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Sample records for mode ii fracture

  1. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  2. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  3. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  4. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  5. Characterization of mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composite utilizing laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Truskowski, J.W. USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH )

    1992-09-01

    A test technique to characterize the mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites utilizing laser interferometry was developed. This was demonstrated by measuring the mode II critical strain energy release rate at room temperature. The present study used the silicon-carbide-fiber/glass-ceramic matrix composite system. 13 refs.

  6. Recommendations for the determination of valid mode II fracture toughnesses K{sub IIc}

    SciTech Connect

    Hiese, W.; Kalthoff, J.F.

    1999-07-01

    From a discussion of the sizes of the plastic zones at the tip of a crack under shear (Mode II) and tensile (Mode I) conditions of loading, hypotheses on specimen size requirements are derived for determining valid values of the shear fracture toughness K{sub IIc}. The following conclusions are drawn: The minimum specimen thickness for a K{sub IIc} test can be smaller, but the minimum in-plane specimen dimensions should be larger than for a K{sub Ic} test. For verification of these hypotheses, Mode II and additionally Mode I fracture toughnesses were determined for the aluminum alloy 7075 and the tool steel 90 MnCrV 8. Measurements were performed with specimens of different sizes with respect to the size of the crack tip plastic zones. The obtained data are in good agreement with the derived criteria for measuring Mode II fracture toughnesses K{sub IIc} and confirm their validity.

  7. Ductile fracture in HY100 steel under mixed mode I/mode II loading

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, D. . Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy); Knott, J.F. . School of Metallurgy and Materials)

    1994-05-01

    A number of criteria have been proposed which predict the direction of cracking under mixed Mode 1/Mode 2 loading. All have been evaluated for brittle materials, in which a crack subjected to tension and shear propagates normal to the maximum tensile stress (i.e. fracture is of the Mode 1 type). In a ductile material, however, a notch subjected to mixed Mode 1/Mode 2 loading may initiate a crack in the direction of maximum shear. This paper shows that the profile of the notch tip changes with increasing mixed mode load in such a way that one side of the tip blunts while the other sharpens. Various specimens, subjected to the same mixed mode ratio, were unloaded from different points on the load-displacement curves to study the change in notch-tip profile. Studies under the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) have shown that cracks initiate at the sharpened end, along a microscopic shear band. Using a dislocation pile-up model for decohesion of the carbide-matrix interface, a micromechanical model has been proposed for crack initiation in the shear band. It is shown that a theoretical prediction of the shear strain required for decohesion gives a result that is, of magnitude, similar to that of the shear strain at crack initiation measured in the experiments.

  8. A Mixed-Mode I/II Fracture Criterion and Its Application in Crack Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Michael A.; Deng, Xiaomin; Ma, Fashang; Newman, James S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A crack tip opening displacement (CTOD)-based, mixed mode fracture criterion is developed for predicting the onset and direction of crack growth. The criterion postulates that crack growth occurs in either the Mode I or Mode II direction, depending on whether the maximum in either the opening or the shear component of CTOD, measured at a specified distance behind the crack tip, attains a critical value. For crack growth direction prediction, the proposed CTOD criterion is shown to be equivalent to seven commonly used crack growth criteria under linearly elastic and asymptotic conditions. Under elastic-plastic conditions the CTOD criterion's prediction of the dependence of the crack growth direction on the crack-up mode mixity is in excellent agreement with the Arcan test results. Furthermore, the CTOD criterion correctly predicts the existence of a crack growth transition from mode I to mode II as the mode mixity approaches the mode II loading condition. The proposed CTOD criterion has been implemented in finite element crack growth simulation codes Z1P2DL and FRANC2DL to predict the crack growth paths in (a) a modified Arcan test specimen and fixture made of AL 2024-T34 and (b) a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen made of AL 7050. A series of crack growth simulations have been carried out for the crack growth tests in the Arcan and DCB specimens and the results further demonstrate the applicability of the mixed mode CTOD fracture criterion crack growth predictions and residual strength analyses for airframe materials.

  9. Effects of Temperature on Mode II Fracture Toughness of Multidirectional CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung Soo; Wang, Wen Xue; Takao, Yoshihiro; Ben, Goichi

    End notched flexure (ENF) tests were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and fiber orientation on Mode II interlaminar fracture behavior, GIIC (GII at the crack initiation), of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites, T800H/#3631. The values of GIIC for three kinds of laminates, [012//012], [22.5/-22.5/08/-22.5/22.5//-22.5/22.5/08/22.5/-22.5] and [45/-45/08/-45/45//-45/45/08/45/-45], with a pre-cracked interface, that is // in each laminate, were obtained at three temperatures, i.e. -100°C, 25°C and 150°C. It is shown that GIIC is obviously affected by the temperature and fiber orientation. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation was also carried out to investigate the fracture surface. SEM analysis suggested that the decreased Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness for all kinds of specimens at high temperature could be attributed to temperature-induced matrix property change or fiber-matrix interfacial weakening.

  10. A Mixed-Mode (I-II) Fracture Criterion for AS4/8552 Carbon/Epoxy Composite Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnati, Sidharth Reddy

    A majority of aerospace structures are subjected to bending and stretching loads that introduce peel and shear stresses between the plies of a composite laminate. These two stress components cause a combination of mode I and II fracture modes in the matrix layer of the composite laminate. The most common failure mode in laminated composites is delamination that affects the structural integrity of composite structures. Damage tolerant designs of structures require two types of materials data: mixed-mode (I-II) delamination fracture toughness that predicts failure and delamination growth rate that predicts the life of the structural component. This research focuses determining mixed-mode (I-II) fracture toughness under a combination of mode I and mode II stress states and then a fracture criterion for AS4/8552 composite laminate, which is widely used in general aviation. The AS4/8552 prepreg was supplied by Hexcel Corporation and autoclave fabricated into a 20-ply unidirectional laminate with an artificial delamination by a Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) film at the mid-plane. Standard split beam specimens were prepared and tested in double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notched flexure modes to determine mode I (GIC) and II (GIIC) fracture toughnesses, respectively. The DCB specimens were also tested in a modified mixed-mode bending apparatus at GIIm /GT ratios of 0.18, 0.37, 0.57 and 0.78, where GT is total and GIIm is the mode II component of energy release rates. The measured fracture toughness, GC, was found to follow the locus a power law equation. The equation was validated for the present and literature experimental data.

  11. Mode I, Mode II, and Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in air at 25 and 1316 C in asymmetric four-point flexure with single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) test specimens. The mode I fracture toughness was found to be K(sub Ic) = 1.15 plus or minus 0.07 and 0.98 plus or minus 0.13 MPa the square root of m, respectively, at 25 and 1316 C. The respective mode II fracture toughness values were K(sub IIc) = 0.73 plus or minus 0.10 and 0.65 plus or minus 0.04 MPa the square root of m. Hence, there was an insignificant difference in either K(sub Ic or K(sub IIc) between 25 and 1316 C for the coating material, whereas there was a noticeable distinction between K(sub Ic) and K(sub IIc), resulting in K(sub IIc) per K(sub Ic) = 0.65 at both temperatures. The empirical mixed-mode fracture criterion best described the coatings' mixed-mode fracture behavior among the four mixed-mode fracture theories considered. The angle of crack propagation was in reasonable agreement with the minimum strain energy density criterion. The effect of the directionality of the coating material in on K(sub Ic) was observed to be insignificant, while its sintering effect at 1316 C on K(sub Ic) was significant.

  12. In-plane response and mode II fracture response of Z-pin woven laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hseng-Ji

    Textile composites are proven to be an attractive choice over traditional pre-preg based composites because of reduced manufacturing costs and improved transverse mechanical properties. However, similar to traditional pre-preg composites, 2D laminates consisting of multiple layers of laminae still suffer from delamination under impact or transverse loads. Z-pin (carbon fiber of small diameter inserted in the thickness direction-z) composites are a means to provide higher through-thethickness stiffness and strength that 2D woven composites lack. In this thesis, The influences of Z-pin density and Z-pin diameter on the response of Z-pin under in-plane loads (compression) and transverse loads (mode II fracture) are examined. Both experiments and numerical simulations were performed to address the problems. Compression tests were conducted first and failure mechanism in each loading scenario was identified, through optical and mechanical measurements, during and after the tests. This was followed by the development of different numerical models of varying degree of sophistication, which include in-plane 2D models, (used to study fiber distortion and damage due to Z-pin insertion), multi-layer 2D models, (used to provide an inexpensive multi-layer model to study the effect of phase difference due to stacking consolidation), and multi-layer-multi-cell models (used to provide a full 3D multi-layer and multi-representative unit cell description). The second part of this thesis investigates the mode II fracture response under static and dynamic loading. Discrete Cohesive Zone Model (DCZM) was adopted to obtain the fracture toughness in conjunction with experimental data. In dynamic test, a crack advance gage (CAG) was designed to capture the exact time when the crack begins to propagate. By use of these CAGs, the corresponding crack propagation speed between different CAGs can be computed accordingly. These observations are supplemented through high speed optical images

  13. A revisit to high-rate mode-II fracture characterization of composites with Kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays composite materials have been extensively utilized in many military and industrial applications. For example, the newest Boeing 787 uses 50% composite (mostly carbon fiber reinforced plastic) in production. However, the weak delamination strength of fiber reinforced composites, when subjected to external impact such as ballistic impact, has been always potential serious threats to the safety of passengers. Dynamic fracture toughness is a critical indicator of the performance from delamination in such impact events. Quasi-static experimental techniques for fracture toughness have been well developed. For example, end notched flexure (ENF) technique, which is illustrated in Fig. 1, has become a typical method to determined mode-II fracture toughness for composites under quasi-static loading conditions. However, dynamic fracture characterization of composites has been challenging. This has resulted in conflictive and confusing conclusions in regard to strain rate effects on fracture toughness of composites.

  14. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  15. Fracture toughness of unidirectional fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in Mode II utilizing laser interferometry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truskowski, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    A laser interferometry technique to measure crack opening displacement was developed and applied to end notched flexure specimens of a Corning Glass Works 1723 glass matrix with silicon carbide fibers. The laser interferometer displacement guage monitored the crack opening displacement (COD) at the location of a support while specimens were subjected to Mode II (forward shear) cracking at room temperature via three point bend tests on a standard Instron Compression machine. Vertical displacement was measured at the center of the test specimen using a linear variable differential transformer. Load verses displacement curves were generated for both the LVDT displacement and the COD. The COD curve showed a marked improvement in determining the onset of crack growth. From the enhanced critical load determination, the materials fracture toughness in Mode II, GI.Ic was calculated for varying crack lengths. The calculations provided estimates with a variance of only 10% from the mean thus illustrating the utility of this procedure.

  16. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m-2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  17. On the localization of fracture in highly constrained polymeric layer subjected to mode II loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, M.Y.M.; Chai, H.

    1996-12-31

    The tight spatial constraints imposed on the interlayer by the relatively rigid substrates in adhesive bonding may impede the natural development and growth of damage sources such as voids, kinks and microcracks. This may lead to extensive nonlinear deformations and intense strain localization prior to fracture in ductile or brittle adhesive systems. Moreover, the localized deformation in the bond may be highly triaxial regardless of the nature of the far-field loading. Fracture criteria based on conventional linear elastic fracture mechanics and small-scale yielding condition may not be applicable on large strain. Therefore, the purpose of the authors work is to focus on the local deformation at the crack tip in an effort to demonstrate a fracture criterion, which is independent of the specimen geometry, for the situation in large (or small) plastic deformation.

  18. Non-Linear Analysis of Mode II Fracture in the end Notched Flexure Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizov, V.

    2016-03-01

    Analysis is carried-out of fracture in the End Notched Flex- ure (ENF) beam configuration, taking into account the material nonlin- earity. For this purpose, the J-integral approach is applied. A non-linear model, based on the Classical beam theory is used. The mechanical be- haviour of the ENF configuration is described by the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain curve. It is assumed that the material possesses the same properties in tension and compression. The influence is evaluated of the material constants in the Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain equation on the fracture behaviour. The effect of the crack length on the J-integral value is investigated, too. The analytical approach, developed in the present paper, is very useful for parametric analyses, since the simple formulae obtained capture the essentials of the non-linear fracture in the ENF con- figuration.

  19. Role of large-scale slip in mode II fracture of bimaterial interface produced by diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. R.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2001-08-01

    Bimaterial interfaces present in diffusion-bonded (and in-situ) composites are often not flat interfaces. The unevenness of the interface can result not only from interface reaction products but also from long-range waviness associated with the surfaces of the component phases bonded together. Experimental studies aimed at determining interface mechanical properties generally ignore the departure in the local stress due to waviness and assume a theoretically flat interface. Furthermore, the commonly used testing methods involving superimposed tension often renders the interface so extremely brittle that if microplastic effects were present it becomes impossible to perceive them. This article examines the role of waviness of the interface and microplastic effects on crack initiation. To do this, a test was selected that provides significant stability against crack growth by superimposing compressive stresses. Mode II interface fracture was studied for NiAl/Mo model laminates using a recently developed asymmetrically loaded shear (ALS) interface shear test. The ALS test may be viewed as opposite of the laminate bend test. In the bend test, shear at the interface is created via tension on one surface of the bend, while in the ALS test, shear is created by compression on one side of the interface relative to the other. Normal to the interface, near the crack tip, an initially compressive state is replaced by slight tension due to Poisson’s expansion of the unbonded part of the compressed beam.

  20. 3-D Mixed Mode Delamination Fracture Criteria - An Experimentalist's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Many delamination failure criteria based on fracture toughness have been suggested over the past few decades, but most only covered the region containing mode I and mode II components of loading because that is where toughness data existed. With new analysis tools, more 3D analyses are being conducted that capture a mode III component of loading. This has increased the need for a fracture criterion that incorporates mode III loading. The introduction of a pure mode III fracture toughness test has also produced data on which to base a full 3D fracture criterion. In this paper, a new framework for visualizing 3D fracture criteria is introduced. The common 2D power law fracture criterion was evaluated to produce unexpected predictions with the introduction of mode III and did not perform well in the critical high mode I region. Another 2D criterion that has been shown to model a wide range of materials well was used as the basis for a new 3D criterion. The new criterion is based on assumptions that the relationship between mode I and mode III toughness is similar to the relation between mode I and mode II and that a linear interpolation can be used between mode II and mode III. Until mixed-mode data exists with a mode III component of loading, 3D fracture criteria cannot be properly evaluated, but these assumptions seem reasonable.

  1. Mode I fracture of sheet metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, T.; Hachez, F.; Marchioni, B.; Blyth, P. H.; Atkins, A. G.

    2004-02-01

    The perceived wisdom about thin sheet fracture is that (i) the crack propagates under mixed mode I & III giving rise to a slant through-thickness fracture profile and (ii) the fracture toughness remains constant at low thickness and eventually decreases with increasing thickness. In the present study, fracture tests performed on thin DENT plates of various thicknesses made of stainless steel, mild steel, 6082-O and NS4 aluminium alloys, brass, bronze, lead, and zinc systematically exhibit (i) mode I "bath-tub", i.e. "cup & cup", fracture profiles with limited shear lips and significant localized necking (more than 50% thickness reduction), (ii) a fracture toughness that linearly increases with increasing thickness (in the range of 0.5- 5 mm). The different contributions to the work expended during fracture of these materials are separated based on dimensional considerations. The paper emphasises the two parts of the work spent in the fracture process zone: the necking work and the "fracture" work. Experiments show that, as expected, the work of necking per unit area linearly increases with thickness. For a typical thickness of 1 mm, both fracture and necking contributions have the same order of magnitude in most of the metals investigated. A model is developed in order to independently evaluate the work of necking, which successfully predicts the experimental values. Furthermore, it enables the fracture energy to be derived from tests performed with only one specimen thickness. In a second modelling step, the work of fracture is computed using an enhanced void growth model valid in the quasi plane stress regime. The fracture energy varies linearly with the yield stress and void spacing and is a strong function of the hardening exponent and initial void volume fraction. The coupling of the two models allows the relative contributions of necking versus fracture to be quantified with respect to (i) the two length scales involved in this problem, i.e. the void spacing

  2. Fracture - An Unforgiving Failure Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2006-01-01

    During the 2005 Conference for the Advancement for Space Safety, after a typical presentation of safety tools, a Russian in the audience simply asked, "How does that affect the hardware?" Having participated in several International System Safety Conferences, I recalled that most attention is dedicated to safety tools and little, if any, to hardware. The intent of this paper on the hazard of fracture and failure modes associated with fracture is my attempt to draw attention to the grass roots of system safety - improving hardware robustness and resilience.

  3. A fractographic study of the edge-sliding mode in fracture toughness testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Chisholm, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A fractographic study of Mode II fracture surfaces has been conducted for the purpose of identifying the microstructural mechanisms responsible for fracture in the edge-sliding mode. A compact shear (CS) specimen was employed to generate the fracture surfaces and also to establish Mode II fracture toughness values for Ti-6Al-4V, A533-B steel, and several aluminum alloys. In all tests, one of the two edge cracks sustained complete Mode II fracture while the other exhibited only a limited amount of subcritical crack growth. Mode II fracture surfaces, which were unique in appearance, have been examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that shear (or parabolic) microvoid coalescence was the dominant mechanism for Mode II fracture. It was also established that most of the surface abrasions were created by the relative sliding of the fracture surfaces during unstable fracture rather than the crack initiation process.

  4. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  5. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation

  6. Mixed Mode Fracture of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis L.

    2008-01-01

    The combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of anisotropic ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the microsplat coating material was modeled using Finite Element approach to account for anisotropy and micro cracked structures, and predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  7. The impact of hygrothermal preconditioning on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness in unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempowicz, Michael L.

    The correlation between the interlaminar Mode II fracture toughness (GIIC) of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy and other material properties across different conditioning regimes was investigated. Specimens were preconditioned using select hygrothermal criteria to evaluate how changes in the material and mechanical properties in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite correlations with changes in GIIC for each regime. An increase in GIIC from baseline values was demonstrated across all conditions from end-notched flexure (ENF) testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile tests had varying responses based on preconditioning environment. Since tensile and some DMA properties rely on fiber strength and show property loss with increased plasticization, fiber strength may not have a large impact on GIIC properties. Test data also implied that the GIIC increased when consolidation of the polymer chains occurred in the arid condition as well as when crosslink density increased in the moisture exposed conditions. From these results it is believed that the chemical and physical changes in matrix cohesion are more important to GIIC behavior prediction than fiber behavior.

  8. Fracture-An Unforgiving Failure Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2010-09-01

    During the 2005 Conference for the Advancement for Space Safety, after a typical presentation of safety tools, a Russian in the audience simply asked, “How does that affect the hardware?” Most of the papers in the International Association for Space Safety Conferences are dedicated to safety tools and few, if any, to hardware. The intent of this paper on the hazard of fracture and failure modes associated with fracture is to draw attention to the grass roots of system safety - improving hardware robustness and resilience. This paper outlines the causes of fracture, test techniques to identify cracks, and design techniques to reduce the probability of system failure due to fracture.

  9. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  10. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  11. Comparison of Mode II and III Monotonic and Fatigue Delamination Onset Behavior for Carbon/Toughened Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1997-01-01

    Monotonic and fatigue tests were performed to compare the Mode II and III interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset for Tenax-HTA/R6376 carbon/toughened epoxy composites. The Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset were characterized using the end-notched flexure (ENF) test while the Mode III interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset were characterized by using the edge crack torsion (ECT) test. Monotonic tests show that the Mode III fracture toughness is higher than the Mode II fracture toughness. Both Mode II and III cyclic loading greatly increases the tendency for a delamination to grow relative to a single monotonically increasing load. Under fatigue loading, the Mode III specimen also has a longer life than the Mode II specimen.

  12. Combined mode I-mode III fracture toughness of a particulate reinforced metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the fracture behavior of a particulate reinfored aluminum alloy composite under combined mode I-mode III loading conditions. A modified three-point bend specimen was used to carry out these tests. It was found that the mode I loading condition was energetically most favorable. Addition of mode III components to the system seems to increase the amount of redundant work during fracture without affecting the critical fracture criterion.

  13. Effect of Mixed-Mode Ratio on Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Woven Fabric Glass/Epoxy Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Y.; Horiguchi, K.; Kumagai, S.; Shinohe, D.

    2004-06-28

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental and analytical study conducted to investigate the effect of mixed-mode ratio on the cryogenic interlaminar fracture toughness of woven fabric glass/epoxy laminates. Interlaminar fracture tests were performed and a three-dimensional finite element analysis was carried out to obtain critical strain energy release rates. The cryogenic interlaminar fracture toughness increased upon the introduction of the mode II component.

  14. Influence of the resin on interlaminar mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    Both literature review data and new data on toughness behavior of seven matrix and adhesive systems in four types of tests were studied in order to assess the influence of the resin on interlaminar fracture. Mixed mode (i.e., various combinations of opening mode 1, G sub 1, and shearing mode 2; G sub 2) fracture toughness data showed that the mixed mode relationship for failure appears to be linear in terms of G sub 1 and G sub 2. The study further indicates that fracture of brittle resins is controlled by the G sub 1 component, and that fracture of many tough resins is controlled by total strain-energy release rate, G sub T. Regarding the relation of polymer structure and the mixed mode fracture: high mode 1 toughness requires resin dilatation; dilatation is low in unmodified epoxies at room temperature/dry conditions; dilatation is higher in plasticized epoxies, heated epoxies, and in modified epoxies; modification improves mode 2 toughness only slightly compared with mode 1 improvements. Analytical aspects of the cracked lap shear test specimen were explored.

  15. Fracture modes in off-axis fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Criteria were developed for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in high-modulus graphite-fiber/resin unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis tensile loading. Procedures are described which use sensitivity analyses and off-axis data to determine the uniaxial strength of fiber composites. It was found that off-axis composites fail by three fracture modes which produce unique fracture surface characteristics. The stress that dominates each fracture mode and the load angle range of its dominance can be identified. Linear composite mechanics is adequate to describe quantitatively the mechanical behavior of off-axis composites. The uniaxial strengths predicted from off-axis data are comparable to these measured in uniaxial tests.

  16. Fracture modes in off-axis fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    Criteria have been developed for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in high-modulus graphite-fiber/resin unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis tensile loading. Procedures are described which use sensitivity analyses and off-axis data to determine the uniaxial strength of fiber composites. It was found that off-axis composites fail by three fracture modes which produce unique fracture surface characteristics. The stress that dominates each fracture mode and the load angle range of its dominance can be identified. Linear composite mechanics is adequate to describe quantitatively the mechanical behavior of off-axis composites. The uniaxial strengths predicted from off-axis data are comparable to those measured in uniaxial tests.

  17. Effects of voids on delamination behavior under static and fatigue mode I and mode II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelal, Nisrin Rizek

    Composite materials have become materials of choice for wind turbine blade manufacturing due to their high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue life. Glass fiber composites are used extensively in light-weight structural components for wind turbines, aircrafts, marine craft and high performance automobile because glass fiber is inexpensive and usually provides high strength to weight ratio and good in-plane mechanical properties. The high cycle fatigue resistance of composite materials used in wind turbine blades has been recognized as a major uncertainty in predicting the reliability of wind turbines over their design lifetime. Blades are expected to experience 108 to 109 fatigue cycles over a 20 to 30 year lifetime. Delamination or interlaminar failure is a serious failure mode observed in composite structures. Even partial delamination will lead to a loss of local stiffness, which can preclude buckling failure. Manufacturing process defects such as voids and fiber waviness degrade the fatigue life and delamination resistance of the blade's composite. This research describes the effect of voids on static and fatigue interlaminar fracture behavior under mode I and mode II loading of wind turbine glass fiber composites. Samples with different void volume fractions in the 0.5%-7% range were successfully obtained by varying the vacuum in the hand layup vacuum bagging manufacturing process. Void content was characterized using four different methods; ultrasonic scanning, epoxy burn off, serial sectioning and X-Ray computed tomography. The effect of voids on both mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness under static and fatigue loading was investigated. Finally, fractographic analysis (using optical and scanning electron microscopy) was conducted. The results showed that voids leads to slight reduction in static modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness. In addition, voids lead to a decrease in modes I and II maximum cyclic strain energy release

  18. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  19. An equivalent domain integral method for three-dimensional mixed-mode fracture problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A general formulation of the equivalent domain integral (EDI) method for mixed mode fracture problems in cracked solids is presented. The method is discussed in the context of a 3-D finite element analysis. The J integral consists of two parts: the volume integral of the crack front potential over a torus enclosing the crack front and the crack surface integral due to the crack front potential plus the crack face loading. In mixed mode crack problems the total J integral is split into J sub I, J sub II, and J sub III representing the severity of the crack front in three modes of deformations. The direct and decomposition methods are used to separate the modes. These two methods were applied to several mixed mode fracture problems, were analyzed, and results were found to agree well with those available in the literature. The method lends itself to be used as a post-processing subroutine in a general purpose finite element program.

  20. An investigation of the edge-sliding mode in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Chisholm, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation procedure has been applied to the Williams stress function to determine the elastic stress distribution for the crack tip region of a finite, edge-cracked plate subjected to mode II loading at the crack tips. The asymmetric specimen selected was particularly suitable for the determination of plane strain fracture toughness for mode II loading. Numerical solutions for stress intensity factors for the edge-sliding mode obtained by the boundary collocation method were in close agreement with values obtained from photoelastic experiments. Fracture tests of several compact shear specimens of 2024-T4 aluminum were conducted in order to experimentally investigate the behavior of the edge-sliding mode. In each case a brittle shear failure was observed and mode II fracture toughness values were obtained. The average value for K-IIc obtained from two tests was 39.5 ksi radical (in). No K-Ic data for 2024-T4 were available for comparison purposes; however, K-Ic values for a similar alloy, 2024-T351, have been reported as 34 ksi radical (in) which is only about 15 per cent below the corresponding K-IIc value.

  1. The effect of mixed mode precracking on the mode 1 fracture toughness of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Prashanth; Bascom, Williard D.; Nairn, John A.

    1993-01-01

    We subjected double cantilever beam specimens from four different composite materials to mixed-mode precracking. Three different precracking mode 1 to mode 2 ratios were used--1 to 4, 1 to 1, and 4 to 1. Following precracking the specimens were tested for mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode precracking often influenced the mode 1 toughness and its influence persisted for as much as 60 mm of mode 1 crack growth. We tested composites with untoughened matrices, composites with rubber-toughened matrices, and composites with interlayer toughening. Depending on material type and precracking mode ratio, the precracking could cause either a significant increase or a significant decrease in the mode 1 fracture toughness.

  2. Size and Geometry Effects on Rock Fracture Toughness: Mode I Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahi, M. R.; Akbardoost, J.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of specimen size and geometry on the apparent mode I fracture toughness ( K c) of an Iranian white marble (Neyriz) are studied. A number of fracture tests were conducted on center-cracked circular disk (CCCD) specimens with different radii to investigate the size effects on K c. The experimental results demonstrate that the apparent fracture toughness increases in bigger specimens. In order to explain the experimental results, the modified maximum tangential stress (MMTS) criterion is used, where higher order terms of the Williams' series expansion are included in the maximum tangential stress criterion. It is shown that the MMTS criterion provides good estimates for the apparent fracture toughness of Neyriz marble, obtained from fracture tests of edge-cracked triangular specimens. It is, therefore, concluded that the proposed criterion is able to account for the size and geometry effects on the fracture resistance of rocks simultaneously.

  3. Fracture Characterization of Human Cortical Bone Under Mode I Loading.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filipe; de Moura, Marcelo; Dourado, Nuno; Xavier, José; Pereira, Fábio; Morais, José; Dias, Maria; Lourenço, Paulo; Judas, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized version of the double cantilever beam (DCB) test is used to determine the fracture energy in human cortical bone under pure mode I loading. An equivalent crack length based data-reduction scheme is used with remarkable advantages relative to classical methods. Digital image correlation (DIC) technique is employed to determine crack opening displacement at the crack tip being correlated with the evolution of fracture energy. A method is presented to obtain the cohesive law (trapezoidal bilinear softening) mimicking the mechanical behavior observed in bone. Cohesive zone modeling (CZM) (finite-element method) was performed to validate the procedure showing excellent agreement. PMID:26502314

  4. Modified Mode-I Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) Fracture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    2001-01-01

    Five composite sandwich panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four of these panels had E-glass/vinylester facesheets and one had carbon/epoxy facesheets. The sandwich panels had different density PVC foam cores. The four E-glass panels had core densities of 80, 100, 130, 200 kg/cu m. The sandwich with carbon/epoxy 3 facesheets had a core with density of 100 kg/cu m. Fracture tests were conducted using a modified Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) test configuration. Load displacement curves were obtained for loading and unloading of the specimens during crack growth. Various increments of crack growth were monitored. Critical Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) were determined from the tests using the area method. The critical values of SERR can be considered the fracture toughness of the sandwich material. The fracture toughness ranged 367 J/sq m to 1350 J/sq m over the range of core densities. These results are compared to the Mode-I fracture toughness of the PVC foam core materials and values obtained for foam-cored sandwiches using the TSD specimen. Finite-element analyses (FEA) were performed for the test configuration and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). The SERR values determined from the FEA were scaled to the fracture loads, or critical loads, obtained from the modified CSB tests. These critical loads were in close agreement with the test values.

  5. Thermoplastic matrix composites - Finite-element analysis of mode I and mode II failure specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankert, Ray J.; Lambropoulos, Nicholas D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Sternstein, Sanford S.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-element analysis was conducted to evaluate the stress distributions within mode I and mode II failure specimens, assuming both isotropic and orthotropic elastic material properties. The effects of anisotropy on both the magnitude and the location of the highest stress concentration at the vicinity of the crack tip are significant. The results from modeling realistic blunt crack tip geometry and resin-rich zones imply that local variations in the microstructure strongly influence the stress state near the crack tip and therefore the measured fracture properties. In addition, the features of a viscoelastic model for thermoplastic matrices are described. This model will be used in future investigations of matrix-dominated failure phenomena.

  6. Fracture-mode map of brittle coatings: Theoretical development and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chong; Xie, Zhaoqian; Guo, Zhenbin; Yao, Haimin

    2015-10-01

    Brittle coatings, upon sufficiently high indentation load, tend to fracture through either ring cracking or radial cracking. In this paper, we systematically study the factors determining the fracture modes of bilayer material under indentation. By analyzing the stress field developed in a coating/substrate bilayer under indentation in combination with the application of the maximum-tensile-stress fracture criterion, we show that the fracture mode of brittle coatings due to indentation is determined synergistically by two dimensionless parameters being functions of the mechanical properties of coating and substrate, coating thickness and indenter tip radius. Such dependence can be graphically depicted by a diagram called 'fracture-mode map', whereby the fracture modes can be directly predicated based on these two dimensionless parameters. Experimental verification of the fracture-mode map is carried out by examining the fracture modes of fused quartz/cement bilayer materials under indentation. The experimental observation exhibits good agreement with the prediction by the fracture-mode map. Our finding in this paper may not only shed light on the mechanics accounting for the fracture modes of brittle coatings in bilayer structures but also pave a new avenue to combating catastrophic damage through fracture mode control.

  7. Influence of Mixed Mode I-Mode II Loading on Fatigue Delamination Growth Characteristics of a Graphite Epoxy Tape Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode I-mode II interlaminar tests were conducted on IM7/8552 tape laminates using the mixed-mode bending test. Three mixed mode ratios, G(sub II)/G(sub T) = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8, were considered. Tests were performed at all three mixed-mode ratios under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, where the former static tests were used to determine initial loading levels for the latter fatigue tests. Fatigue tests at each mixed-mode ratio were performed at four loading levels, Gmax, equal to 0.5G(sub c), 0.4G(sub c), 0.3G(sub c), and 0.2G(sub c), where G(sub c) is the interlaminar fracture toughness of the corresponding mixed-mode ratio at which a test was performed. All fatigue tests were performed using constant-amplitude load control and delamination growth was automatically documented using compliance solutions obtained from the corresponding quasi-static tests. Static fracture toughness data yielded a mixed-mode delamination criterion that exhibited monotonic increase in Gc with mixed-mode ratio, G(sub II)/G(sub T). Fatigue delamination onset parameters varied monotonically with G(sub II)/G(sub T), which was expected based on the fracture toughness data. Analysis of non-normalized data yielded a monotonic change in Paris law exponent with mode ratio. This was not the case when normalized data were analyzed. Fatigue data normalized by the static R-curve were most affected in specimens tested at G(sub II)/G(sub T)=0.2 (this process has little influence on the other data). In this case, the normalized data yielded a higher delamination growth rate compared to the raw data for a given loading level. Overall, fiber bridging appeared to be the dominant mechanism, affecting delamination growth rates in specimens tested at different load levels and differing mixed-mode ratios.

  8. Mixed mode stress field effect in adhesive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical or analytical analyses were performed on seven different test specimens including blister test, 90-degree peel test, torsion test, and various cone tests. These specimens are in general subjected to complex stress fields having various amounts of Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III loads. The specimens were then constructed using polymethyl methacrylate for the adherends and a transparent polyurethane elastomer (Solithane 113) for the adhesive. This combination permitted direct observation of the bondline as load was applied. Although initial debonds as well as bond end termination singularities were present in all specimens, in some cases the debond did not initiate at the singularity points as would normally have been expected. An explanation for this behavior is presented, as well as a comparison of loading mode effect on those specimens for which the debond did propagate from a bond terminus singular point.

  9. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  10. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and “weakest” microstructural resistance. PMID:20409579

  11. Numerical Study on Mixed-mode Fracture in Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rena C.; Saucedo, Luis; Ruiz, Gonzalo

    2010-05-01

    The object of this work is to model the propagation of fracture in mixed-mode in lightly reinforced concrete beams. When a notched beam does not have enough shear reinforcement, fracture can initiate and propagate unstably and lead to failure through diagonal tension. In order to study this phenomenon numerically, a model capable of dealing with both static and dynamic crack propagation as well as the natural transition of those two regimes is necessary. We adopt a cohesive model for concrete fracture and an interface model for the deterioration between concrete and steel re-bar, both combined with an insertion algorithm. The static process is solved by dynamic relaxation (DR) method together with a modified technique [1] to enhance convergence rate. The same DR method is used to detect a dynamic process and switch to a dynamic calculation. The numerically obtained load-displacement curves, load-CMOD curves and crack patterns fit reasonably well with their experimental counterparts, having in mind that we fed the calculations only with parameters measured experimentally.

  12. Liquid-metal-induced fracture mode of martensitic T91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.L.; Auger, T.; Johnson, Duane, Robertson, I.M.

    2012-04-04

    The liquid–metal-induced fracture mode of T91 martensitic steel was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure and crack network in specimens obtained from focused-ion beam machining at and immediately below the fracture surface. Contrary to previous claims of quasi-cleavage fracture, the dominant fracture mode is intergranular cracking at martensite laths and prior austenite grain boundaries. These fracture mode results clarify an outstanding issue in liquid–metal embrittlement of steels that generally occur in a heavily-deformed microstructure. Several cracks were arrested at intergranular carbides, suggesting a metallurgical strategy for impeding liquid–metal-induced crack propagation.

  13. Fracture modes of high modulus graphite/epoxy angleplied laminates subjected to off-axis tensile loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Angleplied laminates of high modulus graphite fiber/epoxy were examined in several ply configurations at various tensile loading angles to the zero ply direction to determine the effects of ply orientations on tensile properties, fracture modes, and fracture surface characteristics of the various plies. Experimental results consist of stress-strain data, selected plots, fracture stresses and strains, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs of fracture surfaces. It was found that the stress-strain curves were linear to fracture, and that although fracture surface characteristics for a given fracture mode are similar to those for the same fracture mode in uniaxial specimens, no simple load angle range can be associated with a given fracture mode. It was also concluded that SEM results must be supplemented with ply stress calculations in order to identify ranges of fracture modes occurring as a function of ply orientation with respect to the load direction.

  14. Effect of stress and temperature on mode of fracture after reheat cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraresi, V.A.; Exaltacao Trevisan, R. da

    1996-12-01

    The phenomenon of stress-relief cracking or reheat cracking can occur in the heat affected zones (HAZ) or weld fillet during Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The parts of the HAZ most susceptible to reheat cracking are the coarse-grained regions which result from heating at elevated temperatures in the austenitic region. The aim of the research is to study the effect of stress and temperature during PWHT for stress relief on modes of fractures in High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steel produced commercially. The Modified Implant Test was applied along with simulation of thermal cycles typically used for stress-relief treatment of welded components. Basically two different modes of fracture have been identified on basis of fracture appearance. For the temperature range of 500 to 600C, under conditions of high and low stresses, a low-ductility intergranular fracture mode (brittle decohesion) was observed and fracture surfaces were characterized by almost featureless facets. At higher temperatures (680 C) and lower stresses, the fractures were slightly more ductile and occurred by creep cavitation on the grain boundaries. Although intergranular, these fractures were basically dimpled due to coalescence of individual creep cavities. Surfaces of fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Tests with varying initial loads and different heat-treatment temperatures were realized in order to render separation of stress and temperature effects. It was observed that fracture mode depends mainly on the temperature level rather than on stress range.

  15. Ductile opening-mode fracture by pore growth and coalescence during combustion alteration of siliceous mudstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla

    2003-01-01

    Opening-mode fractures with blunt tips and large maximum apertures are characteristic of clinker that formed by combustion alteration of siliceous mudstone. These fractures are inferred to result from pore growth and coalescence, with initially circular pores inherited from the diatomaceous protolith. Circular pores grow preferentially in an en-échelon arrangement and coalesce to elongate pores and blunt-tipped fractures by thinning and rupture of bridges between pores. Coalescence of overlapping en-échelon pores causes fracture propagation in a zig-zag path that is considered indicative of significant inelastic deformation outside the immediate vicinity of the fracture tips. This process of fracture formation by void growth and coalescence is inferred to result from solution mass transfer and possible bulk melt movement during partial melting of clinker. Chemical mass transfer provides a mechanism for extensive inelastic deformation in the surrounding host rock concurrent with fracturing that is considered characteristic of ductile fracture. The preferred elongation of coalescing pores and local rupture of pore bridges is explained by a tensile sintering stress due to the thermodynamic tendency of the system for energy minimization of solid and liquid surfaces. It is suggested that ductile fracture processes that are accompanied by extensive inelastic deformation lead to opening-mode fractures with large apertures in a variety of crustal settings including metamorphic and magmatic systems as well as in reactive diagenetic environments, thus affecting fracture-controlled transfer of heat and mass and the rheology of the Earth's crust.

  16. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Salas Zamarripa, A.; Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P.

    2011-12-15

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 Degree-Sign C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 Degree-Sign C testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative methodology to

  17. Combined Type II Odontoid Fracture with Jefferson's Fracture Treated with Temporary Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; O'Leary, Patrick F

    2015-12-01

    An 18-year-old male presented after a motor vehicle rollover accident. Computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of Type II odontoid fracture. Considering the patient's young age and the limitations of C1-C2 fusion including significant loss of cervical rotation, temporary internal fixation with a lateral mass fixation of C1 and pedicle fixation of C2 without fusion was done. CT scan done at 6-month follow-up visit showed healed odontoid fracture and excellent C1-C2 alignment. At ninth postoperative month, internal fixation was removed. Patient had normal movements of cervical spine at 1-year follow-up. Temporary internal fixation can be an important tool in the armamentarium of the surgeon in treating type II odontoid fractures in young adults and children. This strategy avoids the complications halo fixation and immobilizes the unstable C1-C2 segment without fusion. Removal of the internal fixation after healing allows restoration of the rotational motion. PMID:26713132

  18. Hinged external fixation for Regan-Morrey type I and II fractures and fracture-dislocations.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Alberto; D'amico, Salvatore; Combi, Alberto; Benazzo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Elbow fracture-dislocation is always demanding to manage due to the considerable soft-tissue swelling or damage involved, which can make an early open approach and ligamentous reconstruction impossible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of elbow hinged external fixation (HEF) as a definitive treatment in patients with elbow dislocations associated with Regan-Morrey (R-M) type I and II coronoid fractures and soft-tissue damage. We treated 11 patients between 2010 and 2012 with HEF. Instability tests and standard X-ray examinations were performed before surgery and 1-3 to 3-6 months after surgery, respectively. All patients underwent a preoperative CT scan. Outcomes were assessed with a functional assessment scale (Mayo Elbow Performance Score, MEPS) that included 4 parameters: pain, ROM, stability, and function. The results were good or excellent in all 11 patients, and no patient complained of residual instability. Radiographic examination showed bone metaplasia involving the anterior and medial sides of the joint in 5 patients. HEF presented several advantages: it improves elbow stability and it avoids long and demanding surgery in particular in cases with large soft tissue damage. We therefore consider elbow HEF to be a viable option for treating R-M type I and II fracture-dislocations. PMID:26875088

  19. Variation of fracture mode in micro-scale laser shock punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong; Song, Libin; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Yunhu; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Micro-scale laser shock punching is a high strain rate micro-forming method which uses the high-amplitude shock wave pressure induced by pulsed laser irradiation. The response of brass and pure titanium foils under the different ratio of laser beam diameter (d) to die hole diameter (D) in micro-scale laser shock punching was investigated experimentally and numerically. The typical fracture surface morphologies were observed using scanning electron microscope. Numerical simulations were conducted to predict the stress state of the workpiece before and after fracture. The influence of the ratio d/D on dynamic deformation and fracture of metal foils was characterized. The results demonstrate that both the crack locations and fracture surface morphologies of metal foils are strongly related to the ratio d/D. The fracture mode varies from a shear fracture mode to a mixed fracture mode, then to a tensile fracture mode as the ratio decreases. The stress state under the different ratio is discussed in detail and believed to be responsible for the variation.

  20. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  1. Esthetic and biologic mode of reattaching incisor fracture fragment utilizing glass fiber post.

