatment outcome is modeled in wax prior to treatment and transferred into the patient's mouth using silicon indexes and autopolymerizing resin to obtain the patient's approval. Yet, this time-consuming procedure only produces a single version of the possible treatment outcome, which can be unsatisfactory for both the patient and the restorative team. Contemporary digital technologies may provide advantageous features to aid in this diagnostic treatment step. This article reviews opportunities digital technologies offer in the diagnostic phase, and presents clinical cases to illustrate the procedures. PMID:26171442

  18. The Status of the Mock LISA Data Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2009-01-01

    For the last four years, many gravitational-wave researchers around the world have participated in the Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDCs), a program to demonstrate and encourage the development of LISA data-analysis capabilities, tools and techniques. In this poster, we present a summary of the results of MLDC 3, which was completed in 2009. During MLDC 3, 27 participants from 15 institutions successfully analyzed data sets that included Galactic binaries, coalescing spinning massive black holes, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, cosmic-string cusp bursts and a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We also describe the technical and scientific challenges that will be addressed by future MLI)Cs, starting with MLDC 4, which is currently in progress.

  19. The Mock LISA Data Challenges: History, Status, Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallisneri, Michele; Babak, Stas; Baker, John; Benacquista, Matt; Cornish, Neil; Crowder, Jeff; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane; Littenberg, Tyson; Porter, Edward; Vecchio, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance for the Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDC). Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a gravitational wave (GW) observatory that will return data such that data analysis is integral to the measurement concept. Further rationale of the MLDC are to kickstart the development of a LISA data-analysis computational infrastructure, and to encourage, track, and compare progress in LISA data-analysis development in the open community. The MLDCs is a coordinated, voluntary effort in GW community, that will periodically issue datasets with synthetic noise and GW signals from sources of undisclosed parameters; increasing difficulty. The challenge participants return parameter estimates and descriptions of search methods. Some of the challenges and the resultant entries are reviewed. The aim is to show that LISA data analysis is possible, and to develop new techniques, using multiple international teams for the development of LISA core analysis tools

  20. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  1. Report on the second Mock LISA data challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, Stanislav; Baker, John G.; Benacquista, Matthew J.; Cornish, Neil J.; Crowder, Jeff; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane L.; Littenberg, Tyson B.; Porter, Edward K.; Vallisneri, Michele; Vecchio, Alberto; data challenge task force, the Mock LISA; Auger, Gerard; Barack, Leor; Błaut, Arkadiusz; Bloomer, Ed; Brown, Duncan A.; Christensen, Nelson; Clark, James; Fairhurst, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan R.; Halloin, Hubert; Hendry, Martin; Jimenez, Arturo; Królak, Andrzej; Mandel, Ilya; Messenger, Chris; Meyer, Renate; Mohanty, Soumya; Nayak, Rajesh; Petiteau, Antoine; Pitkin, Matt; Plagnol, Eric; Prix, Reinhard; Robinson, Emma L.; Roever, Christian; Savov, Pavlin; Stroeer, Alexander; Toher, Jennifer; Veitch, John; Vinet, Jean–Yves; Wen, Linqing; Whelan, John T.; Woan, Graham; Challenge-2 participants, the

    2008-06-01

    The Mock LISA data challenges are a program to demonstrate LISA data-analysis capabilities and to encourage their development. Each round of challenges consists of several data sets containing simulated instrument noise and gravitational waves from sources of undisclosed parameters. Participants are asked to analyze the data sets and report the maximum information about the source parameters. The challenges are being released in rounds of increasing complexity and realism: here we present the results of Challenge 2, issued in Jan 2007, which successfully demonstrated the recovery of signals from nonspinning supermassive-black-hole binaries with optimal SNRs between ~10 and 2000, from ~20 000 overlapping galactic white-dwarf binaries (among a realistically distributed population of 26 million), and from the extreme-mass-ratio inspirals of compact objects into central galactic black holes with optimal SNRs ~100.

  2. Mock LISA data challenge for the Galactic white dwarf binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaut, Arkadiusz; Babak, Stanislav; Królak, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    We present data analysis methods used in the detection and estimation of parameters of gravitational-wave signals from the white dwarf binaries in the mock LISA data challenge. Our main focus is on the analysis of challenge 3.1, where the gravitational-wave signals from more than 6×107 Galactic binaries were added to the simulated Gaussian instrumental noise. The majority of the signals at low frequencies are not resolved individually. The confusion between the signals is strongly reduced at frequencies above 5 mHz. Our basic data analysis procedure is the maximum likelihood detection method. We filter the data through the template bank at the first step of the search, then we refine parameters using the Nelder-Mead algorithm, we remove the strongest signal found and we repeat the procedure. We detect reliably and estimate parameters accurately of more than ten thousand signals from white dwarf binaries.

  3. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    We present the BMW-Chandra Source Catalogue drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by \\citep{Lazzatiea99} and \\citep{Campanaea99}, which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources which were visually inspected and verified. Among them, 16758 are not associated with the targets of the pointings and are considered certain; they have a 0.5-10 keV absorption corrected flux distribution median of ˜ 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue consists of source positions, count rates, extensions and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard band, 2-7 keV), as well as the additional information drawn from the headers of the original files. We also extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, (0.5-1.0 keV, 1.0-2.0 keV, 2.0-4.0 keV and 4.0-7.0 keV). We compute the sky coverage in the soft and hard bands. The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) of ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ˜ 2 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~xanadu/BMC/bmc_home.html

  4. Associations Between the Ancient Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dennis W.

    2002-07-01

    There are just two substantial sources of star coordinates preserved for us from antiquity: the star catalogue of Ptolemy's Almagest, and the rising, setting, and culmination phenomena, along with some star declinations and right ascensions, from Hipparchus' Commentary to Aratus. Given the controversy associated with the idea that Ptolemy's catalogue is, in whole or in substantial part, a copy of an earlier but now lost catalogue of Hipparchus, it is of interest to try to establish clear and significant associations, or the lack thereof, between the two sets of ancient star data. There have been two complementary efforts to clarify the possible associations. Vogt used the phenomena and declinations to reconstruct the ecliptical coordinates of some 122 stars in Hipparchus' Commentary that also appear in the Almagest catalogue. Vogt's conclusion was that since his reconstructed coordinates and the Almagest coordinates were, in general, different, Ptolemy did not obtain his data from Hipparchus. Vogt did notice five stars with very similar errors and concluded that Ptolemy probably did copy those from Hipparchus. More recently, however, Grasshoff has pointed out that there are several reasons to doubt Vogt's conclusion. Further, Grasshoff worked in the opposite direction, using the Almagest coordinates to compute the Hipparchan phenomena, and concluded, for two reasons, that the Almagest data and the Commentary data share a common origin. First, there are a number of stars that share large common errors, and it is highly unlikely that these agreements could be coincidental. Second, the correlation coefficients between the various error sets are typically large and statistically significant, and this also suggests a common origin of the two data sets. However, Grasshoff provided no analysis of the correlations to support this second conclusion. In this paper I will (1) analyze the correlations between the errors of the phenomena and the predictions of these phenomena

  5. Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars - 5th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Maselli, A.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Perri, M.; Giommi, P.; Piranomonte, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 5th Edition of the Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars is one of the most complete lists of Active Galactic Nuclei whose emission properties are recognised as typical of blazars. It includes the list of sources and an essential compilation of multifrequency data from radio to gamma rays. The source list for the entire sky is also available online at the ASDC web site (http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat/) where it is frequently updated to add new blazars and to improve the database.

  6. Catalogue of diffuse interstellar band measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Diffuse-band data have been collected from the literature and reduced statistically to a common measurement system, enabling correlation analyses to be made with a larger quantity of data than previously possible. A full listing of the catalogued data is presented, along with some discussion of the correlations. One important application of such studies is the identification of cases of peculiar diffuse-band behavior, and a table is given showing all cases of band strengths deviating by more than twice the mean dispersion from the best-fit correlations. This table may be useful in planning further observations.

  7. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  8. Mock Trials versus Management or Litigation-Driven Models of Business Law Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershuny, Pamela; McAllister, Charles; Rainey, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to gain a greater understanding of the learning outcomes associated with the mock trial as an active teaching method. Participating in a product liability mock trial presents students with the complex interplay of administrative regulations and common law. As in real life, the harsh constraints of time pressures, less than…

  9. The Rhetoric of Mock Trial Debate: Using Logos, Pathos and Ethos in Undergraduate Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Felicia R.

    2005-01-01

    While engaging in learning about roles of evidence, rules of procedure and case law, undergraduate mock trial students must also learn how to effectively communicate their evidence to the fact-finder. In mock trial, as in real courtroom trials in the United States legal system, communication skills and the ability to persuade are essential. This…

  10. Introducing Preservice Teachers to Issues Surrounding Evolution and Creationism via a Mock Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars J.; Hoover, John; Sheehan, James

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation between social studies and science education professors to introduce preservice teachers to the evolution versus creationism debate via a mock trial. Uses a hypothetical situation in which a 6th grade teacher was fired for not balancing evolution and creationism in his teaching. Reports that the mock trial slightly increased…

  11. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left.

  12. Statement of Facts for 1994 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Scott Walker v. Tanya Brewster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 23rd annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides the material for a mock civil trial over an accidental shooting. Thirteen-year-old T. J. Walker, Scott Walker's son from a previous marriage, visited the home of 5-year-old Jesse Walker with a pistol…

  13. "The Midnight Judges Ride Again": Marbury v. Madison. Mock Trial Prepared for Classroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Mary A.

    The goal of this mock trial is to dramatize the Federalists' struggle to strengthen their control over the judicial branch of the U.S. government after losing the Presidency and Congress in the 1800 election. This mock trial reveals the personalities of key historical figures, such as Jefferson, Madison, and Marshall and distinguishes how they…

  14. Fictitious and Excess Data in Principal Catalogues of Visual Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwot, Y. M.; Tessema, S. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present methods of detection of errors in catalogues of visual double stars. We also present results of their application to three principal catalogues of visual double and multiple stars, WDS, CCDM and TDSC. In particular we consider cases when positional information on components of a pair is contradictory, and when a double star or its component is included in a catalogue twice, under different names.

  15. Extending the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Instrumental Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Engdhal, Bob; Storchak, Dmitry; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harris, James

    2015-04-01

    After a 27-month project funded by the GEM Foundation (www.globalquakemodel.org), in January 2013 we released the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900 2009) (www.isc.ac.uk/iscgem/index.php) as a special product to use for seismic hazard studies. The new catalogue was necessary as improved seismic hazard studies necessitate that earthquake catalogues are homogeneous (to the largest extent possible) over time in their fundamental parameters, such as location and magnitude. Due to time and resource limitation, the ISC-GEM catalogue (1900-2009) included earthquakes selected according to the following time-variable cut-off magnitudes: Ms=7.5 for earthquakes occurring before 1918; Ms=6.25 between 1918 and 1963; and Ms=5.5 from 1964 onwards. Because of the importance of having a reliable seismic input for seismic hazard studies, funding from GEM and two commercial companies in the US and UK allowed us to start working on the extension of the ISC-GEM catalogue both for earthquakes that occurred beyond 2009 and for earthquakes listed in the International Seismological Summary (ISS) which fell below the cut-off magnitude of 6.25. This extension is part of a four-year program that aims at including in the ISC-GEM catalogue large global earthquakes that occurred before the beginning of the ISC Bulletin in 1964. In this contribution we present the updated ISC GEM catalogue, which will include over 1000 more earthquakes that occurred in 2010 2011 and several hundreds more between 1950 and 1959. The catalogue extension between 1935 and 1949 is currently underway. The extension of the ISC-GEM catalogue will also be helpful for regional cross border seismic hazard studies as the ISC-GEM catalogue should be used as basis for cross-checking the consistency in location and magnitude of those earthquakes listed both in the ISC GEM global catalogue and regional catalogues.

  16. Broad Absorption Line Quasar catalogues with Supervised Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, Simone; Cottis, Christopher E.; Knigge, Christian; Goad, Michael R.

    2008-12-01

    We have applied a Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm to SDSS DR5 quasar spectra in order to create a large catalogue of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). We first discuss the problems with BALQSO catalogues constructed using the conventional balnicity and/or absorption indices (BI and AI), and then describe the supervised LVQ network we have trained to recognise BALQSOs. The resulting BALQSO catalogue should be substantially more robust and complete than BI-or AI-based ones.

  17. Broad Absorption Line Quasar catalogues with Supervised Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Scaringi, Simone; Knigge, Christian; Cottis, Christopher E.; Goad, Michael R.

    2008-12-05

    We have applied a Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm to SDSS DR5 quasar spectra in order to create a large catalogue of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). We first discuss the problems with BALQSO catalogues constructed using the conventional balnicity and/or absorption indices (BI and AI), and then describe the supervised LVQ network we have trained to recognise BALQSOs. The resulting BALQSO catalogue should be substantially more robust and complete than BI-or AI-based ones.

  18. The Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue. III. Results after 54 months of sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A.; Ferrigno, C.; Maselli, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Romano, P.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Masetti, N.; Moretti, A.; Parisi, P.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We present the Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue obtained by analysing data acquired in the first 54 months of the Swift mission. Methods: Using our software dedicated to the analysis of data from coded mask telescopes, we analysed the BAT survey data in three energy bands (15-30 keV, 15-70 keV, 15-150 keV), obtaining a list of 1256 detections above a significance threshold of 4.8 standard deviations. The identification of the source counterparts is pursued using two strategies: the analysis of field observations of soft X-ray instruments and cross-correlation of our catalogue with source databases. Results: The survey covers 50% of the sky to a 15-150 keV flux limit of 1.0×10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 and 9.2×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 for |b| < 10° and |b| > 10°, respectively. The Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue includes 1079 (~86%) hard X-ray sources with an associated counterpart (26 with a double association and 2 with a triple association) and 177 BAT excesses (~14%) that still lack a counterpart. The distribution of the BAT sources among the different object classes consists of ~19% Galactic sources, ~57% extragalactic sources, and ~10% sources with a counterpart at softer energies whose nature has not yet been determined. About half of the BAT associated sources lack a counterpart in the ROSAT catalogues. This suggests that either moderate or strong absorption may be preventing their detection in the ROSAT energy band. The comparison of our BAT catalogue with the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalogue identifies 59 BAT/Fermi correspondences: 48 blazars, 3 Seyfert galaxies, 1 interacting galaxy, 3 high mass X-ray binaries, and 4 pulsars/supernova remnants. This small number of correspondences indicates that different populations make the sky shine in these two different energy bands. Catalogue is also available in electronic firm at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  19. Catalogues of variable stars from Parenago to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.

    2006-04-01

    After World War II, the International Astronomical Union made Soviet astronomers responsible for variable-star catalogues. This work has been continued ever since the first edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars compiled by the team headed by P.P. Parenago and B.V. Kukarkin and published in 1948. Currently, the catalogue work is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). This paper is a brief review of recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogues. Problems as well as new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys are discussed.

  20. The First Three Catalogues of Southern Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glen; Orchiston, W.; Walsh, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nicolas de la Caille, James Dunlop and John Herschel compiled the first three catalogues of southern star clusters and nebulae. Lacaille catalogued 42 objects from Cape Town, South Africa, in 1751 and 1752. Dunlop catalogued 629 objects from Parramatta, Australia, in 1826 and Herschel catalogued 1708 objects between 1834 and 1838 from Cape Town. Many of these objects had not been seen before; In this paper we discuss the new discoveries and the accuracy of the positions supplied by Lacaille, Dunlop and Herschel. Half of Dunlop's 629 objects turned out to be asterisms and faint double stars.

  1. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1997-02-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  2. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1996-10-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  3. Looking for Dark Galaxies at 21-cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, mike; Lang, Robert. Hugh

    2012-10-01

    Blind HI surveys have so far failed to find the Dark and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, and the Intergalactic Gas Clouds which were widely expected. It now appears very likely that this has been caused through incorrectly identifying many sources with clustered visible galaxies in the same groups. We aim to rectify this situation by using ATCA to find interferometric positions accurate to ~ 1 arc minute for a selection of the most unlikely identifications in the HIPASS catalogue and so either to find such objects, or conclusively rule out their existence.

  4. Photometric stellar catalogue for TV meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Photometry for ordinary astrophysics was carefully developed for its own purposes. As stars radiation is very similar to the blackbody radiation, astronomers measure star illumination in wide or narrow calibrated spectral bands. This is enough for star photometry with precise accuracy and for measuring their light flux in these bands in energetic units. Meteors are moving objects and do not allow collection of more photons then they emit. So meteor observers use the whole spectral band that can be covered by sensitivity of their light sensors. This is why measurements of stellar magnitudes of background stars by these sensors are not the same as catalogued star brightness in standard photometric spectral bands. Here we present a special photometric catalogue of 93 bright non-variable stars of the northern hemisphere, that can be used by meteor observers of standard background whose brightness are calculated in energetic units as well as in non-systematic stellar magnitudes in spectral wavelength of the WATEC 902 sensitivity.

  5. HELCATS - Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D.; Harrison, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Byrne, J.; Perry, C. H.; Moestl, C.; Rouillard, A. P.; Bothmer, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kilpua, E.; Odstrcil, D.; Gallagher, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of the solar wind is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the Solar System, making it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of both transient (CMEs) and background (IRs) solar wind plasma structures, by enabling their direct and continuous observation out to 1 AU and beyond. The EU-funded FP7 HELCATS project combines European expertise in heliospheric imaging, built up in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in solar and coronal imaging as well as in-situ and radio measurements of solar wind phenomena, in a programme of work that will enable a much wider exploitation and understanding of heliospheric imaging observations. The HELCATS project endeavors to catalogue transient and background solar wind structures imaged by STEREO/HI throughout the duration of the mission. This catalogue will include estimates of their kinematic properties using a variety of established and more speculative approaches, which are to be evaluated through comparisons with solar source and in-situ measurements. The potential for driving numerical models from these kinematic properties is to be assessed, as is their complementarity to radio observations, specifically Type II bursts and interplanetary scintillation. This presentation provides an overview of the HELCATS project and its progress in first 18 months of operations.

  6. Pan-European catalogue of flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajka, Juraj; Mangini, Walter; Viglione, Alberto; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Ceola, Serena

    2016-04-01

    There have been numerous extreme flood events observed in Europe in the past years. One of the way to improve our understanding about causing flood generation mechanisms is to analyse spatial and temporal variability of a large number of flood events. The aim of this study is to present a pan-European catalogue of flood events developed within the SWITCH-ON EU Project. The flood events are identified from daily discharge observations at 1315 stations listed in Global Runoff Data Centre database. The average length of discharge time-series for selected stations is 54 years. For each event, basin boundary and additional hydrological and weather characteristics are extracted. Hydrological characteristics are extracted from the pan-European HYPE model simulations. Precipitation, together with the corresponding proportions of rainfall and snowfall, snowmelt, and evapotranspiration are computed as total amounts between the event start date and event peak date. Soil moisture, soil moisture deficit, and basin accumulated snow water equivalent are computed for the event start date. Weather characteristics are derived from the weather circulation pattern catalogue developed within COST 733 Project. The results are generated in an open data access and tools framework which allows reproduction and extension of results to other regions. More information about the analysis and project are available at: http://www.water-switch-on.eu/lab.html.

  7. Asteroid family classification from very large catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Anne

    2005-02-01

    The paper presents a review of the recent contributions and open questions concerning the families of asteroids. Due to the availability of very large catalogues (synthetic and analytical proper elements of the asteroids and large observational surveys of their spectra) and to the introduction of non gravitational forces in their determination, the concept of static family has disappeared, to be replaced by this of dynamical families. The proper elements are not constant anymore but are ageing on very long timescales. The size distributions of the populations of asteroids, in and out the families, their ages, the ejection velocities of the fragments after an impact, have been reconsidered by several teams of research, with this new approach. Parallel numerical simulations of collisions and fragmentations of bodies have showed that most of the asteroids are likely rubble piles or agglomerates than monolithic blocks. The methods of classification have been refined and combine, in their newest versions, the dynamics and the observations, working now on 5 dimensional space instead of 3. A series of sub families of the large well-known families have been recently identified, using catalogues with more than 100 000 asteroids (the cluster Karin for example).

  8. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  9. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  10. Automatic Detection of Galaxy Groups by Probabilistic Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahem, R. T.; Tino, P.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Babul, A.

    2015-12-01

    Galaxy groups play a significant role in explaining the evolution of the universe. Given the amounts of available survey data, automated discovery of galaxy groups is of utmost interest. We introduce a novel methodology, based on probabilistic Hough transform, for finding galaxy groups embedded in a rich background. The model takes advantage of a typical signature pattern of galaxy groups known as "fingers-of-God". It also allows us to include prior astrophysical knowledge as an inherent part of the method. The proposed method is first tested in large scale controlled experiments with 2-D patterns and then verified on 3-D realistic mock data (comparing with the well-known friends-of-friends method used in astrophysics). The experiments suggest that our methodology is a promising new candidate for galaxy group finders developed within a machine learning framework.

  11. An approach to measuring the density of the environment of galaxies: results and comparisons with other measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Andernach, H.

    2014-10-01

    With the aim of obtaining a homogeneous and reliable measurement of the density of the environment of a large sample of galaxies, we developed a code that counts the number of neighboring galaxies around a target galaxy. As targets, we selected a large sample of 666,387 galaxies from the spectroscopic catalogue of the SDSS-DR7 with redshifts between 0.03 and 0.30 and more luminous than absolute magnitude of -19 in the SDSS r band. The photometric catalogue of the SDSS-DR7 was used to extract and count the neighboring galaxies from, including about 24M objects, also more luminous than an r-band absolute magnitude of -19, for which a photometric redshift was available to serve as a distance estimate. The code counts all galaxies within an absolute distance of 1.5 Mpc around the target (translated to an apparent radius and a redshift range around that of the target). We avoid galaxies close to the survey edges, leaving 527,074 target galaxies for which we have a measurement of environmental density. We present our results and compare them to other measurements of the density of the environment of galaxies, such as those in the MaxBCG catalogue of brightest cluster galaxies. As a control of our method, we apply it to a sample of galaxies from the 2MIG catalogue of isolated galaxies, and also to a sample of galaxies from a compilation of members of Abell clusters. We aim to use our results to test the morphology-local density relation and to study the relationship between the different types of emission-line activity of galaxies and their ambient density.

  12. Applying machine learning classification techniques to automate sky object cataloguing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayyad, Usama M.; Doyle, Richard J.; Weir, W. Nick; Djorgovski, Stanislav

    1993-08-01

    We describe the application of an Artificial Intelligence machine learning techniques to the development of an automated tool for the reduction of a large scientific data set. The 2nd Mt. Palomar Northern Sky Survey is nearly completed. This survey provides comprehensive coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere in the form of photographic plates. The plates are being transformed into digitized images whose quality will probably not be surpassed in the next ten to twenty years. The images are expected to contain on the order of 107 galaxies and 108 stars. Astronomers wish to determine which of these sky objects belong to various classes of galaxies and stars. Unfortunately, the size of this data set precludes analysis in an exclusively manual fashion. Our approach is to develop a software system which integrates the functions of independently developed techniques for image processing and data classification. Digitized sky images are passed through image processing routines to identify sky objects and to extract a set of features for each object. These routines are used to help select a useful set of attributes for classifying sky objects. Then GID3 (Generalized ID3) and O-B Tree, two inductive learning techniques, learns classification decision trees from examples. These classifiers will then be applied to new data. These developmnent process is highly interactive, with astronomer input playing a vital role. Astronomers refine the feature set used to construct sky object descriptions, and evaluate the performance of the automated classification technique on new data. This paper gives an overview of the machine learning techniques with an emphasis on their general applicability, describes the details of our specific application, and reports the initial encouraging results. The results indicate that our machine learning approach is well-suited to the problem. The primary benefit of the approach is increased data reduction throughput. Another benefit is

  13. The RedGOLD cluster detection algorithm and its cluster candidate catalogue for the CFHT-LS W1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licitra, Rossella; Mei, Simona; Raichoor, Anand; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We present RedGOLD (Red-sequence Galaxy Overdensity cLuster Detector), a new optical/NIR galaxy cluster detection algorithm, and apply it to the CFHT-LS W1 field. RedGOLD searches for red-sequence galaxy overdensities while minimizing contamination from dusty star-forming galaxies. It imposes an Navarro-Frenk-White profile and calculates cluster detection significance and richness. We optimize these latter two parameters using both simulations and X-ray-detected cluster catalogues, and obtain a catalogue ˜80 per cent pure up to z ˜ 1, and ˜100 per cent (˜70 per cent) complete at z ≤ 0.6 (z ≲ 1) for galaxy clusters with M ≳ 1014 M⊙ at the CFHT-LS Wide depth. In the CFHT-LS W1, we detect 11 cluster candidates per deg2 out to z ˜ 1.1. When we optimize both completeness and purity, RedGOLD obtains a cluster catalogue with higher completeness and purity than other public catalogues, obtained using CFHT-LS W1 observations, for M ≳ 1014 M⊙. We use X-ray-detected cluster samples to extend the study of the X-ray temperature-optical richness relation to a lower mass threshold, and find a mass scatter at fixed richness of σlnM|λ = 0.39 ± 0.07 and σlnM|λ = 0.30 ± 0.13 for the Gozaliasl et al. and Mehrtens et al. samples. When considering similar mass ranges as previous work, we recover a smaller scatter in mass at fixed richness. We recover 93 per cent of the redMaPPer detections, and find that its richness estimates is on average ˜40-50 per cent larger than ours at z > 0.3. RedGOLD recovers X-ray cluster spectroscopic redshifts at better than 5 per cent up to z ˜ 1, and the centres within a few tens of arcseconds.

