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Sample records for mode ii fracture

  1. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  2. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  3. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  4. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  5. Characterization of mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composite utilizing laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Truskowski, J.W. USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH )

    1992-09-01

    A test technique to characterize the mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites utilizing laser interferometry was developed. This was demonstrated by measuring the mode II critical strain energy release rate at room temperature. The present study used the silicon-carbide-fiber/glass-ceramic matrix composite system. 13 refs.

  6. Recommendations for the determination of valid mode II fracture toughnesses K{sub IIc}

    SciTech Connect

    Hiese, W.; Kalthoff, J.F.

    1999-07-01

    From a discussion of the sizes of the plastic zones at the tip of a crack under shear (Mode II) and tensile (Mode I) conditions of loading, hypotheses on specimen size requirements are derived for determining valid values of the shear fracture toughness K{sub IIc}. The following conclusions are drawn: The minimum specimen thickness for a K{sub IIc} test can be smaller, but the minimum in-plane specimen dimensions should be larger than for a K{sub Ic} test. For verification of these hypotheses, Mode II and additionally Mode I fracture toughnesses were determined for the aluminum alloy 7075 and the tool steel 90 MnCrV 8. Measurements were performed with specimens of different sizes with respect to the size of the crack tip plastic zones. The obtained data are in good agreement with the derived criteria for measuring Mode II fracture toughnesses K{sub IIc} and confirm their validity.

  7. Ductile fracture in HY100 steel under mixed mode I/mode II loading

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, D. . Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy); Knott, J.F. . School of Metallurgy and Materials)

    1994-05-01

    A number of criteria have been proposed which predict the direction of cracking under mixed Mode 1/Mode 2 loading. All have been evaluated for brittle materials, in which a crack subjected to tension and shear propagates normal to the maximum tensile stress (i.e. fracture is of the Mode 1 type). In a ductile material, however, a notch subjected to mixed Mode 1/Mode 2 loading may initiate a crack in the direction of maximum shear. This paper shows that the profile of the notch tip changes with increasing mixed mode load in such a way that one side of the tip blunts while the other sharpens. Various specimens, subjected to the same mixed mode ratio, were unloaded from different points on the load-displacement curves to study the change in notch-tip profile. Studies under the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) have shown that cracks initiate at the sharpened end, along a microscopic shear band. Using a dislocation pile-up model for decohesion of the carbide-matrix interface, a micromechanical model has been proposed for crack initiation in the shear band. It is shown that a theoretical prediction of the shear strain required for decohesion gives a result that is, of magnitude, similar to that of the shear strain at crack initiation measured in the experiments.

  8. A Mixed-Mode I/II Fracture Criterion and Its Application in Crack Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.; Deng, Xiaomin; Ma, Fashang; Newman, James S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A crack tip opening displacement (CTOD)-based, mixed mode fracture criterion is developed for predicting the onset and direction of crack growth. The criterion postulates that crack growth occurs in either the Mode I or Mode II direction, depending on whether the maximum in either the opening or the shear component of CTOD, measured at a specified distance behind the crack tip, attains a critical value. For crack growth direction prediction, the proposed CTOD criterion is shown to be equivalent to seven commonly used crack growth criteria under linearly elastic and asymptotic conditions. Under elastic-plastic conditions the CTOD criterion's prediction of the dependence of the crack growth direction on the crack-up mode mixity is in excellent agreement with the Arcan test results. Furthermore, the CTOD criterion correctly predicts the existence of a crack growth transition from mode I to mode II as the mode mixity approaches the mode II loading condition. The proposed CTOD criterion has been implemented in finite element crack growth simulation codes Z1P2DL and FRANC2DL to predict the crack growth paths in (a) a modified Arcan test specimen and fixture made of AL 2024-T34 and (b) a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen made of AL 7050. A series of crack growth simulations have been carried out for the crack growth tests in the Arcan and DCB specimens and the results further demonstrate the applicability of the mixed mode CTOD fracture criterion crack growth predictions and residual strength analyses for airframe materials.

  9. Effects of Temperature on Mode II Fracture Toughness of Multidirectional CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung Soo; Wang, Wen Xue; Takao, Yoshihiro; Ben, Goichi

    End notched flexure (ENF) tests were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and fiber orientation on Mode II interlaminar fracture behavior, GIIC (GII at the crack initiation), of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites, T800H/#3631. The values of GIIC for three kinds of laminates, [012//012], [22.5/-22.5/08/-22.5/22.5//-22.5/22.5/08/22.5/-22.5] and [45/-45/08/-45/45//-45/45/08/45/-45], with a pre-cracked interface, that is // in each laminate, were obtained at three temperatures, i.e. -100°C, 25°C and 150°C. It is shown that GIIC is obviously affected by the temperature and fiber orientation. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation was also carried out to investigate the fracture surface. SEM analysis suggested that the decreased Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness for all kinds of specimens at high temperature could be attributed to temperature-induced matrix property change or fiber-matrix interfacial weakening.

  10. A Mixed-Mode (I-II) Fracture Criterion for AS4/8552 Carbon/Epoxy Composite Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnati, Sidharth Reddy

    A majority of aerospace structures are subjected to bending and stretching loads that introduce peel and shear stresses between the plies of a composite laminate. These two stress components cause a combination of mode I and II fracture modes in the matrix layer of the composite laminate. The most common failure mode in laminated composites is delamination that affects the structural integrity of composite structures. Damage tolerant designs of structures require two types of materials data: mixed-mode (I-II) delamination fracture toughness that predicts failure and delamination growth rate that predicts the life of the structural component. This research focuses determining mixed-mode (I-II) fracture toughness under a combination of mode I and mode II stress states and then a fracture criterion for AS4/8552 composite laminate, which is widely used in general aviation. The AS4/8552 prepreg was supplied by Hexcel Corporation and autoclave fabricated into a 20-ply unidirectional laminate with an artificial delamination by a Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) film at the mid-plane. Standard split beam specimens were prepared and tested in double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notched flexure modes to determine mode I (GIC) and II (GIIC) fracture toughnesses, respectively. The DCB specimens were also tested in a modified mixed-mode bending apparatus at GIIm /GT ratios of 0.18, 0.37, 0.57 and 0.78, where GT is total and GIIm is the mode II component of energy release rates. The measured fracture toughness, GC, was found to follow the locus a power law equation. The equation was validated for the present and literature experimental data.

  11. Mode I, Mode II, and Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in air at 25 and 1316 C in asymmetric four-point flexure with single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) test specimens. The mode I fracture toughness was found to be K(sub Ic) = 1.15 plus or minus 0.07 and 0.98 plus or minus 0.13 MPa the square root of m, respectively, at 25 and 1316 C. The respective mode II fracture toughness values were K(sub IIc) = 0.73 plus or minus 0.10 and 0.65 plus or minus 0.04 MPa the square root of m. Hence, there was an insignificant difference in either K(sub Ic or K(sub IIc) between 25 and 1316 C for the coating material, whereas there was a noticeable distinction between K(sub Ic) and K(sub IIc), resulting in K(sub IIc) per K(sub Ic) = 0.65 at both temperatures. The empirical mixed-mode fracture criterion best described the coatings' mixed-mode fracture behavior among the four mixed-mode fracture theories considered. The angle of crack propagation was in reasonable agreement with the minimum strain energy density criterion. The effect of the directionality of the coating material in on K(sub Ic) was observed to be insignificant, while its sintering effect at 1316 C on K(sub Ic) was significant.

  12. In-plane response and mode II fracture response of Z-pin woven laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hseng-Ji

    Textile composites are proven to be an attractive choice over traditional pre-preg based composites because of reduced manufacturing costs and improved transverse mechanical properties. However, similar to traditional pre-preg composites, 2D laminates consisting of multiple layers of laminae still suffer from delamination under impact or transverse loads. Z-pin (carbon fiber of small diameter inserted in the thickness direction-z) composites are a means to provide higher through-thethickness stiffness and strength that 2D woven composites lack. In this thesis, The influences of Z-pin density and Z-pin diameter on the response of Z-pin under in-plane loads (compression) and transverse loads (mode II fracture) are examined. Both experiments and numerical simulations were performed to address the problems. Compression tests were conducted first and failure mechanism in each loading scenario was identified, through optical and mechanical measurements, during and after the tests. This was followed by the development of different numerical models of varying degree of sophistication, which include in-plane 2D models, (used to study fiber distortion and damage due to Z-pin insertion), multi-layer 2D models, (used to provide an inexpensive multi-layer model to study the effect of phase difference due to stacking consolidation), and multi-layer-multi-cell models (used to provide a full 3D multi-layer and multi-representative unit cell description). The second part of this thesis investigates the mode II fracture response under static and dynamic loading. Discrete Cohesive Zone Model (DCZM) was adopted to obtain the fracture toughness in conjunction with experimental data. In dynamic test, a crack advance gage (CAG) was designed to capture the exact time when the crack begins to propagate. By use of these CAGs, the corresponding crack propagation speed between different CAGs can be computed accordingly. These observations are supplemented through high speed optical images

  13. A revisit to high-rate mode-II fracture characterization of composites with Kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays composite materials have been extensively utilized in many military and industrial applications. For example, the newest Boeing 787 uses 50% composite (mostly carbon fiber reinforced plastic) in production. However, the weak delamination strength of fiber reinforced composites, when subjected to external impact such as ballistic impact, has been always potential serious threats to the safety of passengers. Dynamic fracture toughness is a critical indicator of the performance from delamination in such impact events. Quasi-static experimental techniques for fracture toughness have been well developed. For example, end notched flexure (ENF) technique, which is illustrated in Fig. 1, has become a typical method to determined mode-II fracture toughness for composites under quasi-static loading conditions. However, dynamic fracture characterization of composites has been challenging. This has resulted in conflictive and confusing conclusions in regard to strain rate effects on fracture toughness of composites.

  14. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  15. Fracture toughness of unidirectional fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in Mode II utilizing laser interferometry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truskowski, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    A laser interferometry technique to measure crack opening displacement was developed and applied to end notched flexure specimens of a Corning Glass Works 1723 glass matrix with silicon carbide fibers. The laser interferometer displacement guage monitored the crack opening displacement (COD) at the location of a support while specimens were subjected to Mode II (forward shear) cracking at room temperature via three point bend tests on a standard Instron Compression machine. Vertical displacement was measured at the center of the test specimen using a linear variable differential transformer. Load verses displacement curves were generated for both the LVDT displacement and the COD. The COD curve showed a marked improvement in determining the onset of crack growth. From the enhanced critical load determination, the materials fracture toughness in Mode II, GI.Ic was calculated for varying crack lengths. The calculations provided estimates with a variance of only 10% from the mean thus illustrating the utility of this procedure.

  16. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m-2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  17. On the localization of fracture in highly constrained polymeric layer subjected to mode II loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, M.Y.M.; Chai, H.

    1996-12-31

    The tight spatial constraints imposed on the interlayer by the relatively rigid substrates in adhesive bonding may impede the natural development and growth of damage sources such as voids, kinks and microcracks. This may lead to extensive nonlinear deformations and intense strain localization prior to fracture in ductile or brittle adhesive systems. Moreover, the localized deformation in the bond may be highly triaxial regardless of the nature of the far-field loading. Fracture criteria based on conventional linear elastic fracture mechanics and small-scale yielding condition may not be applicable on large strain. Therefore, the purpose of the authors work is to focus on the local deformation at the crack tip in an effort to demonstrate a fracture criterion, which is independent of the specimen geometry, for the situation in large (or small) plastic deformation.

  18. Non-Linear Analysis of Mode II Fracture in the end Notched Flexure Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizov, V.

    2016-03-01

    Analysis is carried-out of fracture in the End Notched Flex- ure (ENF) beam configuration, taking into account the material nonlin- earity. For this purpose, the J-integral approach is applied. A non-linear model, based on the Classical beam theory is used. The mechanical be- haviour of the ENF configuration is described by the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain curve. It is assumed that the material possesses the same properties in tension and compression. The influence is evaluated of the material constants in the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain equation on the fracture behaviour. The effect of the crack length on the J-integral value is investigated, too. The analytical approach, developed in the present paper, is very useful for parametric analyses, since the simple formulae obtained capture the essentials of the non-linear fracture in the ENF con- figuration.

  19. Role of large-scale slip in mode II fracture of bimaterial interface produced by diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. R.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2001-08-01

    Bimaterial interfaces present in diffusion-bonded (and in-situ) composites are often not flat interfaces. The unevenness of the interface can result not only from interface reaction products but also from long-range waviness associated with the surfaces of the component phases bonded together. Experimental studies aimed at determining interface mechanical properties generally ignore the departure in the local stress due to waviness and assume a theoretically flat interface. Furthermore, the commonly used testing methods involving superimposed tension often renders the interface so extremely brittle that if microplastic effects were present it becomes impossible to perceive them. This article examines the role of waviness of the interface and microplastic effects on crack initiation. To do this, a test was selected that provides significant stability against crack growth by superimposing compressive stresses. Mode II interface fracture was studied for NiAl/Mo model laminates using a recently developed asymmetrically loaded shear (ALS) interface shear test. The ALS test may be viewed as opposite of the laminate bend test. In the bend test, shear at the interface is created via tension on one surface of the bend, while in the ALS test, shear is created by compression on one side of the interface relative to the other. Normal to the interface, near the crack tip, an initially compressive state is replaced by slight tension due to Poisson’s expansion of the unbonded part of the compressed beam.

  20. 3-D Mixed Mode Delamination Fracture Criteria - An Experimentalist's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Many delamination failure criteria based on fracture toughness have been suggested over the past few decades, but most only covered the region containing mode I and mode II components of loading because that is where toughness data existed. With new analysis tools, more 3D analyses are being conducted that capture a mode III component of loading. This has increased the need for a fracture criterion that incorporates mode III loading. The introduction of a pure mode III fracture toughness test has also produced data on which to base a full 3D fracture criterion. In this paper, a new framework for visualizing 3D fracture criteria is introduced. The common 2D power law fracture criterion was evaluated to produce unexpected predictions with the introduction of mode III and did not perform well in the critical high mode I region. Another 2D criterion that has been shown to model a wide range of materials well was used as the basis for a new 3D criterion. The new criterion is based on assumptions that the relationship between mode I and mode III toughness is similar to the relation between mode I and mode II and that a linear interpolation can be used between mode II and mode III. Until mixed-mode data exists with a mode III component of loading, 3D fracture criteria cannot be properly evaluated, but these assumptions seem reasonable.

  1. Mode I fracture of sheet metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, T.; Hachez, F.; Marchioni, B.; Blyth, P. H.; Atkins, A. G.

    2004-02-01

    The perceived wisdom about thin sheet fracture is that (i) the crack propagates under mixed mode I & III giving rise to a slant through-thickness fracture profile and (ii) the fracture toughness remains constant at low thickness and eventually decreases with increasing thickness. In the present study, fracture tests performed on thin DENT plates of various thicknesses made of stainless steel, mild steel, 6082-O and NS4 aluminium alloys, brass, bronze, lead, and zinc systematically exhibit (i) mode I "bath-tub", i.e. "cup & cup", fracture profiles with limited shear lips and significant localized necking (more than 50% thickness reduction), (ii) a fracture toughness that linearly increases with increasing thickness (in the range of 0.5- 5 mm). The different contributions to the work expended during fracture of these materials are separated based on dimensional considerations. The paper emphasises the two parts of the work spent in the fracture process zone: the necking work and the "fracture" work. Experiments show that, as expected, the work of necking per unit area linearly increases with thickness. For a typical thickness of 1 mm, both fracture and necking contributions have the same order of magnitude in most of the metals investigated. A model is developed in order to independently evaluate the work of necking, which successfully predicts the experimental values. Furthermore, it enables the fracture energy to be derived from tests performed with only one specimen thickness. In a second modelling step, the work of fracture is computed using an enhanced void growth model valid in the quasi plane stress regime. The fracture energy varies linearly with the yield stress and void spacing and is a strong function of the hardening exponent and initial void volume fraction. The coupling of the two models allows the relative contributions of necking versus fracture to be quantified with respect to (i) the two length scales involved in this problem, i.e. the void spacing

  2. Fracture - An Unforgiving Failure Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2006-01-01

    During the 2005 Conference for the Advancement for Space Safety, after a typical presentation of safety tools, a Russian in the audience simply asked, "How does that affect the hardware?" Having participated in several International System Safety Conferences, I recalled that most attention is dedicated to safety tools and little, if any, to hardware. The intent of this paper on the hazard of fracture and failure modes associated with fracture is my attempt to draw attention to the grass roots of system safety - improving hardware robustness and resilience.

  3. A fractographic study of the edge-sliding mode in fracture toughness testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Chisholm, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A fractographic study of Mode II fracture surfaces has been conducted for the purpose of identifying the microstructural mechanisms responsible for fracture in the edge-sliding mode. A compact shear (CS) specimen was employed to generate the fracture surfaces and also to establish Mode II fracture toughness values for Ti-6Al-4V, A533-B steel, and several aluminum alloys. In all tests, one of the two edge cracks sustained complete Mode II fracture while the other exhibited only a limited amount of subcritical crack growth. Mode II fracture surfaces, which were unique in appearance, have been examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that shear (or parabolic) microvoid coalescence was the dominant mechanism for Mode II fracture. It was also established that most of the surface abrasions were created by the relative sliding of the fracture surfaces during unstable fracture rather than the crack initiation process.

  4. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  5. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation

  6. Mixed Mode Fracture of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis L.

    2008-01-01

    The combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of anisotropic ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the microsplat coating material was modeled using Finite Element approach to account for anisotropy and micro cracked structures, and predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  7. The impact of hygrothermal preconditioning on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness in unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempowicz, Michael L.

    The correlation between the interlaminar Mode II fracture toughness (GIIC) of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy and other material properties across different conditioning regimes was investigated. Specimens were preconditioned using select hygrothermal criteria to evaluate how changes in the material and mechanical properties in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite correlations with changes in GIIC for each regime. An increase in GIIC from baseline values was demonstrated across all conditions from end-notched flexure (ENF) testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile tests had varying responses based on preconditioning environment. Since tensile and some DMA properties rely on fiber strength and show property loss with increased plasticization, fiber strength may not have a large impact on GIIC properties. Test data also implied that the GIIC increased when consolidation of the polymer chains occurred in the arid condition as well as when crosslink density increased in the moisture exposed conditions. From these results it is believed that the chemical and physical changes in matrix cohesion are more important to GIIC behavior prediction than fiber behavior.

  8. Fracture-An Unforgiving Failure Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2010-09-01

    During the 2005 Conference for the Advancement for Space Safety, after a typical presentation of safety tools, a Russian in the audience simply asked, “How does that affect the hardware?” Most of the papers in the International Association for Space Safety Conferences are dedicated to safety tools and few, if any, to hardware. The intent of this paper on the hazard of fracture and failure modes associated with fracture is to draw attention to the grass roots of system safety - improving hardware robustness and resilience. This paper outlines the causes of fracture, test techniques to identify cracks, and design techniques to reduce the probability of system failure due to fracture.

  9. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  10. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  11. Comparison of Mode II and III Monotonic and Fatigue Delamination Onset Behavior for Carbon/Toughened Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1997-01-01

    Monotonic and fatigue tests were performed to compare the Mode II and III interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset for Tenax-HTA/R6376 carbon/toughened epoxy composites. The Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset were characterized using the end-notched flexure (ENF) test while the Mode III interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset were characterized by using the edge crack torsion (ECT) test. Monotonic tests show that the Mode III fracture toughness is higher than the Mode II fracture toughness. Both Mode II and III cyclic loading greatly increases the tendency for a delamination to grow relative to a single monotonically increasing load. Under fatigue loading, the Mode III specimen also has a longer life than the Mode II specimen.

  12. Combined mode I-mode III fracture toughness of a particulate reinforced metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the fracture behavior of a particulate reinfored aluminum alloy composite under combined mode I-mode III loading conditions. A modified three-point bend specimen was used to carry out these tests. It was found that the mode I loading condition was energetically most favorable. Addition of mode III components to the system seems to increase the amount of redundant work during fracture without affecting the critical fracture criterion.

  13. Effect of Mixed-Mode Ratio on Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Woven Fabric Glass/Epoxy Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Y.; Horiguchi, K.; Kumagai, S.; Shinohe, D.

    2004-06-28

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental and analytical study conducted to investigate the effect of mixed-mode ratio on the cryogenic interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric glass/epoxy laminates. Interlaminar fracture tests were performed and a three-dimensional finite element analysis was carried out to obtain critical strain energy release rates. The cryogenic interlaminar fracture toughness increased upon the introduction of the mode II component.

  14. Influence of the resin on interlaminar mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    Both literature review data and new data on toughness behavior of seven matrix and adhesive systems in four types of tests were studied in order to assess the influence of the resin on interlaminar fracture. Mixed mode (i.e., various combinations of opening mode 1, G sub 1, and shearing mode 2; G sub 2) fracture toughness data showed that the mixed mode relationship for failure appears to be linear in terms of G sub 1 and G sub 2. The study further indicates that fracture of brittle resins is controlled by the G sub 1 component, and that fracture of many tough resins is controlled by total strain-energy release rate, G sub T. Regarding the relation of polymer structure and the mixed mode fracture: high mode 1 toughness requires resin dilatation; dilatation is low in unmodified epoxies at room temperature/dry conditions; dilatation is higher in plasticized epoxies, heated epoxies, and in modified epoxies; modification improves mode 2 toughness only slightly compared with mode 1 improvements. Analytical aspects of the cracked lap shear test specimen were explored.

  15. Fracture modes in off-axis fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Criteria were developed for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in high-modulus graphite-fiber/resin unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis tensile loading. Procedures are described which use sensitivity analyses and off-axis data to determine the uniaxial strength of fiber composites. It was found that off-axis composites fail by three fracture modes which produce unique fracture surface characteristics. The stress that dominates each fracture mode and the load angle range of its dominance can be identified. Linear composite mechanics is adequate to describe quantitatively the mechanical behavior of off-axis composites. The uniaxial strengths predicted from off-axis data are comparable to these measured in uniaxial tests.

  16. Fracture modes in off-axis fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    Criteria have been developed for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in high-modulus graphite-fiber/resin unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis tensile loading. Procedures are described which use sensitivity analyses and off-axis data to determine the uniaxial strength of fiber composites. It was found that off-axis composites fail by three fracture modes which produce unique fracture surface characteristics. The stress that dominates each fracture mode and the load angle range of its dominance can be identified. Linear composite mechanics is adequate to describe quantitatively the mechanical behavior of off-axis composites. The uniaxial strengths predicted from off-axis data are comparable to those measured in uniaxial tests.