    PubMed

    Manju, M; Shanthraj, Srinivas L; Savitha, K C; Sethi, Ntasha

    2015-01-01

    Trauma to the anterior teeth affects the esthetic and psychological well-being of the patient. Advancement in the adhesive dentistry has facilitated the restoration of the coronal tooth fractures by minimally invasive procedures when the original tooth fragment is available. Reattachment of fractured fragment offers immediate treatment with improved preponderant aesthetics and restoration of function. Here, we describe a case of complicated fracture of the maxillary left immature permanent central incisor, which was treated endodontically followed by esthetic reattachment of the fractured fragment using the glass fiber post. Functional demands and esthetic considerations of the patient were fully met with this biologic mode of fragment reattachment. PMID:26283849

  2. Esthetic and biologic mode of reattaching incisor fracture fragment utilizing glass fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Manju, M.; Shanthraj, Srinivas L.; Savitha, K. C.; Sethi, Ntasha

    2015-01-01

    Trauma to the anterior teeth affects the esthetic and psychological well-being of the patient. Advancement in the adhesive dentistry has facilitated the restoration of the coronal tooth fractures by minimally invasive procedures when the original tooth fragment is available. Reattachment of fractured fragment offers immediate treatment with improved preponderant aesthetics and restoration of function. Here, we describe a case of complicated fracture of the maxillary left immature permanent central incisor, which was treated endodontically followed by esthetic reattachment of the fractured fragment using the glass fiber post. Functional demands and esthetic considerations of the patient were fully met with this biologic mode of fragment reattachment. PMID:26283849

  3. Opening-mode fracture in siliceous mudstone at high homologous temperature—effect of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla; Lore, Jason

    In analogy to high-temperature sintering of ceramics and metal powder compacts, the formation of opening-mode fractures in siliceous mudstone during natural in-situ combustion of hydrocarbons is attributed to contractile surface forces between mineral grains and an interstitial melt phase. A comparison between bulk density increase during sintering and created fracture space indicates that fracturing resulted from contraction of the rock matrix due to porosity reduction, grain-scale mass transfer, and high-temperature mineral formation. It is suggested that contractile surface forces between mineral grains and between mineral grains and pore fluid contribute to subcritical fracture formation under a wide range of subsurface conditions.

  4. Experimental study on mixed mode fracture in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kezhuang; Li, Zheng; Fu, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Fiber reinforced composites are applied broadly in aeronautic and astronautic fields as a structural material. But the investigation in dynamic fracture behavior of fiber reinforced composite stands in the breach for scientists due to a large number of aircraft disasters. In this paper, the mixed mode fracture problems in fiber reinforced composites under impact are studied. First, based on the theory of the reflective dynamic caustic method for mixed mode fracture, corresponding experiments are carried out to study the dynamic fracture behaviors of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites under two kinds load conditions. By recording and analyzing the shadow spot patterns during the crack propagation process carefully, the dynamic fracture toughness and crack growth velocity of fiber reinforced composites are obtained. Via the observation of the crack growth routes and fracture sections, we further reveal the fracture mechanism of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. It concludes that opening mode still is the easier fracture type for the pre-crack initiation in fiber reinforced composites, while the interface between fibers and matrix becomes the fatal vulnerability during the crack propagation.

  5. A unified potential-based cohesive model of mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery R.

    2009-06-01

    A generalized potential-based constitutive model for mixed-mode cohesive fracture is presented in conjunction with physical parameters such as fracture energy, cohesive strength and shape of cohesive interactions. It characterizes different fracture energies in each fracture mode, and can be applied to various material failure behavior (e.g. quasi-brittle). The unified potential leads to both intrinsic (with initial slope indicators to control elastic behavior) and extrinsic cohesive zone models. Path dependence of work-of-separation is investigated with respect to proportional and non-proportional paths—this investigation demonstrates consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The potential-based model is verified by simulating a mixed-mode bending test. The actual potential is named PPR (Park-Paulino-Roesler), after the first initials of the authors' last names.

  6. Vibrational modes of hydraulic fractures: Inference of fracture geometry from resonant frequencies and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory seismic signals arising from resonant vibrations of hydraulic fractures are observed in many geologic systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluids within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis, valid at wavelengths greater than the fracture aperture, that accounts for quasi-static elastic deformation of the fracture walls, as well as fluid viscosity, inertia, and compressibility. In the long-wavelength limit, anomalously dispersed guided waves known as crack or Krauklis waves propagate with restoring force from fracture wall elasticity. At shorter wavelengths, the waves become sound waves within the fluid channel. Wave attenuation in our model is due to fluid viscosity, rather than seismic radiation from crack tips or fracture wall roughness. We characterize viscous damping at both low frequencies, where the flow is always fully developed, and at high frequencies, where the flow has a nearly constant velocity profile away from viscous boundary layers near the fracture walls. Most observable seismic signals from resonating fractures likely arise in the boundary layer crack wave limit, where fluid-solid coupling is pronounced and attenuation is minimal. We present a method to estimate the aperture and length of a resonating hydraulic fracture using both the seismically observed quality factor and characteristic frequency. Finally, we develop scaling relations between seismic moment and characteristic frequency that might be useful when interpreting the statistics of hydraulic fracture events.

  7. Simplified data reduction methods for the ECT test for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Simplified expressions for the parameter controlling the load point compliance and strain energy release rate were obtained for the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) specimen for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness. Data reduction methods for mode 3 toughness based on the present analysis are proposed. The effect of the transverse shear modulus, G(sub 23), on mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness characterization was evaluated. Parameters influenced by the transverse shear modulus were identified. Analytical results indicate that a higher value of G(sub 23) results in a low load point compliance and lower mode 3 toughness estimation. The effect of G(sub 23) on the mode 3 toughness using the ECT specimen is negligible when an appropriate initial delamination length is chosen. A conservative estimation of mode 3 toughness can be obtained by assuming G(sub 23) = G(sub 12) for any initial delamination length.

  8. Rogue Mode Shileding in NSLS-II Multipole Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Blednykh, A.; Bacha, B.; Borrelli, A.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.; Vetter, K.

    2011-03-28

    Modes with transverse electric field (TE-modes) in the NSLS-II multipole vacuum chamber can be generated at frequencies above 450MHz due to its geometric dimensions. Since the NSLS-II BPM system monitors signals within 10 MHz band at RF frequency of 500 MHz, frequencies of higher-order modes (HOM) can be generated within the transmission band of the band pass filter. In order to avoid systematic errors in the NSLS-II BPM system, we introduced frequency shift of HOMs by using RF metal shielding located in the antechamber slot. We demonstrated numerical modeling and experimental studies of the spurious TE modes in the NSLS-II vacuum chambers with antechamber slot. Calculated frequencies of TE-modes in considered chambers with and without RF shielding were verified experimentally. Flexible BeCu RF shielding inside each chamber at proper location shifts frequencies of H{sub 10p}-modes above {approx}900MHz, except chambers S6 odd and even. These chambers need special attention because of synchrotron radiation from downstream magnets. S6 odd multipole vacuum chamber needs to be measured and the RF shielding length has to be optimized. RF shielding looks adequate for baseline design. Fifty percent of open space provides adequate pumping speed.

  9. Alternate Operating Modes For NDCX-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Lund, S. M.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.

    2012-10-01

    NDCX-II is a newly completed accelerator facility at LBNL, built to study ion-heated warm dense matter and aspects of ion-driven targets for inertial-fusion energy. The baseline design calls for using twelve induction cells to accelerate 40 nC of Li+ ions to 1.2 MeV. During commissioning, though, we plan to extend the source lifetime by extracting less total charge. For operational flexibility, the option of using a helium plasma source is also being investigated. Over time, we expect that NDCX-II will be upgraded to substantially higher energies, necessitating the use of heavier ions to keep a suitable deposition range in targets. Each of these options requires development of an alternate acceleration schedule and the associated transverse focusing. The schedules here are first worked out with a fast-running 1-D particle-in-cell code ASP, then 2-D and 3-D Warp simulations are used to verify the 1-D results and to design transverse focusing.

  10. Transition temperature and fracture mode of as-castand austempered ductile iron.

    PubMed

    Rajnovic, D; Eric, O; Sidjanin, L

    2008-12-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature is a very important criterion that is used for selection of materials in some applications, especially in low-temperature conditions. For that reason, in this paper transition temperature of as-cast and austempered copper and copper-nickel alloyed ductile iron (DI) in the temperature interval from -196 to +150 degrees C have been investigated. The microstructures of DIs and ADIs were examined by light microscope, whereas the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope. The ADI materials have higher impact energies compared with DIs in an as-cast condition. In addition, the transition curves for ADIs are shifted towards lower temperatures. The fracture mode of Dls is influenced by a dominantly pearlitic matrix, exhibiting mostly brittle fracture through all temperatures of testing. By contrast, with decrease of temperature, the fracture mode for ADI materials changes gradually from fully ductile to fully brittle. PMID:19094047

  11. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and S2/8552 tape laminates. Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode IIIdominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of GIIIc exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  12. Effect of initial delamination on Mode 1 and Mode 2 interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue fracture threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen Bostaph; Martin, Roderick H.

    1991-01-01

    Static and fatigue double-cantilever beam (DCB) and end-notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine the effect of the simulated initial delamination in interlaminar fracture toughness, G(sub c), and fatigue fracture threshold, G(sub th). Unidirectional, 24-ply specimens of S2/SP250 glass/epoxy were tested using Kapton inserts of four different thickness - 13, 25, 75, and 130 microns, at the midplane at one end, or with tension or shear precracks, to simulate an initial delamination. To determine G(sub c), the fatigue fracture threshold below which no delamination growth would occur in less than 1 x 10(exp 6) cycles, fatigue tests were conducted by cyclically loading specimens until delamination growth was detected. Consistent values of model 1 fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), were measured from DCB specimens with inserts of thickness 75 microns or thinner, or with shear precracks. The fatigue DCB tests gave similar values of G(sub Ith) for the 13, 25, and 75 microns specimens. Results for the shear precracked specimens were significantly lower that for specimens without precracks. Results for both the static and fatigue ENF tests showed that measured G(IIc) and G(IIth) values decreased with decreasing insert thickness, so that no limiting thickness could be determined. Results for specimens with inserts of 75 microns or thicker were significantly higher than the results for precracked specimens or specimens with 13 or 25 microns inserts.

  13. Fixation of unstable type II clavicle fractures with distal clavicle plate and suture button.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter S; Sears, Benjamin W; Lazarus, Mark R; Frieman, Barbara G

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on a technique to treat unstable type II distal clavicle fractures using fracture-specific plates and coracoclavicular augmentation with a suture button. Six patients with clinically unstable type II distal clavicle fractures underwent treatment using the above technique. All fractures demonstrated radiographic union at 9.6 (8.4-11.6) weeks with a mean follow-up of 15.6 (12.4-22.3) months. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Penn Shoulder Score, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores were 97.97 (98.33-100), 96.4 (91-99), and 95 (90-100), respectively. One patient required implant removal. Fracture-specific plating with suture-button augmentation for type II distal clavicle fractures provides reliable rates of union without absolute requirement for implant removal. PMID:24667803

  14. Non-universal aperture-length scaling of opening mode fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Franziska; Schöpfer, Martin P. J.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Opening-mode fractures, such as joints, veins and dykes, typically exhibit a power-law aperture-length scaling with a power-law exponent of about 0.5. The fracture aperture is hence proportional to the square root of fracture length, a relation which is in fact predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) for an isolated Mode I fracture subjected to remote tension. The existence of such a 'universal scaling law' is however a highly debated topic. High quality outcrop data illustrate that fracture aperture-length scaling may be 'non-universal' and indicate that below a certain length-scale scaling is super-linear (power-law exponent > 1). We use a numerical model comprised of a square lattice of breakable elastic beams to investigate the aperture-length scaling that emerges in thin plates subjected to remote tension. Strength heterogeneity is introduced in the regular lattice by randomly assigning beam strengths from a Weibull probability distribution. The model fracture system evolution is characterised by two stages which are separated by the strain at which peak-stress occurs. During the pre-peak stress stage fracture aperture-length scaling is universal with a power-law exponent of about 0.5 as expected from LEFM. Shortly after the material has attained its maximum load bearing capacity, aperture-length scaling becomes non-universal, so that the average aperture-length relation plotted on a log-log graph exhibits a distinct kink. Fractures with a length less than this critical length scale exhibit super-linear aperture-length scaling, whereas fractures with a greater length exhibit sub-linear scaling. The models illustrate that the emergence of non-universal aperture-length scaling is a result of fracture clustering, which occurs after peak-stress in the form of a localised fracture zone. Given that fracture clustering is a common phenomenon in natural fracture systems, we argue that a universal scaling law may be the exception rather than the rule.

  15. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  16. Strength, reliability and mode of fracture of bilayered porcelain/zirconia (Y-TZP) dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Guazzato, Massimiliano; Proos, Kaarel; Quach, Linda; Swain, Michael Vincent

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biaxial flexural strength, reliability and the mode of fracture of bilayered porcelain/zirconia (Y-TZP) disks. For this purpose, 80 specimens were made from conventional dental porcelain and Y-TZP core ceramic, and equally divided into four groups as follows: monolithic specimens of porcelain; monolithic specimens of core material; bilayered specimens with the porcelain on top (facing the loading piston during testing); bilayered specimens with core material on top. The maximum load at fracture was calculated with a biaxial flexural test and finite element analysis was used to estimate the maximum tensile stress at fracture. Results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD. The reliability of strength was analyzed with the Weibull distribution. SEM was used to identify the initial crack and characterize the fracture mode. Monolithic core specimens and bilayered sample with the core material on the bottom were statistically significantly stronger than monolithic porcelain disks and bilayered samples with the porcelain on the bottom. The study, which was conducted with sample configurations that reproduce the clinical situation of crowns and fixed partial dentures, indicates that the material which lies on the bottom surface dictates the strength, reliability and fracture mode of the specimens. The contribution of strong and tough core materials to the performance of all-ceramics restorations may be offset by the weaker veneering porcelain if the actual distribution of the tensile stresses within the restoration is not taken into consideration. PMID:15109867

  17. Fracture mode control: a bio-inspired strategy to combat catastrophic damage

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haimin; Xie, Zhaoqian; He, Chong; Dao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of natural biomaterials have attracted intense attention from researchers with focus on the strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Nevertheless, no material is unconquerable under sufficiently high load. If fracture is unavoidable, constraining the damage scope turns to be a practical way to preserve the integrity of the whole structure. Recent studies on biomaterials have revealed that many structural biomaterials tend to be fractured, under sufficiently high indentation load, through ring cracking which is more localized and hence less destructive compared to the radial one. Inspired by this observation, here we explore the factors affecting the fracture mode of structural biomaterials idealized as laminated materials. Our results suggest that fracture mode of laminated materials depends on the coating/substrate modulus mismatch and the indenter size. A map of fracture mode is developed, showing a critical modulus mismatch (CMM), below which ring cracking dominates irrespective of the indenter size. Many structural biomaterials in nature are found to have modulus mismatch close to the CMM. Our results not only shed light on the mechanics of inclination to ring cracking exhibited by structural biomaterials but are of great value to the design of laminated structures with better persistence of structural integrity. PMID:25619564

  18. Anisotropy of tensile strength and fracture mode of perfect face-centered-cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. F.; Xu, J.; Qu, R. T.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an effective method to calculate the ideal tensile strength of six face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals (Cu, Au, Ni, Pt, Al, and Ir) along an arbitrary tensile direction by considering the coupling effect of normal stress and shear stress on a given crystallographic plane. Meanwhile, the fracture modes of the six crystals can also be derived from the competition between shear and cleavage fracture along different crystallographic planes. The results show that both the intrinsic factors (the ideal shear strength and cleavage strength of low-index planes) and the orientation may affect the tensile strength and fracture modes of ideal fcc crystals, which may give the reliable strength limit of fcc metals and well interpret the observed high strength in nano-scale mechanical experiments.

  19. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. An ECT specimen is a rectangular laminate, containing an edge delamination at the laminate mid-plane. Torsion load is applied to the specimens, resulting in relative transverse shear sliding of the delaminated faces. The test data reduction schemes are intended to yield initiation values of critical mode III strain energy release rate, G(sub IIIc), that are constant with delamination length. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design as a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and specimens made from S2/8552 tape laminates. Several specimens, each with different delamination lengths are tested. Detailed, three-dimensional finite element analyses of the specimens were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode III-dominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of G(sub IIIc) exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Furthermore, there was a large amount of scatter in the data. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  20. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  1. Study of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mode of Alumina-Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimnezhad Yazdi, A.; Baharvandi, H. R.; Abdizadeh, H.; Ehsani, N.

    In this study Al2O3-SiC nanocomposites have been fabricated by mixing of alumina and silicon carbide nano powders, followed by hot pressing at 1700°C. The mechanical properties and fracture mode of Al2O3-SiC nanocomposites containing different volume fractions (5, 10 and 15%) of nano scale SiC particles were investigated and compared with those of alumina. Al2O3-SiC powders were prepared by planetary milling in isopropanol. Fracture mode of specimens was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. Nanocomposites were tougher than alumina when they were hot pressed at the same temperature, and the values of nanocomposite's flexural strength and hardness were higher than those of alumina. Flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the nanocomposites increase by increasing the volume percent of SiC up to 10% and then decrease slightly. The Scanning electron microscopy observations showed that fracture mode changes from intergranular for alumina to transgranular for nanocomposites. Finally X-ray diffraction analysis couldn't detect any chemical reactions between Al2O3 and SiC particles.

  2. Elastic analysis of a mode II fatigue crack test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Buzzard, R. J.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic displacements and stress intensity measurements for a mode II specimen have been obtained over a range of a/W values between 0.500 and 0.900 using the MARC general purpose finite element program. Stress intensity factors were experimentally determined using load point displacement values. Good general agreement between numerical and experimental results for crack mouth, crack surface, and load point displacements, and for stress intensity factors, demonstrates the accuracy of the present method.

  3. NSLS-II BPM System Protection from Rogue Mode Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Blednykh, A.; Bach, B.; Borrelli, A.; Ferreira, M.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hetzel, C.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.; Vetter, K.

    2011-03-28

    Rogue mode RF shielding has been successfully designed and implemented into the production multipole vacuum chambers. In order to avoid systematic errors in the NSLS-II BPM system we introduced frequency shift of HOM's by using RF metal shielding located in the antechamber slot of each multipole vacuum chamber. To satisfy the pumping requirement the face of the shielding has been perforated with roughly 50 percent transparency. It stays clear of synchrotron radiation in each chamber.

  4. Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Properties of Woven Glass/Epoxy Composite Laminates Under Mixed-Mode I/III Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Takeda, Tomo; Narita, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    We characterize the combined Mode I and Mode III delamination fracture behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates at cryogenic temperatures. The eight-point bending plate (8PBP) tests were conducted at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K) using a new test fixture. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was also performed to calculate the energy release rate distribution along the delamination front, and the delamination fracture toughnesses were evaluated for various mixed-mode I/III ratios. Furthermore, the microscopic examinations of the fracture surfaces were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the mixed-mode I/III delamination fracture mechanisms in the woven GFRP laminates at cryogenic temperatures were assessed. The fracture properties were then correlated with the observed characteristics.

  5. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  6. Chest compressions in an infant with osteogenesis imperfecta type II: No new rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Sewell, R D; Steinberg, M A

    2000-11-01

    The case report of a newborn female with osteogenesis imperfecta type II who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with manual chest compressions for several minutes is presented. Chest radiographs taken before and after the chest compressions were administered were reviewed by several radiologists from 3 different hospitals and demonstrated no new radiographically visible rib fractures. Collagen analysis, the patient's clinical appearance, and clinical course, as well as a consultant's opinion aided in confirmation of the diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type II. A review of 4 previous studies concerning rib fractures and CPR is included. This unique case supports previous articles that have concluded that rib fractures rarely, if ever, result from CPR in pediatrics, even in children with a lethal underlying bone disease, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II. cardiopulmonary resuscitation, chest compressions, osteogenesis imperfecta, rib fractures, bone disease. PMID:11061808

  7. On the mode I fracture analysis of cracked Brazilian disc using a digital image correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshirini, Mohammad; Soltani, Nasser; Marashizadeh, Parisa

    2016-03-01

    Mode I of fracture of centrally cracked Brazilian disc was investigated experimentally using a digital image correlation (DIC) method. Experiments were performed on PMMA polymers subjected to diametric-compression load. The displacement fields were determined by a correlation between the reference and the deformed images captured before and during loading. The stress intensity factors were calculated by displacement fields using William's equation and the least square algorithm. The parameters involved in the accuracy of SIF calculation such as number of terms in William's equation and the region of analysis around the crack were discussed. The DIC results were compared with the numerical results available in literature and a very good agreement between them was observed. By extending the tests up to the critical state, mode I fracture toughness was determined by analyzing the image of specimen captured at the moment before fracture. The results showed that the digital image correlation was a reliable technique for the calculation of the fracture toughness of brittle materials.

  8. Fatigue delamination growth in woven glass/epoxy composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III loading conditions at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tomo; Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the cryogenic delamination growth behavior in woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III fatigue loading. Fatigue delamination tests were conducted with six-point bending plate (6PBP) specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K), and the delamination growth rate data for various mixed-mode ratios of Modes II and III were obtained. The energy release rate was evaluated using the three-dimensional finite element method. In addition, the fatigue delamination growth mechanisms were characterized by scanning electron microscopic observations of the specimen fracture surfaces.

  9. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V 4Cr 4Ti at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R. J.; Jones, R. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode I fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final machining. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 and 12.7 mm thick were taken from Wah Chang Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from Wah Chang Heat No. 832864. The effect of loading mode on fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti at RT was also studied using material from Heat No. 832665. Mode I fracture behavior was compared to mixed-mode (I/III) fracture properties obtained from modified CT specimens. Crack angles of 0° and 25° were used to vary the ratio of mode III to mode I loading. J- R curves were generated as the basis for determining the affect of loading mode. The specimen loaded in mixed-mode exhibited lower resistance to crack initiation and propagation than pure mode I specimens.

  10. Crack front échelon instability in mixed mode fracture of a strongly nonlinear elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess the role of elastic nonlinearity in gel fracture, we study the échelon instability in gelatin under mixed mode tensile and antiplane shear loading —i.e. the emergence of segmented crack front structures connected by steps. We evidence the existence of an energy-release-rate-dependent mode mixity threshold. We show that échelons appear via nucleation of localized helical front distortions, and that their emergence is the continuation of the cross-hatching instability of gels and rubbers under pure tensile loading, shifted by the biasing effect of the antiplane shear. This result, at odds with the direct bifurcation predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics, can be assigned to the controlling role of elastic nonlinearity.

  11. A Practical Test Method for Mode I Fracture Toughness of Adhesive Joints with Dissimilar Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Erdman, D.L.; Klett, L.B.; Lomax, R.D.

    1999-09-27

    A practical test method for determining the mode I fracture toughness of adhesive joints with dissimilar substrates will be discussed. The test method is based on the familiar Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen geometry, but overcomes limitations in existing techniques that preclude their use when testing joints with dissimilar substrates. The test method is applicable to adhesive joints where the two bonded substrates have different flexural rigidities due to geometric and/or material considerations. Two specific features discussed are the use of backing beams to prevent substrate damage and a compliance matching scheme to achieve symmetric loading conditions. The procedure is demonstrated on a modified DCB specimen comprised of SRIM composite and thin-section, e-coat steel substrates bonded with an epoxy adhesive. Results indicate that the test method provides a practical means of characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of joints with dissimilar substrates.

  12. Evaluation of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode 3 Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Lee, Edward W.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1996-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was carried out on G40-800/R6376 graphite epoxy laminates to evaluate the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) test as a candidate for a standard Mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness test for laminated composites. The ECT test consists of a (90/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/90))(sub s) laminate with a delamination introduced by a non-adhesive film at the mid-plane along one edge and loaded in a special fixture to create torsion along the length of the laminate. Dye penetrate enhanced X-radiograph of failed specimens revealed that the delamination initiated at the middle of the specimen length and propagated in a self similar manner along the laminate mid-plane. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed that indicated that a pure Mode 3 delamination exists at the middle of specimen length away from both ends. At the ends near the loading point a small Mode 2 component exists. However, the magnitude of this Mode 2 strain energy release rate at the loading point is small compared to the magnitude of Mode 3 component in the mid-section of the specimen. Hence, the ECT test yielded the desired Mode 3 delamination. The Mode 3 fracture toughness was obtained from a compliance calibration method and was in good agreement with the finite element results. Mode 2 End-Notched Flexure (ENF) tests and Mode 1 Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were also performed for the same composite material. The Mode 1 fracture toughness was much smaller than both the Mode 2 and Mode 3 fracture toughness. The Mode 2 fracture toughness was found to be 75% of the Mode 3 fracture toughness.

  13. Mode and mechanism of fatigue fracture of a pearlitic steel in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, S. H.; Johnson, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    It is presently suggested that there are two mechanisms that cause fatigue crack initiation in a specimen subjected to a hydrogen environment: either a critical concentration of hydrogen is attained within the specimen, causing Mode I crack initiation, or the presence of some hydrogen (below critical concentration) promotes the early onset of plastic instability at the sites of maximum strain. It is further suggested that in the static loading condition, a high hydrogen concentration may be attained by way of mechanical factors, causing Mode I crack initiation. While cyclic fatigue specimens exhibited Mode II crack initiation in air, only Mode I crack initiation emerged in a hydrogen environment.

  14. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  15. Stress-ratio effect on mode II propagation of interlaminar fatigue cracks in graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the stress ratio on the propagation behavior of Mode II interlaminar fatigue cracks was studied with unidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates, Toray T800H/{number_sign}3631. End-notched flexure (ENF) specimens were used for fatigue tests under the stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.6; and end-loaded split (ELS) specimens were used for tests under R = {minus}1.0, {minus}0.5, and 0.2. For each stress ratio, the crack propagation rate was given by a power function of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11}, in the region of rates above 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle. Below this region, there exists the threshold for fatigue crack propagation. The threshold condition is given by a constant value of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11th} = 1.8 MPa{radical}m. The crack propagation rate is determined by {Delta}K{sub 11} near the threshold, while by the maximum stress identity factor, K{sub 11max}, at high rates. A fracture mechanics equation is proposed for predicting the propagation rate of Mode II fatigue cracks under various stress ratios. The effect of the stress ratio on the micromechanism of Mode II fatigue crack propagation was discussed on the basis of the microscopic observations of fracture surfaces and near-crack-tip regions.

  16. Analysis of the Numerical and Geometrical Parameters Influencing the Simulation of Mode I and Mode II Delamination Growth in Unidirectional and Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S.; De Baere, I.; Van Paepegem, W.

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of composite structures depends, among other damage mechanisms, on their ability to withstand delaminations. In order to have a better understanding of the cohesive zone method technique for delamination simulations, a complete analysis of the multiple parameters influencing the results is necessary. In this paper the work is concentrated on the cohesive zone method using cohesive elements. First a summary of the theory of the cohesive zone method is given. A numerical investigation on the multiple parameters influencing the numerical simulation of the mode I and mode II delamination tests has been performed. The parameters such as the stabilization method, the output frequency, the friction and the computational efficiency have been taken into account. The results will be compared to an analytical solution obtained by linear elastic fracture mechanics. Additionally the numerical simulation results will be compared to the experimental results of a glass-fibre reinforced composite material for the mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and to a carbon fibre 5-harness satin weave reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composite for the mode I DCB and mode II End Notched Flexure (ENF).

  17. Kohn-Sham density functional theory prediction of fracture in silicon carbide under mixed mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. W. K.; Pan, Z. L.; Warner, D. H.

    2016-03-01

    The utility of silicon carbide (SiC) for high temperature structural application has been limited by its brittleness. To improve its ductility, it is paramount to develop a sound understanding of the mechanisms controlling crack propagation. In this manuscript, we present direct ab initio predictions of fracture in SiC under pure mode I and mixed mode loading, utilizing a Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KSDFT) framework. Our results show that in both loading cases, cleavage occurs at a stress intensity factor (SIF) only slightly higher than the Griffith toughness, focusing on a (1 1 1) [1 \\bar{1} 0] crack in the 3C-SiC crystal structure. This lattice trapping effect is shown to decrease with mode mixity, due to the formation of a temporary surface bond that forms during decohesion under shear. Comparing the critical mode I SIF to the value obtained in experiments suggests that some plasticity may occur near a crack tip in SiC even at low temperatures. Ultimately, these findings provide a solid foundation upon which to study the influence of impurities on brittleness, and upon which to develop empirical potentials capable of realistically simulating fracture in SiC.

  18. Mason type II radial head fractures fixed with Herbert bone screws.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, M S; Gallannaugh, S C

    1996-01-01

    The management of radial head fractures remains controversial. Accurate classification of the fracture (Mason) may necessitate the use of special X-ray views (45 degrees arterior oblique or radio-capitellar). We present the results of 19 cases of Mason type II fractures treated operatively by open reduction and internal fixation with the Herbert bone screw. All patients achieved 'good-to-excellent' outcome at follow-up. Our results compare favourably with other forms of treatment for this injury. Images Figure 2 (a) Figure 2 (b) Figure 2 (c) Figure 2 (d) Figure 3 (a) Figure 3 (b) PMID:8758194

  19. [Fractures of the metacarpal bones II to V--conservative and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Lumplesch, R; Zilch, H; Friedebold, G

    1985-06-01

    Fractures of the metacarpals II-V can normally be handled conservatively. After reposition under local anaesthetic plaster of Paris is applied for a duration of 3 to 4 weeks. Open fractures usually with accompanying injuries, should be stabilized operatively. The functional results of conservative treatment are very good. Slight sidewards deviation of up to 1/3 of the width of the shaft and shortening of up to 6 mm don't interfere with good hand function. Palmar deviation of the distal fragment of up to 35 degrees following subcapitular fractures does not reduce hand function. PMID:4035810

  20. Under-coracoid-around-clavicle (UCAC) loop in type II distal clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Soliman, O; Koptan, W; Zarad, A

    2013-07-01

    In Neer type II (Robinson type 3B) fractures of the distal clavicle the medial fragment is detached from the coracoclavicular ligaments and displaced upwards, whereas the lateral fragment, which is usually small, maintains its position. Several fixation techniques have been suggested to treat this fracture. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of patients with type II distal clavicle fractures treated with coracoclavicular suture fixation using three loops of Ethibond. This prospective study included 14 patients with Neer type II fractures treated with open reduction and coracoclavicular fixation. Ethibond sutures were passed under the coracoid and around the clavicle (UCAC loop) without making any drill holes in the proximal or distal fragments. There were 11 men and three women with a mean age of 34.57 years (29 to 41). Patients were followed for a mean of 24.64 months (14 to 31) and evaluated radiologically and clinically using the Constant score. Fracture union was obtained in 13 patients at a mean of 18.23 weeks (13 to 23) and the mean Constant score was 96.07 (91 to 100). One patient developed an asymptomatic fibrous nonunion at one year. This study suggests that open reduction and internal fixation of unstable distal clavicle fractures using UCAC loops can provide rigid fixation and lead to bony union. This technique avoids using metal hardware, preserves the acromioclavicular joint and provides adequate stability with excellent results. PMID:23814254

  1. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-31

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays. PMID:26765005

  2. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J.; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-01

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays.

  3. Mode & mechanism of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) in fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew; Lin, Sheldon; Pounder, Neill; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    It has been 30years since the first level one clinical trial demonstrated low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) could accelerate fracture repair. Since 1994 numerous investigations have been performed on the effect of LIPUS. The majority of these studies have used the same signal parameters comprised of an intensity of 30mW/cm(2) SATA, an ultrasound carrier frequency of 1.5MHz, pulsed at 1kHz with an exposure time of 20minutes per day. These studies show that a biological response is stimulated in the cell which produces bioactive molecules. The production of these molecules, linked with observations demonstrating the enhanced effects on mineralization by LIPUS, might be considered the general manner, or mode, of how LIPUS stimulates fractures to heal. We propose a mechanism for how the LIPUS signal can enhance fracture repair by combining the findings of numerous studies. The LIPUS signal is transmitted through tissue to the bone, where cells translate this mechanical signal to a biochemical response via integrin mechano-receptors. The cells enhance the production of cyclo-oxygenese 2 (COX-2) which in turn stimulates molecules to enhance fracture repair. The aim of this review is to present the state of the art data related to LIPUS effects and mechanism. PMID:27130989

  4. Self-Replicating Cracks: A Collaborative Fracture Mode in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthelot, Joël; Roman, Benoît; Bico, José; Teisseire, Jérémie; Dalmas, Davy; Melo, Francisco

    2014-08-01

    Straight cracks are observed in thin coatings under residual tensile stress, resulting into the classical network pattern observed in china crockery, old paintings, or dry mud. Here, we present a novel fracture mechanism where delamination and propagation occur simultaneously, leading to the spontaneous self-replication of an initial template. Surprisingly, this mechanism is active below the standard critical tensile load for channel cracks and selects a robust interaction length scale on the order of 30 times the film thickness. Depending on triggering mechanisms, crescent alleys, spirals, or long bands are generated over a wide range of experimental parameters. We describe with a simple physical model, the selection of the fracture path and provide a configuration diagram displaying the different failure modes.

  5. A tension-mode fracture model for bolted joints in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Packman, P.F.; Eisenmann, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    A failure prediction model for bolted joints in generally orthotropic laminated composite plates that fail in the tension mode under bearing loading conditions has been developed. The plate is analyzed as a bulk orthotropic plate whose material properties are determined through the application of classical lamination theory to facilitate practical application of the model. Ply-by-ply laminated analysis is not required. Fracture mechanics concepts are applied to a pseudo-flaw which is related to the physical cracking of the laminate at the joint. The maximum circumferential stress concept is extended to orthotropic materials where both the fracture toughness and stress intensity vary with orientation. Excellent correlation between experimental tests conducted on single-bolt joints for two laminate layups and analytical prediction was found.

  6. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  7. Propagating mode-I fracture in amorphous materials using the continuous random network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    2011-08-01

    We study propagating mode-I fracture in two-dimensional amorphous materials using atomistic simulations. We use the continuous random network model of an amorphous material, creating samples using a two-dimensional analog of the Wooten-Winer-Weaire Monte Carlo algorithm. For modeling fracture, molecular-dynamics simulations were run on the resulting samples. The results of our simulations reproduce the main experimental features. In addition to achieving a steady-state crack under a constant driving displacement (which has not yet been achieved by other atomistic models for amorphous materials), the runs show microbranching, which increases with driving, transitioning to macrobranching for the largest drivings. In addition to the qualitative visual similarity of the simulated cracks to experiment, the simulation also succeeds in reproducing qualitatively the experimentally observed oscillations of the crack velocity.

  8. Factors influencing the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a rubber toughened thermoplastic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. S.; Yee, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a rubber modified thermoplastic resin has been investigated as a method to improve the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a unidirectional continuous carbon fiber composite. Test results show that the improvement in the fracture toughness is less than expected due to rubber particle agglomeration, solvent and molding induced crystallization of the matrix and poor fiber/matrix adhesion. The plastic zone in composites utilizing tough matrices can extend well beyond a single interfibrillar spacing. However, the development of the plastic zone is limited due to the failure of the fiber/matrix interface. In order to fully evaluate the potential of tough composites using toughened matrices, any improvement made in the matrix toughness must be coupled with improvements in the fiber/matrix adhesion.

  9. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS)

    PubMed Central

    Jonnes, Cyril; SM, Shishir; Najimudeen, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) is still considered the gold standard for treating intertrochanteric fractures by many. Not many studies compare the DHS with Proximal femoral nail (PFN), in Type II intertrochanteric fractures (Boyd and Griffin classification). This study was done to compare the functional and radiological outcome of PFN with DHS in treatment of Type II intertrochanteric fractures. Methods: From October 2012 to March 2015, a prospective comparative study was done where 30 alternative cases of type II intertrochanteric fractures of hip were operated using PFN or DHS. Intraoperative complications were noted. Functional outcome was assessed using Harris Hip Score and radiological findings were compared at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results: The average age of the patients was 60 years. In our series we found that patients with DHS had increased intraoperative blood loss (159ml), longer duration of surgery (105min), and required longer time for mobilization while patients who underwent PFN had lower intraoperative blood loss (73ml), shorter duration of surgery (91min), and allowed early mobilization. The average limb shortening in DHS group was 9.33 mm as compared with PFN group which was only 4.72 mm. The patients treated with PFN started early ambulation as they had better Harris Hip Score in the early post-op period. At the end of 12th month, there was not much difference in the functional outcome between the two groups. Conclusion: PFN is better than DHS in type II intertrochanteric fractures in terms of decreased blood loss, reduced duration of surgery, early weight bearing and mobilization, reduced hospital stay, decreased risk of infection and decreased complications. PMID:26894214

  10. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    of 34 to 38 and the parameter A has the range of 1.02x10-2 to 6.52x10-2 m/s. The effect of confining stress, specimen size, and water saturation on subcritical crack growth under mode II loading has also been investigated. Finally strength parameters for Coconino sandstone were determined experimentally, including tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, in-plane/our-of-plane shear strength and the fracture toughness under mode I, II, and III loading.

  11. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J.; Schulz, H.; Sievers, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  12. Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly: an evidence-based narrative review of management

    PubMed Central

    Pal, D.; Sell, P.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding the optimal management of elderly patients with type II odontoid fractures. There is uncertainty regarding the consequences of non-union. The best treatment remains unclear because of the morbidity associated with prolonged cervical immobilisation versus the risks of surgical intervention. The objective of the study was to evaluate the published literature and determine the current evidence for the management of type II odontoid fractures in elderly. A search of the English language literature from January 1970 to date was performed using Medline and the following keywords: odontoid, fractures, cervical spine and elderly. The search was supplemented by cross-referencing between articles. Case reports and review articles were excluded although some were referred to in the discussion. Studies in patients aged 65 years with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were selected. One-hundred twenty-six articles were reviewed. No class I study was identified. There were two class II studies and the remaining were class III. Significant variability was found in the literature regarding mortality and morbidity rates in patients treated with and without halo vest immobilisation. In recent years several authors have claimed satisfactory results with anterior odontoid screw fixation while others have argued that this may lead to increased complications in this age group. Lately, the posterior cervical (Goel–Harms) construct has also gained popularity amongst surgeons. There is insufficient evidence to establish a standard or guideline for odontoid fracture management in elderly. While most authors agree that cervical immobilisation yields satisfactory results for type I and III fractures in the elderly, the optimal management for type II fractures remain unsolved. A prospective randomised controlled trial is recommended. PMID:20835875

  13. Characterization of Mode I Fracture and Morphological Properties of PLLA Blends with Addition of Lysine Triisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannaladsaysy, Vilay; Todo, Mitsugu

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was toughened by blending with three different ductile biopolymers such as poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene succinate-co-e-caprolactone) (PBSC), poly (butylene succinate-co-L-lactate) (PBSL). The blend ratio was fixed to 50:50. Lysine triisocyanate (LTI) was added to the blends as a compatibilizer. Characterizations such as Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope (FE-SEM), and mode I fracture test were used to characterize the effectiveness of LTI on the mechanical and morphological properties of various PLLA blends. It was found that PLLA/PCL blend shows the highest toughness energy among the binary blends. On the other hand, addition of LTI in PLLA/PBSC blend exhibits the best toughness property. Based on the FE-SEM observation, fractured surfaces of PLLA blends with LTI indicate ductile fracture with dense elongated fibrils. The largest damage zone is generated in the vicinity of crack-trip, suggesting that high energy dissipation occurred in the crack-trip region. FT-IR analysis also suggested that the NCO groups of LTI were acted as a compatibilizer, as the results of interaction between the two phases of the polymer blends.

  14. Mode I Fracture Toughness Prediction for Multiwalled-Carbon-Nanotube Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2015-08-27

    This article develops a multiscale model to predict fracture toughness of multiwalled-carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramics. The model bridges different scales from the scale of a MWCNT to that of a composite domain containing a macroscopic crack. From the nano, micro to meso scales, Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka models combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach are explored to predict the elastic damage behavior of the composite as a function of MWCNT volume fraction. MWCNTs are assumed to be randomly dispersed in a ceramic matrix subject to cracking under loading. A damage variable is used to describe matrix cracking that causes reduction of the elastic modulus of the matrix. This damage model is introduced in a modified boundary layer modeling approach to capture damage initiation and development at a tip of a pre-existing crack. Damage and fracture are captured only in a process window containing the crack tip under plane strain Mode I loading. The model is validated against the published experimental fracture toughness data for a MWCNT 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia composite system. In addition, crack resistance curves as a function of MWCNT content are predicted and fitted by a power law as observed in the experiments on zirconia.

  15. The relationship between critical strain energy release rate and fracture mode in multidirectional carbon-fiber/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Trakas, K.; Kortschot, M.T.

    1997-12-31

    It is proposed that the fracture surface of delaminated specimens, and hence the critical strain energy release rate, is dependent on both the mode of fracture and the orientation of the plies on either side of the delamination with respect to the propagation direction. Recent fractographs of Mode 3 delamination surfaces obtained by the authors have reinforced the idea that the properties, G{sub 11c} and G{sub 111c}, are structural rather than material properties for composite laminates. In this study, the relationship between the mode of fracture, the ply orientation, and the apparent interlaminar toughness has been explored. Standard double-cantilever-beam and end-notched flexure tests have been used, as has the newly developed Mode 3 modified split-cantilever beam test. Delaminations between plies of various orientations have been constrained to the desired plane using Teflon inserts running along the entire length of the specimen. As well, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fractography has been extensively used so that measured energies can be correlated to the surface deformation. While fractographs show that Modes 2 and 3 share common fractographic features, corresponding values of G, do not correlate, and it is shown that the large plastic zone of fractured Mode 2 specimens eliminates any comparison between the two. In contrast, Mode 1 delamination is found to be independent of the orientation of the delaminating plies.