  14. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey. I. UV and near-IR observations, multi-colour catalogues, and photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutard, T.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Hudelot, P.; Vibert, D.; Comte, V.; Conseil, S.; Davidzon, I.; Guzzo, L.; Llebaria, A.; Martin, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Milliard, B.; Morrison, G.; Schiminovich, D.; Treyer, M.; Van Werbaeke, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations collected in the CFHTLS-VIPERS region in the ultraviolet with the GALEX satellite (far- and near-ultraviolet channels) and in the near-infrared with the CFHT/WIRCam camera (Ks band) over an area of 22 and 27 deg2, respectively. The depth of the photometry was optimised to measure the physical properties (e.g., star formation rate, stellar masses) of all the galaxies in the VIPERS spectroscopic survey. The large volume explored by VIPERS will enable a unique investigation of the relationship between the galaxy properties and their environment (density field and cosmic web) at high redshift (0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.2). In this paper, we present the observations, the data reductions, and the build-up of the multi-colour catalogues. The CFHTLS-T0007 (gri-χ2) images are used as reference to detect and measure the Ks-band photometry, while the T0007 u∗-selected sources are used as priors to perform the GALEX photometry based on a dedicated software (EMphot). Our final sample reaches NUVAB ~ 25 (at 5σ) and KAB ~ 22 (at 3σ). The large spectroscopic sample (~51 000 spectroscopic redshifts) allows us to highlight the robustness of our star/galaxy separation and the reliability of our photometric redshifts with a typical accuracy of σz ≤ 0.04 and a fraction of catastrophic failures η ≤ 2% down to i ~ 23. We present various tests on the Ks-band completeness and photometric redshift accuracy by comparing our results with existing overlapping deep photometric catalogues. Finally, we discuss the BzK sample of passive and active galaxies at high redshift and the evolution of galaxy morphology in the (NUV-r) vs. (r-Ks) diagram at low redshift (z ≤ 0.25) based on the high image quality of the CFHTLS. The catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A102The images, catalogues, and photometric redshifts for 1.5 million sources (down to NUV

  15. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar, K. E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in "Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books)" (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare Family…

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MHO Catalogue (Davis+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. J.; Gell, R.; Khanzadyan, T.; Smith, M. D.; Jenness, T.

    2010-02-01

    The catalogue contains almost 1000 objects and covers regions on the sky loosely based on the constellations and associated Giant Molecular Clouds (Perseus, Orion A, Orion B, Taurus, etc.); full details are given in the paper. Note also that this catalogue is being maintained (and updated) at a dedicated, search-able website: http://www.jach.hawaii.edu/UKIRT/MHCat/ (2 data files).

  17. Value of Hipparcos Catalogue shown by planet assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    now have privileged use of the data for nearly a year, before the release of the catalogues to the world-wide astronomical community in April 1997. The new precision in star-fixing promises an extraordinary harvest of new results, on subjects ranging from asteroids to cosmology. A vivid picture of the stars in motion in our corner of the Milky Way Galaxy is one expected outcome. Hipparcos has more than doubled the number of known variable stars, and has discovered many thousands of new double or multiple star systems. Striding the light-years by parallax The study of stars with candidate planets is a dramatic example of Hipparcos's new determinations of the distances of stars by the parallax principle. Many other discoveries will flow from it. Parallax is an unfamiliar name for a familiar concept, akin to stereoscopic vision. People judge distances in nearby scenes from the difference in direction of the two eyes when focused on an object. Military rangefinders use the same principle, with more widely separated optics. Astronomers adapt the Earth's orbit to make a huge rangefinder. At opposite seasons, the Earth is on opposite sides of the Sun, at vantage points 300 million kilometres apart. As a result, the bearings of stars change a little. Nearby stars shift more than very distant stars, and astronomers can measure their distances by trigonometry. Until now, unavoidable inaccuracies in observing the directions of stars from the ground have meant that the distances of only the closest stars can be measured directly by parallax, out to about 100 light-years. Even at short ranges the margin of uncertainty is often wide. Long chains of inference and observation extend the distance scale to much farther objects, including galaxies millions or billions of light-years away. From the resulting estimates, astronomers try to calculate the age of the Universe and arrive at conclusions about its origin and evolution. The foundation for these reckonings has been decidedly shaky

  18. Properties of an H I-selected galaxy sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szomoru, Arpad; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Knapen, Johan H.; Weinberg, David H.; Fruchter, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of galaxies identified in a 21cm, H I-line survey of selected areas in the Perseus-Pisces supercluster and its foreground void. Twelve fields were observed in the supercluster, five of them (target fields) centered on optically bright galaxies, and the other seven (blank fields) selected to contain no bright galaxies within 45 min. of their centers. We detected nine previously uncatalogued, gas-rich galaxies, six of them in the target fields. We also detected H I from seven previously catalogued galaxies in these fields. Observations in the void covered the same volume as the 12 supercluster fields at the same H I-mass sensitivity, but no objects were detected. Combining out H I data with optical broadband and H alpha imaging, we conclude that the properties of H I-selected galaxies do not differ substantially from those of late-type galaxies found in optical surveys. In particular, the galaxies in our sample do not appear to be unusually faint for their H I mass, or for their circular velocity. We find tentative evidence for a connection between optical surface brightness and degree of isolation, in the sense that low surface brightness galaxies tend to be more isolated. The previously catalogued, optically bright galaxies in our survey volume dominate the total H I mass density and cross section; the uncatalogued galaxies contribute only approximately 19 percent of the mass and approximately 12 percent of the cross section. Thus, existing estimates of the density and cross section of neutral hydrogen, most of which are based on optically selected galaxy samples, are probably accurate. Such estimates can be used to compare the nearby universe to the high-redshift universe probed by quasar absorption lines.

  19. D3-instantons, mock theta series and twistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2013-04-01

    The D-instanton corrected hypermultiplet moduli space of type II string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold is known in the type IIA picture to be determined in terms of the generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants, through a twistorial construction. At the same time, in the mirror type IIB picture, and in the limit where only D3-D1-D(-1)-instanton corrections are retained, it should carry an isometric action of the S-duality group SL(2, {Z} ). We prove that this is the case in the one-instanton approximation, by constructing a holomorphic action of SL(2, {Z} ) on the linearized twistor space. Using the modular invariance of the D4-D2-D0 black hole partition function, we show that the standard Darboux coordinates in twistor space have modular anomalies controlled by period integrals of a Siegel-Narain theta series, which can be canceled by a contact transformation generated by a holomorphic mock theta series.

  20. A hybrid mock circulation loop for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Frank; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Timms, Daniel L; Frazier, O Howard; Cohn, William E

    2014-09-01

    Rotary blood pumps are emerging as a viable technology for total artificial hearts, and the development of physiological control algorithms is accelerated with new evaluation environments. In this article, we present a novel hybrid mock circulation loop (HMCL) designed specifically for evaluation of rotary total artificial hearts (rTAH). The rTAH is operated in the physical domain while all vasculature elements are embedded in the numerical domain, thus combining the strengths of both approaches: fast and easy exchange of the vasculature model together with improved controllability of the pump. Parameters, such as vascular resistance, compliance, and blood volume, can be varied dynamically in silico during operation. A hydraulic-numeric interface creates a real-time feedback loop between the physical and numerical domains. The HMCL uses computer-controlled resistance valves as actuators, thereby reducing the size and number of hydraulic elements. Experimental results demonstrate a stable interaction over a wide operational range and a high degree of flexibility. Therefore, we demonstrate that the newly created design environment can play an integral part in the hydraulic design, control development, and durability testing of rTAHs. PMID:25234760

  1. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. Accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. Usually, only a limited set of accurate N-body simulations is available. Thus, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Further, relying on simulated realizations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these points in mind, this work presents a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements for galaxy samples with a trivial geometry in the case of a Gaussian approximation of the clustering likelihood. As main result of this paper, we give the explicit formulae for Fourier and configuration space covariance matrices. To validate our model, we create synthetic halo occupation distribution galaxy catalogues by populating the haloes of an ensemble of large-volume N-body simulations. Using linear and non-linear input power spectra, we find very good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements on the synthetic catalogues in the quasi-linear regime.

  2. Stellar Haloes with the Illustris Simulation: Mock Observations and Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillepich, Annalisa; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Snyder, Greg; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Illustris is a state-of-the-art simulation which combines the statistical power of a ˜106 Mpc-side cosmological volume with gasdynamics, prescriptions for star formation, feedback, and kpc resolution. It allows us to analyze about ˜5,000 well-resolved galaxies spanning a variety of morphologies, environments, and halo masses (3×10^11 < Mvir < 10^14 Msun). Illustris therefore provides the most realistic and richest sample of simulated galactic stellar haloes available up to date. Based on the properties of the stellar particles in each simulated galaxy/halo, we have produced synthetic images in different luminosity bands and extracted information about the mass distribution, smoothness, and phase-space structures up to large galactocentric distances at different limits of surface brightness. We can therefore gain insight and provide theoretically-motivated expectations for the build-up and properties of the stellar haloes, and their relation to the underlying DM haloes, their central galaxies, and their halo assembly histories.

  3. Galaxy bias from the DES Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ˜116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al. 2016) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2 - 0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4 - 0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6 - 0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8 - 1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8-independent constraint among the three. We forward-model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogs by including shape noise, photo-z errors and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  4. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Ωm0 from the galaxy clustering ratio measured at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Marinoni, C.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Branchini, E.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Iovino, A.; Percival, W. J.; Steigerwald, H.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-03-01

    We use a sample of about 22 000 galaxies at 0.65 < z < 1.2 from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1) catalogue, to constrain the cosmological model through a measurement of the galaxy clustering ratio ηg,R. This statistic has favourable properties, which is defined as the ratio of two quantities characterizing the smoothed density field in spheres of a given radius R: the value of its correlation function on a multiple of this scale, ξ(nR), and its variance σ2(R). For sufficiently large values of R, this is a universal number, which captures 2-point clustering information independently of the linear bias and linear redshift-space distortions of the specific galaxy tracers. In this paper, we discuss how to extend the application of ηg,R to quasi-linear scales and how to control and remove observational selection effects, which are typical of redshift surveys as VIPERS, in detail. We verify the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures using mock catalogues that match the survey selection process. These results show the robustness of ηg,R to non-linearities and observational effects, which is related to its very definition as a ratio of quantities that are similarly affected. At an effective redshift z = 0.93, we measured the value ηg,R(15) = 0.141 ± 0.013 at R = 5h-1 Mpc. Within a flat ΛCDM cosmology and by including the best available priors on H0, ns and baryon density, we obtain a matter density parameter at the current epoch Ωm,0 = 0.270-0.025+0.029. In addition to the great precision achieved on our estimation of Ωm using VIPERS PDR-1, this result is remarkable because it appears to be in good agreement with a recent estimate at z ≃ 0.3, which was obtained by applying the same technique to the SDSS-LRG catalogue. It, therefore, supports the robustness of the present analysis. Moreover, the combination of these two measurements at z ~ 0.3 and z ~ 0.9 provides us with a very precise estimate of Ωm,0

  5. Can neutrino decay-driven mock gravity save hot dark matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Randall J.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative decay of a 30 eV neutrino with a lifetime of order 10 exp 23-24 s has recently been shown to yield a satisfactory explanation of a wide range of problems in astrophysics. In this paper, it is investigated whether the photon flux generated by the radiative decay of a massive neutrino is capable of generating sufficient radiation pressure to cause a 'mock gravitational' collapse of primordial hydrogen clouds. It is shown that when using neutral hydrogen as a source of opacity for mock gravity the time scale for mock gravitational collapse is significantly larger than the expansion time scale. Thus, the model fails as a source of galactic seed perturbations. Furthermore, it is argued that nonlinear feedback mechanisms will be unable to increase the collapse rate of the cloud under mock gravity.

  6. The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Tully, R Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called 'superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea. PMID:25186900

  7. The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called `superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea.

  8. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view of the entire sky reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond our Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is constructed from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's Extended Source Catalog; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The image is a representation of the relative brightnesses of these million-plus galaxies, all observed at a wavelength of 2.2 microns.

    The brightest and nearest galaxies are represented in blue, and the faintest, most distant ones are in red. This color scheme gives insights into the three dimensional large-scale structure of the nearby universe with the brightest, closest clusters and superclusters showing up as the blue and bluish-white features. The dark band in this image shows the area of the sky where our Milky Way galaxy blocks our view of distant objects, which, in this projection, lies predominantly along the edges of the image.

  9. Photometric Properties of Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T.

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using optical photometry. We select these poor clusters as luminous, extended X-ray sources identified with poor galaxy systems in the EMSS catalogue of clusters of galaxies. The clusters are at moderate redshifts (0.08galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of their color--magnitude relations and accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo Cluster. The fraction of blue galaxies is similar to those of low-redshift richness 0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The luminosity functions (LFs) of the individual clusters are not significantly different from each other. Using these, we construct composite LFs in B, V , and R bands (to MV=-18). The faint-end of these LFs are flat, like the V-band LF of other (e.g., MKW/AWM) poor clusters, but steeper than the field LF in the R-band. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts.

  10. Carlsberg Meridian Catalogue, La Palma. Number 9. Observations of positions of stars and planets, May 1984 to March 1995 including extinction and meteorological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This catalogue (CMC9) contains 141593 positions and magnitudes of 138603 stars north of declination -40°, 117559 proper motions, and 19585 positions and magnitudes of 97 Solar System objects obtained with the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle on La Palma during the period May 1984 to March 1995. CMC9 includes CMC1 to CMC8; i.e. it comprises all the observations made since the instrument began operation on La Palma. The positions of the stars are for the epoch of observation and the equinox J2000.0, and are referred to the new International Celestial Reference Frame. The original version of the catalogue with positions referred to a smoothed version of the FK5 is also given. The limiting magnitude is V = 15.4. The catalogue mainly comprises observations and proper motions for the following programmes: 36000 International Reference Stars, 30000 faint reference stars in a global net, 18000 reference stars in the fields of radio sources, 17000 stars in the Lick Northern Proper Motion catalogue, 5000 reference stars for calibration of Schmidt plates, 2600 stars in the Gliese catalogue of nearby stars, 5000 stars in nearby OB associations, 10500 F-type stars within 100 pc, 9000 G-type d&g, K-type g stars within 300 pc, 2200 unbiased sample of K/M-type d stars, 2200 reference stars near Veron-Cetty galaxies, 1050 variable stars (12 - 14 mag) in GCVS, 800 stars (11 - 14 mag) with pm > 0″-3/yr ion NLTT, and several smaller programmes mainly aimed at galactic kinematics. Positions and magnitudes of 8 novae and 7 supernovae which occurred in the years 1991 to 1995 are included. The catalogue also contains observations of the following Solar System objects: Callisto, Ganymede, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, Hyperion, Uranus, Oberon, Neptune, Pluto and 87 minor planets. The mean error of a catalogue position in the zenith is 0″-09 in right ascension and declination in CMC4-5-6, improving to 0″-06 in CMC7-9. The accuracy in magnitude is 0.05 mag throughout. The mean error of the

  11. Thin slice expert testimony and mock trial deliberations.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Caroline Titcomb; Brodsky, Stanley L; Wilson, Jennifer Kelly

    2015-01-01

    This study examined impressions of expert witness testimony in a not guilty by reason of insanity defense on two outcomes: witness's credibility and verdict. Borrowing in part from the "thin slice" methodology, we assessed outcomes in a 2 (deliberating vs. non-deliberating jurors) × 3 (length of videotaped testimony) between-subjects design. In 30 mock juries, 188 participants viewed the testimony by a forensic psychologist; then half of the juries deliberated. Thinner slices of the testimony were defined by the lower (30s long) and upper (5 min long) temporal bounds in the literature. The third, fuller testimony condition was 10 min long and served as the accuracy marker for the shorter sliced exposures. We aimed to explore potential consequences to jurors relying on impressions of the expert, and his or her opinion, and to test that effect post deliberation. Accounting for deliberation, brief impressions of expert credibility generally exerted a similar influence on credibility to fuller considerations. The essential finding was that a two-way interaction emerged from time slice and deliberation on verdict for jurors in the 30s condition. Overall, predictive accuracy was found in the 5 min slice, yet accuracy was not supported in the predictions based on the shortest slice. Individually-formed impressions are not likely to translate to the verdict ballot post-deliberation. Instead, brief impressions are likely to be heavily influenced by deliberation. Implications for understanding how impression-based testimony evaluations translate from the jury box to the deliberation room are discussed. PMID:26346686

  12. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Rae, Philip; Clements, Bradford E.

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  13. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues: present and future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caniego, Marcos

    2015-08-01

    The Planck Collaboration has produced catalogues of radio and sub-mm compact sources at the nine Planck frequencies, Galactic cold clumps catalogues and SZ cluster catalogues. But new catalogues are foreseen. A multifrequency compact source catalogue will be produced selecting sources at radio frequencies and following them across all Planck bands. Multifrequency catalogues can be difficult to produce in experiments like Planck with a large frequency coverage and very different resolutions across bands, but the science that can be extracted from such a catalogue compensates the effort. In addition, for those sources where a clear identification can be made, we will attempt to include flux density information from Herschel and other experiments, in particular for those blazars that are bright in radio, sub-mm and even in gamma-ray frequencies, as seen by Fermi. Moreover, Planck is making available to the community the single survey frequency maps that will allow astronomers to study the long-term variability of their favourite sources. New functionalities will be added to the Planck Legacy Archive, for example a timeline-cutting tool that will allow one to extract maps from the Planck timelines for specific periods of time allowing short-term variability studies of compact sources (e.g., flares). The unique frequency coverage of Planck make these catalogues very valuable for other experiments using the Planck compact source catalogues. For example, experiments like QUIJOTE use Planck selected sources to study the impact of polarized radio source emission on their cosmological fields and other CMB experiments will use Planck polarized compact source information for calibration.

  14. Grid computing enhances standards-compatible geospatial catalogue service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aijun; Di, Liping; Bai, Yuqi; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Yang

    2010-04-01

    A catalogue service facilitates sharing, discovery, retrieval, management of, and access to large volumes of distributed geospatial resources, for example data, services, applications, and their replicas on the Internet. Grid computing provides an infrastructure for effective use of computing, storage, and other resources available online. The Open Geospatial Consortium has proposed a catalogue service specification and a series of profiles for promoting the interoperability of geospatial resources. By referring to the profile of the catalogue service for Web, an innovative information model of a catalogue service is proposed to offer Grid-enabled registry, management, retrieval of and access to geospatial resources and their replicas. This information model extends the e-business registry information model by adopting several geospatial data and service metadata standards—the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)'s 19115/19119 standards and the US Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) and US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) metadata standards for describing and indexing geospatial resources. In order to select the optimal geospatial resources and their replicas managed by the Grid, the Grid data management service and information service from the Globus Toolkits are closely integrated with the extended catalogue information model. Based on this new model, a catalogue service is implemented first as a Web service. Then, the catalogue service is further developed as a Grid service conforming to Grid service specifications. The catalogue service can be deployed in both the Web and Grid environments and accessed by standard Web services or authorized Grid services, respectively. The catalogue service has been implemented at the George Mason University/Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems (GMU/CSISS), managing more than 17 TB of geospatial data and geospatial Grid services. This service makes it easy to share and

  15. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. II. Photometric redshifts and rest frame properties in Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Amorín, R.; Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; McLure, R. J.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Mortlock, A.; Parsa, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Balestra, I.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Nonino, M.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Rosati, P.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of photometric redshifts, galaxy rest frame properties and associated magnification values in the cluster and parallel pointings of the first two Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416. The released catalogues aim to provide a reference for future investigations of extragalactic populations in these legacy fields: from lensed high-redshift galaxies to cluster members themselves. Methods: We exploit a multiwavelength catalogue, ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to ground-based K and Spitzer IRAC, which is specifically designed to enable detection and measurement of accurate fluxes in crowded cluster regions. The multiband information is used to derive photometric redshifts and physical properties of sources detected either in the H-band image alone, or from a stack of four WFC3 bands. To minimize systematics, median photometric redshifts are assembled from six different approaches to photo-z estimates. Their reliability is assessed through a comparison with available spectroscopic samples. State-of-the-art lensing models are used to derive magnification values on an object-by-object basis by taking into account sources positions and redshifts. Results: We show that photometric redshifts reach a remarkable ~3-5% accuracy. After accounting for magnification, the H-band number counts are found to be in agreement at bright magnitudes with number counts from the CANDELS fields, while extending the presently available samples to galaxies that, intrinsically, are as faint as H ~ 32-33, thanks to strong gravitational lensing. The Frontier Fields allow the galaxy stellar mass distribution to be probed, depending on magnification, at 0.5-1.5 dex lower masses with respect to extragalactic wide fields, including sources at Mstar ~ 107-108 M⊙ at z > 5. Similarly, they allow the detection of objects with intrinsic star formation rates (SFRs) >1 dex lower than in the CANDELS fields reaching 0.1-1 M⊙/yr at z ~ 6-10. The

  16. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species. PMID:26250020

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XMMOMCDFS catalogue (Antonucci+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, M.; Talavera, A.; Vagnetti, F.; Trevese, D.; Comastri, A.; Paolillo, M.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present the catalogue of the Optical Monitor observations performed by XMM-Newton in the Chandra Deep Field South during the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey (Comastri et al. 2011A&A...526L...9C). The main catalogue provides photometric measurements for 1129 CDFS sources from individual observations and/or from the stacked images, and includes optical/UV/X-ray photometric and spectroscopic information from other surveys. The supplementary catalogue contains 44 alternative XMM-OM identifications for 38 EIS/COMBO-17 sources. (2 data files).

  18. SB9: The ninth catalogue of spectroscopic binary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, D.; Tokovinin, A. A.; Batten, A. H.; Fekel, F. C.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Levato, H.; Morrell, N. I.; Torres, G.; Udry, S.

    2004-09-01

    The Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (http://sb9.astro.ulb.ac.be) continues the series of compilations of spectroscopic orbits carried out over the past 35 years by Batten and collaborators. As of 2004 May 1st, the new Catalogue holds orbits for 2386 systems. Some essential differences between this catalogue and its predecessors are outlined and three straightforward applications are presented: (1) completeness assessment: period distribution of SB1s and SB2s; (2) shortest periods across the H-R diagram; (3) period-eccentricity relation.

  19. LOFAR 150-MHz observations of the Boötes field: catalogue and source counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W. L.; van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Best, P.; Dijkema, T. J.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Heald, G.; Prandoni, I.; Sabater, J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Tasse, C.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Conway, J. E.; Enßlin, T.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Jackson, N.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mahony, E. K.; Miley, G. K.; Morabito, L. K.; Morganti, R.; Orrú, E.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Sridhar, S. S.; Toribio, M. C.; White, G. J.; Wise, M. W.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first wide area (19 deg$^2$), deep ($\\approx120-150$ {\\mu}Jy beam$^{-1}$), high resolution ($5.6 \\times 7.4$ arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Bo\\"otes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3-5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6276 sources detected over an area of $19$\\,deg$^2$, with a peak flux density threshold of $5\\sigma$. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150 MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux density star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN.

  20. LOFAR 150-MHz observations of the Boötes field: Catalogue and Source Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W. L.; van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Best, P.; Dijkema, T. J.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Heald, G.; Prandoni, I.; Sabater, J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Tasse, C.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Conway, J. E.; Enßlin, T.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Jackson, N.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mahony, E. K.; Miley, G. K.; Morabito, L. K.; Morganti, R.; Orrú, E.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Sridhar, S. S.; Toribio, M. C.; White, G. J.; Wise, M. W.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first wide area (19 deg2), deep (≈120-150 μJy beam-1), high resolution (5.6 × 7.4 arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Boötes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3 - 5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6 276 sources detected over an area of 19 deg2, with a peak flux density threshold of 5σ. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150 MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux density star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN.

  1. LOFAR 150-MHz observations of the Boötes field: catalogue and source counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, W. L.; van Weeren, R. J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Best, P.; Dijkema, T. J.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Heald, G.; Prandoni, I.; Sabater, J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Tasse, C.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Conway, J. E.; Enßlin, T.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Ferrari, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Jackson, N.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mahony, E. K.; Miley, G. K.; Morabito, L. K.; Morganti, R.; Orrú, E.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Sridhar, S. S.; Toribio, M. C.; White, G. J.; Wise, M. W.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first wide area (19 deg2), deep (≈120-150 μJy beam-1), high-resolution (5.6 × 7.4 arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Boötes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3-5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6 276 sources detected over an area of 19 deg2, with a peak flux density threshold of 5σ. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150-MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux density star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN.

  2. Searching for Galaxy Clusters in the VST-KiDS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovich, M.; Puddu, E.; Bellagamba, F.; Moscardini, L.; Roncarelli, M.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.

    We present the methods and first results of the search for galaxy clusters in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). The adopted algorithm and the criterium for selecting the member galaxies are illustrated. Here we report the preliminary results obtained over a small area (7 deg2), and the comparison of our cluster candidates with those found in the RedMapper and SZ Planck catalogues; the analysis to a larger area (148 deg2) is currently in progress. By the KiDS cluster search, we expect to increase the completeness of the clusters catalogue to z = 0.6-0.7 compared to RedMapper.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: INTEGRAL/IBIS AGN catalogue (Malizia+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Masetti, N.; Panessa, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.

    2013-04-01

    In the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS survey (Bird et al. 2010, Cat. J/ApJS/186/1), there are 234 objects which have been identified with AGN. To this set of sources, we have then added 38 galaxies listed in the INTEGRAL all-sky survey by Krivonos et al. (2007, Cat. J/A+A/475/775) updated on the website (http://hea.iki.rssi.ru/integral/survey/catalog.php) but not included in the Bird et al. catalogue due to the different sky coverage (see source names in bold in Appendix Appendix). The final data set presented and discussed in this work therefore comprises 272 AGN (last updated in 2011 March), which represents the most complete view of the INTEGRAL extragalactic sky to date. (2 data files).

  4. Cataloguing Large Amounts of Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrate, E.; O'Connor, A. S.; Hulslander, D.; Farr, B.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing users face the challenge of managing hundreds, even thousands of scenes. These images are normally stored as files organized in a folder structure. Unless there are clearly defined rules about the organization of the directories and file naming conventions, users inevitably find it very difficult to find particular images. "Katalog" is a free satellite image cataloguing tool developed to solve this problem. It can crawl a particular folder structure in search of the satellite images, extracting both metadata, footprints, and thumbnails. This information is then searchable by a number of variables (e.g. name, sensor, geographic location, date, description, and so on) allowing users to quickly find scenes in their imagery libraries, discovering and rediscovering data they didn't even know they had. "Katalog" works as an extension to the ENVI software package, taking advantage of the large collection of satellite image readers that ENVI provides. Generated thumbnails and footprints are also compatible with other applications like Google Earth, Picasa, and Esri ArcGIS.

  5. Official 1997 Mock Trial Materials for the Twenty-Fifth Annual District of Columbia Public Schools Mock Trail Program: Ricki Jones, Plaintiff v. Metro City, Defendant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Kamina A.; Roe, Richard L.