  17. Effects of voids on delamination behavior under static and fatigue mode I and mode II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelal, Nisrin Rizek

    Composite materials have become materials of choice for wind turbine blade manufacturing due to their high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue life. Glass fiber composites are used extensively in light-weight structural components for wind turbines, aircrafts, marine craft and high performance automobile because glass fiber is inexpensive and usually provides high strength to weight ratio and good in-plane mechanical properties. The high cycle fatigue resistance of composite materials used in wind turbine blades has been recognized as a major uncertainty in predicting the reliability of wind turbines over their design lifetime. Blades are expected to experience 108 to 109 fatigue cycles over a 20 to 30 year lifetime. Delamination or interlaminar failure is a serious failure mode observed in composite structures. Even partial delamination will lead to a loss of local stiffness, which can preclude buckling failure. Manufacturing process defects such as voids and fiber waviness degrade the fatigue life and delamination resistance of the blade's composite. This research describes the effect of voids on static and fatigue interlaminar fracture behavior under mode I and mode II loading of wind turbine glass fiber composites. Samples with different void volume fractions in the 0.5%-7% range were successfully obtained by varying the vacuum in the hand layup vacuum bagging manufacturing process. Void content was characterized using four different methods; ultrasonic scanning, epoxy burn off, serial sectioning and X-Ray computed tomography. The effect of voids on both mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness under static and fatigue loading was investigated. Finally, fractographic analysis (using optical and scanning electron microscopy) was conducted. The results showed that voids leads to slight reduction in static modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness. In addition, voids lead to a decrease in modes I and II maximum cyclic strain energy release

  18. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  19. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  20. An investigation of the edge-sliding mode in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Chisholm, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation procedure has been applied to the Williams stress function to determine the elastic stress distribution for the crack tip region of a finite, edge-cracked plate subjected to mode II loading at the crack tips. The asymmetric specimen selected was particularly suitable for the determination of plane strain fracture toughness for mode II loading. Numerical solutions for stress intensity factors for the edge-sliding mode obtained by the boundary collocation method were in close agreement with values obtained from photoelastic experiments. Fracture tests of several compact shear specimens of 2024-T4 aluminum were conducted in order to experimentally investigate the behavior of the edge-sliding mode. In each case a brittle shear failure was observed and mode II fracture toughness values were obtained. The average value for K-IIc obtained from two tests was 39.5 ksi radical (in). No K-Ic data for 2024-T4 were available for comparison purposes; however, K-Ic values for a similar alloy, 2024-T351, have been reported as 34 ksi radical (in) which is only about 15 per cent below the corresponding K-IIc value.

  1. The effect of mixed mode precracking on the mode 1 fracture toughness of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Prashanth; Bascom, Williard D.; Nairn, John A.

    1993-01-01

    We subjected double cantilever beam specimens from four different composite materials to mixed-mode precracking. Three different precracking mode 1 to mode 2 ratios were used--1 to 4, 1 to 1, and 4 to 1. Following precracking the specimens were tested for mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode precracking often influenced the mode 1 toughness and its influence persisted for as much as 60 mm of mode 1 crack growth. We tested composites with untoughened matrices, composites with rubber-toughened matrices, and composites with interlayer toughening. Depending on material type and precracking mode ratio, the precracking could cause either a significant increase or a significant decrease in the mode 1 fracture toughness.

  2. Size and Geometry Effects on Rock Fracture Toughness: Mode I Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahi, M. R.; Akbardoost, J.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of specimen size and geometry on the apparent mode I fracture toughness ( K c) of an Iranian white marble (Neyriz) are studied. A number of fracture tests were conducted on center-cracked circular disk (CCCD) specimens with different radii to investigate the size effects on K c. The experimental results demonstrate that the apparent fracture toughness increases in bigger specimens. In order to explain the experimental results, the modified maximum tangential stress (MMTS) criterion is used, where higher order terms of the Williams' series expansion are included in the maximum tangential stress criterion. It is shown that the MMTS criterion provides good estimates for the apparent fracture toughness of Neyriz marble, obtained from fracture tests of edge-cracked triangular specimens. It is, therefore, concluded that the proposed criterion is able to account for the size and geometry effects on the fracture resistance of rocks simultaneously.

  3. Fracture Characterization of Human Cortical Bone Under Mode I Loading.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filipe; de Moura, Marcelo; Dourado, Nuno; Xavier, José; Pereira, Fábio; Morais, José; Dias, Maria; Lourenço, Paulo; Judas, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized version of the double cantilever beam (DCB) test is used to determine the fracture energy in human cortical bone under pure mode I loading. An equivalent crack length based data-reduction scheme is used with remarkable advantages relative to classical methods. Digital image correlation (DIC) technique is employed to determine crack opening displacement at the crack tip being correlated with the evolution of fracture energy. A method is presented to obtain the cohesive law (trapezoidal bilinear softening) mimicking the mechanical behavior observed in bone. Cohesive zone modeling (CZM) (finite-element method) was performed to validate the procedure showing excellent agreement. PMID:26502314

  4. Modified Mode-I Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) Fracture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    2001-01-01

    Five composite sandwich panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four of these panels had E-glass/vinylester facesheets and one had carbon/epoxy facesheets. The sandwich panels had different density PVC foam cores. The four E-glass panels had core densities of 80, 100, 130, 200 kg/cu m. The sandwich with carbon/epoxy 3 facesheets had a core with density of 100 kg/cu m. Fracture tests were conducted using a modified Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) test configuration. Load displacement curves were obtained for loading and unloading of the specimens during crack growth. Various increments of crack growth were monitored. Critical Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) were determined from the tests using the area method. The critical values of SERR can be considered the fracture toughness of the sandwich material. The fracture toughness ranged 367 J/sq m to 1350 J/sq m over the range of core densities. These results are compared to the Mode-I fracture toughness of the PVC foam core materials and values obtained for foam-cored sandwiches using the TSD specimen. Finite-element analyses (FEA) were performed for the test configuration and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). The SERR values determined from the FEA were scaled to the fracture loads, or critical loads, obtained from the modified CSB tests. These critical loads were in close agreement with the test values.

  5. Thermoplastic matrix composites - Finite-element analysis of mode I and mode II failure specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankert, Ray J.; Lambropoulos, Nicholas D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Sternstein, Sanford S.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-element analysis was conducted to evaluate the stress distributions within mode I and mode II failure specimens, assuming both isotropic and orthotropic elastic material properties. The effects of anisotropy on both the magnitude and the location of the highest stress concentration at the vicinity of the crack tip are significant. The results from modeling realistic blunt crack tip geometry and resin-rich zones imply that local variations in the microstructure strongly influence the stress state near the crack tip and therefore the measured fracture properties. In addition, the features of a viscoelastic model for thermoplastic matrices are described. This model will be used in future investigations of matrix-dominated failure phenomena.

  6. Fracture-mode map of brittle coatings: Theoretical development and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chong; Xie, Zhaoqian; Guo, Zhenbin; Yao, Haimin

    2015-10-01

    Brittle coatings, upon sufficiently high indentation load, tend to fracture through either ring cracking or radial cracking. In this paper, we systematically study the factors determining the fracture modes of bilayer material under indentation. By analyzing the stress field developed in a coating/substrate bilayer under indentation in combination with the application of the maximum-tensile-stress fracture criterion, we show that the fracture mode of brittle coatings due to indentation is determined synergistically by two dimensionless parameters being functions of the mechanical properties of coating and substrate, coating thickness and indenter tip radius. Such dependence can be graphically depicted by a diagram called 'fracture-mode map', whereby the fracture modes can be directly predicated based on these two dimensionless parameters. Experimental verification of the fracture-mode map is carried out by examining the fracture modes of fused quartz/cement bilayer materials under indentation. The experimental observation exhibits good agreement with the prediction by the fracture-mode map. Our finding in this paper may not only shed light on the mechanics accounting for the fracture modes of brittle coatings in bilayer structures but also pave a new avenue to combating catastrophic damage through fracture mode control.

  7. Influence of Mixed Mode I-Mode II Loading on Fatigue Delamination Growth Characteristics of a Graphite Epoxy Tape Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode I-mode II interlaminar tests were conducted on IM7/8552 tape laminates using the mixed-mode bending test. Three mixed mode ratios, G(sub II)/G(sub T) = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8, were considered. Tests were performed at all three mixed-mode ratios under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, where the former static tests were used to determine initial loading levels for the latter fatigue tests. Fatigue tests at each mixed-mode ratio were performed at four loading levels, Gmax, equal to 0.5G(sub c), 0.4G(sub c), 0.3G(sub c), and 0.2G(sub c), where G(sub c) is the interlaminar fracture toughness of the corresponding mixed-mode ratio at which a test was performed. All fatigue tests were performed using constant-amplitude load control and delamination growth was automatically documented using compliance solutions obtained from the corresponding quasi-static tests. Static fracture toughness data yielded a mixed-mode delamination criterion that exhibited monotonic increase in Gc with mixed-mode ratio, G(sub II)/G(sub T). Fatigue delamination onset parameters varied monotonically with G(sub II)/G(sub T), which was expected based on the fracture toughness data. Analysis of non-normalized data yielded a monotonic change in Paris law exponent with mode ratio. This was not the case when normalized data were analyzed. Fatigue data normalized by the static R-curve were most affected in specimens tested at G(sub II)/G(sub T)=0.2 (this process has little influence on the other data). In this case, the normalized data yielded a higher delamination growth rate compared to the raw data for a given loading level. Overall, fiber bridging appeared to be the dominant mechanism, affecting delamination growth rates in specimens tested at different load levels and differing mixed-mode ratios.

  8. Mixed mode stress field effect in adhesive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical or analytical analyses were performed on seven different test specimens including blister test, 90-degree peel test, torsion test, and various cone tests. These specimens are in general subjected to complex stress fields having various amounts of Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III loads. The specimens were then constructed using polymethyl methacrylate for the adherends and a transparent polyurethane elastomer (Solithane 113) for the adhesive. This combination permitted direct observation of the bondline as load was applied. Although initial debonds as well as bond end termination singularities were present in all specimens, in some cases the debond did not initiate at the singularity points as would normally have been expected. An explanation for this behavior is presented, as well as a comparison of loading mode effect on those specimens for which the debond did propagate from a bond terminus singular point.

  9. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  10. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and “weakest” microstructural resistance. PMID:20409579

  11. Numerical Study on Mixed-mode Fracture in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rena C.; Saucedo, Luis; Ruiz, Gonzalo

    2010-05-01

    The object of this work is to model the propagation of fracture in mixed-mode in lightly reinforced concrete beams. When a notched beam does not have enough shear reinforcement, fracture can initiate and propagate unstably and lead to failure through diagonal tension. In order to study this phenomenon numerically, a model capable of dealing with both static and dynamic crack propagation as well as the natural transition of those two regimes is necessary. We adopt a cohesive model for concrete fracture and an interface model for the deterioration between concrete and steel re-bar, both combined with an insertion algorithm. The static process is solved by dynamic relaxation (DR) method together with a modified technique [1] to enhance convergence rate. The same DR method is used to detect a dynamic process and switch to a dynamic calculation. The numerically obtained load-displacement curves, load-CMOD curves and crack patterns fit reasonably well with their experimental counterparts, having in mind that we fed the calculations only with parameters measured experimentally.

  12. Liquid-metal-induced fracture mode of martensitic T91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.L.; Auger, T.; Johnson, Duane, Robertson, I.M.

    2012-04-04

    The liquid–metal-induced fracture mode of T91 martensitic steel was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure and crack network in specimens obtained from focused-ion beam machining at and immediately below the fracture surface. Contrary to previous claims of quasi-cleavage fracture, the dominant fracture mode is intergranular cracking at martensite laths and prior austenite grain boundaries. These fracture mode results clarify an outstanding issue in liquid–metal embrittlement of steels that generally occur in a heavily-deformed microstructure. Several cracks were arrested at intergranular carbides, suggesting a metallurgical strategy for impeding liquid–metal-induced crack propagation.

  13. Fracture modes of high modulus graphite/epoxy angleplied laminates subjected to off-axis tensile loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Angleplied laminates of high modulus graphite fiber/epoxy were examined in several ply configurations at various tensile loading angles to the zero ply direction to determine the effects of ply orientations on tensile properties, fracture modes, and fracture surface characteristics of the various plies. Experimental results consist of stress-strain data, selected plots, fracture stresses and strains, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs of fracture surfaces. It was found that the stress-strain curves were linear to fracture, and that although fracture surface characteristics for a given fracture mode are similar to those for the same fracture mode in uniaxial specimens, no simple load angle range can be associated with a given fracture mode. It was also concluded that SEM results must be supplemented with ply stress calculations in order to identify ranges of fracture modes occurring as a function of ply orientation with respect to the load direction.

  14. Effect of stress and temperature on mode of fracture after reheat cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraresi, V.A.; Exaltacao Trevisan, R. da

    1996-12-01

    The phenomenon of stress-relief cracking or reheat cracking can occur in the heat affected zones (HAZ) or weld fillet during Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The parts of the HAZ most susceptible to reheat cracking are the coarse-grained regions which result from heating at elevated temperatures in the austenitic region. The aim of the research is to study the effect of stress and temperature during PWHT for stress relief on modes of fractures in High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steel produced commercially. The Modified Implant Test was applied along with simulation of thermal cycles typically used for stress-relief treatment of welded components. Basically two different modes of fracture have been identified on basis of fracture appearance. For the temperature range of 500 to 600C, under conditions of high and low stresses, a low-ductility intergranular fracture mode (brittle decohesion) was observed and fracture surfaces were characterized by almost featureless facets. At higher temperatures (680 C) and lower stresses, the fractures were slightly more ductile and occurred by creep cavitation on the grain boundaries. Although intergranular, these fractures were basically dimpled due to coalescence of individual creep cavities. Surfaces of fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Tests with varying initial loads and different heat-treatment temperatures were realized in order to render separation of stress and temperature effects. It was observed that fracture mode depends mainly on the temperature level rather than on stress range.

  15. Ductile opening-mode fracture by pore growth and coalescence during combustion alteration of siliceous mudstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla

    2003-01-01

    Opening-mode fractures with blunt tips and large maximum apertures are characteristic of clinker that formed by combustion alteration of siliceous mudstone. These fractures are inferred to result from pore growth and coalescence, with initially circular pores inherited from the diatomaceous protolith. Circular pores grow preferentially in an en-échelon arrangement and coalesce to elongate pores and blunt-tipped fractures by thinning and rupture of bridges between pores. Coalescence of overlapping en-échelon pores causes fracture propagation in a zig-zag path that is considered indicative of significant inelastic deformation outside the immediate vicinity of the fracture tips. This process of fracture formation by void growth and coalescence is inferred to result from solution mass transfer and possible bulk melt movement during partial melting of clinker. Chemical mass transfer provides a mechanism for extensive inelastic deformation in the surrounding host rock concurrent with fracturing that is considered characteristic of ductile fracture. The preferred elongation of coalescing pores and local rupture of pore bridges is explained by a tensile sintering stress due to the thermodynamic tendency of the system for energy minimization of solid and liquid surfaces. It is suggested that ductile fracture processes that are accompanied by extensive inelastic deformation lead to opening-mode fractures with large apertures in a variety of crustal settings including metamorphic and magmatic systems as well as in reactive diagenetic environments, thus affecting fracture-controlled transfer of heat and mass and the rheology of the Earth's crust.

  16. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Salas Zamarripa, A.; Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P.

    2011-12-15

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 Degree-Sign C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 Degree-Sign C testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative methodology to

  17. Combined Type II Odontoid Fracture with Jefferson's Fracture Treated with Temporary Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; O'Leary, Patrick F

    2015-12-01

    An 18-year-old male presented after a motor vehicle rollover accident. Computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of Type II odontoid fracture. Considering the patient's young age and the limitations of C1-C2 fusion including significant loss of cervical rotation, temporary internal fixation with a lateral mass fixation of C1 and pedicle fixation of C2 without fusion was done. CT scan done at 6-month follow-up visit showed healed odontoid fracture and excellent C1-C2 alignment. At ninth postoperative month, internal fixation was removed. Patient had normal movements of cervical spine at 1-year follow-up. Temporary internal fixation can be an important tool in the armamentarium of the surgeon in treating type II odontoid fractures in young adults and children. This strategy avoids the complications halo fixation and immobilizes the unstable C1-C2 segment without fusion. Removal of the internal fixation after healing allows restoration of the rotational motion. PMID:26713132

  18. Hinged external fixation for Regan-Morrey type I and II fractures and fracture-dislocations.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Alberto; D'amico, Salvatore; Combi, Alberto; Benazzo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Elbow fracture-dislocation is always demanding to manage due to the considerable soft-tissue swelling or damage involved, which can make an early open approach and ligamentous reconstruction impossible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of elbow hinged external fixation (HEF) as a definitive treatment in patients with elbow dislocations associated with Regan-Morrey (R-M) type I and II coronoid fractures and soft-tissue damage. We treated 11 patients between 2010 and 2012 with HEF. Instability tests and standard X-ray examinations were performed before surgery and 1-3 to 3-6 months after surgery, respectively. All patients underwent a preoperative CT scan. Outcomes were assessed with a functional assessment scale (Mayo Elbow Performance Score, MEPS) that included 4 parameters: pain, ROM, stability, and function. The results were good or excellent in all 11 patients, and no patient complained of residual instability. Radiographic examination showed bone metaplasia involving the anterior and medial sides of the joint in 5 patients. HEF presented several advantages: it improves elbow stability and it avoids long and demanding surgery in particular in cases with large soft tissue damage. We therefore consider elbow HEF to be a viable option for treating R-M type I and II fracture-dislocations. PMID:26875088

  19. Variation of fracture mode in micro-scale laser shock punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong; Song, Libin; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Yunhu; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Micro-scale laser shock punching is a high strain rate micro-forming method which uses the high-amplitude shock wave pressure induced by pulsed laser irradiation. The response of brass and pure titanium foils under the different ratio of laser beam diameter (d) to die hole diameter (D) in micro-scale laser shock punching was investigated experimentally and numerically. The typical fracture surface morphologies were observed using scanning electron microscope. Numerical simulations were conducted to predict the stress state of the workpiece before and after fracture. The influence of the ratio d/D on dynamic deformation and fracture of metal foils was characterized. The results demonstrate that both the crack locations and fracture surface morphologies of metal foils are strongly related to the ratio d/D. The fracture mode varies from a shear fracture mode to a mixed fracture mode, then to a tensile fracture mode as the ratio decreases. The stress state under the different ratio is discussed in detail and believed to be responsible for the variation.

  20. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  1. Opening-mode fracture in siliceous mudstone at high homologous temperature—effect of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla; Lore, Jason

    In analogy to high-temperature sintering of ceramics and metal powder compacts, the formation of opening-mode fractures in siliceous mudstone during natural in-situ combustion of hydrocarbons is attributed to contractile surface forces between mineral grains and an interstitial melt phase. A comparison between bulk density increase during sintering and created fracture space indicates that fracturing resulted from contraction of the rock matrix due to porosity reduction, grain-scale mass transfer, and high-temperature mineral formation. It is suggested that contractile surface forces between mineral grains and between mineral grains and pore fluid contribute to subcritical fracture formation under a wide range of subsurface conditions.

  2. Esthetic and biologic mode of reattaching incisor fracture fragment utilizing glass fiber post.

    PubMed

    Manju, M; Shanthraj, Srinivas L; Savitha, K C; Sethi, Ntasha

    2015-01-01

    Trauma to the anterior teeth affects the esthetic and psychological well-being of the patient. Advancement in the adhesive dentistry has facilitated the restoration of the coronal tooth fractures by minimally invasive procedures when the original tooth fragment is available. Reattachment of fractured fragment offers immediate treatment with improved preponderant aesthetics and restoration of function. Here, we describe a case of complicated fracture of the maxillary left immature permanent central incisor, which was treated endodontically followed by esthetic reattachment of the fractured fragment using the glass fiber post. Functional demands and esthetic considerations of the patient were fully met with this biologic mode of fragment reattachment. PMID:26283849

  3. Esthetic and biologic mode of reattaching incisor fracture fragment utilizing glass fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Manju, M.; Shanthraj, Srinivas L.; Savitha, K. C.; Sethi, Ntasha

    2015-01-01

    Trauma to the anterior teeth affects the esthetic and psychological well-being of the patient. Advancement in the adhesive dentistry has facilitated the restoration of the coronal tooth fractures by minimally invasive procedures when the original tooth fragment is available. Reattachment of fractured fragment offers immediate treatment with improved preponderant aesthetics and restoration of function. Here, we describe a case of complicated fracture of the maxillary left immature permanent central incisor, which was treated endodontically followed by esthetic reattachment of the fractured fragment using the glass fiber post. Functional demands and esthetic considerations of the patient were fully met with this biologic mode of fragment reattachment. PMID:26283849

  4. Experimental study on mixed mode fracture in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kezhuang; Li, Zheng; Fu, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Fiber reinforced composites are applied broadly in aeronautic and astronautic fields as a structural material. But the investigation in dynamic fracture behavior of fiber reinforced composite stands in the breach for scientists due to a large number of aircraft disasters. In this paper, the mixed mode fracture problems in fiber reinforced composites under impact are studied. First, based on the theory of the reflective dynamic caustic method for mixed mode fracture, corresponding experiments are carried out to study the dynamic fracture behaviors of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites under two kinds load conditions. By recording and analyzing the shadow spot patterns during the crack propagation process carefully, the dynamic fracture toughness and crack growth velocity of fiber reinforced composites are obtained. Via the observation of the crack growth routes and fracture sections, we further reveal the fracture mechanism of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. It concludes that opening mode still is the easier fracture type for the pre-crack initiation in fiber reinforced composites, while the interface between fibers and matrix becomes the fatal vulnerability during the crack propagation.

  5. A unified potential-based cohesive model of mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery R.

    2009-06-01

    A generalized potential-based constitutive model for mixed-mode cohesive fracture is presented in conjunction with physical parameters such as fracture energy, cohesive strength and shape of cohesive interactions. It characterizes different fracture energies in each fracture mode, and can be applied to various material failure behavior (e.g. quasi-brittle). The unified potential leads to both intrinsic (with initial slope indicators to control elastic behavior) and extrinsic cohesive zone models. Path dependence of work-of-separation is investigated with respect to proportional and non-proportional paths—this investigation demonstrates consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The potential-based model is verified by simulating a mixed-mode bending test. The actual potential is named PPR (Park-Paulino-Roesler), after the first initials of the authors' last names.

  6. Vibrational modes of hydraulic fractures: Inference of fracture geometry from resonant frequencies and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory seismic signals arising from resonant vibrations of hydraulic fractures are observed in many geologic systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluids within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis, valid at wavelengths greater than the fracture aperture, that accounts for quasi-static elastic deformation of the fracture walls, as well as fluid viscosity, inertia, and compressibility. In the long-wavelength limit, anomalously dispersed guided waves known as crack or Krauklis waves propagate with restoring force from fracture wall elasticity. At shorter wavelengths, the waves become sound waves within the fluid channel. Wave attenuation in our model is due to fluid viscosity, rather than seismic radiation from crack tips or fracture wall roughness. We characterize viscous damping at both low frequencies, where the flow is always fully developed, and at high frequencies, where the flow has a nearly constant velocity profile away from viscous boundary layers near the fracture walls. Most observable seismic signals from resonating fractures likely arise in the boundary layer crack wave limit, where fluid-solid coupling is pronounced and attenuation is minimal. We present a method to estimate the aperture and length of a resonating hydraulic fracture using both the seismically observed quality factor and characteristic frequency. Finally, we develop scaling relations between seismic moment and characteristic frequency that might be useful when interpreting the statistics of hydraulic fracture events.