  16. Influence of preparation design and ceramic thicknesses on fracture resistance and failure modes of premolar partial coverage restorations

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Petra C.; Schultheis, Stefan; Wolkewitz, Martin; Zhang; Strub, Joerg R.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem Preparation designs and ceramic thicknesses are key factors for the long-term success of minimally invasive premolar partial coverage restorations. However, only limited information is presently available on this topic. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and failure modes of ceramic premolar partial coverage restorations with different preparation designs and ceramic thicknesses. Material and methods Caries-free human premolars (n= 144) were divided into 9 groups. Palatal onlay preparation comprised reduction of the palatal cusp by 2 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Standard), 1 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Thin), or 0.5 mm (Palatal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin). Complete-coverage onlay preparation additionally included the buccal cusp (Occlusal-Onlay-Standard; Occlusal-Onlay-Thin; Occlusal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin). Labial surface preparations with chamfer reductions of 0.8 mm (Complete-Veneer-Standard), 0.6 mm (Complete-Veneer-Thin) and 0.4 mm (Complete-Veneer-Ultra-Thin) were implemented for complete veneer restorations. Restorations were fabricated from a pressable lithium-disilicate ceramic (IPS-e.max-Press) and cemented adhesively (Syntac-Classic/Variolink-II). All specimens were subjected to cyclic mechanical loading (F= 49 N, 1.2 million cycles) and simultaneous thermocycling (5°C to 55°C) in a mouth-motion simulator. After fatigue, restorations were exposed to single-load-to-failure. Two-way ANOVA was used to identify statistical differences. Pair-wise differences were calculated and P-values were adjusted by the Tukey–Kramer method (α= .05). Results All specimens survived fatigue. Mean (SD) load to failure values (N) were as follows: 837 (320/Palatal-Onlay-Standard), 1055 (369/Palatal-Onlay-Thin), 1192 (342/Palatal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin), 963 (405/Occlusal-Onlay-Standard), 1108 (340/Occlusal-Onlay-Thin), 997 (331/Occlusal-Onlay-Ultra-Thin), 1361 (333/Complete-Veneer-Standard), 1087 (251/Complete-Veneer-Thin), 883 (311/Complete

  17. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Yasa, Bilal; Akcay, Merve; Savas, Selcuk; Kavrik, Fevzi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (TheraCal LC, Calcimol LC, Dycal) applied on pulpo-axial wall of each cavity, and the restoration was completed with composite resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive load in a universal mechanical testing machine. The surfaces of the tooth and restoration were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: For pulp capping materials, the highest fracture load (931.15 ± 203.81 N) and the lowest fracture load (832.28 ± 245.75 N) were calculated for Control and Dycal group, respectively. However, there were no statistically significant differences among all groups (P > 0.05). The fracture load of the dovetail groups was significantly higher than those of the slot cavity groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dovetail cavity design shows better fracture resistance in Class II composite restorations, independent of used or not used pulp capping materials. PMID:26038653

  18. Fracture resistance and failure mode of posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two zirconia CAD/CAM systems

    PubMed Central

    López-Suárez, Carlos; Gonzalo, Esther; Peláez, Jesús; Rodríguez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an improvement of zirconia ceramic materials to replace posterior missing teeth. To date little in vitro studies has been carried out on the fracture resistance of zirconia veneered posterior fixed dental prostheses. This study investigated the fracture resistance and the failure mode of 3-unit zirconia-based posterior fixed dental prostheses fabricated with two CAD/CAM systems. Material and Methods Twenty posterior fixed dental prostheses were studied. Samples were randomly divided into two groups (n=10 each) according to the zirconia ceramic analyzed: Lava and Procera. Specimens were loaded until fracture under static load. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon´s rank sum test and Wilcoxon´s signed-rank test (P<0.05). Results Partial fracture of the veneering porcelain occurred in 100% of the samples. Within each group, significant differences were shown between the veneering and the framework fracture resistance (P=0.002). The failure occurred in the connector cervical area in 80% of the cases. Conclusions All fracture load values of the zirconia frameworks could be considered clinically acceptable. The connector area is the weak point of the restorations. Key words:Fixed dental prostheses, zirconium-dioxide, zirconia, fracture resistance, failure mode. PMID:26155341

  19. Modification of fracture surfaces by dissolution. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.

    1983-01-01

    This study focuses upon how and to what extent dissolution related fluid/rock interactions modify the morphology and roughness of surfaces on Sioux Quartzite. Dissolution experiments consisted of reacting small discs of Sioux Quartzite in sealed gold capsules containing either distilled water or 0.05 N to 4.0 N aqueous solutions of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Samples were reacted at 200/sup 0/C and 20 to 30 MPa fluid pressures for 2 to 5 days. Two markedly different starting surface textures were used: polished, optically flat surfaces and tensile fracture surfaces. An exploratory experiment also was performed to assess the occurrence of a pressure solution phenomenon on a polished quartzite surface at contact regions of indenting quartz sand grains. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicate progressive increases in the amount of dissolution produced significant changes of surface roughness for both initial surface textures. Surface roughness increased measurably, with the initially polished surfaces exhibiting the more dramatic changes. The pressure solution experiments did not produce definite results, but several surface features are suggestive of dissolution enhancement at load carrying contacts. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Comprehensive fracture diagnostics experiment. Part II. Comparison of seven fracture azimuth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.B.; Ren, N.K.; Sorrells, G.G.; Teufel, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been devoted recently to find geophysical techniques for measuring the hydraulic fracture azimuth. This paper discusses a comparison of seven different measurements used to determine the azimuth in a sandstone formation at a depth of 1000 ft (320 m). The azimuth was determined as N95E, but significant differences existed between some of the results. This is of fundamental importance since in developing new measurements, the limits of these must be found and honored. Of particular interest are the results from microseismic monitoring. The lack of results suggests that remote (e.g., surface) monitoring for seismic events may be impractical for normal, sedimentary, hydrocarbon-bearing formations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode i fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 mm to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final matching. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 mm and 12.7 mm thick were taken from ANL Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from GA Heat No. 832864. J-R curves were generated by the single specimen unload-compliance test technique in accordance with ASTM E813. All tests were performed in laboratory air at 25 C. Fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti under mixed-mode loading conditions showed the same trend observed previously for V-5Cr-5Ti and for other tough materials. For materials which fail by microvoid coalescence, the addition of an out-of-plane shear loading component introduces incompatibility stresses at particle interfaces in the trajectory of the crack. These incompatibility stresses cause particle/matrix decohesion or particle fracture which leads to void formation that limits the mode i plastic flow field. The present results demonstrates that fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti is sensitive to the addition of shear loading components and that model fracture toughness tests may not give the most conservative measure of resistance to ductile fracture.

  2. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    PubMed

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05). The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property. PMID:22641437

  3. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  4. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  5. A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH, A.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.

  6. Simulations of flow mode distributions on rough fracture surfaces using a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Shigorina, E.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Under idealized conditions (smooth surfaces, linear relationship between Bond number and Capillary number of droplets) steady-state flow modes on fracture surfaces have been shown to develop from sliding droplets to rivulets and finally (wavy) film flow, depending on the specified flux. In a recent study we demonstrated the effect of surface roughness on droplet flow in unsaturated wide aperture fractures, however, its effect on other prevailing flow modes is still an open question. The objective of this work is to investigate the formation of complex flow modes on fracture surfaces employing an efficient three-dimensional parallelized SPH model. The model is able to simulate highly intermittent, gravity-driven free-surface flows under dynamic wetting conditions. The effect of surface tension is included via efficient pairwise interaction forces. We validate the model using various analytical and semi-analytical relationships for droplet and complex flow dynamics. To investigate the effect of surface roughness on flow dynamics we construct surfaces with a self-affine fractal geometry and roughness characterized by the Hurst exponent. We demonstrate the effect of surface roughness (on macroscopic scales this can be understood as a tortuosity) on the steady-state distribution of flow modes. Furthermore we show the influence of a wide range of natural wetting conditions (defined by static contact angles) on the final distribution of surface coverage, which is of high importance for matrix-fracture interaction processes.

  7. Notch strengthening or weakening governed by transition of shear failure to normal mode fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xianqi; Li, Congling; Shi, Xinghua; Xu, Xianghong; Wei, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    It is generally observed that the existence of geometrical discontinuity like notches in materials will lead to strength weakening, as a resultant of local stress concentration. By comparing the influence of notches to the strength of three typical materials, aluminum alloys with intermediate tensile ductility, metallic glasses with no tensile ductility, and brittle ceramics, we observed strengthening in aluminum alloys and metallic glasses: Tensile strength of the net section in circumferentially notched cylinders increases with the constraint quantified by the ratio of notch depth over notch root radius; in contrast, the ceramic exhibit notch weakening. The strengthening in the former two is due to resultant deformation transition: Shear failure occurs in intact samples while samples with deep notches break in normal mode fracture. No such deformation transition was observed in the ceramic, and stress concentration leads to its notch weakening. The experimental results are confirmed by theoretical analyses and numerical simulation. The results reported here suggest that the conventional criterion to use brittleness and/or ductility to differentiate notch strengthening or weakening is not physically sound. Notch strengthening or weakening relies on the existence of failure mode transition and materials exhibiting shear failure while subjected to tension will notch strengthen. PMID:26022892

  8. Notch strengthening or weakening governed by transition of shear failure to normal mode fracture.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xianqi; Li, Congling; Shi, Xinghua; Xu, Xianghong; Wei, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    It is generally observed that the existence of geometrical discontinuity like notches in materials will lead to strength weakening, as a resultant of local stress concentration. By comparing the influence of notches to the strength of three typical materials, aluminum alloys with intermediate tensile ductility, metallic glasses with no tensile ductility, and brittle ceramics, we observed strengthening in aluminum alloys and metallic glasses: Tensile strength of the net section in circumferentially notched cylinders increases with the constraint quantified by the ratio of notch depth over notch root radius; in contrast, the ceramic exhibit notch weakening. The strengthening in the former two is due to resultant deformation transition: Shear failure occurs in intact samples while samples with deep notches break in normal mode fracture. No such deformation transition was observed in the ceramic, and stress concentration leads to its notch weakening. The experimental results are confirmed by theoretical analyses and numerical simulation. The results reported here suggest that the conventional criterion to use brittleness and/or ductility to differentiate notch strengthening or weakening is not physically sound. Notch strengthening or weakening relies on the existence of failure mode transition and materials exhibiting shear failure while subjected to tension will notch strengthen. PMID:26022892

  9. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  10. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  11. Microbranching in mode-I fracture in a randomly perturbed lattice.

    PubMed

    Heizler, Shay I; Kessler, David A; Elbaz, Yonatan S

    2013-08-01

    We study mode-I fracture in lattices using atomistic simulations with randomly distributed bond lengths. By using a small parameter that measures the variation of the bond length between the atoms in perfect lattices and using a three-body force law, simulations reproduce the qualitative behavior of the beyond-steady-state cracks in the high-velocity regime, including reasonable microbranching. In particular, the effect of the lattice structure on the crack appears minimal, even though in terms of the physical properties such as the structure factor g(r) and the radial or angular distributions, these lattices share the physical properties of perfect lattices rather than those of an amorphous material (e.g., the continuous random network model). A clear transition can be seen between steady-state cracks, where a single crack propagates in the midline of the sample, and the regime of unstable cracks, where microbranches start to appear near the main crack, in line with previous experimental results. This is seen in both a honeycomb lattice and a fully hexagonal lattice. This model reproduces the main physical features of propagating cracks in brittle materials, including the total length of microbranches as a function of driving displacement and the increasing amplitude of oscillations of the electrical resistance. In addition, preliminary indications of power-law behavior of the microbranch shapes can be seen, potentially reproducing one of the most intriguing experimental results of brittle fracture. There was found to exist a critical degree of disorder, i.e., a sharp threshold between the cleaving behavior characterizing perfect lattices and the microbranching behavior that characterizes amorphous materials. PMID:24032843

  12. Microbranching in mode-I fracture in a randomly perturbed lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.; Elbaz, Yonatan S.

    2013-08-01

    We study mode-I fracture in lattices using atomistic simulations with randomly distributed bond lengths. By using a small parameter that measures the variation of the bond length between the atoms in perfect lattices and using a three-body force law, simulations reproduce the qualitative behavior of the beyond-steady-state cracks in the high-velocity regime, including reasonable microbranching. In particular, the effect of the lattice structure on the crack appears minimal, even though in terms of the physical properties such as the structure factor g(r) and the radial or angular distributions, these lattices share the physical properties of perfect lattices rather than those of an amorphous material (e.g., the continuous random network model). A clear transition can be seen between steady-state cracks, where a single crack propagates in the midline of the sample, and the regime of unstable cracks, where microbranches start to appear near the main crack, in line with previous experimental results. This is seen in both a honeycomb lattice and a fully hexagonal lattice. This model reproduces the main physical features of propagating cracks in brittle materials, including the total length of microbranches as a function of driving displacement and the increasing amplitude of oscillations of the electrical resistance. In addition, preliminary indications of power-law behavior of the microbranch shapes can be seen, potentially reproducing one of the most intriguing experimental results of brittle fracture. There was found to exist a critical degree of disorder, i.e., a sharp threshold between the cleaving behavior characterizing perfect lattices and the microbranching behavior that characterizes amorphous materials.

  13. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with class II bonded composite resin.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether composite resin bonded to enamel or to both enamel and dentin can increase the fracture resistance of teeth with Class II cavity preparations. Extracted maxillary pre-molars with MOD slot preparations were restored with composite resin bonded to enamel (P-30 and Enamel Bond) or composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin (P-30 and Scotch-bond). Teeth in a control group were prepared but left unrestored. All teeth were loaded occlusally in a universal testing machine until they fractured. Means of forces required to fracture teeth in each of the three groups were statistically compared (one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni t test). Teeth restored with combined enamel- and dentin-bonded composite resins were significantly more resistant to fracture than were similarly prepared but unrestored teeth and also than teeth restored with enamel-bonded composite resin (p less than 0.05). A significant difference was not demonstrated between the enamel-bonded group and the unrestored group. Further testing is needed to determine the durability of the bonds between tooth and restoration in the clinical setting. PMID:3511111

  14. Clinical Features and Treatment Modes of Mandibular Fracture at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Eiji; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Sekine, Joji

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of elderly patients with maxillofacial trauma is rapidly increasing due to active lifestyles and longevity. Shimane prefecture has the fastest growing proportion of elderly individuals in Japan. The aim of this study was to reveal the distinctive features and treatment modes of mandibular fracture treatment mode in patients requiring hospitalization at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan. Patients and Methods Patient age, sex, period between injury and first consultation, years since injury, cause of injury, fracture site, treatment, and duration of hospitalization were evaluated. Univariate Poisson regression, relative risk with 95% confidence interval based on the Wald test, Fisher’s exact test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to explore associations among clinical and demographic variables. Results In total, 305 patients were diagnosed with and hospitalized for mandibular fracture from 1980 to 2010. Younger age increased the risk for mandibular fracture. Incidence was higher in males than females, particularly in the young, but the male to female ratio decreased with age. The period until first hospital consultation decreased progressively over the study period. Fall was a much more frequent cause in patients aged ≥60 than in those aged <60 years. Mandibular fracture with condyle, symphysis, and angle involvement were most common and were associated with sex, age, and treatment mode. Length of hospitalization has decreased since 1980. Conclusion In our department, patients aged ≥60 years accounted for a greater proportion of mandibular fracture cases than in many previous studies, reflecting the greater proportion of elderly residents in Shimane prefecture. PMID:26334627

  15. Effect of intermediate fiber layer on the fracture load and failure mode of maxillary incisors restored with laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Turkaslan, Suha; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Bagis, Bora; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture load and failure mode of various veneer materials cemented with or without the addition of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) layer at the adhesive interface. Sixty intact incisors were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 was fabricated with the heat-press technique (IPS Empress 2); Group 2 with the copy milling technique (ZirkonZahn); and Group 3 with the direct or indirect composite technique (Z250)--and specimens were cemented either with or without FRC at the adhesive interface. The specimens were thermocycled and tested with a universal testing machine. No significant differences in fracture load (p>0.05) were found among the various veneer materials. The addition of FRC at the adhesive layer did not lead to significant differences in the fracture load (p>0.05) but resulted in differences in the failure mode. Laminate veneers made of composite, zirconia, and Empress 2 showed comparable mean fracture loads. However, the use of FRC at the interface changed their failure modes. PMID:18309613

  16. Comparison of Intralaminar and Interlaminar Mode-I Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional IM7/8552 Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James

    2012-01-01

    The intralaminar and interlaminar mode-I fracture-toughness of a unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy composite were measured using compact tension (CT) and double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens, respectively. Two starter crack geometries were considered for both the CT and DCB specimen configurations. In the first case, starter cracks were produced by 12.5 micron thick, Teflon film inserts. In the second case, considerably sharper starter cracks were produced by fatigue precracking. For each specimen configuration, use of the Teflon film starter cracks resulted in initially unstable crack growth and artificially high initiation fracture-toughness values. Conversely, specimens with fatigue precracks exhibited stable growth onset and lower initiation fracture toughness. For CT and DCB specimens with fatigue precracks, the intralaminar and interlaminar initiation fracture toughnesses were approximately equal. However, during propagation, the CT specimens exhibited more extensive fiber bridging, and rapidly increasing R-curve behavior as compared to the DCB specimens. Observations of initiation and propagation of intralaminar and interlaminar fracture, and the measurements of fracture toughness, were supported by fractographic analysis using scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  18. Microstructure and fracture mode of a martensitic stainless steel steam turbine blade characterized via scanning auger microscopy and potentiodynamic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, D.; Zaid, B.; Souami, N.; Negache, M.; Ahmed, A. Si

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure, the fracture and the resistance to pitting corrosion, in a10-2M (NaCl + Na2SO4) solution, of steam turbine blades, made of martensitic stainless steel (12% Cr), were analysed prior and after their utilization (during about 100 000 hours). The unused blades display an inter-granular fracture mode whereas a trans-granular one emerges in used blades. The SAM analysis of the fractured surfaces reveals that this change is concomitant with carbon and chromium redistribution from the grain boundaries to the grain interior. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and the SEM-EDS analysis of the pitting sites show that the used blades are less susceptible to pitting corrosion than the unused ones. These results are interpreted as a further qualitative evidence of an evolution of the microstructure leading to the formation of new precipitates.

  19. Interlaminar fracture toughness: Three-dimensional finite element modeling for end-notch and mixed-mode flexure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A computational procedure is described for evaluating End-Notch-Flexure (ENF) and Mixed-Mode-Flexure (MMF) interlaminar fracture toughness in unidirectional fiber composites. The procedure consists of a three-dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with the strain energy release rate concept and with composite micromechanics. The procedure is used to analyze select cases of ENF and MMF. The strain energy release rate predicted by this procedure is in good agreement with limited experimental data. The procedure is used to identify significant parameters associated with interlaminar fracture toughness. It is also used to determine the critical strain energy release rate and its attendant crack length in ENF and/or MMF. This computational procedure has considerable versatility/generality and provides extensive information about interlaminar fracture toughness in fiber composites.

  20. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu-Peng; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Nai-Qi; Wang, Chun-Mei; DU, Shao-Long

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID:24137306

  1. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture

    PubMed Central

    YANG, WU-PENG; WANG, ZHE; FENG, NAI-QI; WANG, CHUN-MEI; DU, SHAO-LONG

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID

  2. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.

  3. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approachmore » to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  4. Effect of interfacial characteristics on mode I fracture behavior of glass woven fabric composites under static and fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Kotaki, Masaya; Lowe, A.

    1997-12-31

    The influence of fiber surface treatment on the mode I delamination characteristics of a glass fabric/vinyl ester composite was studied. Five treatments were used: solutions containing 0.01 wt%, 0.4 wt % and 1.0 wt% of {gamma}-methacryloxy-propyltrimethoxysilane (MS); 0.4 wt% of MS subsequently washed in methanol; and 0.4 wt% of {gamma}-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (ES). Static mode I tests were performed on specimens oriented in both the wasp and weft fiber directions. The tests revealed that stable crack propagation was only observed with the ES-treated specimens and with the most dilute MS treatment. Invariably, fracture toughnesses were higher in the weft oriented specimens. The degree of unstable fracture observed under fatigue loading was generally significantly lower than under static loading. The specimens treated with the highest concentrations of MS possessed the highest fatigue resistance and had threshold toughness values in excess of the static toughness values. Fractographic examination was performed on both static and fatigue fracture surfaces, revealing markedly different fracture morphologies in relation to the degree of interfacial failure observed.

  5. Influence of Injection Mode on Transport Properties in Kilometer-Scale Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey; Painter, Scott L; Viswanathan, Hari; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident or flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt amore » Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that a after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than two. The physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures which o er reduced resistance to flow and in-fracture channeling that results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  6. Influence of Injection Mode on Transport Properties in Kilometer-Scale Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey; Painter, Scott L; Viswanathan, Hari; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident or flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that a after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than two. The physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures which o er reduced resistance to flow and in-fracture channeling that results from the topology of the DFN.

  7. Effects of Specimen Thickness and Notch Shape on Fracture Modes in the Drop Weight Tear Test of API X70 and X80 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Nack J.

    2011-09-01

    This study is concerned with effects of specimen thickness and notch shape on drop weight tear test (DWTT) properties and fracture modes of API X70 and API X80 low-carbon microalloyed linepipe steels. Detailed fractographic analysis of broken DWTT specimens showed that the fracture initiated in an initial cleavage mode near the specimen notch and that some delaminations occurred at the center of the fracture surface. The chevron notch (CN) DWTT specimens had broader initial cleavage areas than the pressed notch (PN) DWTT specimens. The larger inverse fracture areas ( i.e., cleavage areas close the hammer impact side) appeared in the PN DWTT specimens, because their higher fracture initiation energy at the notch allowed a higher strain hardening in the hammer-impacted region. The number and length of delaminations were larger in the CN DWTT specimens than in the PN DWTT specimens, and increased with increasing specimen thickness due to the plane strain condition effect. As the test temperature decreased, the tendency of delaminations increased, but delaminations were not found when the cleavage fracture prevailed at very low temperatures. The DWTT test results such as upper shelf energy (USE) and energy transition temperature (ETT) were discussed with relation to microstructures and fracture modes including initial cleavage fracture, ductile fracture, inverse fracture, and delaminations.

  8. Shear Fracture of Dual Phase AHSS in the Process of Stamping: Macroscopic Failure Mode and Micro-level Metallographical Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wurong; Wei, Xicheng; Yang, Jun; Shi, Gang

    2011-08-01

    Due to its excellent strength and formability combinations, dual phase (DP) steels offer the potential to improve the vehicle crashworthiness performance without increasing car body weight and have been increasingly used into new vehicles. However, a new type of crack mode termed as shear fracture is accompanied with the application of these high strength DP steel sheets. With the cup drawing experiment to identify the limit drawing ratio (LDR) of three DP AHSS with strength level from 600 MPa to 1000 MPa, the study compared and categorized the macroscopic failure mode of these three types of materials. The metallographical observation along the direction of crack was conducted for the DP steels to discover the micro-level propagation mechanism of the fracture.

  9. Development of fracture facets from a crack loaded in mode I+III: Solution and application of a model 2D problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Frelat, Joël

    2014-03-01

    It is experimentally well-known that a crack loaded in mode I+III propagates through formation of discrete fracture facets inclined at a certain tilt angle on the original crack plane, depending on the ratio of the mode III to mode I initial stress intensity factors. Pollard et al. (1982) have proposed to calculate this angle by considering the tractions on all possible future infinitesimal facets and assuming shear tractions to be zero on that which will actually develop. In this paper we consider the opposite case of well-developed facets; the stress field near the lateral fronts of such facets becomes independent of the initial crack and essentially 2D in a plane perpendicular to the main direction of crack propagation. To determine this stress field, we solve the model 2D problem of an infinite plate containing an infinite periodic array of cracks inclined at some angle on a straight line, and loaded through uniform stresses at infinity. This is done first analytically, for small values of this angle, by combining Muskhelishvili's (1953) formalism and a first-order perturbation procedure. The formulae found for the 2D stress intensity factors are then extended in an approximate way to larger angles by using another reference solution, and finally assessed through comparison with some finite element results. To finally illustrate the possible future application of these formulae to the prediction of the stationary tilt angle, we introduce the tentative assumption that the 2D mode II stress intensity factor is zero on the lateral fronts of the facets. An approximate formula providing the tilt angle as a function of the ratio of the mode III to mode I stress intensity factors of the initial crack is deduced from there. This formula, which slightly depends on the type of loading imposed, predicts somewhat smaller angles than that of Pollard et al. (1982).

  10. Do joints initiate as sharp mode I fractures or finite thickness dilatancy bands? Insights from laboratory experiments and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, J.; Chemenda, A. I.; Jorand, C.

    2011-12-01

    Terminology on fracture and discontinuities in geological objects mainly relies on distinguishing between tabular and sharp forms of deformation localization/failure structures (Aydin et al, JSG 2006; Shultz and Fossen, AAPG, 2009). On this basis joints (considered as mode I fractures) and dilation bands (very rarely observed) are distinguished among extension discontinuities. The former propagate with the separation of the fracture walls due to strong stress concentration at the fracture tips. The plumose features or hackles typical of joints (these terms cover a wide variety of diverging fractographic features) are believed to result from the fracture front breakdown due to the loading mode change (the origin of this change remains unclear). This view is called into question by recent experimental results of extension tests conducted on a synthetic physical rock analogue (granular, frictional, cohesive and dilatant) material (GRAM1) and by field observations of embryonic (not yet open) joints in highly jointed dolomicrite Chemenda et al., JGR, 2011). The initial porosity and grain size of both materials are very different, but at SEM scale, both experimental and natural unopened discontinuities reveal a comparable dilatancy (dilation) band structure with a porosity increase over a width of several grains. This suggests that the distinction between tabular and sharp is a matter of observation scale. Both axisymetric and poly-axial extension tests show that dilatancy bands form at elevated mean stress and have plumose morphology. Mode I cracking occurs only at very low mean stres and the forming fractures do not bear plumose features. Thus the absence of plumose structures can be considered as the signature of mode I fracturing. Consequently, we propose that non- plumose bearing natural joints (provided their fractography is not eroded) could originate as mode I fractures and call them "mode I joints". We call the joints formed as closed dilatancy bands propagating

  11. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  12. The sustentaculum tali screw fixation for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing-Jiang; Yu, Xiao; Guo, Zong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the surgery of calcaneal fracture, whether the sustentaculum tali screw should always be placed is widely controversial. The aim of this study was to explore the necessity and function of the sustentaculum tali screw placement for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture. Methods: The finite element analysis was used in this study. After the establishment of the finite element model of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture, the two internal fixation simulations were designed. In one model, the AO calcaneal plate was simulated on the lateral side of the calcanues with 7 screws being fixated at different position of the plate. In the other model, the calcaneus was fixated with the same AO calcaneal plate together with an additional screw being infiltrated into the sustentaculum tali. The two models were simulated under the same loading and the displacement of the fracture line and the stress distribution in the two models were calculated respectively. Results: The maximum principal stress focused on the cortical bone of sustentaculum tali in both the models under the same loading. The displacement of the fracture line, the maximum principal stress of calcaneus and internal fixation system in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation were smaller than that in the model without sustentaculum screw fixation. The stress in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation was more dispersed. Conclusions: The placement of sustentaculum tali screw is essential for fixation of type II calcaneal fracture to achieve the biomechanical stability. PMID:25225534

  13. Fractionalization of optical beams: II. Elegant Laguerre Gaussian modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2007-05-01

    We apply the tools of fractional calculus to introduce new fractional-order solutions of the paraxial wave equation that smoothly connect the elegant Laguerre-Gaussian beams of integral-order. The solutions are characterized in general by two fractional indices and are obtained by fractionalizing the creation operators used to create elegant Laguerre-Gauss beams from the fundamental Gaussian beam. The physical and mathematical properties of the circular fractional beams are discussed in detail. The orbital angular momentum carried by the fractional beam is a continuous function of the angular mode index and it is not restricted to take only discrete values.

  14. Atomistic study on mixed-mode fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron interacting with coherent copper and nickel nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Motasem, Ahmed Tamer; Mai, Nghia Trong; Choi, Seung Tae; Posselt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper and/or nickel nanoclusters, generally formed by neutron irradiation, on fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron was investigated by using molecular statics simulation. The equilibrium configuration of nanoclusters was obtained by using a combination of an on-lattice annealing based on Metropolis Monte Carlo method and an off-lattice relaxation by molecular dynamics simulation. Residual stress distributions near the nanoclusters were also calculated, since compressive or tensile residual stresses may retard or accelerate, respectively, the propagation of a crack running into a nanocluster. One of the nanoclusters was located in front of a straight crack in ferrite iron with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. Two crystallographic directions, of which the crack plane and crack front direction are (010)[001] and (111) [ 1 bar 10 ] , were considered, representing cleavage and non-cleavage orientations in ferrite iron, respectively. Displacements corresponding to pure opening-mode and mixed-mode loadings were imposed on the boundary region and the energy minimization was performed. It was observed that the fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron under the pure opening-mode loading are strongly influenced by the presence of nanoclusters, while under the mixed-mode loading the nanoclusters have no significant effect on the crack propagation behavior of ferrite iron.

  15. Modes and timing of fracture network development in poly-deformed carbonate reservoir analogues, Mt. Chianello, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano; Dati, Francesco; Mazzoli, Stefano; Ciarcia, Sabatino; Guerriero, Vincenzo; Iannace, Alessandro

    2012-04-01

    Structural and paleostress analyses carried out on a kilometre-sized outcrop of allochthonous shallow-water carbonate units of the southern Apennines allowed us to unravel a superposed deformation pattern associated with plate convergence. The reconstructed tectonic evolution involves: (i) early extensional faulting and fracturing associated with bending of the foreland lithosphere during forebulge and foredeep stages (including the development of both 'tangential' and 'radial' normal fault and tensile fractures; Early-Middle Miocene); (ii) large-scale thrusting and folding (Late Miocene); (iii) transcurrent faulting (including two distinct sub-stages characterized by different remote stress fields; Pliocene-Early Pleistocene), and (iv) extensional faulting (late Quaternary). Stage (i) normal faults - generally occurring as conjugate sets - and related fractures and veins are variably deformed and overprinted by later horizontal shortening. Despite having experienced such a long and complex structural history, the studied carbonates are characterized by a 'background' fracture network - including two joint/vein sets orthogonal to each other and to bedding - that appears to be associated with the early fault sets that formed during the first (foredeep/forebulge-related) deformation stage. Therefore, away from younger (Late Miocene to Quaternary) fault zones, the permeability structure of the studied carbonates appears to be essentially controlled by the early, inherited fracture network. As a similar fracture network is likely to characterize also the buried Apulian Platform carbonates, representing the reservoir units for major oil fields in southern Italy, our results also bear possible implications for a better understanding of fluid flow in the subsurface and related hydrocarbon production.

  16. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  17. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe-PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jennifer E.; Case, Eldon D.; Schmidt, Robert D.; Wu, Chun-I.; Hogan, Timothy P.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08-0.055% PbI2-SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1-3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  18. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Jennifer E; Case, Eldon D; Hogan, Timophy P.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08 0.055% PbI2 SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1 3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  19. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. Material/Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. Results The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. Conclusions BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  20. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. MATERIAL AND METHODS Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. RESULTS The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. CONCLUSIONS BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  1. Interlaminar fracture toughness of composites. II - Refinement of the edge delamination test and application to thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.; Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The mixed mode interlaminar fracture toughness, G(c), is obtained for the two thermoplastic matrices UDEL P1700 polysulfone and ULTEM polyetherimide by means of edge delamination tensile (EDT) tests on unnotched, eleven-ply graphite fiber reinforced composite specimens. A novel method is used to obtain the stiffness parameter employed in the closed form equation for the calculation of G(c), decreasing the number of stiffness measurements required and simplifying the calculations. The G(Ic) values from double cantilever beam (DCB) measurements on composites of the two thermoplastics were similar to each other, but slightly higher than the G(c) data obtained by EDT. Interfacial resin/fiber failures predominated in both the EDT and DCB tests.

  2. EFFECT OF RADIUS OF LOADING NOSE AND SUPPORTS IN SHORT BEAM TEST FIXTURE ON FRACTURE MODE AND INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF GFRP AT 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, A.

    2008-03-03

    A short beam test is useful to evaluate interlaminar shear strength of glass fiber reinforced plastics, especially for material selection. However, effect of test fixture configuration on interlaminar shear strength has not been clarified. This paper describes dependence of fracture mode and interlaminar shear strength on the fixture radius using the same materials and procedure. In addition, global understanding of the role of the fixture is discussed. When small loading nose and supports are used for the tests, bending fracture or translaminar fracture happens and the interlaminar shear strength would become smaller. By adopting the large radius loading nose and supports (6 mm radius is recommended), it is newly recognized that some stress concentration is able to be reduced, and the interlaminar fracture tends to occur and the other fracture modes will be suppressed. The interlaminar shear strength of 2.5 mm thick GFRP plate of G-10CR is evaluated as 130-150 MPa at 77 K.

  3. Physical significance of interfaces on fracture growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.J.; Guo, Q. )

    1993-08-01

    Details of the interfaces between two geologic materials are normally neglected in predicting the growth of hydraulic fractures. In addition, perfect bonding is assumed across the interface. However, due to a combination of reasons, the perfect bonding assumption is violated to various degrees. Assessment for potential slippage is important to fracture-growth modeling. As a fracture approaches an interface, both mode I (for a fracture crossing the interface) and mode II (for a fracture extending in the interface) stress-intensity factors need to be evaluated. Should the interface properties be such that the mode I stress-intensity factor reach the critical value, the fracture will cross the interface. Should the converse happen and the mode II stress-intensity factor become critical, slippage along the interface will occur. If both the critical stress intensity factors are reached simultaneously, both fractures across the interface and slippage will occur. Good description of the interface material is needed to model the fracturing process. Methodology to model the physical significance of interfaces for calculating two-dimensional fracture growth includes descriptions of applications to oil/gas recovery and the injection of contaminants in isolated formations.

  4. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    PubMed

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 3 than in all other groups, except Group 2 (p>0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations. PMID:24240900

  5. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.; Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H.; Adams, F.; De Jong, M.

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q`s of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods.

  6. Higher order mode damping studies on the PEP-II B-Factory RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.; Goldberg, D.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F. ); Ko, K.; Kroll, N.; Pendleton, R.; Schwarz, H. ); Adams, F.; De Jong, M. )

    1992-03-01

    We describe studies of the higher-order-mode (HOM) properties of the prototype 476 MHz RF cavity for the proposed PEP-II B-Factory and a waveguide damping scheme to reduce possible HOM-driven coupled-bunch beam instability growth. Numerical studies include modelling of the HOM spectrum using MAFIA and ARGUS, and calculation of the loaded Q's of the damped modes using data from these codes and the Kroll-Yu method. We discuss briefly the experimental investigations of the modes, which will be made in a full-size low-power test cavity, using probes, wire excitation and bead perturbation methods.

  7. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, E. Ya.; Ogloblin, B. G.; Shalaev, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated.

  8. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    SciTech Connect

    Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Fracture modes during severe plastic deformation of NiTi shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, C. M.; Silva, R. J. C.; Fernandes, F. M. Braz

    2015-07-01

    The effects of severe plastic deformation on the surface micro-structural characteristics of NiTi shape memory alloys were observed after one single pass using the equal channel angular pressure technique. The analysis of the deformation and fracture showed distinct features related to the composition of the alloys, the temperature of the process, and the surface effects during the relative sliding in the die. In samples deformed at room temperature, the cracks initiated at the surface under tensile stress are amplified during the extrusion in the concurrent channel. The multiple cracks that develop during the friction process between the surfaces of the sample and channels of the die are the main cause for the fracture, even in materials that are less brittle, incorporating a smaller fraction of Ti2Ni precipitates and showing ductile fracture. A differential state of stress appears to exist in the deformed alloys starting from one surface to the other.

  10. Scale-selective turbulence reduction in H-mode plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, T.; Conway, G. D.; Stroth, U.; Estrada, T.; Blanco, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Collaboration: TJ-II Team

    2011-10-15

    Wavenumber spectra of density turbulence in L- and H-mode plasmas have been measured in the TJ-II stellarator by means of Doppler reflectometry. A pronounced suppression of the density fluctuation level is observed in H-mode close to the radial position of maximum radial electric field (E{sub r}) shear. Furthermore, intermediate scale density turbulence is reduced preferentially. This effect can be interpreted within the framework of vortex stretching feeding energy through Reynolds stress into zonal flows, while shear decorrelation of turbulent structures might not play a central role in TJ-II. Moreover, it is shown that in both L- and H-mode, the phase velocity of density fluctuations does not depend on the structure scale.

  11. Ball shear strength and fracture modes of lead-free solder joints prepared using nickel nanoparticle doped flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujan, G. K.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Amalina, M. A.; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Miniaturization and the need for the replacement of lead (Pb) based solders in microelectronic devices raise concerns over their reliability in the recent years. Particularly, the rapid growth of interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layers in Pb free solders can lead to brittle fracture. A novel nanoparticle doped fluxing method was used to prepare ball grid array solder joints between Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder balls and Cu pads. In this method, nickel nanoparticles were mixed with a water soluble flux prior to its use. The shear strength and fracture modes of the resulting solder joints were investigated as a function of aging time. Results showed that IMC layer growth was suppressed in solder joints prepared with 0.1 wt.% Ni doped flux. The average shear strength was marginally higher for solder joints prepared using 0.1 wt. % Ni doped flux compared with the joints prepared with undoped flux. Samples prepared using Ni doped flux showed a better resistant against brittle fracture for up to 30 days of aging.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Effect of Interface Control on Mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Woven C/C Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, Masaki; Yamao, Taketoshi; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Ochiai, Shojiro; Iwashita, Norio; Sawada, Yoshihiro

    Effects of fiber/matrix interface and matrix microstructure on the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of C/C composite materials were investigated by coating bismaleimide-triazine co-polymer (BT-resin) on the surface of carbon fiber and changing the heat-treatment temperature (HTT). For the case of laminates with HTT of 1600°C (carbonized C/C composites), the initial fracture toughness, GIC, was insensitive to BT-resin coating. Moreover, the fracture toughness during crack propagation, GIR, increased by coating BT-resin. On the other hand, both GIC and GIR decreased with BT-resin coating for the laminates with HTT of 2500°C. While both GIC and GIR are insensitive to HTT for laminates without BT-resin coating, they both decreased by increasing HTT for laminates with BT-resin coating. The difference of the effects of interface control and HTT was discussed on the basis of microscopic mechanism consideration. Comparison between in-plane and interlaminar strength indicated the possibility to optimize the interface control.

  13. Comparison of high-resolution and standard zoom imaging modes in cone beam computed tomography for detection of longitudinal root fracture: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Taramsari, Mehran; Bashirzadeh, Parinaz; Salamat, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of two imaging modes in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system in detecting root fracture in endodontically-treated teeth with fiber posts or screw posts by selecting two fields of view. Materials and Methods In this study, 78 endodontically-treated single canal premolars were included. A post space was created in all of them. Then the teeth were randomly set in one of 6 artificial dental arches. In 39 of the 78 teeth set in the 6 dental arches, a root fracture was intentionally created. Next, a fiber post and a screw post were cemented into 26 teeth having equal the root fractures. High resolution (HiRes) and standard zoom images were provided by a CBCT device. Upon considering the reconstructed images, two observers in agreement with each other confirmed the presence or absence of root fracture. A McNemar test was used for comparing the results of the two modes. Results The frequency of making a correct diagnosis using the HiRes zoom imaging mode was 71.8% and in standard zoom was 59%. The overall sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing root fracture in the HiRes mode were 71.79% and 46.15% and in the standard zoom modes were 58.97% and 33.33%, respectively. Conclusion There were no significant differences between the diagnostic values of the two imaging modes used in the diagnosis of root fracture or in the presence of root canal restorations. In both modes, the most true-positive results were reported in the post space group. PMID:24083210

  14. Tests and analyses for fully plastic fracture mechanics of plane strain mode I crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, F.A.; Parks, D.M.; Kim, Y.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under monotonic loading, structures should ideally be ductile enough to provide continued resistance during crack growth. For fully plastic crack growth in low strength alloys, existing asymptotic solutions for elastic-plastic growing cracks are not applicable because they reach the fracture strain only in regions small compared to the inhomogeneities of the actual fracture process. For the limiting case of non-hardening fully-plastic plane strain crack growth, in a number of geometries and loadings the near-tip fields are characterized in terms of three parameters: an effective angle 2{theta}{sub s} between a pair of slip planes, and the normal stress {sigma}{sub s} and the increment of displacement {delta}u{sub s} across the planes. This three-parameter characterization is in contrast to the one- or two-parameter (K or J and T or Q) characterization in linear or non-linear elastic fracture mechanics. These {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and {delta}u{sub s} parameters are found form the far-field geometries and loadings through slip line fields or least upper bound analyses based on circular arcs. The resulting crack growth, in terms of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA), is a function of {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and the material. The geometry of the crack growing between two moving slip planes emanating from its tip reduces this function to the critical fracture shear strain left behind the slip planes, {gamma}f, as a function of {sigma}{sub s}. {gamma}f({sigma}{sub s}) is found theoretically from a hole initiation and growth model. It is also found from preliminary fully plastic crack growth experiments on unequally grooved specimens with fixed-grip extension or 4-point bending of a 1018 CF steel.