    This packet of materials contains law-related materials for students to conduct a mock trial. In this case a faulty water system, containing the parasite Pindia, contributed to the death of an AIDS patient. Statements from the plaintiff, a representative of the Metro City Water Department, health officials, and others are presented. New releases,…

  6. Philosophy and updating of the asteroid photometric catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Capria, M. T.; Dahlgren, Mats; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lagerkvist, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue now contains photometric lightcurves for 584 asteroids. We discuss some of the guiding principles behind it. This concerns both observers who offer input to it and users of the product.

  7. A Catalogue of XMM-Newton BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racero, E.; De la Calle, I.; Rouco Escorial, A.

    2015-05-01

    A catalogue of XMM-Newton BL Lac is presented based on a cross-correlation with the 1374 BL Lac objects listed in the 13th edition of the Veron-Cetty and Veron (2010) catalogue. X-ray counterparts were searched for in the field of view of more than 10000 pointed observations available in the XMM-Newton Archive (XSA) that were public before June 2012. The cross-correlation yielded around 250 XMM-Newton observations, which correspond to 162 different sources. X-ray data from the three EPIC cameras and Optical Monitor data were uniformly analyzed using the latest XMM-Newton Science Analysis System (SAS) version. The catalogue collects X-ray spectral properties, including flux variability, of the sample in the 0.2--10 KeV energy band. All the catalogue products will be made publicly available to the scientific community.

  8. 19. WEST SIDE OF GROCERY BUILDING, BRIDGE TO CATALOGUE OPERATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WEST SIDE OF GROCERY BUILDING, BRIDGE TO CATALOGUE OPERATIONS BUILDING, AND ANNEX A, WITH MERCHANDISE BUILDING TOWER IN BACKGROUND - Sears Roebuck & Company Mail Order Plant, Merchandise Building, 924 South Homan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  9. Galaxy masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courteau, Stéphane; Cappellari, Michele; de Jong, Roelof S.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Hoekstra, Henk; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mamon, Gary A.; Maraston, Claudia; Treu, Tommaso; Widrow, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy masses play a fundamental role in our understanding of structure formation models. This review addresses the variety and reliability of mass estimators that pertain to stars, gas, and dark matter. The different sections on masses from stellar populations, dynamical masses of gas-rich and gas-poor galaxies, with some attention paid to our Milky Way, and masses from weak and strong lensing methods all provide review material on galaxy masses in a self-consistent manner.

  10. A digitized version of the NLTT Catalogue of proper motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Sturch, Conrad R.; Lasker, Barry M.; Jahreiss, Hartmut; Luyten, Willem J.

    1989-01-01

    An optically scanning data-entry machine and various manual techniques are used to digitize the NLTT Catalogue and the first supplement to the NLTT Catalogue. Included in the catalog are stars found on over 800 Palomar proper-motion survey plates to have relative annual proper motions exceeding 0.18 arcsec. The supplement contains data for 398 stars having motions larger than 0.179 arcsec annually.

  11. Maintenance procedures catalogue: BC Hydro International Ltd. , October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    New catalogue lists over 1,000 written procedures developed over the past 25 years by BC Hydro personnel, both in the field and in the company's research and development division that are available for purchase from the Canadian utility. Developed at a cost of an estimated $5 million, the procedure documents cover Apparatus, Protection and Control, Safety, Distribution Standards, Engineering Contracts and Live Line Training. Procedures listed in the catalogue are available in both hard copy and electronic formats.

  12. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image is a Galaxy Evolution Explorer observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way. Andromeda is the nearest large galaxy to our own. The image is a mosaic of 10 separate Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken in September, 2003. The color image (with near ultraviolet shown by red and far ultraviolet shown by blue) shows blue regions of young, hot, high mass stars tracing out the spiral arms where star formation is occurring, and the central orange-white 'bulge' of old, cooler stars formed long ago. The star forming arms of Messier 31 are unusual in being quite circular rather than the usual spiral shape. Several companion galaxies can also be seen. These include Messier 32, a dwarf elliptical galaxy directly below the central bulge and just outside the spiral arms, and Messier 110 (M110), which is above and to the right of the center. M110 has an unusual far ultraviolet bright core in an otherwise 'red,' old star halo. Many other regions of star formation can be seen far outside the main body of the galaxy.

  13. Starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of bright IDS stars (Lipaeva+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipaeva, N. A.; Sementsov, V. N.; Malkov, O.

    2014-11-01

    A new catalogue of bright binary stars is presented. The catalogue includes bright IDS systems and bright spectroscopic binaries. Besides IDS data (coordinates, relative positions, magnitudes and spectral classification) the catalogue contains extensive cross-identification and comments for 27452 systems. The catalogue is complete to magnitudes of 9mag, but contains stars down to about 16mag. (2 data files).

  15. Preliminary Results from Galaxy Zoo: The Sloan by Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, K.; Land, K.; Slosar, A.; Szalay, A.; Bamford, S.; Nichol, R.; Thomas, D.; van den Berg, J.; Murray, P.; Raddick, J.; Andreescu, D.; Galaxy Zoo Team

    2007-12-01

    The relationship between the morphology of a galaxy and its formation and evolution is a fundamental question for modern astrophysics. However, classification by morphology is still most reliably performed by visual inspection of the data, and so in the era of large redshift surveys it is normal to estimate morphology via proxies for galaxy shape such as colour or the density profile (e.g. Bernardi et al. 2003). The use of such proxies must introduce a bias into the result (See Schawinski et al. 2007). In this presentation we present the first scientific results of the Galaxy Zoo project, which invited the public to inspect and classify galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). (Our methodology is described in an accompanying outreach poster) More than 110,000 people have viewed more than 30 million images, leading to a catalogue of more than 300,000 galaxies with secure classifications. A comparison with smaller catalogues produced by professional astronomers (e.g. Fukugita et al. 2007) is used to demonstrate the accuracy of Galaxy Zoo classifications. One obvious advantage of our approach is the identification of galaxies that appear morphologically normal, but are otherwise unusual. As an example, we present preliminary results from a study of extremely blue early-type galaxies identified by the project. We also derive for the first time a low-redshift morphology-density relation which is based on visual morphologies, covering an unprecedented range of environments across the whole SDSS. In addition to galaxy morphology, classifiers were also asked to identify the sense of rotation of spiral galaxies; we present preliminary results providing a test of the cosmological principle, as well as constraints on the tidal torque theory of structure formation.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The XMM-Newton 2nd Incremental Source Catalogue (2XMMi) (XMM-SSC, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xmm-Newton Survey Science Centre, Consortium

    2008-09-01

    The 2XMMi catalogue is the fourth publicly released XMM X-ray source catalogue produced by the XMM Survey Science Centre (SSC) consortium, following the 1XMM (Cat. IX/37, released in April 2003), 2XMMp (July 2006) and 2XMM (Cat. IX/39, August 2007) catalogues: 2XMMp was a preliminary version of 2XMM. 2XMMi is an incremental version of the 2XMM catalogue. The 2XMMi catalogue is about 17% larger than the 2XMM catalogue, which it supersedes, due to the 1-year longer baseline of observations included (it is about 8 times larger than the 1XMM catalogue). As such, it is the largest X-ray source catalogue ever produced, containing more than twice as many discrete sources as either the ROSAT survey or pointed catalogues. 2XMMi complements deeper Chandra and XMM-Newton small area surveys, probing a large sky area at the flux limit where the bulk of the objects that contribute to the X-ray background lie. The 2XMMi catalogue provides a rich resource for generating large, well-defined samples for specific studies, utilizing the fact that X-ray selection is a highly efficient (arguably the most efficient) way of selecting certain types of object, notably active galaxies (AGN), clusters of galaxies, interacting compact binaries and active stellar coronae. The large sky area covered by the serendipitous survey, or equivalently the large size of the catalogue, also means that 2XMMi is a superb resource for exploring the variety of the X-ray source population and identifying rare source types. The production of the 2XMMi catalogue has been undertaken by the XMM-Newton SSC consortium in fulfilment of one of its major responsibilities within the XMM-Newton project. The catalogue production process has been designed to exploit fully the capabilities of the XMM-Newton EPIC cameras and to ensure the integrity and quality of the resultant catalogue through rigorous screening of the data. The predecessor 2XMM catalogue was made from a subset of public observations emerging from a re

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The XMM-Newton 2nd Incremental Source Catalogue (2XMMi) (XMM-SSC, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xmm-Newton Survey Science Centre, Consortium

    2007-09-01

    The 2XMMi catalogue is the fourth publicly released XMM X-ray source catalogue produced by the XMM Survey Science Centre (SSC) consortium, following the 1XMM (Cat. IX/37, released in April 2003), 2XMMp (July 2006) and 2XMM (Cat. IX/39, August 2007) catalogues: 2XMMp was a preliminary version of 2XMM. 2XMMi is an incremental version of the 2XMM catalogue. The 2XMMi catalogue is about 17% larger than the 2XMM catalogue, which it supersedes, due to the 1-year longer baseline of observations included (it is about 8 times larger than the 1XMM catalogue). As such, it is the largest X-ray source catalogue ever produced, containing more than twice as many discrete sources as either the ROSAT survey or pointed catalogues. 2XMMi complements deeper Chandra and XMM-Newton small area surveys, probing a large sky area at the flux limit where the bulk of the objects that contribute to the X-ray background lie. The 2XMMi catalogue provides a rich resource for generating large, well-defined samples for specific studies, utilizing the fact that X-ray selection is a highly efficient (arguably the most efficient) way of selecting certain types of object, notably active galaxies (AGN), clusters of galaxies, interacting compact binaries and active stellar coronae. The large sky area covered by the serendipitous survey, or equivalently the large size of the catalogue, also means that 2XMMi is a superb resource for exploring the variety of the X-ray source population and identifying rare source types. The production of the 2XMMi catalogue has been undertaken by the XMM-Newton SSC consortium in fulfilment of one of its major responsibilities within the XMM-Newton project. The catalogue production process has been designed to exploit fully the capabilities of the XMM-Newton EPIC cameras and to ensure the integrity and quality of the resultant catalogue through rigorous screening of the data. The predecessor 2XMM catalogue was made from a subset of public observations emerging from a re

  18. Mass Modelling of dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the origin and properties of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. We create mock kinematic data sets by observing the dwarf in different directions. When the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. However, most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert. We model the velocity dispersion profiles of the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25%.

  19. HELCATS - Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard; Davies, Jackie; Perry, Chris; Moestl, Christian; Rouillard, Alexis; Bothmer, Volker; Rodriguez, Luciano; Eastwood, Jonathan; Kilpua, Emilia; Gallagher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the evolution of the solar wind is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the solar system, rendering it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of both transient (CMEs) and background (SIRs/CIRs) solar wind plasma structures, by enabling their direct and continuous observation out to 1 AU and beyond. The EU-funded FP7 HELCATS project combines European expertise in heliospheric imaging, built up in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in solar and coronal imaging as well as in-situ and radio measurements of solar wind phenomena, in a programme of work that will enable a much wider exploitation and understanding of heliospheric imaging observations. With HELCATS, we are (1.) cataloguing transient and background solar wind structures imaged in the heliosphere by STEREO/HI, since launch in late October 2006 to date, including estimates of their kinematic properties based on a variety of established techniques and more speculative, approaches; (2.) evaluating these kinematic properties, and thereby the validity of these techniques, through comparison with solar source observations and in-situ measurements made at multiple points throughout the heliosphere; (3.) appraising the potential for initialising advanced numerical models based on these kinematic properties; (4.) assessing the complementarity of radio observations (in particular of Type II radio bursts and interplanetary scintillation) in combination with heliospheric imagery. We will, in this presentation, provide an overview of progress from the first 18 months of the HELCATS project.

  20. The star catalogues of Ptolemaios and Ulugh Beg. Machine-readable versions and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2012-08-01

    In late antiquity and throughout the middle ages, the positions of stars on the celestial sphere were obtained from the star catalogue of Ptolemaios. A catalogue based on new measurements appeared in 1437, with positions by Ulugh Beg, and magnitudes from the 10th-century astronomer al-Sufi. We provide machine-readable versions of these two star catalogues, based on the editions by Toomer (1998, Ptolemy's Almagest, 2nd edn.) and Knobel (1917, Ulugh Beg's catalogue of stars), and determine their accuracies by comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue. The magnitudes in the catalogues correlate well with modern visual magnitudes; the indication "faint" by Ptolemaios is found to correspond to his magnitudes 5 and 6. Gaussian fits to the error distributions in longitude/latitude give widths σ ≃ 27'/23' in the range |Δλ,Δβ| < 50' for Ptolemaios and σ ≃ 22'/18' in Ulugh Beg. Fits to the range |Δλ,Δβ| < 100' gives 10-15% larger widths, showing that the error distributions are broader than Gaussians. The fraction of stars with positions wrong by more than 150' is about 2% for Ptolemaios and 0.1% in Ulugh Beg; the numbers of unidentified stars are 1 in Ptolemaios and 3 in Ulugh Beg. These numbers testify to the excellent quality of both star catalogues (as edited by Toomer and Knobel). Machine-readable catalogues are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/544/A31

  1. The WSRT ZoA Perseus-Pisces Filament wide-field HI imaging survey I. HI catalogue and atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Schröder, A. C.; Jarrett, T. H.; Elson, E. C.; van Driel, W.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Henning, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present results of a blind 21cm H I-line imaging survey of a galaxy overdensity located behind the Milky Way at ℓ, b ≈ 160°, 0.5°. The overdensity corresponds to a Zone-of-Avoidance crossing of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster filament. Although it is known that this filament contains an X-ray galaxy cluster (3C 129) hosting two strong radio galaxies, little is known about galaxies associated with this potentially rich cluster because of the high Galactic dust extinction. We mapped a sky area of ˜9.6 sq.deg using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in a hexagonal mosaic of 35 pointings observed for 12 hours each, in the radial velocity range cz = 2400 - 16600 km s-1. The survey has a sensitivity of 0.36 mJy/beam rms at a velocity resolution of 16.5 km s-1. We detected 211 galaxies, 62% of which have a near-infrared counterpart in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. We present a catalogue of the H I properties and an H I atlas containing total intensity maps, position-velocity diagrams, global H I profiles and UKIDSS counterpart images. For the resolved galaxies we also present H I velocity fields and radial H I surface density profiles. A brief analysis of the structures outlined by these galaxies finds that 87 of them lie at the distance of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster (cz ˜ 4000 - 8000 km s-1) and seem to form part of the 3C 129 cluster. Further 72 detections trace an overdensity at a velocity of cz ≈ 10000 km s-1 and seem to coincide with a structure predicted from mass density reconstructions in the first 2MASS Redshift Survey.

  2. Carlsberg Meridian Catalogues, La Palma. Numbers 1 - 11, 1999. Observations of positions of stars and planets, May 1984 to May 1998 including extinction and meteorological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This composite catalogue contains 180812 positions and magnitudes of 176591 stars north of declination -40°, 155005 proper motions, and 25848 positions and magnitudes of 184 Solar System objects obtained with the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle on La Palma during the period May 1984 to May 1998. It includes CMC1 - 11; i.e. it comprises all the observations made with the moving-slit micrometer since the instrument began operation on La Palma. The positions of the stars are for the epoch of observation and the equinox J2000.0, and are referred to the new International Celestial Reference Frame. The limiting magnitude is V = 15.4. The catalogue mainly comprises observations and proper motions for the following programmes: 36000 International Reference Stars, 30000 faint reference stars in a global net, 18000 reference stars in the fields of radio sources, 17000 stars in the Lick Northern Proper Motion catalogue, 5000 reference stars for calibration of Schmidt plates, 2600 stars in the Gliese catalogue of nearby stars, 5000 stars in nearby OB associations, 10500 F-type stars within 100 pc, 9000 G-type d&g, K-type g stars within 300 pc, 2200 unbiased sample of K/M-typed stars, 19400 reference stars near Veron-Cetty galaxies, 4700 variable stars (12 - 14 mag) in GCVS, 12400 stars (11 - 14 mag) with pm > 0″-18/yr in NLTT, and several smaller programmes mainly aimed at galactic kinematics. Positions and magnitudes of 12 novae and 8 supernovae which occurred in the years 1991 to 1998 are included. The catalogue also contains observations of the following Solar System objects: Callisto, Ganymede, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, Hyperion, Uranus, Oberon, Neptune, Pluto and 173 minor planets and comet P/Wild 2. The mean error of a catalogue position in the zenith is 0-09 in right ascension and declination in CMC1 - 6, improving to 0-06 in CMC7 - 11. The accuracy in magnitude is 0.05 mag in CMC1 - 10, improving to 0.03 mag in CMC11. The mean error of the proper motions, derived by

  3. GALAXY CLUSTERING TOPOLOGY IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY MAIN GALAXY SAMPLE: A TEST FOR GALAXY FORMATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun-Young; Kim, Juhan; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard; Weinberg, David H.; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2010-09-15

    We measure the topology of the main galaxy distribution using the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, examining the dependence of galaxy clustering topology on galaxy properties. The observational results are used to test galaxy formation models. A volume-limited sample defined by M{sub r} < -20.19 enables us to measure the genus curve with an amplitude of G = 378 at 6 h {sup -1} Mpc smoothing scale, with 4.8% uncertainty including all systematics and cosmic variance. The clustering topology over the smoothing length interval from 6 to 10 h {sup -1} Mpc reveals a mild scale dependence for the shift ({Delta}{nu}) and void abundance (A{sub V}) parameters of the genus curve. We find substantial bias in the topology of galaxy clustering with respect to the predicted topology of the matter distribution, which varies with luminosity, morphology, color, and the smoothing scale of the density field. The distribution of relatively brighter galaxies shows a greater prevalence of isolated clusters and more percolated voids. Even though early (late)-type galaxies show topology similar to that of red (blue) galaxies, the morphology dependence of topology is not identical to the color dependence. In particular, the void abundance parameter A{sub V} depends on morphology more strongly than on color. We test five galaxy assignment schemes applied to cosmological N-body simulations of a {Lambda}CDM universe to generate mock galaxies: the halo-galaxy one-to-one correspondence model, the halo occupation distribution model, and three implementations of semi-analytic models (SAMs). None of the models reproduces all aspects of the observed clustering topology; the deviations vary from one model to another but include statistically significant discrepancies in the abundance of isolated voids or isolated clusters and the amplitude and overall shift of the genus curve. SAM predictions of the topology color dependence are usually correct in sign but incorrect in magnitude

  4. A New Method to Estimate Halo Mass of Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaohu; Shen, Shiyin

    2015-08-01

    Reliable halo mass estimation for a given galaxy system plays an important role both in cosmology and galaxy formation studies. Here we set out to find the way that can improve the halo mass estimation for those galaxy systems with limited brightest member galaxies been observed. Using four mock galaxy samples constructed from semi-analytical formation models, the subhalo abundance matching method and the conditional luminosity functions, respectively, we find that the luminosity gap between the brightest and the subsequent brightest member galaxies in a halo (group) can be used to significantly reduce the scatter in the halo mass estimation based on the luminosity of the brightest galaxy alone. Tests show that these corrections can significantly reduce the scatter in the halo mass estimations by $\\sim 50\\%$ to $\\sim 70\\%$ in massive halos depending on which member galaxies are considered. Comparing to the traditional ranking method, we find that this method works better for groups with less than five members, or in observations with very bright magnitude cut.

  5. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A). Planetary nebulae catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.; Rejkuba, M.; Walton, N. A.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Planetary nebulae (PNe) are excellent tracers of the common low mass stars through their strong and narrow emission lines. The velocities of large numbers of PNe are excellent tracers of galaxy kinematics. NGC 5128, the nearest large early-type galaxy, offers the possibility to gather a large sample. Aims: Imaging and spectroscopic observations of PNe in NGC 5128 were obtained to find and measure their velocities. Combined with literature data, a large sample of high quality kinematic probes is assembled for dynamical studies. Methods: NTT imaging was obtained in 15 fields in NGC 5128 across 1° with EMMI and [O III] and off-band filters. Newly detected sources, combined with literature PN, were used as input for FLAMES multi-fibre spectroscopy in MEDUSA mode. Spectra of the 4600-5100 Å region were analysed and velocities measured based on [O III]4959, 5007 Å and often Hβ. Results: The chief results are catalogues of 1118 PN candidates and 1267 spectroscopically confirmed PNe in NGC 5128. The catalogue of PN candidates contains 1060 PNe discovered with NTT EMMI imaging and 58 from literature surveys. The spectroscopic PN catalogue has FLAMES radial velocity and emission line measurements for 1135 PNe, of which 486 are new. Another 132 PN radial velocities are available from the literature. For 629 PNe observed with FLAMES, Hβ was measured in addition to [O III]. Nine targets show double-lined or more complex profiles, and their possible origin is discussed. FLAMES spectra of 48 globular clusters were also targetted: 11 had emission lines detected (two with multiple components), but only 3 are PNe likely to belong to the host globular. Conclusions: The total of 1267 confirmed PNe in NGC 5128 with radial velocity measurements (1135 with small velocity errors) is the largest collection of individual kinematic probes in an early-type galaxy. This PN dataset, as well as the catalogue of PN candidates, are valuable resources for detailed investigation of NGC

  6. ITER ICRF Antenna Reduced-Scale Mock-up EM Simulations and Comparisons with the Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrytsya, V.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.

    2009-11-01

    A reduced-scale mock-up of one ITER ICRF antenna triplet has been recently built, featuring the optimized front-end geometry, an optimized 4-port junction and the implementation of a service stub. Provision is made to adapt the frequency response of the antenna by acting on the 4-port junction arms lengths, the service stub length as well as the position of its inclusion in the circuit. Variable antenna loading is achieved by moving a salted water tank in front of the antenna. A summary of the first measurements carried out on this mockup is reported in a companion paper [1]. The EM simulations of the mock-up are done with CST Microwave Studio®. The geometry of the mock-up is converted from a CAD file and all essential details are included in the model. S parameters of the mock-up are calculated in a large frequency range covering the ITER ICRF antenna frequency band for different geometries of the mock-up and distances to the load. Results of the simulations and systematic comparisons with the measurements are presented.

  7. ITER ICRF Antenna Reduced-Scale Mock-up EM Simulations and Comparisons with the Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrytsya, V.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.

    2009-11-26

    A reduced-scale mock-up of one ITER ICRF antenna triplet has been recently built, featuring the optimized front-end geometry, an optimized 4-port junction and the implementation of a service stub. Provision is made to adapt the frequency response of the antenna by acting on the 4-port junction arms lengths, the service stub length as well as the position of its inclusion in the circuit. Variable antenna loading is achieved by moving a salted water tank in front of the antenna. A summary of the first measurements carried out on this mockup is reported in a companion paper. The EM simulations of the mock-up are done with CST Microwave Studio registered. The geometry of the mock-up is converted from a CAD file and all essential details are included in the model. S parameters of the mock-up are calculated in a large frequency range covering the ITER ICRF antenna frequency band for different geometries of the mock-up and distances to the load. Results of the simulations and systematic comparisons with the measurements are presented.

  8. Conformity Between LR0 Mock-Ups and Vvers Npp Rpv Neutron Flux Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Sergey; Ilieva, Krassimira; Kirilova, Desislava

    2009-08-01

    The conformity of the mock-up results and those for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of nuclear power plants (NPP) has been evaluated in order to qualify if the mock-ups data could be used for benchmark's purpose only, or/and for simulating of the NPP irradiation conditions. Neutron transport through the vessel has been calculated by the three-dimensional discrete ordinate code TORT with problem oriented multigroup energy neutron cross-section library BGL. Neutron flux/fluence and spectrum shape represented by normalized group neutron fluxes in the multigroup energy structure, for neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV, have been used for conformity analysis. It has been demonstrated that the relative difference of the attenuation factor as well as the group neutron fluxes did not exceed 10% at all considered positions for VVER-440. For VVER-1000, it has been obtained the same consistency, except for the location behind the RPV. The neutron flux attenuation behind the RPV is 18% higher than the mock-up attenuation. It has been shown that this difference arises from the dissimilarity of the biological shielding. The obtained results have demonstrated that the VVERs' mock-ups are appropriate for simulating the NPP irradiation conditions. The mock-up results for VVER-1000 have to be applied more carefully i.e. taking into account the existing peculiarity of the biological shielding and RPV attenuation azimuthal dependence.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dwarf galaxy planes in Local Group (Pawlowski+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, M. S.; Kroupa, P.; Jerjen, H.

    2014-09-01

    The analysis presented in the following is based on the catalogue of nearby galaxies as compiled by McConnachie (2012AJ....144....4M, Cat. J/AJ/144/4) (see also Mateo, 1998ARA&A..36..435M). It includes information on all known galaxies within 3Mpc from the Sun, which have distance estimates based on resolved stellar populations. We use the galaxy positions, radial distances and line-of-sight velocities of the LG galaxies as provided by the most recent online version of the tables by McConnachie (2012AJ....144....4M, https://www.astrosci.ca/users/alan/NearbyDwarfsDatabase.html, Version 2013/Jun/17). To this we add the recently published line-of-sight velocity for Andromeda XXIX (Tollerud et al., 2013ApJ...768...50T) for which no velocities are provided in the catalogue yet. (1 data file).

  10. A prototype catalogue: DOE National Laboratory technologies for infrastructure modernization

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, J.W.; Wilfert, G.L.; March, F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) with information about selected technologies under development in the Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Laboratory System and its Program Office operations. The technologies selected are those that have the potential to improve the performance of the nation's public works infrastructure. The product is a relational database that we refer to as a prototype catalogue of technologies.'' The catalogue contains over 100 entries of DOE-supported technologies having potential application to infrastructure-related problems. The work involved conceptualizing an approach, developing a framework for organizing technology information, and collecting samples of readily available data to be put into a prototype catalogue. In developing the catalogue, our objectives were to demonstrate the concept and provide readily available information to OTA. As such, the catalogue represents a preliminary product. The existing database is not exhaustive and likely represents only a fraction of relevant technologies developed by DOE. In addition, the taxonomy we used to classify technologies is based on the judgment of project staff and has received minimal review by individuals who have been involved in the development and testing of the technologies. Finally, end users will likely identify framework changes and additions that will strengthen the catalogue approach. The framework for the catalogue includes four components: a description of the technology, along with potential uses and other pertinent information; identification of the source of the descriptive information; identification of a person or group knowledgeable about the technology; and a classification of the described technology in terms of its type, application, life-cycle use, function, and readiness.