  7. Simplified data reduction methods for the ECT test for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Simplified expressions for the parameter controlling the load point compliance and strain energy release rate were obtained for the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) specimen for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness. Data reduction methods for mode 3 toughness based on the present analysis are proposed. The effect of the transverse shear modulus, G(sub 23), on mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness characterization was evaluated. Parameters influenced by the transverse shear modulus were identified. Analytical results indicate that a higher value of G(sub 23) results in a low load point compliance and lower mode 3 toughness estimation. The effect of G(sub 23) on the mode 3 toughness using the ECT specimen is negligible when an appropriate initial delamination length is chosen. A conservative estimation of mode 3 toughness can be obtained by assuming G(sub 23) = G(sub 12) for any initial delamination length.

  8. Rogue Mode Shileding in NSLS-II Multipole Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Blednykh, A.; Bacha, B.; Borrelli, A.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.; Vetter, K.

    2011-03-28

    Modes with transverse electric field (TE-modes) in the NSLS-II multipole vacuum chamber can be generated at frequencies above 450MHz due to its geometric dimensions. Since the NSLS-II BPM system monitors signals within 10 MHz band at RF frequency of 500 MHz, frequencies of higher-order modes (HOM) can be generated within the transmission band of the band pass filter. In order to avoid systematic errors in the NSLS-II BPM system, we introduced frequency shift of HOMs by using RF metal shielding located in the antechamber slot. We demonstrated numerical modeling and experimental studies of the spurious TE modes in the NSLS-II vacuum chambers with antechamber slot. Calculated frequencies of TE-modes in considered chambers with and without RF shielding were verified experimentally. Flexible BeCu RF shielding inside each chamber at proper location shifts frequencies of H{sub 10p}-modes above {approx}900MHz, except chambers S6 odd and even. These chambers need special attention because of synchrotron radiation from downstream magnets. S6 odd multipole vacuum chamber needs to be measured and the RF shielding length has to be optimized. RF shielding looks adequate for baseline design. Fifty percent of open space provides adequate pumping speed.

  9. Alternate Operating Modes For NDCX-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Lund, S. M.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.

    2012-10-01

    NDCX-II is a newly completed accelerator facility at LBNL, built to study ion-heated warm dense matter and aspects of ion-driven targets for inertial-fusion energy. The baseline design calls for using twelve induction cells to accelerate 40 nC of Li+ ions to 1.2 MeV. During commissioning, though, we plan to extend the source lifetime by extracting less total charge. For operational flexibility, the option of using a helium plasma source is also being investigated. Over time, we expect that NDCX-II will be upgraded to substantially higher energies, necessitating the use of heavier ions to keep a suitable deposition range in targets. Each of these options requires development of an alternate acceleration schedule and the associated transverse focusing. The schedules here are first worked out with a fast-running 1-D particle-in-cell code ASP, then 2-D and 3-D Warp simulations are used to verify the 1-D results and to design transverse focusing.

  10. Transition temperature and fracture mode of as-castand austempered ductile iron.

    PubMed

    Rajnovic, D; Eric, O; Sidjanin, L

    2008-12-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature is a very important criterion that is used for selection of materials in some applications, especially in low-temperature conditions. For that reason, in this paper transition temperature of as-cast and austempered copper and copper-nickel alloyed ductile iron (DI) in the temperature interval from -196 to +150 degrees C have been investigated. The microstructures of DIs and ADIs were examined by light microscope, whereas the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope. The ADI materials have higher impact energies compared with DIs in an as-cast condition. In addition, the transition curves for ADIs are shifted towards lower temperatures. The fracture mode of Dls is influenced by a dominantly pearlitic matrix, exhibiting mostly brittle fracture through all temperatures of testing. By contrast, with decrease of temperature, the fracture mode for ADI materials changes gradually from fully ductile to fully brittle. PMID:19094047

  11. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and S2/8552 tape laminates. Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode IIIdominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of GIIIc exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  12. Effect of initial delamination on Mode 1 and Mode 2 interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue fracture threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen Bostaph; Martin, Roderick H.

    1991-01-01

    Static and fatigue double-cantilever beam (DCB) and end-notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine the effect of the simulated initial delamination in interlaminar fracture toughness, G(sub c), and fatigue fracture threshold, G(sub th). Unidirectional, 24-ply specimens of S2/SP250 glass/epoxy were tested using Kapton inserts of four different thickness - 13, 25, 75, and 130 microns, at the midplane at one end, or with tension or shear precracks, to simulate an initial delamination. To determine G(sub c), the fatigue fracture threshold below which no delamination growth would occur in less than 1 x 10(exp 6) cycles, fatigue tests were conducted by cyclically loading specimens until delamination growth was detected. Consistent values of model 1 fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), were measured from DCB specimens with inserts of thickness 75 microns or thinner, or with shear precracks. The fatigue DCB tests gave similar values of G(sub Ith) for the 13, 25, and 75 microns specimens. Results for the shear precracked specimens were significantly lower that for specimens without precracks. Results for both the static and fatigue ENF tests showed that measured G(IIc) and G(IIth) values decreased with decreasing insert thickness, so that no limiting thickness could be determined. Results for specimens with inserts of 75 microns or thicker were significantly higher than the results for precracked specimens or specimens with 13 or 25 microns inserts.

  13. Fixation of unstable type II clavicle fractures with distal clavicle plate and suture button.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter S; Sears, Benjamin W; Lazarus, Mark R; Frieman, Barbara G

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on a technique to treat unstable type II distal clavicle fractures using fracture-specific plates and coracoclavicular augmentation with a suture button. Six patients with clinically unstable type II distal clavicle fractures underwent treatment using the above technique. All fractures demonstrated radiographic union at 9.6 (8.4-11.6) weeks with a mean follow-up of 15.6 (12.4-22.3) months. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Penn Shoulder Score, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores were 97.97 (98.33-100), 96.4 (91-99), and 95 (90-100), respectively. One patient required implant removal. Fracture-specific plating with suture-button augmentation for type II distal clavicle fractures provides reliable rates of union without absolute requirement for implant removal. PMID:24667803

  14. Non-universal aperture-length scaling of opening mode fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Franziska; Schöpfer, Martin P. J.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Opening-mode fractures, such as joints, veins and dykes, typically exhibit a power-law aperture-length scaling with a power-law exponent of about 0.5. The fracture aperture is hence proportional to the square root of fracture length, a relation which is in fact predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) for an isolated Mode I fracture subjected to remote tension. The existence of such a 'universal scaling law' is however a highly debated topic. High quality outcrop data illustrate that fracture aperture-length scaling may be 'non-universal' and indicate that below a certain length-scale scaling is super-linear (power-law exponent > 1). We use a numerical model comprised of a square lattice of breakable elastic beams to investigate the aperture-length scaling that emerges in thin plates subjected to remote tension. Strength heterogeneity is introduced in the regular lattice by randomly assigning beam strengths from a Weibull probability distribution. The model fracture system evolution is characterised by two stages which are separated by the strain at which peak-stress occurs. During the pre-peak stress stage fracture aperture-length scaling is universal with a power-law exponent of about 0.5 as expected from LEFM. Shortly after the material has attained its maximum load bearing capacity, aperture-length scaling becomes non-universal, so that the average aperture-length relation plotted on a log-log graph exhibits a distinct kink. Fractures with a length less than this critical length scale exhibit super-linear aperture-length scaling, whereas fractures with a greater length exhibit sub-linear scaling. The models illustrate that the emergence of non-universal aperture-length scaling is a result of fracture clustering, which occurs after peak-stress in the form of a localised fracture zone. Given that fracture clustering is a common phenomenon in natural fracture systems, we argue that a universal scaling law may be the exception rather than the rule.

  15. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  16. Strength, reliability and mode of fracture of bilayered porcelain/zirconia (Y-TZP) dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Guazzato, Massimiliano; Proos, Kaarel; Quach, Linda; Swain, Michael Vincent

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biaxial flexural strength, reliability and the mode of fracture of bilayered porcelain/zirconia (Y-TZP) disks. For this purpose, 80 specimens were made from conventional dental porcelain and Y-TZP core ceramic, and equally divided into four groups as follows: monolithic specimens of porcelain; monolithic specimens of core material; bilayered specimens with the porcelain on top (facing the loading piston during testing); bilayered specimens with core material on top. The maximum load at fracture was calculated with a biaxial flexural test and finite element analysis was used to estimate the maximum tensile stress at fracture. Results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD. The reliability of strength was analyzed with the Weibull distribution. SEM was used to identify the initial crack and characterize the fracture mode. Monolithic core specimens and bilayered sample with the core material on the bottom were statistically significantly stronger than monolithic porcelain disks and bilayered samples with the porcelain on the bottom. The study, which was conducted with sample configurations that reproduce the clinical situation of crowns and fixed partial dentures, indicates that the material which lies on the bottom surface dictates the strength, reliability and fracture mode of the specimens. The contribution of strong and tough core materials to the performance of all-ceramics restorations may be offset by the weaker veneering porcelain if the actual distribution of the tensile stresses within the restoration is not taken into consideration. PMID:15109867

  17. Fracture mode control: a bio-inspired strategy to combat catastrophic damage

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haimin; Xie, Zhaoqian; He, Chong; Dao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of natural biomaterials have attracted intense attention from researchers with focus on the strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Nevertheless, no material is unconquerable under sufficiently high load. If fracture is unavoidable, constraining the damage scope turns to be a practical way to preserve the integrity of the whole structure. Recent studies on biomaterials have revealed that many structural biomaterials tend to be fractured, under sufficiently high indentation load, through ring cracking which is more localized and hence less destructive compared to the radial one. Inspired by this observation, here we explore the factors affecting the fracture mode of structural biomaterials idealized as laminated materials. Our results suggest that fracture mode of laminated materials depends on the coating/substrate modulus mismatch and the indenter size. A map of fracture mode is developed, showing a critical modulus mismatch (CMM), below which ring cracking dominates irrespective of the indenter size. Many structural biomaterials in nature are found to have modulus mismatch close to the CMM. Our results not only shed light on the mechanics of inclination to ring cracking exhibited by structural biomaterials but are of great value to the design of laminated structures with better persistence of structural integrity. PMID:25619564

  18. Anisotropy of tensile strength and fracture mode of perfect face-centered-cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. F.; Xu, J.; Qu, R. T.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an effective method to calculate the ideal tensile strength of six face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals (Cu, Au, Ni, Pt, Al, and Ir) along an arbitrary tensile direction by considering the coupling effect of normal stress and shear stress on a given crystallographic plane. Meanwhile, the fracture modes of the six crystals can also be derived from the competition between shear and cleavage fracture along different crystallographic planes. The results show that both the intrinsic factors (the ideal shear strength and cleavage strength of low-index planes) and the orientation may affect the tensile strength and fracture modes of ideal fcc crystals, which may give the reliable strength limit of fcc metals and well interpret the observed high strength in nano-scale mechanical experiments.

  19. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. An ECT specimen is a rectangular laminate, containing an edge delamination at the laminate mid-plane. Torsion load is applied to the specimens, resulting in relative transverse shear sliding of the delaminated faces. The test data reduction schemes are intended to yield initiation values of critical mode III strain energy release rate, G(sub IIIc), that are constant with delamination length. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design as a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and specimens made from S2/8552 tape laminates. Several specimens, each with different delamination lengths are tested. Detailed, three-dimensional finite element analyses of the specimens were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode III-dominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of G(sub IIIc) exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Furthermore, there was a large amount of scatter in the data. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  20. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  1. Study of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mode of Alumina-Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimnezhad Yazdi, A.; Baharvandi, H. R.; Abdizadeh, H.; Ehsani, N.

    In this study Al2O3-SiC nanocomposites have been fabricated by mixing of alumina and silicon carbide nano powders, followed by hot pressing at 1700°C. The mechanical properties and fracture mode of Al2O3-SiC nanocomposites containing different volume fractions (5, 10 and 15%) of nano scale SiC particles were investigated and compared with those of alumina. Al2O3-SiC powders were prepared by planetary milling in isopropanol. Fracture mode of specimens was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. Nanocomposites were tougher than alumina when they were hot pressed at the same temperature, and the values of nanocomposite's flexural strength and hardness were higher than those of alumina. Flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the nanocomposites increase by increasing the volume percent of SiC up to 10% and then decrease slightly. The Scanning electron microscopy observations showed that fracture mode changes from intergranular for alumina to transgranular for nanocomposites. Finally X-ray diffraction analysis couldn't detect any chemical reactions between Al2O3 and SiC particles.

  2. NSLS-II BPM System Protection from Rogue Mode Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Blednykh, A.; Bach, B.; Borrelli, A.; Ferreira, M.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hetzel, C.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.; Vetter, K.

    2011-03-28

    Rogue mode RF shielding has been successfully designed and implemented into the production multipole vacuum chambers. In order to avoid systematic errors in the NSLS-II BPM system we introduced frequency shift of HOM's by using RF metal shielding located in the antechamber slot of each multipole vacuum chamber. To satisfy the pumping requirement the face of the shielding has been perforated with roughly 50 percent transparency. It stays clear of synchrotron radiation in each chamber.

  3. Elastic analysis of a mode II fatigue crack test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Buzzard, R. J.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic displacements and stress intensity measurements for a mode II specimen have been obtained over a range of a/W values between 0.500 and 0.900 using the MARC general purpose finite element program. Stress intensity factors were experimentally determined using load point displacement values. Good general agreement between numerical and experimental results for crack mouth, crack surface, and load point displacements, and for stress intensity factors, demonstrates the accuracy of the present method.

  4. Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Properties of Woven Glass/Epoxy Composite Laminates Under Mixed-Mode I/III Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Takeda, Tomo; Narita, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    We characterize the combined Mode I and Mode III delamination fracture behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates at cryogenic temperatures. The eight-point bending plate (8PBP) tests were conducted at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K) using a new test fixture. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was also performed to calculate the energy release rate distribution along the delamination front, and the delamination fracture toughnesses were evaluated for various mixed-mode I/III ratios. Furthermore, the microscopic examinations of the fracture surfaces were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the mixed-mode I/III delamination fracture mechanisms in the woven GFRP laminates at cryogenic temperatures were assessed. The fracture properties were then correlated with the observed characteristics.

  5. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  6. Chest compressions in an infant with osteogenesis imperfecta type II: No new rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Sewell, R D; Steinberg, M A

    2000-11-01

    The case report of a newborn female with osteogenesis imperfecta type II who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with manual chest compressions for several minutes is presented. Chest radiographs taken before and after the chest compressions were administered were reviewed by several radiologists from 3 different hospitals and demonstrated no new radiographically visible rib fractures. Collagen analysis, the patient's clinical appearance, and clinical course, as well as a consultant's opinion aided in confirmation of the diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type II. A review of 4 previous studies concerning rib fractures and CPR is included. This unique case supports previous articles that have concluded that rib fractures rarely, if ever, result from CPR in pediatrics, even in children with a lethal underlying bone disease, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II. cardiopulmonary resuscitation, chest compressions, osteogenesis imperfecta, rib fractures, bone disease. PMID:11061808

  7. Fatigue delamination growth in woven glass/epoxy composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III loading conditions at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tomo; Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the cryogenic delamination growth behavior in woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III fatigue loading. Fatigue delamination tests were conducted with six-point bending plate (6PBP) specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K), and the delamination growth rate data for various mixed-mode ratios of Modes II and III were obtained. The energy release rate was evaluated using the three-dimensional finite element method. In addition, the fatigue delamination growth mechanisms were characterized by scanning electron microscopic observations of the specimen fracture surfaces.

  8. On the mode I fracture analysis of cracked Brazilian disc using a digital image correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshirini, Mohammad; Soltani, Nasser; Marashizadeh, Parisa

    2016-03-01

    Mode I of fracture of centrally cracked Brazilian disc was investigated experimentally using a digital image correlation (DIC) method. Experiments were performed on PMMA polymers subjected to diametric-compression load. The displacement fields were determined by a correlation between the reference and the deformed images captured before and during loading. The stress intensity factors were calculated by displacement fields using William's equation and the least square algorithm. The parameters involved in the accuracy of SIF calculation such as number of terms in William's equation and the region of analysis around the crack were discussed. The DIC results were compared with the numerical results available in literature and a very good agreement between them was observed. By extending the tests up to the critical state, mode I fracture toughness was determined by analyzing the image of specimen captured at the moment before fracture. The results showed that the digital image correlation was a reliable technique for the calculation of the fracture toughness of brittle materials.

  9. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V 4Cr 4Ti at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R. J.; Jones, R. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode I fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final machining. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 and 12.7 mm thick were taken from Wah Chang Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from Wah Chang Heat No. 832864. The effect of loading mode on fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti at RT was also studied using material from Heat No. 832665. Mode I fracture behavior was compared to mixed-mode (I/III) fracture properties obtained from modified CT specimens. Crack angles of 0° and 25° were used to vary the ratio of mode III to mode I loading. J- R curves were generated as the basis for determining the affect of loading mode. The specimen loaded in mixed-mode exhibited lower resistance to crack initiation and propagation than pure mode I specimens.

  10. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  11. Crack front échelon instability in mixed mode fracture of a strongly nonlinear elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess the role of elastic nonlinearity in gel fracture, we study the échelon instability in gelatin under mixed mode tensile and antiplane shear loading —i.e. the emergence of segmented crack front structures connected by steps. We evidence the existence of an energy-release-rate-dependent mode mixity threshold. We show that échelons appear via nucleation of localized helical front distortions, and that their emergence is the continuation of the cross-hatching instability of gels and rubbers under pure tensile loading, shifted by the biasing effect of the antiplane shear. This result, at odds with the direct bifurcation predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics, can be assigned to the controlling role of elastic nonlinearity.

  12. Evaluation of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode 3 Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Lee, Edward W.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1996-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was carried out on G40-800/R6376 graphite epoxy laminates to evaluate the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) test as a candidate for a standard Mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness test for laminated composites. The ECT test consists of a (90/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/90))(sub s) laminate with a delamination introduced by a non-adhesive film at the mid-plane along one edge and loaded in a special fixture to create torsion along the length of the laminate. Dye penetrate enhanced X-radiograph of failed specimens revealed that the delamination initiated at the middle of the specimen length and propagated in a self similar manner along the laminate mid-plane. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed that indicated that a pure Mode 3 delamination exists at the middle of specimen length away from both ends. At the ends near the loading point a small Mode 2 component exists. However, the magnitude of this Mode 2 strain energy release rate at the loading point is small compared to the magnitude of Mode 3 component in the mid-section of the specimen. Hence, the ECT test yielded the desired Mode 3 delamination. The Mode 3 fracture toughness was obtained from a compliance calibration method and was in good agreement with the finite element results. Mode 2 End-Notched Flexure (ENF) tests and Mode 1 Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were also performed for the same composite material. The Mode 1 fracture toughness was much smaller than both the Mode 2 and Mode 3 fracture toughness. The Mode 2 fracture toughness was found to be 75% of the Mode 3 fracture toughness.

  13. Mode and mechanism of fatigue fracture of a pearlitic steel in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, S. H.; Johnson, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    It is presently suggested that there are two mechanisms that cause fatigue crack initiation in a specimen subjected to a hydrogen environment: either a critical concentration of hydrogen is attained within the specimen, causing Mode I crack initiation, or the presence of some hydrogen (below critical concentration) promotes the early onset of plastic instability at the sites of maximum strain. It is further suggested that in the static loading condition, a high hydrogen concentration may be attained by way of mechanical factors, causing Mode I crack initiation. While cyclic fatigue specimens exhibited Mode II crack initiation in air, only Mode I crack initiation emerged in a hydrogen environment.

  14. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  15. Stress-ratio effect on mode II propagation of interlaminar fatigue cracks in graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the stress ratio on the propagation behavior of Mode II interlaminar fatigue cracks was studied with unidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates, Toray T800H/{number_sign}3631. End-notched flexure (ENF) specimens were used for fatigue tests under the stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.6; and end-loaded split (ELS) specimens were used for tests under R = {minus}1.0, {minus}0.5, and 0.2. For each stress ratio, the crack propagation rate was given by a power function of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11}, in the region of rates above 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle. Below this region, there exists the threshold for fatigue crack propagation. The threshold condition is given by a constant value of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11th} = 1.8 MPa{radical}m. The crack propagation rate is determined by {Delta}K{sub 11} near the threshold, while by the maximum stress identity factor, K{sub 11max}, at high rates. A fracture mechanics equation is proposed for predicting the propagation rate of Mode II fatigue cracks under various stress ratios. The effect of the stress ratio on the micromechanism of Mode II fatigue crack propagation was discussed on the basis of the microscopic observations of fracture surfaces and near-crack-tip regions.

  16. Analysis of the Numerical and Geometrical Parameters Influencing the Simulation of Mode I and Mode II Delamination Growth in Unidirectional and Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S.; De Baere, I.; Van Paepegem, W.

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of composite structures depends, among other damage mechanisms, on their ability to withstand delaminations. In order to have a better understanding of the cohesive zone method technique for delamination simulations, a complete analysis of the multiple parameters influencing the results is necessary. In this paper the work is concentrated on the cohesive zone method using cohesive elements. First a summary of the theory of the cohesive zone method is given. A numerical investigation on the multiple parameters influencing the numerical simulation of the mode I and mode II delamination tests has been performed. The parameters such as the stabilization method, the output frequency, the friction and the computational efficiency have been taken into account. The results will be compared to an analytical solution obtained by linear elastic fracture mechanics. Additionally the numerical simulation results will be compared to the experimental results of a glass-fibre reinforced composite material for the mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and to a carbon fibre 5-harness satin weave reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composite for the mode I DCB and mode II End Notched Flexure (ENF).

  17. Kohn-Sham density functional theory prediction of fracture in silicon carbide under mixed mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. W. K.; Pan, Z. L.; Warner, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    The utility of silicon carbide (SiC) for high temperature structural application has been limited by its brittleness. To improve its ductility, it is paramount to develop a sound understanding of the mechanisms controlling crack propagation. In this manuscript, we present direct ab initio predictions of fracture in SiC under pure mode I and mixed mode loading, utilizing a Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KSDFT) framework. Our results show that in both loading cases, cleavage occurs at a stress intensity factor (SIF) only slightly higher than the Griffith toughness, focusing on a (1 1 1) [1 \\bar{1} 0] crack in the 3C-SiC crystal structure. This lattice trapping effect is shown to decrease with mode mixity, due to the formation of a temporary surface bond that forms during decohesion under shear. Comparing the critical mode I SIF to the value obtained in experiments suggests that some plasticity may occur near a crack tip in SiC even at low temperatures. Ultimately, these findings provide a solid foundation upon which to study the influence of impurities on brittleness, and upon which to develop empirical potentials capable of realistically simulating fracture in SiC.