  15. Continuous infusion of angiotensin II modulates hypertrophic differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in cartilage formation in a fracture model mouse.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Hirohisa; Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Aoki, Motokuni; Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-06-01

    Although components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are reported to be expressed in cultured chondrocytes and cartilage, little is known about the precise function of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in chondrocytes. In this study, we employed a rib fracture model mouse to investigate the effect of Ang II on chondrocytes. Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was expressed in chondrocytes in the growth plate of mouse tibia. Continuous infusion of Ang II to rib-fractured mice resulted in a significant increase in the volume of cartilage, suggesting Ang II-induced hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. It was also confirmed by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Sox9 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which are genes related to chondrocyte differentiation, and type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which are hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific molecular markers. Chondrocyte hypertrophy with upregulation of these genes was attenuated by administration of olmesartan, an AT1R blocker, but not by hydralazine. Moreover, Ang II infusion significantly suppressed apoptosis of chondrocytes, accompanied by significant induction of mRNA expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL. Olmesartan, but not hydralazine, significantly attenuated the reduction of apoptotic cells and the increase in anti-apoptotic genes induced by Ang II infusion. Overall, the present study demonstrated that Ang II promoted hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and reduced apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes independently of high blood pressure. The present data indicate the role of Ang II in cartilage, and might provide a new concept for treatment of cartilage diseases. PMID:25693858

  16. Transpedicular screw fixation for type II Hangman's fracture: a motion preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    ElMiligui, Yasser; Koptan, Wael; Emran, Ihab

    2010-08-01

    Opinions have varied regarding the optimal treatment of an unstable Hangman's fracture. C2 pedicle screw instrumentation is a biomechanically strong fixation which although done through a simple posterior approach, is a technically demanding procedure. This prospective, non-randomized multicentre study included 15 consecutive patients with displaced type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis. There were nine males and six females with a mean age of 37 years at surgery. The cause of injury was a road traffic accident in 11 patients and a fall from height in 4 patients. All patients had a single stage reduction and direct transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles. During follow-up, clinical evaluation and plain X-rays were performed at each visit; at 6-month follow-up, additional dynamic lateral flexion/extension views and a CT scan were performed. The average follow-up period was 32 months (range 25-56 months). At final follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic and regained a good functional outcome with no limitation of range of motion; all the patients showed solid union with no implant failure. There were no neurological complications. At 6-month follow-up, CT evaluation showed fusion in all patients and an adequate position of 28 screws. Two pedicle screws (6.6%) showed minimal (defined as <2 mm) intrusion; one into the spinal canal and the other into the vertebral foreamen. Transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles is a safe and effective method in treating type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis resulting in good clinical and radiological outcomes. Adequate reduction was achieved and motion segments were preserved with its use. PMID:20401619

  17. Damping Higher Order Modes in the PEP-II B-Factory Vertex Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.; Langton, J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    Higher stored currents and shorter bunch lengths are requirements for increasing luminosity in colliding storage rings. As a result, more HOM power is generated in the IP region. This HOM power propagates to sensitive components causing undesirable heating, thus becoming a limiting issue for the PEP-II B-factory. HOM field penetration through RF shielding fingers has been shown to cause heating in bellows structures. To overcome these limitations, a proposal to incorporate ceramic absorbers within the bellows cavity to damp these modes is presented. Results show that the majority of modes of interest are damped, the effectiveness depending on geometrical considerations. An optimal configuration is presented for the PEP-II B-factory IR bellows component utilizing commercial grade ceramics with consideration for heat transfer requirements.

  18. Sliding mode control of the space nuclear reactor system TOPAZ II

    SciTech Connect

    Shtessel, Y.B.; Wyant, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Automatic Control System (ACS) of the space nuclear reactor power system TOPAZ II that generates electricity from nuclear heat using in-core thermionic converters is considered. Sliding Mode Control Technique was applied to the reactor system controller design in order to provide the robust high accuracy following of a neutron (thermal) power reference profile in a start up regime and a payload electric power (current) reference profile following in an operation regime. Extensive simulations of the TOPAZ II reactor system with the designed sliding mode controllers showed improved accuracy and robustness of the reactor system performances in a start up regime and in an electric power supply regime as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Far-field stress dependency of the failure mode of damage-zone fractures in fault zones: Results from laboratory tests and field observations of siliceous mudstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic failure mode (tensile/hybrid/shear) of damage-zone fractures in fault zones may influence the hydrogeological properties of the fault zone. Application of the Griffith-Coulomb failure criterion, combined with the simple assumption that failures are predominantly induced by an increase in differential stresses and/or a decrease in effective normal stresses resulting from stress concentrations generated at the asperities/tips of faults, suggests that (1) only tensile fractures propagate from faults when the effective mean stress is less than the rock tensile strength, (2) tensile/hybrid fractures form when the effective mean stress is less than twice the rock tensile strength, and (3) shear fractures can develop when the effective mean stress is more than twice the rock tensile strength, which suppresses the formation of tensile/hybrid fractures. In this study, thin slots were precut in siliceous mudstone samples and mechanical experiments were conducted under a range of effective confining pressures using core samples with and without precut slots. A comparison of fractures formed in the samples at different applied effective mean stresses gave results consistent with the proposed model. The correspondence of model predictions and results was also corroborated by observations of natural damage-zone fractures observed in the field, in boreholes penetrating the same siliceous mudstone as used in the experiments. The results indicate that fault zones containing numerous tensile/hybrid fractures are limited to domains that have experienced effective mean stresses of less than twice the rock tensile strength.

  20. Fracture Analysis of Competing Failure Modes of Aluminum-CFRP Joints Using Three-Layer Titanium Laminates as Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, P.; Vollertsen, F.

    2015-09-01

    The structural properties of lightweight constructions can be adapted to specific local requirements using multi-material designs. Aluminum alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are materials of great interest requiring suitable joining techniques in order to transfer the advantages of combining the materials to structural benefits. Thus, the research group "Schwarz-Silber" investigates novel concepts to enable frontal aluminum-CFRP joints using transition structures. In the foil concept titanium foils are used as transition elements. Specimens have been produced using three-layer titanium laminates. In tensile tests, three failure locations have been observed: (1) Al-Ti seam, (2) Ti-CFRP hybrid laminate, and (3) CFRP laminate. In this paper, the fracture mechanisms of these failure modes are investigated by analyzing metallographic micrographs and fracture surfaces as well as by correlating load-displacement curves to video imaging of tensile tests. The results show that the cracking of the CFRP layers can be traced back to an assembly error. The laminate character of the titanium part tends to reduce the Al-Ti seam strength. However, two sub-joint tests demonstrate that the Al-Ti seam can endure loads up to 9.5 kN. The ductile failure behavior of the Ti-CFRP hybrid laminates is caused by plastic deformations of the titanium laminate liners.

  1. Mode I fracture toughness behavior of hydro-thermally aged carbon fibre reinforced DGEBA-HHPA-PES systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Pitarresi, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Giuseppe; Tumino, Davide

    2012-07-01

    In this work the Mode I fracture toughness behavior of unidirectional CFRP laminates is investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests. The composite samples were manufactured by thermal curing after impregnation of a Carbon fabric with a DGEBA epoxy and anhydride HHPA curing agent. One resin batch was also mixed with a PES thermoplastic monomer to enhance the matrix toughness. Two lots of samples, toughened and untoughened, were then left to soak in hot water to achieve various degrees of aging. The influence of matrix toughening and hydrothermal aging on the delamination behavior of the composite have then been assessed and correlated with characterization data from Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  2. Compressive fracture morphology and mechanism of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-11-01

    We quantitatively investigated the fracture morphologies of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and Pd78Cu6Si16 metallic glasses (MGs) under compression. The characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphology were captured, and the shear vein patterns were found to be not a one-to-one correspondence between two opposing fracture surfaces in an identical sample. This finding experimentally confirms that the compressive failure behaves in a fracture mode of pure shear (mode II). Quantitative measurements show that a ˜1 μm thickness layer with materials not only inside but also adjacent to the major shear band contributes to the formation of shear vein patterns. The critical shear strain to break a shear band was found to be more than 105% and higher in more ductile MGs under compression than tension. Estimation on the temperature rise at the fracture moment indicates that only ˜5% of the total elastic energy stored in the sample converts into the heat required for melting the layer to form the vein patterns. The mode II fracture toughness was also estimated based on the quantitative measurements of shear vein pattern and found larger than the mode I fracture toughness. Finally, the deformation and fracture mechanisms of MGs under tension and compression were compared and discussed. These results may improve the understanding on the fracture behaviors and mechanisms of MGs and may provide instructions on future design for ductile MGs with high resistance for fracture.

  3. Kinetics of fracture in Fe-3Si steel under mode I loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessendorf, Michael H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with experimental studies of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Fe-3Si steel. The FCP experiments were performed on single-edge crack specimens. Results show that an extensive damage zone consisting of slip bands surrounds and precedes the propagating crack. The system of the crack and the damage zone constitutes the crack layer (CL). The results demonstrate that fracture propagates by the translation, expansion, and distortion of the part of CL called the active zone. The contours of the damage distribution show that different loading stresses may cause significantly different shapes of damage. Application of the stability criteria is demonstrated. It was shown that the critical energy release rate depends on the history of loading.

  4. Progressive fracture modes in a unidirectional brittle matrix composite under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, N.J.; Kim, R.Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this work we augment the data set of our recent publication on progressive matrix microcrack initiation, which was accomplished under flexure, by conducting similar tests under direct tension. The new data supports completely that which was done earlier. We also provide an analysis to portray the statistical variation of the major controlling parameter in this phenomenon, i.e., the matrix fracture toughness, wherein sufficient data seem to be available to identify the {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} of the distribution. We also examine the progression of fiber damage and observe the correlation between this mechanism and the composite stiffness degradation, where we again note significant departure from commonly-accepted concepts prevalent in the literature. Included are model results for the crack deflection problem and observations regarding the status of debonding criteria.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Cracked Chevron Notched Semi-Circular Bend Method for Characterizing the Mode I Fracture Toughness of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Dong; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nu-Wen; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xu, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The cracked chevron notched semi-circular bending (CCNSCB) method for measuring the mode I fracture toughness of rocks combines the merits (e.g., avoidance of tedious pre-cracking of notch tips, ease of sample preparation and loading accommodation) of both methods suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics, which are the cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) method and the notched semi-circular bend (NSCB) method. However, the limited availability of the critical dimensionless stress intensity factor (SIF) values severely hinders the widespread usage of the CCNSCB method. In this study, the critical SIFs are determined for a wide range of CCNSCB specimen geometries via three-dimensional finite element analysis. A relatively large support span in the three point bending configuration was considered because the fracture of the CCNSCB specimen in that situation is finely restricted in the notch ligament, which has been commonly assumed for mode I fracture toughness measurements using chevron notched rock specimens. Both CCNSCB and NSCB tests were conducted to measure the fracture toughness of two different rock types; for each rock type, the two methods produce similar toughness values. Given the reported experimental results, the CCNSCB method can be reliable for characterizing the mode I fracture toughness of rocks.

  6. Predicting the occurrence of mixed mode failure associated with hydraulic fracturing, part 2 water saturated tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Choens, Charles; Barrow, Perry Carl

    2015-09-14

    Seven water-saturated triaxial extension experiments were conducted on four sedimentary rocks. This experimental condition was hypothesized more representative of that existing for downhole hydrofracture and thus it may improve our understanding of the phenomena. In all tests the pore pressure was 10 MPa and confirming pressure was adjusted to achieve tensile and transitional failure mode conditions. Using previous work in this LDRD for comparison, the law of effective stress is demonstrated in extension using this sample geometry. In three of the four lithologies, no apparent chemo-mechanical effect of water is apparent, and in the fourth lithology test results indicate some chemo-mechanical effect of water.

  7. Effect of Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors on Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Resistance of Composite Laminates Under Mode I Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2006-01-01

    Double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimens of a glass/epoxy composite material with embedded piezoelectric sensors were tested both statically and under fatigue loading to determine the effect of the embedded material on the Mode I fracture toughness and fatigue resistance compared to baseline data without the embedded elements. A material known as LaRC-Macrofiber Composite (LaRC-MFC (TradeMark)), or MFC, was embedded at the midplane of the specimen during the layup. Specimens were manufactured with the embedded MFC material either at the loaded end of the specimen to simulate an initial delamination; or with the MFC material located at the delaminating interface, with a Teflon film at the loaded end to simulate an initial delamination. There were three types of specimens with the embedded material at the delaminating interface: co-cured with no added adhesive; cured with a paste adhesive applied to the embedded element; or cured with a film adhesive added to the embedded material. Tests were conducted with the sensors in both the passive and active states. Results were compared to baseline data for the same material without embedded elements. Interlaminar fracture toughness values (G(sub Ic)) for the passive condition showed little change when the MFC was at the insert end. Passive results varied when the MFC was at the delaminating interface. For the co-cured case and with the paste adhesive, G(sub Ic) decreased compared to the baseline toughness, whereas, for the film adhesive case, G(sub Ic) was significantly greater than the baseline toughness, but the failure was always catastrophic. When the MFC was in the active state, G(sub Ic) was generally lower compared to the passive results. Fatigue tests showed little effect of the embedded material whether it was active or passive compared to baseline values.

  8. Recommendations for protecting against failure by brittle fracture: Category II and III ferritic steel shipping containers with wall thickness greater than four inches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.; Fischer, L.E.

    1996-08-01

    This report provides criteria for selecting ferritic steels that would prevent brittle fracture in Category II and III shipping containers with wall thickness greater than 4 inches. These methods are extensions of those previously used for Category II and III containers less than 4 inches thick and Category I containers more than 4 inches thick.

  9. An experimental study of CTOD for Mode I/Mode II stable crack growth in thin 2024-T3 aluminum specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Dawicke, D.S.; Newman, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study of crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) for Mode I/Mode II stable crack growth in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum has been conducted. To perform the experiments, an Arcan specimen and fixture was modified so that (1) slippage in the grips was eliminated, (2) large rotations of the fixture components were achievable and (3) bending stresses were minimized. Defining {Theta} to be the angle between the Mode I loading direction (perpendicular to the crack line) and the direction of applied loading, experimental results indicate that (a) for large amounts of crack extension, a {ge} 10mm, the value of CTOD at 1 mm behind the crack tip appears to approach a constant value of 0.1 mm for all modes of loading, (b) the direction of crack extension varied with applied mixed mode loading, (c) Mode I crack extension is predominant for 0{degree} {le} {Theta} {le} 60{degree}, (d) Mode II crack extension is predominant for 75{degree} {le} {Theta} {le} 90{degree} and (e) a transition zone exists for angles {Theta} near 75{degree}.

  10. Application of the J integral to fracture under mixed-mode loading. [MMJINT; 4330V steel

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The calculation of the J integral proved to be a successful method for characterizing the stress and displacement fields around a crack tip under mixed mode loading. A computer program was written to determine the symmetric and antisymmetric J integral quantities. The stress intensity factors from these J integral calculations were in excellent agreement with other calculations. The compact shear specimen used contains three loading holes, the load applied at the center hole being the opposite direction to the load applied at the two outer holes. For 7075-T6 aluminum, K/sub IIc/ was 1.9 times larger than K/sub Ic/. In the brittle photoelastic material K/sub IIc/ was less than K/sub Ic/. Failure of the 4330V steel compact shear specimens came as a result of the average shear stress in the region ahead of the crack tip exceeding the material flow shear stress. The experimental results suggest that the angle of crack growth is best predicted by the maximum tangential stress theory.

  11. Microbranching in mode-I fracture using large-scale simulations of amorphous and perturbed-lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, Shay I.; Kessler, David A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the high-velocity regime mode-I fracture instability wherein small microbranches start to appear near the main crack, using large-scale simulations. Some of the features of those microbranches have been reproduced qualitatively in smaller-scale studies [using O (104) atoms] on both a model of an amorphous material (via the continuous random network model) and using perturbed-lattice models. In this study, larger-scale simulations [ O (106) atoms] were performed using multithreading computing on a GPU device, in order to achieve more physically realistic results. First, we find that the microbranching pattern appears to be converging with the lattice width. Second, the simulations reproduce the growth of the size of a microbranch as a function of the crack velocity, as well as the increase of the amplitude of the derivative of the electrical-resistance root-mean square with respect to the time as a function of the crack velocity. In addition, the simulations yield the correct branching angle of the microbranches, and the power law exponent governing the shape of the microbranches seems to be lower than unity, so that the side cracks turn over in the direction of propagation of the main crack as seen in experiment.

  12. Microbranching in mode-I fracture using large-scale simulations of amorphous and perturbed-lattice models.

    PubMed

    Heizler, Shay I; Kessler, David A

    2015-07-01

    We study the high-velocity regime mode-I fracture instability wherein small microbranches start to appear near the main crack, using large-scale simulations. Some of the features of those microbranches have been reproduced qualitatively in smaller-scale studies [using O(10(4)) atoms] on both a model of an amorphous material (via the continuous random network model) and using perturbed-lattice models. In this study, larger-scale simulations [O(10(6)) atoms] were performed using multithreading computing on a GPU device, in order to achieve more physically realistic results. First, we find that the microbranching pattern appears to be converging with the lattice width. Second, the simulations reproduce the growth of the size of a microbranch as a function of the crack velocity, as well as the increase of the amplitude of the derivative of the electrical-resistance root-mean square with respect to the time as a function of the crack velocity. In addition, the simulations yield the correct branching angle of the microbranches, and the power law exponent governing the shape of the microbranches seems to be lower than unity, so that the side cracks turn over in the direction of propagation of the main crack as seen in experiment. PMID:26274182

  13. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R. )

    1996-01-01

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  14. The Monterey Formation of the Santa Ynez Unit, Part II: Fractures, borehole images, and production

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, D.F.; Schwalbach, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Ynez Unit (SYU), operated by Exxon, USA, comprises sixteen Federal OCS leases in the western portion of the Santa Barbara Channel, offshore California. The three accumulations, Hondo, Pescado, and Sacate Fields, are trapped in a large complex of east-west trending anticlines. The Hondo and Harmony platforms produce from the Hondo structure, and the Heritage platform produces from the Pescado structure. Hondo platform production began in 1981, and approximately 130 MBO and 200 BCF have been produced. Drilling began from Harmony and Heritage platforms in 1993. The primary reservoir is the Miocene Monterey Formation, consisting of very thin interbeds of fine-grained siliceous mudstones, charts, porcelanites, and carbonate rocks. The majority of the recoverable reserves are contained in and produced from the extensive, high-permeability fracture network. Part of our formation evaluation program emphasizes fracture characterization and quantification by integrating a number of new technologies. We have calibrated borehole images to approximately 1000 feet of continuous cores from the main producing zones. This enables us to quantify levels of fracturing in wells without core, and to develop strategies for selective perforation of the most highly-productive intervals. Production logs and wireline formation tests provide valuable information about the relation between fluid entry to the well bore and fracture distribution. Borehole images also provide valuable information about fracture orientations, bed orientations, locally-developed chert folds, and lithofacies.

  15. Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Case, Eldon D; Ren, Fei; Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Part I of this paper discussed the Weibull modulus m, versus porosity P behavior of brittle materials, including HA. While the Weibull modulus m deals with the scatter in fracture strength data, this paper (Part II) focuses on two additional key mechanical properties of porous materials, namely the average fracture strength f , and Young s modulus E, for P in the interval from P zero to P PG (the porosity of the unfired compacts). The f versus P data for HA from this study and the literature data for alumina, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and silicon nitride are describedwell by functions of , where = 1 P/PG = the degree of densification. A similar function of applies to the E versus P behavior of HA from this study and data from the literature for alumina, titanium and YSZ. All of the data analyzed in this study (Part II) are based on partially and fully sintered powder compacts (excluding green powder compacts), thus the f / 0 versus and E /E0 versus relationships may apply only to such specimens.

  16. Stimuli Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Energy Production (Part II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Jung, Hun Bok; Shao, Hongbo; Kabilan, Senthil; Um, Wooyong; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Varga, Tamas; Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-12-14

    We have used an environmentally friendly and recyclable hydraulic fracturing fluid - diluted aqueous solutions of polyallylamine or PAA – for reservoir stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). This fluid undergoes a controlled and large volume expansion with a simultaneous increase in viscosity triggered by CO2 at EGS temperatures. We are presenting here the results of laboratory-scale hydraulic fracturing experiment using the fluid on small cylindrical rock cores (1.59 cm in diameter and 5.08 cm in length) from the Coso geothermal field in California. Rock samples consisted of Mesozoic diorite metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The experiments were conducted on 5 samples for realistic ranges of pressures (up to 275 bar) and temperatures (up to 210 °C) for both the rock samples and the injected fluid. After fracturing, cores were subjected to a CO2 leakage test, injection of KI solution, and X-ray microtomography (XMT) scanning to examine the formation and distribution of fractures. The design and conduct of these experiments will be presented and discussed in details. Based on the obtained XMT images, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were then performed to visualize hydraulic fractures and compute the bulk permeability. OpenFOAM (OpenCFD Ltd., Reading, UK), was used to solve the steady state simulation. The flow predictions, based upon the laminar, 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for fluid mass and momentum, show the remarkable stimulation of the permeability in the core samples and demonstrate the efficiency of such a CO2 triggered fluid in EGS.

  17. Pseudo-type-II tuning behavior and mode identification in whispering gallery optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Meisenheimer, Sarah-Katharina; Fürst, Josef Urban; Schiller, Annelie; Holderied, Florian; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2016-06-27

    Wavelength tuning of conventional mirror-based optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) exhibits parabolically-shaped tuning curves (type-0 and type-I phase matching) or tuning branches that cross each other with a finite slope (type-II phase matching). We predict and experimentally prove that whispering gallery OPOs based on type-0 phase matching show both tuning behaviors, depending on whether the mode numbers of the generated waves coincide or differ. We investigate the wavelength tuning of optical parametric oscillation in a millimeter-sized radially-poled lithium niobate disk pumped at 1 μm wavelength generating signal and idler waves between 1.7 and 2.6 μm wavelength. Our experimental findings excellently coincide with the theoretical predictions. The investigated whispering gallery optical parametric oscillator combines the employment of the highest nonlinear-optical coefficient of the material with a controlled type-II-like wavelength tuning and with the possibility of self-phase locking. PMID:27410665

  18. On the verification of binding modes of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone with mercury(II). The solid state studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata

    2014-08-01

    Two coordination compounds of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, fluorescent chemosensor, have been synthesised from the mercury(II) nitrate and mercury(II) chloride, and subsequently characterised by IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The inorganic anion has a distinct influence on binding mode of thiosemicarbazone ligand to Hg(II) ion. In both compounds the metal to ligand stoichiometry is 1:2 and the organic ligands coordinate to Hg ion in the neutral thione form, but they differ in a ligand binding mode and the conformation of the ligand. The crystal packing of mercury(II) nitrate complex with thiosemicarbazone is controlled by the mercury chelate ring-phenylene ring π···π stacking interactions.

  19. Maxillofacial Fractures: Midface and Internal Orbit-Part II: Principles and Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mast, Gerson; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Tasman, Abel-Jan; Litschel, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Current clinical assessment and imaging techniques were described in part 1, and this article presents a systematic review of the surgical treatment principles in the management of midface and internal orbit fractures from initial care to definitive treatment, including illustrative case examples. New developments enabled limited surgical approaches by standardization of osteosynthesis principles regarding three-dimensional buttress reconstruction, by newly developed individualized implants such as titanium meshes and, especially for complex fracture patterns, by critical assessment of anatomical reconstruction through intraoperative endoscopy, as well as intra- and postoperative imaging. Resorbable soft tissue anchors can be used both for ligament and soft tissue resuspension to reduce ptosis effects in the cheeks and nasolabial area and to achieve facial aesthetics similar to those prior to the injury. PMID:26372710

  20. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 6: failure mode analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    Material properties and failure criteria were evaluated to assess the requirements for double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of the Zion Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. The properties of the 316 stainless steel piping materials were obtained from the literature. Statistical distributions of both the tensile and fracture properties at room and operating temperatures were developed. Yield and ultimate strength tensile properties were combined to estimate the material flow strength. The flow strength and fracture properties were used in the various failure models analyzed. Linear-elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic fracture models were compared, and the governing fracture criterion was determined. For the particular case studied, the fully plastic flow requirement was found to be the controlling fracture criterion leading to a double-ended guillotine pipe break.

  1. Some recent theoretical and experimental developments in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.; Hones, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in four distinct areas of fracture mechanics research are described. These are as follows: experimental comparisons of different nonlinear fracture toughness measures, including the nonlinear energy, R curve, COD and J integral methods; the singular elastic crack-tip stress and displacement equations and the validity of the proposition of their general adequacy as indicated, for example, by the biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat crack; the thermodynamic nature of surface energy induced by propagating cracks in relation to a general continuum thermodynamic description of brittle fracture; and analytical and experimental aspects of Mode II fracture, with experimental data for certain aluminum, steel and titanium alloys.

  2. The effect of incomplete crown ferrules on fracture resistance and failure modes of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with quartz fiber post, composite core, and crowns

    PubMed Central

    Muangamphan, Panorjit; Sattapan, Boonrat; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Thammasitboon, Kewalin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the fracture resistance of restored endodontically treated teeth (RETT) with fiber posts, cores, and crowns with limited ferrules. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically treated and decoronated 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction, and then divided into 6 groups of 10 teeth each; Group circumferential ferrule (2FR), Group ferrule in the labial, mesial, and palatal region (2FR-LaMPa), Group ferrule in the labial, and palatal region (2FR-LaPa), Group 2FR-Pa and 2FR-La respectively, and Group 0FR (no ferrule). All 60 prepared teeth were then restored with quartz fiber posts, resin composite cores, and metal crowns. The specimens were subjected to load until failure occurred. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The mode of failure was determined under a stereoscope. Results: A statistical significant difference was found among groups 2FR-LaMPa, 2FR-Pa, 2FR-LaPa, and 2FR from the group 2FR-La, and from the group 0FR (P < 0.01). The predominant mode of failure was an oblique palatal to labial root fracture for the groups with remaining ferrules. Conclusion: For RETT that have incomplete crown ferrules, the location of the ferrules may affect their fracture resistance. PMID:26069401

  3. A compendium of sources of fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth data for metallic alloys. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Seward, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    A compendium is presented of sources for metallic alloy fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth data, which concentrates on technical reports as the primary source of references and updates the previous Hudson and Seward (1978) compendium references on technical journals. Where available, the accession numbers which are used as code numbers for the ordering of the reports from their publishers are given. The sources of these reports include the AIAA Technical Information Service, the Defense Technical Information Center, the National Technical Information Service, and NASA.

  4. Probabilistic Fracture Analysis of Functionally Graded Materials--Part II: Implementation and Numerical Examples

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tam H.; Song, Junho; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2008-02-15

    Probabilistic fracture analyses are performed for investigating uncertain fracture response of Functionally Graded Material (FGM) structures. The First-Order-Reliability-Method (FORM) is implemented into an existing Finite Element code for FGM (FE-FGM), which was previously developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The computational simulation will be used in order to estimate the probability of crack initiation with uncertainties in the material properties only. The two-step probability analysis method proposed in the companion paper is illustrated by a numerical example of a composite strip with an edge crack. First, the reliability index of a crack initiation event is estimated as we vary the mean and standard deviation of the slope and the location of the inflection point of the spatial profile of Young's modulus. Secondly, the reliability index is estimated as we vary the standard deviation and the correlation length of the random field that characterize the random spatial fluctuation of Young's modulus. Also investigated is the relative importance of the uncertainties in the toughness compared to those in Young's modulus.

  5. Field-Selective Anomaly and Chiral Mode Reversal in Type-II Weyl Materials.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, M; Bergholtz, E J

    2016-08-19

    Three-dimensional condensed matter incarnations of Weyl fermions generically have a tilted dispersion-in sharp contrast to their elusive high-energy relatives where a tilt is forbidden by Lorentz invariance, and with the low-energy excitations of two-dimensional graphene sheets where a tilt is forbidden by either crystalline or particle-hole symmetry. Very recently, a number of materials (MoTe_{2}, LaAlGe, and WTe_{2}) have been identified as hosts of so-called type-II Weyl fermions whose dispersion is so strongly tilted that a Fermi surface is formed, whereby the Weyl node becomes a singular point connecting electron and hole pockets. We here predict that these systems have remarkable properties in the presence of magnetic fields. Most saliently, we show that the nature of the chiral anomaly depends crucially on the relative angle between the applied field and the tilt, and that an inversion-asymmetric overtilting creates an imbalance in the number of chiral modes with positive and negative slopes. The field-selective anomaly gives a novel magneto-optical resonance, providing an experimental way to detect concealed Weyl nodes. PMID:27588869

  6. Trickle-Charge: a New Operational Mode for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W.; Colocho, W.S.; Decker, F.-J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Grady, C.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.K.; Turner, J.L.; Weaver, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    In regular top-up-and-coast operation, PEP-II average luminosity is about 70-75% of the peak luminosity due to detector ramp-down and ramp-up times plus the time it takes to top-up both beams. We recently commissioned a new operational mode where the Low Energy Ring is injected continuously without ramping down the detector. The benefits--increased luminosity lifetime and roughly half the number of top-ups per shift--were expected to give an increase in delivered luminosity of about 15% at the same peak luminosity; this was confirmed in test runs. In routine trickle operation, however, it appears that the increase in delivered luminosity is more than twice that due to an increase in availability credited to the more stable operating conditions during trickle operation. Further gains were made when continuous injection was extended to the high energy ring as well. In this paper we will present our operational experience as well as some of the diagnostics we use to monitor and maintain tuning of the machine in order to control injection background and protect the detector.

  7. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

  8. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  9. Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

    1980-09-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

  10. Les fractures distales de la clavicule type II de Neer: plaque à crochet versus brochage transacromiale

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Cette étude a été menée afin de faire une comparaison entre deux techniques chirurgicales différentes: la plaque à crochet et l'embrochage dans les fractures instables du quart externe de la clavicule. Nous avons mené une étude prospective entre 2009 et 2013, incluant deux groupes de patients: un premier groupe de 14 patients traités par plaque à crochet par voie d'abord antéro-inférieure, un second de 12 patients traités par brochage. Tous les patients ont été hospitalisés 24 h après la chirurgie et ont été suivi pendant 1 an. Nous avons comparé les résultats des deux techniques en étudiant: le temps opératoire, le saignement, délai de consolidation, la douleur et la fonction selon le score de constant. L'analyse statistique des résultats fonctionnels et radiologiques a montré la supériorité d'une technique par rapport à l'autre; ainsi l’âge moyen global était de 32,6 ans (+/- 13,7), le sex-ratio (H/F) était de 1. Le temps opératoire moyen est de 35 min pour la plaque à crochet contre 45 minutes pour le brochage, le délai moyen de consolidation était de 6,1 (+/-0,7) semaines dans le groupe traité par plaque vissée, et de 6 (+/-0,7) semaines dans le groupe traité par embrochage (p = 0,5), le score de Constant absolu moyen était respectivement de 86 (+/-10,4) et de 90,92 (+/-2,5) (p = 0,04). L'analyse uni variée a montré une association statistiquement significative entre les paramètres d’évaluation et les deux techniques chirurgicales étudiées. Par conséquent, l’étude a noté la supériorité de la plaque à crochet contre l'embroche dans les fractures instables du quart externe de la clavicule. PMID:26090053

  11. Saturation of the f -mode instability in neutron stars. II. Applications and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnigouras, Pantelis; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2016-07-01

    We present the first results on the saturation of the f -mode instability in neutron stars due to nonlinear mode coupling. Emission of gravitational waves drives the f -mode (fundamental mode) unstable in fast-rotating, newborn neutron stars. The initial growth phase of the mode is followed by its saturation, because of energy leaking to other modes of the star. The saturation point determines the strain of the generated gravitational-wave signal, which can then be used to extract information about the neutron star's equation of state. The parent (unstable) mode couples via parametric resonances with pairs of daughter modes, with the triplets' evolution exhibiting a rich variety of behaviors. We study both supernova- and merger-derived neutron stars, simply modeled as polytropes in a Newtonian context, and show that the parent may couple to many different daughter pairs during the star's evolution through the instability window, with the saturation amplitude changing by orders of magnitude.

  12. Biomechanical comparison of three types of internal fixation in a type C zone II pelvic fracture model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Wei; Li, Xu; Zhang, Qi; Lv, Hong-Zhi; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the stability of Tile C pelvic fractures fixed with two iliosacral (IS) screws, tension band plate (TBP), and minimally invasive adjustable plate (MIAP). Methods: Six embalmed specimens of adult pelvis were used. The soft tissue was removed from the specimens, but spines from the fourth lumbar vertebra to the proximal one-third of both femurs were retained. The pubic symphysis, bilateral sacroiliac joints and ligaments, bilateral hip joints, bilateral sacrotuberous ligaments, and bilateral sacrospinous ligaments were intact. Tile C pelvic fractures were created on the specimens. The symphysis pubis was fixed with a plate, and the fracture on the posterior pelvic ring was fixed with three types of internal fixation in a randomized block design. The specimens were placed in a biomechanical machine at a standing neutral posture. A cyclic vertical load of up to 500N was applied, and displacement was recorded. Shifts in the fracture gap were measured by a grating displacement sensor. Results: Under different vertical loads, the shift in the fracture gap and displacement of the pelvic fractures fixed with two IS screws were similar to those in fractures fixed with MIAP. However, the shift in the fracture gap and displacement of fractures fixed with MIAP was significantly smaller than those of fractures fixed with TBP. Conclusion: The stability of the Tile C pelvic fractures fixed with MIAP was similar to that of fractures fixed with IS screws. MIAP performed better than TBP under vertical load. PMID:25932113

  13. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL AND HIGHER-ORDER MODES FOR 7-CELL CAVITY OF PETRA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Y.; Blednykh, A.; Cupolo, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Holub, B.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II will include a 7-cell PETRA cavity, which was manufactured for the PETRA-II project at DESY. The cavity fundamental frequency operates at 500 MHz. In order to verify the impedances of the fundamental and higher-order modes (HOM), which were calculated by computer code, we measured the magnitude of the electromagnetic field of the fundamental acceleration mode and HOM using the bead-pull method. To keep the cavity body temperature constant, we used a chiller system to supply cooling water at 20 degrees C. The bead-pull measurement was automated with a computer. We encountered some issues during the measurement process due to the difficulty in measuring the electromagnetic field magnitude in a multi-cell cavity. We describe the method and apparatus for the field measurement, and the obtained results.

  15. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  16. Asteroseismology of the nearby SN II Progenitor Rigel. II. epsilon-mechanism Triggering Gravity-mode Pulsations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravveji, Ehsan; Moya, Andres; Guinan, Edward F.

    2012-04-01

    The cores of luminous B- and A-type (BA) supergiant stars are the seeds of later core-collapse supernovae. Thus, constraining the near-core conditions in this class of stars can place tighter constraints on the size, mass, and chemical composition of supernova remnants. Asteroseismology of these massive stars is one possible approach into such investigations. Recently, Moravveji et al. in 2012 (hereafter Paper I) extracted 19 significant frequencies from a 6-year radial velocity monitoring of Rigel (β Ori, B8 Ia). The periods they determined broadly range from 1.22 to 74.74 days. Based on our differentially rotating stellar structure and evolution model, Rigel, at its current evolutionary state, is undergoing core He burning and shell H burning. Linear fully non-adiabatic non-radial stability analyses result in the excitation of a dense spectrum of non-radial gravity-dominated mixed modes. The fundamental radial mode (l = 0) and its overtones are all stable. When the hydrogen-burning shell is located even partially in the radiative zone, a favorable condition for destabilization of g-modes through the so-called epsilon-mechanism becomes viable. Only those g-modes that have high relative amplitudes in the hydrogen-burning (radiative) zone can survive the strong radiative damping. From the entire observed range of variability periods of Rigel (found in Paper I), and based on our model, only those modes with periods ranging between 21 and 127 days can be theoretically explained by the epsilon-mechanism. The origin of the short-period variations (found in Paper I) still remains unexplained. Because Rigel is similar to other massive BA supergiants, we believe that the epsilon-mechanism may be able to explain the long-period variations in α Cygni class of pulsating stars.

  17. Couple stresses and the fracture of rock.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Colin; Coman, Ciprian D; Aldazabal, Javier

    2015-03-28

    An assessment is made here of the role played by the micropolar continuum theory on the cracked Brazilian disc test used for determining rock fracture toughness. By analytically solving the corresponding mixed boundary-value problems and employing singular-perturbation arguments, we provide closed-form expressions for the energy release rate and the corresponding stress-intensity factors for both mode I and mode II loading. These theoretical results are augmented by a set of fracture toughness experiments on both sandstone and marble rocks. It is further shown that the morphology of the fracturing process in our centrally pre-cracked circular samples correlates very well with discrete element simulations. PMID:25713450

  18. Radon hazard in shallow groundwaters II: dry season fracture drainage and alluvial fan upwelling.

    PubMed

    Tommasone, F Pascale; De Francesco, S; Cuoco, E; Verrengia, G; Santoro, D; Tedesco, D

    2011-08-15

    ²²²Rn concentrations have been measured in a well located on the edge of a large Pleistocene-Holocene fan and belonging to the shallow pyroclastic aquifer of the Pietramelara Plain, southern Italy. The aim of this study has been both to characterise the hydrological inputs that determine the influx of ²²²Rn to the shallow aquifer and to understand the correlations between ²²²Rn, major ions, physical-chemical parameters and rainfall. Results obtained from the time series indicate that the studied well shows a ²²²Rn variability that is inconsistent with a mechanism of pure hydrological amplification, such as described in Radon hazard in shallow groundwaters: Amplification and long term variability induced by rainfall (De Francesco et al., 2010a). On the contrary, in this well hydrological amplification appears to be mainly tied to the upwelling of alluvial fan waters, rich in radon, in response to pistoning from recharge in the carbonate substrate. This upwelling of alluvial fan waters occurs during almost the whole period of the annual recharge and is also responsible of the constant increase in ²²²Rn levels during the autumn-spring period, when both the water table level and weekly rainfall totals drop. Furthermore, a rapid delivery mechanism for ²²²Rn likely operates through fracture drainage in concomitance with the very first late summer-early autumn rains, when rainfall totals appear largely insufficient to saturate the soil storage capacity. Results obtained from this study appear to be particularly significant in both radon hazard zoning in relation to the shallow aquifer and possibly also for indoor radon, owing to possible shallow aquifer-soil-building exchanges. Moreover, both the spike-like events and the long wave monthly scale background fluctuations detected can also have potential significance in interpreting ²²²Rn time series data as seismic and/or volcanic precursors. Finally, ²²²Rn has proved to be an excellent tracer for

  19. Solar seismology. II - The stochastic excitation of the solar p-modes by turbulent convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Keeley, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the solar p-modes are stabilized by damping due to turbulent viscosity in the convective zone. Starting from the assumption that the modes are stable, we calculate expectation values for the modal energies. We find that the interaction between a p-mode and the turbulent convection is such that the modal energy tends toward equipartition with the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies whose lifetimes are comparable to the modal period. From the calculated values of the modal energies, we compute rms surface velocity amplitudes. Our predicted rms surface velocities range from 0.01 cm/sec for the fundamental radial mode to 0.6 cm/sec for the radial mode whose period is approximately 5 minutes. The predicted surface velocities for the low order p-modes are much smaller than the velocities inferred from recent observations.

  20. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  1. Spectroscopic modification of the Pippard relation applied for the translational mode in ammonia solid II near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtseven, H.; Yıldız, İ.

    2005-09-01

    This study gives our calculation for the frequency shifts 1v/∂ and the specific heat CP near the melting point in the ammonia solid II. We establish a linear relationship between CP and 1v/∂ using the Raman frequencies of the translational mode which we calculated in this system. This leads to the validity of the spectroscopic modification of the first Pippard relation in the ammonia solid II near the melting point. From this linear variation of CP with the 1v/∂ we deduce the slope values of {dP}/{dT} near the melting point for the fixed pressures of 3.65, 5.02 and 6.57 kbar in the ammonia solid II. They are compared with the experimental {dP}/{dT} values for this system.

  2. Oscillations of a vertically stratified dissipative atmosphere. II. Low frequency trapped modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, G. V.; Dmitrienko, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped atmosphere waves, such as IGW waveguide modes and Lamb modes, are described using dissipative solution above source (DSAS) (Dmitrienko and Rudenko, 2016). According to this description, the modes are disturbances penetrating without limit in the upper atmosphere and dissipating their energy throughout the atmosphere; leakage from a trapping region to the upper atmosphere is taken into consideration. The DSAS results are compared to those based on both accurate and WKB approximated dissipationless equations. It is shown that the spatial and frequency characteristics of modes in the upper atmosphere calculated by any of the methods are close to each other and are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  3. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  4. An engineering treatise on the CARE II dual mode and coverage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model used to calculate the reliability of any dual-mode, spare-switching computer system was described, and some illustrative examples were presented. The possibility of extending the resultant computer program further was also examined, enabling it, in particular, to accommodate computer configurations involving more than two modes of operation.

  5. Rossby normal modes in nonuniform background configurations. I Simple fields. II - Equinox and solstice conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salby, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the influence of mean field variations on the realization of planetary normal modes, taking into account the mode response and structure in the presence of simple background nonuniformities. It is found that mean field variations have the combined effect of depressing, shifting, and broadening the characteristic response of Rossby normal modes. While nonuniformities in both the mean wind and temperature fields contribute to the reduction in peak response, the former are primarily responsible for translation and spectral broadening. An investigation is conducted to determine which modes may be realized in actual atmospheric configurations and which may be identified. For both the equinox and solstice configurations, response peaks corresponding to all of the first four modes of wavenumbers 1, 2, and 3 are readily visible above the noise.