  11. Catalogue of ISO LWS observations of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, F.; Müller, T. G.

    2009-04-01

    Context: The long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) onboard the infrared space observatory (ISO) observed the four large main-belt asteroids (1) Ceres, (2) Pallas, (4) Vesta, and (10) Hygiea multiple times. The photometric and spectroscopic data cover the wavelength range between 43 and 197 μm, and are a unique dataset for future investigations and detailed characterisations of these bodies. Aims: The standard ISO archive products, produced through the last post-mission LWS pipeline, were still affected by instrument artefacts. Our goal was to provide the best possible data products to exploit the full scientific potential of these observations. Methods: For all asteroid observations we analysed in detail the dark current, the calibration reference flashes, the space environment effects (glitches), memory effects, tracking influences, and various other sources of uncertainty. We performed a refined reduction of all measurements, corrected for the various effects, and re-calibrated the data. We outline the data reduction process and give an overview of the available data and the quality of the observations. We apply a thermophysical model to the flux measurements to derive far-IR based diameter and albedo values of the asteroids. The measured thermal rotational lightcurve of (4) Vesta is compared to model predictions. Results: The catalogue of LWS (long wavelength spectrometer) observations of asteroids contains 57 manually reduced datasets, including seven non-standard observations, which as such did not have final pipeline products available before. In total, the archive now contains 11 spectral scans and 46 fixed grating measurements with a simultaneous observation at 10 key wavelengths distributed over the full LWS range. The new data products are now accessible via the ISO data archive as highly processed data products (HPDP). Conclusions: The quality of the data products was checked against state-of-the-art thermophysical model predictions and an excellent

  12. H-ATLAS: the far-infrared properties of galaxies in and around the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C.; Davies, J. I.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Eales, S.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Maddox, S.; Sansom, A.; Michałowski, M. J.; Davis, T.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a far-infrared survey of the Coma cluster and the galaxy filament it resides within. Our survey covers an area of ˜150 deg2 observed by Herschel H-ATLAS (Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey) in five bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm. The SDSS spectroscopic survey (mr ≤ 17.8) is used to define an area (within the virial radius) and redshift selected (4268 < v < 9700 km s-1) sample of 744 Coma cluster galaxies - the Coma Cluster Catalogue. For comparison, we also define a sample of 951 galaxies in the connecting filament - the Coma Filament Catalogue. The optical positions and parameters are used to define appropriate apertures to measure each galaxy's far-infrared emission. We have detected 99 of 744 (13 per cent) and 422 of 951 (44 per cent) of the cluster and filament galaxies in the SPIRE 250 μm band. We consider the relative detection rates of galaxies of different morphological types finding that it is only the S0/Sa population that shows clear differences between the cluster and filament. We find no differences between the dust masses and temperatures of cluster and filament galaxies with the exception of early-type galaxy dust temperatures, which are significantly hotter in the cluster than in the filament (X-ray heating?). From a chemical evolution model, we find no evidence for different evolutionary processes (gas loss or infall) between galaxies in the cluster and filament.

  13. Intrinsic alignment of simulated galaxies in the cosmic web: implications for weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codis, S.; Gavazzi, R.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Benabed, K.; Desjacques, V.; Pogosyan, D.; Devriendt, J.; Slyz, A.

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes (by means of their angular momentum) and their cross-correlation with the surrounding dark matter tidal field are investigated using the 160 000, z = 1.2 synthetic galaxies extracted from the high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulation HORIZON-AGN. One- and two-point statistics of the spin of the stellar component are measured as a function of mass and colour. For the low-mass galaxies, this spin is locally aligned with the tidal field `filamentary' direction while, for the high-mass galaxies, it is perpendicular to both filaments and walls. The bluest galaxies of our synthetic catalogue are more strongly correlated with the surrounding tidal field than the reddest galaxies, and this correlation extends up to ˜10 h- 1 Mpc comoving distance. We also report a correlation of the projected ellipticities of blue, intermediate-mass galaxies on a similar scale at a level of 10-4 which could be a concern for cosmic shear measurements. We do not report any measurable intrinsic alignments of the reddest galaxies of our sample. This work is a first step towards the use of very realistic catalogue of synthetic galaxies to evaluate the contamination of weak lensing measurement by the intrinsic galactic alignments.

  14. Mock-up Test of Remote Controlled Dismantling Apparatus for Large-sized Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Myodo, M.; Okane, S.; Miyajima, K.

    2002-02-26

    The remote dismantling apparatus, which is equipped with multi-units for functioning of washing, cutting, collection of cut pieces and so on, has been constructed to dismantle the large-sized vessels in the JAERI's Reprocessing Test Facility (JRTF). The apparatus has five-axis movement capability and its operation is performed remotely. The mock-up tests were performed to evaluate the applicability of the apparatus to actual dismantling activities by using the mock-ups of LV-3 and LV-5 in the facility. It was confirmed that each unit was satisfactory functioned by remote operation. Efficient procedure for dismantling the large-sized vessel was studied and various data were obtained from the mock-up tests. This apparatus was found to be applicable for the actual dismantling activity in JRTF.

  15. An Innovative Approach to Pharmacy Law Education Utilizing a Mock Board of Pharmacy Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Bess, D. Todd; Taylor, Jade; Schwab, Carol A.; Wang, Junling; Carter, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of pharmacy law by students is important in the molding of future pharmacy practitioners but a standardized template for the best way to educate students in this area has not been created. A mock Board of Pharmacy meeting was designed and incorporated into the Pharmacy Law course to meet the ACPE accreditation standards at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. Students acted as Board of Pharmacy members and utilized technology to decide outcomes of cases and requests addressed in a typical 2 day Tennessee Board of Pharmacy meeting. The actual responses to those cases, as well as similar cases and requests addressed over a 5 year period, were revealed to students after they made motions on mock scenarios. Student participation in this interactive learning experience resulted in good understanding of the rules and regulations of pharmacy practice and the consequences associated with violating regulations. Such mock Board of Pharmacy meeting is recommended for future pharmacy law education. PMID:27347433

  16. Thermal Damage on LX-04 Mock Material and Gas Permeability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Dehaven, M; McClelland, M; Maienschein, J

    2004-11-15

    RM-04-BR, a mock material for the plastic-bonded HMX-based explosive LX-04, is characterized after being thermally damaged at 140 C and 190 C. We measured the following material properties before and after the thermal experiments: sample volume, density, sound speed, and gas permeability in the material. Thermal treatment of the mock material leads to de-coloring and insignificant weight loss. Sample expanded, resulting in density reductions of 1.0% to 2.5% at 140 C and 190 C, respectively. Permeability in the mock samples was found to increase from 10{sup -15} to 10{sup -16} m{sup 2}, as the porosity increased. The permeability measurements are well represented by the Blake-Kozeny equation for laminar flow through porous media. The results are similar to the gas permeability in PBX-9501 obtained by other researchers.

  17. Thermo-mechanical analyses of HELICA and HEXCALIBER mock-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yixiang; Kamlah, Marc

    2009-04-01

    As benchmark exercises, HELICA and HEXCALIBER mock-ups have been launched in the HE-FUS 3 facility at ENEA Brasimone for investigating the thermo-mechanical behaviour of pebble beds. The present material model of pebble beds, based on the modified Drucker-Prager-Cap model, has been implemented in the commercial finite element package, ABAQUS. The overall behaviour of the lithium orthosilicate cassette (HELICA) and the interactions of ceramic breeder pebble beds and beryllium pebble beds (HEXCALIBER) are studied numerically. The finite element analyses show the temperature distribution of the mock-up experiments, as well as the stress-strain fields. The predictions of HELICA mock-up are compared with the experiments, including the temperature measured by thermo-couples located inside the pebble beds and the lateral deformation of the cell.

  18. Two ASTP prime crews atop mock-ups at JSC to symbolize historic docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The two prime crews of the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) sit atop ASTP mock-ups at JSC to symbolize their historic docking in Earth orbit mission schedules for summer of 1975. They are, left to right, Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot of the American crew; Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American Crew; Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander of the American crew; Cosmonaut Valeriy N. Kubasov, engineer of the Soviet crew; and Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, commander of the Soviet crew. The three Americans are seated on a mock-up of a Docking Module, which is designed to link the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft. The two Soviets are atop a mock-up of a Soyuz spacecraft orbital module. Leonov and Kubasov were among a group of cosmonauts and engineers who visited JSC for three weeks of joint crew training.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Friends-of-friends galaxy group finder (Tempel+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Kipper, R.; Tamm, A.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, M.; Sepp, T.; Tuvikene, T.

    2016-01-01

    To delineate galaxy groups in the local Universe, we used galaxy data from the extragalactic distance database (EDD2; Tully et al., 2009AJ....138..323T). The sample encompasses three datasets. As the main source, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey (Skrutskie et al. 2006AJ....131.1163S, Cat. VII/233) Redshift Survey (2MRS) galaxies brighter than 11.75 mag in the Ks band (for a description of the catalogue, see Huchra et al., 2012, Cat. J/ApJS/199/26). We only used galaxies that are securely off the Galactic plane: Galactic latitude |b|>5°. Since the galaxy sample becomes extremely sparse farther away, we only used galaxies with a cosmic microwave background (CMB) corrected redshift z=0...0.1 (up to 430Mpc). This selection restricts our 2MRS sample to 43480 galaxies. For our analysis, we complemented the main 2MRS sample with two other sources. From the CosmicFlows-2 survey that contains 8198 galaxies with redshift-independent distance estimates (CF2; Tully et al., 2013, Cat. J/AJ/146/86), we added 3627 (of these, 2799 galaxies do not have a measured Ks magnitude). In addition, we made use of the 2M++ catalogue Lavaux & Hudson (2011, Cat. J/MNRAS/416/2840), which combines elements from the 2MRS, the 6DF Galaxy Survey (Jones et al. 2009MNRAS.399..683J, Cat. VII/259), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (York et al., 2000AJ....120.1579Y). Of the 64745 galaxies of the 2M++, we added 31271 galaxies down to Ks<12.54, which extends the sample well beyond the 2MRS magnitude limit. Our final galaxy dataset includes 78378 galaxies. (4 data files).

  20. THE EVOLUTION OF THE NUMBER DENSITY OF COMPACT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Poggianti, B. M.; Calvi, R.; Renzini, A.; Moretti, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Fritz, J.

    2013-11-10

    We compare the number density of compact (small size) massive galaxies at low and high redshift using our Padova Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue (PM2GC) at z = 0.03-0.11 and the CANDELS results from Barro et al. at z = 1-2. The number density of local compact galaxies with luminosity weighted (LW) ages compatible with being already passive at high redshift is compared with the density of compact passive galaxies observed at high-z. Our results place an upper limit of a factor ∼2 on the evolution of the number density and are inconsistent with a significant size evolution for most of the compact galaxies observed at high-z. Instead, the evolution may be significant (up to a factor five) for the most extreme, ultracompact galaxies. Considering all compact galaxies, regardless of LW age and star formation activity, a minority of local compact galaxies (≤1/3) might have formed at z < 1. Finally, we show that the secular decrease of the galaxy stellar mass due to simple stellar evolution may in some cases be a non-negligible factor in the context of the evolution of the mass-size relation, and we caution that passive evolution in mass should be taken into account when comparing samples at different redshifts.

  1. Oxygen abundances in low surface-brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roennback, Jari

    1993-01-01

    Recent theories predict that some protogalaxies, in low-density environments of the field, are contracting and interacting so slowly that global star formation can be delayed until today. These systems should be gas rich and have low surface-brightness. Blue compact galaxies (BCG's) and other compact HII region galaxies currently experiencing a burst of star formation are good candidates of truly young galaxies (in the sense that global star formation recently has been initiated). If they really are young, they ought to have a recent phase when their brightness was much lower than in the bursting phase. No claims of observations of such proto-BCG's exist. Observations of galaxies in their juvenile phases would undoubtedly be of great interest, e.g. the determination of the primordial helium abundance would improve. A proper place to search for young nearby galaxies could be among blue low surface-brightness galaxies (BLSBG's) in the local field. The study of low surface-brightness galaxies (LSBG's) as a group began relatively recently. They are galaxies with extraordinary properties both as individuals and as a group. A few years ago we started an optical study of a sample of BLSBG's selected from the ESO/Uppsala catalogue. Results of spectroscopic observations obtained on a subsample - 8 galaxies - of our selection are reported. The HII region oxygen chemical abundances and its relation to the blue absolute magnitude and surface-brightness is investigated.

  2. Discovery of rare double-lobe radio galaxies hosted in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sievers, Jonathan; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Hilton, Matt; Beelen, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Double-lobe radio galaxies in the local Universe have traditionally been found to be hosted in elliptical or lenticular galaxies. We report the discovery of four spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies (J0836+0532, J1159+5820, J1352+3126, and J1649+2635) that are discovered by cross-matching a large sample of 187 005 spiral galaxies from SDSS DR7 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7) to the full catalogues of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) and NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey). J0836+0532 is reported for the first time. The host galaxies are forming stars at an average rate of 1.7-10 M⊙ yr-1 and possess supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses of a few times 108 M⊙. Their radio morphologies are similar to Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies with total projected linear sizes ranging from 86 to 420 kpc, but their total 1.4-GHz radio luminosities are only in the range 1024-1025 W Hz-1. We propose that the formation of spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies can be attributed to more than one factor, such as the occurrence of strong interactions, mergers, and the presence of unusually massive SMBHs, such that the spiral structures are not destroyed. Only one of our sources (J1649+2635) is found in a cluster environment, indicating that processes other than accretion through cooling flows e.g. galaxy-galaxy mergers or interactions could be plausible scenarios for triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei activity in spiral galaxies.

  3. Identifying and relating biological concepts in the Catalogue of Life

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this paper we describe our experience of adding globally unique identifiers to the Species 2000 and ITIS Catalogue of Life, an on-line index of organisms which is intended, ultimately, to cover all the world's known species. The scientific species names held in the Catalogue are names that already play an extensive role as terms in the organisation of information about living organisms in bioinformatics and other domains, but the effectiveness of their use is hindered by variation in individuals' opinions and understanding of these terms; indeed, in some cases more than one name will have been used to refer to the same organism. This means that it is desirable to be able to give unique labels to each of these differing concepts within the catalogue and to be able to determine which concepts are being used in other systems, in order that they can be associated with the concepts in the catalogue. Not only is this needed, but it is also necessary to know the relationships between alternative concepts that scientists might have employed, as these determine what can be inferred when data associated with related concepts is being processed. A further complication is that the catalogue itself is evolving as scientific opinion changes due to an increasing understanding of life. Results We describe how we are using Life Science Identifiers (LSIDs) as globally unique identifiers in the Catalogue of Life, explaining how the mapping to species concepts is performed, how concepts are associated with specific editions of the catalogue, and how the Taxon Concept Schema has been adopted in order to express information about concepts and their relationships. We explore the implications of using globally unique identifiers in order to refer to abstract concepts such as species, which incorporate at least a measure of subjectivity in their definition, in contrast with the more traditional use of such identifiers to refer to more tangible entities, events, documents

  4. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  5. Functional MRI detection of deception after committing a mock sabotage crime.

    PubMed

    Kozel, F Andrew; Johnson, Kevin A; Grenesko, Emily L; Laken, Steven J; Kose, Samet; Lu, Xinghua; Pollina, Dean; Ryan, Andrew; George, Mark S

    2009-01-01

    Using Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) to detect deception is feasible in simple laboratory paradigms. A mock sabotage scenario was used to test whether this technology would also be effective in a scenario closer to a real-world situation. Healthy, nonmedicated adults were recruited from the community, screened, and randomized to either a Mock-crime group or a No-crime group. The Mock-crime group damaged and stole compact discs (CDs), which contained incriminating video footage, while the No-crime group did not perform a task. The Mock-crime group also picked up an envelope from a researcher, while the No-crime group did not perform this task. Both groups were instructed to report that they picked up an envelope, but did not sabotage any video evidence. Participants later went to the imaging center and were scanned while being asked questions regarding the mock crime. Participants also performed a simple laboratory based fMRI deception testing (Ring-Watch testing). The Ring-Watch testing consisted of "stealing" either a watch or a ring. The participants were instructed to report that they stole neither object. We correctly identified deception during the Ring-Watch testing in 25 of 36 participants (Validated Group). In this Validated Group for whom a determination was made, computer-based scoring correctly identified nine of nine Mock-crime participants (100% sensitivity) and five of 15 No-crime participants (33% specificity). BOLD fMRI presently can be used to detect deception concerning past events with high sensitivity, but low specificity. PMID:19067772

  6. Les galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Francoise

    2016-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made on galaxy formation and evolution in recent years, and new issues. The old Hubble classification according to the tuning fork of spirals, lenticulars and ellipticals, is still useful but has given place to the red sequence, the blue cloud and the green valley, showing a real bimodality of types between star forming galaxies (blue) and quenched ones (red). Large surveys have shown that stellar mass and environment density are the two main factors of the evolution from blue to red sequences. Evolution is followed directly with redshift through a look-back time of more than 12 billion years. The most distant galaxy at z=11. has already a stellar mass of a billion suns. In an apparent anti-hierarchical scenario, the most massive galaxies form stars early on, while essentially dwarf galaxies are actively star-formers now. This downsizing feature also applies to the growth of super-massive black holes at the heart of each bulgy galaxy. The feedback from active nuclei is essential to explain the distribution of mass in galaxies, and in particular to explain why the fraction of baryonic matter is so low, lower by more than a factor 5 than the baryonic fraction of the Universe. New instruments just entering in operation, like MUSE and ALMA, provide a new and rich data flow, which is developed in this series of articles.

  7. Galaxy Zoo 1: data release of morphological classifications for nearly 900 000 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Linott, C.; Slosar, A.; Lintott, C.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S.; Slosar, A.; Land, K.; Thomas, D.; Edmondson, E.; Masters, K.; Nichol, R.C.; Raddick, M.J.; Szalay, A.; Andreescu, D.; Murray, P.; Vandenberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    Morphology is a powerful indicator of a galaxy's dynamical and merger history. It is strongly correlated with many physical parameters, including mass, star formation history and the distribution of mass. The Galaxy Zoo project collected simple morphological classifications of nearly 900,000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, contributed by hundreds of thousands of volunteers. This large number of classifications allows us to exclude classifier error, and measure the influence of subtle biases inherent in morphological classification. This paper presents the data collected by the project, alongside measures of classification accuracy and bias. The data are now publicly available and full catalogues can be downloaded in electronic format from http://data.galaxyzoo.org.

  8. The XXL survey: first results on clusters of galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, Florian

    2016-07-01

    With a total geometric area of 50deg2, XXL is the largest contiguous survey undertaken by the XMM-Newton satellite. The final survey catalogues are expected to contain ~25000 AGNs down to a flux limit of 3e-15 erg/s/cm2 and ~500 groups and clusters of galaxies up to a redshift of z~1.5. The first results of the survey focus on a sub-sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters and have recently been released to the public. In this contribution, I will first describe the sample and the modeling of its selection function. Then, I will discuss some of the most significant early scientific results based on the catalogue, namely the measured scaling relations, the baryon budget of XXL groups, the detection of superstructures and the cosmological implications of the sample.

  9. A Task Plan Method for Auto-Cataloguing Based on SSPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lefeng; Wu, Jianhui; Huang, Jian; Hu, Weidong

    2013-08-01

    The on-orbit object auto-cataloguing of Space Surveillance Phased Array Radar (SSPAR) contains two progresses, one is catalogue improvement, the other one is catalogue maintenance. In the catalogue improvement, SSPAR captures the new on-orbit objects in the search fence, and grows the record count of the catalogue database. In the catalogue maintenance, SSPAR samples the catalogued objects' arcs and updates their stable orbital elements. The auto-cataloguing capacity of SSPAR is highly dependent on the stable tracking and updating rate, which will be influenced by many radar parameters. If SSPAR's total time resource is allocated rationally between the searching task and tracking task according to SSPAR's work parameters and objects' orbital characteristics, SSPAR's auto-cataloguing capacity will be improved remarkably.

  10. Study of the star catalogue (epoch AD 1396.0) recorded in ancient Korean astronomical almanac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Junhyeok; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Yong-Sam

    2015-11-01

    The study of old star catalogues provides important astrometric data. Most of the researches based on the old star catalogues were manuscript published in Europe and from Arabic/Islam. However, the old star catalogues published in East Asia did not get attention. Therefore, among the East Asian star catalogues we focus on a particular catalogue recorded in a Korean almanac. Its catalogue contains 277 stars that are positioned in a region within 10° of the ecliptic plane. The stars in the catalogue were identified using the modern Hipparcos catalogue. We identified 274 among 277 stars, which is a rate of 98.9 per cent. The catalogue records the epoch of the stars' positions as AD 1396.0. However, by using all of the identified stars we found that the initial epoch of the catalogue is AD 1363.1 ± 3.2. In conclusion, the star catalogue was compiled and edited from various older star catalogues. We assume a correlation with the Almagest by Ptolemaios. This study presents newly analysed results from the historically important astronomical data discovered in East Asia. Therefore, this star catalogue will become important data for comparison with the star catalogues published in Europe and from Arabic/Islam.

  11. The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    ESO's Wide Field Imager has captured the intricate swirls of the spiral galaxy Messier 83, a smaller look-alike of our own Milky Way. Shining with the light of billions of stars and the ruby red glow of hydrogen gas, it is a beautiful example of a barred spiral galaxy, whose shape has led to it being nicknamed the Southern Pinwheel. Messier 83, M83 ESO PR Photo 25/08 Spiral Galaxy Messier 83 This dramatic image of the galaxy Messier 83 was captured by the Wide Field Imager at ESO's La Silla Observatory, located high in the dry desert mountains of the Chilean Atacama Desert. Messier 83 lies roughly 15 million light-years away towards the huge southern constellation of Hydra (the sea serpent). It stretches over 40 000 light-years, making it roughly 2.5 times smaller than our own Milky Way. However, in some respects, Messier 83 is quite similar to our own galaxy. Both the Milky Way and Messier 83 possess a bar across their galactic nucleus, the dense spherical conglomeration of stars seen at the centre of the galaxies. This very detailed image shows the spiral arms of Messier 83 adorned by countless bright flourishes of ruby red light. These are in fact huge clouds of glowing hydrogen gas. Ultraviolet radiation from newly born, massive stars is ionising the gas in these clouds, causing the great regions of hydrogen to glow red. These star forming regions are contrasted dramatically in this image against the ethereal glow of older yellow stars near the galaxy's central hub. The image also shows the delicate tracery of dark and winding dust streams weaving throughout the arms of the galaxy. Messier 83 was discovered by the French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in the mid 18th century. Decades later it was listed in the famous catalogue of deep sky objects compiled by another French astronomer and famous comet hunter, Charles Messier. Recent observations of this enigmatic galaxy in ultraviolet light and radio waves have shown that even its outer desolate regions

  12. X-15 mock-up with test pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA research pilot Milt Thompson is seen here with the mock-up of X-15 #3 that was later installed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Milton 0. Thompson was a research pilot, Chief Engineer and Director of Research Projects during a long career at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Thompson was hired as an engineer at the flight research facility on 19 March 1956, when it was still under the auspices of NACA. He became a research pilot on 25 May 1958. Thompson was one of the 12 NASA, Air Force, and Navy pilots to fly the X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft between 1959 and 1968. He began flying X-15s on 29 October 1963. He flew the aircraft 14 times during the following two years, reaching a maximum speed of 3723 mph (Mach 5.42) and a peak altitude of 214,100 feet on separate flights. (On a different flight, he reached a Mach number of 5.48 but his mph was only 3712.) Thompson concluded his active flying career in 1968, becoming Director of Research Projects. In 1975 he was appointed Chief Engineer and retained the position until his death on 8 August 1993. The X-15 was a rocket powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense

  13. X-15 mock-up with test pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA research pilot Milt Thompson stands next to a mock-up of X-15 number 3 that was later installed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Milton 0. Thompson was a research pilot, Chief Engineer and Director of Research Projects during a long career at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Thompson was hired as an engineer at the flight research facility on 19 March 1956, when it was still under the auspices of NACA. He became a research pilot on 25 May 1958. Thompson was one of the 12 NASA, Air Force, and Navy pilots to fly the X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft between 1959 and 1968. He began flying X-15s on 29 October 1963. He flew the aircraft 14 times during the following two years, reaching a maximum speed of 3723 mph (Mach 5.42) and a peak altitude of 214,100 feet on separate flights. Thompson concluded his active flying career in 1968, becoming Director of Research Projects. In 1975 he was appointed Chief Engineer and retained the position until his death on 8 August 1993. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as

  14. A GROUP-GALAXY CROSS-CORRELATION FUNCTION ANALYSIS IN zCOSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Knobel, C.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Caputi, K.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Cucciati, O.; Iovino, A.; De la Torre, S.; De Ravel, L.; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present a group-galaxy cross-correlation analysis using a group catalog produced from the 16,500 spectra from the optical zCOSMOS galaxy survey. Our aim is to perform a consistency test in the redshift range 0.2 {<=} z {<=} 0.8 between the clustering strength of the groups and mass estimates that are based on the richness of the groups. We measure the linear bias of the groups by means of a group-galaxy cross-correlation analysis and convert it into mass using the bias-mass relation for a given cosmology, checking the systematic errors using realistic group and galaxy mock catalogs. The measured bias for the zCOSMOS groups increases with group richness as expected by the theory of cosmic structure formation and yields masses that are reasonably consistent with the masses estimated from the richness directly, considering the scatter that is obtained from the 24 mock catalogs. Some exceptions are the richest groups at high redshift (estimated to be more massive than 10{sup 13.5} M{sub Sun }), for which the measured bias is significantly larger than for any of the 24 mock catalogs (corresponding to a 3{sigma} effect), which is attributed to the extremely large structure that is present in the COSMOS field at z {approx} 0.7. Our results are in general agreement with previous studies that reported unusually strong clustering in the COSMOS field.

  15. Official 1996 Mock Trial Materials for the Twenty-Fourth Annual District of Columbia Public Schools Mock Trial Program. Kyle Wilkins, Plaintiff, v. New Columbia County School District, Defendant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Alexandra M.