  18. Mason type II radial head fractures fixed with Herbert bone screws.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, M S; Gallannaugh, S C

    1996-01-01

    The management of radial head fractures remains controversial. Accurate classification of the fracture (Mason) may necessitate the use of special X-ray views (45 degrees arterior oblique or radio-capitellar). We present the results of 19 cases of Mason type II fractures treated operatively by open reduction and internal fixation with the Herbert bone screw. All patients achieved 'good-to-excellent' outcome at follow-up. Our results compare favourably with other forms of treatment for this injury. Images Figure 2 (a) Figure 2 (b) Figure 2 (c) Figure 2 (d) Figure 3 (a) Figure 3 (b) PMID:8758194

  19. [Fractures of the metacarpal bones II to V--conservative and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Lumplesch, R; Zilch, H; Friedebold, G

    1985-06-01

    Fractures of the metacarpals II-V can normally be handled conservatively. After reposition under local anaesthetic plaster of Paris is applied for a duration of 3 to 4 weeks. Open fractures usually with accompanying injuries, should be stabilized operatively. The functional results of conservative treatment are very good. Slight sidewards deviation of up to 1/3 of the width of the shaft and shortening of up to 6 mm don't interfere with good hand function. Palmar deviation of the distal fragment of up to 35 degrees following subcapitular fractures does not reduce hand function. PMID:4035810

  20. Under-coracoid-around-clavicle (UCAC) loop in type II distal clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Soliman, O; Koptan, W; Zarad, A

    2013-07-01

    In Neer type II (Robinson type 3B) fractures of the distal clavicle the medial fragment is detached from the coracoclavicular ligaments and displaced upwards, whereas the lateral fragment, which is usually small, maintains its position. Several fixation techniques have been suggested to treat this fracture. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of patients with type II distal clavicle fractures treated with coracoclavicular suture fixation using three loops of Ethibond. This prospective study included 14 patients with Neer type II fractures treated with open reduction and coracoclavicular fixation. Ethibond sutures were passed under the coracoid and around the clavicle (UCAC loop) without making any drill holes in the proximal or distal fragments. There were 11 men and three women with a mean age of 34.57 years (29 to 41). Patients were followed for a mean of 24.64 months (14 to 31) and evaluated radiologically and clinically using the Constant score. Fracture union was obtained in 13 patients at a mean of 18.23 weeks (13 to 23) and the mean Constant score was 96.07 (91 to 100). One patient developed an asymptomatic fibrous nonunion at one year. This study suggests that open reduction and internal fixation of unstable distal clavicle fractures using UCAC loops can provide rigid fixation and lead to bony union. This technique avoids using metal hardware, preserves the acromioclavicular joint and provides adequate stability with excellent results. PMID:23814254

  1. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J.; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-01

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays.

  2. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-31

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays. PMID:26765005

  3. Mode & mechanism of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) in fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew; Lin, Sheldon; Pounder, Neill; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    It has been 30years since the first level one clinical trial demonstrated low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) could accelerate fracture repair. Since 1994 numerous investigations have been performed on the effect of LIPUS. The majority of these studies have used the same signal parameters comprised of an intensity of 30mW/cm(2) SATA, an ultrasound carrier frequency of 1.5MHz, pulsed at 1kHz with an exposure time of 20minutes per day. These studies show that a biological response is stimulated in the cell which produces bioactive molecules. The production of these molecules, linked with observations demonstrating the enhanced effects on mineralization by LIPUS, might be considered the general manner, or mode, of how LIPUS stimulates fractures to heal. We propose a mechanism for how the LIPUS signal can enhance fracture repair by combining the findings of numerous studies. The LIPUS signal is transmitted through tissue to the bone, where cells translate this mechanical signal to a biochemical response via integrin mechano-receptors. The cells enhance the production of cyclo-oxygenese 2 (COX-2) which in turn stimulates molecules to enhance fracture repair. The aim of this review is to present the state of the art data related to LIPUS effects and mechanism. PMID:27130989

  4. Factors influencing the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a rubber toughened thermoplastic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. S.; Yee, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a rubber modified thermoplastic resin has been investigated as a method to improve the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a unidirectional continuous carbon fiber composite. Test results show that the improvement in the fracture toughness is less than expected due to rubber particle agglomeration, solvent and molding induced crystallization of the matrix and poor fiber/matrix adhesion. The plastic zone in composites utilizing tough matrices can extend well beyond a single interfibrillar spacing. However, the development of the plastic zone is limited due to the failure of the fiber/matrix interface. In order to fully evaluate the potential of tough composites using toughened matrices, any improvement made in the matrix toughness must be coupled with improvements in the fiber/matrix adhesion.

  5. Self-Replicating Cracks: A Collaborative Fracture Mode in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthelot, Joël; Roman, Benoît; Bico, José; Teisseire, Jérémie; Dalmas, Davy; Melo, Francisco

    2014-08-01

    Straight cracks are observed in thin coatings under residual tensile stress, resulting into the classical network pattern observed in china crockery, old paintings, or dry mud. Here, we present a novel fracture mechanism where delamination and propagation occur simultaneously, leading to the spontaneous self-replication of an initial template. Surprisingly, this mechanism is active below the standard critical tensile load for channel cracks and selects a robust interaction length scale on the order of 30 times the film thickness. Depending on triggering mechanisms, crescent alleys, spirals, or long bands are generated over a wide range of experimental parameters. We describe with a simple physical model, the selection of the fracture path and provide a configuration diagram displaying the different failure modes.

  6. A tension-mode fracture model for bolted joints in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Packman, P.F.; Eisenmann, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    A failure prediction model for bolted joints in generally orthotropic laminated composite plates that fail in the tension mode under bearing loading conditions has been developed. The plate is analyzed as a bulk orthotropic plate whose material properties are determined through the application of classical lamination theory to facilitate practical application of the model. Ply-by-ply laminated analysis is not required. Fracture mechanics concepts are applied to a pseudo-flaw which is related to the physical cracking of the laminate at the joint. The maximum circumferential stress concept is extended to orthotropic materials where both the fracture toughness and stress intensity vary with orientation. Excellent correlation between experimental tests conducted on single-bolt joints for two laminate layups and analytical prediction was found.

  7. Propagating mode-I fracture in amorphous materials using the continuous random network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    2011-08-01

    We study propagating mode-I fracture in two-dimensional amorphous materials using atomistic simulations. We use the continuous random network model of an amorphous material, creating samples using a two-dimensional analog of the Wooten-Winer-Weaire Monte Carlo algorithm. For modeling fracture, molecular-dynamics simulations were run on the resulting samples. The results of our simulations reproduce the main experimental features. In addition to achieving a steady-state crack under a constant driving displacement (which has not yet been achieved by other atomistic models for amorphous materials), the runs show microbranching, which increases with driving, transitioning to macrobranching for the largest drivings. In addition to the qualitative visual similarity of the simulated cracks to experiment, the simulation also succeeds in reproducing qualitatively the experimentally observed oscillations of the crack velocity.

  8. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  9. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS)

    PubMed Central

    Jonnes, Cyril; SM, Shishir; Najimudeen, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN), in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification). This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures. Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml), longer duration of surgery (105min), and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml), shorter duration of surgery (91min), and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II intertrochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications. PMID:26894214

  10. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    of 34 to 38 and the parameter A has the range of 1.02x10-2 to 6.52x10-2 m/s. The effect of confining stress, specimen size, and water saturation on subcritical crack growth under mode II loading has also been investigated. Finally strength parameters for Coconino sandstone were determined experimentally, including tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, in-plane/our-of-plane shear strength and the fracture toughness under mode I, II, and III loading.

  11. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J.; Schulz, H.; Sievers, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  12. Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly: an evidence-based narrative review of management

    PubMed Central

    Pal, D.; Sell, P.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding the optimal management of elderly patients with type II odontoid fractures. There is uncertainty regarding the consequences of non-union. The best treatment remains unclear because of the morbidity associated with prolonged cervical immobilisation versus the risks of surgical intervention. The objective of the study was to evaluate the published literature and determine the current evidence for the management of type II odontoid fractures in elderly. A search of the English language literature from January 1970 to date was performed using Medline and the following keywords: odontoid, fractures, cervical spine and elderly. The search was supplemented by cross-referencing between articles. Case reports and review articles were excluded although some were referred to in the discussion. Studies in patients aged 65 years with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were selected. One-hundred twenty-six articles were reviewed. No class I study was identified. There were two class II studies and the remaining were class III. Significant variability was found in the literature regarding mortality and morbidity rates in patients treated with and without halo vest immobilisation. In recent years several authors have claimed satisfactory results with anterior odontoid screw fixation while others have argued that this may lead to increased complications in this age group. Lately, the posterior cervical (Goel–Harms) construct has also gained popularity amongst surgeons. There is insufficient evidence to establish a standard or guideline for odontoid fracture management in elderly. While most authors agree that cervical immobilisation yields satisfactory results for type I and III fractures in the elderly, the optimal management for type II fractures remain unsolved. A prospective randomised controlled trial is recommended. PMID:20835875

  13. Characterization of Mode I Fracture and Morphological Properties of PLLA Blends with Addition of Lysine Triisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannaladsaysy, Vilay; Todo, Mitsugu

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was toughened by blending with three different ductile biopolymers such as poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene succinate-co-e-caprolactone) (PBSC), poly (butylene succinate-co-L-lactate) (PBSL). The blend ratio was fixed to 50:50. Lysine triisocyanate (LTI) was added to the blends as a compatibilizer. Characterizations such as Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope (FE-SEM), and mode I fracture test were used to characterize the effectiveness of LTI on the mechanical and morphological properties of various PLLA blends. It was found that PLLA/PCL blend shows the highest toughness energy among the binary blends. On the other hand, addition of LTI in PLLA/PBSC blend exhibits the best toughness property. Based on the FE-SEM observation, fractured surfaces of PLLA blends with LTI indicate ductile fracture with dense elongated fibrils. The largest damage zone is generated in the vicinity of crack-trip, suggesting that high energy dissipation occurred in the crack-trip region. FT-IR analysis also suggested that the NCO groups of LTI were acted as a compatibilizer, as the results of interaction between the two phases of the polymer blends.

  14. Mode I Fracture Toughness Prediction for Multiwalled-Carbon-Nanotube Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2015-08-27

    This article develops a multiscale model to predict fracture toughness of multiwalled-carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramics. The model bridges different scales from the scale of a MWCNT to that of a composite domain containing a macroscopic crack. From the nano, micro to meso scales, Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka models combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach are explored to predict the elastic damage behavior of the composite as a function of MWCNT volume fraction. MWCNTs are assumed to be randomly dispersed in a ceramic matrix subject to cracking under loading. A damage variable is used to describe matrix cracking that causes reduction of the elastic modulus of the matrix. This damage model is introduced in a modified boundary layer modeling approach to capture damage initiation and development at a tip of a pre-existing crack. Damage and fracture are captured only in a process window containing the crack tip under plane strain Mode I loading. The model is validated against the published experimental fracture toughness data for a MWCNT 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia composite system. In addition, crack resistance curves as a function of MWCNT content are predicted and fitted by a power law as observed in the experiments on zirconia.

  15. The relationship between critical strain energy release rate and fracture mode in multidirectional carbon-fiber/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Trakas, K.; Kortschot, M.T.

    1997-12-31

    It is proposed that the fracture surface of delaminated specimens, and hence the critical strain energy release rate, is dependent on both the mode of fracture and the orientation of the plies on either side of the delamination with respect to the propagation direction. Recent fractographs of Mode 3 delamination surfaces obtained by the authors have reinforced the idea that the properties, G{sub 11c} and G{sub 111c}, are structural rather than material properties for composite laminates. In this study, the relationship between the mode of fracture, the ply orientation, and the apparent interlaminar toughness has been explored. Standard double-cantilever-beam and end-notched flexure tests have been used, as has the newly developed Mode 3 modified split-cantilever beam test. Delaminations between plies of various orientations have been constrained to the desired plane using Teflon inserts running along the entire length of the specimen. As well, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fractography has been extensively used so that measured energies can be correlated to the surface deformation. While fractographs show that Modes 2 and 3 share common fractographic features, corresponding values of G, do not correlate, and it is shown that the large plastic zone of fractured Mode 2 specimens eliminates any comparison between the two. In contrast, Mode 1 delamination is found to be independent of the orientation of the delaminating plies.

  16. Influence of preparation design and ceramic thicknesses on fracture resistance and failure modes of premolar partial coverage restorations

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Petra C.; Schultheis, Stefan; Wolkewitz, Martin; Zhang; Strub, Joerg R.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem Preparation designs and ceramic thicknesses are key factors for the long-term success of minimally invasive premolar partial coverage restorations. However, only limited information is presently available on this topic. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and failure modes of ceramic premolar partial coverage restorations with different preparation designs and ceramic thicknesses. Material and methods Caries-free human premolars (n= 144) were divided into 9 groups. Palatal onlay preparation comprised reduction of the palatal cusp by 2 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Standard), 1 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Thin), or 0.5 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin). Complete-coverage onlay preparation additionally included the buccal cusp (Occlusal-Onlay-Standard; Occlusal-Onlay-Thin; Occlusal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin). Labial surface preparations with chamfer reductions of 0.8 mm (Complete-Veneer-Standard), 0.6 mm (Complete-Veneer-Thin) and 0.4 mm (Complete-Veneer-Ultra-Thin) were implemented for complete veneer restorations. Restorations were fabricated from a pressable lithium-disilicate ceramic (IPS-e.max-Press) and cemented adhesively (Syntac-Classic/Variolink-II). All specimens were subjected to cyclic mechanical loading (F= 49 N, 1.2 million cycles) and simultaneous thermocycling (5°C to 55°C) in a mouth-motion simulator. After fatigue, restorations were exposed to single-load-to-failure. Two-way ANOVA was used to identify statistical differences. Pair-wise differences were calculated and P-values were adjusted by the Tukey–Kramer method (α= .05). Results All specimens survived fatigue. Mean (SD) load to failure values (N) were as follows: 837 (320/Palatal-Onlay-Standard), 1055 (369/Palatal-Onlay-Thin), 1192 (342/Palatal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin), 963 (405/Occlusal-Onlay-Standard), 1108 (340/Occlusal-Onlay-Thin), 997 (331/Occlusal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin), 1361 (333/Complete-Veneer-Standard), 1087 (251/Complete-Veneer-Thin), 883 (311/Complete

  17. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Yasa, Bilal; Akcay, Merve; Savas, Selcuk; Kavrik, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (TheraCal LC, Calcimol LC, Dycal) applied on pulpo-axial wall of each cavity, and the restoration was completed with composite resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive load in a universal mechanical testing machine. The surfaces of the tooth and restoration were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: For pulp capping materials, the highest fracture load (931.15 ± 203.81 N) and the lowest fracture load (832.28 ± 245.75 N) were calculated for Control and Dycal group, respectively. However, there were no statistically significant differences among all groups (P > 0.05). The fracture load of the dovetail groups was significantly higher than those of the slot cavity groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dovetail cavity design shows better fracture resistance in Class II composite restorations, independent of used or not used pulp capping materials. PMID:26038653

  18. Fracture resistance and failure mode of posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two zirconia CAD/CAM systems

    PubMed Central

    López-Suárez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Peláez, Jesús; Rodríguez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an improvement of zirconia ceramic materials to replace posterior missing teeth. To date little in vitro studies has been carried out on the fracture resistance of zirconia veneered posterior fixed dental prostheses. This study investigated the fracture resistance and the failure mode of 3-unit zirconia-based posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two CAD/CAM systems. Material and Methods Twenty posterior fixed dental prostheses were studied. Samples were randomly divided into two groups (n=10 each) according to the zirconia ceramic analyzed: Lava and Procera. Specimens were loaded until fracture under static load. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon´s rank sum test and Wilcoxon´s signed-rank test (P<0.05). Results Partial fracture of the veneering porcelain occurred in 100% of the samples. Within each group, significant differences were shown between the veneering and the framework fracture resistance (P=0.002). The failure occurred in the connector cervical area in 80% of the cases. Conclusions All fracture load values of the zirconia frameworks could be considered clinically acceptable. The connector area is the weak point of the restorations. Key words:Fixed dental prostheses, zirconium-dioxide, zirconia, fracture resistance, failure mode. PMID:26155341

  19. Modification of fracture surfaces by dissolution. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.

    1983-01-01

    This study focuses upon how and to what extent dissolution related fluid/rock interactions modify the morphology and roughness of surfaces on Sioux Quartzite. Dissolution experiments consisted of reacting small discs of Sioux Quartzite in sealed gold capsules containing either distilled water or 0.05 N to 4.0 N aqueous solutions of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Samples were reacted at 200/sup 0/C and 20 to 30 MPa fluid pressures for 2 to 5 days. Two markedly different starting surface textures were used: polished, optically flat surfaces and tensile fracture surfaces. An exploratory experiment also was performed to assess the occurrence of a pressure solution phenomenon on a polished quartzite surface at contact regions of indenting quartz sand grains. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicate progressive increases in the amount of dissolution produced significant changes of surface roughness for both initial surface textures. Surface roughness increased measurably, with the initially polished surfaces exhibiting the more dramatic changes. The pressure solution experiments did not produce definite results, but several surface features are suggestive of dissolution enhancement at load carrying contacts. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Comprehensive fracture diagnostics experiment. Part II. Comparison of seven fracture azimuth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.B.; Ren, N.K.; Sorrells, G.G.; Teufel, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been devoted recently to find geophysical techniques for measuring the hydraulic fracture azimuth. This paper discusses a comparison of seven different measurements used to determine the azimuth in a sandstone formation at a depth of 1000 ft (320 m). The azimuth was determined as N95E, but significant differences existed between some of the results. This is of fundamental importance since in developing new measurements, the limits of these must be found and honored. Of particular interest are the results from microseismic monitoring. The lack of results suggests that remote (e.g., surface) monitoring for seismic events may be impractical for normal, sedimentary, hydrocarbon-bearing formations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode i fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 mm to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final matching. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 mm and 12.7 mm thick were taken from ANL Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from GA Heat No. 832864. J-R curves were generated by the single specimen unload-compliance test technique in accordance with ASTM E813. All tests were performed in laboratory air at 25 C. Fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti under mixed-mode loading conditions showed the same trend observed previously for V-5Cr-5Ti and for other tough materials. For materials which fail by microvoid coalescence, the addition of an out-of-plane shear loading component introduces incompatibility stresses at particle interfaces in the trajectory of the crack. These incompatibility stresses cause particle/matrix decohesion or particle fracture which leads to void formation that limits the mode i plastic flow field. The present results demonstrates that fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti is sensitive to the addition of shear loading components and that model fracture toughness tests may not give the most conservative measure of resistance to ductile fracture.

  2. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    PubMed

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05). The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property. PMID:22641437

  3. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  4. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  5. A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH, A.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.

  6. Simulations of flow mode distributions on rough fracture surfaces using a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Shigorina, E.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Under idealized conditions (smooth surfaces, linear relationship between Bond number and Capillary number of droplets) steady-state flow modes on fracture surfaces have been shown to develop from sliding droplets to rivulets and finally (wavy) film flow, depending on the specified flux. In a recent study we demonstrated the effect of surface roughness on droplet flow in unsaturated wide aperture fractures, however, its effect on other prevailing flow modes is still an open question. The objective of this work is to investigate the formation of complex flow modes on fracture surfaces employing an efficient three-dimensional parallelized SPH model. The model is able to simulate highly intermittent, gravity-driven free-surface flows under dynamic wetting conditions. The effect of surface tension is included via efficient pairwise interaction forces. We validate the model using various analytical and semi-analytical relationships for droplet and complex flow dynamics. To investigate the effect of surface roughness on flow dynamics we construct surfaces with a self-affine fractal geometry and roughness characterized by the Hurst exponent. We demonstrate the effect of surface roughness (on macroscopic scales this can be understood as a tortuosity) on the steady-state distribution of flow modes. Furthermore we show the influence of a wide range of natural wetting conditions (defined by static contact angles) on the final distribution of surface coverage, which is of high importance for matrix-fracture interaction processes.

  7. Notch strengthening or weakening governed by transition of shear failure to normal mode fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xianqi; Li, Congling; Shi, Xinghua; Xu, Xianghong; Wei, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    It is generally observed that the existence of geometrical discontinuity like notches in materials will lead to strength weakening, as a resultant of local stress concentration. By comparing the influence of notches to the strength of three typical materials, aluminum alloys with intermediate tensile ductility, metallic glasses with no tensile ductility, and brittle ceramics, we observed strengthening in aluminum alloys and metallic glasses: Tensile strength of the net section in circumferentially notched cylinders increases with the constraint quantified by the ratio of notch depth over notch root radius; in contrast, the ceramic exhibit notch weakening. The strengthening in the former two is due to resultant deformation transition: Shear failure occurs in intact samples while samples with deep notches break in normal mode fracture. No such deformation transition was observed in the ceramic, and stress concentration leads to its notch weakening. The experimental results are confirmed by theoretical analyses and numerical simulation. The results reported here suggest that the conventional criterion to use brittleness and/or ductility to differentiate notch strengthening or weakening is not physically sound. Notch strengthening or weakening relies on the existence of failure mode transition and materials exhibiting shear failure while subjected to tension will notch strengthen. PMID:26022892

  8. Notch strengthening or weakening governed by transition of shear failure to normal mode fracture.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xianqi; Li, Congling; Shi, Xinghua; Xu, Xianghong; Wei, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    It is generally observed that the existence of geometrical discontinuity like notches in materials will lead to strength weakening, as a resultant of local stress concentration. By comparing the influence of notches to the strength of three typical materials, aluminum alloys with intermediate tensile ductility, metallic glasses with no tensile ductility, and brittle ceramics, we observed strengthening in aluminum alloys and metallic glasses: Tensile strength of the net section in circumferentially notched cylinders increases with the constraint quantified by the ratio of notch depth over notch root radius; in contrast, the ceramic exhibit notch weakening. The strengthening in the former two is due to resultant deformation transition: Shear failure occurs in intact samples while samples with deep notches break in normal mode fracture. No such deformation transition was observed in the ceramic, and stress concentration leads to its notch weakening. The experimental results are confirmed by theoretical analyses and numerical simulation. The results reported here suggest that the conventional criterion to use brittleness and/or ductility to differentiate notch strengthening or weakening is not physically sound. Notch strengthening or weakening relies on the existence of failure mode transition and materials exhibiting shear failure while subjected to tension will notch strengthen. PMID:26022892

  9. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  10. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  11. Microbranching in mode-I fracture in a randomly perturbed lattice.

    PubMed

    Heizler, Shay I; Kessler, David A; Elbaz, Yonatan S

    2013-08-01

    We study mode-I fracture in lattices using atomistic simulations with randomly distributed bond lengths. By using a small parameter that measures the variation of the bond length between the atoms in perfect lattices and using a three-body force law, simulations reproduce the qualitative behavior of the beyond-steady-state cracks in the high-velocity regime, including reasonable microbranching. In particular, the effect of the lattice structure on the crack appears minimal, even though in terms of the physical properties such as the structure factor g(r) and the radial or angular distributions, these lattices share the physical properties of perfect lattices rather than those of an amorphous material (e.g., the continuous random network model). A clear transition can be seen between steady-state cracks, where a single crack propagates in the midline of the sample, and the regime of unstable cracks, where microbranches start to appear near the main crack, in line with previous experimental results. This is seen in both a honeycomb lattice and a fully hexagonal lattice. This model reproduces the main physical features of propagating cracks in brittle materials, including the total length of microbranches as a function of driving displacement and the increasing amplitude of oscillations of the electrical resistance. In addition, preliminary indications of power-law behavior of the microbranch shapes can be seen, potentially reproducing one of the most intriguing experimental results of brittle fracture. There was found to exist a critical degree of disorder, i.e., a sharp threshold between the cleaving behavior characterizing perfect lattices and the microbranching behavior that characterizes amorphous materials. PMID:24032843

  12. Microbranching in mode-I fracture in a randomly perturbed lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.; Elbaz, Yonatan S.