  6. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  7. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-11-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  8. Deformation and damage mechanisms of zinc coatings on hot-dip galvanized steel sheets: Part II. Damage modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Rodolphe; Forest, Samuel; Pineau, André; Grillon, François; Demonet, Xavier; Mataigne, Jean-Michel

    2004-03-01

    Zinc-based coatings are widely used for protection against corrosion of steel-sheet products in the automotive industry. The objective of the present article is to investigate the damage modes at work in three different microstructures of a zinc coating on an interstitial-free steel substrate under tension, planestrain tension, and expansion loading. Plastic-deformation mechanisms are addressed in the companion article. Two main fracture mechanisms, namely, intergranular cracking and transgranular cleavage fracture, were identified in an untempered cold-rolled coating, a tempered cold-rolled coating, and a recrystallized coating. No fracture at the interface between the steel and zinc coating was observed that could lead to spalling, in the studied zinc alloy. A complex network of cleavage cracks and their interaction with deformation twinning is shown to develop in the material. An extensive quantitative analysis based on systematic image analysis provides the number and cumulative length of cleavage cracks at different strain levels for the three investigated microstructures and three loading conditions. Grain refinement by recrystallization is shown to lead to an improved cracking resistance of the coating. A model for crystallographic cleavage combining the stress component normal to the basal plane and the amount of plastic slip on the basal slip systems is proposed and identified from equibiaxial tension tests and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the cracked grains. This analysis requires the computation of the nonlinear stress-strain response of each grain using a crystal-plasticity constitutive model. The model is then applied successfully to other loading conditions and is shown to account for the preferred orientations of damaged grains observed in the case of plane-strain tension.

  9. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It usually occurs after an injury and often occurs with ...

  10. Sensitivity Monitor Report for the STIS First-Order Modes -II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ed; Stys, David; Walborn, Nolan; Bohlin, Ralph

    2000-09-01

    An analysis of all low and medium resolution observations of the STIS Sensitivity Monitoring Programs made prior to December 1999 shows continuation of trends correlated with temperature and with time. We provide the first detailed report on additional trends in sensitivities revealed by the medium resolution modes of the instrument. Only the G750L mode shows no significant variation in sensitivity. All other modes, when averaged over a broad band of the wavelength coverage of each, show evidence for an ~1%/yr decline, except for G140L and G230L (after ~1998.7) being ~1.4%/yr, G140M being ~2.5%/yr, and G430L declining at ~0.5%/yr. A bimodal, before and after ~1998.7, trend previously found in the G230L is found in the NUV-MAMA G230M. Similar trends are also evident in the CCD in the G230LB and the two G230MB monitoring modes. The temperature dependence of the sensitivity in the G140M modes is found to be consistent with the -0.25%/°C correlation measured in the G140L mode. The mean "relative gain", gain1/gain4, of the CCD between 1998.3 and 1999.7 was 4.039 ±0.006 and did not change significantly in that period. Recommendations are made for changes in the "pipeline" calibration software to correct for the time and temperature variations in all L modes and in the M modes of both MAMA detectors.

  11. Tidal interactions of a Maclaurin spheroid - II. Resonant excitation of modes by a close, misaligned orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braviner, Harry J.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2015-02-01

    We model a tidally forced star or giant planet as a Maclaurin spheroid, decomposing the motion into the normal modes found by Bryan. We first describe the general prescription for this decomposition and the computation of the tidal power. Although this formalism is very general, forcing due to a companion on a misaligned, circular orbit is used to illustrate the theory. The tidal power is plotted for a variety of orbital radii, misalignment angles, and spheroid rotation rates. Our calculations are carried out including all modes of degree l ≤ 4, and the same degree of gravitational forcing. Remarkably, we find that for close orbits (a/R* ≈ 3) and rotational deformations that are typical of giant planets (e ≈ 0.4) the l = 4 component of the gravitational potential may significantly enhance the dissipation through resonance with surface gravity modes. There are also a large number of resonances with inertial modes, with the tidal power being locally enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude. For very close orbits (a/R* ≈ 3), the contribution to the power from the l = 4 modes is roughly the same magnitude as that due to the l = 3 modes.

  12. Mixed-Mode Fracture and Fatigue Analysis of Cracked 3D Complex Structures using a 3D SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavanam, Sharada

    The aim of this thesis is to numerically evaluate the mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs) of complex 3D structural geometries with arbitrary 3D cracks using the Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method-Finite Element Method (SGBEM-FEM) Alternating Method. Various structural geometries with different loading scenarios and crack configurations were examined in this thesis to understand the behavior and trends of the mixed-mode SIFs as well as the fatigue life for these complex structural geometries. Although some 3D structures have empirical and numerical solutions that are readily available in the open literature, some do not; therefore this thesis presents the results of fracture and fatigue analyses of these 3D complex structures using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method to serve as reference for future studies. Furthermore, there are advantages of using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method compared to traditional FEM methods. For example, the fatigue-crack-growth and fatigue life can be better estimated for a structure because different fatigue models (i.e. Walker, Paris, and NASGRO) can be used within the same framework of the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method. The FEM (un-cracked structure)/BEM(crack model) meshes are modeled independently, which speeds up the computation process and reduces the cost of human labor. A simple coarse mesh can be used for all fracture and fatigue analyses of complex structures. In this thesis, simple coarse meshes were used for 3D complex structures, which were below 5000 elements as compared to traditional FEM, which require meshes where the elements range on the order of ˜250,000 to ˜106 and sometimes even more than that.

  13. Structure and mode of action of cyclic lipopeptide pseudofactin II with divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Janek, Tomasz; Rodrigues, Lígia R; Gudiña, Eduardo J; Czyżnikowska, Żaneta

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of natural lipopeptide pseudofactin II with a series of doubly charged metal cations was examined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular modelling. The molecular modelling for metal-pseudofactin II provides information on the metal-peptide binding sites. Overall, Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) favor the association with oxygen atoms spanning the peptide backbone, whereas Cu(2+) is coordinated by three nitrogens. Circular dichroism (CD) results confirmed that Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) can disrupt the secondary structure of pseudofactin II at high concentrations, while Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) did not essentially affect the structure of the lipopeptide. Interestingly, our results showed that the addition of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) helped smaller micelles to form larger micellar aggregates. Since pseudofactin II binds metals, we tested whether this phenomena was somehow related to its antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Proteus mirabilis. We found that the antimicrobial effect of pseudofactin II was increased by supplementation of culture media with all tested divalent metal ions. Finally, by using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria we showed that the higher antimicrobial activity of metal complexes of pseudofactin II is attributed to the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:27416562

  14. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Seventeenth National Symposium, Albany, NY, August 7-9, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. M. (Editor); Chait, R. (Editor); Smith, C. W. (Editor); Wilhem, D. P. (Editor); Andrews, W. A. (Editor); Newman, J. C. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference gives attention to topics in the application of fracture mechanics, subcritical crack growth phenomena, fracture testing methods, ductile fracture behavior, and fracture mechanisms and their analysis. Specific papers treat the resistance curve approach to composite materials characterization, fracture toughness in ductile iron and cast steel, hold-time effects in elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation, creep crack growth under nonsteady conditions, viscoplastic fatigue in a superalloy at elevated temperatures, fracture testing with arc bend specimens, one-point bend impact test application, and a compact mode II fracture specimen. Also discussed are the computation of stable crack growth using the J-integral, the use of plastic energy dissipation to characterize crack growth, the extension of surface cracks under cyclic loading, the minimum time criterion for crack instability in structural materials, dynamic crack propagation and branching under biaxial loading, and boundary layer effects in cracked bodies.

  15. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures. II: Infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater at Maqarin, Jordan, a natural analogue site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steefel, C. I.; Lichtner, P. C.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical multicomponent reactive transport model described fully in Steefel and Lichtner (1998)[Steefel, C.I., Lichtner, P.C., 1998. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures, I. Controls on reaction front geometry. J. Hydrol. (in press)] is used to simulate the infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater along discrete fractures at Maqarin, Jordan, a site considered as a natural analogue to cement-bearing nuclear waste repositories. In the Eastern Springs area at Maqarin, two prominent sets of sub-parallel fractures trending NW-SE are approximately perpendicular to the local water table contours, with the slope of the water table indicating north-westward flow. Extensive mineralogic investigations [Alexander W.R. (Ed.), 1992. A natural analogue study of cement-buffered, hyperalkaline groundwaters and their interaction with a sedimentary host rock. NAgrA Technical Report (NTB 91-10), Wettingen, Switzerland; Milodowski, A.E., Hyslop, E.K., Pearce, J.M., Wetton, P.D., Kemp, S.J., Longworth, G., Hodginson, E., and Hughes, C.R., 1998. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the western springs area. In: Smellie, J.A.T. (ed.), 1998: Maqarin Natural Analogue Study: Phase III. SKB Technical Report TR98-04, Stockholm, Sweden] indicate that the width of intense rock alteration zone bordering the fractures changes from about 4 mm at one locality (the M1 sampling site) to approximately 1 mm 100 m to the north-west in the flow direction (the M2 site), suggesting a lessening of alteration intensity in that direction. Using this information, the dimensionless parameter δ v/φ D' (φ=porosity, D'=effective diffusion coefficient in rock matrix, δ=fracture aperture, and v=fluid velocity in the fracture) and measurements of the local hydraulic head gradient and effective diffusion coefficient in the rock matrix, a mean fracture aperture of 0.194 mm is calculated assuming the cubic law applies. This information, in combination with measured groundwater compositions at the

  16. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  17. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  18. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The examples are based on finite element models of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen. The examples are independent of the analysis software used and allow the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, quasi-static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Good agreement between the results obtained from the automated propagation analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting input parameters that had previously been determined during analyses of mode I Double Cantilever Beam and mode II End Notched Flexure specimens. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  19. Seismic transmission operator reciprocity - II: impedance-operator symmetry via elastic lateral modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of the overburden transmission response are of particular interest for the analysis of reflectivity illumination or blurring in seismic depth imaging. The first step to showing a transmission-operator reciprocity property is to identify the symmetry of the so-called displacement-to-traction operators. The latter are analogous to Dirichlet-to-Neumann operators and they may also be called impedance operators. Their symmetry is deduced here after development of a formal spectral or modal theory of lateral wavefunctions in a laterally heterogeneous generally anisotropic elastic medium. The elastic lateral modes are displacement-traction 6-vectors and they are built from two auxiliary 3-vector lateral-mode bases. These auxiliary modes arise from Hermitian and anti-Hermitian operators, so they have familiar properties such as orthogonality. There is no assumption of down/up symmetry of the elasticity tensor, but basic assumptions are made about the existence and completeness of the elastic modes. A point-symmetry property appears and plays a central role. The 6-vector elastic modes have a symplectic orthogonality property, which facilitates the development of modal expansions for 6-vector functions of the lateral coordinates when completeness is assumed. While the elastic modal theory is consistent with the laterally homogeneous case, numerical work would provide confidence that it is correct in general. An appendix contains an introductory overview of acoustic lateral modes that were studied by other authors, given from the perspective of this new work. A distinction is drawn between unit normalization of scalar auxiliary modes and a separate energy-flux normalization of 2-vector acoustic modes. Neither is crucial to the form of acoustic pressure-to-velocity or impedance operators. This statement carries over to the elastic case for the 3-vector auxiliary- and 6-vector elastic-mode normalizations. The modal theory is used to construct the kernel of the

  20. The Fundamental Solutions for the Stress Intensity Factors of Modes I, II And III. The Axially Symmetric Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, B.

    2015-05-01

    The subject of the paper are Green's functions for the stress intensity factors of modes I, II and III. Green's functions are defined as a solution to the problem of an elastic, transversely isotropic solid with a penny-shaped or an external crack under general axisymmetric loadings acting along a circumference on the plane parallel to the crack plane. Exact solutions are presented in a closed form for the stress intensity factors under each type of axisymmetric ring forces as fundamental solutions. Numerical examples are employed and conclusions which can be utilized in engineering practice are formulated.

  1. VERTOS II: Percutaneous vertebroplasty versus conservative therapy in patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures; rationale, objectives and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Klazen, CAH; Verhaar, HJJ; Lampmann, LEH; Juttmann, JR; Blonk, MC; Jansen, FH; Tielbeek, AV; Schoemaker, MC; Buskens, E; van der Graaf, Y; Janssens, X; Fransen, H; van Everdingen, KJ; Muller, AF; Mali, WPThM; Lohle, PNM

    2007-01-01

    Background The standard care in patients with a painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is conservative therapy. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), a minimally invasive technique, is gaining popularity as a new treatment option. Many prospective and retrospective studies have reported on the effectiveness and safety of PV, but no large randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been published. Objective To estimate cost-effectiveness of PV compared to conservative therapy in terms of: pain reduction, quality of life, complications, secondary fractures and mortality. Materials and methods The VERTOS II study is designed as a prospective, multicenter RCT. Patients with a painful VCF with bone edema on MR imaging, local back pain for 6 weeks or less, osteopenia and aged 50 years or older, after obtaining informed consent are included and randomized for PV or conservative therapy. In total 200 patients will be enrolled. Follow-up is at regular intervals during a 1-year period with standard questionnaires, addressing: clinical symptoms, pain medication, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Secondary fractures, necessary additional therapies and complications are recorded. Conclusion The VERTOS II study is the first methodologically sound RCT designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of PV compared to conservative therapy in patients with an acute osteoporotic VCF. Trial registration , NCT00232466 PMID:17973983

  2. Geomechanical Parameters in Fracturing Process of Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is crucial to geothermal and hydrocarbon recovery. Predicting performance based on rock characteristics (micro and macro) is essential to effective stimulation. We studied two extreme rock types: 1) Lyons sandstone, a brittle, low porosity, low permeability, weakly anisotropic material and 2) pyrophyllite, a strongly anisotropic metamorphic rock similar chemically and mechanically to shale, having extremely low porosity and permeability. Mineralogy, porosity, permeability, mercury capillary pressure, grain size, μ-CT imaging and elastic anisotropy analysis describe these rocks. Brazilian disk tests were carried to observe the fracture initiation and propagation under tension. Fracture propagation velocity is measured using a high speed digital camera. Strain gauges and acoustic emission (AE) sensors recorded deformation leading to and during failure. SEM imaging and surface profilometry were used to study the post-failure fracture systems and failed surface topology. The fracture process zone (FPZ) is mapped and evaluated using a mosaic of stitched SEM images. The fracture permeability was measured as a function of effective stress and compared to fracture permeability models. The effect of anisotropy on fracturing (Mode I and Mode II fractures) was also investigated rotating the fabric direction of the tested disks relative to the loading axis through increments of 15 degrees. Results indicate differences in fracturing process of these two rock types. Pyrophyllite displays a localized ductile behavior in the process zone resulting in a narrower fracture with a higher propagation velocity and far less AE activity. Pyrophyllite shows 70 % higher tensile strength compared to Lyons sandstone even though it becomes ductile at much lower pressures. The sandstone shows a wide brittle fracture with larger FPZ and better permeability at elevated effective pressures. The greater number of AE activity associated with higher energy events confirms the

  3. Novel fracture technology proves marginal Viking prospect economic, part II: Well clean-up, flowback and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, S.; Rylance, M.; Tybero, G.

    1996-12-31

    Having completed both fracture treatments as discussed in a companion paper, this paper continues on to describe the post fracture shut-in, clean-up and well testing operations that took place on the Viking Wx exploration well 49/17-12. These operations involved the removal of Resin Coated Proppant (RCP) from the wellbore, via Coiled Tubing (CT), through the use of a specially designed jetting nozzle. The RCP pack stability at a concentration of 3.0 lb/ft{sup 2} (as per planned design) had already been tested in a flowback cell. The use of a Surface Read-Out (SRO) gauge, combined with gas, water and proppant flow rates as well as the viscosity of fracturing fluids returns, enabled real time calculation of the drag forces, on the proppant pack, during clean-up. The flow rate, in the field, was controlled such that the calculated drag forces remained below those observed in the laboratory. Following the clean-up a flow and build-up test was conducted, to evaluate the fracture half length and fracture conductivity, from which a Pseudo-radial skin was calculated. The Non-Darcy effects in the fracture were also evaluated, and finally the short term and long term well deliverabilities were assessed.

  4. Accretion modes and unified schemes for FR-II radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whysong, David Harold.

    2005-11-01

    A robust and general method of testing for the presence of an obscured quasar inside a radio galaxy is to look for high mid-IR luminosity from the nuclear obscuring material. We conducted a survey of 3CR FR-II radio galaxies and quasars using the Keck I telescope Long Wavelength Spectrometer. The sample is flux-limited and selected on an isotropic property (low-frequency radio lobe flux). We also observed Cygnus A and two FR-I radio galaxies, Centaurus A, and M87. For the FR-I sources, we f0ind that the nuclear mid-IR source in M87 is consistent with pure synchrotron emission from the base of the jet. This result establishes the existence of "nonthermal" narrow line radio galaxies wherein the energetics are dominated by jet kinetic luminosity rather than thermal accretion. However, Cen A does contain a modest quasar-like nucleus, so the central engines of FR-I radio galaxies are heterogeneous in nature. ? showed that for 3CR FR-II sources with Z < 0.5, there appears to be an excess number of low-luminosity Narrow Line Radio Galaxies with small projected linear size relative to the simplest orientation models. The simplest explanation is that there is a population of relatively small, low power FR-IIs that lack hidden quasars. An alternative hypothesis is possible if the opening angle of the dusty torus scales with luminosity and the radio power decreases with time (?). Our observations test these hypotheses. For our FR-II sample, the mid-IR flux is positively correlated with projected linear size of the radio lobes at 99.8% confidence. Many of the smaller radio galaxies have small mid-IR flux (upper limit 3s < 1.5 mJy) which indicates they probably lack a powerful thermal accretion flow. It seems likely that many FR- II radio sources are predominantly powered by nonthermal means, while the largest and most powerful FR-II radio galaxies show, strong mid-IR emission indicating that they harbor a hidden quasar. This is consistent with the fragmentary optical

  5. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. II - Internal overstable modes. [convectively driven Alfven wave role

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    It had been pointed out by Parker (1974) that the basic cause of the sunspot phenomenon is the enhanced heat transport in the magnetic field of the sunspot. The enhanced transport occurs through convective overstability which operates as a heat engine generating Alfven waves. The characteristics of the convective forces present are investigated along with questions concerning overstability and convectively driven Alfven waves. Relations regarding instability and convectively driven surface waves are discussed and attention is given to individual overstable Alfven modes. It is found that the form of an Alfven wave in the absence of convective forces is entirely arbitrary, so that waves with any arbitrary profile can be fitted into a vertical column of the field without disturbing the fluid outside. With the introduction of convective forces the situation changes so that the presence of lateral boundaries alters the form of the basic wave modes.

  6. Single-mode tapered optical fiber loop immunosensor II: assay of anti-cholera toxin immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Robert S.; Hale, Zoe M.; Levine, Myron M.; Lowe, C. R.; Payne, Frank P.

    1994-07-01

    An evanescent wave immunoassay for cholera antitoxin immunoglobulins was performed using a single mode tapered optical fiber loop sensor. The transducer was silanized with 3- glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and chemically modified to link covalently either cholera toxin B subunit or a synthetic peptide derived from it, CTP3. The sensor was exposed to seral fluids, obtained from human volunteers having been exposed to live virulent Vibrio cholerae 01 and shown to produce rice-water stools. Other toxins of interest, such as Clostridium botulinum toxin A, have been tested on similar systems. The bound unlabelled immunoglobulins were then exposed to a mixture of FITC-anti-IgG and TRITC-anti-IgA, without requirement for a separation step. The emanating fluorescent emissions of fluorescein and rhodamine, excited by the input laser light, were coupled back into the guided mode of the tapered fiber, and used to determine the concentrations of the complementary antigens.

  7. Effects of mixed mode I/II loading and grain orientation on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2024-T3 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, B.E.; Sutton, M.A.; Boone, M.L.; Dawicke, D.S.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of material grain orientation and mixed mode I/II loading on crack initiation and stable tearing in 2.3-mm-thick, unclad 2024-T3 aluminum is experimentally investigated. Mode I experiments were performed on center-cracked specimens with the crack being oriented at various angles relative to the rolling direction. Defining {theta} to be the angle between the normal to the initial crack plane and the loading direction, Mode I/II experiments were performed using an Arcan test fixture for 0{degree} {le} {theta} {le} 90{degree} [corresponding to 90{degree} {ge} {beta} {ge} 0{degree}, where {beta} = atan (K{sub II}/K{sub I})] with the crack oriented either along the rolling direction (T-L) or perpendicular to the rolling direction (L-T). Results indicate that: 1. The Mode I crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) is a strong function of the orientation of the crack relative to the rolling direction; CTOD for a T-L specimen is 0.84 mm, increasing linearly with orientation angle to 1.05 mm for an L-T case. 2. The Mode I/II CTOD increases rapidly during initial increments of crack growth and then decreases towards a constant value as crack growth continues. 3. For {theta} < 68{degree} ({beta} > 29{degree}), all cracks kinked and the Mode I/II plastic zones are similar to rotated Mode I plastic zones throughout the crack growth process. 4. J{sub II} = 0 reasonably predicts the direction of tension-dominated crack growth, but does not predict the transition to shear crack growth which occurs for {theta} {ge} 75{degree}. 5. K{sub II} {ge} K{sub I} for {theta} {approx} 58{degree} ({beta} = 45{degree}) does not quantitatively predict the transition to shear crack growth for {theta} {ge} 75{degree} ({beta} {le} 22{degree}), but does provide an indication of changing conditions in the crack tip region.

  8. Thermal load distribution on the ALT-II limiter of TEXTOR-94 during RI mode operation and during disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.; Denner, T.; Mank, G.

    2000-03-01

    Thermographic measurements using an IR scanner have been performed at the pump limiter ALT-II of TEXTOR-94 during RI mode discharges and during disruptions. The measurements on the RI mode discharges were done to complete the TEXTOR database which had shown a structured decay pattern of the deposited power. It was found that the underlying radial heat flux can be described by two exponential decay functions. This structure, which generates an unexpected heat component close to the tangent line, has been observed in all discharge conditions including the RI mode. During disruptions, the heat is released in short pulses with a typical duration of 0.01-0.1 ms. The radial decay length of these pulses has a similar shape to the heat flux during normal discharges: it consists again of a strong component close to the tangent line with a radial decay length of 2-5 mm and probably one with a decay length of the order of 1 cm. The heat is released at the time when the edge electron temperature of the plasma drops, when intense hydrogen and carbon fluxes occur near the walls, and when electrical currents in the limiter blades are excited. In a tentative interpretation, the temporal and spatial structure of the heat pulse is attributed to the presence and growth of a laminar zone at the plasma edge, which is connected with the ergodization of the plasma edge during a disruption.

  9. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented. The example is based on a finite element model of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen for 50% mode II. The benchmarking is demonstrated for Abaqus/Standard, however, the example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, a quasi-static benchmark example was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement as well as delamination length versus applied load/displacement relationships from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall, the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  10. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  11. Nucleosynthesis Modes in the High-Entropy-Wind Scenario of Type II Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Cowan, J. J.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Pfeiffer, B.; Sneden, C.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Truran, J. W.

    2008-03-11

    In an attempt to constrain the astrophysical conditions for the nucleosynthesis of the classical r-process elements beyond Fe, we have performed large-scale dynamical network calculations within the model of an adiabatically expanding high- entropy wind (HEW) of type II supernovae (SN II). A superposition of several entropy-components (S) with model-inherent weightings results in an excellent reproduction of the overall Solar System (SS) isotopic r-process residuals (N{sub r,{center_dot}}), as well as the more recent observations of elemental abundances of metal-poor, r-process rich halo stars in the early Galaxy. For the heavy r-process elements beyond Sn, our HEW model predicts a robust abundance pattern up to the Th, U r-chronometer region. For the lighter neutron-capture region, an S-dependent superposition of (i) a normal {alpha}-component directly producing stable nuclei, including s-only isotopes, and (ii) a component from a neutron-rich {alpha}-freezeout followed by the rapid recapture of {beta}-delayed neutrons ({beta}dnrpar; emitted from the far-unstable seed nuclei is indicated. In agreement with several recent halo-star observations in the 60

  12. Fractures of the coracoid process.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K; Yoshida, A; Takahashi, M; Ui, M

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed 67 consecutive patients with fractures of the coracoid process, classifying them by the relationship between the fracture site and the coracoclavicular ligament. The 53 type-I fractures were behind the attachment of this ligament, and the 11 type-II fractures were anterior to it. The relationship of three fractures was uncertain. Type-I fractures were associated with a wide variety of shoulder injuries and consequent dissociation between the scapula and the clavicle. Treatment was usually by open reduction and fixation for type-I fractures and conservative methods for type-II. At follow-up of the 45 available patients, 87% had excellent results, with no significant differences between the operative and non-operative groups or between the type-I and type-II fractures. We consider that operative treatment should be reserved for patients with multiple shoulder injuries with severe disruption of the scapuloclavicular connection. PMID:9020438

  13. Characterization and modelling of naturally fractured granites in the Redang Island, Terengganu, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Kadir, Askury; Rahman, Mohd Razlan Abdul; Chee Meng, Choong; Jamaludin, Fathiyah; Talib, Jasmi Ab

    2015-04-01

    The Redang Island is situated in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia, in the state of Terengganu. Geologically, it is mainly composed of medium- to coarse-grained biotite-hornblend granite and overlain by sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The close-spaced fractured pattern gave an indicator for the active tectonic, which create a fractured basement in Anding Utara that situated 200km SE of the study area. The main primary objective is to characterize the fracture orientation, fracture density as well as to create the static DFN model based on the surface outcrops. A systematic and accurate data collection is crucial for a proper statistical analysis of fracture parameters for fracture modeling. A total of five scan-lines at different length was captured to represent the area. The mode I (extension) and mode II (sheared) fractures are identified during the data aquisition. Hence, the maximum stresses (α1) were interpreted from rose diagram and stereoplots, which are trending towards NE-SW and ENE-WSW. The regional stresses obtained is almost identical to FMI data from the Malay Basin (Anding). Hence, this study suggests that the fracture networking are genetically correlated between fractured basement in the Malay Basin and the Redang Island. Therefore, it can become a good analogue for in-depth studies for better understanding of fracture reservoir.

  14. Numerical Observation of Three-Dimensional Wing Cracking of Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc Rock Specimen Subjected to Mixed Mode Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N. W.; Dai, F.; Wei, M. D.; Xu, Y.; Zhao, T.

    2016-01-01

    The cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) specimen has been suggested by International Society for Rock Mechanics for measuring mode I fracture toughness of rocks. Subsequently, this specimen geometry has been widely extended to conduct mixed mode fracture tests on rocks as well. A straight through crack front during the fracturing process upon the root of the chevron notch is assumed in the testing principle, but has never been thoroughly evaluated before. In this study, for the first time, the progressive rock fracture mechanism of the CCNBD rock specimen under mixed mode loading is numerically simulated. Specimens under representative mixed mode loading angles are modelled; and the assumption of the straight through crack front growth is critically assessed. The results show that not only the notch tip but also the saw-cut chevron notch cracks during the experiments, yielding a prominent twisted front, far from being straight. The crack front never grows up to the root of the notch ligament and the straight through crack front assumption is never satisfied in the realistic rock fracture progress of this chevron notched specimen subjected to mixed mode loads. In contrast, the fracture progress features typical three-dimensional wing cracking towards the loading ends. The numerically observed progressive fracture mechanism reveals that the measuring principle of mixed mode fracture tests employing CCNBD specimens is significantly violated and the measures of both modes I and II fracture toughness are uncertain.

  15. Hybrid fracture and the transition from extension fracture to shear fracture.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Jonathan M; Chester, Frederick M

    2004-03-01

    Fracture is a fundamental mechanism of material failure. Two basic types of brittle fractures are commonly observed in rock deformation experiments--extension (opening mode) fractures and shear fractures. For nearly half a century it has been hypothesized that extension and shear fractures represent end-members of a continuous spectrum of brittle fracture types. However, observations of transitional fractures that display both opening and shear modes (hybrids) in naturally deformed rock have often remained ambiguous, and a clear demonstration of hybrid fracture formation has not been provided by experiments. Here we present the results of triaxial extension experiments on Carrara marble that show a continuous transition from extension fracture to shear fracture with an increase in compressive stress. Hybrid fractures form under mixed tensile and compressive stress states at acute angles to the maximum principal compressive stress. Fracture angles are greater than those observed for extension fractures and less than those observed for shear fractures. Fracture surfaces also display a progressive change from an extension to shear fracture morphology. PMID:14999279

  16. SIF-based fracture criterion for interface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The complex stress intensity factor K governing the stress field of an interface crack tip may be split into two parts, i.e., hat{K} and s^{-i\\varepsilon } , so that K=hat{K}s^{-i\\varepsilon }, s is a characteristic length and \\varepsilon is the oscillatory index. hat{K} has the same dimension as the classical stress intensity factor and characterizes the interface crack tip field. That means a criterion for interface cracks may be formulated directly with hat{K} , as Irwin (ASME J. Appl. Mech. 24:361-364, 1957) did in 1957 for the classical fracture mechanics. Then, for an interface crack, it is demonstrated that the quasi Mode I and Mode II tip fields can be defined and distinguished from the coupled mode tip fields. Built upon SIF-based fracture criteria for quasi Mode I and Mode II, the stress intensity factor (SIF)-based fracture criterion for mixed mode interface cracks is proposed and validated against existing experimental results.

  17. SIF-based fracture criterion for interface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xing

    2016-06-01

    The complex stress intensity factor K governing the stress field of an interface crack tip may be split into two parts, i.e., hat{K} and s^{-iɛ}, so that K=hat{K}s^{-iɛ}, s is a characteristic length and ɛ is the oscillatory index. hat{K} has the same dimension as the classical stress intensity factor and characterizes the interface crack tip field. That means a criterion for interface cracks may be formulated directly with hat{K}, as Irwin (ASME J. Appl. Mech. 24:361-364, 1957) did in 1957 for the classical fracture mechanics. Then, for an interface crack, it is demonstrated that the quasi Mode I and Mode II tip fields can be defined and distinguished from the coupled mode tip fields. Built upon SIF-based fracture criteria for quasi Mode I and Mode II, the stress intensity factor (SIF)-based fracture criterion for mixed mode interface cracks is proposed and validated against existing experimental results.

  18. Biomechanical Comparison of Two Kinds of Internal Fixation in a Type C Zone II Pelvic Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Zhan-Le; Lyu, Hong-Zhi; Cui, Yun-Wei; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Yang, Yan-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unstable pelvic fractures are complex and serious injuries. Selection of a fixation method for these fractures remains a challenging problem for orthopedic surgeons. This study aimed to compare the stability of Tile C pelvic fractures fixed with two iliosacral (IS) screws and minimally invasive adjustable plate (MIAP) combined with one IS screw. Methods: This study was a biomechanical experiment. Six embalmed specimens of the adult pelvis were used. The soft tissue was removed from the specimens, and the spines from the fourth lumbar vertebra to the proximal one-third of both femurs were retained. The pubic symphysis, bilateral sacroiliac joints and ligaments, bilateral hip joints, bilateral sacrotuberous ligaments, and bilateral sacrospinous ligaments were intact. Tile C pelvic fractures were made on the specimens. The symphysis pubis was fixed with a plate, and the fracture on the posterior pelvic ring was fixed with two kinds of internal fixation in turn. The specimens were placed in a biomechanical machine at a standing neutral posture. A cyclic vertical load of up to 500 N was applied, and displacement was recorded. Shifts in the fracture gap were measured by a grating displacement sensor. Statistical analysis used: Paired-samples t-test. Results: Under the vertical load of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 N, the average displacement of the specimens fixed with MIAP combined with one IS screw was 0.46, 0.735, 1.377, 1.823, and 2.215 mm, respectively, which was significantly lower than that of specimens fixed with two IS screws under corresponding load (P < 0.05). Under the vertical load of 500 N, the shift in the fracture gap of specimens fixed with MIAP combined with one IS screw was 0.261 ± 0.095 mm, and that of specimens fixed with two IS screws was 0.809 ± 0.170 mm. The difference was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The stability of Tile C pelvic fractures fixed with MIAP combined with one IS screw was better than that fixed with two IS screws

  19. Strength, Fracture Toughness, Fatigue, and Standardization Issues of Free-standing Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Strength, fracture toughness and fatigue behavior of free-standing thick thermal barrier coatings of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt % Y2O3 were determined at ambient and elevated temperatures in an attempt to establish a database for design. Strength, in conjunction with deformation (stress-strain behavior), was evaluated in tension (uniaxial and trans-thickness), compression, and uniaxial and biaxial flexure; fracture toughness was determined in various load conditions including mode I, mode II, and mixed modes I and II; fatigue or slow crack growth behavior was estimated in cyclic tension and dynamic flexure loading. Effect of sintering was quantified through approaches using strength, fracture toughness, and modulus (constitutive relations) measurements. Standardization issues on test methodology also was presented with a special regard to material's unique constitutive relations.

  20. PEP-II B-Factory prototype higher order mode load design

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, R.; Ko, K.; Ng, N.

    1995-10-01

    To reduce the impedance of the cavity higher order modes, (HOM`s), a compact broad-band, low-reflection, waveguide load is required with a VSWR less than 2:1 in the frequency range 714 MHz to 2500 MHz. The load must also work in the high vacuum of the cavity, and be capable of dissipating up to 10 kW of power which is generated by the interaction of the beam with the cavity HOM`s and which is directed to each load assembly. A prototype load assembly is being fabricated which uses the lossy ceramic Al-N with 7% by weight glassy carbon to absorb the microwave power.

  1. Majorana modes in InSb nanowires (II): resolving the topological phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Gül, Önder; de Moor, Michiel; de Vries, Fokko; van Veen, Jasper; van Woerkom, David; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; Cassidy, Maja; Geresdi, Attila; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Goswami, Srijit; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    Majorana modes in hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowire devices can be probed via tunnelling spectroscopy which shows a zero bias peak (ZBP) in differential conductance (1). Majoranas are formed when the Zeeman energy EZ and the chemical potential μ satisfy the condition EZ >√{Δ2 +μ2 } , with Δ the superconducting gap. This Majorana condition outlines the topologically non-trivial phase and predicts a particular dependence of ZBPs on the gate voltage and the external magnetic field. In this talk we show that the magnetic field range of ZBPs can be tuned by gate voltage and vice versa, consistent with these Majorana predictions. Supported by measurements in different external magnetic field orientations, these observations pave the way for exploring the topological phase diagram of spin-orbit coupled semiconductor nanowires with induced superconductivity.

  2. Nonlinear behavior of solar gravity modes driven by He-3 in the core. II - Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merryfield, William J.; Gough, Douglas; Toomre, Juri

    1991-02-01

    The nonlinear behavior of gravity-mode oscillations driven by He-3-destroying reactions in the solar core has been examined by numerically integrating equations describing a very simplified model. The results of a previous bifurcation analysis, which suggest that such oscillations are unlikely to attain amplitudes sufficient to trigger core convection, are verified. These results are extended to models whose nuclear reaction rates and thermal stratification represent the core somewhat more accurately. Nonlinear processes give rise to a preference for the oscillations to develop as standing waves rather than traveling waves, thus breaking the degeneracy between these two types of motion which exists in linearized theory. Study of the large-amplitude behavior of the oscillations is hindered by a tendency for the model to become thermally unstable.

  3. Strain energy release rates of composite interlaminar end-notch and mixed-mode fracture: A sublaminate/ply level analysis and a computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valisetty, R. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code is presented for the sublaminate/ply level analysis of composite structures. This code is useful for obtaining stresses in regions affected by delaminations, transverse cracks, and discontinuities related to inherent fabrication anomalies, geometric configurations, and loading conditions. Particular attention is focussed on those layers or groups of layers (sublaminates) which are immediately affected by the inherent flaws. These layers are analyzed as homogeneous bodies in equilibrium and in isolation from the rest of the laminate. The theoretical model used to analyze the individual layers allows the relevant stresses and displacements near discontinuities to be represented in the form of pure exponential-decay-type functions which are selected to eliminate the exponential-precision-related difficulties in sublaminate/ply level analysis. Thus, sublaminate analysis can be conducted without any restriction on the maximum number of layers, delaminations, transverse cracks, or other types of discontinuities. In conjunction with the strain energy release rate (SERR) concept and composite micromechanics, this computational procedure is used to model select cases of end-notch and mixed-mode fracture specimens. The computed stresses are in good agreement with those from a three-dimensional finite element analysis. Also, SERRs compare well with limited available experimental data.

  4. Antimicrobial effects of copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes provide new insight into their biochemical mode of action.

    PubMed

    Djoko, Karrera Y; Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S; McEwan, Alastair G

    2014-04-01

    The copper(II) complexes of bis-thiosemicarbazones (Cu(btsc)) such as Cu(atsm) and Cu(gtsm) are neutral, lipophilic compounds that show promise as therapeutics for the treatment of certain neurological diseases and cancers. Although the effects of these compounds have been described at the cellular level, there is almost no information about their biochemical mode of action. In this work, we showed that Cu(atsm) and Cu(gtsm) displayed antimicrobial activities against the human obligate pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae that were more than 100 times more potent than Cu(NO3)2 salt alone. Treatment with Cu(btsc) also produced phenotypes that were consistent with copper poisoning, but the levels of intracellular copper were undetectable by ICP MS. We observed that Cu(btsc) interacted with proteins in the cell membrane. Systematic measurements of O2 uptake further demonstrated that treatment with both Cu(atsm) and Cu(gtsm) led to dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory electron transfer processes via succinate and NADH dehydrogenases. These dehydrogenases were not inhibited by a non-btsc source of Cu(II). The results led us to conclude that the biochemical mechanism of Cu(btsc) action is likely more complex than the present, simplistic model of copper release into the cytoplasm. PMID:24435165

  5. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. ); Wagner, K.C. )

    1990-07-01

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

  6. Comparison of fracture resistance and failure pattern of endodontically treated premolars with different esthetic onlay systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mynampati, Praffulla; Babu, Mandava Ramesh; Saraswathi, Devabhaktuni Disha; Kumar, Janga Ravi; Gudugunta, Leneena; Gaddam, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the fracture resistance and modes of failures of three different aesthetic MOD onlays on endodontically treated premolars. Materials and Methods: Forty sound maxillary premolars were selected of which 10 untreated teeth were taken as control (Group I). The other thirty premolars were subjected to standardized MOD onlay preparations and root canal treatments and divided into 3 equal groups. Onlays were prepared in Group II- Indirect composite, Group III- Lithium Disilicate ceramic and Group IV- Full Zirconia. All onlays were cemented using Multilink Automix. All the 40 samples were subjected to fracture resistance testing on Universal testing machine. Also fractured specimens were observed under stereo-microscope for modes of failure. Results: Group IV presented the highest fracture resistance. Groups II and III presented no significant difference in fracture resistance from each other (P > 0.05). Group II and Group III showed significantly lower fracture resistance values than Group I. Coming to modes of failure, only Group IV had showed no cracks in any of the restorations. Conclusion: Full Zirconia MOD onlays increased the fracture resistance of endodontically treated premolars to a significantly higher level than the sound teeth. PMID:25829694

  7. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mode II Static Delamination Propagation and Fatigue Growth Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for static delamination propagation and cyclic delamination onset and growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of an End-Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation, onset and growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, based on the static results, benchmark examples for cyclic delamination growth were created. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Fourth, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the automated analysis and compared to the benchmark examples. Again, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  8. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. II. Mode jumping and nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    A fireball is formed inside a highly transparent spherical grid immersed in a dc discharge plasma. The ambient plasma acts as a cathode and the positively biased grid as an anode. A strong nearly current-free double layer separates the two plasmas. Electrons are accelerated into the fireball, ionize, and establish a discharge plasma with plasma potential near the grid potential. Ions are ejected from the fireball. Since electrons are lost at the same rate as ions, most electrons accelerated into the fireball just pass through it. Thus, the electron distribution contains radially counterstreaming electrons. High-frequency oscillations are excited with rf period given by the electron transit time through the fireball. Since the frequency is well below the electron plasma frequency, no eigenmodes other than a beam space-charge wave exists. The instability is an inertial transit-time instability similar to the sheath-plasma instability or the reflex vircator instability. In contrast to vircators, there is no electron reflection from a space-charge layer but counterstreaming arises from spherical convergence and divergence of electrons. While the basic instability properties have been presented in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012104 (2011)], the present paper focuses on observed mode jumping and nonlinear effects. The former produce frequency jumps and different potential profiles, the latter produce harmonics associated with electron bunching at large amplitudes. In situ probe measurements are presented and interpreted.

  9. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. II. Mode jumping and nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-15

    A fireball is formed inside a highly transparent spherical grid immersed in a dc discharge plasma. The ambient plasma acts as a cathode and the positively biased grid as an anode. A strong nearly current-free double layer separates the two plasmas. Electrons are accelerated into the fireball, ionize, and establish a discharge plasma with plasma potential near the grid potential. Ions are ejected from the fireball. Since electrons are lost at the same rate as ions, most electrons accelerated into the fireball just pass through it. Thus, the electron distribution contains radially counterstreaming electrons. High-frequency oscillations are excited with rf period given by the electron transit time through the fireball. Since the frequency is well below the electron plasma frequency, no eigenmodes other than a beam space-charge wave exists. The instability is an inertial transit-time instability similar to the sheath-plasma instability or the reflex vircator instability. In contrast to vircators, there is no electron reflection from a space-charge layer but counterstreaming arises from spherical convergence and divergence of electrons. While the basic instability properties have been presented in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012104 (2011)], the present paper focuses on observed mode jumping and nonlinear effects. The former produce frequency jumps and different potential profiles, the latter produce harmonics associated with electron bunching at large amplitudes. In situ probe measurements are presented and interpreted.