    This guide contains the 1996 mock trial materials for the District of Columbia mock trial program. The trial focuses on a high school student who died of a heart attack attributed to the use of steroids. The plaintiff, the student's father, alleges that the school, its principal, and track coach were negligent in the death because they failed to…

  16. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  17. A Catalogue of XMM-Newton BL Lacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouco Escorial, A.; de la Calle, I.; Held, J.; Racero, E.

    2014-07-01

    A catalogue of XMM-Newton BL Lac is presented based on a cross-correlation with the 1374 BL Lac objects listed in the 13th edition of the Veron-Cetty and Veron (2010) catalogue. X-ray counterparts were searched for in the field of view of more than 10000 pointed observations available in the XMM-Newton Archive (XSA) that were public before June 2012. The cross-correlation yielded around 250 XMM-Newton observations, which correspond to 162 different sources. X-ray data from the three EPIC cameras and Optical Monitor data were uniformly analyzed using the latest XMMNewton Science Analysis System (SAS) version. The catalogue collects X-ray spectral properties, including flux variability, of the sample in the 0.2 - 10 keV energy band.

  18. Reassessing the BATSE Catalogue of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleinkofer, A. M.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2015-12-01

    Since Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on NASA's Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) in the 1990s, other observations have increased our knowledge of TGFs. This improved understanding includes characteristics such as the distributions of geographic locations, pulse durations, pulse shapes, and pulse multiplicities. Using this post-BATSE knowledge, we reassessed the BATSE TGF catalogue(http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/batse/tgf/). Some BATSE triggers have features that can easily identify the trigger as a TGF, while others display different features that are unusual for TGFs. The BATSE triggers of the TGF catalogue were classified into five categories: TGFs, Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs), unusual TGFs, uncertain due to insufficient data, and TEB candidates. The triggers with unusual features will be further investigated. A table of our classifications and comments will be added to the online catalogue.

  19. Euclid Star Catalogue Management for the Fine Guidance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The Fine Guidance Sensor is a key element of the AOCS subsystem for the Euclid spacecraft in order to achieve the required absolute pointing accuracy and pointing stability of the telescope Line of Sight. The Fine Guidance Sensor is able to give measure of the relative attitude with respect to the first attitude acquired and the measure of the absolute attitude with respect to the inertial reference frame through the use of an on-board Star Catalogue. The presence of at least 3 star-like objects per FoV is needed to compute the attitude; considering the small FGS FoV (0.1x0.1deg) the Star Catalogue shall be complete up to visual magnitude 19 to allow the correct coverage. The paper describes the implementation of the catalogue in the FGS design and the management of the big amount of data on ground, between ground and spacecraft, and on-board.

  20. Planck 2013 results. XXVIII. The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Beelen, A.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is the catalogue of sources detected in the first 15 months of Planck operations, the “nominal” mission. It consists of nine single-frequency catalogues of compact sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, detected over the entire sky. The PCCS covers the frequency range 30-857 GHz with higher sensitivity (it is 90% complete at 180 mJy in the best channel) and better angular resolution (from 32.88' to 4.33') than previous all-sky surveys in this frequency band. By construction its reliability is >80% and more than 65% of the sources have been detected in at least two contiguous Planck channels. In this paper we present the construction and validation of the PCCS, its contents and its statistical characterization.

  1. Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Th.; Freyberg, M. J.; Trümper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. Methods: We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4° × 6.4° sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the variable point-spread function (PSF) across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. X-ray control images showing the source and background extraction regions were generated, which were visually inspected. Simulations were performed to assess the spurious source content of the 2RXS catalogue. X-ray spectra and light curves were extracted for the 2RXS sources, with spectral and variability parameters derived from these products. Results: We obtained about 135 000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5, as adopted in the 1RXS faint source catalogue. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spurious detections. A more conservative likelihood threshold of 9, on the other hand, yields about 71 000 detections with a 5% spurious fraction. We recommend thresholds appropriate to the scientific application. X-ray images and overlaid X-ray contour lines provide an additional user product to evaluate the detections visually, and we performed our own visual inspections to flag uncertain detections. Intra-day variability in the X-ray light curves was quantified based on the

  2. Development of the Equatorial Infrared Catalogue from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinsheimer, T. F.; Sweeney, L. H.; Yates, F. F.; Maran, S. P.; Lesh, J. R.; Nagy, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    More than 40,000 infrared measurements of stellar sources have been obtained since November, 1976 during the ongoing process of compiling an Equatorial Infrared Catalogue. Because of the problem of eliminating spurious sources, which has affected earlier space surveys, an extensive effort is being made to verify the sources by means of (1) repetitive observations by satellite sensors, (2) cross correlation with a large data base developed from ground-based and space surveys at other wavelengths, and (3) investigation of a significant subset of the sources with a ground-based infrared telescope. As sources are verified, they are transferred from a working list to a screened preliminary version of the catalogue. The catalogue comprises the only survey of a significant area of the sky that has been accomplished (or is presently planned) with positional accuracies of a few arc seconds at a wavelength of not less than 2 microns.

  3. Gamma-ray detected radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Volker; Soldi, Simona; De Jong, Sandra; Kretschmer, Karsten; Savchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    So far 15 radio galaxies have been detected in the gamma-ray domain by CGRO/EGRET and Fermi/LAT, with a few detections also in the VHE range. We search for distinguishing parameters and estimate the total number of gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies that are potentially detectable by Fermi/LAT. We use Fermi/LAT data in comparison with X-ray and hard X-ray data in order to constrain basic parameters such as the total power of the inverse Compton branch and the position of its peak. We search for possible correlations between the radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray domain and derive the number counts distribution. We then compare their properties with those of the radio galaxies in the 3CRR and SMS4 catalogues. The data show no correlation between the peak of the inverse Compton emission and its luminosity. For the gamma-ray detected radio galaxies the luminosities in the various bands are correlated, except for the UV band, but there is no indication of a correlation of peak frequency or luminosity with the spectral slopes in the X-ray or gamma-ray band. The comparison with other bright radio galaxies shows that the gamma-ray detected objects are among those that have the largest X-ray but rather moderate radio fluxes. Their UV and X-ray luminosities are similar, but gamma-ray detected radio galaxies are predominantly of type FR-I, while the 3CRR sample contains mainly FR-II objects. The number counts of the so far gamma-ray detected radio galaxies shows a very shallow slope, indicating that potentially a fraction of radio galaxies has been missed so far or has not been identified as such, although the predicted number of 22 ± 7 is consistent with the observed 15 objects.

  4. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Marinoni, Christian; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; Faber, S.M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  5. Three editions of the star catalogue of Tycho Brahe. Machine-readable versions and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    Tycho Brahe completed his catalogue with the positions and magnitudes of 1004 fixed stars in 1598. This catalogue circulated in manuscript form. Brahe edited a shorter version with 777 stars, printed in 1602, and Kepler edited the full catalogue of 1004 stars, printed in 1627. We provide machine-readable versions of the three versions of the catalogue, describe the differences between them and briefly discuss their accuracy on the basis of comparison with modern data from the Hipparcos Catalogue. We also compare our results with earlier analyses by Dreyer (1916, Tychonis Brahe Dani Scripta Astronomica, Vol. II) and Rawlins (1993, DIO, 3, 1), finding good overall agreement. The magnitudes given by Brahe correlate well with modern values, his longitudes and latitudes have error distributions with widths of 2´, with excess numbers of stars with larger errors (as compared to Gaussian distributions), in particular for the faintest stars. Errors in positions larger than ≃10´, which comprise about 15% of the entries, are likely due to computing or copying errors. The full tables KeplerE and Variants (see Table 4) and the table with the latin descriptions of the stars are available in electronic form only at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/516/A28

  6. Selecting background galaxies in weak-lensing analysis of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formicola, I.; Radovich, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Mazzotta, P.; Grado, A.; Giocoli, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to select the faint, background galaxies used to derive the mass of galaxy clusters by weak lensing. The method is based on the simultaneous analysis of the shear signal, that should be consistent with zero for the foreground, unlensed galaxies, and of the colours of the galaxies: photometric data from the COSMic evOlution Survey are used to train the colour selection. In order to validate this methodology, we test it against a set of state-of-the-art image simulations of mock galaxy clusters in different redshift [0.23-0.45] and mass [0.5-1.55 × 1015 M⊙] ranges, mimicking medium-deep multicolour imaging observations [e.g. Subaru, Large Binocular Telescope]. The performance of our method in terms of contamination by unlensed sources is comparable to a selection based on photometric redshifts, which however requires a good spectral coverage and is thus much more observationally demanding. The application of our method to simulations gives an average ratio between estimated and true masses of ˜0.98 ± 0.09. As a further test, we finally apply our method to real data, and compare our results with other weak-lensing mass estimates in the literature: for this purpose, we choose the cluster Abell 2219 (z = 0.228), for which multiband (BVRi) data are publicly available.

  7. Supervoids in the WISE-2MASS catalogue imprinting cold spots in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, F.; García-Bellido, J.; Kovács, A.; Paci, F.; Szapudi, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Cold Spot (CS) is a clear feature in the cosmic microwave background (CMB); it could be of primordial origin, or caused by a intervening structure along the line of sight. We identified a large projected underdensity in the recently constructed WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogue aligned with the CS direction at (l, b) ≈ (209°, -57°). It has an angular size of tens of degrees, and shows a ˜20 per cent galaxy underdensity in the centre. Moreover, we find another large underdensity in the projected WISE-2MASS galaxy map at (l, b) ≈ (101°, 46°) (hereafter Draco supervoid), also aligned with a CMB decrement, although less significant than that of the CS direction. Motivated by these findings, we develop spherically symmetric Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) compensated void models to explain the observed CMB decrements with these two underdensities, or `supervoids'. Within our perturbative treatment of the LTB voids, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe and Riess-Sciama effects due to the Draco supervoid can account for the CMB decrement observed in the same direction. On the contrary, the extremely deep CMB decrement in the CS direction is more difficult to explain by the presence of the CS supervoid only. Nevertheless, the probability of a random alignment between the CS and the corresponding supervoid is disfavoured, and thus its contribution as a secondary anisotropy cannot be neglected. We comment on how the approximations used in this paper, in particular the assumption of spherical symmetry, could change quantitatively our conclusions and might provide a better explanation for the CMB CS.

  8. Towards a Next-Generation Catalogue Cross-Match Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, F.; Boch, T.; Derriere, S.; Arches Consortium

    2015-09-01

    We have been developing in the past several catalogue cross-match tools. On one hand the CDS XMatch service (Pineau et al. 2011), able to perform basic but very efficient cross-matches, scalable to the largest catalogues on a single regular server. On the other hand, as part of the European project ARCHES1, we have been developing a generic and flexible tool which performs potentially complex multi-catalogue cross-matches and which computes probabilities of association based on a novel statistical framework. Although the two approaches have been managed so far as different tracks, the need for next generation cross-match services dealing with both efficiency and complexity is becoming pressing with forthcoming projects which will produce huge high quality catalogues. We are addressing this challenge which is both theoretical and technical. In ARCHES we generalize to N catalogues the candidate selection criteria - based on the chi-square distribution - described in Pineau et al. (2011). We formulate and test a number of Bayesian hypothesis which necessarily increases dramatically with the number of catalogues. To assign a probability to each hypotheses, we rely on estimated priors which account for local densities of sources. We validated our developments by comparing the theoretical curves we derived with the results of Monte-Carlo simulations. The current prototype is able to take into account heterogeneous positional errors, object extension and proper motion. The technical complexity is managed by OO programming design patterns and SQL-like functionalities. Large tasks are split into smaller independent pieces for scalability. Performances are achieved resorting to multi-threading, sequential reads and several tree data-structures. In addition to kd-trees, we account for heterogeneous positional errors and object's extension using M-trees. Proper-motions are supported using a modified M-tree we developed, inspired from Time Parametrized R-trees (TPR

  9. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterbos, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy is the closest SPIRAL GALAXY to the MILKY WAY, just visible to the naked eye on a dark night as a faint smudge of light in the constellation Andromeda. The earliest records of the Andromeda nebula, as it is still often referred to, date back to AD 964, to the `Book of the Fixed Stars' published by the Persian astronomer AL-SÛFI. The first European to officially note the Andro...

  10. Spectral Imaging of Galaxy Clusters with Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Rasia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is a promising tool for detecting the presence of hot gas out to the galaxy cluster peripheries. We developed a spectral imaging algorithm dedicated to the SZ observations of nearby galaxy clusters with Planck, with the aim of revealing gas density anisotropies related to the filamentary accretion of materials, or pressure discontinuities induced by the propagation of shock fronts. To optimize an unavoidable trade-off between angular resolution and precision of the SZ flux measurements, the algorithm performs a multi-scale analysis of the SZ maps as well as of other extended components, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the Galactic thermal dust. The demixing of the SZ signal is tackled through kernel-weighted likelihood maximizations. The CMB anisotropies are further analyzed through a wavelet analysis, while the Galactic foregrounds and SZ maps are analyzed via a curvelet analysis that best preserves their anisotropic details. The algorithm performance has been tested against mock observations of galaxy clusters obtained by simulating the Planck High Frequency Instrument and by pointing at a few characteristic positions in the sky. These tests suggest that Planck should easily allow us to detect filaments in the cluster peripheries and detect large-scale shocks in colliding galaxy clusters that feature favorable geometry.

  11. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2012-11-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a EUCLID-like photometric galaxy and cosmic shear survey will be able to constrain the absolute neutrino mass scale. Adopting conservative assumptions about the survey specifications and assuming complete ignorance of the galaxy bias, we estimate that the minimum mass sum of Σm{sub ν} ≅ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5σ to 2.5σ significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from PLANCK. With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4σ. Interestingly, neither PLANCK+shear nor PLANCK+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to Σm{sub ν}, EUCLID-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias ( < 1σ) in the parameter estimation is induced by fitting inaccurate models of the neutrino mass splittings to the mock data, nor does the goodness-of-fit of these models suffer any significant degradation relative to the true one (Δχ{sub eff}{sup 2} < 1)

  12. Galaxy clusters as probes for cosmology and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistelli, Elia S.; Burigana, Carlo; de Bernardis, Paolo; Kirillov, Alexander A.; Neto, Gastao B. Lima; Masi, Silvia; Norgaard-Nielsen, Hans U.; Ostermann, Peter; Roman, Matthieu; Rosati, Piero; Rossetti, Mariachiara

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in building new galaxy clusters samples, at low and high redshifts, from wide-area surveys, particularly exploiting the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect. A large effort is underway to identify and characterize these new systems with optical/NIR and X-ray facilities, thus opening new avenues to constraint cosmological models using structure growth and geometrical tests. A census of galaxy clusters sets constraints on reionization mechanisms and epochs, which need to be reconciled with recent limits on the reionization optical depth from cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Future advances in SZ effect measurements will include the possibility to (unambiguously) measure directly the kinematic SZ effect, to build an even larger catalogue of galaxy clusters able to study the high redshift universe, and to make (spatially-)resolved galaxy cluster maps with even spectral capability to (spectrally-)resolve the relativistic corrections of the SZ effect.

  13. A Search for Carbon Stars in the AFGL Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamore, A.; Smriglio, F.; Bussoletti, E.; Corsi, C. E.; Rossi, L.

    1980-09-01

    A comparison between theGeneral Catalogue of Cool Carbon Stars (CCS) and theAFGL Catalogue has been performed. Eighty-five stars have been found in common between the two lists. Eighty-four stars which were present in Baumert's comparison between CCS and the 2 μ Sky Survey have no counterpart in the AFGL. Four new tentative identifications are given. The analysis of the two colours diagrams K-[4.2 μ] vs. I-K and I-[4.2 μ] vs. [4.2 μ]-[11 μ] led to the conclusion that all the infrared emission from the sources seems to come from a single circumstellar shell.

  14. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, M. R.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Lazzati, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2003-02-01

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI) derived from all ROSAT HRI pointed observations with exposure times longer than 100 s available in the ROSAT public archives. The data were analyzed automatically using a wavelet detection algorithm suited to the detection and characterization of both point-like and extended sources. This algorithm is able to detect and disentangle sources in very crowded fields and/or in the presence of extended or bright sources. Images have been also visually inspected after the analysis to ensure verification. The final catalogue, derived from 4303 observations, consists of 29 089 sources detected with a detection probability of >=4.2 sigma . For each source, the primary catalogue entries provide name, position, count rate, flux and extension along with the relative errors. In addition, results of cross-correlations with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS and GSC2) are also reported. Some information is available on the web via the DIANA Interface. As an external check, we compared our catalogue with the previously available ROSHRICAT catalogue (both in its short and long versions) and we were able to recover, for the short version, ~ 90% of the entries. We computed the sky coverage of the entire HRI data set by means of simulations. The complete BMW-HRI catalogue provides a sky coverage of 732 deg2 down to a limiting flux of ~ 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 and of 10 deg2 down to ~ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. We were able to compute the cosmological log(N)-log(S) distribution down to a flux of =~ 1.2 x 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. The catalogue is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/399/351

  15. People v. Clevenger: Issues of Vandalism, Computer Crimes, and Search and Seizure. Official Materials for the California Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    This booklet contains the official materials that student teams used to prepare for the 16th Annual California State Mock Trial Competition, held in April 1997. The mock trial process is designed to clarify for students the workings of legal institutions. As student teams study a hypothetical case, conduct legal research, and receive guidance from…

  16. Statement of Facts for 1992 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. United States v. David Jones. MT-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 21 annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides material for a mock rape trial. David Jones and Susan Williams, both students at Capital University, had dated on and off during the previous years and on the night of the incident had attended a party…

  17. Statement of Facts for 1988 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. United States v. Martha Monroe. MT-88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 17th annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides the material for a mock criminal trial. The federal government charges Martha Monroe with first degree murder for shooting her husband, George Monroe, while he slept. Martha Monroe asserts that she acted…

  18. Hipparcos to deliver its final results catalogue soon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    them, almost 30 years ago, to propose carrying out these observations from the relatively benign environment of space. Hipparcos is, by present standards, a medium-sized satellite, with a 30 cm telescope sensing simply ordinary light. But it has been described as the most imaginative in the short history of space astronomy. This foresight has been amply repaid. In the long history of stargazing it ranks with the surveys by Hipparchus the Greek in the 2nd Century BC and by Tichy Brahe the Dane in the 16th Century AD, both of which transformed human perceptions of the Universe. Positions derived from the Hipparcos satellite are better than a millionth of a degree, and newly a thousand times more accurate than star positions routinely determined from he ground. This accuracy makes it possible to measure directly the distances to the stars. While it took 250 years between astronomers first setting out on the exacting task of measuring the distance to a star, and a stellar distance being measured for the first time, ESA's Hipparcos mission has revolutionised this long, painstaking, and fundamental task by measuring accurate distances and movements of more than one hundred thousand. The measurement concept involved he satellite triangulating its way between he stars all wound the sky, building up a celestial map in much the same way as land surveyors use triangulation between hill-tops to measure distances accurately. Only the angles involved are much smaller : the accuracy that has been achieved with the Hipparcos Catalogue is such that he two edges of a coin, viewed from he other side of the Atlantic Ocean, could be distinguished. The results from Hipparcos will deliver scientists with long-awaited details of our place in he Milky Way Galaxy. Most of he stars visible to the naked eye are, to a large extent, companions of the Sun, in a great orbital march around the centre of the Galaxy, a journey so long that it takes individual stars 250 million years to complete, in

  19. Study of the Lynx-Cancer void galaxies. - V. The extremely isolated galaxy UGC 4722

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Makarov, D. I.; Perepelitsyna, Y. A.; Safonova, E. S.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2015-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the extremely isolated Sdm galaxy UGC 4722 (MB = -17.4) located in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. UGC 4722 is a member of the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies, and has also been identified as one of the most isolated galaxies in the Local Supercluster. Optical images of the galaxy however show that it has a peculiar morphology with an elongated ˜14 kpc-long plume. New observations with the Russian 6-m telescope (BTA) and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) of the ionized and neutral gas in UGC 4722 reveal the second component responsible for the disturbed morphology of the system. This is a small, almost completely destroyed, very gas-rich dwarf (MB = -15.2, M(H I)/LB ˜ 4.3) We estimate the oxygen abundance for both galaxies to be 12 + log (O/H) ˜ 7.5-7.6 which is two to three times lower than what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation for similar galaxies in denser environments. The ugr colours of the plume derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images are consistent with a simple stellar population with a post starburst age of 0.45-0.5 Gyr. This system hence appears to be the first known case of a minor merger with a prominent tidal feature consisting of a young stellar population.

  20. MCMC Analysis of biases in the interpretation of disk galaxy kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation of galaxy surveys like SAMI, CALIFA and MaNGA opens up the possibility of studying simultaneously properties of galaxies such as spiral arms, bars, disk geometry and orientation, stellar and gas mass distribution, 2D kinematics, etc. The previous task involves exploring a complicated multi-dimensional parameter space. Puglielli et al. (2010) introduced Bayesian statistics and MCMC (Monte Carlo Markov Chain) techniques to construct dynamical models of spiral galaxies. In our study we used synthetic velocity fields that include non-circular motions and assume different disk orientations in order to produce mock observations. We apply popular reconstruction techniques in order to estimate the geometrical disk parameters, systemic velocities, rotation curve shape and maximum circular velocity which are crucial to construct the scaling relations. We conclude that a detailed analysis of kinematics in galaxies using MCMC technique will be reflected in accurate estimations of galaxy properties and more robust scalings relations, otherwise physical conclusions may be importantly biased.

  1. Bling My Research! A Mock Grant Panel Activity Illustrating the Importance of Basic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leander, Celeste A.; Whitton, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students have misconceptions about the source and dynamics of publicly funded research money. We designed an activity in which students take part in a mock grant panel. The results indicated a strong tendency toward student funding of applied medical research at the expense of basic research. Exposure to a few examples of…

  2. The Florida High School Mock Trial Competition Case Materials, 1997. State of Florida v. Lee Appleman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Law Related Education Association, Tallahassee.

    This material provides students with information to prepare for a mock trial. The defendant in this case has been accused of the crime of driving under the influence of alcoholic beverages causing severe bodily injury. Case materials include stipulated facts, jury instructions, depositions, and other related materials. (EH)

  3. Seeing is Believing: Video Mock-Ups to Evaluate and Demonstrate Multimedia Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadde, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    A video mock-up is a "design story", described by Patrick Parrish in a recent "TechTrends" article as "imagining the journey of a learner's experience in engaging with a finished design". A design story allows designers to show their design vision to others and to observe features and benefits of the program as a learner would experience it. The…

  4. Speaking with (Dis)respect: A Study of Reactions to Mock Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the reactions of 147 participants of various ethnicities to a language practice in the USA that has been characterized as Mock Spanish, a special register in which Spanish words or phrases are used to evoke humor by indexing an often unflattering image of Spanish speakers. Research questions include…

  5. Structural-hydraulic test of the liquid metal EURISOL target mock-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, Rade Ž.; Dementjevs, Sergejs; Samec, Karel; Platacis, Ernests; Zik, Anatolij; Flerov, Aleksej; Manfrin, Enzo; Thomsen, Knud

    2009-08-01

    Structural-hydraulic tests of the European Isotope Separation On-Line (EURISOL) neutron converter target mock-up, named MErcury Target EXperiment 1 (METEX 1), have been conducted by Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI, Switzerland) in cooperation with Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL, Latvia). PSI proceeded with extensive thermal-hydraulic and structural computational studies, followed by the target mock-up tests carried out on the mercury loop at IPUL. One of the main goals of the METEX 1 test is to investigate the hydraulic and structural behaviour of the EURISOL target mock-up for various inlet flow conditions (i.e. mass flow rates) and, in particular, for nominal operating flow rate and pressure in the system. The experimental results were analysed by advanced time-frequency methods such as Short-Time Fourier Transform in order to check the vibration characteristics of the mock-up and the resonance risk. The experimental results (obtained in METEX 1), which include inlet flow rate, pressure of the cover gas, total pressure loss, structural acceleration, sound and strain data, were jointly analysed together with numerical data obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

  6. Effects of Detail in Eyewitness Testimony on Decisions by Mock Jurors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Wendy P.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Sawa, Stephanie E.; Hodge, Kristine M.

    1997-01-01

    Investigated the effects of the presence and typicality of detail in a witness' testimony on mock juror judgments. Results indicate that the presence of detail affected the ratings of witnesses. Atypical or typical detail provided by one witness, with no detail provided by the opposing witness, enhanced assessments of the former. (RJM)

  7. "Francine, Kerplunk, and the Golden Nugget" -- Conducting Mock Trials and Debates in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Charles R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process for creating a mock trial based on the fable "Francine, Kerplunk, and the Golden Nugget." Explains that during the jury deliberations the jurors utilize chart structures to assess the credibility of the witness' testimony and the attorney's arguments. Maintains that chart structures can also be adapted to classroom debates.…

  8. Using Mock Trials to Teach Students Forensic Core Competencies in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Linville, Deanna; Todahl, Jeff; Metcalfe, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a description of a university-based project that used mock trials to train both practicum-level marriage and family therapy and law students in forensic work, and a qualitative investigation of student experiences with the training. The content of the training focused on American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy…

  9. The Mock Trial: A Dynamic Exercise for Thinking Critically about Management Theories, Topics, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Kevin; Meisel, Steven I.; Seltzer, Joe; Kane, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The Mock Trial is an experiential exercise adapted from a law school process that encourages students to think critically about theories, topics, and the practice of management in an innovative classroom experience. Playing the role of attorneys and witnesses, learners ask questions and challenge assumptions by playing roles in a trial with…

  10. Millimeter wave experiment of ITER equatorial EC launcher mock-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Isozaki, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Omori, T.; Henderson, M.

    2014-02-01

    The full-scale mock-up of the equatorial launcher was fabricated in basis of the baseline design to investigate the mm-wave propagation properties of the launcher, the manufacturability, the cooling line management, how to assemble the components and so on. The mock-up consists of one of three mm-wave transmission sets and one of eight waveguide lines can deliver the mm-wave power. The mock-up was connected to the ITER compatible transmission line and the 170GHz gyrotron and the high power experiment was carried out. The measured radiation pattern of the beam at the location of 2.5m away from the EL mock-up shows the successful steering capability of 20°˜40°. It was also revealed that the radiated profile at both steering and fixed focusing mirror agreed with the calculation. The result also suggests that some unwanted modes are included in the radiated beam. Transmission of 0.5MW-0.4sec and of 0.12MW-50sec were also demonstrated.