    2013-08-01

    We study mode-I fracture in lattices using atomistic simulations with randomly distributed bond lengths. By using a small parameter that measures the variation of the bond length between the atoms in perfect lattices and using a three-body force law, simulations reproduce the qualitative behavior of the beyond-steady-state cracks in the high-velocity regime, including reasonable microbranching. In particular, the effect of the lattice structure on the crack appears minimal, even though in terms of the physical properties such as the structure factor g(r) and the radial or angular distributions, these lattices share the physical properties of perfect lattices rather than those of an amorphous material (e.g., the continuous random network model). A clear transition can be seen between steady-state cracks, where a single crack propagates in the midline of the sample, and the regime of unstable cracks, where microbranches start to appear near the main crack, in line with previous experimental results. This is seen in both a honeycomb lattice and a fully hexagonal lattice. This model reproduces the main physical features of propagating cracks in brittle materials, including the total length of microbranches as a function of driving displacement and the increasing amplitude of oscillations of the electrical resistance. In addition, preliminary indications of power-law behavior of the microbranch shapes can be seen, potentially reproducing one of the most intriguing experimental results of brittle fracture. There was found to exist a critical degree of disorder, i.e., a sharp threshold between the cleaving behavior characterizing perfect lattices and the microbranching behavior that characterizes amorphous materials.

  13. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with class II bonded composite resin.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether composite resin bonded to enamel or to both enamel and dentin can increase the fracture resistance of teeth with Class II cavity preparations. Extracted maxillary pre-molars with MOD slot preparations were restored with composite resin bonded to enamel (P-30 and Enamel Bond) or composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin (P-30 and Scotch-bond). Teeth in a control group were prepared but left unrestored. All teeth were loaded occlusally in a universal testing machine until they fractured. Means of forces required to fracture teeth in each of the three groups were statistically compared (one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni t test). Teeth restored with combined enamel- and dentin-bonded composite resins were significantly more resistant to fracture than were similarly prepared but unrestored teeth and also than teeth restored with enamel-bonded composite resin (p less than 0.05). A significant difference was not demonstrated between the enamel-bonded group and the unrestored group. Further testing is needed to determine the durability of the bonds between tooth and restoration in the clinical setting. PMID:3511111

  14. Clinical Features and Treatment Modes of Mandibular Fracture at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Eiji; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Sekine, Joji

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of elderly patients with maxillofacial trauma is rapidly increasing due to active lifestyles and longevity. Shimane prefecture has the fastest growing proportion of elderly individuals in Japan. The aim of this study was to reveal the distinctive features and treatment modes of mandibular fracture treatment mode in patients requiring hospitalization at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan. Patients and Methods Patient age, sex, period between injury and first consultation, years since injury, cause of injury, fracture site, treatment, and duration of hospitalization were evaluated. Univariate Poisson regression, relative risk with 95% confidence interval based on the Wald test, Fisher’s exact test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to explore associations among clinical and demographic variables. Results In total, 305 patients were diagnosed with and hospitalized for mandibular fracture from 1980 to 2010. Younger age increased the risk for mandibular fracture. Incidence was higher in males than females, particularly in the young, but the male to female ratio decreased with age. The period until first hospital consultation decreased progressively over the study period. Fall was a much more frequent cause in patients aged ≥60 than in those aged <60 years. Mandibular fracture with condyle, symphysis, and angle involvement were most common and were associated with sex, age, and treatment mode. Length of hospitalization has decreased since 1980. Conclusion In our department, patients aged ≥60 years accounted for a greater proportion of mandibular fracture cases than in many previous studies, reflecting the greater proportion of elderly residents in Shimane prefecture. PMID:26334627

  15. Effect of intermediate fiber layer on the fracture load and failure mode of maxillary incisors restored with laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Turkaslan, Suha; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Bagis, Bora; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture load and failure mode of various veneer materials cemented with or without the addition of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) layer at the adhesive interface. Sixty intact incisors were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 was fabricated with the heat-press technique (IPS Empress 2); Group 2 with the copy milling technique (ZirkonZahn); and Group 3 with the direct or indirect composite technique (Z250)--and specimens were cemented either with or without FRC at the adhesive interface. The specimens were thermocycled and tested with a universal testing machine. No significant differences in fracture load (p>0.05) were found among the various veneer materials. The addition of FRC at the adhesive layer did not lead to significant differences in the fracture load (p>0.05) but resulted in differences in the failure mode. Laminate veneers made of composite, zirconia, and Empress 2 showed comparable mean fracture loads. However, the use of FRC at the interface changed their failure modes. PMID:18309613

  16. Comparison of Intralaminar and Interlaminar Mode-I Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional IM7/8552 Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James

    2012-01-01

    The intralaminar and interlaminar mode-I fracture-toughness of a unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy composite were measured using compact tension (CT) and double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens, respectively. Two starter crack geometries were considered for both the CT and DCB specimen configurations. In the first case, starter cracks were produced by 12.5 micron thick, Teflon film inserts. In the second case, considerably sharper starter cracks were produced by fatigue precracking. For each specimen configuration, use of the Teflon film starter cracks resulted in initially unstable crack growth and artificially high initiation fracture-toughness values. Conversely, specimens with fatigue precracks exhibited stable growth onset and lower initiation fracture toughness. For CT and DCB specimens with fatigue precracks, the intralaminar and interlaminar initiation fracture toughnesses were approximately equal. However, during propagation, the CT specimens exhibited more extensive fiber bridging, and rapidly increasing R-curve behavior as compared to the DCB specimens. Observations of initiation and propagation of intralaminar and interlaminar fracture, and the measurements of fracture toughness, were supported by fractographic analysis using scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  18. Microstructure and fracture mode of a martensitic stainless steel steam turbine blade characterized via scanning auger microscopy and potentiodynamic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, D.; Zaid, B.; Souami, N.; Negache, M.; Ahmed, A. Si

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure, the fracture and the resistance to pitting corrosion, in a10-2M (NaCl + Na2SO4) solution, of steam turbine blades, made of martensitic stainless steel (12% Cr), were analysed prior and after their utilization (during about 100 000 hours). The unused blades display an inter-granular fracture mode whereas a trans-granular one emerges in used blades. The SAM analysis of the fractured surfaces reveals that this change is concomitant with carbon and chromium redistribution from the grain boundaries to the grain interior. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and the SEM-EDS analysis of the pitting sites show that the used blades are less susceptible to pitting corrosion than the unused ones. These results are interpreted as a further qualitative evidence of an evolution of the microstructure leading to the formation of new precipitates.

  19. Interlaminar fracture toughness: Three-dimensional finite element modeling for end-notch and mixed-mode flexure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A computational procedure is described for evaluating End-Notch-Flexure (ENF) and Mixed-Mode-Flexure (MMF) interlaminar fracture toughness in unidirectional fiber composites. The procedure consists of a three-dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with the strain energy release rate concept and with composite micromechanics. The procedure is used to analyze select cases of ENF and MMF. The strain energy release rate predicted by this procedure is in good agreement with limited experimental data. The procedure is used to identify significant parameters associated with interlaminar fracture toughness. It is also used to determine the critical strain energy release rate and its attendant crack length in ENF and/or MMF. This computational procedure has considerable versatility/generality and provides extensive information about interlaminar fracture toughness in fiber composites.

  20. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu-Peng; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Nai-Qi; Wang, Chun-Mei; DU, Shao-Long

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID:24137306

  1. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture

    PubMed Central

    YANG, WU-PENG; WANG, ZHE; FENG, NAI-QI; WANG, CHUN-MEI; DU, SHAO-LONG

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID

  2. Effects of Specimen Thickness and Notch Shape on Fracture Modes in the Drop Weight Tear Test of API X70 and X80 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Nack J.

    2011-09-01

    This study is concerned with effects of specimen thickness and notch shape on drop weight tear test (DWTT) properties and fracture modes of API X70 and API X80 low-carbon microalloyed linepipe steels. Detailed fractographic analysis of broken DWTT specimens showed that the fracture initiated in an initial cleavage mode near the specimen notch and that some delaminations occurred at the center of the fracture surface. The chevron notch (CN) DWTT specimens had broader initial cleavage areas than the pressed notch (PN) DWTT specimens. The larger inverse fracture areas ( i.e., cleavage areas close the hammer impact side) appeared in the PN DWTT specimens, because their higher fracture initiation energy at the notch allowed a higher strain hardening in the hammer-impacted region. The number and length of delaminations were larger in the CN DWTT specimens than in the PN DWTT specimens, and increased with increasing specimen thickness due to the plane strain condition effect. As the test temperature decreased, the tendency of delaminations increased, but delaminations were not found when the cleavage fracture prevailed at very low temperatures. The DWTT test results such as upper shelf energy (USE) and energy transition temperature (ETT) were discussed with relation to microstructures and fracture modes including initial cleavage fracture, ductile fracture, inverse fracture, and delaminations.

  3. Effect of interfacial characteristics on mode I fracture behavior of glass woven fabric composites under static and fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Kotaki, Masaya; Lowe, A.

    1997-12-31

    The influence of fiber surface treatment on the mode I delamination characteristics of a glass fabric/vinyl ester composite was studied. Five treatments were used: solutions containing 0.01 wt%, 0.4 wt % and 1.0 wt% of {gamma}-methacryloxy-propyltrimethoxysilane (MS); 0.4 wt% of MS subsequently washed in methanol; and 0.4 wt% of {gamma}-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (ES). Static mode I tests were performed on specimens oriented in both the wasp and weft fiber directions. The tests revealed that stable crack propagation was only observed with the ES-treated specimens and with the most dilute MS treatment. Invariably, fracture toughnesses were higher in the weft oriented specimens. The degree of unstable fracture observed under fatigue loading was generally significantly lower than under static loading. The specimens treated with the highest concentrations of MS possessed the highest fatigue resistance and had threshold toughness values in excess of the static toughness values. Fractographic examination was performed on both static and fatigue fracture surfaces, revealing markedly different fracture morphologies in relation to the degree of interfacial failure observed.

  4. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.

  5. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approachmore » to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  6. Influence of Injection Mode on Transport Properties in Kilometer-Scale Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey; Painter, Scott L; Viswanathan, Hari; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident or flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt amore » Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that a after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than two. The physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures which o er reduced resistance to flow and in-fracture channeling that results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  7. Influence of Injection Mode on Transport Properties in Kilometer-Scale Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey; Painter, Scott L; Viswanathan, Hari; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident or flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that a after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than two. The physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures which o er reduced resistance to flow and in-fracture channeling that results from the topology of the DFN.

  8. Shear Fracture of Dual Phase AHSS in the Process of Stamping: Macroscopic Failure Mode and Micro-level Metallographical Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wurong; Wei, Xicheng; Yang, Jun; Shi, Gang

    2011-08-01

    Due to its excellent strength and formability combinations, dual phase (DP) steels offer the potential to improve the vehicle crashworthiness performance without increasing car body weight and have been increasingly used into new vehicles. However, a new type of crack mode termed as shear fracture is accompanied with the application of these high strength DP steel sheets. With the cup drawing experiment to identify the limit drawing ratio (LDR) of three DP AHSS with strength level from 600 MPa to 1000 MPa, the study compared and categorized the macroscopic failure mode of these three types of materials. The metallographical observation along the direction of crack was conducted for the DP steels to discover the micro-level propagation mechanism of the fracture.

  9. Development of fracture facets from a crack loaded in mode I+III: Solution and application of a model 2D problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Frelat, Joël

    2014-03-01

    It is experimentally well-known that a crack loaded in mode I+III propagates through formation of discrete fracture facets inclined at a certain tilt angle on the original crack plane, depending on the ratio of the mode III to mode I initial stress intensity factors. Pollard et al. (1982) have proposed to calculate this angle by considering the tractions on all possible future infinitesimal facets and assuming shear tractions to be zero on that which will actually develop. In this paper we consider the opposite case of well-developed facets; the stress field near the lateral fronts of such facets becomes independent of the initial crack and essentially 2D in a plane perpendicular to the main direction of crack propagation. To determine this stress field, we solve the model 2D problem of an infinite plate containing an infinite periodic array of cracks inclined at some angle on a straight line, and loaded through uniform stresses at infinity. This is done first analytically, for small values of this angle, by combining Muskhelishvili's (1953) formalism and a first-order perturbation procedure. The formulae found for the 2D stress intensity factors are then extended in an approximate way to larger angles by using another reference solution, and finally assessed through comparison with some finite element results. To finally illustrate the possible future application of these formulae to the prediction of the stationary tilt angle, we introduce the tentative assumption that the 2D mode II stress intensity factor is zero on the lateral fronts of the facets. An approximate formula providing the tilt angle as a function of the ratio of the mode III to mode I stress intensity factors of the initial crack is deduced from there. This formula, which slightly depends on the type of loading imposed, predicts somewhat smaller angles than that of Pollard et al. (1982).

  10. Do joints initiate as sharp mode I fractures or finite thickness dilatancy bands? Insights from laboratory experiments and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, J.; Chemenda, A. I.; Jorand, C.

    2011-12-01

    Terminology on fracture and discontinuities in geological objects mainly relies on distinguishing between tabular and sharp forms of deformation localization/failure structures (Aydin et al, JSG 2006; Shultz and Fossen, AAPG, 2009). On this basis joints (considered as mode I fractures) and dilation bands (very rarely observed) are distinguished among extension discontinuities. The former propagate with the separation of the fracture walls due to strong stress concentration at the fracture tips. The plumose features or hackles typical of joints (these terms cover a wide variety of diverging fractographic features) are believed to result from the fracture front breakdown due to the loading mode change (the origin of this change remains unclear). This view is called into question by recent experimental results of extension tests conducted on a synthetic physical rock analogue (granular, frictional, cohesive and dilatant) material (GRAM1) and by field observations of embryonic (not yet open) joints in highly jointed dolomicrite Chemenda et al., JGR, 2011). The initial porosity and grain size of both materials are very different, but at SEM scale, both experimental and natural unopened discontinuities reveal a comparable dilatancy (dilation) band structure with a porosity increase over a width of several grains. This suggests that the distinction between tabular and sharp is a matter of observation scale. Both axisymetric and poly-axial extension tests show that dilatancy bands form at elevated mean stress and have plumose morphology. Mode I cracking occurs only at very low mean stres and the forming fractures do not bear plumose features. Thus the absence of plumose structures can be considered as the signature of mode I fracturing. Consequently, we propose that non- plumose bearing natural joints (provided their fractography is not eroded) could originate as mode I fractures and call them "mode I joints". We call the joints formed as closed dilatancy bands propagating

  11. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  12. The sustentaculum tali screw fixation for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing-Jiang; Yu, Xiao; Guo, Zong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the surgery of calcaneal fracture, whether the sustentaculum tali screw should always be placed is widely controversial. The aim of this study was to explore the necessity and function of the sustentaculum tali screw placement for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture. Methods: The finite element analysis was used in this study. After the establishment of the finite element model of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture, the two internal fixation simulations were designed. In one model, the AO calcaneal plate was simulated on the lateral side of the calcanues with 7 screws being fixated at different position of the plate. In the other model, the calcaneus was fixated with the same AO calcaneal plate together with an additional screw being infiltrated into the sustentaculum tali. The two models were simulated under the same loading and the displacement of the fracture line and the stress distribution in the two models were calculated respectively. Results: The maximum principal stress focused on the cortical bone of sustentaculum tali in both the models under the same loading. The displacement of the fracture line, the maximum principal stress of calcaneus and internal fixation system in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation were smaller than that in the model without sustentaculum screw fixation. The stress in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation was more dispersed. Conclusions: The placement of sustentaculum tali screw is essential for fixation of type II calcaneal fracture to achieve the biomechanical stability. PMID:25225534

  13. Fractionalization of optical beams: II. Elegant Laguerre Gaussian modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2007-05-01

    We apply the tools of fractional calculus to introduce new fractional-order solutions of the paraxial wave equation that smoothly connect the elegant Laguerre-Gaussian beams of integral-order. The solutions are characterized in general by two fractional indices and are obtained by fractionalizing the creation operators used to create elegant Laguerre-Gauss beams from the fundamental Gaussian beam. The physical and mathematical properties of the circular fractional beams are discussed in detail. The orbital angular momentum carried by the fractional beam is a continuous function of the angular mode index and it is not restricted to take only discrete values.

  14. Atomistic study on mixed-mode fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron interacting with coherent copper and nickel nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Motasem, Ahmed Tamer; Mai, Nghia Trong; Choi, Seung Tae; Posselt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper and/or nickel nanoclusters, generally formed by neutron irradiation, on fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron was investigated by using molecular statics simulation. The equilibrium configuration of nanoclusters was obtained by using a combination of an on-lattice annealing based on Metropolis Monte Carlo method and an off-lattice relaxation by molecular dynamics simulation. Residual stress distributions near the nanoclusters were also calculated, since compressive or tensile residual stresses may retard or accelerate, respectively, the propagation of a crack running into a nanocluster. One of the nanoclusters was located in front of a straight crack in ferrite iron with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. Two crystallographic directions, of which the crack plane and crack front direction are (010)[001] and (111) [ 1 bar 10 ] , were considered, representing cleavage and non-cleavage orientations in ferrite iron, respectively. Displacements corresponding to pure opening-mode and mixed-mode loadings were imposed on the boundary region and the energy minimization was performed. It was observed that the fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron under the pure opening-mode loading are strongly influenced by the presence of nanoclusters, while under the mixed-mode loading the nanoclusters have no significant effect on the crack propagation behavior of ferrite iron.

  15. Modes and timing of fracture network development in poly-deformed carbonate reservoir analogues, Mt. Chianello, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano; Dati, Francesco; Mazzoli, Stefano; Ciarcia, Sabatino; Guerriero, Vincenzo; Iannace, Alessandro

    2012-04-01

    Structural and paleostress analyses carried out on a kilometre-sized outcrop of allochthonous shallow-water carbonate units of the southern Apennines allowed us to unravel a superposed deformation pattern associated with plate convergence. The reconstructed tectonic evolution involves: (i) early extensional faulting and fracturing associated with bending of the foreland lithosphere during forebulge and foredeep stages (including the development of both 'tangential' and 'radial' normal fault and tensile fractures; Early-Middle Miocene); (ii) large-scale thrusting and folding (Late Miocene); (iii) transcurrent faulting (including two distinct sub-stages characterized by different remote stress fields; Pliocene-Early Pleistocene), and (iv) extensional faulting (late Quaternary). Stage (i) normal faults - generally occurring as conjugate sets - and related fractures and veins are variably deformed and overprinted by later horizontal shortening. Despite having experienced such a long and complex structural history, the studied carbonates are characterized by a 'background' fracture network - including two joint/vein sets orthogonal to each other and to bedding - that appears to be associated with the early fault sets that formed during the first (foredeep/forebulge-related) deformation stage. Therefore, away from younger (Late Miocene to Quaternary) fault zones, the permeability structure of the studied carbonates appears to be essentially controlled by the early, inherited fracture network. As a similar fracture network is likely to characterize also the buried Apulian Platform carbonates, representing the reservoir units for major oil fields in southern Italy, our results also bear possible implications for a better understanding of fluid flow in the subsurface and related hydrocarbon production.

  16. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  17. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe-PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jennifer E.; Case, Eldon D.; Schmidt, Robert D.; Wu, Chun-I.; Hogan, Timothy P.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08-0.055% PbI2-SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1-3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  18. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Jennifer E; Case, Eldon D; Hogan, Timophy P.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08 0.055% PbI2 SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1 3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  19. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. Material/Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. Results The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. Conclusions BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  20. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. MATERIAL AND METHODS Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. RESULTS The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. CONCLUSIONS BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  1. Interlaminar fracture toughness of composites. II - Refinement of the edge delamination test and application to thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.; Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The mixed mode interlaminar fracture toughness, G(c), is obtained for the two thermoplastic matrices UDEL P1700 polysulfone and ULTEM polyetherimide by means of edge delamination tensile (EDT) tests on unnotched, eleven-ply graphite fiber reinforced composite specimens. A novel method is used to obtain the stiffness parameter employed in the closed form equation for the calculation of G(c), decreasing the number of stiffness measurements required and simplifying the calculations. The G(Ic) values from double cantilever beam (DCB) measurements on composites of the two thermoplastics were similar to each other, but slightly higher than the G(c) data obtained by EDT. Interfacial resin/fiber failures predominated in both the EDT and DCB tests.

  2. EFFECT OF RADIUS OF LOADING NOSE AND SUPPORTS IN SHORT BEAM TEST FIXTURE ON FRACTURE MODE AND INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF GFRP AT 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, A.

    2008-03-03

    A short beam test is useful to evaluate interlaminar shear strength of glass fiber reinforced plastics, especially for material selection. However, effect of test fixture configuration on interlaminar shear strength has not been clarified. This paper describes dependence of fracture mode and interlaminar shear strength on the fixture radius using the same materials and procedure. In addition, global understanding of the role of the fixture is discussed. When small loading nose and supports are used for the tests, bending fracture or translaminar fracture happens and the interlaminar shear strength would become smaller. By adopting the large radius loading nose and supports (6 mm radius is recommended), it is newly recognized that some stress concentration is able to be reduced, and the interlaminar fracture tends to occur and the other fracture modes will be suppressed. The interlaminar shear strength of 2.5 mm thick GFRP plate of G-10CR is evaluated as 130-150 MPa at 77 K.

  3. Physical significance of interfaces on fracture growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.J.; Guo, Q. )

    1993-08-01

    Details of the interfaces between two geologic materials are normally neglected in predicting the growth of hydraulic fractures. In addition, perfect bonding is assumed across the interface. However, due to a combination of reasons, the perfect bonding assumption is violated to various degrees. Assessment for potential slippage is important to fracture-growth modeling. As a fracture approaches an interface, both mode I (for a fracture crossing the interface) and mode II (for a fracture extending in the interface) stress-intensity factors need to be evaluated. Should the interface properties be such that the mode I stress-intensity factor reach the critical value, the fracture will cross the interface. Should the converse happen and the mode II stress-intensity factor become critical, slippage along the interface will occur. If both the critical stress intensity factors are reached simultaneously, both fractures across the interface and slippage will occur. Good description of the interface material is needed to model the fracturing process. Methodology to model the physical significance of interfaces for calculating two-dimensional fracture growth includes descriptions of applications to oil/gas recovery and the injection of contaminants in isolated formations.

  4. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations. PMID:24240900

  5. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H.; Adams, F.; De Jong, M.

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q`s of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods.

  6. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F. ); Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H. ); Adams, F.; De Jong, M. )

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q's of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods.

  7. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, E. Ya.; Ogloblin, B. G.; Shalaev, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated.