  10. Forward Modeling of Standing Kink Modes in Coronal Loops. II. Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves are believed to play a significant role in coronal heating, and could be used for remote diagnostics of solar plasma. Both the heating and diagnostic applications rely on a correct inversion (or backward modeling) of the observables into the thermal and magnetic structures of the plasma. However, due to the limited availability of observables, this is an ill-posed issue. Forward modeling is designed to establish a plausible mapping of plasma structuring into observables. In this study, we set up forward models of standing kink modes in coronal loops and simulate optically thin emissions in the extreme ultraviolet bandpasses, and then adjust plasma parameters and viewing angles to match three events of transverse loop oscillations observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We demonstrate that forward models could be effectively used to identify the oscillation overtone and polarization, to reproduce the general profile of oscillation amplitude and phase, and to predict multiple harmonic periodicities in the associated emission intensity and loop width variation.

  11. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. . Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  12. Fractional Diffusion Analysis of the Electromagnetic Field In Fractured Media Part II: 2.5-D Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Everett, M. E.; Weiss, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    A 2.5D finite difference (FD) frequency-domain modeling algorithm based on the theory of fractional diffusion of electromagnetic (EM) fields generated by a loop source lying above a fractured geological medium is addressed in this paper. The presence of fractures in the subsurface, usually containing highly conductive pore fluids, gives rise to spatially hierarchical flow paths of induced EM eddy currents. The diffusion of EM eddy currents in such formations is anomalous, generalizing the classical Gaussian process described by the conventional Maxwell equations. Based on the continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory, the diffusion of EM eddy currents in a rough medium is governed by the fractional Maxwell equations. Here, we model the EM response of a 2D subsurface containing fractured zones, with a 3D loop source, which results the so-called 2.5D model geometry. The governing equation in the frequency domain is converted using Fourier transform into k domain along the strike direction (along which the model conductivity doesn't vary). The resulting equation system is solved by the multifrontal massively parallel solver (MUMPS). The data obtained is then converted back to spatial domain and the time domain. We find excellent agreement between the FD and analytic solutions for a rough halfspace model. Then FD solutions are calculated for a 2D fault zone model with variable conductivity and roughness. We compare the results with responses from several classical models and explore the relationship between the roughness and the spatial density of the fracture distribution.

  13. Cohesive zone laws for void growth — II. Numerical field projection of elasto-plastic fracture processes with vapor pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Huck Beng; Hong, Soonsung; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2009-08-01

    Modeling ductile fracture processes using Gurson-type cell elements has achieved considerable success in recent years. However, incorporating the full mechanisms of void growth and coalescence in cohesive zone laws for ductile fracture still remains an open challenge. In this work, a planar field projection method, combined with equilibrium field regularization, is used to extract crack-tip cohesive zone laws of void growth in an elastic-plastic solid. To this end, a single row of void-containing cell elements is deployed directly ahead of a crack in an elastic-plastic medium subjected to a remote K-field loading; the macroscopic behavior of each cell element is governed by the Gurson porous material relation, extended to incorporate vapor pressure effects. A thin elastic strip surrounding this fracture process zone is introduced, from which the cohesive zone variables can be extracted via the planar field projection method. We show that the material's initial porosity induces a highly convex traction-separation relationship — the cohesive traction reaches the peak almost instantaneously and decreases gradually with void growth, before succumbing to rapid softening during coalescence. The profile of this numerically extracted cohesive zone law is consistent with experimentally determined cohesive zone law in Part I for multiple micro-crazing in HIPS. In the presence of vapor pressure, both the cohesive traction and energy are dramatically lowered; the shape of the cohesive zone law, however, remains highly convex, which suggests that diffusive damage is still the governing failure mechanism.

  14. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. II - The delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extension. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13222

  15. Synthesis, structure and antifungal activity of thiophene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde bis(thiosemicarbazone) and nickel(II), copper(II) and cadmium(II) complexes: unsymmetrical coordination mode of nickel complex.

    PubMed

    Alomar, Kusaï; Landreau, Anne; Allain, Magali; Bouet, Gilles; Larcher, Gérald

    2013-09-01

    The reaction of nickel(II), copper(II) chlorides and cadmium(II) chloride and bromide with thiophene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde bis(thiosemicarbazone) (2,3BTSTCH2) leads to a series of new complexes: [Ni(2,3BTSTCH)]Cl, [Cu(2,3BTSTC)], [CdCl2(2,3BTSTCH2)] and [CdBr2(2,3BTSTCH2)]. The crystal structures of the ligand and of [Ni(2,3BTSTCH)]Cl complex have been determined. In this case, we remark an unusual non-symmetrical coordination mode for the two functional groups: one acting as a thione and the second as a deprotonated thiolate. All compounds have been tested for their antifungal activity against human pathogenic fungi: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Aspergillus fumigatus, the cadmium complexes exhibit the highest antifungal activity. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using two biological methods: human MRC5 cultured cells and brine shrimp Artemia salina bioassay. PMID:23792913

  16. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR Plant. Volume 6. Failure mode analysis load combination program. Project I, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    Material properties and failure criteria were evaluated to assess the requirements for double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of the Zion Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. The properties of the 316 stainless steel piping materials were obtained from the literature. Statistical distributions of both the tensile and fracture properties at room and operating temperatures were developed. Yield and ultimate strength tensile properties were combined to estimate the material flow strength. The flow strength and fracture properties were used in the various failure models analyzed. Linear-elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic fracture models were compared, and the governing fracture criterion was determined. For the particular case studied, the fully plastic requirement was found to be the controlling fracture criterion leading to a double-ended guillotine pipe break.

  17. Preoperative posterior tilt of at least 20° increased the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dolatowski, Filip C; Adampour, Mina; Frihagen, Frede; Stavem, Knut; Erik Utvåg, Stein; Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose It has been suggested that preoperative posterior tilt of the femoral head may increase the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 322 such patients. Patients and methods Patients treated with internal fixation between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively identified using hospital records and the digital image bank. 2 raters measured the preoperative posterior tilt angle and categorized it into 3 groups: < 10°, 10–20°, and ≥ 20°. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined. Patients were observed until September 2013 (with a minimum follow-up of 18 months) or until failure of fixation necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The risk of fixation failure was assessed using competing-risk regression analysis, adjusting for time to surgery. Results Patients with a posterior tilt of ≥ 20° had a higher risk of fixation failure: 19% (8/43) as compared to 11% (14/127) in the 10–20° category and 6% (9/152) in the < 10° category (p = 0.03). Posterior tilt of ≥ 20° increased the risk of fixation failure, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.3–8.9; p = 0.01). The interclass correlation coefficient for angular measurements of posterior tilt was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.92), and the IRR for the categorization of posterior tilt into 3 groups was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69–0.81). Interpretation Preoperative posterior tilt of ≥ 20° in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures increased the risk of fixation failure necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The reliability of the methods that we used to measure posterior tilt ranged from good to excellent. PMID:26937557

  18. Preoperative posterior tilt of at least 20° increased the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Dolatowski, Filip C; Adampour, Mina; Frihagen, Frede; Stavem, Knut; Erik Utvåg, Stein; Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - It has been suggested that preoperative posterior tilt of the femoral head may increase the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 322 such patients. Patients and methods - Patients treated with internal fixation between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively identified using hospital records and the digital image bank. 2 raters measured the preoperative posterior tilt angle and categorized it into 3 groups: < 10°, 10-20°, and ≥ 20°. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined. Patients were observed until September 2013 (with a minimum follow-up of 18 months) or until failure of fixation necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The risk of fixation failure was assessed using competing-risk regression analysis, adjusting for time to surgery. Results - Patients with a posterior tilt of ≥ 20° had a higher risk of fixation failure: 19% (8/43) as compared to 11% (14/127) in the 10-20° category and 6% (9/152) in the < 10° category (p = 0.03). Posterior tilt of ≥ 20° increased the risk of fixation failure, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.3-8.9; p = 0.01). The interclass correlation coefficient for angular measurements of posterior tilt was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87-0.92), and the IRR for the categorization of posterior tilt into 3 groups was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69-0.81). Interpretation - Preoperative posterior tilt of ≥ 20° in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures increased the risk of fixation failure necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The reliability of the methods that we used to measure posterior tilt ranged from good to excellent. PMID:26937557

  19. Crack Extension in Hydraulic Fracturing of Shale Cores Using Viscous Oil, Water, and Liquid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennour, Ziad; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Yuya; Chen, Youqing; Nara, Yoshitaka; Chen, Qu; Sekine, Kotaro; Nagano, Yu

    2015-07-01

    We performed hydraulic fracturing experiments on cylindrical cores of anisotropic shale obtained by drilling normal to the sedimentary plane. Experiments were conducted under ambient condition and uniaxial stresses, using three types of fracturing fluid: viscous oil, water, and liquid carbon dioxide (L-CO2). In the experiments using water and oil, cracks extended along the loading direction normal to the sedimentary plane under the uniaxial loading and extended along the sedimentary plane without loading. These results suggest that the direction of crack extension is strongly affected by in situ stress conditions. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that hydraulic fracturing with viscous oil produced linear cracks with few branches, whereas that with water produced cracks with many branches inclining from the loading axis. Statistical analysis of P wave polarity of acoustic emission waveforms showed that viscous oil tended to induce Mode I fracture, whereas both water and L-CO2 tended to induce Mode II fracture. Crack extension upon injection of L-CO2 was independent of loading condition unlike extension for the other two fluids. This result seemed attributable to the low viscosity of L-CO2 and was consistent with previous observations for granite specimens that low-viscosity fluids like CO2 tend to induce widely extending cracks with many branches, with Mode II fractures being dominant. These features are more advantageous for shale gas production than those induced by injection of conventional slick water.

  20. 3D-RISM-MP2 Approach to Hydration Structure of Pt(II) and Pd(II) Complexes: Unusual H-Ahead Mode vs Usual O-Ahead One.

    PubMed

    Aono, Shinji; Mori, Toshifumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Solvation of transition metal complexes with water has been one of the fundamental topics in physical and coordination chemistry. In particular, Pt(II) complexes have recently attracted considerable interest for their relation to anticancer activity in cisplatin and its analogues, yet the interaction of the water molecule and the metal center has been obscured. The challenge from a theoretical perspective remains that both the microscopic solvation effect and the dynamical electron correlation (DEC) effect have to be treated simultaneously in a reasonable manner. In this work we derive the analytical gradient for the three-dimensional reference interaction site model Møller-Plesset second order (3D-RISM-MP2) free energy. On the basis of the three-regions 3D-RISM self-consistent field (SCF) method recently proposed by us, we apply a new layer of the Z-vector method to the CP-RISM equation as well as point-charge approximation to the derivatives with respect to the density matrix elements in the RISM-CPHF equation to remarkably reduce the computational cost. This method is applied to study the interaction of H2O with the d(8) square planar transition metal complexes in aqueous solution, trans-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)(glycine)] (1a), [Pt(II)(NH3)4](2+) (1b), [Pt(II)(CN)4](2-) (1c), and their Pd(II) analogues 2a, 2b, and 2c, respectively, to elucidate whether the usual H2O interaction through O atom (O-ahead mode) or unusual one through H atom (H-ahead mode) is stable in these complexes. We find that the interaction energy of the coordinating water and the transition metal complex changes little when switching from gas to aqueous phase, but the solvation free energy differs remarkably between the two interaction modes, thereby affecting the relative stability of the H-ahead and O-ahead modes. Particularly, in contrast to the expectation that the O-ahead mode is preferred due to the presence of positive charges in 1b, the H-ahead mode is also found to be more stable. The O

  1. Investigation of Explosively Driven Fragmentation of Metals - Two Dimensional Fracture and Fragmentation of Metal Shells: Progress Report II

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D

    2003-02-01

    High explosive enclosed by a metal case qualitatively describes an essential component of high energy systems of importance to the Department of Energy. Detonation of the high explosive causes intense transient pressure loading of the metal following arrival of normal or obliquely incident explosive detonation wave. Subsequent expansion and deformation of the metal case leads to eventual rupture and the opening of fractures and fissures. Details of the rupture process are critical to performance of the system. Consequently, it is essential that the material and kinematic issues governing the processes of dynamic loading and subsequent failure of an explosive-metal case component within a functioning system be adequately understood. Among the reasons are to quantify existing performance, characterize potential degradation of performance resulting from system aging, and optimizing or maintaining system performance through implementation of structural or material changes. The physical and engineering issues underlying this dynamic response and failure phenomena are not adequately understood. The purpose of the present program is to identify the key issues and develop theoretical, computational and experimental models needed to achieve a satisfactory theoretical and analysis framework for analysis of metal case failure in the explosive environment. Specific tasks within the present program include: (1) Models and theories currently being pursued based on physical principles of both the statistical fragmentation concepts of Mott and the energy-based concept of others show promise of providing the analytic and computational methodology capable of predicting explosion-induced fracture and fragmentation of metal components. Experimental studies initiated in the earlier effort offer promise to provide critical test data for validation. The present task shall involve the further refinement and development of the dynamic failure and fragmentation models and theories, and the

  2. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, natural bond orbitals and Mulliken atomic charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex, [Cd(DDTC)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez Soto, C. A.; Costa, A. C.; Versiane, O.; Lemma, T.; Machado, N. C. F.; Mondragón, M. A.; Martin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned to the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Cd(II) complex, abbreviated as ([Cd(DDTC)2]). The calculations and spectral interpretation have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, infrared and Raman second derivative spectra, and band deconvolution analysis to assist in the assignment of observed fundamentals. This study validated the unusual pseudo tetrahedral molecular structure formed around the Cd(II) cation. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to determine the interactions of the normal-modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex on nano-structured silver surfaces. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to study the Cd(II) hybridization causing the pseudo tetrahedral geometry of the framework of the [Cd(DDTC)2] complex, and to confirm the charge transfer mechanisms through second order perturbation theory analysis of the Fox Matrix. In order to find out the electronic dispersion of the Mulliken atomic charges (MAC) in the normal modes, we calculated the MAC for each normal mode and correlated these values with the SERS effect. Experimental UV-Vis spectra were obtained and charge transfer bands were assigned. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values for the vibrational and UV-Vis spectra was obtained.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, natural bond orbitals and Mulliken atomic charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex, [Cd(DDTC)₂].

    PubMed

    Soto, C A Téllez; Costa, A C; Versiane, O; Lemma, T; Machado, N C F; Mondragón, M A; Martin, A A

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental bands have been assigned to the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of the bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)Cd(II) complex, abbreviated as ([Cd(DDTC)2]). The calculations and spectral interpretation have been based on the DFT/B3LYP method, infrared and Raman second derivative spectra, and band deconvolution analysis to assist in the assignment of observed fundamentals. This study validated the unusual pseudo tetrahedral molecular structure formed around the Cd(II) cation. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to determine the interactions of the normal-modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate cadmium (II) complex on nano-structured silver surfaces. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to study the Cd(II) hybridization causing the pseudo tetrahedral geometry of the framework of the [Cd(DDTC)2] complex, and to confirm the charge transfer mechanisms through second order perturbation theory analysis of the Fox Matrix. In order to find out the electronic dispersion of the Mulliken atomic charges (MAC) in the normal modes, we calculated the MAC for each normal mode and correlated these values with the SERS effect. Experimental UV-Vis spectra were obtained and charge transfer bands were assigned. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental values for the vibrational and UV-Vis spectra was obtained. PMID:25813176

  4. Mathematical and numerical analysis of non-planer static mode-II crack in a two-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, S.; Yamashita, T.

    2009-12-01

    A crack in an infinite homogeneous medium is widely assumed as a model for earthquake fault. It is, however, well known that the earth's crust is heterogeneous and its structure is approximated well by a layered medium. Hence, such structure should be taken into account to model earthquake fault reasonably. We mathematically analyze the behavior of a 2-D static mode-II non-planar crack in a two-layered elastic medium in order to understand the effect of layer boundary on earthquake faulting. Although Rani and Singh (1993) and Rivalta et al.(2002) studied similar problems, focuses of their studies were quite narrow probably because of inherent mathematical difficulty. Actually the former assumed a planar crack with uniform slip and the latter assumed a planar crack perpendicular to the layer boundary. While a serious difficulty of the analysis of mode-II crack lies in the derivation of stress distribution due to point source as a kernel function, we first overcome the difficulty by writing its expression in a sequence of complex functions in the real (not the Fourier) domain. A very important characteristic in the sequence is that it has recursive property, which makes possible to derive the kernel function explicitly and to integrate it by parts; the integration by parts is required before the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is applied. Our kernel function is much easier to treat than the expression given by Rani and Singh (1993). This enables us to analyze arbitrarily oriented non-planar crack in a two-layered medium. Next, we calculate the spatial distribution of stress due to crack that does not intersect the layer boundary using the above derived kernel function. We find in the calculation that the existence of layer boundary amplifies or reduces the stress at the crack tip when the crack is located close to the boundary; the stress is amplified when the crack exists in the layer with lower rigidity. Our method of analysis can easily be applied to the

  5. Cadmium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of pyrrole-appended oxacarbaporphyrin: a side-on coordination mode of O-confused carbaporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, Miłosz; Latos-Grazyński, Lechosław; Szterenberg, Ludmiła

    2005-12-26

    A pyrrole adduct of 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-di(p-tolyl)-2-oxa-21-carbaporphyrin [(H,pyr)OCPH]H(2) reacted with sodium ethanolate to yield 5,20-diphenyl-10,15-di(p-tolyl)-3-ethoxy-3-(2'-pyrrol)-2-oxa-21-carbaporphyrin [(EtO,pyr)OCPH]H(2). Subsequently, "true" O-confused oxaporphyrin with a pendant pyrrole ring [(pyr)OCPH]H was formed by the addition of acid to [(EtO,pyr)OCPH]H(2), which triggered an ethanol elimination. In the course of this process, the tetrahedral-trigonal rearrangements originated at the C(3) atom. Insertion of zinc(II), cadmium(II), and nickel(II) into [(pyr)OCPH]H yielded [(pyr)OCPH]Zn(II)Cl, [(pyr)OCPH]Cd(II)Cl, and [(pyr)OCP]Ni(II). The formation of [(pyr)OCP]Ni(II) was accompanied by the C(21)H dehydrogenation step. The nickel(II) ion of [(pyr)OCP]Ni(II), coordinated to a dianionic macrocyclic ligand, is bound by three pyrrolic nitrogens and a trigonally hybridized C(21) atom of the inverted furan. The pyrrole-appended O-confused carbaporphyrin acts as a monoanionic ligand toward zinc(II) and cadmium(II) cations. Three nitrogen atoms and the C(21)H fragment of the inverted furan occupy equatorial positions. In (1)H NMR spectra, the unique inner C(21)H resonances of the inverted furan ring are located at 0.15 ppm for [(pyr)OCPH]Zn(II)Cl, and at 0.21 ppm for [(pyr)OCPH]Cd(II)Cl. The proximity of the furan fragment to the metal ion induces direct scalar couplings between the spin-active nucleus of the metal ((111/113)Cd) and the adjacent (1)H nucleus. The interaction of the metal ion and C(21)H was also reflected by significant changes in carbon chemical shifts ([(pyr)OCPH]Zn(II)Cl, 78.3 ppm; [(pyr)OCPH]Cd(II)Cl, 81.4 ppm; the free base, 101.3 ppm). The density functional theory (DFT) has been applied to model the molecular structures of zinc(II) and cadmium(II) complexes of O-confused oxaporphyrin with an appended pyrrole ring. The Cd...C(21) distance in the optimized structure exceeds the typical Cd-C bond lengths, but is much shorter than the

  6. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  7. Angular momentum redistribution by mixed modes in evolved low-mass stars. II. Spin-down of the core of red giants induced by mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, K.; Marques, J. P.; Goupil, M. J.; Mosser, B.; Sonoi, T.; Ouazzani, R. M.; Dupret, M. A.; Mathis, S.; Grosjean, M.

    2015-07-01

    The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants by the CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions allows us to investigate the internal structure of evolved low-mass stars, from the end of the main sequence to the central helium-burning phase. In particular, the measurement of the mean core rotation rate as a function of the evolution places stringent constraints on the physical mechanisms responsible for the angular momentum redistribution in stars. It showed that the current stellar evolution codes including the modelling of rotation fail to reproduce the observations. An additional physical process that efficiently extracts angular momentum from the core is thus necessary. Our aim is to assess the ability of mixed modes to do this. To this end, we developed a formalism that provides a modelling of the wave fluxes in both the mean angular momentum and the mean energy equations in a companion paper. In this article, mode amplitudes are modelled based on recent asteroseismic observations, and a quantitative estimate of the angular momentum transfer is obtained. This is performed for a benchmark model of 1.3 M⊙ at three evolutionary stages, representative of the evolved pulsating stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler. We show that mixed modes extract angular momentum from the innermost regions of subgiants and red giants. However, this transport of angular momentum from the core is unlikely to counterbalance the effect of the core contraction in subgiants and early red giants. In contrast, for more evolved red giants, mixed modes are found efficient enough to balance and exceed the effect of the core contraction, in particular in the hydrogen-burning shell. Our results thus indicate that mixed modes are a promising candidate to explain the observed spin-down of the core of evolved red giants, but that an other mechanism is to be invoked for subgiants and early red giants.

  8. Dynamic fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic fracture and crack propagation concepts for ductile materials are reviewed. The equations for calculating dynamic stress integrity and the dynamic energy release rate in order to study dynamic crack propagation are provided. The stress intensity factor versus crack velocity relation is investigated. The uses of optical experimental techniques and finite element methods for fracture analyses are described. The fracture criteria for a rapidly propagating crack under mixed mode conditions are discussed; crack extension and fracture criteria under combined tension and shear loading are based on maximum circumferential stress or energy criteria such as strain energy density. The development and use of a Dugdale model and finite element models to represent crack and fracture dynamics are examined.

  9. Using outcrop observations, 3D discrete feature network (DFN) fluid-flow simulations, and subsurface data to constrain the impact of normal faults and opening mode fractures on fluid flow in an active asphalt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. E.; Aydin, A.; Durlofsky, L.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Brownlow, D. T.

    2008-12-01

    An active quarry near Uvalde, TX which mines asphaltic limestone from the Anacacho Formation offers an ideal setting to study fluid-flow in fractured and faulted carbonate rocks. Semi-3D exposures of normal faults and fractures in addition to visual evidence of asphalt concentrations in the quarry help constrain relationships between geologic structures and the flow and transport of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a subsurface dataset which includes thin sections and measured asphalt concentration from the surrounding region provides a basis to estimate asphalt concentrations and constrain the depositional architecture of both the previously mined portions of the quarry and the un-mined surrounding rock volume. We characterized a series of normal faults and opening mode fractures at the quarry and documented a correlation between the intensity and distribution of these structures with increased concentrations of asphalt. The three-dimensional depositional architecture of the Anacacho Formation was characterized using the subsurface thin sections. Then outcrop exposures of faults, fractured beds, and stratigraphic contacts were mapped and their three-dimensional positions were recorded with differential gps devices. These two datasets were assimilated and a quarry-scale, geologically realistic, three-dimensional Discrete Feature Network (DFN) which represents the geometries and material properties of the matrix, normal faults, and fractures within the quarry was constructed. We then performed two-point flux, control-volume finite- difference fluid-flow simulations with the DFN to investigate the 3D flow and transport of fluids. The results were compared and contrasted with available asphalt concentration estimates from the mine and the aforementioned data from the surrounding drill cores.

  10. Experimental and simulation predicted crack paths for al-2024-t351 under mixed-mode i/ii fatigue loading using an arcan fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eileen

    Mixed mode I/II fatigue experiments and simulations are performed for an Arcan fixture and a 6.35mm thick Al-2024-T351 specimen. Experiments were performed for Arcan loading angles that gave rise to a range of Mode I/II crack tip conditions from 0 ¡U ¦¤KII/¦¤KI ¡U ¡TH. Measurements include the crack paths, loading cycles and maximum and minimum loads for each loading angle. Simulations were performed using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) with 10-noded tetrahedral elements via CRACK3D. While modeling the entire fixture-specimen geometry, a modified version of VCCT with automatic crack tip re-meshing and a maximum normal stress criterion were used to predict the direction of crack growth. Results indicate excellent agreement between experiments and simulations for the measured crack paths during the first several millimeters of crack extension.

  11. Avalanche weak layer shear fracture parameters from the cohesive crack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, David

    2014-05-01

    Dry slab avalanches release by mode II shear fracture within thin weak layers under cohesive snow slabs. The important fracture parameters include: nominal shear strength, mode II fracture toughness and mode II fracture energy. Alpine snow is not an elastic material unless the rate of deformation is very high. For natural avalanche release, it would not be possible that the fracture parameters can be considered as from classical fracture mechanics from an elastic framework. The strong rate dependence of alpine snow implies that it is a quasi-brittle material (Bažant et al., 2003) with an important size effect on nominal shear strength. Further, the rate of deformation for release of an avalanche is unknown, so it is not possible to calculate the fracture parameters for avalanche release from any model which requires the effective elastic modulus. The cohesive crack model does not require the modulus to be known to estimate the fracture energy. In this paper, the cohesive crack model was used to calculate the mode II fracture energy as a function of a brittleness number and nominal shear strength values calculated from slab avalanche fracture line data (60 with natural triggers; 191 with a mix of triggers). The brittleness number models the ratio of the approximate peak value of shear strength to nominal shear strength. A high brittleness number (> 10) represents large size relative to fracture process zone (FPZ) size and the implications of LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics). A low brittleness number (e.g. 0.1) represents small sample size and primarily plastic response. An intermediate value (e.g. 5) implies non-linear fracture mechanics with intermediate relative size. The calculations also implied effective values for the modulus and the critical shear fracture toughness as functions of the brittleness number. The results showed that the effective mode II fracture energy may vary by two orders of magnitude for alpine snow with median values ranging from 0

  12. Crustal magnetization and accretion at the Southwest Indian Ridge near the Atlantis II fracture zone, 0-25 Ma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford, A.; Tivey, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Dick, H.; Schouten, Hans; Kinoshita, H.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze geophysical data that extend from 0 to 25-Myr-old seafloor on both flanks of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Lineated marine magnetic anomalies are consistent and identifiable within the study area, even over seafloor lacking a basaltic upper crust. The full spreading rate of 14 km/Myr has remained nearly constant since at least 20 Ma, but crustal accretion has been highly asymmetric, with half rates of 8.5 and 5.5 km/Myr on the Antarctic and African flanks, respectively. This asymmetry may be unique to a ???400 km wide corridor between large-offset fracture zones of the SWIR. In contrast to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, crustal magnetization amplitudes correlate directly with seafloor topography along the present-day rift valleys. This pattern appears to be primarily a function of along-axis variations in crustal thickness, rather than magnetic mineralogy. Off-axis, magnetization amplitudes at paleo-segment ends are more positive than at paleo-segment midpoints, suggesting the presence of an induced component of magnetization within the lower crust or serpentinized upper mantle. Alteration of the magnetic source layer at paleo-segment midpoints reduces magnetization amplitudes by 70-80% within 20 Myr of accretion. Magnetic and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B data suggest that the lower crust cooled quickly enough to lock in a primary thermoremanent magnetization that is in phase with that of the overlying upper crust. Thus magnetic polarity boundaries within the intrusive lower crust may be steeper than envisioned in prior models of ocean crustal magnetization. As the crust ages, the lower crust becomes increasingly important in preserving marine magnetic stripes.

  13. On the relation between incident and emergent light beams of optical fibers. II. Single-mode fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, H.; Sakurai, T.

    1999-03-01

    The change in F-ratio when a beam of light goes through an optical fiber is examined for a single-mode fiber (core radius = 9 μm). A previous study (Makita and Imai 1988) showed that, for multi-mode fibers, the F-ratio of the output beam is smaller (i.e. the beam spreads) than the F-ratio of the input beam. Such degradation in F-ratio is not seen in a single-mode fiber because the output beam's F-ratio is fixed by the mode propagating in the fiber.

  14. Experimental study of stable imbibition displacements in a model open fracture. II. Scale-dependent avalanche dynamics.

    PubMed

    Clotet, Xavier; Santucci, Stéphane; Ortín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of stable imbibition fronts in a disordered medium, in the regime of capillary disorder, for a wide range of experimental conditions. We have used silicone oils of various viscosities μ and nearly identical oil-air surface tension, and forced them to slowly invade a model open fracture at very different flow rates v. In this second part of the study we have carried out a scale-dependent statistical analysis of the front dynamics. We have specifically analyzed the influence of μ and v on the statistical properties of the velocity V_{ℓ}, the spatial average of the local front velocities over a window of lateral size ℓ. We have varied ℓ from the local scale defined by our spatial resolution up to the lateral system size L. Even though the imposed flow rate is constant, the signals V_{ℓ}(t) present very strong fluctuations which evolve systematically with the parameters μ, v, and ℓ. We have verified that the non-Gaussian fluctuations of the global velocity V_{ℓ}(t) are very well described by a generalized Gumbel statistics. The asymmetric shape and the exponential tail of those distributions are controlled by the number of effective degrees of freedom of the imbibition fronts, given by N_{eff}=ℓ/ℓ_{c} (the ratio of the lateral size of the measuring window ℓ to the correlation length ℓ_{c}∼1/sqrt[μv]). The large correlated excursions of V_{ℓ}(t) correspond to global avalanches, which reflect extra displacements of the imbibition fronts. We show that global avalanches are power-law distributed, both in sizes and durations, with robustly defined exponents-independent of μ, v, and ℓ. Nevertheless, the exponential upper cutoffs of the distributions evolve systematically with those parameters. We have found, moreover, that maximum sizes ξ_{S} and maximum durations ξ_{T} of global avalanches are not controlled by the same mechanism. While ξ_{S} are also

  15. Experimental study of stable imbibition displacements in a model open fracture. II. Scale-dependent avalanche dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clotet, Xavier; Santucci, Stéphane; Ortín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of stable imbibition fronts in a disordered medium, in the regime of capillary disorder, for a wide range of experimental conditions. We have used silicone oils of various viscosities μ and nearly identical oil-air surface tension, and forced them to slowly invade a model open fracture at very different flow rates v . In this second part of the study we have carried out a scale-dependent statistical analysis of the front dynamics. We have specifically analyzed the influence of μ and v on the statistical properties of the velocity Vℓ, the spatial average of the local front velocities over a window of lateral size ℓ . We have varied ℓ from the local scale defined by our spatial resolution up to the lateral system size L . Even though the imposed flow rate is constant, the signals Vℓ(t ) present very strong fluctuations which evolve systematically with the parameters μ , v , and ℓ . We have verified that the non-Gaussian fluctuations of the global velocity Vℓ(t ) are very well described by a generalized Gumbel statistics. The asymmetric shape and the exponential tail of those distributions are controlled by the number of effective degrees of freedom of the imbibition fronts, given by Neff=ℓ /ℓc (the ratio of the lateral size of the measuring window ℓ to the correlation length ℓc˜1 /√{μ v } ). The large correlated excursions of Vℓ(t ) correspond to global avalanches, which reflect extra displacements of the imbibition fronts. We show that global avalanches are power-law distributed, both in sizes and durations, with robustly defined exponents—independent of μ , v , and ℓ . Nevertheless, the exponential upper cutoffs of the distributions evolve systematically with those parameters. We have found, moreover, that maximum sizes ξS and maximum durations ξT of global avalanches are not controlled by the same mechanism. While ξS are also determined by

  16. Application of the Pegasus II Pulsed-Power Facility to the Study of Inertial Instability and Fracture of Cylindrical Tubes of Solid Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, E.A.; Stokes, J.; Fulton, R.D.; Morgan, D.V.; Obst, A.W.; Oro, D.M.; Oona, H.; Anderson, W.E.

    1999-06-23

    Understanding the surface stability of metals undergoing dynamic fracture at shock breakout is important to several applications in metals processing. The advantages of using the Pegasus II facility to investigate the phenomena occurring at shock break out are described. As an example of the data collected, we concentrate on brief descriptions of two experiments that compared the tensile failure, i.e. ''spall'', patterns in the presence of sinusoidal perturbations seeded on the free inner surface of cylindrical samples of 3 types of Al. These samples were composed variously of soft Al 1100-O, structural grade Al 6061-T6, and ultra-pure 99.99% Al and were subjected to Taylor waves with shock pressures of 14 GPa. We show that the material behind the exiting surface undergoes a type of failure termed here ''microspall'', resulting in the production of a significant volume of low-density, probably granular, material. The failure mechanism, combined with the forces that cause inertial instability, leads to rapid pattern growth in the failed material and subsequent pattern growth on the surface. Pattern growth was studied as a function of perturbation wavelength and amplitude. The different Al samples vary by an order of magnitude in yield strength, and some increase in pattern instability was observed at lower yield strength. The ultra-pure Al has exceptionally large grain size, in the mm range. No appreciable variation of spall pattern was observed due to grain size.

  17. Numerical investigations with a hybrid isentropic-sigma model. I - Normal-mode characteristics. II - The inclusion of moist processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.; Zapotocny, Tom H.; Wolf, Bart J.

    1991-01-01

    The normal-mode characteristics of baroclinically amplifying disturbances were numerically investigated in a series of adiabatic simulations by a hybrid isentropic-sigma model, demonstrating the effect of coupling an isentropic-coordinate free atmospheric domain with a sigma-coordinate PBL on the normal-mode characteristics. Next, the normal-mode model was modified by including a transport equation for water vapor and adiabatic heating by condensation. Simulations with and without a hydrological component showed that the overall effect of latent heat release is to markedly enhance cyclogenesis and frontogenesis.

  18. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, electronic spectrum, natural bond orbital, and Mulliken charge distribution in the normal modes of diethyldithiocarbamate copper (II) complex, [Cu(DDTC)2].

    PubMed

    Téllez Soto, C A; Costa, A C; Ramos, J M; Vieira, L S; Rost, N C V; Versiane, O; Rangel, J L; Mondragón, M A; Raniero, L; Martin, A A

    2013-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to study the interactions of the normal modes of the diethyldithiocarbamate copper (II) complex, [Cu(DDTC)2] on nano-structured mixture silver-gold surfaces and on silver surfaces. The electronic spectrum of this complex was measured and the charge transfer bands were assigned through the TD-PBE1PBE procedure. Natural bond orbital (NBO) were also carried out to study the Cu(II) hybridation leading to the square planar geometry of the framework of the [Cu(DDTC)2] complex, and to study which are the donor NBO and the acceptor NBO in meaningful charge transfer through the Second Order Perturbation Theory Analysis of the Fox Matrix in NBO basis. To see the electronic dispersion, the Mulliken electronic charges (MAC) were calculated for each normal mode and correlated with the SERS effect. Full assignment of the SERS spectra was also supported by carefully analysis of the distorted geometries generated by the normal modes. PMID:23978740

  19. Optical phonon modes of III-V nanoparticles and indium phosphide/II-VI core-shell nanoparticles: A Raman and infrared study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia Speranta

    The prospects for realizing efficient nanoparticle light emitters in the visible/near IR for communications and bio-medical applications have benefited from progress in chemical fabrication of nanoparticles. III-V semiconductor nanopaticles such as GaP and InP are promising materials for the development of "blue" and "green" emitters, respectively, due to their large effective bandgaps. Enhanced emission efficiency has been achieved for core-shell nanoparticles, since inorganic shell materials increase electronic tunability and may decrease surface defects that often occur for nanoparticles capped with organic molecules. Also, the emission wavelength of InP nanoparticle cores can be tuned from green to red by changing the shell material in InP/II-VI core-shell nanoparticles. Investigations of phonon modes in nanocrystals are of both fundamental and applied interest. In the former case the optical phonon modes, such as surface/interface modes, are dependent on the nanoparticle dimensions, and also can provide information about dynamical properties of the nanoparticles and test the validity of various theoretical approaches. In the latter case the vibronic properties of nanoparticle emitters are controlled by confined phonons and modifications of the electron-phonon interaction by the confinement. Thus, the objective of the present thesis is the detailed study of the phonon modes of III-V nanoparticles (GaP and InP) and InP/II-VI core-shell nanoparticles by IR absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies, and an elucidation of their complex vibrational properties. With the exception of three samples (two GaP and one InP), all samples were synthesized by a novel colloidal chemistry method, which does not requires added surfactant, but rather treatment of the corresponding precursors in octadecene noncoordinative solvent. Sample quality was characterized by ED, TEM and X-ray diffraction. Based on a comparison with a dielectric continuum model, the observed features

  20. Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task II: fracture permeability of crystalline rocks as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrothermal alteration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The primary objective is to measure and understand the variation of the fracture permeability of quartzite subjected to hydrothermal conditions. Pore fluids will consist of distilled water and aqueous Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solutions at temperatures to 250/sup 0/C, fluid pressures to 20 MPa and effective normal stresses to 70 MPa. Fluid flow rates will be controllable to rates at least as small as 0.2 ml/day (approx. 4 fracture volumes). Experiments are designed to assess what role, if any, pressure solution may play at time scales of those of the experiments (less than or equal to 2 weeks). Secondary objectives are: (1) continue simulated fracture studies, incorporating inelastic deformation into model and characterize the nature of inelastic deformation occurring on loaded tensile fractures in quartzite; (2) continue dissolution experiment, with emphasis on dissolution modification of tensile fracture surfaces on quartzite; and (3) study natural fractures in a quartzite exhibiting hydrothermal dissolution features.

  1. Mixed-mode crack behavior. ASTM special technical publication 1325

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.; McDowell, D.L.

    1999-07-01

    This conference was international and balanced in scope, as witnessed by the presentation of over 20 papers addressing the following topics: (1) Elastic-Plastic Fracture; (2) Three-Dimensional Cracks; (3) Anisotropic Fracture and Applications; (4) Fracture of Composite Materials; (5) Mixed-Mode Fracture Toughness; (6) Mixed-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth; and (7) Experimental Studies in Mixed-Mode Fatigue and Fracture. Separate abstracts were prepared for all papers.

  2. A family of insulinomimetic zinc(II) complexes of amino ligands with Zn(Nn) (n=3 and 4) coordination modes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Kondo, Mayuko; Sakurai, Hiromu; Kojima, Yoshitane

    2005-07-01

    Several metal ions and their complexes have been known to mimic the action of insulin in in vitro and in vivo systems. We prepared a family of Zn(II) complexes derived from amino ligands with Zn(Nn) (n=3 and 4) coordination modes, the insulinomimetic activity being estimated by an inhibitory effect of free fatty acid release from isolated rat adipocytes treated with epinephrine. In comparison with the positive controls VOSO(4) and ZnSO(4), Zn(II)-amine complexes with stability constants (log beta) lower than 11.5 exhibited higher insulinomimetic activities. Among them, a bis(2-aminomethyl pyridinato)Zn(II) (Zn(2-ampy)(2)(2+)) complex with the highest insulinomimetic activity and a higher stability constant but lower than 11.5 was selected, and subjected to in vivo evaluation in KK-A(y) mice with a genetically type 2 diabetes mellitus. The high blood glucose level of the mice was lowered by daily intraperitoneal injections of Zn(2-ampy)(2)(2+) at a dose of 2 mg Zn/kg body weight for 14 days. Based on the results, Zn(2-ampy)(2)(2+) with Zn(N(4)) coordination mode was proposed to have both a high in vitro insulinomimetic activity and an in vivo blood glucose lowering effect. PMID:15921760

  3. Failure modes and materials design for biomechanical layer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan

    Ceramic materials are finding increasing usage in the area of biomechanical replacements---dental crowns, hip and bone implants, etc.---where strength, wear resistance, biocompatibility, chemical durability and even aesthetics are critical issues. Aesthetic ceramic crowns have been widely used in dentistry to replace damaged or missing teeth. However, the failure rates of ceramic crowns, especially all-ceramic crowns, can be 1%˜6% per year, which is not satisfactory to patients. The materials limitations and underlying fracture mechanisms of these prostheses are not well understood. In this thesis, fundamental fracture and damage mechanisms in model dental bilayer and trilayer structures are studied. Principle failure modes are identified from in situ experimentation and confirmed by fracture mechanics analysis. In bilayer structures of ceramic/polycarbonate (representative of ceramic crown/dentin structure), three major damage sources are identified: (i) top-surface cone cracks or (ii) quasiplasticity, dominating in thick ceramic bilayers; (iii) bottom-surface radial cracks, dominating in thin ceramic bilayers. Critical load P for each damage mode are measured in six dental ceramics: Y-TZP zirconia, glass-infiltrated zirconia and alumina (InCeram), glass-ceramic (Empress II), Porcelain (Mark II and Empress) bonded to polymer substrates, as a function of ceramic thickness d in the range of 100 mum to 10 mm. P is found independent of d for mode (i) and (ii), but has a d 2 relations for mode (iii)---bottom surface radial cracking. In trilayer structures of glass/core-ceramic/polycarbonate (representing veneer porcelain/core/dentin structures), three inner fracture origins are identified: radial cracks from the bottom surface in the (i) first and (ii) second layers; and (iii) quasiplasticity in core-ceramic layer. The role of relative veneer/core thickness, d1/d 2 and materials properties is investigated for three core materials with different modulus (114--270GPa

  4. Physical Investigations of Small Particles: (I) Aerosol Particle Charging and Flux Enhancement and (II) Whispering Gallery Mode Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Yglesias, Xerxes

    of the molecule and the electromagnetic interaction between the molecule and particle, especially for the neutral particle case, are completely ignored, or, as is often the case for a permanent dipole vapor species, strongly underestimated. Comparing our model to these classical models we determine an "enhancement factor" to characterize how important the addition of these physical parameters and processes is to the understanding of particle nucleation and growth. Part II: Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical biosensors are capable of extraordinarily sensitive specific and non-specific detection of species suspended in a gas or fluid. Recent experimental results suggest that these devices may attain single-molecule sensitivity to protein solutions in the form of stepwise shifts in their resonance wavelength, lambdaR, but present sensor models predict much smaller steps than were reported. This study examines the physical interaction between a WGM sensor and a molecule adsorbed to its surface, exploring assumptions made in previous efforts to model WGM sensor behavior, and describing computational schemes that model the experiments for which single protein sensitivity was reported. The resulting model is used to simulate sensor performance, within constraints imposed by the limited material property data. On this basis, we conclude that nonlinear optical effects would be needed to attain the reported sensitivity, and that, in the experiments for which extreme sensitivity was reported, a bound protein experiences optical energy fluxes too high for such effects to be ignored.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  6. The effects of radiation on the interlaminar fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. G.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study is made of the effect of electron irradiation (10 to the 10th rad), simulating a 30-year geosynchronous orbit exposure, on the fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite, T300/934. The double cantilever beam (DBC) test is used to determine Mode I (peel) critical strain energy release rate and the edge delamination tension (EDT) test is used to determine mixed Mode I and II (peel and shear) critical strain energy release rate. It is found that the electron interaction of the epoxy matrix material enhances the fracture toughness properties of the composite and that the test temperature has a significant effect on the fracture toughness of both baseline and irradiated material.