  11. The Trial of Napoleon: A Case Study for Using Mock Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKay, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "The Trial of Napoleon Bonaparte" that focuses on a fictitious mock trial of Napoleon Bonaparte to answer the question: did Napoleon pervert or preserve the gain of the French Revolution? Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the course. (CMK)

  12. Order of Verdict Consideration and Decision Rule Effects on Mock Jury Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaye, Imafidon M.

    A study investigated the effects of order verdict consideration and decision rule on jury verdicts. After reading the summary of an actual trial, 240 mock jurors drawn from undergraduate communications classes were randomly assigned to six-member juries. Jury assignments were made under two verdict orders (ascending and descending order of…

  13. Millimeter wave experiment of ITER equatorial EC launcher mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Isozaki, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Omori, T.; Henderson, M.

    2014-02-12

    The full-scale mock-up of the equatorial launcher was fabricated in basis of the baseline design to investigate the mm-wave propagation properties of the launcher, the manufacturability, the cooling line management, how to assemble the components and so on. The mock-up consists of one of three mm-wave transmission sets and one of eight waveguide lines can deliver the mm-wave power. The mock-up was connected to the ITER compatible transmission line and the 170GHz gyrotron and the high power experiment was carried out. The measured radiation pattern of the beam at the location of 2.5m away from the EL mock-up shows the successful steering capability of 20°∼40°. It was also revealed that the radiated profile at both steering and fixed focusing mirror agreed with the calculation. The result also suggests that some unwanted modes are included in the radiated beam. Transmission of 0.5MW-0.4sec and of 0.12MW-50sec were also demonstrated.

  14. Data-Based Active Learning in the Principles of Macroeconomics Course: A Mock FOMC Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Cathleen

    2006-01-01

    The author presents an active-learning exercise for the introductory macroeconomics class in which students participate in a mock Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting. Preparation involves data gathering and writing both a research report and a policy recommendation. An FOMC meeting is simulated in which students give their policy…

  15. STS 61-B crewmembers participate in egress training using shuttle mock-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 61-B crewmembers participate in egress training using shuttle mock-up. Views include Astronaut Sherwood C. Spring using the Sky Genie to exit the full fuselage trainer (43582); Two payload specialists, Charles D. Walker and Rodolfo Neri, are strapped into their seats in the middeck section of the full fuselage trainer, which is tilted in launch mode (43583).

  16. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ITER MOCK-UP INSULATION AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-08

    The ITER mock-up project was launched in order to demonstrate the feasibility of an industrial impregnation process using the new cyanate ester/epoxy blend. The mock-up simulates the TF winding pack cross section by a stainless steel structure with the same dimensions as the TF winding pack at a length of 1 m. It consists of 7 plates simulating the double pancakes, each of them is wrapped with glass fiber/Kapton sandwich tapes. After stacking the 7 plates, additional insulation layers are wrapped to simulate the ground insulation. This paper presents the results of the mechanical quality tests on the mock-up pancake insulation. Tensile and short beam shear specimens were cut from the plates extracted from the mock-up and tested at 77 K using a servo-hydraulic material testing device. All tests were repeated after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2}(E>0.1 MeV). In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. Initial results show a high mechanical strength as expected from the high number of thin glass fiber layers, and an excellent homogeneity of the material.

  17. Mechanical Characterization of the Iter Mock-Up Insulation after Reactor Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-01

    The ITER mock-up project was launched in order to demonstrate the feasibility of an industrial impregnation process using the new cyanate ester/epoxy blend. The mock-up simulates the TF winding pack cross section by a stainless steel structure with the same dimensions as the TF winding pack at a length of 1 m. It consists of 7 plates simulating the double pancakes, each of them is wrapped with glass fiber/Kapton sandwich tapes. After stacking the 7 plates, additional insulation layers are wrapped to simulate the ground insulation. This paper presents the results of the mechanical quality tests on the mock-up pancake insulation. Tensile and short beam shear specimens were cut from the plates extracted from the mock-up and tested at 77 K using a servo-hydraulic material testing device. All tests were repeated after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. Initial results show a high mechanical strength as expected from the high number of thin glass fiber layers, and an excellent homogeneity of the material.

  18. A new approach to the assessment of stochastic errors of radio source position catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2013-10-01

    Assessing the external stochastic errors of radio source position catalogues derived from VLBI observations is important for tasks such as estimating the quality of the catalogues and their weighting during combination. One of the widely used methods to estimate these errors is the three-cornered-hat technique, which can be extended to the N-cornered-hat technique. A critical point of this method is how to properly account for the correlations between the compared catalogues. We present a new approach to solving this problem that is suitable for simultaneous investigations of several catalogues. To compute the correlation between two catalogues A and B, the differences between these catalogues and a third arbitrary catalogue C are computed. Then the correlation between these differences is considered as an estimate of the correlation between catalogues A and B. The average value of these estimates over all catalogues C is taken as a final estimate of the target correlation. In this way, an exhaustive search of all possible combinations allows one to compute the paired correlations between all catalogues. As an additional refinement of the method, we introduce the concept of weighted correlation coefficient. This technique was applied to nine recently published radio source position catalogues. We found large systematic differences between catalogues, that significantly impact determination of their stochastic errors. Finally, we estimated the stochastic errors of the nine catalogues.

  19. NUV signatures of environment driven galaxy quenching in SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using GALEX NUV galaxy photometry with the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007). We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5M⊙ and 1010.7M⊙, showing that higher mass galaxies are more able to form stars when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot (2003) with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  20. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; La Barbera, Francesco; Ferreras, Ignacio; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disc decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or discs of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a compact core as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, there are abundant compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ˜ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red nuggets with elliptical galaxies, a comparable fraction of red nuggets might have ended up embedded in discs. This result generalizes the inside-out formation scenario; present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disc is formed later.

  1. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Clustering of Galaxies in Early Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coil, Alison L.; Davis, Marc; Madgwick, Darren S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cooper, Michael; Ellis, Richard S.; Faber, S. M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2004-07-01

    We measure the two-point correlation function ξ(rp,π) in a sample of 2219 galaxies between z=0.7 and 1.35 to a magnitude limit of RAB=24.1 from the first season of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. From ξ(rp,π) we recover the real-space correlation function, ξ(r), which we find can be approximated within the errors by a power law, ξ(r)=(r/r0)-γ, on scales ~0.1-10 h-1 Mpc. In a sample with an effective redshift of zeff=0.82, for a ΛCDM cosmology we find r0=3.53+/-0.81 h-1 Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.66+/-0.12, while in a higher redshift sample with zeff=1.14 we find r0=3.12+/-0.72 h-1 Mpc and γ=1.66+/-0.12. These errors are estimated from mock galaxy catalogs and are dominated by the cosmic variance present in the current data sample. We find that red, absorption-dominated, passively evolving galaxies have a larger clustering scale length, r0, than blue, emission-line, actively star-forming galaxies. Intrinsically brighter galaxies also cluster more strongly than fainter galaxies at z~=1. Our results imply that the DEEP2 galaxies have an effective bias b=0.96+/-0.13 if σ8DM=1 today or b=1.19+/-0.16 if σ8DM=0.8 today. This bias is lower than that predicted by semianalytic simulations at z~=1, which may be the result of our R-band target selection. We discuss possible evolutionary effects within our survey volume, and we compare our results with galaxy-clustering studies at other redshifts, noting that our star-forming sample at z~=1 has selection criteria very similar to the Lyman break galaxies at z~=3 and that our red, absorption-line sample displays a clustering strength comparable to the expected clustering of the Lyman break galaxy descendants at z~=1. Our results demonstrate that galaxy-clustering properties as a function of color, spectral type, and luminosity seen in the local universe were largely in place by z~=1.

  2. An empirical model to form and evolve galaxies in dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Jie; Zhang, You-Cai; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Tweed, Dylan; Liu, Cheng-Ze; Yang, Lei; Shi, Feng; Lu, Yi; Luo, Wen-Tao; Wei, Jian-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Based on the star formation histories of galaxies in halos with different masses, we develop an empirical model to grow galaxies in dark matter halos. This model has very few ingredients, any of which can be associated with observational data and thus be efficiently assessed. By applying this model to a very high resolution cosmological N-body simulation, we predict a number of galaxy properties that are a very good match to relevant observational data. Namely, for both centrals and satellites, the galaxy stellar mass functions up to redshift z ≃ 4 and the conditional stellar mass functions in the local universe are in good agreement with observations. In addition, the two point correlation function is well predicted in the different stellar mass ranges explored by our model. Furthermore, after applying stellar population synthesis models to our stellar composition as a function of redshift, we find that the luminosity functions in the 0.1 u, 0.1 g, 0.1 r, 0.1 i and 0.1 z bands agree quite well with the SDSS observational results down to an absolute magnitude at about ‑17.0. The SDSS conditional luminosity function itself is predicted well. Finally, the cold gas is derived from the star formation rate to predict the HI gas mass within each mock galaxy. We find a remarkably good match to observed HI-to-stellar mass ratios. These features ensure that such galaxy/gas catalogs can be used to generate reliable mock redshift surveys.

  3. Superclusters of galaxies in the 2dF redshift survey. 3. The properties of galaxies in superclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Einasto, Maret; Einasto, J.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Liivamagi, L.J.; oeveer, M.J; Hutsi, G.; Heinamaki, P.; Muller, V.; Tucker, D.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    We use catalogues of superclusters of galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey to study the properties of galaxies in superclusters. We compare the properties of galaxies in high and low density regions of rich superclusters, in poor superclusters and in the field, as well as in groups, and of isolated galaxies in superclusters of various richness. We show that in rich superclusters the values of the luminosity density smoothed on a scale of 8 h{sup -1} Mpc are higher than in poor superclusters: the median density in rich superclusters is {sigma} {approx} 7.5, in poor superclusters {delta} {approx} 6.0. Rich superclusters contain high density cores with densities {sigma} > 10 while in poor superclusters such high density cores are absent. The properties of galaxies in rich and poor superclusters and in the field are different: the fraction of early type, passive galaxies in rich superclusters is slightly larger than in poor superclusters, and is the smallest among the field galaxies. Most importantly, in high density cores of rich superclusters ({delta} > 10) there is an excess of early type, passive galaxies in groups and clusters, as well as among those which do not belong to groups or clusters. The main galaxies of superclusters have a rather limited range of absolute magnitudes. The main galaxies of rich superclusters have larger luminosities than those of poor superclusters and of groups in the field (the median values are correspondingly M{sub bj} = -21.02, M{sub bj} = -20.9 and M{sub bj} = -19.7 for rich and poor superclusters and groups in the field). Our results show that both the local (group/cluster) environments and global (supercluster) environments influence galaxy morphologies and their star formation activity.

  4. Catalogues of hot white dwarfs in the Milky Way from GALEX's ultraviolet sky surveys: constraining stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Efremova, Boryana; Herald, James; Girardi, Léo; Zabot, Alexandre; Marigo, Paola; Martin, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    We present comprehensive catalogues of hot star candidates in the Milky Way (MW), selected from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV (FUV; 1344-1786 Å) and near-UV (NUV; 1771-2831 Å) imaging. The FUV and NUV photometry allows us to extract the hottest stellar objects, in particular hot white dwarfs (WD), which are elusive at other wavelengths because of their high temperatures and faint optical luminosities. We generated catalogues of UV sources from two GALEX's surveys: All-Sky Imaging Survey (AIS; depth AB magnitude ˜19.9/20.8 in FUV/NUV) and Medium-depth Imaging Survey (MIS; depth ˜22.6/22.7 mag). The two catalogues (from GALEX fifth data release) contain 65.3/12.6 million (AIS/MIS) unique UV sources with errorNUV≤ 0.5 mag, over 21 435/1579 deg2. We also constructed subcatalogues of the UV sources with matched optical photometry from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; seventh data release): these contain 0.6/0.9 million (AIS/MIS) sources with errors ≤0.3 mag in both FUV and NUV, excluding sources with multiple optical counterparts, over an area of 7325/1103 deg2. All catalogues are available online. We then selected 28 319 (AIS)/9028 (MIS) matched sources with FUV - NUV < -0.13; this colour cut corresponds to stellar Teff hotter than ˜18 000 K (the exact value varying with gravity). An additional colour cut of NUV-r > 0.1 isolates binaries with largely differing Teffs, and some intruding quasi-stellar objects (QSOs; more numerous at faint magnitudes). Available spectroscopy for a subsample indicates that hot-star candidates with NUV-r < 0.1 (mostly 'single' hot stars) have negligible contamination by non-stellar objects. We discuss the distribution of sources in the catalogues, and the effects of error and colour cuts on the samples. The density of hot-star candidates increases from high to low Galactic latitudes, but drops on the MW plane due to dust extinction. Our hot-star counts at all latitudes are better matched by MW models computed with an

  5. 12. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary Medicines, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Druggists' Sundries, Etc. Portland, ME: Cook, Everett, and Pennell, 1896.) ca. 1896, photographer unknown 'MAIN OFFICE AND COUNTING ROOM' - Woodman Building, 140 Middle Street, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  6. 11. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary Medicines, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Druggists' Sundries, Etc. Portland, ME: Cook, Everett, and Pennell, 1896.) ca. 1896, photographer unknown 'SECTION OF MAIN FLOOR AND ORDER DEPARTMENT' - Woodman Building, 140 Middle Street, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  7. Modelling and Implementation of Catalogue Cards Using FreeMarker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radjenovic, Jelen; Milosavljevic, Branko; Surla, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study involving the specification (using Unified Modelling Language (UML) 2.0) of information requirements and implementation of the software components for generating catalogue cards. The implementation in a Java environment is developed using the FreeMarker software.…

  8. A new stochastic event catalogue for hail in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Angelika; Punge, Heinz Juergen; Bedka, Kritopher; Stephenson, David B.; Puskeiler, Marc; Kunz, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Damage by hail events constitutes one of the major atmospheric risks to mobile, buildings and agricultural values. The quantification of this risk is of particular interest for insurance companies. However, there is little knowledge beyond local historical damage, due to the rarety of events and the lack of uniform detection methods. Here, we present the hazard component of a stochastic risk model for hail in Europe. The stochastic event catalogue is based on hail observations from the ESWD network and satellite observations of overshooting cloud tops (OT), indicating very strong convection and thereby favorable conditions for hail formation. The presented catalogue is the first hail event catalogue based on a single homogeneous observation source over Europe. Historic hail events are defined based on OT occurrences detected from infrared brightness temperatures of the MSG SEVIRI satellite between 2004-2011. The stochastic catalogue uses this historic event properties compromised by hailstone observations from the ESWD network to derive more than 1 million individual events with an event footprint resolution of 1km.

  9. Catalogue of the Lichenized and Lichenicolous Fungi of Montenegro

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Branka; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Summary The catalogue is based on a comprehensive evaluation of 169 published sources. The lichen mycota as currently known from Montenegro includes 681 species (with eight subspecies, nine varieties and one form) of lichenized fungi, 12 species of lichenicolous fungi, and nine non-lichenized fungi traditionally included in lichenological literature. PMID:21423858

  10. Ballistic parameter and lifetime assessment for catalogued objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K. D.; Sdunnus, H.; Mandeville, J. C.; Klinkrad, H.

    2001-10-01

    The LASCO (Lifetime Assessment of Catalogued Objects) tool is dedicated to the computation of the orbital lifetimes of all catalogued objects. It was developed in the course of an upgrade of ESA's DISCOS database. It consists of a graphical user interface, and four separate modules addressing individual tasks. A single-point interface to the DISCOS database is realised by means of a Perl script. It extracts data from DISCOS, initiates the execution of the subordinated modules and writes the results to the database. 1. BaPIT (Ballistic Parameter Iteration Tool) calculates the ballistic parameters of catalogued objects contained in DISCOS. 2. SOLAT (Simple Orbital Lifetime Assessment Tool) calculates the orbital lifetime of catalogued objects using different orbit propagation methods depending on the expected lifetime and the required accuracy. 3. RIO (Risk Object Re-entry Warning Tool) performs detailed decay analysis for all objects identified as hazardous, and having an expected lifetime below a pre-defined time span. The amount and continuity of ballistic parameter and lifetime assessment data provided by LASCO for the DISCOS database is unprecedented. It allows for a global analysis of the currently tracked population. The primary aim of this paper is to give a survey of the capabilities of LASCO. A second aspect will be to provide a first critical review of the results obtained from the LASCO runs performed since the beginning of the operational phase in October 1999.

  11. Master Catalogue of the WSO-UV mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupina, N.; Piskunov, A.; Kharchenko, N.

    2008-12-01

    We summarize the basic properties of the Master Catalogue of the WSO-UV mission: the constraints it should satisfy, the astronomical basis, necessary reductions, current parameters, and dedicated interoperable end-user oriented software for the MC access and visualization.

  12. Restful Implementation of Catalogue Service for Geospatial Data Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L. C.; Yue, P.; Lu, X. C.

    2013-10-01

    Provenance, also known as lineage, is important in understanding the derivation history of data products. Geospatial data provenance helps data consumers to evaluate the quality and reliability of geospatial data. In a service-oriented environment, where data are often consumed or produced by distributed services, provenance could be managed by following the same service-oriented paradigm. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Service for the Web (CSW) is used for the registration and query of geospatial data provenance by extending ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM). Recent advance of the REpresentational State Transfer (REST) paradigm has shown great promise for the easy integration of distributed resources. RESTful Web Service aims to provide a standard way for Web clients to communicate with servers based on REST principles. The existing approach for provenance catalogue service could be improved by adopting the RESTful design. This paper presents the design and implementation of a catalogue service for geospatial data provenance following RESTful architecture style. A middleware named REST Converter is added on the top of the legacy catalogue service to support a RESTful style interface. The REST Converter is composed of a resource request dispatcher and six resource handlers. A prototype service is developed to demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  13. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mottini, M.

    2009-07-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time > 10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2keV, S/N=3) is ~ 8 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ~ 2 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2keV), HB1 (2-4keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  14. Catalogue Use at the State Library of Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire survey conducted at the State Library of Victoria indicates that users in general, and not just scholars, value the standard elements of bibliographic data found in the Library's catalogues, and consider all these elements useful for finding, identifying and selecting items. Rather than making do with less, users wanted more…

  15. The Royal Society Catalogue as an Index to Nineteenth Century American Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Clark A.

    1970-01-01

    The Royal Society Catalogue of Scientific Papers is investigated in terms of its coverage of American science journals and American scientists. The journals indexed by the catalogue are compared to other standard lists of journals from the nineteenth century. (Author)

  16. A Cluster and a Sea of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    A new wide-field image released today by ESO displays many thousands of distant galaxies, and more particularly a large group belonging to the massive galaxy cluster known as Abell 315. As crowded as it may appear, this assembly of galaxies is only the proverbial "tip of the iceberg", as Abell 315 - like most galaxy clusters - is dominated by dark matter. The huge mass of this cluster deflects light from background galaxies, distorting their observed shapes slightly. When looking at the sky with the unaided eye, we mostly only see stars within our Milky Way galaxy and some of its closest neighbours. More distant galaxies are just too faint to be perceived by the human eye, but if we could see them, they would literally cover the sky. This new image released by ESO is both a wide-field and long-exposure one, and reveals thousands of galaxies crowding an area on the sky roughly as large as the full Moon. These galaxies span a vast range of distances from us. Some are relatively close, as it is possible to distinguish their spiral arms or elliptical halos, especially in the upper part of the image. The more distant appear just like the faintest of blobs - their light has travelled through the Universe for eight billion years or more before reaching Earth. Beginning in the centre of the image and extending below and to the left, a concentration of about a hundred yellowish galaxies identifies a massive galaxy cluster, designated with the number 315 in the catalogue compiled by the American astronomer George Abell in 1958 [1]. The cluster is located between the faint, red and blue galaxies and the Earth, about two billion light-years away from us. It lies in the constellation of Cetus (the Whale). Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity. But there is more in these structures than the many galaxies we can see. Galaxies in these giants contribute to only ten percent of the mass, with hot gas in between galaxies

  17. A Galaxy for Science and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    During his visit to ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal, the European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, participated in an observing sequence and took images of a beautiful spiral galaxy. ESO PR Photo 43/07 ESO PR Photo 49/07 Twisted Spiral Galaxy NGC 134 The visit took place on 27 October and the Commissioner observed with one of the FORS instruments on Antu, the first 8.2-m Unit Telescope of the VLT. "Two hours bus ride from the nearest town, Antofagasta, in the middle of nowhere and at 2 600 m altitude, rises a state of the art astronomical observatory at which scientists from across Europe venture to exploit some of the most advanced technologies and sophisticated techniques available within astronomy. One of the facilities is the VLT, the Very Large Telescope, with which, together with the other telescopes, scientists can study objects at the far edge of the Universe," wrote Potočnik on his blog. Known until now as a simple number in a catalogue, NGC 134, the 'Island in the Universe' that was observed by the Commissioner is replete with remarkable attributes, and the VLT has clapped its eyes on them. Just like our own Galaxy, NGC 134 is a barred spiral with its spiral arms loosely wrapped around a bright, bar-shaped central region. One feature that stands out is its warped disc. While a galaxy's disc is often pictured as a flat structure of gas and stars surrounding the galaxy's centre, a warped disc is a structure that, when viewed sideways, resembles a bent record album left out too long in the burning Sun. Warps are actually not atypical. More than half of the spiral galaxies do show warps one way or another, and our own Milky Way also has a small warp. Many theories exist to explain warps. One possibility is that warps are the aftermath of interactions or collisions between galaxies. These can also produce tails of material being pulled out from the galaxy. The VLT image reveals that NGC 134 also appears to have a tail of gas

  18. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  19. Accurate and efficient halo-based galaxy clustering modelling with simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Small- and intermediate-scale galaxy clustering can be used to establish the galaxy-halo connection to study galaxy formation and evolution and to tighten constraints on cosmological parameters. With the increasing precision of galaxy clustering measurements from ongoing and forthcoming large galaxy surveys, accurate models are required to interpret the data and extract relevant information. We introduce a method based on high-resolution N-body simulations to accurately and efficiently model the galaxy two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) in projected and redshift spaces. The basic idea is to tabulate all information of haloes in the simulations necessary for computing the galaxy 2PCFs within the framework of halo occupation distribution or conditional luminosity function. It is equivalent to populating galaxies to dark matter haloes and using the mock 2PCF measurements as the model predictions. Besides the accurate 2PCF calculations, the method is also fast and therefore enables an efficient exploration of the parameter space. As an example of the method, we decompose the redshift-space galaxy 2PCF into different components based on the type of galaxy pairs and show the redshift-space distortion effect in each component. The generalizations and limitations of the method are discussed.

  20. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3 per cent when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1 Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.

  1. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ultraviolet Excess Galaxies (Mitchell+ 1982)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Brotzman, L. E.; Warnock, A.; Usher, P. D.

    2015-05-01

    The catalog contains a list of 412 faint galaxies selected for their apparent ultraviolet excess. The galaxies were selected from a 3-color (UBV) plate taken with the Palomar 48-inch Schmidt telescope. The 14-inch-square plates cover an area of 30 square degrees centered on Kapteyn Selected Area 28. The catalog includes running numbers, coordinates, color codes, magnitude codes, morphologies, diameters, and notes. The catalogued galaxies were selected by eye from the Palomar Schmidt 3-color (UBV) plate PS24771, centered on Kapteyn Selexted Area 28 and taken by Usher under conditions of good seeing and transparency. (1 data file).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Nuclear activity in isolated galaxies (Hernandez-Ibarra+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Ibarra, F. J.; Dultzin, D.; Krongold, Y.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Gonzalez, J.

    2014-07-01

    We used two samples of rigorously defined isolated galaxies: the photometric catalogue of isolated galaxies (CIG) by Karachentseva (1973, Cat. VII/82) and the northern isolated disc galaxies compiled by Varela et al. (2004, Cat. J/A+A/420/873). We examined all of the spectra looking if emission lines were present. Within the spectral range covered by the SDSS spectra, we searched for Hβ, [OIII] λ5007Å, [OI] λ6300Å, [NII] λλ6548, 6584Å, Hα and the two sulphur ([SII] λλ6717, 6731Å) lines. (2 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Richness of galaxy clusters (Oguri, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, M.

    2015-04-01

    We apply our cluster finding algorithm CAMIRA to imaging data of SDSS DR8 (Aihara et al., 2011ApJS..193...29A). The input galaxy catalogue includes model magnitudes (MODEL_MAG) and their errors for SDSS ugriz-band. We exclude galaxies with any of the following flags; SATURATED, SATURCENTER, BRIGHT, and DEBLENDEDAS_MOVING. We only use galaxies with extinction-corrected i-band magnitude brighter than 21.0 and its error smaller than 0.2. (1 data file).

  5. The nature of voids - II. Tracing underdensities with biased galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadathur, S.; Hotchkiss, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study how the properties of cosmic voids depend on those of the tracer galaxy populations in which they are identified. We use a suite of halo occupation distribution mocks in a simulation, identify voids in these populations using the ZOBOV void finder and measure their abundances, sizes, tracer densities and dark matter content. To separate the effects of bias from those of sampling density, we do the same for voids traced by randomly downsampled subsets of the simulation dark matter particles. At the same sampling density, galaxy bias reduces the total number of voids by ˜50 per cent and can dramatically change their size distribution. The matter content of voids in biased and unbiased tracers also differs. Deducing void properties from simulation therefore requires the use of realistic galaxy mocks. We discuss how the void observables can be related to their matter content. In particular we consider the compensation of the total mass deficit in voids and find that the distinction between over- and undercompensated voids is not a function of void size alone, as has previously been suggested. However, we find a simple linear relationship between the average density of tracers in the void and the total mass compensation on much larger scales. The existence of this linear relationship holds independent of the bias and sampling density of the tracers. This provides a universal tool to classify void environments and will be important for the use of voids in observational cosmology.

  6. Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists are seeing unprecedented detail of the spiral arms and dust clouds in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy, thanks to a new Hubble Space Telescope image, available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc/wfpc.html. The image uses data collected January 15 and 24, 1995, and July 21, 1999, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by JPL. Using the image, a research group led by Dr. Nick Scoville of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, clearly defined the structure of the galaxy's cold dust clouds and hot hydrogen, and they linked star clusters within the galaxy to their parent dust clouds.