  8. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    SciTech Connect

    Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Fracture modes during severe plastic deformation of NiTi shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, C. M.; Silva, R. J. C.; Fernandes, F. M. Braz

    2015-07-01

    The effects of severe plastic deformation on the surface micro-structural characteristics of NiTi shape memory alloys were observed after one single pass using the equal channel angular pressure technique. The analysis of the deformation and fracture showed distinct features related to the composition of the alloys, the temperature of the process, and the surface effects during the relative sliding in the die. In samples deformed at room temperature, the cracks initiated at the surface under tensile stress are amplified during the extrusion in the concurrent channel. The multiple cracks that develop during the friction process between the surfaces of the sample and channels of the die are the main cause for the fracture, even in materials that are less brittle, incorporating a smaller fraction of Ti2Ni precipitates and showing ductile fracture. A differential state of stress appears to exist in the deformed alloys starting from one surface to the other.

  10. Scale-selective turbulence reduction in H-mode plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, T.; Conway, G. D.; Stroth, U.; Estrada, T.; Blanco, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Collaboration: TJ-II Team

    2011-10-15

    Wavenumber spectra of density turbulence in L- and H-mode plasmas have been measured in the TJ-II stellarator by means of Doppler reflectometry. A pronounced suppression of the density fluctuation level is observed in H-mode close to the radial position of maximum radial electric field (E{sub r}) shear. Furthermore, intermediate scale density turbulence is reduced preferentially. This effect can be interpreted within the framework of vortex stretching feeding energy through Reynolds stress into zonal flows, while shear decorrelation of turbulent structures might not play a central role in TJ-II. Moreover, it is shown that in both L- and H-mode, the phase velocity of density fluctuations does not depend on the structure scale.

  11. Effect of Interface Control on Mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Woven C/C Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, Masaki; Yamao, Taketoshi; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Ochiai, Shojiro; Iwashita, Norio; Sawada, Yoshihiro

    Effects of fiber/matrix interface and matrix microstructure on the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of C/C composite materials were investigated by coating bismaleimide-triazine co-polymer (BT-resin) on the surface of carbon fiber and changing the heat-treatment temperature (HTT). For the case of laminates with HTT of 1600°C (carbonized C/C composites), the initial fracture toughness, GIC, was insensitive to BT-resin coating. Moreover, the fracture toughness during crack propagation, GIR, increased by coating BT-resin. On the other hand, both GIC and GIR decreased with BT-resin coating for the laminates with HTT of 2500°C. While both GIC and GIR are insensitive to HTT for laminates without BT-resin coating, they both decreased by increasing HTT for laminates with BT-resin coating. The difference of the effects of interface control and HTT was discussed on the basis of microscopic mechanism consideration. Comparison between in-plane and interlaminar strength indicated the possibility to optimize the interface control.

  12. Ball shear strength and fracture modes of lead-free solder joints prepared using nickel nanoparticle doped flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujan, G. K.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Amalina, M. A.; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Miniaturization and the need for the replacement of lead (Pb) based solders in microelectronic devices raise concerns over their reliability in the recent years. Particularly, the rapid growth of interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layers in Pb free solders can lead to brittle fracture. A novel nanoparticle doped fluxing method was used to prepare ball grid array solder joints between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder balls and Cu pads. In this method, nickel nanoparticles were mixed with a water soluble flux prior to its use. The shear strength and fracture modes of the resulting solder joints were investigated as a function of aging time. Results showed that IMC layer growth was suppressed in solder joints prepared with 0.1 wt.% Ni doped flux. The average shear strength was marginally higher for solder joints prepared using 0.1 wt. % Ni doped flux compared with the joints prepared with undoped flux. Samples prepared using Ni doped flux showed a better resistant against brittle fracture for up to 30 days of aging.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Comparison of high-resolution and standard zoom imaging modes in cone beam computed tomography for detection of longitudinal root fracture: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Taramsari, Mehran; Bashirzadeh, Parinaz; Salamat, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of two imaging modes in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system in detecting root fracture in endodontically-treated teeth with fiber posts or screw posts by selecting two fields of view. Materials and Methods In this study, 78 endodontically-treated single canal premolars were included. A post space was created in all of them. Then the teeth were randomly set in one of 6 artificial dental arches. In 39 of the 78 teeth set in the 6 dental arches, a root fracture was intentionally created. Next, a fiber post and a screw post were cemented into 26 teeth having equal the root fractures. High resolution (HiRes) and standard zoom images were provided by a CBCT device. Upon considering the reconstructed images, two observers in agreement with each other confirmed the presence or absence of root fracture. A McNemar test was used for comparing the results of the two modes. Results The frequency of making a correct diagnosis using the HiRes zoom imaging mode was 71.8% and in standard zoom was 59%. The overall sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing root fracture in the HiRes mode were 71.79% and 46.15% and in the standard zoom modes were 58.97% and 33.33%, respectively. Conclusion There were no significant differences between the diagnostic values of the two imaging modes used in the diagnosis of root fracture or in the presence of root canal restorations. In both modes, the most true-positive results were reported in the post space group. PMID:24083210

  14. Tests and analyses for fully plastic fracture mechanics of plane strain mode I crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, F.A.; Parks, D.M.; Kim, Y.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under monotonic loading, structures should ideally be ductile enough to provide continued resistance during crack growth. For fully plastic crack growth in low strength alloys, existing asymptotic solutions for elastic-plastic growing cracks are not applicable because they reach the fracture strain only in regions small compared to the inhomogeneities of the actual fracture process. For the limiting case of non-hardening fully-plastic plane strain crack growth, in a number of geometries and loadings the near-tip fields are characterized in terms of three parameters: an effective angle 2{theta}{sub s} between a pair of slip planes, and the normal stress {sigma}{sub s} and the increment of displacement {delta}u{sub s} across the planes. This three-parameter characterization is in contrast to the one- or two-parameter (K or J and T or Q) characterization in linear or non-linear elastic fracture mechanics. These {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and {delta}u{sub s} parameters are found form the far-field geometries and loadings through slip line fields or least upper bound analyses based on circular arcs. The resulting crack growth, in terms of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA), is a function of {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and the material. The geometry of the crack growing between two moving slip planes emanating from its tip reduces this function to the critical fracture shear strain left behind the slip planes, {gamma}f, as a function of {sigma}{sub s}. {gamma}f({sigma}{sub s}) is found theoretically from a hole initiation and growth model. It is also found from preliminary fully plastic crack growth experiments on unequally grooved specimens with fixed-grip extension or 4-point bending of a 1018 CF steel.

  15. Continuous infusion of angiotensin II modulates hypertrophic differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in cartilage formation in a fracture model mouse.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Hirohisa; Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Aoki, Motokuni; Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-06-01

    Although components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are reported to be expressed in cultured chondrocytes and cartilage, little is known about the precise function of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in chondrocytes. In this study, we employed a rib fracture model mouse to investigate the effect of Ang II on chondrocytes. Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was expressed in chondrocytes in the growth plate of mouse tibia. Continuous infusion of Ang II to rib-fractured mice resulted in a significant increase in the volume of cartilage, suggesting Ang II-induced hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. It was also confirmed by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Sox9 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which are genes related to chondrocyte differentiation, and type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which are hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific molecular markers. Chondrocyte hypertrophy with upregulation of these genes was attenuated by administration of olmesartan, an AT1R blocker, but not by hydralazine. Moreover, Ang II infusion significantly suppressed apoptosis of chondrocytes, accompanied by significant induction of mRNA expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL. Olmesartan, but not hydralazine, significantly attenuated the reduction of apoptotic cells and the increase in anti-apoptotic genes induced by Ang II infusion. Overall, the present study demonstrated that Ang II promoted hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and reduced apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes independently of high blood pressure. The present data indicate the role of Ang II in cartilage, and might provide a new concept for treatment of cartilage diseases. PMID:25693858

  16. Transpedicular screw fixation for type II Hangman's fracture: a motion preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    ElMiligui, Yasser; Koptan, Wael; Emran, Ihab

    2010-08-01

    Opinions have varied regarding the optimal treatment of an unstable Hangman's fracture. C2 pedicle screw instrumentation is a biomechanically strong fixation which although done through a simple posterior approach, is a technically demanding procedure. This prospective, non-randomized multicentre study included 15 consecutive patients with displaced type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis. There were nine males and six females with a mean age of 37 years at surgery. The cause of injury was a road traffic accident in 11 patients and a fall from height in 4 patients. All patients had a single stage reduction and direct transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles. During follow-up, clinical evaluation and plain X-rays were performed at each visit; at 6-month follow-up, additional dynamic lateral flexion/extension views and a CT scan were performed. The average follow-up period was 32 months (range 25-56 months). At final follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic and regained a good functional outcome with no limitation of range of motion; all the patients showed solid union with no implant failure. There were no neurological complications. At 6-month follow-up, CT evaluation showed fusion in all patients and an adequate position of 28 screws. Two pedicle screws (6.6%) showed minimal (defined as <2 mm) intrusion; one into the spinal canal and the other into the vertebral foreamen. Transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles is a safe and effective method in treating type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis resulting in good clinical and radiological outcomes. Adequate reduction was achieved and motion segments were preserved with its use. PMID:20401619

  17. Damping Higher Order Modes in the PEP-II B-Factory Vertex Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.; Langton, J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    Higher stored currents and shorter bunch lengths are requirements for increasing luminosity in colliding storage rings. As a result, more HOM power is generated in the IP region. This HOM power propagates to sensitive components causing undesirable heating, thus becoming a limiting issue for the PEP-II B-factory. HOM field penetration through RF shielding fingers has been shown to cause heating in bellows structures. To overcome these limitations, a proposal to incorporate ceramic absorbers within the bellows cavity to damp these modes is presented. Results show that the majority of modes of interest are damped, the effectiveness depending on geometrical considerations. An optimal configuration is presented for the PEP-II B-factory IR bellows component utilizing commercial grade ceramics with consideration for heat transfer requirements.

  18. Sliding mode control of the space nuclear reactor system TOPAZ II

    SciTech Connect

    Shtessel, Y.B.; Wyant, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Automatic Control System (ACS) of the space nuclear reactor power system TOPAZ II that generates electricity from nuclear heat using in-core thermionic converters is considered. Sliding Mode Control Technique was applied to the reactor system controller design in order to provide the robust high accuracy following of a neutron (thermal) power reference profile in a start up regime and a payload electric power (current) reference profile following in an operation regime. Extensive simulations of the TOPAZ II reactor system with the designed sliding mode controllers showed improved accuracy and robustness of the reactor system performances in a start up regime and in an electric power supply regime as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Far-field stress dependency of the failure mode of damage-zone fractures in fault zones: Results from laboratory tests and field observations of siliceous mudstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic failure mode (tensile/hybrid/shear) of damage-zone fractures in fault zones may influence the hydrogeological properties of the fault zone. Application of the Griffith-Coulomb failure criterion, combined with the simple assumption that failures are predominantly induced by an increase in differential stresses and/or a decrease in effective normal stresses resulting from stress concentrations generated at the asperities/tips of faults, suggests that (1) only tensile fractures propagate from faults when the effective mean stress is less than the rock tensile strength, (2) tensile/hybrid fractures form when the effective mean stress is less than twice the rock tensile strength, and (3) shear fractures can develop when the effective mean stress is more than twice the rock tensile strength, which suppresses the formation of tensile/hybrid fractures. In this study, thin slots were precut in siliceous mudstone samples and mechanical experiments were conducted under a range of effective confining pressures using core samples with and without precut slots. A comparison of fractures formed in the samples at different applied effective mean stresses gave results consistent with the proposed model. The correspondence of model predictions and results was also corroborated by observations of natural damage-zone fractures observed in the field, in boreholes penetrating the same siliceous mudstone as used in the experiments. The results indicate that fault zones containing numerous tensile/hybrid fractures are limited to domains that have experienced effective mean stresses of less than twice the rock tensile strength.

  20. Fracture Analysis of Competing Failure Modes of Aluminum-CFRP Joints Using Three-Layer Titanium Laminates as Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, P.; Vollertsen, F.

    2015-09-01

    The structural properties of lightweight constructions can be adapted to specific local requirements using multi-material designs. Aluminum alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are materials of great interest requiring suitable joining techniques in order to transfer the advantages of combining the materials to structural benefits. Thus, the research group "Schwarz-Silber" investigates novel concepts to enable frontal aluminum-CFRP joints using transition structures. In the foil concept titanium foils are used as transition elements. Specimens have been produced using three-layer titanium laminates. In tensile tests, three failure locations have been observed: (1) Al-Ti seam, (2) Ti-CFRP hybrid laminate, and (3) CFRP laminate. In this paper, the fracture mechanisms of these failure modes are investigated by analyzing metallographic micrographs and fracture surfaces as well as by correlating load-displacement curves to video imaging of tensile tests. The results show that the cracking of the CFRP layers can be traced back to an assembly error. The laminate character of the titanium part tends to reduce the Al-Ti seam strength. However, two sub-joint tests demonstrate that the Al-Ti seam can endure loads up to 9.5 kN. The ductile failure behavior of the Ti-CFRP hybrid laminates is caused by plastic deformations of the titanium laminate liners.

  1. Mode I fracture toughness behavior of hydro-thermally aged carbon fibre reinforced DGEBA-HHPA-PES systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Pitarresi, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Giuseppe; Tumino, Davide

    2012-07-01

    In this work the Mode I fracture toughness behavior of unidirectional CFRP laminates is investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests. The composite samples were manufactured by thermal curing after impregnation of a Carbon fabric with a DGEBA epoxy and anhydride HHPA curing agent. One resin batch was also mixed with a PES thermoplastic monomer to enhance the matrix toughness. Two lots of samples, toughened and untoughened, were then left to soak in hot water to achieve various degrees of aging. The influence of matrix toughening and hydrothermal aging on the delamination behavior of the composite have then been assessed and correlated with characterization data from Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  2. Compressive fracture morphology and mechanism of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-11-01

    We quantitatively investigated the fracture morphologies of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and Pd78Cu6Si16 metallic glasses (MGs) under compression. The characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphology were captured, and the shear vein patterns were found to be not a one-to-one correspondence between two opposing fracture surfaces in an identical sample. This finding experimentally confirms that the compressive failure behaves in a fracture mode of pure shear (mode II). Quantitative measurements show that a ˜1 μm thickness layer with materials not only inside but also adjacent to the major shear band contributes to the formation of shear vein patterns. The critical shear strain to break a shear band was found to be more than 105% and higher in more ductile MGs under compression than tension. Estimation on the temperature rise at the fracture moment indicates that only ˜5% of the total elastic energy stored in the sample converts into the heat required for melting the layer to form the vein patterns. The mode II fracture toughness was also estimated based on the quantitative measurements of shear vein pattern and found larger than the mode I fracture toughness. Finally, the deformation and fracture mechanisms of MGs under tension and compression were compared and discussed. These results may improve the understanding on the fracture behaviors and mechanisms of MGs and may provide instructions on future design for ductile MGs with high resistance for fracture.

  3. Kinetics of fracture in Fe-3Si steel under mode I loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessendorf, Michael H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with experimental studies of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Fe-3Si steel. The FCP experiments were performed on single-edge crack specimens. Results show that an extensive damage zone consisting of slip bands surrounds and precedes the propagating crack. The system of the crack and the damage zone constitutes the crack layer (CL). The results demonstrate that fracture propagates by the translation, expansion, and distortion of the part of CL called the active zone. The contours of the damage distribution show that different loading stresses may cause significantly different shapes of damage. Application of the stability criteria is demonstrated. It was shown that the critical energy release rate depends on the history of loading.

  4. Progressive fracture modes in a unidirectional brittle matrix composite under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, N.J.; Kim, R.Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this work we augment the data set of our recent publication on progressive matrix microcrack initiation, which was accomplished under flexure, by conducting similar tests under direct tension. The new data supports completely that which was done earlier. We also provide an analysis to portray the statistical variation of the major controlling parameter in this phenomenon, i.e., the matrix fracture toughness, wherein sufficient data seem to be available to identify the {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} of the distribution. We also examine the progression of fiber damage and observe the correlation between this mechanism and the composite stiffness degradation, where we again note significant departure from commonly-accepted concepts prevalent in the literature. Included are model results for the crack deflection problem and observations regarding the status of debonding criteria.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Cracked Chevron Notched Semi-Circular Bend Method for Characterizing the Mode I Fracture Toughness of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Dong; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nu-Wen; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xu, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The cracked chevron notched semi-circular bending (CCNSCB) method for measuring the mode I fracture toughness of rocks combines the merits (e.g., avoidance of tedious pre-cracking of notch tips, ease of sample preparation and loading accommodation) of both methods suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics, which are the cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) method and the notched semi-circular bend (NSCB) method. However, the limited availability of the critical dimensionless stress intensity factor (SIF) values severely hinders the widespread usage of the CCNSCB method. In this study, the critical SIFs are determined for a wide range of CCNSCB specimen geometries via three-dimensional finite element analysis. A relatively large support span in the three point bending configuration was considered because the fracture of the CCNSCB specimen in that situation is finely restricted in the notch ligament, which has been commonly assumed for mode I fracture toughness measurements using chevron notched rock specimens. Both CCNSCB and NSCB tests were conducted to measure the fracture toughness of two different rock types; for each rock type, the two methods produce similar toughness values. Given the reported experimental results, the CCNSCB method can be reliable for characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of rocks.

  6. Predicting the occurrence of mixed mode failure associated with hydraulic fracturing, part 2 water saturated tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Choens, Charles; Barrow, Perry Carl

    2015-09-14

    Seven water-saturated triaxial extension experiments were conducted on four sedimentary rocks. This experimental condition was hypothesized more representative of that existing for downhole hydrofracture and thus it may improve our understanding of the phenomena. In all tests the pore pressure was 10 MPa and confirming pressure was adjusted to achieve tensile and transitional failure mode conditions. Using previous work in this LDRD for comparison, the law of effective stress is demonstrated in extension using this sample geometry. In three of the four lithologies, no apparent chemo-mechanical effect of water is apparent, and in the fourth lithology test results indicate some chemo-mechanical effect of water.

  7. Effect of Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors on Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Resistance of Composite Laminates Under Mode I Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2006-01-01

    Double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimens of a glass/epoxy composite material with embedded piezoelectric sensors were tested both statically and under fatigue loading to determine the effect of the embedded material on the Mode I fracture toughness and fatigue resistance compared to baseline data without the embedded elements. A material known as LaRC-Macrofiber Composite (LaRC-MFC (TradeMark)), or MFC, was embedded at the midplane of the specimen during the layup. Specimens were manufactured with the embedded MFC material either at the loaded end of the specimen to simulate an initial delamination; or with the MFC material located at the delaminating interface, with a Teflon film at the loaded end to simulate an initial delamination. There were three types of specimens with the embedded material at the delaminating interface: co-cured with no added adhesive; cured with a paste adhesive applied to the embedded element; or cured with a film adhesive added to the embedded material. Tests were conducted with the sensors in both the passive and active states. Results were compared to baseline data for the same material without embedded elements. Interlaminar fracture toughness values (G(sub Ic)) for the passive condition showed little change when the MFC was at the insert end. Passive results varied when the MFC was at the delaminating interface. For the co-cured case and with the paste adhesive, G(sub Ic) decreased compared to the baseline toughness, whereas, for the film adhesive case, G(sub Ic) was significantly greater than the baseline toughness, but the failure was always catastrophic. When the MFC was in the active state, G(sub Ic) was generally lower compared to the passive results. Fatigue tests showed little effect of the embedded material whether it was active or passive compared to baseline values.

  8. Recommendations for protecting against failure by brittle fracture: Category II and III ferritic steel shipping containers with wall thickness greater than four inches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1996-08-01

    This report provides criteria for selecting ferritic steels that would prevent brittle fracture in Category II and III shipping containers with wall thickness greater than 4 inches. These methods are extensions of those previously used for Category II and III containers less than 4 inches thick and Category I containers more than 4 inches thick.

  9. An experimental study of CTOD for Mode I/Mode II stable crack growth in thin 2024-T3 aluminum specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Dawicke, D.S.; Newman, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study of crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) for Mode I/Mode II stable crack growth in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum has been conducted. To perform the experiments, an Arcan specimen and fixture was modified so that (1) slippage in the grips was eliminated, (2) large rotations of the fixture components were achievable and (3) bending stresses were minimized. Defining {Theta} to be the angle between the Mode I loading direction (perpendicular to the crack line) and the direction of applied loading, experimental results indicate that (a) for large amounts of crack extension, a {ge} 10mm, the value of CTOD at 1 mm behind the crack tip appears to approach a constant value of 0.1 mm for all modes of loading, (b) the direction of crack extension varied with applied mixed mode loading, (c) Mode I crack extension is predominant for 0{degree} {le} {Theta} {le} 60{degree}, (d) Mode II crack extension is predominant for 75{degree} {le} {Theta} {le} 90{degree} and (e) a transition zone exists for angles {Theta} near 75{degree}.

  10. Application of the J integral to fracture under mixed-mode loading. [MMJINT; 4330V steel

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The calculation of the J integral proved to be a successful method for characterizing the stress and displacement fields around a crack tip under mixed mode loading. A computer program was written to determine the symmetric and antisymmetric J integral quantities. The stress intensity factors from these J integral calculations were in excellent agreement with other calculations. The compact shear specimen used contains three loading holes, the load applied at the center hole being the opposite direction to the load applied at the two outer holes. For 7075-T6 aluminum, K/sub IIc/ was 1.9 times larger than K/sub Ic/. In the brittle photoelastic material K/sub IIc/ was less than K/sub Ic/. Failure of the 4330V steel compact shear specimens came as a result of the average shear stress in the region ahead of the crack tip exceeding the material flow shear stress. The experimental results suggest that the angle of crack growth is best predicted by the maximum tangential stress theory.

  11. Microbranching in mode-I fracture using large-scale simulations of amorphous and perturbed-lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the high-velocity regime mode-I fracture instability wherein small microbranches start to appear near the main crack, using large-scale simulations. Some of the features of those microbranches have been reproduced qualitatively in smaller-scale studies [using O (104) atoms] on both a model of an amorphous material (via the continuous random network model) and using perturbed-lattice models. In this study, larger-scale simulations [ O (106) atoms] were performed using multithreading computing on a GPU device, in order to achieve more physically realistic results. First, we find that the microbranching pattern appears to be converging with the lattice width. Second, the simulations reproduce the growth of the size of a microbranch as a function of the crack velocity, as well as the increase of the amplitude of the derivative of the electrical-resistance root-mean square with respect to the time as a function of the crack velocity. In addition, the simulations yield the correct branching angle of the microbranches, and the power law exponent governing the shape of the microbranches seems to be lower than unity, so that the side cracks turn over in the direction of propagation of the main crack as seen in experiment.