  7. Effects of radiation on the interlaminar fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, J.G.; Sykes, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study is made of the effect of electron irradiation (10 to the 10th rad), simulating a 30-year geosynchronous orbit exposure, on the fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite, T300/934. The double cantilever beam (DBC) test is used to determine Mode I (peel) critical strain energy release rate and the edge delamination tension (EDT) test is used to determine mixed Mode I and II (peel and shear) critical strain energy release rate. It is found that the electron interaction of the epoxy matrix material enhances the fracture toughness properties of the composite and that the test temperature has a significant effect on the fracture toughness of both baseline and irradiated material. 13 references.

  8. Computation of Anisotropic Bi-Material Interfacial Fracture Parameters and Delamination Creteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, W-T.; Wang, L.; Atluri, S. N.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the recent developments in methodologies for the evaluation of the integrity and durability of composite structures, including i) the establishment of a stress-intensity-factor based fracture criterion for bimaterial interfacial cracks in anisotropic materials (see Sec. 2); ii) the development of a virtual crack closure integral method for the evaluation of the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for a bimaterial interfacial crack (see Sec. 3). Analytical and numerical results show that the proposed fracture criterion is a better fracture criterion than the total energy release rate criterion in the characterization of the bimaterial interfacial cracks. The proposed virtual crack closure integral method is an efficient and accurate numerical method for the evaluation of mixed-mode stress intensity factors.

  9. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes. PMID:22025275

  10. Improving the fracture toughness and the strength of epoxy using nanomaterials - a review of the current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domun, N.; Hadavinia, H.; Zhang, T.; Sainsbury, T.; Liaghat, G. H.; Vahid, S.

    2015-06-01

    The incorporation of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix is considered to be a highly effective technique to improve the mechanical properties of resins. In this paper the effects of the addition of different nanoparticles such as single-walled CNT (SWCNT), double-walled CNT (DWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), graphene, nanoclay and nanosilica on fracture toughness, strength and stiffness of the epoxy matrix have been reviewed. The Young's modulus (E), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), mode I (GIC) and mode II (GIIC) fracture toughness of the various nanocomposites at different nanoparticle loadings are compared. The review shows that, depending on the type of nanoparticles, the integration of the nanoparticles has a substantial effect on mode I and mode II fracture toughness, strength and stiffness. The critical factors such as maintaining a homogeneous dispersion and good adhesion between the matrix and the nanoparticles are highlighted. The effect of surface functionalization, its relevancy and toughening mechanism are also scrutinized and discussed. A large variety of data comprised of the mechanical properties of nanomaterial toughened composites reported to date has thus been compiled to facilitate the evolution of this emerging field, and the results are presented in maps showing the effect of nanoparticle loading on mode I fracture toughness, stiffness and strength.

  11. Improving the fracture toughness and the strength of epoxy using nanomaterials--a review of the current status.

    PubMed

    Domun, N; Hadavinia, H; Zhang, T; Sainsbury, T; Liaghat, G H; Vahid, S

    2015-06-21

    The incorporation of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix is considered to be a highly effective technique to improve the mechanical properties of resins. In this paper the effects of the addition of different nanoparticles such as single-walled CNT (SWCNT), double-walled CNT (DWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), graphene, nanoclay and nanosilica on fracture toughness, strength and stiffness of the epoxy matrix have been reviewed. The Young's modulus (E), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), mode I (GIC) and mode II (GIIC) fracture toughness of the various nanocomposites at different nanoparticle loadings are compared. The review shows that, depending on the type of nanoparticles, the integration of the nanoparticles has a substantial effect on mode I and mode II fracture toughness, strength and stiffness. The critical factors such as maintaining a homogeneous dispersion and good adhesion between the matrix and the nanoparticles are highlighted. The effect of surface functionalization, its relevancy and toughening mechanism are also scrutinized and discussed. A large variety of data comprised of the mechanical properties of nanomaterial toughened composites reported to date has thus been compiled to facilitate the evolution of this emerging field, and the results are presented in maps showing the effect of nanoparticle loading on mode I fracture toughness, stiffness and strength. PMID:26006766

  12. Comparative internal kinematics of the H II regions in interacting and isolated galaxies: implications for massive star formation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John E.; Font, Joan; García-Lorenzo, Begoña; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Fathi, Kambiz; James, Philip A.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cisternas, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    We have observed 12 interacting galaxy pairs using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GH αFaS (Galaxy H α Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma. We present here the Hα surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion maps for the 10 systems we have not previously observed using this technique, as well as the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosities and velocity dispersion) of 1259 H II regions from the full sample. We also derive the physical properties of 1054 H II regions in a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare the two populations of H II regions. We find a population of the brightest H II regions for which the scaling relations, for example the relation between the Hα luminosity and the radius, are clearly distinct from the relations for the regions of lower luminosity. The regions in this bright population are more frequent in the interacting galaxies. We find that the turbulence, and also the star formation rate (SFR), are enhanced in the H II regions in the interacting galaxies. We have also extracted the Hα equivalent widths for the H II regions of both samples, and we have found that the distribution of H II region ages coincides for the two samples of galaxies. We suggest that the SFR enhancement is brought about by gas flows induced by the interactions, which give rise to gravitationally bound gas clouds which grow further by accretion from the flowing gas, producing conditions favourable to star formation.

  13. Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro; Manepally, Chandrika; Fedors, Randall; Wyrick, Danielle Y.

    2009-09-01

    Active fractures refer to the portions of unsaturated, connected fractures that actively conduct water. The active fracture model parameter accounts for the reduction in the number of fractures carrying water and in the fracture-matrix interface area in field-scale simulations of flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rocks. One example includes the numerical analyses of the fault test results at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada (USA). In such applications, the active fracture model parameter is commonly used as a calibration parameter without relating it to fracture network orientations and infiltration rates. A two-dimensional, multiphase lattice-Boltzmann model was used in this study to investigate the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios for an unsaturated, variable dipping, and geometrically simple fracture network. The active fracture model parameter differed by as much as 0.11-0.44 when the effects of fracture network orientation, injection rate, and injection mode were included in the simulations. Hence, the numerical results suggest that the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation, injection rates, and injection modes should be explored at the field-scale to strengthen the technical basis and range of applicability of the active fracture model.

  14. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  15. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. Study Design: The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Coltène/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Coltène/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual). Specimens were subjected to quantitative marginal analysis before and after thermo-mechanical loading. Results: Higher percentages of marginal adaptation at the total margin length, both before and after thermo-mechanical loading, were found in groups in which enamel was etched with phosphoric acid, without significant differences between the chemically and dual-cured modes. The restorations performance was similar on enamel and dentin, obtaining low results of adaptation on occlusal enamel in the groups without enamel etching, the lowest scores were on cervical dentin in the group with no ortophosphoric acid and self-cured. Conclusions: A dual-cure composite applied in bulk on acid etched enamel obtained acceptable marginal adaptation results, and may be an alternative technique for the restoration of class II cavities. Key words:Dual-cure composite, bulk technique, class II restoration, selective enamel etching, marginal adaptation. PMID:25674316

  16. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  17. Pore- and fracture-filling gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Green Canyon 955 H well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2012-01-01

    High-quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) downhole logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrateJointIndustryProjectLegII in the spring of 2009. Well logs obtained in one of the wells, the GreenCanyon Block 955Hwell (GC955-H), indicate that a 27.4-m thick zone at the depth of 428 m below sea floor (mbsf; 1404 feet below sea floor (fbsf)) contains gashydrate within sand with average gashydrate saturations estimated at 60% from the compressional-wave (P-wave) velocity and 65% (locally more than 80%) from resistivity logs if the gashydrate is assumed to be uniformly distributed in this mostly sand-rich section. Similar analysis, however, of log data from a shallow clay-rich interval between 183 and 366 mbsf (600 and 1200 fbsf) yielded average gashydrate saturations of about 20% from the resistivity log (locally 50-60%) and negligible amounts of gashydrate from the P-wave velocity logs. Differences in saturations estimated between resistivity and P-wave velocities within the upper clay-rich interval are caused by the nature of the gashydrate occurrences. In the case of the shallow clay-rich interval, gashydrate fills vertical (or high angle) fractures in rather than fillingpore space in sands. In this study, isotropic and anisotropic resistivity and velocity models are used to analyze the occurrence of gashydrate within both the clay-rich and sand dominated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs in the GC955-Hwell.

  18. Olecranon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Tyler J; Throckmorton, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Olecranon fractures are common upper extremity injuries, with all but nondisplaced fractures treated surgically. There has been a recent shift in the surgical management of these fractures from tension band wiring to locking plate fixation and intramedullary nailing; however, this comes with increased implant cost. Although most patients can expect good outcomes after these various techniques, there is little information to guide a surgeon's treatment plan. This article reviews the epidemiology, classification, treatment, and outcomes of olecranon fractures. PMID:26498547

  19. Lunar floor-fractured craters as magmatic intrusions: Geometry, modes of emplacement, associated tectonic and volcanic features, and implications for gravity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, Lauren M.; Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    2015-03-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are a class of 170 lunar craters with anomalously shallow, fractured floors. Two end-member processes have been proposed for the floor formation: viscous relaxation, and subcrater magmatic intrusion and sill formation. Recent morphometric analysis with new Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and image (LROC) data supports an origin related to shallow magmatic intrusion and uplift. We find that the distribution and characteristics of the FFC population correlates strongly with crustal thickness and the predicted frequency distribution of overpressurization values of magmatic dikes. For a typical nearside lunar crustal thickness, dikes with high overpressurization values favor surface effusive eruptions, medium values favor intrusion and sill formation, and low values favor formation of solidified dikes concentrated lower in the crust. We develop a model for this process, make predictions for the morphologic, morphometric, volcanic, and geophysical consequences of the process and then compare these predictions with the population of observed floor-fractured craters. In our model, the process of magmatic intrusion and sill formation begins when a dike propagates vertically towards the surface; as the dike encounters the underdense brecciated region beneath the crater, the magmatic driving pressure is insufficient to continue vertical propagation, but pressure in the stalled dike exceeds the local lithostatic pressure. The dike then begins to propagate laterally forming a sill which does not propagate past the crater floor region because increased overburden pressure from the crater wall and rim crest pinch off the dike at this boundary; the sill then continues to inflate, further raising and fracturing the brittle crater floor. When the intrusion diameter to intrusion depth ratio is smaller than a critical value, the intrusion assumes a laccolith shape with a domed central region. When the ratio exceeds a critical value

  20. Out-of-plane deviation of a mode I+III crack encountering a tougher obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    One possible explanation of out-of-plane deviations of cracks loaded in mode I+III was suggested by Gao and Rice in 1986. These authors noted that small in-plane undulations of the crack front, arising from fluctuations of the fracture toughness, should generate a small local mode-II component, causing the crack to depart from planarity. Their analysis is completed here by explicitly calculating the evolution in time of the out-of-plane deviation of a mode-I+III crack encountering a tougher obstacle. The calculation is based on (i) first-order formulae for the stress intensity factors of a crack slightly perturbed within and out of its plane; and (ii) a "double" propagation criterion combining a Griffith condition on the local energy-release rate and a Goldstein-Salganik condition on the local stress intensity factor of mode II. It is predicted that the crack must evolve toward a stationary state, wherein the orthogonal distance from the average fracture plane to the perturbed crack front is constant outside the obstacle and varies linearly across it. We hope that this theoretical prediction will encourage comparison with experiments, and propose a fracture test involving propagation of a mode-I+III crack through a 3D-printed specimen containing some designed obstacle. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Two coordination modes around the Cu(II) cations in complexes with benzo[b]furancarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzewiecka, Aleksandra; Koziol, Anna E.; Klepka, Marcin T.; Wolska, Anna; Jimenez-Pulido, Sonia B.; Lis, Tadeusz; Ostrowska, Kinga; Struga, Marta

    2013-02-01

    Three Cu(II) complexes with derivatives of the benzo[b]furancarboxylic acid have been synthesized and characterized by the elemental and thermal analyses, and IR spectroscopy. The geometry of metal-ligand interaction for all compounds has been described using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and for one of them by X-ray crystallography. Two mononuclear Cu(II) complexes, with 7-acetyl-5-bromo-6-hydroxy-3-methylbenzo[b]furan-2-carboxylic and 6-acetyl-5-hydroxy-2-methylbenzo[b]furan-3-carboxylic acids, exhibit a tetra-fold coordination, CuO4. The Cu(II) cation in crystals with 7-acetyl-6-methoxy-3-methyl-benzo[b]furan-2-carboxylic acid is penta-coordinated; the bridging COO- groups and ethanol molecule stabilize the dinuclear center Cu2O10. The powdered form of this complex is based on the Cu2O8 units, indicating the absence of the ethanol molecules.

  2. Influence of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the phonon mode frequency in the II-VI compound solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Woźny, M. Cebulski, J.; Sheregii, E. M.; Marcelli, A.; Piccinini, M.

    2015-01-14

    We present an experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the TO-phonon mode frequencies for the HgTe-based II-VI semiconductor solid solutions. In the case of the ternary Hg{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te solid solution was shown a discontinuity in the temperature dependence of the HgTe-like T{sub 0}-mode and of the ZnTe-like T{sub 1}-mode, similar to the Hg{sub 0.85}Cd{sub 0.15}Te system [Sheregii et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 045504 (2009)]. A generalization of the theoretical temperature shift of the phonon mode frequency as analytic equation is derived that includes both the anharmonic contribution and the electron-phonon e-p interaction which in this case is returnable—the electron subsystem effect on the phonon one. Data show that our equation satisfactorily describes the temperature shift of both Hg{sub 0.85}Cd{sub 0.15}Te and Hg{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te containing Dirac point (E{sub g} ≡ Γ{sub 6} – Γ{sub 8} = 0) although one of the two constants describing the anharmonic shift of the HgTe-like mode should be positive what is abnormal too. In the case of the Hg{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.20}Te and Hg{sub 0.763}Zn{sub 0.237}Te solid solution, the role of the returnable e-p contribution is negligible but a positive temperature shift for the HgTe-like modes occurs. This result does not allow to explain the positive temperature shift of these modes merely by the contribution of the (e-p) interaction. Indeed, the relativistic contribution to the chemical bonds induces an abnormal temperature shift of the electron states in Hg-based semiconductors—the effect is expected since the Hg d spin-orbit split contribution to chemical bonds may lead to an abnormal temperature shift of the HgTe-like modes.

  3. Interlaminar fracture characterization: A current review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1991-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture characterization has been investigated for several years. Only now is it well enough understood for standardization organizations to attempt to write standard test methods. A review of the current philosophies in characterizing interlaminar fracture is presented. First, the mode 1, double cantilever beam test (DCB) for measuring G(sub 1c) and the end notched flexure (ENF) test for measuring G(sub 2c) are discussed. These tests have undergone the most extensive research throughout the years and are furthest towards standardization. In addition, the mode 2, end loaded split (ELS) specimen is discussed. Mixed mode fracture is also discussed and the recently developed mixed mode bending (MMB) test is detailed. Then, tests for evaluating mode 3 fracture toughness, including the split cantilever beam (SCB), are reviewed. Finally, the work done on interlaminar fracture characterization in fatigue is reviewed.

  4. Study of Composite Interface Fracture and Crack Growth Monitoring Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bily, Mollie A.; Kwon, Young W.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-08-01

    Interface fracture of woven fabric composite layers was studied using Mode II fracture testing. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were used with a vinyl ester resin. First, the single-step cured (i.e., co-cured) composite interface strength was compared to that of the two-step cured interface as used in the scarf joint technique. The results showed that the two-step cured interface was as strong as the co-cured interface. Carbon nanotubes were then applied to the composite interface using two-step curing, and then followed by Mode II fracture testing. The results indicated a significant improvement of the interface fracture toughness due to the dispersed carbon nanotube layer for both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites. The carbon nanotube layer was then evaluated as a means to monitor crack growth along the interface. Because carbon nanotubes have very high electrical conductivity, the electrical resistance was measured through the interface as a crack grew, thus disrupting the carbon nanotube network and increasing the resistance. The results showed a linear relationship between crack length and interface resistance for the carbon fiber composites, and allowed initial detection of failure in the E-glass fiber composites. This study demonstrated that the application of carbon nanotubes along a critical composite interface not only improves fracture properties but can also be used to detect and monitor interfacial damage.

  5. An Evaluation of the Mode of Action Framework for MutagenicCarcinogens Case Study II: Chromium (VI).

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the 2005 revised U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a strategy is being developed to include all mutagenicity and other genotoxicity data with any additional information to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode...

  6. Mixed-mode I and II fatigue threshold and crack deflection angle in SiCp/2024Al composite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.; Wang, Z.

    1996-04-15

    In the past decade, extensive studies were made on fatigue crack propagation behavior in particle or whisker reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) with specific emphasis on the pure mode I fatigue crack growth threshold condition. However, the pure mode I case seldom occurred in practice. In many components cracks are not normal to the maximum principal stress direction and the crack may not grow in the plane of initial crack. Therefore, it is important to study the fatigue behavior under mixed-mode condition. A particle reinforced metal-matrix composite and its matrix alloy were selected for this study. Special attention has been paid to the influence of crack faces friction on the mixed-mode thresholds and crack deflection angle {theta}c. The composite used in the present work is a 15% vol. SiC particulate (nominal size 14 {micro}m) reinforced 2024Al which was produced by casting and extruded at an extrusion ratio of 10:1 into 28 mm diameter rod. Also an unreinforced 2024 Al alloy with a processing history identical to that of the composite was used for comparison.

  7. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture. Vol. 3. ASTM Special Technical Publication, No. 1110

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.K. NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses topics in the fields of matrix cracking and delamination, interlaminar fracture toughness, delamination analysis, strength and impact characteristics, and fatigue and fracture behavior. Attention is given to cooling rate effects in carbon-reinforced PEEK, the effect of porosity on flange-web corner strength, mode II delamination in toughened composites, the combined effect of matrix cracking and free edge delamination, and a 3D stress analysis of plain weave composites. Also discussed are the compression behavior of composites, damage-based notched-strength modeling, fatigue failure processes in aligned carbon-epoxy laminates, and the thermomechanical fatigue of a quasi-isotropic metal-matrix composite.

  8. Sports fractures.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, T. A.; Stevens, M. A.; Albright, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures occur in athletes and dramatically influence performance during competitive and recreational activities. Fractures occur in athletes as the result of repetitive stress, acute sports-related trauma and trauma outside of athletics. The literature provides general guidelines for treatment as well as a variety of statistics on the epidemiology of fractures by sport and level of participation. Athletes are healthy and motivated patients, and have high expectations regarding their level of function. These qualities make them good surgical candidates. Although closed treatment methods are appropriate for most sports fractures, an aggressive approach to more complicated fractures employing current techniques may optimize their subsequent performance. PMID:7719781

  9. Effects of fracture reactivation and diagenesis on fracture network evolution: Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, J. N.; Eichhubl, P.; Xu, G.; Ahn, H.; Fall, A.; Hargrove, P.; Laubach, S.; Ukar, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian Eriboll Formation quartzarenites contain abundant fractures with varying degrees of quartz cement infill. Fractures exist that are entirely sealed; are locally sealed by bridging cements but preserve pore space among bridges; are mostly open but lined with veneers of cement; or are devoid of cement. Fracture propagation in the Eriboll Formation is highly sensitive to the presence of pre-existing fractures. Fracture reactivation occurs in opening mode as individual fractures repeatedly open and are filled or bridged by syn-kinematic cements. As well, reactivation occurs in shear as opening of one fracture orientation coincides with shear displacement along pre-existing fractures of different orientations. The tendency for pre-existing fractures to slip varies in part by the extent of cement infill, yet we observe shear and opening-mode reactivation even among sealed fractures. Paleotemperature analysis of fluid inclusions within fracture cements suggests some fractures now in outcrop formed deep in the subsurface. Fractures within the Eriboll Formation may therefore affect later fracture propagation throughout geologic time. With progressive strain, fault zones develop within fracture networks by a sequence of opening-mode fracture formation, fracture reactivation and linkage, fragmentation, cataclasis, and the formation of slip surfaces. Cataclasite within fault zones is commonly more thoroughly cemented than fractures in the damage zone or outside the fault zone. This variance of cement abundance is likely the result of (1) continued exposure of freshly broken quartz surfaces within cataclasite, promoting quartz precipitation, and (2) possibly more interconnected pathways for mass transfer within the fault zone. Enhanced cementation of cataclasite results in strengthening or diagenetic strain hardening of the evolving fault zone. Further slip is accommodated by shear localization along discrete slip surfaces. With further linkage of fault segments

  10. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  11. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-15

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  12. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-01

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  13. Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes and type-II quantum dots in photovoltaics and passive mode-locking saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jau; Wang, Yong-Gang; Cheng, Shin-Min; Yu, Pyng; Huang, Kuo-Yen; Yuan, Chi-Tsu

    2012-10-01

    Using single-molecule confocal imaging techniques combined with time-correlated single-photon counting we investigated the electron transfer (ET) rates to the single-walled carbon nanotubes from various types of semiconductor hetero-nanocrystals of type-I or type-II band alignment. We observed significantly larger ET rate for type-II ZnSe/CdS dot-in-rod nanostructures as compared to type-I spherical CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum-dots, and to CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod structures. We demonstrated that such rapid ET dynamics can compete with both Auger and radiative recombination processes, leading to potentially more effective photovoltaic operation. In another work, we used aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes as saturable absorbers for ps laser pulse generation. Using the vertical evaporation technique we fabricated saturable absorbers by transferring the water-soluble single wall carbon nanotubes onto a hydrophilic quartz substrate. The fast recovery times of the absorber were measured to be 136 fs and 790 fs. The modulation depth of the absorber was about 1.5%. Passive mode-locked Nd: GdVO4 laser using such an absorber was demonstrated. The continuous wave mode-locked pulses with the pulse duration of 12.4 ps and the repetition of 120 MHz were achieved. The maximum average output power of the mode-locked laser is 2.4 W at the pump power of 13 W. Such a kind of absorbers has potential to be put into practical use.

  14. Analysis of functional motions in Brownian molecular machines with an efficient block normal mode approach: myosin-II and Ca2+ -ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohui; Cui, Qiang

    2004-02-01

    The structural flexibilities of two molecular machines, myosin and Ca(2+)-ATPase, have been analyzed with normal mode analysis and discussed in the context of their energy conversion functions. The normal mode analysis with physical intermolecular interactions was made possible by an improved implementation of the block normal mode (BNM) approach. The BNM results clearly illustrated that the large-scale conformational transitions implicated in the functional cycles of the two motor systems can be largely captured with a small number of low-frequency normal modes. Therefore, the results support the idea that structural flexibility is an essential part of the construction principle of molecular motors through evolution. Such a feature is expected to be more prevalent in motor proteins than in simpler systems (e.g., signal transduction proteins) because in the former, large-scale conformational transitions often have to occur before the chemical events (e.g., ATP hydrolysis in myosin and ATP binding/phosphorylation in Ca(2+)-ATPase). This highlights the importance of Brownian motions associated with the protein domains that are involved in the functional transitions; in this sense, Brownian molecular machines is an appropriate description of molecular motors, although the normal mode results do not address the origin of the ratchet effect. The results also suggest that it might be more appropriate to describe functional transitions in some molecular motors as intrinsic elastic motions modulating local structural changes in the active site, which in turn gets stabilized by the subsequent chemical events, in contrast with the conventional idea of local changes somehow getting amplified into larger-scale motions. In the case of myosin, for example, we favor the idea that Brownian motions associated with the flexible converter propagates to the Switch I/II region, where the salt-bridge formation gets stabilized by ATP hydrolysis, in contrast with the textbook notion that

  15. Risk Factors for Severity and Type of the Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Jane A.; Lui, Li-Yung; Genant, Harry K.; Salamone, Loran; Browner, Warren; Fink, Howard A.; Cohen, Peter; Hillier, Teresa; Bauer, Doug C.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    More severe hip fractures such as displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures and unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures lead to poorer outcomes, but risk factors for severe fractures have not been studied. To identify risk factors for severe types of hip fracture, we performed a prospective cohort study and obtained preoperative hip radiographs from women who sustained an incident hip fracture (excluding traumatic fractures). A single radiologist scored the severity of FN fractures by the Garden System: grades I and II, undisplaced; grades III and IV, displaced. The severity of IT hip fractures was rated by the Kyle System: grades I and II, stable; grades III and IV, unstable. A total of 249 women had FN fractures: 75 (30%) were undisplaced. A total of 213 women had IT fractures: 59 (28%) were stable. Both types of hip fracture increased with age, but older age was even more strongly associated with more severe hip fractures. Low BMD was more strongly related to undisplaced FN fractures (p interaction BMD × FN type, p = 0.0008) and stable IT fractures (p interaction BMD × IT type, p = 0.04). Similar findings were observed for estimated volumetric BMD and hip geometric parameters. Corticosteroid use was only associated with displaced FN fractures, and Parkinson's disease was only associated with stable IT fractures. Little difference was reported in the self-reported circumstances surrounding each type of fracture. In conclusion, the lower the BMD, the greater the likelihood of experiencing a hip fracture that is less displaced and more stable. PMID:19113930

  16. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

    2002-05-30

    This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

  17. Vibrational investigation on the copper(II) binding mode of carcinine and its pH dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Reggiani, Matteo; Manco, Immacolata; Tinti, Anna

    2007-05-01

    A comparative FT-Raman and FT-IR study of Carcinine (Carc), a natural imidazole dipeptide, and its complexes with Cu(II) ions was performed at different pH's. Both Raman and IR spectra present marker bands useful for the identification of the predominant complexes; in particular, Raman spectroscopy appears useful for identifying the metal-coordination site of the imidazole ring (N π or N τ atoms) of Carc. Free Carc shows a strong network of H-bonds and tautomer I (N τ-H) is the preferred form of the imidazolic ring (bands at 1578, 1292 and 988 cm -1). The presence of Cu(II) does not affect the tautomeric equilibrium at pH 7, whereas the deprotonation of both N-imidazolic nitrogens is strongly induced at higher pH. Under neutral and alkaline conditions the primary amino group takes part to the Cu(II) chelation, whereas all the peptidic moieties are involved in coordination only at pH 7. Thus, Carc acts as a tri-dentate ligand at neutral pH, mainly giving a monomeric complex, [CuLH -1], containing tautomer I, whereas an oligonuclear complex, probably [Cu 4L 4H -8], where metal-imidazolate ions connect different ligand molecules, predominates at alkaline pH.

  18. Structures of mammalian ER α-glucosidase II capture the binding modes of broad-spectrum iminosugar antivirals.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Alessandro T; Alonzi, Dominic S; Marti, Lucia; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kiappes, J L; Struwe, Weston B; Cross, Alice; Basu, Souradeep; Lowe, Edward D; Darlot, Benoit; Santino, Angelo; Roversi, Pietro; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    The biosynthesis of enveloped viruses depends heavily on the host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein quality control (QC) machinery. This dependency exceeds the dependency of host glycoproteins, offering a window for the targeting of ERQC for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. We determined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and crystal structures of the main ERQC enzyme, ER α-glucosidase II (α-GluII; from mouse), alone and in complex with key ligands of its catalytic cycle and antiviral iminosugars, including two that are in clinical trials for the treatment of dengue fever. The SAXS data capture the enzyme's quaternary structure and suggest a conformational rearrangement is needed for the simultaneous binding of a monoglucosylated glycan to both subunits. The X-ray structures with key catalytic cycle intermediates highlight that an insertion between the +1 and +2 subsites contributes to the enzyme's activity and substrate specificity, and reveal that the presence of d-mannose at the +1 subsite renders the acid catalyst less efficient during the cleavage of the monoglucosylated substrate. The complexes with iminosugar antivirals suggest that inhibitors targeting a conserved ring of aromatic residues between the α-GluII +1 and +2 subsites would have increased potency and selectivity, thus providing a template for further rational drug design. PMID:27462106

  19. The effect of ferrule presence and type of dowel on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with metal-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Yadav, Suman; Yadav, Harish; Sharma, Vikram; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to comparatively evaluate the effect of presence of a 2 mm ferrule and different type of dowels on fracture resistance of mandibular premolars. Materials and Methods: Fifty uniradicular mandibular premolars were divided into five groups (n = 10). Ten teeth received no treatment (group I). Samples in group II & III were decoronated 2 mm above cemento-enamel junction and received custom cast dowel-core and fiber dowel-composite core respectively, with 2 mm ferrule. Samples in group IV & V were decoronated at CEJ and were restored using cast dowels and fiber dowel-composite cores, without any ferrule. The restored teeth received metal ceramic crowns and were mechanically loaded. The specimens were subjected to a static load, until fracture, to determine the fracture resistance and fracture mode. Results: The samples with 2 mm ferrule had a higher fracture resistance than non ferrule groups. Within non ferrule groups, there were no significant differences in the fracture resistance. Specimen restored with cast dowel had more incidence of non-repairable fracture. Conclusions: Presence of ferrule increased the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. In case of absence of ferrule, fiber dowels had similar fracture resistance as that of cast dowels and showed increased incidence of repairable fracture. PMID:24778519

  20. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  1. Fracture mechanics of human cortical bone: The relationship of geometry, microstructure and composition with the fracture of the tibia, femoral shaft and the femoral neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeni, Yener Nail

    Bone fracture is a major health problem in old population with its complications leading to mortality and morbidity. Therapies mostly involve preventing bone mass loss. Individuals with high bone mass, however, may still suffer fractures suggesting that additional components such as bone microstructure and composition may be responsible for increased fracture risk in the elderly. The relationship of bone constituents with bone fragility, however, is not well-understood. A better understanding of these relationships will help improving therapies by controlling the relevant biological processes. Bone is a composite material with many constituents such as osteons embedded with vascular channels, collagen fibers, mineral crystals, etc. The nature of interfacing between these constituents makes bone a more complex material. Bone also has a structure that adapts itself, both internally and externally, to better fit its needs. This suggested that, unlike man-made materials, a relationship between material properties and structural properties may exist. Because bone has some similarities with engineering composite materials and also experiences microcracks, a fracture mechanics approach would be more appropriate for investigating its fragility. Choosing mode I and mode II fracture toughness (Gsb{Ic} and Gnsb{IIc}, respectively) as indicators of bone fragility, their relationship with bone microstructure (porosity, osteon morphology, mineral crystal imperfection and microdamage), composition (density, mineral, organic, water and collagen content) and macrostructure (thickness, diameter and moment of inertia of the shaft and angle between the femoral neck and femoral shaft from different views) was investigated. Use of x-ray radiogrammetry for detecting the latter was tested. Differences among the femoral shaft, femoral neck and the tibia were investigated for an age range of 22-94 years. In general, fracture toughness increased with increasing bone quantity. However, the

  2. Wilsonville SRC-I pilot plant: I. Fractionation area corrosion studies; II. Hot vs. normal separation mode of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Extensive corrosion studies in solvent recovery columns have been done with different coals (mainly Kentucky number 9 Lafayette, Dotiki and Fies). Sodium carbonate (0.1 to 1.1% of coal) was added as neutralizer to control corrosion rate. Chloride balance runs were made for isolation of corrosive streams with high chlorine content. A caustic wash program of inlet streams has been developed for selective treatment of corrosive streams as an alternative means for possible replacement of sodium carbonate addition. High chlorine content coals such as Kentucky number 9 Lafayette and Dotiki (0.2 to 0.3%) were very corrosive, compared to low chlorine content coal, Kentucky number 9 Fies (< 0.1%). Sodium carbonate addition (0.6 to 0.7% of coal) reduced corrosion rate from 500 MPY to an insignificant level of less than 5 MPY. Caustic wash of solvents could reduce corrosion rate by 50%, removing most corrosive compounds present in the 440 to 480/sup 0/F boiling fraction. Extensive studies for the hot separator mode of operation have been done as a means of saving substantial energy by elimination of dissolver slurry cooling (0.3 MM Btu/hr) and reheating for solvent recovery (1 MM Btu/h). Impacts of the hot separator mode on plant operability, product quality and Kerr-McGee CSD Unit recovery have been studied. The hot separator mode of operation was carried out by controlling the V103 temperature to 740/sup 0/F. It was observed that preasphaltene contents increased in the SRC products such as V110 L/F SRC and CSD feed; CSD unit recovery was not affected significantly; solvent quality was not affected significantly.

  3. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  4. Occult Intertrochanteric Fracture Mimicking the Fracture of Greater Trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Phil Hyun; Kang, Suk; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Young Sung; Back, In Hwa; Eom, Kyeong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Occult intertrochanteric fractures are misdiagnosed as isolated greater trochanteric fractures in some cases. We investigated the utility of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and outcome management of occult intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods This study involved 23 cases of greater trochanteric fractures as diagnosed using plain radiographs from January 2004 to July 2013. Until January 2008, 9 cases were examined with 3D-CT only, while 14 cases were screened with both 3D-CT and MRI scans. We analyzed diagnostic accuracy and treatment results following 3D-CT and MRI scanning. Results Nine cases that underwent 3D-CT only were diagnosed with isolated greater trochanteric fractures without occult intertrochanteric fractures. Of these, a patient with displacement received surgical treatment. Of the 14 patients screened using both CT and MRI, 13 were diagnosed with occult intertrochanteric fractures. Of these, 11 were treated with surgical intervention and 2 with conservative management. Conclusion Three-dimensional CT has very low diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing occult intertrochanteric fractures. For this reason, MRI is recommended to confirm a suspected occult intertrochanteric fracture and to determine the most appropriate mode of treatment.

  5. Failure and fracture of thin film materials for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonnalagadda, Krishna Nagasai

    Design and reliable operation of Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) depend on the material parameters that influence the failure and fracture properties of brittle and metallic thin films. Failure in brittle materials is quantified by the onset of catastrophic fracture, while in metals, the onset of inelastic deformation is considered as failure as it increases the material compliance. This dissertation research developed new experimental methods to address three aspects on the failure response of these two categories of materials: (a) the role of microstructure and intrinsic stress gradients in the opening mode fracture of mathematically sharp pre-cracks in amorphous and polycrystalline brittle thin films, (b) the critical conditions for mixed mode I/II pre-cracks and their comparison with linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) criteria for crack initiation in homogeneous materials, and (c) the strain rate sensitivity of textured nanocrystalline Au and Pt films with grain sizes of 38 nm and 25 nm respectively. One of the technical objectives of this research was to develop experimental methods and tools that could become standards in MEMS and thin film experimental mechanics. In this regard, a new method was introduced to conduct mode I and mixed mode I/II fracture studies with microscale thin film specimens containing sharp edge pre-cracks. The mode I experiments permitted the direct application of LEFM handbook solutions. On the other hand, the newly introduced mixed mode I/II experiments in thin films were conducted by establishing a new protocol that employs non-standard oblique edge pre-cracks and a numerical analysis based on the J-integral to calculate the stress intensity factors. Similarly, a new experimental protocol has been implemented to carry out experiments with metallic thin films at strain rates that vary by more than six orders of magnitude. The results of mode I fracture experiments concluded that grain inhomogeneity in polycrystalline

  6. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport. PMID:26901629

  7. The Effects of Targeted Deliveries of Lovastatin and Tocotrienol on Ossification-Related Gene Expressions in Fracture Healing in an Osteoporosis Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nurul 'Izzah; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporotic drugs are used to prevent fragility fractures, but their role in fracture healing still remains unknown. Thus, alternative agents with suitable mode of delivery are needed to promote fracture healing. This study was performed to investigate the effects of direct deliveries of lovastatin and tocotrienol to fracture sites on ossification-related gene expression in fracture healing in a postmenopausal osteoporosis model. Forty-eight Sprague Dawley female rats were divided into six groups. Group I comprised the sham-operated rats, while Groups II-VI were ovariectomized rats. After 8 weeks, the right tibiae of all rats were fractured and stabilized. Group I and Group II were given two single injections of lovastatin and tocotrienol carriers. Group III was given an estrogen preparation at 64.5 µg/kg daily via oral gavages. Group IV was injected with lovastatin particles (750 µg/kg), while Group V was injected with tocotrienol particles (60 mg/kg). Group VI received two single injections of 750 µg/kg lovastatin particles and 60 mg/kg tocotrienol particles. After 4 weeks, the gene expressions were measured. Group VI showed significantly higher gene expressions of osteocalcin, BMP-2, VEGF-α, and RUNX-2 compared to Group II. In conclusion, combined treatment of lovastatin and tocotrienol upregulated the expression of genes related to fracture healing. PMID:26501302

  8. Fracture mechanics analyses for skin-stiffener debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.; Krishnamurthy, T.; Lotts, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The debond configurations presently subjected to 3D FEM fracture mechanics analyses are respectively of the flange-skin strip and skin-stiffener configuration type. Two methods employing the virtual crack closure technique were used to evaluate the strain energy release rate, or 'G-value' distributions across the debond front. Both methods yielded nearly identical G-value distributions for the debond configurations studied; they were compared with plane strain and shell analyses results from the literature for the flange skin strip configuration, and found to be in good agreement. Mode II is dominant for the skin-stiffener debond configuration.

  9. Fracture mechanics investigation of oil shale to aid in understanding the explosive fragmentation process. Final technical report, January 1983-July 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.P.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes goals and findings achieved in developing technologies to improve the overall efficiency of oil shale recovery processes. The objectives are to (a) develop theoretical fracture mechanics tools that are applicable to transversely isotropic materials such as sedimentary rock, more particularly oil shale; and (b) develop a fracture mechanics test procedure that can be conveniently used for rock specimens. Such a test procedure would: utilize the geometry of a typical rock core for the test; require a minimum amount of specimen machining; and provide meaningful, reproducible data that corresponds well to test data obtained from conventional fracture mechanics tests. Critical review of the state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics on layered rocks has been completed. Recommendations are made for innovative and promising methods for oil shale fracture mechanics. Numerical and analytical studies of mixed mode fracture mechanics are investigated. Transversely isotropic properties of oil shale are input using isoparametric finite elements with singular elements at the crack tip. The model is a plate with an edge crack whose angle with the edge varies to study the effect of mixed mode fracture under various conditions. The three-dimensional plate is in tension, and stress, energy methods are used in the fracture analysis. Precracked disks of oil shale cored perpendicular to bedding planes are analyzed numerically. Stress intensity factors are determined by (i) strain energy method, and (ii) elliptic simulation method. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Microstructural effects in foam fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    We examine the fracture of a quasi two-dimensional aqueous foam under an applied driving pressure, using a network modelling approach developed for metallic foams by Stewart & Davis (J. Rheol., vol. 56, 2012, p. 543). In agreement with experiments, we observe two distinct mechanisms of failure analogous to those observed in a crystalline solid: a slow ductile mode when the driving pressure is applied slowly, where the void propagates as bubbles interchange neighbours through the T1 process, and a rapid brittle mode for faster application of pressures, where the void advances by successive rupture of liquid films driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The simulations allow detailed insight into the mechanics of the fracturing medium and the role of its microstructure. In particular, we examine the stress distribution around the crack tip and investigate how brittle fracture localizes into a single line of breakages. We also confirm that pre-existing microstructural defects can alter the course of fracture.

  11. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species. PMID:27483277

  12. Unusual mode of protein binding by a cytotoxic π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound containing an O,S-chelating ligand.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Jana; Görls, Helmar; Häfner, Norman; Ferraro, Giarita; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Weigand, Wolfgang; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-08-01

    A new pseudo-octahedral π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound, containing an O,S-bidentate ligand (compound 1) and showing significant cytotoxic activity in vitro, was synthesized and characterized. In solution stability and interaction with the model protein bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Its crystal structure and that of the adduct formed upon reaction with RNase A were obtained by X-ray crystallography. The comparison between the structure of purified compound 1 and that of the fragment bound to RNase A reveals an unusual mode of protein binding that includes ligand exchange and alteration of coordination sphere geometry. PMID:27427335

  13. DNA binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity studies of a new water soluble copper(II) complex: The effect of ligand shape on the mode of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2012-02-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with [Cu(ph 2phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl was studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, circular dichroism, and viscometric techniques. Considerable hypochromicity and red shift are observed in the UV absorption band of the Cu complex. Binding constants ( Kb) of DNA with the complex were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. All these results indicate that Cu(II) complex interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative mode. Also, this new complex induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) and human T lymphocyte carcinoma-Jurkat cell lines.