    The Whirlpool galaxy is one of the most photogenic galaxies. This celestial beauty is easily seen and photographed with smaller telescopes and studied extensively from large ground- and space-based observatories. The new composite image shows visible starlight and light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

    The galaxy is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of the image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, lit up by numerous clusters of young and energetic stars in brilliant detail. Luminous clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

    This image was composed by the Hubble Heritage Team from Hubble archive data and was superimposed onto data taken by Dr. Travis Rector of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory at the .9-meter (35-inch) telescope at the National Science Foundation's Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Ariz. Scoville's team includes M. Polletta of the University of Geneva, Switzerland; S. Ewald and S. Stolovy of Caltech; and R. Thompson and M. Rieke of the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md., manages space operations for the Hubble Space

  7. Environmental quantification and Halpha characterisation of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, Simon

    2005-12-01

    The role of the environment on galaxy evolution is still not fully understood. In order to quantify and set limits on the role of nurture one must identify and study a sample of isolated galaxies. The AMIGA project "Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies" is doing a multi-wavelength study of a large sample of isolated galaxies in order to examine their interstellar medium and star formation activity. We processed 950 galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (Karachentseva, 1973) and evaluated their isolation using an automated star-galaxy classification procedure (down to M_B = 17.5) on large digitised POSS-I fields surrounding each isolated galaxy. We defined, compared and discussed various criteria to quantify the degree of isolation for these galaxies: e.g. Karachentseva's revised criterion, local surface density computations, estimation of the external tidal force affecting each isolated galaxy. We find galaxies violating Karachentseva's original criterion, and we define various subsamples of galaxies according to their degree of isolation. Additionally, we sought for the redshifts of the primary and companion galaxies to access the radial dimension and have an accurate three dimensional picture of the surroundings. Finally, we applied our pipeline to triplets, compact groups and clusters and interpret the isolated galaxy population in light of these control samples. The star formation is known to be affected by the local environment of the galaxies, but the star formation rate also highly depends on the intrinsic interstellar medium features. Disentangling these two effects is still a challenging subject. To address this issue, we observed and gathered photometric data (Halpha narrow- & r Gunn broad-band filters) for 200 spiral galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies which are, by definition, in low-density regions. We subsequently studied the Halpha morphological aspect of the 45 biggest and less inclined galaxies. Using

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): galaxy radial alignments in GAMA groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Michael D.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kelvin, Lee; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Norberg, Peder; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon; Hopkins, Andrew; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Robotham, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    We constrain the distributions of projected radial alignment angles of satellite galaxy shapes within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey group catalogue. We identify the galaxy groups using spectroscopic redshifts and measure galaxy projected ellipticities from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. With a sample of 3850 groups with 13 655 satellite galaxies with high quality shape measurements, we find a less than 2σ signal of radial alignments in the mean projected ellipticity components and the projected position angle when using galaxy shape estimates optimized for weak lensing measurements. Our radial alignment measurement increases to greater than 3σ significance relative to the expectation for no alignments if we use 2D Sérsic model fits to define galaxy orientations. Our weak measurement of radial alignments is in conflict with predictions from dark-matter N-body simulations, which we interpret as evidence for large misalignments of baryons and dark matter in group and cluster satellites. Within our uncertainties, that are dominated by our small sample size, we find only weak and marginally significant trends of the radial alignment angle distributions on projected distance from the group centre, host halo mass, and redshift that could be consistent with a tidal torquing mechanism for radial alignments. Using our lensing optimized shape estimators, we estimate that intrinsic alignments of galaxy group members may contribute a systematic error to the mean differential projected surface mass density of groups inferred from weak lensing observations by -1 ± 20 per cent at scales around 300 h-1 kpc from the group centre assuming a photometric redshift rms error of 10 per cent, and given our group sample with median redshift of 0.17 and median virial masses ˜1013 h-1 M⊙.

  9. On optical mass estimation methods for galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Farr, W. M.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the performance of a variety of different estimators for the mass of galaxy groups, based on their galaxy distribution alone. We draw galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for a set of groups and clusters for which hydrostatic mass estimates based on high-quality Chandra X-ray data are available. These are used to calibrate the galaxy-based mass proxies, and to test their performance. Richness, luminosity, galaxy overdensity, rms radius and dynamical mass proxies are all explored. These different mass indicators all have their merits, and we argue that using them in combination can provide protection against being misled by the effects of dynamical disturbance or variations in star formation efficiency. Using them in this way leads us to infer the presence of significant non-statistical scatter in the X-ray based mass estimates we employ. We apply a similar analysis to a set of mock groups derived from applying a semi-analytic galaxy formation code to the Millennium dark matter simulation. The relations between halo mass and the mass proxies differ significantly in some cases from those seen in the observational groups, and we discuss possible reasons for this.

  10. Modeling the Galaxy Three-Point Correlation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, Felipe; Wechsler, Risa; Frieman, Joshua A.; Nichol, Robert; /Portsmouth U., ICG

    2007-06-05

    We present new theoretical predictions for the galaxy three-point correlation function (3PCF) using high-resolution dissipationless cosmological simulations of a flat Lambda CDM Universe which resolve galaxy-size halos and subhalos. We create realistic mock galaxy catalogs by assigning luminosities and colors to dark matter halos and subhalos, and we measure the reduced 3PCF as a function of luminosity and color in both real and redshift space. As galaxy luminosity and color are varied, we find small differences in the amplitude and shape dependence of the reduced 3PCF, at a level qualitatively consistent with recent measurements from the SDSS and 2dFGRS. We confirm that discrepancies between previous 3PCF measurements can be explained in part by differences in binning choices. We explore the degree to which a simple local bias model can fit the simulated 3PCF. The agreement between the model predictions and galaxy 3PCF measurements lends further credence to the straightforward association of galaxies with CDM halos and subhalos.

  11. The color-indices of early-type galaxies with core collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, G. D.

    We performed least-squares fits to determine the transformation equations of the color-indices (u-g), (g-r) (SDSS photometric catalog, Release 8, 2011); (NUV-B) (GALEX ultra-violet Atlas of nearby galaxies, Gil de Paz et al, 2007); (B-Ve), (U-Be) (General photometry of galaxies, Prugniel et al, 1998) to the photometric system of catalogue RC3 (U-B)T and (B-V)T. We determined the color - indices (U-B)Tc and (B-V)Tc for the 20 galaxies with SNe of types Ibc and II. The 17 of these galaxies are seen to fall in red sequence galaxies of color- magnitude diagram for 872 of the RC3 early-type galaxies with known (U-B)T0 colors. The blue galaxies are NGC 4691, NGC 838 and NGC 7803 - the galaxies with active galaxy nuclei (AGN). The 12 host galaxies are peculiar and 13 - are members of group of galaxies.

  12. A PARAMETERIZED GALAXY CATALOG SIMULATOR FOR TESTING CLUSTER FINDING, MASS ESTIMATION, AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION IN OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jeeseon; Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Rude, Cody; Warren, Michael S.; Dolag, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    We present a galaxy catalog simulator that converts N-body simulations with halo and subhalo catalogs into mock, multiband photometric catalogs. The simulator assigns galaxy properties to each subhalo in a way that reproduces the observed cluster galaxy halo occupation distribution, the radial and mass-dependent variation in fractions of blue galaxies, the luminosity functions in the cluster and the field, and the color-magnitude relation in clusters. Moreover, the evolution of these parameters is tuned to match existing observational constraints. Parameterizing an ensemble of cluster galaxy properties enables us to create mock catalogs with variations in those properties, which in turn allows us to quantify the sensitivity of cluster finding to current observational uncertainties in these properties. Field galaxies are sampled from existing multiband photometric surveys of similar depth. We present an application of the catalog simulator to characterize the selection function and contamination of a galaxy cluster finder that utilizes the cluster red sequence together with galaxy clustering on the sky. We estimate systematic uncertainties in the selection to be at the {<=}15% level with current observational constraints on cluster galaxy populations and their evolution. We find the contamination in this cluster finder to be {approx}35% to redshift z {approx} 0.6. In addition, we use the mock galaxy catalogs to test the optical mass indicator B{sub gc} and a red-sequence redshift estimator. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the B{sub gc}-mass relation to be approximately log normal with {sigma}{sub log10M}{approx}0.25 and we demonstrate photometric redshift accuracies for massive clusters at the {approx}3% level out to z {approx} 0.7.

  13. The same with less: The cosmic web of warm versus cold dark matter dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Darren; Schneider, Aurel; Smith, Robert E.; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We explore fundamental properties of the distribution of low mass dark matter halos within the cosmic web using warm dark matter (WDM) and cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulations. Using self abundance-matched mock galaxy catalogs, we show that the distribution of dwarf galaxies in a WDM universe wherein low mass halo formation is heavily suppressed, is nearly indistinguishable to that of a CDM universe whose low mass halos are not seen because galaxy formation is suppressed below some threshold halo mass. However, if the scatter between dwarf galaxy luminosity and halo properties is large enough, low mass CDM halos would sometimes host relatively bright galaxies thereby populating CDM voids with the occasional isolated galaxyand reducing the numbers of completely empty voids. Otherwise, without high mass to light scatter, all mock galaxy clustering statistics that we consider-the auto-correlation function, the numbers and radial profiles of satellites, the numbers of isolated galaxies, and the PDF of small voids-are nearly identical in CDM and WDM. WDM voids are neither larger nor emptier than CDM voids, when constructed from abundance- matched halo catalogs. It is thus a challenge to determine whether the CDM problem of the over-abundance of small halos with respect to the number density of observed dwarf galaxies has a cosmological solution or an astrophysical solution. However, some clues about the dark matter particle and the scatter between the properties of dwarfgalaxies and their dark matter halo hosts might be found in the cosmic web of galaxies in future surveys of the local volume.

  14. Color indices of core-collapse supernova host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, G. D.

    2015-04-01

    Using data from different catalogues, we determined color indices of early type (E, L, and S0/a) core-collapse supernova host galaxies. These color indices were compared with the colors of the galaxies of the same morphological types but in which explosions of such supernovae have not been observed. It is shown that in the blue sequence of the color-magnitude diagram, the compared samples of galaxies differ with probability P = 95% in the relative frequencies of the ( U - B){/Tc 0} and ( U - B){/T 0} color indices in the intervals from to and to . A difference in the relative frequencies with probability P = 99% was also obtained for the ( B - V){/Tc 0} and ( B - V){/T 0} colors in the interval . The calculated average colors of these intervals for the galaxies of both samples allow us to assume a significant proportion of the young population in them. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that the colors of the core-collapse supernova host galaxies and the early-type galaxies without explosions of such supernovae are similar on average with probability P = 95%, and the galaxies do not differ in stellar population content.

  15. Photometric Properties of Face-on Isolated Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Alexander; Epstein, P.; Durbala, A.

    2011-05-01

    We want to quantify the relative role of nature versus nurture in defining the observed properties of galaxies. In simpler terms we would like to disentangle the ``genetic'’ and the environmental influences in shaping the morphology of galaxies. In order to do that one needs to firstly define a zero-order baseline, i.e., a sample of galaxies that have been minimally perturbed by neighbors in the last few billion years of their existence. Such a sample has been produced and refined in different stages in the context of the AMIGA international project (www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html). The recent catalogue ``The All-Sky Catalog of Isolated Galaxies Selected from 2MASS'’ (Karachentseva, V. E. et al. 2010) allows us to complete and enrich the initial sample constructed within AMIGA with new objects, thus enhancing the statistical relevance of our study. Our focus is to define a subset of isolated disk spiral galaxies. We constrain the sample selection by: 1) orientation, restricting to almost face-on galaxies and 2) availability of good photometric images in SDSS. The goal is to ``dissect'’ (decompose) these galaxies in major components (disk, bulge, bars, etc.) and to study the properties of the components in a statistical context. Having a reasonable representation of all morphological types, we aim to test the bimodality of bulges and bars. We present a progress report of our work.

  16. From Spitzer Galaxy photometry to Tully-Fisher distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, J. G.; Tully, R. B.; Courtois, H. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Neill, J. D.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper involves a data release of the observational campaign: Cosmicflows with Spitzer (CFS). Surface photometry of the 1270 galaxies constituting the survey is presented. An additional ˜400 galaxies from various other Spitzer surveys are also analysed. CFS complements the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, that provides photometry for an additional 2352 galaxies, by extending observations to low galactic latitudes (|b| < 30°). Among these galaxies are calibrators, selected in the K band, of the Tully-Fisher relation. The addition of new calibrators demonstrates the robustness of the previously released calibration. Our estimate of the Hubble constant using supernova host galaxies is unchanged, H0 = 75.2 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1. Distance-derived radial peculiar velocities, for the 1935 galaxies with all the available parameters, will be incorporated into a new data release of the Cosmicflows project. The size of the previous catalogue will be increased by 20 per cent, including spatial regions close to the Zone of Avoidance.

  17. Generating mock data sets for large-scale Lyman-α forest correlation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov

    2012-01-01

    Massive spectroscopic surveys of high-redshift quasars yield large numbers of correlated Lyα absorption spectra that can be used to measure large-scale structure. Simulations of these surveys are required to accurately interpret the measurements of correlations and correct for systematic errors. An efficient method to generate mock realizations of Lyα forest surveys is presented which generates a field over the lines of sight to the survey sources only, instead of having to generate it over the entire three-dimensional volume of the survey. The method can be calibrated to reproduce the power spectrum and one-point distribution function of the transmitted flux fraction, as well as the redshift evolution of these quantities, and is easily used for modeling any survey systematic effects. We present an example of how these mock surveys are applied to predict the measurement errors in a survey with similar parameters as the BOSS quasar survey in SDSS-III.

  18. Advanced Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Packaging Concept Mock-Up Design & Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O''Connell, Mary K.; Slade, Howard G.; Stinson, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    A concentrated development effort was begun at NASA Johnson Space Center to create an advanced Portable Life Support System (PLSS) packaging concept. Ease of maintenance, technological flexibility, low weight, and minimal volume are targeted in the design of future micro-gravity and planetary PLSS configurations. Three main design concepts emerged from conceptual design techniques and were carried forth into detailed design, then full scale mock-up creation. "Foam", "Motherboard", and "LEGOtm" packaging design concepts are described in detail. Results of the evaluation process targeted maintenance, robustness, mass properties, and flexibility as key aspects to a new PLSS packaging configuration. The various design tools used to evolve concepts into high fidelity mock ups revealed that no single tool was all encompassing, several combinations were complimentary, the devil is in the details, and, despite efforts, many lessons were learned only after working with hardware.

  19. Cataloguing Rules for Books and other Media in Primary and Secondary Schools. A Simplified Version of Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Together with Rules for Cataloguing Non-book Materials. Fifth (Expanded) Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Norman, Comp.; Platt, Peter, Comp.

    The School Library Association (London, England) presents a brief and simplified version of the 1967 "Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules" along with cataloging rules for non-book materials based on the "Non-book Materials: Cataloguing Rules" of 1973. The 33 rules are briefly stated, and short examples are given for main entries, titles, imprint,…

  20. Automatic approach to solve the morphological galaxy classification problem using the sparse representation technique and dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Hernandez, R.; Ortiz-Esquivel, A.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Altamirano-Robles, L.; Gonzalez-Bernal, J.

    2016-04-01

    The observation of celestial objects in the sky is a practice that helps astronomers to understand the way in which the Universe is structured. However, due to the large number of observed objects with modern telescopes, the analysis of these by hand is a difficult task. An important part in galaxy research is the morphological structure classification based on the Hubble sequence. In this research, we present an approach to solve the morphological galaxy classification problem in an automatic way by using the Sparse Representation technique and dictionary learning with K-SVD. For the tests in this work, we use a database of galaxies extracted from the Principal Galaxy Catalog (PGC) and the APM Equatorial Catalogue of Galaxies obtaining a total of 2403 useful galaxies. In order to represent each galaxy frame, we propose to calculate a set of 20 features such as Hu's invariant moments, galaxy nucleus eccentricity, gabor galaxy ratio and some other features commonly used in galaxy classification. A stage of feature relevance analysis was performed using Relief-f in order to determine which are the best parameters for the classification tests using 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 galaxy classes making signal vectors of different length values with the most important features. For the classification task, we use a 20-random cross-validation technique to evaluate classification accuracy with all signal sets achieving a score of 82.27 % for 2 galaxy classes and up to 44.27 % for 7 galaxy classes.

  1. Automatic approach to solve the morphological galaxy classification problem using the sparse representation technique and dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Hernandez, R.; Ortiz-Esquivel, A.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Altamirano-Robles, L.; Gonzalez-Bernal, J.

    2016-06-01

    The observation of celestial objects in the sky is a practice that helps astronomers to understand the way in which the Universe is structured. However, due to the large number of observed objects with modern telescopes, the analysis of these by hand is a difficult task. An important part in galaxy research is the morphological structure classification based on the Hubble sequence. In this research, we present an approach to solve the morphological galaxy classification problem in an automatic way by using the Sparse Representation technique and dictionary learning with K-SVD. For the tests in this work, we use a database of galaxies extracted from the Principal Galaxy Catalog (PGC) and the APM Equatorial Catalogue of Galaxies obtaining a total of 2403 useful galaxies. In order to represent each galaxy frame, we propose to calculate a set of 20 features such as Hu's invariant moments, galaxy nucleus eccentricity, gabor galaxy ratio and some other features commonly used in galaxy classification. A stage of feature relevance analysis was performed using Relief-f in order to determine which are the best parameters for the classification tests using 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 galaxy classes making signal vectors of different length values with the most important features. For the classification task, we use a 20-random cross-validation technique to evaluate classification accuracy with all signal sets achieving a score of 82.27 % for 2 galaxy classes and up to 44.27 % for 7 galaxy classes.

  2. Spatially resolved Lyman-alpha emission from a virtual dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhamme, Anne

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the first light of MUSE, Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectrograph of second generation installed recently at VLT, we compute mock IFU Lyman-alpha (lyα) observations of a virtual dwarf galaxy, to help understanding and interpreting forthcoming observations. This study is an extension of the work carried out in Verhamme et al. (2012), where we studied the spatially integrated lyα properties of a dwarf galaxy. With the same data, we now investigate the spatial variations of lyα spectra.

  3. Amiba and Galaxy Cluster Survey via Thermal Sunyaev-Zel Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    2003-03-01

    Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is a 19-element, platform-mounted interferometry telescope operating at 90 GHz. With a 10' field of view and 2' angular resolution, the designed sensitivity of AMiBA for real-space imaging of galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect can achieve 150μ {K {K {√ {sec} } ; {√ {sec } }} . I present our preliminary tests for the quality of AMiBA cluster images via mosaic mock observations on the simulated sky produced by cosmological N-body/SPH simulations. I also discuss the issue of confusion caused by the synchrotron and dust emission from galaxies residing in clusters.

  4. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies adopting λRe, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematical classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain λRe from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the λRe-ɛe distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass ≃109 M⊙), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as z = 2; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock λRe-ɛe distribution at z < 0.1 reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS3D/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed λRe-ɛe distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  5. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies adopting λRe, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematical classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain λRe from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the λRe-ɛe distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass ≃109 M⊙), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as z = 2; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock λRe-ɛe distribution at z < 0.1 reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS3D/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed λRe-ɛe distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  6. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies adopting $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematic classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$ from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass $\\simeq$10$^{\\rm 9}$ M$_{\\odot}$), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as $z=2$; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution at $z<0.1$ reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS$^{\\rm 3D}$/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  7. Mock circulation loop to investigate hemolysis in a pulsatile total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Felix; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Laumen, Marco; Mager, Ilona; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Hemocompatibility of blood pumps is a crucial parameter that has to be ensured prior to in vivo testing. In contrast to rotary blood pumps, a standard for testing a pulsatile total artificial heart (TAH) has not yet been established. Therefore, a new mock circulation loop was designed to investigate hemolysis in the left ventricle of the ReinHeart TAH. Its main features are a high hemocompatibility, physiological conditions, a low priming volume, and the conduction of blood through a closed tubing system. The mock circulation loop consists of a noninvasive pressure chamber, an aortic compliance chamber, and an atrium directly connected to the ventricle. As a control pump, the clinically approved Medos-HIA ventricular assist device (VAD) was used. The pumps were operated at 120 beats per minute with an aortic pressure of 120 to 80 mm Hg and a mean atrial pressure of 10 mm Hg, generating an output flow of about 5 L/min. Heparinized porcine blood was used. A series of six identical tests were performed. A test method was established that is comparable to ASTM F 1841, which is standard practice for the assessment of hemolysis in continuous-flow blood pumps. The average normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) values of the VAD and the ReinHeart TAH were 0.018 g/100 L and 0.03 g/100 L, respectively. The standard deviation of the NIH was 0.0033 for the VAD and 0.0034 for the TAH. Furthermore, a single test with a BPX-80 Bio-Pump was performed to verify that the hemolysis induced by the mock circulation loop was negligible. The performed tests showed a good reproducibility and statistical significance. The mock circulation loop and test protocol developed in this study are valid methods to investigate the hemolysis induced by a pulsatile blood pump. PMID:25586541

  8. Using a Mock Trial Method to Enhance Effectiveness of Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    White, Cindy T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional teaching methodologies may deter adult learning because of passive the exchange of knowledge. Teaching to the "evidence" substantiating best practice requires a systematic approach to transfer knowledge into clinical inquiry. A mock trial simulated role-play activity was selected to show the value of learning through active engagement. The nurse "defendant" was challenged to substantiate practice based on the evidence. Seminar participants (the jury) scrutinized testimony through deliberation before delivering the final verdict. PMID:26580469

  9. Extragalatic zoo. I. [New galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of various types of extragalactic objects are described. Consideration is given to cD galaxies, D galaxies, N galaxies, Markarian galaxies, liners, starburst galaxies, and megamasers. Emphasis is also placed on the isolated extragalatic H I region; the isolated extragalatic H II region; primeval galaxies or photogalaxies; peculiar galaxies; Arp galaxies; interacting galaxies; ring galaxies; and polar-ring galaxies. Diagrams of these objects are provided.

  10. [Catalogues of therapeutic nursing activities in neurological early rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, S; Wallesch, C W

    2015-02-01

    Under the German DRG-system, hospital-based rehabilitation of still critically ill patients becomes increasingly important. The code for early neurological rehabilitation in the DRG-system's (Diagnosis Related Groups) list of operations and procedures requires an average daily therapeutic intensity of 300 min, part of which is being contributed by therapeutic nursing. As therapeutic aspects are integrated in other nursing activities, it is difficult to separate its time consumption. This problem is pragmatically resolved by catalogues of therapeutic nursing activities which assign plausible amounts of therapeutic minutes to each activity. The 4 catalogues that are used most often are described and compared. Nursing science has not focused yet on therapeutic nursing. PMID:25317957

  11. Chamber catalogues of optical and fluorescent signatures distinguish bioaerosol classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Mark; Perring, Anne E.; McCabe, Kevin; Kok, Greg; Granger, Gary; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-07-01

    Rapid bioaerosol characterization has immediate applications in the military, environmental and public health sectors. Recent technological advances have facilitated single-particle detection of fluorescent aerosol in near real time; this leverages controlled ultraviolet exposures with single or multiple wavelengths, followed by the characterization of associated fluorescence. This type of ultraviolet induced fluorescence has been used to detect airborne microorganisms and their fragments in laboratory studies, and it has been extended to field studies that implicate bioaerosol to compose a substantial fraction of supermicron atmospheric particles. To enhance the information yield that new-generation fluorescence instruments can provide, we report the compilation of a referential aerobiological catalogue including more than 50 pure cultures of common airborne bacteria, fungi and pollens, recovered at water activity equilibrium in a mesoscale chamber (1 m3). This catalogue juxtaposes intrinsic optical properties and select bandwidths of fluorescence emissions, which manifest to clearly distinguish between major classes of airborne microbes and pollens.

  12. Catalogue of snout mites (Acariformes: Bdellidae) of the world.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Fabio A; Skvarla, Michael J; Fisher, J Ray; Dowling, Ashley P G; Ochoa, Ronald; Ueckermann, Edward A; Bauchan, Gary R

    2016-01-01

    Bdellidae (Trombidiformes: Prostigmata) are moderate to large sized predatory mites that inhabit soil, leaves, leaf litter, and intertidal rocks. They are readily recognized by an elongated, snout-like gnathosoma and by elbowed pedipalps bearing two (one in Monotrichobdella Baker & Balock) long terminal setae. Despite being among the first mites ever described, with species described by Carl Linnaeus, the knowledge about bdellids has never been compiled into a taxonomic catalogue. Here we present a catalogue listing 278 valid species; for each species we include distribution information, taxonomic literature, and type depository institutions. The genus Rigibdella Tseng, 1978 is considered a junior synonym of Cyta von Heyden, 1826, and Bdellodes Oudemans, 1937 is considered a junior synonym of Odontoscirus Tohr, 1913. Illustrated keys to subfamilies and genera are presented, as well as keys to species of each genus. PMID:27615820

  13. An annotated catalogue of the Iranian Alysiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Fischer, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a catalogue of the Iranian Alysiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is given. It is based on a detailed study of all available published data. In total 78 species from 15 genera including Alloea Haliday, 1833 (1 species), Angelovia Zaykov, 1980 (1 species), Aphaereta Foerster, 1862 (2 species), Aspilota Foerster, 1862 (2 species), Chorebus Haliday, 1833 (42 species), Coelinidea Viereck, 1913 (2 species), Coloneura Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Dacnusa Haliday, 1833 (10 species), Dinotrema Foerster, 1862 (5 species), Idiasta Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Orthostigma Ratzeburg, 1844 (3 species), Phaenocarpa Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Protodacnusa Griffiths, 1964 (2 species), Pseudopezomachus Mantero, 1905 (2 species), and Synaldis Foerster, 1862 (3 species) are reported in this catalogue. Two species are new records for Iran: Coelinidea elegans (Curtis, 1829) and Dacnusa (Pachysema) aterrima Thomson, 1895. Also, a faunistic list with distribution data and host records is provided. PMID:26249881

  14. Analysis of astrometric catalogues with vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignard, F.; Klioner, S.