  12. Microbranching in mode-I fracture using large-scale simulations of amorphous and perturbed-lattice models.

    PubMed

    Heizler, Shay I; Kessler, David A

    2015-07-01

    We study the high-velocity regime mode-I fracture instability wherein small microbranches start to appear near the main crack, using large-scale simulations. Some of the features of those microbranches have been reproduced qualitatively in smaller-scale studies [using O(10(4)) atoms] on both a model of an amorphous material (via the continuous random network model) and using perturbed-lattice models. In this study, larger-scale simulations [O(10(6)) atoms] were performed using multithreading computing on a GPU device, in order to achieve more physically realistic results. First, we find that the microbranching pattern appears to be converging with the lattice width. Second, the simulations reproduce the growth of the size of a microbranch as a function of the crack velocity, as well as the increase of the amplitude of the derivative of the electrical-resistance root-mean square with respect to the time as a function of the crack velocity. In addition, the simulations yield the correct branching angle of the microbranches, and the power law exponent governing the shape of the microbranches seems to be lower than unity, so that the side cracks turn over in the direction of propagation of the main crack as seen in experiment. PMID:26274182

  13. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R. )

    1996-01-01

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  14. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  15. Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Case, Eldon D; Ren, Fei; Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Part I of this paper discussed the Weibull modulus m, versus porosity P behavior of brittle materials, including HA. While the Weibull modulus m deals with the scatter in fracture strength data, this paper (Part II) focuses on two additional key mechanical properties of porous materials, namely the average fracture strength f , and Young s modulus E, for P in the interval from P zero to P PG (the porosity of the unfired compacts). The f versus P data for HA from this study and the literature data for alumina, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and silicon nitride are describedwell by functions of , where = 1 P/PG = the degree of densification. A similar function of applies to the E versus P behavior of HA from this study and data from the literature for alumina, titanium and YSZ. All of the data analyzed in this study (Part II) are based on partially and fully sintered powder compacts (excluding green powder compacts), thus the f / 0 versus and E /E0 versus relationships may apply only to such specimens.

  16. Stimuli Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Energy Production (Part II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Jung, Hun Bok; Shao, Hongbo; Kabilan, Senthil; Um, Wooyong; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Varga, Tamas; Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-12-14

    We have used an environmentally friendly and recyclable hydraulic fracturing fluid - diluted aqueous solutions of polyallylamine or PAA – for reservoir stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). This fluid undergoes a controlled and large volume expansion with a simultaneous increase in viscosity triggered by CO2 at EGS temperatures. We are presenting here the results of laboratory-scale hydraulic fracturing experiment using the fluid on small cylindrical rock cores (1.59 cm in diameter and 5.08 cm in length) from the Coso geothermal field in California. Rock samples consisted of Mesozoic diorite metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The experiments were conducted on 5 samples for realistic ranges of pressures (up to 275 bar) and temperatures (up to 210 °C) for both the rock samples and the injected fluid. After fracturing, cores were subjected to a CO2 leakage test, injection of KI solution, and X-ray microtomography (XMT) scanning to examine the formation and distribution of fractures. The design and conduct of these experiments will be presented and discussed in details. Based on the obtained XMT images, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were then performed to visualize hydraulic fractures and compute the bulk permeability. OpenFOAM (OpenCFD Ltd., Reading, UK), was used to solve the steady state simulation. The flow predictions, based upon the laminar, 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for fluid mass and momentum, show the remarkable stimulation of the permeability in the core samples and demonstrate the efficiency of such a CO2 triggered fluid in EGS.

  17. Pseudo-type-II tuning behavior and mode identification in whispering gallery optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Meisenheimer, Sarah-Katharina; Fürst, Josef Urban; Schiller, Annelie; Holderied, Florian; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2016-06-27

    Wavelength tuning of conventional mirror-based optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) exhibits parabolically-shaped tuning curves (type-0 and type-I phase matching) or tuning branches that cross each other with a finite slope (type-II phase matching). We predict and experimentally prove that whispering gallery OPOs based on type-0 phase matching show both tuning behaviors, depending on whether the mode numbers of the generated waves coincide or differ. We investigate the wavelength tuning of optical parametric oscillation in a millimeter-sized radially-poled lithium niobate disk pumped at 1 μm wavelength generating signal and idler waves between 1.7 and 2.6 μm wavelength. Our experimental findings excellently coincide with the theoretical predictions. The investigated whispering gallery optical parametric oscillator combines the employment of the highest nonlinear-optical coefficient of the material with a controlled type-II-like wavelength tuning and with the possibility of self-phase locking. PMID:27410665

  18. On the verification of binding modes of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone with mercury(II). The solid state studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata

    2014-08-01

    Two coordination compounds of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, fluorescent chemosensor, have been synthesised from the mercury(II) nitrate and mercury(II) chloride, and subsequently characterised by IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The inorganic anion has a distinct influence on binding mode of thiosemicarbazone ligand to Hg(II) ion. In both compounds the metal to ligand stoichiometry is 1:2 and the organic ligands coordinate to Hg ion in the neutral thione form, but they differ in a ligand binding mode and the conformation of the ligand. The crystal packing of mercury(II) nitrate complex with thiosemicarbazone is controlled by the mercury chelate ring-phenylene ring π···π stacking interactions.

  19. Maxillofacial Fractures: Midface and Internal Orbit-Part II: Principles and Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mast, Gerson; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Tasman, Abel-Jan; Litschel, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Current clinical assessment and imaging techniques were described in part 1, and this article presents a systematic review of the surgical treatment principles in the management of midface and internal orbit fractures from initial care to definitive treatment, including illustrative case examples. New developments enabled limited surgical approaches by standardization of osteosynthesis principles regarding three-dimensional buttress reconstruction, by newly developed individualized implants such as titanium meshes and, especially for complex fracture patterns, by critical assessment of anatomical reconstruction through intraoperative endoscopy, as well as intra- and postoperative imaging. Resorbable soft tissue anchors can be used both for ligament and soft tissue resuspension to reduce ptosis effects in the cheeks and nasolabial area and to achieve facial aesthetics similar to those prior to the injury. PMID:26372710

  20. Some recent theoretical and experimental developments in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.; Hones, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in four distinct areas of fracture mechanics research are described. These are as follows: experimental comparisons of different nonlinear fracture toughness measures, including the nonlinear energy, R curve, COD and J integral methods; the singular elastic crack-tip stress and displacement equations and the validity of the proposition of their general adequacy as indicated, for example, by the biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat crack; the thermodynamic nature of surface energy induced by propagating cracks in relation to a general continuum thermodynamic description of brittle fracture; and analytical and experimental aspects of Mode II fracture, with experimental data for certain aluminum, steel and titanium alloys.

  1. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 6: failure mode analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    Material properties and failure criteria were evaluated to assess the requirements for double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of the Zion Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. The properties of the 316 stainless steel piping materials were obtained from the literature. Statistical distributions of both the tensile and fracture properties at room and operating temperatures were developed. Yield and ultimate strength tensile properties were combined to estimate the material flow strength. The flow strength and fracture properties were used in the various failure models analyzed. Linear-elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic fracture models were compared, and the governing fracture criterion was determined. For the particular case studied, the fully plastic flow requirement was found to be the controlling fracture criterion leading to a double-ended guillotine pipe break.

  2. The effect of incomplete crown ferrules on fracture resistance and failure modes of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with quartz fiber post, composite core, and crowns

    PubMed Central

    Muangamphan, Panorjit; Sattapan, Boonrat; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Thammasitboon, Kewalin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the fracture resistance of restored endodontically treated teeth (RETT) with fiber posts, cores, and crowns with limited ferrules. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically treated and decoronated 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction, and then divided into 6 groups of 10 teeth each; Group circumferential ferrule (2FR), Group ferrule in the labial, mesial, and palatal region (2FR-LaMPa), Group ferrule in the labial, and palatal region (2FR-LaPa), Group 2FR-Pa and 2FR-La respectively, and Group 0FR (no ferrule). All 60 prepared teeth were then restored with quartz fiber posts, resin composite cores, and metal crowns. The specimens were subjected to load until failure occurred. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The mode of failure was determined under a stereoscope. Results: A statistical significant difference was found among groups 2FR-LaMPa, 2FR-Pa, 2FR-LaPa, and 2FR from the group 2FR-La, and from the group 0FR (P < 0.01). The predominant mode of failure was an oblique palatal to labial root fracture for the groups with remaining ferrules. Conclusion: For RETT that have incomplete crown ferrules, the location of the ferrules may affect their fracture resistance. PMID:26069401

  3. A compendium of sources of fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth data for metallic alloys. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Seward, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    A compendium is presented of sources for metallic alloy fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth data, which concentrates on technical reports as the primary source of references and updates the previous Hudson and Seward (1978) compendium references on technical journals. Where available, the accession numbers which are used as code numbers for the ordering of the reports from their publishers are given. The sources of these reports include the AIAA Technical Information Service, the Defense Technical Information Center, the National Technical Information Service, and NASA.

  4. Probabilistic Fracture Analysis of Functionally Graded Materials--Part II: Implementation and Numerical Examples

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tam H.; Song, Junho; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2008-02-15

    Probabilistic fracture analyses are performed for investigating uncertain fracture response of Functionally Graded Material (FGM) structures. The First-Order-Reliability-Method (FORM) is implemented into an existing Finite Element code for FGM (FE-FGM), which was previously developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The computational simulation will be used in order to estimate the probability of crack initiation with uncertainties in the material properties only. The two-step probability analysis method proposed in the companion paper is illustrated by a numerical example of a composite strip with an edge crack. First, the reliability index of a crack initiation event is estimated as we vary the mean and standard deviation of the slope and the location of the inflection point of the spatial profile of Young's modulus. Secondly, the reliability index is estimated as we vary the standard deviation and the correlation length of the random field that characterize the random spatial fluctuation of Young's modulus. Also investigated is the relative importance of the uncertainties in the toughness compared to those in Young's modulus.

  5. Trickle-Charge: a New Operational Mode for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W.; Colocho, W.S.; Decker, F.-J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Grady, C.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.K.; Turner, J.L.; Weaver, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    In regular top-up-and-coast operation, PEP-II average luminosity is about 70-75% of the peak luminosity due to detector ramp-down and ramp-up times plus the time it takes to top-up both beams. We recently commissioned a new operational mode where the Low Energy Ring is injected continuously without ramping down the detector. The benefits--increased luminosity lifetime and roughly half the number of top-ups per shift--were expected to give an increase in delivered luminosity of about 15% at the same peak luminosity; this was confirmed in test runs. In routine trickle operation, however, it appears that the increase in delivered luminosity is more than twice that due to an increase in availability credited to the more stable operating conditions during trickle operation. Further gains were made when continuous injection was extended to the high energy ring as well. In this paper we will present our operational experience as well as some of the diagnostics we use to monitor and maintain tuning of the machine in order to control injection background and protect the detector.

  6. Field-Selective Anomaly and Chiral Mode Reversal in Type-II Weyl Materials.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, M; Bergholtz, E J

    2016-08-19

    Three-dimensional condensed matter incarnations of Weyl fermions generically have a tilted dispersion-in sharp contrast to their elusive high-energy relatives where a tilt is forbidden by Lorentz invariance, and with the low-energy excitations of two-dimensional graphene sheets where a tilt is forbidden by either crystalline or particle-hole symmetry. Very recently, a number of materials (MoTe_{2}, LaAlGe, and WTe_{2}) have been identified as hosts of so-called type-II Weyl fermions whose dispersion is so strongly tilted that a Fermi surface is formed, whereby the Weyl node becomes a singular point connecting electron and hole pockets. We here predict that these systems have remarkable properties in the presence of magnetic fields. Most saliently, we show that the nature of the chiral anomaly depends crucially on the relative angle between the applied field and the tilt, and that an inversion-asymmetric overtilting creates an imbalance in the number of chiral modes with positive and negative slopes. The field-selective anomaly gives a novel magneto-optical resonance, providing an experimental way to detect concealed Weyl nodes. PMID:27588869

  7. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

  8. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  9. Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

    1980-09-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

  10. Les fractures distales de la clavicule type II de Neer: plaque à crochet versus brochage transacromiale

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Cette étude a été menée afin de faire une comparaison entre deux techniques chirurgicales différentes: la plaque à crochet et l'embrochage dans les fractures instables du quart externe de la clavicule. Nous avons mené une étude prospective entre 2009 et 2013, incluant deux groupes de patients: un premier groupe de 14 patients traités par plaque à crochet par voie d'abord antéro-inférieure, un second de 12 patients traités par brochage. Tous les patients ont été hospitalisés 24 h après la chirurgie et ont été suivi pendant 1 an. Nous avons comparé les résultats des deux techniques en étudiant: le temps opératoire, le saignement, délai de consolidation, la douleur et la fonction selon le score de constant. L'analyse statistique des résultats fonctionnels et radiologiques a montré la supériorité d'une technique par rapport à l'autre; ainsi l’âge moyen global était de 32,6 ans (+/- 13,7), le sex-ratio (H/F) était de 1. Le temps opératoire moyen est de 35 min pour la plaque à crochet contre 45 minutes pour le brochage, le délai moyen de consolidation était de 6,1 (+/-0,7) semaines dans le groupe traité par plaque vissée, et de 6 (+/-0,7) semaines dans le groupe traité par embrochage (p = 0,5), le score de Constant absolu moyen était respectivement de 86 (+/-10,4) et de 90,92 (+/-2,5) (p = 0,04). L'analyse uni variée a montré une association statistiquement significative entre les paramètres d’évaluation et les deux techniques chirurgicales étudiées. Par conséquent, l’étude a noté la supériorité de la plaque à crochet contre l'embroche dans les fractures instables du quart externe de la clavicule. PMID:26090053

  11. Saturation of the f -mode instability in neutron stars. II. Applications and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnigouras, Pantelis; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2016-07-01

    We present the first results on the saturation of the f -mode instability in neutron stars due to nonlinear mode coupling. Emission of gravitational waves drives the f -mode (fundamental mode) unstable in fast-rotating, newborn neutron stars. The initial growth phase of the mode is followed by its saturation, because of energy leaking to other modes of the star. The saturation point determines the strain of the generated gravitational-wave signal, which can then be used to extract information about the neutron star's equation of state. The parent (unstable) mode couples via parametric resonances with pairs of daughter modes, with the triplets' evolution exhibiting a rich variety of behaviors. We study both supernova- and merger-derived neutron stars, simply modeled as polytropes in a Newtonian context, and show that the parent may couple to many different daughter pairs during the star's evolution through the instability window, with the saturation amplitude changing by orders of magnitude.

  12. Biomechanical comparison of three types of internal fixation in a type C zone II pelvic fracture model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Wei; Li, Xu; Zhang, Qi; Lv, Hong-Zhi; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the stability of Tile C pelvic fractures fixed with two iliosacral (IS) screws, tension band plate (TBP), and minimally invasive adjustable plate (MIAP). Methods: Six embalmed specimens of adult pelvis were used. The soft tissue was removed from the specimens, but spines from the fourth lumbar vertebra to the proximal one-third of both femurs were retained. The pubic symphysis, bilateral sacroiliac joints and ligaments, bilateral hip joints, bilateral sacrotuberous ligaments, and bilateral sacrospinous ligaments were intact. Tile C pelvic fractures were created on the specimens. The symphysis pubis was fixed with a plate, and the fracture on the posterior pelvic ring was fixed with three types of internal fixation in a randomized block design. The specimens were placed in a biomechanical machine at a standing neutral posture. A cyclic vertical load of up to 500N was applied, and displacement was recorded. Shifts in the fracture gap were measured by a grating displacement sensor. Results: Under different vertical loads, the shift in the fracture gap and displacement of the pelvic fractures fixed with two IS screws were similar to those in fractures fixed with MIAP. However, the shift in the fracture gap and displacement of fractures fixed with MIAP was significantly smaller than those of fractures fixed with TBP. Conclusion: The stability of the Tile C pelvic fractures fixed with MIAP was similar to that of fractures fixed with IS screws. MIAP performed better than TBP under vertical load. PMID:25932113

  13. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL AND HIGHER-ORDER MODES FOR 7-CELL CAVITY OF PETRA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Y.; Blednykh, A.; Cupolo, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Holub, B.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II will include a 7-cell PETRA cavity, which was manufactured for the PETRA-II project at DESY. The cavity fundamental frequency operates at 500 MHz. In order to verify the impedances of the fundamental and higher-order modes (HOM), which were calculated by computer code, we measured the magnitude of the electromagnetic field of the fundamental acceleration mode and HOM using the bead-pull method. To keep the cavity body temperature constant, we used a chiller system to supply cooling water at 20 degrees C. The bead-pull measurement was automated with a computer. We encountered some issues during the measurement process due to the difficulty in measuring the electromagnetic field magnitude in a multi-cell cavity. We describe the method and apparatus for the field measurement, and the obtained results.

  15. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  16. Asteroseismology of the nearby SN II Progenitor Rigel. II. epsilon-mechanism Triggering Gravity-mode Pulsations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravveji, Ehsan; Moya, Andres; Guinan, Edward F.

    2012-04-01

    The cores of luminous B- and A-type (BA) supergiant stars are the seeds of later core-collapse supernovae. Thus, constraining the near-core conditions in this class of stars can place tighter constraints on the size, mass, and chemical composition of supernova remnants. Asteroseismology of these massive stars is one possible approach into such investigations. Recently, Moravveji et al. in 2012 (hereafter Paper I) extracted 19 significant frequencies from a 6-year radial velocity monitoring of Rigel (β Ori, B8 Ia). The periods they determined broadly range from 1.22 to 74.74 days. Based on our differentially rotating stellar structure and evolution model, Rigel, at its current evolutionary state, is undergoing core He burning and shell H burning. Linear fully non-adiabatic non-radial stability analyses result in the excitation of a dense spectrum of non-radial gravity-dominated mixed modes. The fundamental radial mode (l = 0) and its overtones are all stable. When the hydrogen-burning shell is located even partially in the radiative zone, a favorable condition for destabilization of g-modes through the so-called epsilon-mechanism becomes viable. Only those g-modes that have high relative amplitudes in the hydrogen-burning (radiative) zone can survive the strong radiative damping. From the entire observed range of variability periods of Rigel (found in Paper I), and based on our model, only those modes with periods ranging between 21 and 127 days can be theoretically explained by the epsilon-mechanism. The origin of the short-period variations (found in Paper I) still remains unexplained. Because Rigel is similar to other massive BA supergiants, we believe that the epsilon-mechanism may be able to explain the long-period variations in α Cygni class of pulsating stars.

  17. Couple stresses and the fracture of rock.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Colin; Coman, Ciprian D; Aldazabal, Javier

    2015-03-28

    An assessment is made here of the role played by the micropolar continuum theory on the cracked Brazilian disc test used for determining rock fracture toughness. By analytically solving the corresponding mixed boundary-value problems and employing singular-perturbation arguments, we provide closed-form expressions for the energy release rate and the corresponding stress-intensity factors for both mode I and mode II loading. These theoretical results are augmented by a set of fracture toughness experiments on both sandstone and marble rocks. It is further shown that the morphology of the fracturing process in our centrally pre-cracked circular samples correlates very well with discrete element simulations. PMID:25713450

  18. Radon hazard in shallow groundwaters II: dry season fracture drainage and alluvial fan upwelling.

    PubMed

    Tommasone, F Pascale; De Francesco, S; Cuoco, E; Verrengia, G; Santoro, D; Tedesco, D

    2011-08-15

    ²²²Rn concentrations have been measured in a well located on the edge of a large Pleistocene-Holocene fan and belonging to the shallow pyroclastic aquifer of the Pietramelara Plain, southern Italy. The aim of this study has been both to characterise the hydrological inputs that determine the influx of ²²²Rn to the shallow aquifer and to understand the correlations between ²²²Rn, major ions, physical-chemical parameters and rainfall. Results obtained from the time series indicate that the studied well shows a ²²²Rn variability that is inconsistent with a mechanism of pure hydrological amplification, such as described in Radon hazard in shallow groundwaters: Amplification and long term variability induced by rainfall (De Francesco et al., 2010a). On the contrary, in this well hydrological amplification appears to be mainly tied to the upwelling of alluvial fan waters, rich in radon, in response to pistoning from recharge in the carbonate substrate. This upwelling of alluvial fan waters occurs during almost the whole period of the annual recharge and is also responsible of the constant increase in ²²²Rn levels during the autumn-spring period, when both the water table level and weekly rainfall totals drop. Furthermore, a rapid delivery mechanism for ²²²Rn likely operates through fracture drainage in concomitance with the very first late summer-early autumn rains, when rainfall totals appear largely insufficient to saturate the soil storage capacity. Results obtained from this study appear to be particularly significant in both radon hazard zoning in relation to the shallow aquifer and possibly also for indoor radon, owing to possible shallow aquifer-soil-building exchanges. Moreover, both the spike-like events and the long wave monthly scale background fluctuations detected can also have potential significance in interpreting ²²²Rn time series data as seismic and/or volcanic precursors. Finally, ²²²Rn has proved to be an excellent tracer for

  19. Solar seismology. II - The stochastic excitation of the solar p-modes by turbulent convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Keeley, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the solar p-modes are stabilized by damping due to turbulent viscosity in the convective zone. Starting from the assumption that the modes are stable, we calculate expectation values for the modal energies. We find that the interaction between a p-mode and the turbulent convection is such that the modal energy tends toward equipartition with the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies whose lifetimes are comparable to the modal period. From the calculated values of the modal energies, we compute rms surface velocity amplitudes. Our predicted rms surface velocities range from 0.01 cm/sec for the fundamental radial mode to 0.6 cm/sec for the radial mode whose period is approximately 5 minutes. The predicted surface velocities for the low order p-modes are much smaller than the velocities inferred from recent observations.

  20. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  1. Spectroscopic modification of the Pippard relation applied for the translational mode in ammonia solid II near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtseven, H.; Yıldız, İ.

    2005-09-01

    This study gives our calculation for the frequency shifts 1v/∂ and the specific heat CP near the melting point in the ammonia solid II. We establish a linear relationship between CP and 1v/∂ using the Raman frequencies of the translational mode which we calculated in this system. This leads to the validity of the spectroscopic modification of the first Pippard relation in the ammonia solid II near the melting point. From this linear variation of CP with the 1v/∂ we deduce the slope values of {dP}/{dT} near the melting point for the fixed pressures of 3.65, 5.02 and 6.57 kbar in the ammonia solid II. They are compared with the experimental {dP}/{dT} values for this system.

  2. Oscillations of a vertically stratified dissipative atmosphere. II. Low frequency trapped modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, G. V.; Dmitrienko, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped atmosphere waves, such as IGW waveguide modes and Lamb modes, are described using dissipative solution above source (DSAS) (Dmitrienko and Rudenko, 2016). According to this description, the modes are disturbances penetrating without limit in the upper atmosphere and dissipating their energy throughout the atmosphere; leakage from a trapping region to the upper atmosphere is taken into consideration. The DSAS results are compared to those based on both accurate and WKB approximated dissipationless equations. It is shown that the spatial and frequency characteristics of modes in the upper atmosphere calculated by any of the methods are close to each other and are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  3. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  4. An engineering treatise on the CARE II dual mode and coverage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model used to calculate the reliability of any dual-mode, spare-switching computer system was described, and some illustrative examples were presented. The possibility of extending the resultant computer program further was also examined, enabling it, in particular, to accommodate computer configurations involving more than two modes of operation.

  5. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-11-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  6. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  7. Rossby normal modes in nonuniform background configurations. I Simple fields. II - Equinox and solstice conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salby, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the influence of mean field variations on the realization of planetary normal modes, taking into account the mode response and structure in the presence of simple background nonuniformities. It is found that mean field variations have the combined effect of depressing, shifting, and broadening the characteristic response of Rossby normal modes. While nonuniformities in both the mean wind and temperature fields contribute to the reduction in peak response, the former are primarily responsible for translation and spectral broadening. An investigation is conducted to determine which modes may be realized in actual atmospheric configurations and which may be identified. For both the equinox and solstice configurations, response peaks corresponding to all of the first four modes of wavenumbers 1, 2, and 3 are readily visible above the noise.

  8. Deformation and damage mechanisms of zinc coatings on hot-dip galvanized steel sheets: Part II. Damage modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Rodolphe; Forest, Samuel; Pineau, André; Grillon, François; Demonet, Xavier; Mataigne, Jean-Michel

    2004-03-01

    Zinc-based coatings are widely used for protection against corrosion of steel-sheet products in the automotive industry. The objective of the present article is to investigate the damage modes at work in three different microstructures of a zinc coating on an interstitial-free steel substrate under tension, planestrain tension, and expansion loading. Plastic-deformation mechanisms are addressed in the companion article. Two main fracture mechanisms, namely, intergranular cracking and transgranular cleavage fracture, were identified in an untempered cold-rolled coating, a tempered cold-rolled coating, and a recrystallized coating. No fracture at the interface between the steel and zinc coating was observed that could lead to spalling, in the studied zinc alloy. A complex network of cleavage cracks and their interaction with deformation twinning is shown to develop in the material. An extensive quantitative analysis based on systematic image analysis provides the number and cumulative length of cleavage cracks at different strain levels for the three investigated microstructures and three loading conditions. Grain refinement by recrystallization is shown to lead to an improved cracking resistance of the coating. A model for crystallographic cleavage combining the stress component normal to the basal plane and the amount of plastic slip on the basal slip systems is proposed and identified from equibiaxial tension tests and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the cracked grains. This analysis requires the computation of the nonlinear stress-strain response of each grain using a crystal-plasticity constitutive model. The model is then applied successfully to other loading conditions and is shown to account for the preferred orientations of damaged grains observed in the case of plane-strain tension.

  9. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It usually occurs after an injury and often occurs with ...

  10. Sensitivity Monitor Report for the STIS First-Order Modes -II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ed; Stys, David; Walborn, Nolan; Bohlin, Ralph

    2000-09-01

    An analysis of all low and medium resolution observations of the STIS Sensitivity Monitoring Programs made prior to December 1999 shows continuation of trends correlated with temperature and with time. We provide the first detailed report on additional trends in sensitivities revealed by the medium resolution modes of the instrument. Only the G750L mode shows no significant variation in sensitivity. All other modes, when averaged over a broad band of the wavelength coverage of each, show evidence for an ~1%/yr decline, except for G140L and G230L (after ~1998.7) being ~1.4%/yr, G140M being ~2.5%/yr, and G430L declining at ~0.5%/yr. A bimodal, before and after ~1998.7, trend previously found in the G230L is found in the NUV-MAMA G230M. Similar trends are also evident in the CCD in the G230LB and the two G230MB monitoring modes. The temperature dependence of the sensitivity in the G140M modes is found to be consistent with the -0.25%/°C correlation measured in the G140L mode. The mean "relative gain", gain1/gain4, of the CCD between 1998.3 and 1999.7 was 4.039 ±0.006 and did not change significantly in that period. Recommendations are made for changes in the "pipeline" calibration software to correct for the time and temperature variations in all L modes and in the M modes of both MAMA detectors.

  11. Tidal interactions of a Maclaurin spheroid - II. Resonant excitation of modes by a close, misaligned orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braviner, Harry J.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2015-02-01

    We model a tidally forced star or giant planet as a Maclaurin spheroid, decomposing the motion into the normal modes found by Bryan. We first describe the general prescription for this decomposition and the computation of the tidal power. Although this formalism is very general, forcing due to a companion on a misaligned, circular orbit is used to illustrate the theory. The tidal power is plotted for a variety of orbital radii, misalignment angles, and spheroid rotation rates. Our calculations are carried out including all modes of degree l ≤ 4, and the same degree of gravitational forcing. Remarkably, we find that for close orbits (a/R* ≈ 3) and rotational deformations that are typical of giant planets (e ≈ 0.4) the l = 4 component of the gravitational potential may significantly enhance the dissipation through resonance with surface gravity modes. There are also a large number of resonances with inertial modes, with the tidal power being locally enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude. For very close orbits (a/R* ≈ 3), the contribution to the power from the l = 4 modes is roughly the same magnitude as that due to the l = 3 modes.

  12. Mixed-Mode Fracture and Fatigue Analysis of Cracked 3D Complex Structures using a 3D SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavanam, Sharada

    The aim of this thesis is to numerically evaluate the mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs) of complex 3D structural geometries with arbitrary 3D cracks using the Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method-Finite Element Method (SGBEM-FEM) Alternating Method. Various structural geometries with different loading scenarios and crack configurations were examined in this thesis to understand the behavior and trends of the mixed-mode SIFs as well as the fatigue life for these complex structural geometries. Although some 3D structures have empirical and numerical solutions that are readily available in the open literature, some do not; therefore this thesis presents the results of fracture and fatigue analyses of these 3D complex structures using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method to serve as reference for future studies. Furthermore, there are advantages of using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method compared to traditional FEM methods. For example, the fatigue-crack-growth and fatigue life can be better estimated for a structure because different fatigue models (i.e. Walker, Paris, and NASGRO) can be used within the same framework of the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method. The FEM (un-cracked structure)/BEM(crack model) meshes are modeled independently, which speeds up the computation process and reduces the cost of human labor. A simple coarse mesh can be used for all fracture and fatigue analyses of complex structures. In this thesis, simple coarse meshes were used for 3D complex structures, which were below 5000 elements as compared to traditional FEM, which require meshes where the elements range on the order of ˜250,000 to ˜106 and sometimes even more than that.

  13. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Seventeenth National Symposium, Albany, NY, August 7-9, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. M. (Editor); Chait, R. (Editor); Smith, C. W. (Editor); Wilhem, D. P. (Editor); Andrews, W. A. (Editor); Newman, J. C. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference gives attention to topics in the application of fracture mechanics, subcritical crack growth phenomena, fracture testing methods, ductile fracture behavior, and fracture mechanisms and their analysis. Specific papers treat the resistance curve approach to composite materials characterization, fracture toughness in ductile iron and cast steel, hold-time effects in elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation, creep crack growth under nonsteady conditions, viscoplastic fatigue in a superalloy at elevated temperatures, fracture testing with arc bend specimens, one-point bend impact test application, and a compact mode II fracture specimen. Also discussed are the computation of stable crack growth using the J-integral, the use of plastic energy dissipation to characterize crack growth, the extension of surface cracks under cyclic loading, the minimum time criterion for crack instability in structural materials, dynamic crack propagation and branching under biaxial loading, and boundary layer effects in cracked bodies.

  14. Structure and mode of action of cyclic lipopeptide pseudofactin II with divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Janek, Tomasz; Rodrigues, Lígia R; Gudiña, Eduardo J; Czyżnikowska, Żaneta

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of natural lipopeptide pseudofactin II with a series of doubly charged metal cations was examined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular modelling. The molecular modelling for metal-pseudofactin II provides information on the metal-peptide binding sites. Overall, Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) favor the association with oxygen atoms spanning the peptide backbone, whereas Cu(2+) is coordinated by three nitrogens. Circular dichroism (CD) results confirmed that Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) can disrupt the secondary structure of pseudofactin II at high concentrations, while Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) did not essentially affect the structure of the lipopeptide. Interestingly, our results showed that the addition of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) helped smaller micelles to form larger micellar aggregates. Since pseudofactin II binds metals, we tested whether this phenomena was somehow related to its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Proteus mirabilis. We found that the antimicrobial effect of pseudofactin II was increased by supplementation of culture media with all tested divalent metal ions. Finally, by using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria we showed that the higher antimicrobial activity of metal complexes of pseudofactin II is attributed to the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:27416562

  15. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  16. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures. II: Infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater at Maqarin, Jordan, a natural analogue site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steefel, C. I.; Lichtner, P. C.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical multicomponent reactive transport model described fully in Steefel and Lichtner (1998)[Steefel, C.I., Lichtner, P.C., 1998. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures, I. Controls on reaction front geometry. J. Hydrol. (in press)] is used to simulate the infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater along discrete fractures at Maqarin, Jordan, a site considered as a natural analogue to cement-bearing nuclear waste repositories. In the Eastern Springs area at Maqarin, two prominent sets of sub-parallel fractures trending NW-SE are approximately perpendicular to the local water table contours, with the slope of the water table indicating north-westward flow. Extensive mineralogic investigations [Alexander W.R. (Ed.), 1992. A natural analogue study of cement-buffered, hyperalkaline groundwaters and their interaction with a sedimentary host rock. NAgrA Technical Report (NTB 91-10), Wettingen, Switzerland; Milodowski, A.E., Hyslop, E.K., Pearce, J.M., Wetton, P.D., Kemp, S.J., Longworth, G., Hodginson, E., and Hughes, C.R., 1998. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the western springs area. In: Smellie, J.A.T. (ed.), 1998: Maqarin Natural Analogue Study: Phase III. SKB Technical Report TR98-04, Stockholm, Sweden] indicate that the width of intense rock alteration zone bordering the fractures changes from about 4 mm at one locality (the M1 sampling site) to approximately 1 mm 100 m to the north-west in the flow direction (the M2 site), suggesting a lessening of alteration intensity in that direction. Using this information, the dimensionless parameter δ v/φ D' (φ=porosity, D'=effective diffusion coefficient in rock matrix, δ=fracture aperture, and v=fluid velocity in the fracture) and measurements of the local hydraulic head gradient and effective diffusion coefficient in the rock matrix, a mean fracture aperture of 0.194 mm is calculated assuming the cubic law applies. This information, in combination with measured groundwater compositions at the

  17. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  18. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The examples are based on finite element models of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen. The examples are independent of the analysis software used and allow the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, quasi-static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Good agreement between the results obtained from the automated propagation analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting input parameters that had previously been determined during analyses of mode I Double Cantilever Beam and mode II End Notched Flexure specimens. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  19. Seismic transmission operator reciprocity - II: impedance-operator symmetry via elastic lateral modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of the overburden transmission response are of particular interest for the analysis of reflectivity illumination or blurring in seismic depth imaging. The first step to showing a transmission-operator reciprocity property is to identify the symmetry of the so-called displacement-to-traction operators. The latter are analogous to Dirichlet-to-Neumann operators and they may also be called impedance operators. Their symmetry is deduced here after development of a formal spectral or modal theory of lateral wavefunctions in a laterally heterogeneous generally anisotropic elastic medium. The elastic lateral modes are displacement-traction 6-vectors and they are built from two auxiliary 3-vector lateral-mode bases. These auxiliary modes arise from Hermitian and anti-Hermitian operators, so they have familiar properties such as orthogonality. There is no assumption of down/up symmetry of the elasticity tensor, but basic assumptions are made about the existence and completeness of the elastic modes. A point-symmetry property appears and plays a central role. The 6-vector elastic modes have a symplectic orthogonality property, which facilitates the development of modal expansions for 6-vector functions of the lateral coordinates when completeness is assumed. While the elastic modal theory is consistent with the laterally homogeneous case, numerical work would provide confidence that it is correct in general. An appendix contains an introductory overview of acoustic lateral modes that were studied by other authors, given from the perspective of this new work. A distinction is drawn between unit normalization of scalar auxiliary modes and a separate energy-flux normalization of 2-vector acoustic modes. Neither is crucial to the form of acoustic pressure-to-velocity or impedance operators. This statement carries over to the elastic case for the 3-vector auxiliary- and 6-vector elastic-mode normalizations. The modal theory is used to construct the kernel of the

  20. The Fundamental Solutions for the Stress Intensity Factors of Modes I, II And III. The Axially Symmetric Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, B.

    2015-05-01

    The subject of the paper are Green's functions for the stress intensity factors of modes I, II and III. Green's functions are defined as a solution to the problem of an elastic, transversely isotropic solid with a penny-shaped or an external crack under general axisymmetric loadings acting along a circumference on the plane parallel to the crack plane. Exact solutions are presented in a closed form for the stress intensity factors under each type of axisymmetric ring forces as fundamental solutions. Numerical examples are employed and conclusions which can be utilized in engineering practice are formulated.

  1. VERTOS II: Percutaneous vertebroplasty versus conservative therapy in patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures; rationale, objectives and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Klazen, CAH; Verhaar, HJJ; Lampmann, LEH; Juttmann, JR; Blonk, MC; Jansen, FH; Tielbeek, AV; Schoemaker, MC; Buskens, E; van der Graaf, Y; Janssens, X; Fransen, H; van Everdingen, KJ; Muller, AF; Mali, WPThM; Lohle, PNM

    2007-01-01

    Background The standard care in patients with a painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is conservative therapy. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), a minimally invasive technique, is gaining popularity as a new treatment option. Many prospective and retrospective studies have reported on the effectiveness and safety of PV, but no large randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been published. Objective To estimate cost-effectiveness of PV compared to conservative therapy in terms of: pain reduction, quality of life, complications, secondary fractures and mortality. Materials and methods The VERTOS II study is designed as a prospective, multicenter RCT. Patients with a painful VCF with bone edema on MR imaging, local back pain for 6 weeks or less, osteopenia and aged 50 years or older, after obtaining informed consent are included and randomized for PV or conservative therapy. In total 200 patients will be enrolled. Follow-up is at regular intervals during a 1-year period with standard questionnaires, addressing: clinical symptoms, pain medication, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Secondary fractures, necessary additional therapies and complications are recorded. Conclusion The VERTOS II study is the first methodologically sound RCT designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of PV compared to conservative therapy in patients with an acute osteoporotic VCF. Trial registration , NCT00232466 PMID:17973983

  2. Geomechanical Parameters in Fracturing Process of Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is crucial to geothermal and hydrocarbon recovery. Predicting performance based on rock characteristics (micro and macro) is essential to effective stimulation. We studied two extreme rock types: 1) Lyons sandstone, a brittle, low porosity, low permeability, weakly anisotropic material and 2) pyrophyllite, a strongly anisotropic metamorphic rock similar chemically and mechanically to shale, having extremely low porosity and permeability. Mineralogy, porosity, permeability, mercury capillary pressure, grain size, μ-CT imaging and elastic anisotropy analysis describe these rocks. Brazilian disk tests were carried to observe the fracture initiation and propagation under tension. Fracture propagation velocity is measured using a high speed digital camera. Strain gauges and acoustic emission (AE) sensors recorded deformation leading to and during failure. SEM imaging and surface profilometry were used to study the post-failure fracture systems and failed surface topology. The fracture process zone (FPZ) is mapped and evaluated using a mosaic of stitched SEM images. The fracture permeability was measured as a function of effective stress and compared to fracture permeability models. The effect of anisotropy on fracturing (Mode I and Mode II fractures) was also investigated rotating the fabric direction of the tested disks relative to the loading axis through increments of 15 degrees. Results indicate differences in fracturing process of these two rock types. Pyrophyllite displays a localized ductile behavior in the process zone resulting in a narrower fracture with a higher propagation velocity and far less AE activity. Pyrophyllite shows 70 % higher tensile strength compared to Lyons sandstone even though it becomes ductile at much lower pressures. The sandstone shows a wide brittle fracture with larger FPZ and better permeability at elevated effective pressures. The greater number of AE activity associated with higher energy events confirms the

  3. Novel fracture technology proves marginal Viking prospect economic, part II: Well clean-up, flowback and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, S.; Rylance, M.; Tybero, G.

    1996-12-31

    Having completed both fracture treatments as discussed in a companion paper, this paper continues on to describe the post fracture shut-in, clean-up and well testing operations that took place on the Viking Wx exploration well 49/17-12. These operations involved the removal of Resin Coated Proppant (RCP) from the wellbore, via Coiled Tubing (CT), through the use of a specially designed jetting nozzle. The RCP pack stability at a concentration of 3.0 lb/ft{sup 2} (as per planned design) had already been tested in a flowback cell. The use of a Surface Read-Out (SRO) gauge, combined with gas, water and proppant flow rates as well as the viscosity of fracturing fluids returns, enabled real time calculation of the drag forces, on the proppant pack, during clean-up. The flow rate, in the field, was controlled such that the calculated drag forces remained below those observed in the laboratory. Following the clean-up a flow and build-up test was conducted, to evaluate the fracture half length and fracture conductivity, from which a Pseudo-radial skin was calculated. The Non-Darcy effects in the fracture were also evaluated, and finally the short term and long term well deliverabilities were assessed.

  4. Effects of mixed mode I/II loading and grain orientation on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2024-T3 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Boone, M.L.; Dawicke, D.S.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of material grain orientation and mixed mode I/II loading on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2.3-mm-thick, unclad 2024-T3 aluminum is experimentally investigated. Mode I experiments were performed on center-cracked specimens with the crack being oriented at various angles relative to the rolling direction. Defining {theta} to be the angle between the normal to the initial crack plane and the loading direction, Mode I/II experiments were performed using an Arcan test fixture for 0{degree} {le} {theta} {le} 90{degree} [corresponding to 90{degree} {ge} {beta} {ge} 0{degree}, where {beta} = atan (K{sub II}/K{sub I})] with the crack oriented either along the rolling direction (T-L) or perpendicular to the rolling direction (L-T). Results indicate that: 1. The Mode I crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) is a strong function of the orientation of the crack relative to the rolling direction; CTOD for a T-L specimen is 0.84 mm, increasing linearly with orientation angle to 1.05 mm for an L-T case. 2. The Mode I/II CTOD increases rapidly during initial increments of crack growth and then decreases towards a constant value as crack growth continues. 3. For {theta} < 68{degree} ({beta} > 29{degree}), all cracks kinked and the Mode I/II plastic zones are similar to rotated Mode I plastic zones throughout the crack growth process. 4. J{sub II} = 0 reasonably predicts the direction of tension-dominated crack growth, but does not predict the transition to shear crack growth which occurs for {theta} {ge} 75{degree}. 5. K{sub II} {ge} K{sub I} for {theta} {approx} 58{degree} ({beta} = 45{degree}) does not quantitatively predict the transition to shear crack growth for {theta} {ge} 75{degree} ({beta} {le} 22{degree}), but does provide an indication of changing conditions in the crack tip region.

  5. Accretion modes and unified schemes for FR-II radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whysong, David Harold.

    2005-11-01

    A robust and general method of testing for the presence of an obscured quasar inside a radio galaxy is to look for high mid-IR luminosity from the nuclear obscuring material. We conducted a survey of 3CR FR-II radio galaxies and quasars using the Keck I telescope Long Wavelength Spectrometer. The sample is flux-limited and selected on an isotropic property (low-frequency radio lobe flux). We also observed Cygnus A and two FR-I radio galaxies, Centaurus A, and M87. For the FR-I sources, we f0ind that the nuclear mid-IR source in M87 is consistent with pure synchrotron emission from the base of the jet. This result establishes the existence of "nonthermal" narrow line radio galaxies wherein the energetics are dominated by jet kinetic luminosity rather than thermal accretion. However, Cen A does contain a modest quasar-like nucleus, so the central engines of FR-I radio galaxies are heterogeneous in nature. ? showed that for 3CR FR-II sources with Z < 0.5, there appears to be an excess number of low-luminosity Narrow Line Radio Galaxies with small projected linear size relative to the simplest orientation models. The simplest explanation is that there is a population of relatively small, low power FR-IIs that lack hidden quasars. An alternative hypothesis is possible if the opening angle of the dusty torus scales with luminosity and the radio power decreases with time (?). Our observations test these hypotheses. For our FR-II sample, the mid-IR flux is positively correlated with projected linear size of the radio lobes at 99.8% confidence. Many of the smaller radio galaxies have small mid-IR flux (upper limit 3s < 1.5 mJy) which indicates they probably lack a powerful thermal accretion flow. It seems likely that many FR- II radio sources are predominantly powered by nonthermal means, while the largest and most powerful FR-II radio galaxies show, strong mid-IR emission indicating that they harbor a hidden quasar. This is consistent with the fragmentary optical

  6. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. II - Internal overstable modes. [convectively driven Alfven wave role

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    It had been pointed out by Parker (1974) that the basic cause of the sunspot phenomenon is the enhanced heat transport in the magnetic field of the sunspot. The enhanced transport occurs through convective overstability which operates as a heat engine generating Alfven waves. The characteristics of the convective forces present are investigated along with questions concerning overstability and convectively driven Alfven waves. Relations regarding instability and convectively driven surface waves are discussed and attention is given to individual overstable Alfven modes. It is found that the form of an Alfven wave in the absence of convective forces is entirely arbitrary, so that waves with any arbitrary profile can be fitted into a vertical column of the field without disturbing the fluid outside. With the introduction of convective forces the situation changes so that the presence of lateral boundaries alters the form of the basic wave modes.

  7. Single-mode tapered optical fiber loop immunosensor II: assay of anti-cholera toxin immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Robert S.; Hale, Zoe M.; Levine, Myron M.; Lowe, C. R.; Payne, Frank P.

    1994-07-01

    An evanescent wave immunoassay for cholera antitoxin immunoglobulins was performed using a single mode tapered optical fiber loop sensor. The transducer was silanized with 3- glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and chemically modified to link covalently either cholera toxin B subunit or a synthetic peptide derived from it, CTP3. The sensor was exposed to seral fluids, obtained from human volunteers having been exposed to live virulent Vibrio cholerae 01 and shown to produce rice-water stools. Other toxins of interest, such as Clostridium botulinum toxin A, have been tested on similar systems. The bound unlabelled immunoglobulins were then exposed to a mixture of FITC-anti-IgG and TRITC-anti-IgA, without requirement for a separation step. The emanating fluorescent emissions of fluorescein and rhodamine, excited by the input laser light, were coupled back into the guided mode of the tapered fiber, and used to determine the concentrations of the complementary antigens.

  8. Thermal load distribution on the ALT-II limiter of TEXTOR-94 during RI mode operation and during disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.; Denner, T.; Mank, G.

    2000-03-01

    Thermographic measurements using an IR scanner have been performed at the pump limiter ALT-II of TEXTOR-94 during RI mode discharges and during disruptions. The measurements on the RI mode discharges were done to complete the TEXTOR database which had shown a structured decay pattern of the deposited power. It was found that the underlying radial heat flux can be described by two exponential decay functions. This structure, which generates an unexpected heat component close to the tangent line, has been observed in all discharge conditions including the RI mode. During disruptions, the heat is released in short pulses with a typical duration of 0.01-0.1 ms. The radial decay length of these pulses has a similar shape to the heat flux during normal discharges: it consists again of a strong component close to the tangent line with a radial decay length of 2-5 mm and probably one with a decay length of the order of 1 cm. The heat is released at the time when the edge electron temperature of the plasma drops, when intense hydrogen and carbon fluxes occur near the walls, and when electrical currents in the limiter blades are excited. In a tentative interpretation, the temporal and spatial structure of the heat pulse is attributed to the presence and growth of a laminar zone at the plasma edge, which is connected with the ergodization of the plasma edge during a disruption.

  9. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented. The example is based on a finite element model of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen for 50% mode II. The benchmarking is demonstrated for Abaqus/Standard, however, the example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, a quasi-static benchmark example was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement as well as delamination length versus applied load/displacement relationships from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall, the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  10. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and