    2012-11-01

    Aims: We compare stellar catalogues with position and proper motion components using a decomposition on a set of orthogonal vector spherical harmonics. We aim to show the theoretical and practical advantages of this technique as a result of invariance properties and the independence of the decomposition from a prior model. Methods: We describe the mathematical principles used to perform the spectral decomposition, evaluate the level of significance of the multipolar components, and examine the transformation properties under space rotation. Results: The principles are illustrated with a characterisation of systematic effects in the FK5 catalogue compared to Hipparcos and with an application to extraction of the rotation and dipole acceleration in the astrometric solution of QSOs expected from Gaia.

  15. Differences in expert witness knowledge: do mock jurors notice and does it matter?

    PubMed

    Parrott, Caroline T; Neal, Tess M S; Wilson, Jennifer K; Brodsky, Stanley L

    2015-03-01

    The knowledge of experts presumably affects their credibility and the degree to which the trier of fact agrees with them. However, specific effects of demonstrated knowledge are largely unknown. In this experiment, we manipulated a forensic expert's level of knowledge in a mock-trial paradigm. We tested the influence of low versus high expert knowledge on mock juror perceptions of expert credibility, on agreement with the expert, and on sentencing. We also tested expert gender as a potential moderator. Knowledge effects were statistically significant; however, these differences carried little practical utility in predicting mock jurors' ultimate decisions. Contrary to the hypotheses that high knowledge would yield increased credibility and agreement, knowledge manipulations influenced only perceived expert likeability. The low-knowledge expert was perceived as more likeable than the high-knowledge counterpart, a paradoxical finding. No significant differences across expert gender were found. Implications for conceptualizing expert witness knowledge and credibility and their potential effects on juror decision-making are discussed. PMID:25770282

  16. Time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic applied to mock osseointegration monitoring applying two experimental models.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Jacques; Haupert, Sylvain; Laugier, Pascal; Ulrich, T J; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Johnson, Paul A

    2012-03-01

    This study broadens vibration-like techniques developed for osseointegration monitoring to the nonlinear field. The time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic is applied to two mock models. The first one consists of tightening a dental implant at different torques in a mock cortical bone; the second one allows one to follow glue curing at the interface between a dental implant and a mock jaw. Energy is focused near the implant interface using the time reversal technique. Two nonlinear procedures termed pulse inversion and the scaling subtraction method, already used successfully in other fields such as contrast agents and material characterization, are employed. These two procedures are compared for both models. The results suggest that nonlinear elasticity can provide new information regarding the interface, complementary to the linear wave velocity and attenuation. The curing experiment exhibits an overall low nonlinear level due to the fact that the glue significantly damps elastic nonlinearity at the interface. In contrast, the torque experiment shows strong nonlinearities at the focus time. Consequently, a parallel analysis of these models, both only partially reflecting a real case, enables one to envisage future in vivo experiments. PMID:22423689

  17. Dynamic Characterization of Mock Explosive Material Using Reverse Taylor Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ferranti, L; Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J; Vandersall, K S

    2010-03-25

    The motivation for the current study is to evaluate the dynamic loading response of an inert mock explosive material used to replicate the physical and mechanical properties of LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 insensitive high explosives. The evaluation of dynamic material parameters is needed for predicting the deformation behavior including the onset of failure and intensity of fragmentation resulting from high velocity impact events. These parameters are necessary for developing and validating physically based material constitutive models that will characterize the safety and performance of energetic materials. The preliminary study uses a reverse Taylor impact configuration that was designed to measure the dynamic behavior of the explosive mock up to and including associated fragmentation. A stationary rod-shaped specimen was impacted using a compressed-gas gun by accelerating a rigid steel anvil attached to a sabot. The impact test employed high-speed imaging and velocity interferometry diagnostics for capturing the transient deformation of the sample at discrete times. Once established as a viable experimental technique with mock explosives, future studies will examine the dynamic response of insensitive high explosives and propellants.

  18. Crashing galaxies, cosmic fireworks

    SciTech Connect

    Keel, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    The study of binary systems is reviewed. The history of the study of interacting galaxies, the behavior of gas in binary systems, studies to identify the processes that occur when galaxies interact, and the relationship of Seyfert galaxies and quasars to binary systems are discussed. The development of an atlas of peculiar galaxies (Arp, 1966) and methods for modeling galaxy interactions are examined.

  19. Supernova explosion in dense clouds in the galaxy and the COS-B gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Supernova (SN) exploding in dense cloudlets produce large fluxes of gamma-rays. They would shine on gamma-ray sources, but their life time is small. Flux distribution of these sources in the Galaxy are calculated and compared with the COS-B catalogue of sources.

  20. Aeronautical facilities catalogue. Volume 2: Airbreathing propulsion and flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E.; Freda, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    Volume two of the facilities catalogue deals with Airbreathing Propulsion and Flight Simulation Facilities. Data pertinent to managers and engineers are presented. Each facility is described on a data sheet that shows the facility's technical parameters on a chart and more detailed information in narratives. Facilities judged comparable in testing capability are noted and grouped together. Several comprehensive cross-indexes and charts are included.

  1. Catalogue of Galactic globular-cluster surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trager, S. C.; King, Ivan R.; Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    We present a catalogue of surface-brightness profiles (SBPs) of 125 Galactic globular clusters, the largest such collection ever gathered. The SPBs are constructed from generally inhomogeneous data, but are based heavily on the Berkeley Global Cluster Survey of Djorgovski & King. All but four of the SBPs have photometric zero points. We derive central surface brightness, King-model concentrations, core radii, half-light, and other fraction-of-light radii where data permit, and we briefly discuss their use.

  2. NASA space geodesy program: Catalogue of site information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, M. A.; Noll, C. E.

    1993-01-01

    This is the first edition of the NASA Space Geodesy Program: Catalogue of Site Information. This catalogue supersedes all previous versions of the Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of Site Information, last published in May 1989. This document is prepared under the direction of the Space Geodesy and Altimetry Projects Office (SGAPO), Code 920.1, Goddard Space Flight Center. SGAPO has assumed the responsibilities of the Crustal Dynamics Project, which officially ended December 31, 1991. The catalog contains information on all NASA supported sites as well as sites from cooperating international partners. This catalog is designed to provde descriptions and occupation histories of high-accuracy geodetic measuring sites employing space-related techniques. The emphasis of the catalog has been in the past, and continues to be with this edition, station information for facilities and remote locations utilizing the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques. With the proliferation of high-quality Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) transponders, many co-located at established SLR and VLBI observatories, the requirement for accurate station and localized survey information for an ever broadening base of scientists and engineers has been recognized. It is our objective to provide accurate station information to scientific groups interested in these facilities.

  3. A catalogue of temperatures for Kepler eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.

    2014-02-01

    We have combined the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalogue with information from the HES, KIS and 2MASS photometric surveys to produce spectral energy distribution fits to over 2600 eclipsing binaries in the catalogue over a wavelength range of 0.36-2.16 Å. We present primary (T1) and secondary (T2) stellar temperatures, plus information on the stellar radii and system distance ratios. The derived temperatures are on average accurate to 370 K in T1 and 620 K in T2. Our results improve on the similarly derived physical parameters of the Kepler Input Catalogue through consideration of both stars of the binary system rather than a single star model, and inclusion of additional U-band photometry. We expect these results to aid future uses of the Kepler eclipsing binary data, both in target selection and to inform users of the extremely high-precision light curves available. We do not include surface gravities or system metallicities, as these were found to have an insignificant effect on the observed photometric bands.

  4. THROES: A Catalogue of Herschel Observations of Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Medina, J.; Sánchez-Contreras, C.; García-Lario, P.; Rodrigo, C.

    2015-12-01

    We are building a catalogue of fully-reprocessed observations of all evolved stars observed with Herschel (THROES). In a first stage, we focus on observations performed with the PACS instrument in its full range spectroscopy mode. Once finished, the catalogue will offer all reduced data for each observation, as well as, complementary information from other observatories. As a first step, we concentrate our efforts on two main activities: 1) the reprocessing and data-reduction of more than 200 individual sources, observed by Herschel/PACS in the 55-210 micron range, available in the Herschel Science Archive (HSA); 2) The creation of an initial catalogue, accesible via web and the Virtual Observatory (VO), with all the information relative to PACS observations and the classification of the sources. Our ultimate goal will be to carry out a comprehensive and systematic study of the far infrared properties of low-and intermediate-mass (1-8 FX1) evolved stars using these data. These objects cover the whole range of possible evolutionary stages in this short-lived phase of stellar evolution, from AGB phase to the PN stage, displaying a wide variety of chemical and physical properties.

  5. The Polar Metadata Catalogue for the IPY Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledrew, E. F.; Barnard, C.; Vincent, W.; Latour, S.; Tomlinson, S.

    2008-12-01

    The International IPY Data Management Committee is working towards an IPY Master Directory that will provide a discovery portal for metadata in either the FGDC (Federal Geographic Data Committee) or GCMD (Global Change Master Directory) standard. This will, in time, evolve towards the international ISO standard for Metadata. In Canada, we have been developing a Metadata discovery portal for the ArcticNet program which is currently operational. This program includes scientists working in the natural, social and health sciences and, as such, addresses a wide range of issues associated with Metadata cataloguing within a multisdisciplinary program. With support form the Federal IPY Secretariat, this Metadata portal has been modified to address many of the needs of the Canadian IPY scientists. We are also working with the National Contaminants Program of Canada (Scott, anything more specific to identify this?) to provide a similar service for their data management issues. The system is evolving towards a 'Polar Metadata Catalogue' that will include flexibility to address the needs of scientists in a wide range of programs dealing with Polar science issues. In doing this, we will maintain interoperability with other Metadata catalogues to ensure a wide-ranging discovery experience for the scientists, no matter what the discipline, provide long term support of the information beyond the IPY sunset years, and provide information and tools for ongoing outreach and communications. In this paper we will describe the evolution of this portal and potential new directions for metadata and data archives.

  6. Informal information for web-based engineering catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Richard D.; Culley, Stephen J.; Hicks, Ben J.

    2001-10-01

    Success is highly dependent on the ability of a company to efficiently produce optimal designs. In order to achieve this companies must minimize time to market and possess the ability to make fully informed decisions at the early phase of the design process. Such decisions may include the choice of component and suppliers, as well as cost and maintenance considerations. Computer modeling and electronic catalogues are becoming the preferred medium for the selection and design of mechanical components. In utilizing these techniques, the designer demands the capability to identify, evaluate and select mechanical components both quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitative decisions generally encompass performance data included in the formal catalogue representation. It is in the area of qualitative decisions that the use of what the authors call 'Informal Information' is of crucial importance. Thus, 'Informal Information' must often be incorporated into the selection process and selection systems. This would enable more informed decisions to be made quicker, without the need for information retrieval via discussion with colleagues in the design environment. This paper provides an overview of the use of electronic information in the design of mechanical systems, including a discussion of limitations of current technology. The importance of Informal Information is discussed and the requirements for association with web based electronic catalogues are developed. This system is based on a flexible XML schema and enables the storage, classification and recall of Informal Information packets. Furthermore, a strategy for the inclusion of Informal Information is proposed, and an example case is used to illustrate the benefits.

  7. On the quantitative measurement of fracture toughness in high explosive and mock materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Cady, Carl M; Rae, Philip J; Lovato, Manuel L

    2010-01-01

    Two approaches in measuring the fracture toughness of heterogeneous high explosives and their mocks are explored in this investigation. One is the global measurement according to the ASTM E 1820-06 standard, which is primarily developed for metallic materials to obtain quantitative measurement of parameters such as the stress intensity factor, the J-integral, and the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). The second approach is based on local measurements using digital image correlation (DIC). Detailed results and comparisons of the two strategies will be presented for the Mock 900-21, a mechanical simulant of the PBX 9501 high explosive. Cracking is the most dominant mechanical failure mechanism in high explosives (HE) and a key parameter for describing and predicting crack initiation and extension is the fracture toughness. Quantitative measurement of such material property poses challenges, and this is mainly because that the material is highly heterogeneous with a very complicated microstructure and the contrast of the mechanical properties of the constituents is also remarkably high. In this investigation, we explore two strategies in measuring the fracture toughness of heterogeneous high explosives and their mocks. The first approach is based on the global measurement according to the ASTM E 1820-06 standard, which is primarily developed for metallic materials to obtain quantitative measurement of parameters such as the stress intensity factor, the J-integral, and the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). However, there are difficulties in applying the ASTM standard on energetic solids that include identifying the moment of crack initiation and pinpointing exact crack length at each instant of time. The second approach is based on local measurements. We developed a technique for quantitatively identifying the location and extent of macroscopic cracks in heterogeneous high explosive and mock material. By combining such a technique with the displacement field

  8. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. IV - The large-scale space distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Gott, J. Richard, III; Schneider, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from a statistical analysis of published observational data on a sample of 860 northern dwarf and low-surface-brightness (D/LSB) galaxies with delta = 0 deg or greater and b between -40 and 40 deg, selected from the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies (Nilson et al., 1973). The results are presented in extensive redshift/space maps, histograms, graphs and tables and characterized in detail. It is shown that the distribution of D/LSB galaxies closely resembles that of bright galaxies, apparently ruling out biased-star-formation models predicting a uniform distribution of D/LSBs. Although bright galaxies outside clusters are somewhat more clustered than the H I-rich D/LSBs, the latters' pairwise peculiar velocity (460 + or - 50 km/sec) is similar to that of the former.

  9. Shaping galaxy evolution with galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond

    A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5galaxies from quiescent galaxies. Our method indicates that the inner stellar mass is the most correlated parameter of quenching, implying that the process that quenches galaxies must also buildup their inner structure. Second, we explore the relationship between galactic bars and their host galaxies with Galaxy Zoo 2 at z˜0. The correlations of bar properties and galaxy properties are consistent with simulations of bar formation and evolution, indicating that bars affect their host galaxies. Finally, we investigate whether bars can drive supermassive black hole growth with data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble at 0.2galaxies to a matched sample of inactive, control galaxies shows that there is no statistically significant excess of bars in active hosts. Our result shows that bars are not the primary fueling mechanism of supermassive black hole

  10. Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, A. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Universe was a more exciting place at moderate to high redshifts z˜3, after reionization took place, but before the present day galaxy properties were firmly established. From a wide variety of directions, we are gaining insight into the Universe at these epochs. Less gas was sequestered into stars and had been ejected into the interstellar medium as weakly emitting, slowly cooling debris, because a significant amount of star formation and supermassive blackhole growth in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) was still to occur. Furthermore, the processes that shape today’s galaxies were at work, and can be seen in real time with the appropriate tools. The most active regions of galaxies at these redshifts are deeply obscured at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths by an opaque interstellar medium (ISM) that absorbs most of their radiation, and then re-emits at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths. This emission provides us with a very powerful probe of the regions within galaxies where the most intense activity takes place; both their total energy output, and from spectroscopy, about the physics and chemistry of the atomic and molecular gas that fuels, hides and surrounds these regions. This information is unique, but not complete: radio, mid- and near-IR, optical and X-ray observations each provide unique complementary views. Nevertheless, probing the obscured Universe, with the Atacama Large (Sub-)Millimeter Array (ALMA), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Herschel Space Observatory, Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and missions and telescopes that are not yet in construction, like an actively cooled sub-10-m class IR space telescope and a 25-m class ground-based submillimeter/THz telescope (CCAT) will provide a more complete picture of in which neighborhoods, by what means and how quickly the most vigorous bursts of activity take place.

  11. In Vitro Matured Oocytes Are More Susceptible than In Vivo Matured Oocytes to Mock ICSI Induced Functional and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Salian, Sujit Raj; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of ICSI have been intensified recently due to increased risk of birth defects in ICSI born children. Although fertilization rate is significantly higher in ICSI cycles, studies have failed to demonstrate the benefits of ICSI in improving the pregnancy rate. Poor technical skill, and suboptimal in vitro conditions may account for the ICSI results however, there is no report on the effects of oocyte manipulations on the ICSI outcome. Objective The present study elucidates the influence of mock ICSI on the functional and genetic integrity of the mouse oocytes. Methods Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) level, mitochondrial status, and phosphorylation of H2AX were assessed in the in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI. Results A significant increase in ROS level was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P<0.05-0.001) whereas unique mitochondrial distribution pattern was found only in IVM oocytes (P<0.01-0.001). Importantly, differential H2AX phosphorylation was observed in both in vivo matured and IVM oocytes subjected to mock ICSI (P <0.001). Conclusion The data from this study suggests that mock ICSI can alter genetic and functional integrity in oocytes and IVM oocytes are more vulnerable to mock ICSI induced changes. PMID:25786120

  12. The initial conditions for stellar protocluster formation. III. The Herschel counterparts of the Spitzer Dark Cloud catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretto, N.; Lenfestey, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Traficante, A.; Molinari, S.; Thompson, M. A.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic plane surveys of pristine molecular clouds are key for establishing a Galactic-scale view of star formation. For this reason, an unbiased sample of infrared dark clouds in the 10° < | l | < 65°, | b | < 1° region of the Galactic plane was built using Spitzer 8 μm extinction. However, intrinsic fluctuations in the mid-infrared background can be misinterpreted as foreground clouds. Aims: The main goal of this study is to disentangle real clouds in the Spitzer Dark Cloud (SDC) catalogue from artefacts due to fluctuations in the mid-infrared background. Methods: We constructed H2 column density maps at ~18″ resolution using the 160 μm and 250 μm data from the Herschel Galactic plane survey Hi-GAL. We also developed an automated detection scheme that confirms the existence of a SDC through its association with a peak on these Herschel column density maps. Detection simulations, along with visual inspection of a small sub-sample of SDCs, have been performed to get more insight into the limitations of our automated identification scheme. Results: Our analysis shows that 76( ± 19)% of the catalogued SDCs are real. This fraction drops to 55( ± 12)% for clouds with angular diameters larger than ~1 arcmin. The contamination of the PF09 catalogue by large spurious sources reflects the large uncertainties associated to the construction of the 8 μm background emission, a key stage in identiying SDCs. A comparison of the Herschel confirmed SDC sample with the BGPS and ATLASGAL samples shows that SDCs probe a unique range of cloud properties, reaching down to more compact and lower column density clouds than any of these two (sub-)millimetre Galactic plane surveys. Conclusions: Even though about half of the large SDCs are spurious sources, the vast majority of the catalogued SDCs do have a Herschel counterpart. The Herschel-confirmed sample of SDCs offers a unique opportunity to study the earliest stages of both low- and high-mass star formation across

  13. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  14. Satellite galaxies around present-day massive ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo; Trujillo, Ignacio; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther

    2014-07-01

    Using the spectroscopic New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue and the photometric photo-z catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we have explored the satellite distribution around ˜1000 massive (M⋆ ≳ 2 × 1011 M⊙) visually classified elliptical galaxies down to a satellite mass ratio of 1:400 (i.e. 5 × 108 ≲ Msat ≲ 2 × 1011 M⊙). Our host galaxies were selected to be representative of a mass complete sample. The satellites of these galaxies were searched within a projected radial distance of 100 kpc to their hosts. We have found that only 20-23 per cent of the massive ellipticals have at least a satellite down to a mass ratio 1:10. This number increases to 45-52 per cent if we explore satellites down to 1:100 and is >60-70 per cent if we go further down to 1:400. The average projected radial distance of the satellites to their hosts for our whole sample down to 1:400 is ˜59 kpc (which can be decreased at least down to 50 kpc if we account for incompleteness effects). The number of satellites per galaxy host only increases very mildly at decreasing the satellite mass. The fraction of mass which is contained in the satellites down to a mass ratio of 1:400 is 8 per cent of the total mass contained by the hosts. Satellites with a mass ratio from 1:2 to 1:5 (with ˜28 per cent of the total mass of the satellites) are the main contributor to the total satellite mass. If the satellites eventually infall into the host galaxies, the merger channel will be largely dominated by satellites with a mass ratio down to 1:10 (as these objects have 68 per cent of the total mass in satellites).

  15. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The connection between metals, specific SFR and H I gas in galaxies: the Z-SSFR relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-López, M. A.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We study the interplay between gas phase metallicity (Z), specific star formation rate (SSFR) and neutral hydrogen gas (HI) for galaxies of different stellar masses. Our study uses spectroscopic data from Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, as well as HI detection from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) and Galex Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS) public catalogues. We present a model based on the Z-SSFR relation that shows that at a given stellar mass, depending on the amount of gas, galaxies will follow opposite behaviours. Low-mass galaxies with a large amount of gas will show high SSFR and low metallicities, while low-mass galaxies with small amounts of gas will show lower SSFR and high metallicities. In contrast, massive galaxies with a large amount of gas will show moderate SSFR and high metallicities, while massive galaxies with small amounts of gas will show low SSFR and low metallicities. Using ALFALFA and GASS counterparts, we find that the amount of gas is related to those drastic differences in Z and SSFR for galaxies of a similar stellar mass. The results of this study were publish recently in a ``letter to the editor" (Lara-Lopez, M. A. et al. 2013, MNRAS, 433, L35).

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the connection between metals, specific SFR and H I gas in galaxies: the Z-SSFR relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-López, M. A.; Hopkins, A. M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Brough, S.; Colless, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Driver, S.; Foster, C.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sharp, R. G.; Steele, O.; Taylor, E. N.

    2013-06-01

    We study the interplay between gas phase metallicity (Z), specific star formation rate (SSFR) and neutral hydrogen gas (H I) for galaxies of different stellar masses. Our study uses spectroscopic data from Galaxy and Mass Assembly and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, as well as H I detection from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) and Galex Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS) public catalogues. We present a model based on the Z-SSFR relation that shows that at a given stellar mass, depending on the amount of gas, galaxies will follow opposite behaviours. Low-mass galaxies with a large amount of gas will show high SSFR and low metallicities, while low-mass galaxies with small amounts of gas will show lower SSFR and high metallicities. In contrast, massive galaxies with a large amount of gas will show moderate SSFR and high metallicities, while massive galaxies with small amounts of gas will show low SSFR and low metallicities. Using ALFALFA and GASS counterparts, we find that the amount of gas is related to those drastic differences in Z and SSFR for galaxies of a similar stellar mass.

  17. The WSRT ZoA Perseus-Pisces filament wide-field H I imaging survey - I. H I catalogue and atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Schröder, A. C.; Jarrett, T. H.; Elson, E. C.; van Driel, W.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Henning, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present results of a blind 21cm H I-line imaging survey of a galaxy overdensity located behind the Milky Way at ℓ, b ≈ 160°, 0.5°. The overdensity corresponds to a zone-of-avoidance crossing of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster filament. Although it is known that this filament contains an X-ray galaxy cluster (3C 129) hosting two strong radio galaxies, little is known about galaxies associated with this potentially rich cluster because of the high Galactic dust extinction. We mapped a sky area of ˜9.6 deg2 using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in a hexagonal mosaic of 35 pointings observed for 12 h each, in the radial velocity range cz = 2400-16 600 km s-1. The survey has a sensitivity of 0.36 mJy beam-1 rms at a velocity resolution of 16.5 km s-1. We detected 211 galaxies, 62 per cent of which have a near-infrared counterpart in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. We present a catalogue of the H I properties and an H I atlas containing total intensity maps, position-velocity diagrams, global H I profiles and UKIDSS counterpart images. For the resolved galaxies we also present H I velocity fields and radial H I surface density profiles. A brief analysis of the structures outlined by these galaxies finds that 87 of them lie at the distance of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster (cz ˜ 4000-8000 km s-1) and seem to form part of the 3C 129 cluster. Further 72 detections trace an overdensity at a velocity of cz ≈ 10 000 km s-1 and seem to coincide with a structure predicted from mass density reconstructions in the first 2MASS Redshift Survey.

  18. Evolution of galaxy structure using visual morphologies in CANDELS and Hydro-ART simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark W.

    2013-08-01

    present in the simulations with our observations, we are able to probe the model's ability to create realistic galaxy populations. The first chapter of this thesis focuses on visually classifying and studying galaxy populations at z~2 and how they change with redshift for a given mass. The second chapter focuses on applying our techniques to Hydro-ART simulations at z~2 and comparing these mock 'observed' simulations with our real WFC3 HST observations. Both of these chapters closely resemble manuscripts in the process of being submitted for independent publication.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IRAS PSC/FSC Combined Catalogue (Abrahamyan+ 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, H. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Knyazyan, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical identifications of a few thousands of IRAS sources showed that IRAS Point Source and IRAS Faint Source catalogues (PSC and FSC, respectively) contain many quasars and active galactic nuclei, late-type stars, planetary nebulae, variables, etc. To increase the efficiency of using IRAS PSC and FSC, which contain a lot of common sources, one needs a joint catalogue of all IRAS point sources with improved data based on both catalogues. However, cross-correlation of the catalogues is not so easy, as the association of many sources is relative, and not always it is obvious, whose source from one catalogue corresponds to the other one in the second catalogue. This problem exists in case of using standard cross-correlation tools. Therefore, we have created a tool for cross-matching astronomical catalogues and we have applied it to IRAS PSC and FSC. Using this tool we have carried out identifications with a search radius corresponding to 3-σ of errors for each source individually rather than a standard radius for all sources. As a result, we obtained 73,770 associations. In addition, we have made cross-correlations with AKARI-IRC, AKARI-FIS and WISE catalogues. We created a catalogue of 345,163 IRAS sources with high positional accuracy and with 17 photometric measurements from 1.25 to 160 ?m range, providing a detailed catalogue for IRAS point sources. (1 data file).

  20. Diverse structural evolution at z > 1 in cosmologically simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2015-08-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 < z < 3. We measure automated diagnostics of galaxy morphology in cosmological simulations of the formation of 22 central galaxies with 9.3 < log10M*/M⊙ < 10.7. These high-spatial-resolution zoom-in calculations enable accurate modelling of the rest-frame UV and optical morphology. Even with small numbers of galaxies, we find that structural evolution is neither universal nor monotonic: galaxy interactions can trigger either bulge or disc formation, and optically bulge-dominated galaxies at this mass may not remain so forever. Simulated galaxies with M* > 1010M⊙ contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 < z < 2. By this epoch, simulated galaxies with specific star formation rates below 10- 9.7 yr- 1 are more likely than normal star-formers to have a broader mix of structural types, especially at M* > 1010 M⊙. We analyse a cosmological major merger at z ˜ 1.5 and find that the newly proposed Multimode-Intensity-Deviation (MID) morphology diagnostics trace later merger stages while Gini-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is <100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.