  14. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  15. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  16. Mode of opening of an oceanic pull-apart: The 20°N Basin along the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Mathieu; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Fournier, Marc; Huchon, Philippe; Delescluse, Matthias

    2013-09-01

    basins are common features observed at releasing bends along major strike-slip faults. The formation and structural evolution of such basins have mostly been investigated in the continental domain and by sandbox laboratory experiments or numerical models. Here we present recently acquired multibeam bathymetry, 3.5 kHz echo sounder, and seismic profiles across the 20°N pull-apart Basin along the India-Arabia transform boundary, known as the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ). Using nearby oceanic drilling (Deep Sea Drilling Project 222), we constrain the structural evolution of the basin since opening some 3 Myr ago. The 20°N Basin is large (90 km long and 35 km wide) despite limited transcurrent motion (~10 km). The first stage involved the formation of a step over along the OFZ and the subsequent isolation of a subsiding half graben. Extension and subsidence were further partitioned over three distinct subbasins separated by complex sets of transverse faults. The size of the basin was enhanced by gravity-driven collapse. The 20°N Basin has been a catchment for Indus turbidites since its opening, which provide a good record of syn-sedimentary deformation. The deformation related to the subsidence of the half graben mimics rollover structures commonly encountered in salt tectonics, suggesting that subsidence was accommodated by one or several décollement layers at depth. Despite a different rheological context, the subsurface structure of the nascent oceanic 20°N Basin is very similar to the more mature continental Dead Sea Basin along the Levant Fault, which also displays subbasins separated by transverse faults.

  17. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth. Progress report, August 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W.; Mendelsohn, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  18. [Transitional fractures : Epiphyseal injuries in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Schneidmueller, D; von Rüden, C; Friederichs, J; Bühren, V

    2016-06-01

    The so-called transitional fractures describe articular fractures in adolescents with partial closure of the epiphyseal growth plate. This shows a specific stereotype fracture pattern, which can be differentiated into biplane, triplane I and triplane II fractures depending on the involvement of the metaphysis and the number of fragments. The diagnostics and therapy can differ from fractures where the epiphyseal growth plate is still open. The main focus for surgical treatment is the reconstruction of the articular surface whereas relevant growth disturbances no longer need to be feared when the epiphysis has already begun to close. PMID:27240851

  19. Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

    2012-11-30

    The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

  20. Elastic waves along a fracture intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Bradley Charles

    Fractures and fracture networks play a significant role in the subsurface hydraulic connectivity within the Earth. While a significant amount of research has been performed on the seismic response of single fractures and sets of fractures, few studies have examined the effect of fracture intersections on elastic wave propagation. Intersections play a key role in the connectivity of a fracture network that ultimately affects the hydraulic integrity of a rock mass. In this dissertation two new types of coupled waves are examined that propagate along intersections. 1) A coupled wedge wave that propagates along a surface fracture with particle motion highly localized to the intersection of a fracture with a free surface, and 2) fracture intersection waves that propagate along the intersection between two orthogonal fractures. Theoretical formulations were derived to determine the particle motion and velocity of intersection waves. Vibrational modes calculated from the theoretical formulation match those predicted by group theory based on the symmetry of the problem. For the coupled wedge wave, two vibrational modes exist that range in velocity between the wedge wave and Rayleigh wave velocity and exhibit either wagging or breathing motion depending on the Poisson's ratio. For the intersection waves, the observed modes depend on the properties of the fractures forming the intersection. If both fractures have equal stiffness four modes exist, two with wagging and two with breathing motion. If the fractures have unequal stiffness, four modes also exist, but the motion depends on the Poisson's ratio. The velocity of intersection waves depends on the coupling or stiffness of the intersection and frequency of the signal. In general, the different modes travel with speeds between the wedge wave and bulk shear wave velocity. Laboratory experiments were performed on isotropic and anisotropic samples to verify the existence of these waves. For both waves, the observed signals

  1. Effects of Different Modes of Hot Cross-Rolling in 7010 Aluminum Alloy: Part II. Mechanical Properties Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Chandan; Singh, A. K.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of microstructure and texture developed by different modes of hot cross-rolling on in-plane anisotropy ( A IP) of yield strength, work hardening behavior, and anisotropy of Knoop hardness (KHN) yield locus has been investigated. The A IP and work hardening behavior are evaluated by tensile testing at 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg to the rolling direction, while yield loci have been generated by directional KHN measurements. It has been observed that specimens especially in the peak-aged temper, in spite of having a strong, rotated Brass texture, show low A IP. The results are discussed on the basis of Schmid factor analyses in conjunction with microstructural features, namely grain morphology and precipitation effects. For the specimen having a single-component texture, the yield strength variation as a function of orientation can be rationalized by the Schmid factor analysis of a perfectly textured material behaving as a quasi-single crystal. The work hardening behavior is significantly affected by the presence of solute in the matrix and the state of precipitation rather than texture, while yield loci derived from KHN measurements reiterate the low anisotropy of the materials. Theoretic yield loci calculated from the texture data using the visco-plastic self-consistent model and Hill's anisotropic equation are compared with that obtained experimentally.

  2. A unifying mode-coupling theory for transport properties of electrolyte solutions. II. Results for equal-sized ions electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Aburto, Claudio Contreras; Nägele, Gerhard

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of a versatile mode-coupling theory (MCT) method developed in Paper I [C. Contreras Aburto and G. Nägele, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134109 (2013)], we investigate the concentration dependence of conduction-diffusion linear transport properties for a symmetric binary electrolyte solution. The ions are treated in this method as charged Brownian spheres, and the solvent-mediated ion-ion hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for also in the ion atmosphere relaxation effect. By means of a simplified solution scheme, convenient semi-analytic MCT expressions are derived for the electrophoretic mobilities, and the molar conductivity, of an electrolyte mixture with equal-sized ions. These expressions reduce to the classical Debye-Falkenhagen-Onsager-Fuoss results in the limit of very low ion concentration. The MCT expressions are numerically evaluated for a binary electrolyte, and compared to experimental data and results by another theoretical method. Our analysis encloses, in addition, the electrolyte viscosity. To analyze the dynamic influence of the hydration shell, the significance of mixed slip-stick hydrodynamic surface boundary conditions, and the effect of solvent permeability are explored. For the stick boundary condition employed in the hydrodynamic diffusivity tensors, our theoretical results for the molar conductivity and viscosity of an aqueous 1:1 electrolyte are in good overall agreement with reported experimental data for aqueous NaCl solutions, for concentrations extending even up to two molar. PMID:24116555

  3. A unifying mode-coupling theory for transport properties of electrolyte solutions. II. Results for equal-sized ions electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburto, Claudio Contreras; Nägele, Gerhard

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of a versatile mode-coupling theory (MCT) method developed in Paper I [C. Contreras Aburto and G. Nägele, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134109 (2013)], we investigate the concentration dependence of conduction-diffusion linear transport properties for a symmetric binary electrolyte solution. The ions are treated in this method as charged Brownian spheres, and the solvent-mediated ion-ion hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for also in the ion atmosphere relaxation effect. By means of a simplified solution scheme, convenient semi-analytic MCT expressions are derived for the electrophoretic mobilities, and the molar conductivity, of an electrolyte mixture with equal-sized ions. These expressions reduce to the classical Debye-Falkenhagen-Onsager-Fuoss results in the limit of very low ion concentration. The MCT expressions are numerically evaluated for a binary electrolyte, and compared to experimental data and results by another theoretical method. Our analysis encloses, in addition, the electrolyte viscosity. To analyze the dynamic influence of the hydration shell, the significance of mixed slip-stick hydrodynamic surface boundary conditions, and the effect of solvent permeability are explored. For the stick boundary condition employed in the hydrodynamic diffusivity tensors, our theoretical results for the molar conductivity and viscosity of an aqueous 1:1 electrolyte are in good overall agreement with reported experimental data for aqueous NaCl solutions, for concentrations extending even up to two molar.

  4. CAD-II: the second version current-mode readout ASIC for high-resolution timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. X.; Deng, Z.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y. N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the second version of a fully current-mode front-end ASIC, CAD (Current Amplifier and Discriminator), for MRPC detectors for TOF applications. Several upgrades have been made in this new version, including: 1). Using differential input stages with input impedance down to 30 Ω and LVDS compatible outputs; 2). Much higher current gain and bandwidth of 4.5 A/A and 380 MHz 3). Fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS process instead of 0.35 μ m CMOS technology used in CAD-I. The detailed design of the ASIC will be described as well as the measurement results. The single-ended input impedance could be as low as 32 Ω and the power consumption was measured to be 15 mW per channel. Input referred RMS noise current was about 0.56 μ A. The threshold could be set as low as 4.5 μ A referred to input, corresponding to 9 fC for the typical MRPC detector signal with 2 ns width. Sub-10 ps resolution has been measured for input signal above 200 μ A.

  5. Nucleosynthesis Modes in The High-Entropy Wind of Type II Supernovae: Comparison of Calculations With Halo-Star Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Pfeiffer, B.; Cowan, J. J.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Truran, J. W.

    2009-03-01

    While the high-entropy wind (HEW) of Type II supernovae remains one of the more promising sites for the rapid neutron-capture (r-) process, hydrodynamic simulations have yet to reproduce the astrophysical conditions under which the latter occurs. We have performed large-scale network calculations within an extended parameter range of the HEW, seeking to identify or to constrain the necessary conditions for a full reproduction of all r-process residuals N r,sun = N sun-N s,sun by comparing the results with recent astronomical observations. A superposition of weighted entropy trajectories results in an excellent reproduction of the overall N r,sun pattern beyond Sn. For the lighter elements, from the Fe group via Sr-Y-Zr to Ag, our HEW calculations indicate a transition from the need for clearly different sources (conditions/sites) to a possible co-production with r-process elements, provided a range of entropies are contributing. This explains recent halo-star observations of a clear noncorrelation of Zn and Ge and a weak correlation of Sr-Zr with heavier r-process elements. Moreover, new observational data on Ru and Pd also seem to confirm a partial correlation with Sr as well as the main r-process elements (e.g., Eu).

  6. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  7. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  8. Mode-coupling approach to polymer diffusion in an unentangled melt. II. The effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farago, J.; Meyer, H.; Baschnagel, J.; Semenov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    A mode-coupling theory (MCT) version (called hMCT thereafter) of a recently presented theory [Farago, Meyer, and Semenov, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.178301 107, 178301 (2011)] is developed to describe the diffusional properties of a tagged polymer in a melt. The hMCT accounts for the effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions (VHIs), that is, a physical mechanism distinct from the density-based MCT (dMCT) described in the first paper of this series. The two versions of the MCT yield two different contributions to the asymptotic behavior of the center-of-mass velocity autocorrelation function (c.m. VAF). We show that in most cases the VHI mechanism is dominant; for long chains and prediffusive times it yields a negative tail ∝-N-1/2t-3/2 for the c.m. VAF. The case of non-momentum-conserving dynamics (Langevin or Monte Carlo) is discussed as well. It generally displays a distinctive behavior with two successive relaxation stages: first -N-1t-5/4 (as in the dMCT approach), then -N-1/2t-3/2. Both the amplitude and the duration of the first t-5/4 stage crucially depend on the Langevin friction parameter γ. All results are also relevant for the early time regime of entangled melts. These slow relaxations of the c.m. VAF, thus account for the anomalous subdiffusive regime of the c.m. mean square displacement widely observed in numerical and experimental works.

  9. Period-Luminosity Relations Derived from the OGLE-III Fundamental Mode Cepheids. II. The Small Magellanic Cloud Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Bhardwaj, Anupam; Singh, Harinder P.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present multi-band period-luminosity (P-L) relations for fundamental mode Cepheids in the SMC. The optical VI-band mean magnitudes for these SMC Cepheids were taken from the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) catalog. We also matched the OGLE-III SMC Cepheids to 2MASS and SAGE-SMC catalog to derive mean magnitudes in the JHK-bands and the four Spitzer IRAC bands, respectively. All photometry was corrected for extinction by adopting Zaritsky’s extinction map. Cepheids with periods smaller than ˜2.5 days were removed from the sample. In addition to the extinction corrected P-L relations in nine filters from optical to infrared, we also derived the extinction-free Wesenheit function for these Cepheids. We tested the nonlinearity of these SMC P-L relations (except the 8.0 μ {{m}}-band P-L relation) at 10 days: none of the P-L relations show statistically significant evidence of nonlinearity. When compared to the P-L relations in the LMC, the t-test results revealed that there is a difference between the SMC/LMC P-L slopes only in the V- and J-band. Further, we found excellent agreement between the SMC/LMC Wesenheit P-L slope. The difference in LMC and SMC Period-Wesenheit relation LMC and SMC zero points was found to be {{Δ }}μ =0.483+/- 0.015 mag. This amounts to a difference in distance modulus between the LMC and SMC.

  10. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  11. Sharply notch cylindrical tension specimen for screening plane-strain fracture toughness. I - Influence of fundamental testing variables on notch strength. II Applications in aluminum alloy quality assurance of fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.; Bucci, R. J.; Collis, S. F.; Kohm, R. F.; Kaufman, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of studies which have been conducted to establish an improved technology base for a use of the sharply notched cylindrical specimen in quality assurance tests of aluminum alloy products. The results are presented of an investigation of fundamental variables associated with specimen preparation and testing, taking into account the influence of the notch root radius, the eccentricity of loading, the specimen diameter, and the notch depth on the sharp notch strength. Attention is given to the statistical procedures which are necessary to establish correlations between the sharp notch strength and the plane-strain fracture toughness for high-strength aluminum alloys.

  12. Avoiding occlusal derangement in facial fractures: An evidence based approach.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Derick; Kenkere, Deepika

    2013-05-01

    Facial fractures with occlusal derangement describe any fracture which directly or indirectly affects the occlusal relationship. Such fractures include dento-alveolar fractures in the maxilla and mandible, midface fractures - Le fort I, II, III and mandible fractures of the symphysis, parasymphysis, body, angle, and condyle. In some of these fractures, the fracture line runs through the dento-alveolar component whereas in others the fracture line is remote from the occlusal plane nevertheless altering the occlusion. The complications that could ensue from the management of maxillofacial fractures are predominantly iatrogenic, and therefore can be avoided if adequate care is exercised by the operating surgeon. This paper does not emphasize on complications arising from any particular technique in the management of maxillofacial fractures but rather discusses complications in general, irrespective of the technique used. PMID:24501457

  13. Illuminating heterogeneous anisotropic upper mantle: testing a new anisotropic teleseismic body-wave tomography code - part II: Inversion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzarova, Helena; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Kissling, Edi

    2015-04-01

    necessary step before AniTomo is applied to real datasets. We examine various aspects coming along with anisotropic tomography such as setting a starting anisotropic model and parameters controlling the inversion, and particularly influence of a ray coverage on resolvability of individual anisotropic parameters. Synthetic testing also allows investigation of the well-known trade-off between effects of P-wave anisotropy and isotropic heterogeneities. Therefore, the target synthetic models are designed to represent schematically different heterogeneous anisotropic structures of the upper mantle. Testing inversion mode of the AniTomo code, considering an azimuthally quasi-equal distribution of rays and teleseismic P-wave incidences, shows that a separation of seismic anisotropy and isotropic velocity heterogeneities is plausible and that the correct orientation of the symmetry axes in a model can be found within three iterations for well-tuned damping factors.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Damage and Fracture Mechanisms Controlling the Performance of Full Aperture Easy Open Ends for Food Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. L. P.; Nagy, G. T.; Owen, D. R. J.

    2011-05-01

    Can manufacturers produce hundreds of millions of cans annually, increasingly, food cans are being opened by lifting a tab on the can end that initiates a fracture, which then propagates around a circumferential score. The damage and fracture mechanisms that lead to crack initiation and propagation in the opening process, however, are not fully understood, therefore optimisation of easy open end scores is largely based on trial and error. This paper presents an experimental analysis that concentrates on the combined shear and bending forces as applied to the particular industrial method concerning full aperture easy open ends. The influence of a gradually increasing gap measured between the score and shear force location on traditional groove geometries and depths are examined for two different packaging steels. Earlier studies have shown that the complete opening cycle depends on fracture modes I, II & III as well as their combination. Experimental results for Modes I, II & III will be presented, however attention will focus on the behaviour of the initial fracture point, whereby prior investigations have shown it to be influenced primarily by mode II shearing. After initial specimen manufacture, where the score is formed by pressing a punch into a thin steel sheet the predeformed scored specimens are loaded in shear to simulate the local stress field found during the initial opening phase. Experiments have been completed using a novel Mode II experimental technique that has been designed for use in the majority of commercially available tensile test machines. Experimental results indicate that opening forces can change radically with different gap sizes and that there is considerable potential for the industrialised process of can end manufacture to be optimised through the efficient management and control of the can ends dimensional parameters.

  15. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture; Proceedings of the Second Symposium, Cincinnati, OH, Apr. 27, 28, 1987. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lagace, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume are concerned with fatigue and damage growth, models and analysis, delamination, and structural aspects. Papers are presented on the fatigue life prediction of cross-ply composite laminates; damage initiation and growth in notched laminates under reversed cyclic loading; the influence of fiber, matrix, and interface on transverse cracking in carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic cross-ply laminates; edge stresses in woven laminates at low temperatures; and predicting interlaminar fatigue crack growth rates in compressively loaded laminates. Attention is also given to the mode II delamination fracture toughness of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites, the mode I and mode II delamination of thermosetting and thermoplastic composites, free-edge delamination characteristics in S2/CE9000 glass/epoxy laminates under static and fatigue loads, delamination failure modes in filament-wound composite tubes, and the lateral impact of composite cylinders.

  16. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  17. Fractal patterns of fractures in granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.; Dubois, J.; Moore, D.; Touchard, G.

    1991-05-01

    Fractal measurements using the Cantor's dust method in a linear one-dimensional analysis mode were made on the fracture patterns revealed on two-dimensional, planar surfaces in four granites. This method allows one to conclude that: (1) The fracture systems seen on two-dimensional surfaces in granites are consistent with the part of fractal theory that predicts a repetition of patterns on different scales of observation, self similarity. Fractal analysis gives essentially the same values of D on the scale of kilometres, metres and centimetres (five orders of magnitude) using mapped, surface fracture patterns in a Sierra Nevada granite batholith (Mt. Abbot quadrangle, Calif.). (2) Fractures show the same fractal values at different depths in a given batholith. Mapped fractures (main stage ore veins) at three mining levels (over a 700 m depth interval) of the Boulder batholith, Butte, Mont. show the same fractal values although the fracture disposition appears to be different at different levels. (3) Different sets of fracture planes in a granite batholith, Central France, and in experimental deformation can have different fractal values. In these examples shear and tension modes have the same fractal values while compressional fractures follow a different fractal mode of failure. The composite fracture patterns are also fractal but with a different, median, fractal value compared to the individual values for the fracture plane sets. These observations indicate that the fractal method can possibly be used to distinguish fractures of different origins in a complex system. It is concluded that granites fracture in a fractal manner which can be followed at many scales. It appears that fracture planes of different origins can be characterized using linear fractal analysis.

  18. Fractal patterns of fractures in granites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velde, B.; Dubois, J.; Moore, D.; Touchard, G.

    1991-01-01

    Fractal measurements using the Cantor's dust method in a linear one-dimensional analysis mode were made on the fracture patterns revealed on two-dimensional, planar surfaces in four granites. This method allows one to conclude that: 1. (1)|The fracture systems seen on two-dimensional surfaces in granites are consistent with the part of fractal theory that predicts a repetition of patterns on different scales of observation, self similarity. Fractal analysis gives essentially the same values of D on the scale of kilometres, metres and centimetres (five orders of magnitude) using mapped, surface fracture patterns in a Sierra Nevada granite batholith (Mt. Abbot quadrangle, Calif.). 2. (2)|Fractures show the same fractal values at different depths in a given batholith. Mapped fractures (main stage ore veins) at three mining levels (over a 700 m depth interval) of the Boulder batholith, Butte, Mont. show the same fractal values although the fracture disposition appears to be different at different levels. 3. (3)|Different sets of fracture planes in a granite batholith, Central France, and in experimental deformation can have different fractal values. In these examples shear and tension modes have the same fractal values while compressional fractures follow a different fractal mode of failure. The composite fracture patterns are also fractal but with a different, median, fractal value compared to the individual values for the fracture plane sets. These observations indicate that the fractal method can possibly be used to distinguish fractures of different origins in a complex system. It is concluded that granites fracture in a fractal manner which can be followed at many scales. It appears that fracture planes of different origins can be characterized using linear fractal analysis. ?? 1991.

  19. The Effects of Targeted Deliveries of Lovastatin and Tocotrienol on Ossification-Related Gene Expressions in Fracture Healing in an Osteoporosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nurul ‘Izzah; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic drugs are used to prevent fragility fractures, but their role in fracture healing still remains unknown. Thus, alternative agents with suitable mode of delivery are needed to promote fracture healing. This study was performed to investigate the effects of direct deliveries of lovastatin and tocotrienol to fracture sites on ossification-related gene expression in fracture healing in a postmenopausal osteoporosis model. Forty-eight Sprague Dawley female rats were divided into six groups. Group I comprised the sham-operated rats, while Groups II–VI were ovariectomized rats. After 8 weeks, the right tibiae of all rats were fractured and stabilized. Group I and Group II were given two single injections of lovastatin and tocotrienol carriers. Group III was given an estrogen preparation at 64.5 µg/kg daily via oral gavages. Group IV was injected with lovastatin particles (750 µg/kg), while Group V was injected with tocotrienol particles (60 mg/kg). Group VI received two single injections of 750 µg/kg lovastatin particles and 60 mg/kg tocotrienol particles. After 4 weeks, the gene expressions were measured. Group VI showed significantly higher gene expressions of osteocalcin, BMP-2, VEGF-α, and RUNX-2 compared to Group II. In conclusion, combined treatment of lovastatin and tocotrienol upregulated the expression of genes related to fracture healing. PMID:26501302

  20. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  1. Nonlinear fracture mechanics. Volume 1. Time-dependent fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Landes, J.D.; Bassani, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on time-dependent fracture in nonlinear fracture mechanics are presented. Individual subjects considered include: numerical study of non-steady-state creep at stationary crack tips, crack growth in small-scale creep, growth of macroscopic cracks by void coalescence under extensive creeping conditions, creep embrittlement susceptibility and creep crack growth behavior in low-alloy steels, and experimental determination of the high-temperature crack growth behavior of Incoloy 800H. Also discussed are: three-dimensional transient analysis of a dynamically loaded three-point-bend ductile fracture specimen, experimental study of the validity of a Delta J criterion for fatigue crack growth, combined-mode low-cycle fatigue crack growth under torsional loading, fatigue crack-tip mechanics in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy from high-sensitivity displacement field measurements, and nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics.

  2. Spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of pentammineruthenium(II) dinitrogen oxide and corresponding nitrosyl complexes: binding mode of N(2)O and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Paulat, Florian; Kuschel, Torben; Näther, Christian; Praneeth, V K K; Sander, Ole; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2004-11-01

    The spectroscopic properties and the electronic structure of the only nitrous oxide complex existing in isolated form, [Ru(NH(3))(5)(N(2)O)]X(2) (1, X = Br(-), BF(4)(-)), are investigated in detail in comparison to the nitric oxide precursor, [Ru(NH(3))(5)(NO)]X(3) (2). IR and Raman spectra of 1 and of the corresponding (15)NNO labeled complex are presented and assigned with the help of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) and density functional (DFT) calculations. This allows for the identification of the Ru-N(2)O stretch at approximately 300 cm(-)(1) and for the unambiguous definition of the binding mode of the N(2)O ligand as N-terminal. Obtained force constants are 17.3, 9.6, and 1.4 mdyn/A for N-N, N-O, and Ru-N(2)O, respectively. The Ru(II)-N(2)O bond is dominated by pi back-donation, which, however, is weak compared to the NO complex. This bond is further weakened by Coulomb repulsion between the fully occupied t(2g) shell of Ru(II) and the HOMO of N(2)O. Hence, nitrous oxide is an extremely weak ligand to Ru(II). Calculated free energies and formation constants for [Ru(NH(3))(5)(L)](2+) (L = NNO, N(2), OH(2)) are in good agreement with experiment. The observed intense absorption at 238 nm of 1 is assigned to the t(2g) --> pi(*) charge transfer transition. These data are compared in detail to the spectroscopic and electronic structural properties of NO complex 2. Finally, the transition metal centered reaction of nitrous oxide to N(2) and H(2)O is investigated. Nitrous oxide is activated by back-donation. Initial protonation leads to a weakening of the N-O bond and triggers electron transfer from the metal to the NN-OH ligand through the pi system. The implications of this mechanism for biological nitrous oxide reduction are discussed. PMID:15500336

  3. Fracture behavior of human molars.

    PubMed

    Keown, Amanda J; Lee, James J-W; Bush, Mark B

    2012-12-01

    Despite the durability of human teeth, which are able to withstand repeated loading while maintaining form and function, they are still susceptible to fracture. We focus here on longitudinal fracture in molar teeth-channel-like cracks that run along the enamel sidewall of the tooth between the gum line (cemento-enamel junction-CEJ) and the occlusal surface. Such fractures can often be painful and necessitate costly restorative work. The following study describes fracture experiments made on molar teeth of humans in which the molars are placed under axial compressive load using a hard indenting plate in order to induce longitudinal cracks in the enamel. Observed damage modes include fractures originating in the occlusal region ('radial-median cracks') and fractures emanating from the margin of the enamel in the region of the CEJ ('margin cracks'), as well as 'spalling' of enamel (the linking of longitudinal cracks). The loading conditions that govern fracture behavior in enamel are reported and observations made of the evolution of fracture as the load is increased. Relatively low loads were required to induce observable crack initiation-approximately 100 N for radial-median cracks and 200 N for margin cracks-both of which are less than the reported maximum biting force on a single molar tooth of several hundred Newtons. Unstable crack growth was observed to take place soon after and occurred at loads lower than those calculated by the current fracture models. Multiple cracks were observed on a single cusp, their interactions influencing crack growth behavior. The majority of the teeth tested in this study were noted to exhibit margin cracks prior to compression testing, which were apparently formed during the functional lifetime of the tooth. Such teeth were still able to withstand additional loading prior to catastrophic fracture, highlighting the remarkable damage containment capabilities of the natural tooth structure. PMID:22956116

  4. Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact and interlaminar fracture properties of textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Suresh K.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and mode I and mode II fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates. Uniweave resin-transfer-molded 48 ply graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminates were stitched with Kevlar and glass yarns of different linear densities and stitch spacings. Delaminations were implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed to determine the effects of stitching on the compressive strength. The results showed outstanding improvements of up to 400 percent in the compression strength over the unstitched laminates. In impact and static indentation tests the onset of damage occurred at the same level, but the extent of damage was less in stitched laminates. Mode I fracture toughness of 24 ply Uniweave unidirectional (AS4/3501-6) stitched laminates was measured by conducting double-cantilever-beam tests. The critical strain energy release rate (G(sub Ic)) was found to be up to 30 times higher than the unstitched laminates. Mode II fracture toughness of the Uniweave laminates was measured by performing end-notched-flexure tests. Two new methods to compute the apparent G(sub IIc) are presented. The apparent G(sub IIc) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates.

  5. Transition from chirping to steady NBI-driven Alfvén modes caused by magnetic configuration variations in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Eliseev, L. G.; Ascasíbar, E.; Cappa, A.; Castejón, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Ido, T.; Jiménez, J. A.; Kozachek, A. S.; Krupnik, L. I.; Liniers, M.; Lysenko, S. E.; Nagaoka, K.; de Pablos, J. L.; Shimizu, A.; Sharapov, S. E.; Ufimtsev, M. V.; Yamamoto, S.; HIBP group; TJ-II team

    2016-07-01

    Beam-driven Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) have been studied in the TJ-II low-magnetic-shear flexible heliac (B 0  =  0.95 T,   =  1.5 m,   =  0.22 m), in L-mode hydrogen plasmas with hydrogen NBI and ECR heating (P NBI  ⩽  1.0 MW, E NBI  =  32 keV, P ECRH  ⩽  0.6 MW). In low-density plasmas in the range \\overline{{{n}\\text{e}}}   =  (0.3–1.5)  ×  1019 m‑3, a large variety of AEs have been observed in the plasma core with the heavy ion beam probe diagnostic and Mirnov coils, in the frequency range 50 kHz  <  f AE  <  380 kHz. In experiments in which the vacuum rotational transform {\\rlap- \\iota} is varied during the shot (dynamic configuration scan), some AEs exhibit changes in their nonlinear evolution from bursting-amplitude AEs with chirping frequency to steady-frequency AEs, and back. The range of {\\rlap- \\iota} intervals within which the AEs studied are chirping or steady-state is determined.

  6. Control over the Self-Assembly Modes of Pt(II) Complexes by Alkyl Chain Variation: From Slipped to Parallel π-Stacks.

    PubMed

    Allampally, Naveen Kumar; Mayoral, María José; Chansai, Sarayute; Lagunas, María Cristina; Hardacre, Christopher; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Albuquerque, Rodrigo Q; Fernández, Gustavo

    2016-06-01

    We report the self-assembly of a new family of hydrophobic, bis(pyridyl) Pt(II) complexes featuring an extended oligophenyleneethynylene-derived π-surface appended with six long (dodecyloxy (2)) or short (methoxy (3)) side groups. Complex 2, containing dodecyloxy chains, forms fibrous assemblies with a slipped arrangement of the monomer units (dPt⋅⋅⋅Pt ≈14 Å) in both nonpolar solvents and the solid state. Dispersion-corrected PM6 calculations suggest that this organization is driven by cooperative π-π, C-H⋅⋅⋅Cl and π-Pt interactions, which is supported by EXAFS and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. In contrast, nearly parallel π-stacks (dPt⋅⋅⋅Pt ≈4.4 Å) stabilized by multiple π-π and C-H⋅⋅⋅Cl contacts are obtained in the crystalline state for 3 lacking long side chains, as shown by X-ray analysis and PM6 calculations. Our results reveal not only the key role of alkyl chain length in controlling self-assembly modes but also show the relevance of Pt-bound chlorine ligands as new supramolecular synthons. PMID:27113990

  7. Experimental characterization and macro-modeling of mechanical strength of multi-sheets and multi-materials spot welds under pure and mixed modes I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtourou, Rim; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Zouari, Bassem; Chaari, Fahmi; Markiewicz, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) of multiple sheets with multiple materials are increasingly realized in the automotive industry. The mechanical strength of such new generation of spot welded assemblies is not that much dealt with. This is true in particular for experiments dedicated to investigate the mechanical strength of spot weld made by multi sheets of different grades, and their macro modeling in structural computations. Indeed, the most published studies are limited to two sheet assemblies. Therefore, in the first part of this work an advanced experimental set-up with a reduced mass is proposed to characterize the quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior and rupture of spot weld made by several sheets of different grades. The proposed device is based on Arcan test, the plates contribution in the global response is, thus, reduced. Loading modes I/II are, therefore, combined and well controlled. In the second part a simplified spot weld connector element (macroscopic modeling) is proposed to describe the nonlinear response and rupture of this new generation of spot welded assemblies. The weld connector model involves several parameters to be set. The remaining parameters are finally identified through a reverse engineering approach using mechanical responses of experimental tests presented in the first part of this work.

  8. Copper(II) complexes with naringenin and hesperetin: cytotoxic activity against A 549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and investigation on the mode of action.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Lenka V; Gouvea, Ligiane R; Sousa, Anna C; Albuquerque, Ronniel M; Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; de Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Louro, Sonia R W; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2016-02-01

    Copper(II) complexes [Cu(H2O)2 (L1)(phen)](ClO4) (1) and [Cu(H2O)(L2)(phen)](ClO4) (2) (HL1 = naringenin; HL2 = hesperetin) were obtained, in which an anionic flavonoid ligand is attached to the metal center along with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) as co-ligand. Complexes (1) and (2) were assayed for their cytotoxic activity against A549 lung carcinoma and against normal lung fibroblasts (LL-24) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We found IC50 = 16.42 µM (1) and IC50 = 5.82 µM (2) against A549 tumor cells. Complexes (1) and (2) exhibited slight specificity, being more cytotoxic against malignant than against non-malignant cells. 1 and 2 induced apoptosis on A549 cells in a mitochondria-independent pathway, and showed antioxidant activity. The antioxidant effect of the complexes could possibly improve their apoptotic action, most likely by a PI3K-independent reduction of autophagy. Complexes (1) and (2) interact in vitro with calf thymus DNA by an intercalative binding mode. EPR data indicated that 1 and 2 interact with human serum albumin (HSA) forming mixed ligand species. PMID:26582127

  9. Fracture toughness anisotropy in shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Michael R.; Meredith, Philip G.; Brantut, Nicolas; Crawford, Brian R.

    2016-03-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale gas has focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales, but there remains a paucity of available experimental data on their mechanical and physical properties. Such shales are strongly anisotropic, so that their fracture propagation trajectories depend on the interaction between their anisotropic mechanical properties and the anisotropic in situ stress field in the shallow crust. Here we report fracture toughness measurements on Mancos shale determined in all three principal fracture orientations: Divider, Short Transverse, and Arrester, using a modified short-rod methodology. Experimental results for a range of other sedimentary and carbonate rocks are also reported for comparison purposes. Significant anisotropy is observed in shale fracture toughness measurements at ambient conditions, with values, as high as 0.72 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is normal to the bedding, and values as low as 0.21 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is parallel to the bedding. For cracks propagating nonparallel to bedding, we observe a tendency for deviation toward the bedding-parallel orientation. Applying a maximum energy release rate criterion, we determined the conditions under which such deviations are more or less likely to occur under more generalized mixed-mode loading conditions. We find for Mancos shale that the fracture should deviate toward the plane with lowest toughness regardless of the loading conditions.

  10. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests....

  11. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests....

  12. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests....

  13. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests....

  14. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests....

  15. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  16. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  17. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  18. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. PMID:25015169

  19. Reinvestigation of the copper(II)-carcinine equilibrium system: "two-dimensional" EPR simulation and NMR relaxation studies for determining the formation constants and coordination modes.

    PubMed

    Arkosi, Zsuzsanna; Paksi, Zoltán; Korecz, László; Gajda, Tamás; Henry, Bernard; Rockenbauer, Antal

    2004-12-01

    The equilibria and solution structure of complexes formed between copper(II) and carcinine (beta-alanyl-histamine) at 2< or = pH< or =11.2 have been studied by EPR and NMR relaxation methods. Beside the species that have already been described in the literature from pH-potentiometric measurements, several new complexes have been identified and/or structurally characterized. The singlet on the EPR spectrum detected in equimolar solutions at pH 7, indicates the formation of an oligomerized (CuL)n(2n+) complex, with [NH2,Nim] coordination. The oligomerization is probably associated with the low stability of the ten-membered macrochelate ring, which would form in the mononuclear complex CuL2+. In presence of moderate excess of ligand the formation of four new bis-complexes (CuL2Hn(2+n), n=2,1 and 0/-1) was detected with [Nim][Nim], [NH2,Nim][Nim] and [NH2,N-,Nim][Nim] type co-ordination modes, respectively. At higher excess of ligand ([L]/[Cu2+]>10) and at pH approximately 7, the predominant species is CuL4H2(4+). The 1H and 13C relaxation measurements of carcinine solutions (0.6 M) in presence of 0 mM< or = [Cu2+](tot)< or = 5 mM at pH=6.8, allowed us to extract the carbon-to-metal distances, the electronic relaxation and tumbling correlation times, as well as the ligand exchange rate for the species CuL4H2(4+). According to these results, the metal ion is [4Nim] co-ordinated in the equatorial plane, while the neutral amino groups are unbounded. Since naturally occurring carcinine shows in vivo antioxidant property, the SOD-like activity of the copper(II)-carcinine system has also been investigated and the complex CuLH(-1) was found to be highly active. PMID:15541487

  20. Fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing Hoi; Miclau, Theodore; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Yang, Frank F; Alt, Volker

    2016-06-01

    As the world population rises, osteoporotic fracture is an emerging global threat to the well-being of elderly patients. The process of fracture healing by intramembranous ossification or/and endochondral ossification involve many well-orchestrated events including the signaling, recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during the early phase; formation of a hard callus and extracellular matrix, angiogenesis and revascularization during the mid-phase; and finally callus remodeling at the late phase of fracture healing. Through clinical and animal research, many of these factors are shown to be impaired in osteoporotic bone. Animal studies related to post-menopausal estrogen deficient osteoporosis (type I) have shown healing to be prolonged with decreased levels of MSCs and decreased levels of angiogenesis. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) was shown to be delayed in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture. This might be related to the observed difference in mechanical sensitivity between normal and osteoporotic bones, which requires further experiments to elucidate. In mice fracture models related to senile osteoporosis (type II), it was observed that chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation were impaired; and that transplantation of juvenile bone marrow would result in enhanced callus formation. Other factors related to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have also been noted to be impaired in aged models, affecting the degradation of cartilaginous matrixes and vascular invasion; the result is changes in matrix composition and growth factors concentrations that ultimately impairs healing during age-related osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic related fractures occur at metaphyseal sites clinically, and reports have indicated that differences exist between diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. An animal model that satisfies three main criteria (metaphyseal region, plate fixation, osteoporosis) is suggested for future research for

  1. Posterior talar fracture with dislocation of both talo-navicular and subtalar joints: a variant type II of the Sneppens classification

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old man fell from a ladder, thus causing an axial compression injury to the right ankle. Severe deformity was evident and the ankle could not be reduced by simple manipulation. The skin was tented and appearing critically contused. Radiographs revealed an oblique fracture of the posterior aspect of the talar body with dislocation of both the talo-navicular and subtalar joints, an injury previously not described in the literature. The fracture–dislocation was anatomically reduced within 3 h of presentation and stability achieved with two headless buried compression screws. CT scan confirmed anatomical reduction and the patient remained non-weight bearing in a cast for 6 weeks. One year postoperatively, the patient remains pain-free with no radiological signs of avascular necrosis of the talus. This injury is unique and despite its severity and soft tissue compromise good quality reduction and internal fixation resulted in an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:22847568

  2. Hydraulic Fracturing in Saturated Cohesionless Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Hurt, R. S.; Huang, H.

    2007-12-01

    Based on the developed experimental techniques, hydraulic fracturing in particulate materials has been directly observed in the laboratory. As a result, we suggested several mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing in particulate materials and determined relevant scaling relationships (e.g., the interplay between elastic and plastic processes). While the ongoing work is likely to change at least some conclusions, it is important that the results reported in this work appear to form the framework for modeling and, perhaps, even for (qualitative) interpretation of field data. The observed fracture geometry and the measured pressure injection curves suggest that hydraulic fracturing occurs in soft sediments in the following sequence: (i) cavity expansion, (ii) fracture front initiation, and (iii) propagation of the developed fracture. Our experiments show that liquid can indeed propagate as a crack-like feature when injected into cohesionless saturated materials. Laboratory observations suggest that at the initial stage, the cavity expansion process ends with fracture initiation. Sometimes, the growing fracture resembles penetration of one movable material into another less movable material, which may be a manifestation of the Taylor-like instability. An important conclusion of our work is that all parts of the cohesionless particulate material (including the tip zone of hydraulic fracture) are likely to be in compression. The compressive stress state is an important characteristic of hydraulic fracturing in particulate materials with low, or no, cohesion (such as were used in our experiments). At present, two kinematic mechanisms of fracture propagation, consistent with the compressive stress regime, can be offered. The first mechanism is based on shear bands propagating ahead of the tip of an open fracture. The second is based on the tensile strain ahead of the fracture tip and reduction of the effective stresses to zero within the leak-off zone. Additionally, an

  3. Are Carotid Stent Fractures Clinically Significant?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Rodriguez, Heron E.; Naughton, Peter A.; Keeling, Aiofee; Phade, Sachin V.; Morasch, Mark D.; Kibbe, Melina R.; Eskandari, Mark K.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Late stent fatigue is a known complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for cervical carotid occlusive disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid stent fractures. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective review of 253 carotid bifurcation lesions treated with CAS and mechanical embolic protection from April 2001 to December 2009 was performed. Stent integrity was analyzed by two independent observers using multiplanar cervical plain radiographs with fractures classified into the following types: type I = single strut fracture; type II = multiple strut fractures; type III = transverse fracture; and type IV = transverse fracture with dislocation. Mean follow-up was 32 months. Results: Follow-up imaging was completed on 106 self-expanding nitinol stents (26 closed-cell and 80 open-cell stents). Eight fractures (7.5%) were detected (type I n = 1, type II n = 6, and type III n = 1). Seven fractures were found in open-cell stents (Precise n = 3, ViVEXX n = 2, and Acculink n = 2), and 1 fracture was found in a closed-cell stent (Xact n = 1) (p = 0.67). Only a previous history of external beam neck irradiation was associated with fractures (p = 0.048). No associated clinical sequelae were observed among the patients with fractures, and only 1 patient had an associated significant restenosis ({>=}80%) requiring reintervention. Conclusions: Late stent fatigue after CAS is an uncommon event and rarely clinically relevant. Although cell design does not appear to influence the occurrence of fractures, lesion characteristics may be associated risk factors.

  4. Optimizing Shear Stresses at the Tip of a Hydraulic Fracture - What Is the Ideal Orientation of Natural Fractures with respect to Hydraulic Fracture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheibani, F.; Hager, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    While many shale and unconventional plays are naturally fractured (or contain planes of weakness), these are often cemented and effectively impermeable to flow. Stress shadow behind the tip of a hydraulic fracture stablizes natural fractures. It essentially means that if impermeable natural fractures and weakness planes are not opened when the hydraulic fracture tip passes, they will remain closed and impermeable to flow. In this work a detailed and comprehensive evaluation of tip shear stresses and associated natural fracture or weakness plane shear is presented. From analytical work, the theoretical shear stresses from a fracture tip are first presented. The effect of fracture length, in-situ pore pressure, maximum horizontal remote stress, net pressure, natural fracture friction coefficient and the direction of natural fracture with respect to the hydraulic fracture on shear stimulation at the tip are calculated using the plane strain analytical solution of a 2-D fracture, and assuming simple linear coulomb friction law. Since slippage along natural fractures will locally violate the assumptions used in the analytical solutions and to incorporate the effect of weakness planes on stress-strain and displacement field, 2-D and 3-D finite element model (FEM) simulations are presented that build upon both the analytical and continuum solutions. FEM models are capable of numerically simulating the slippage through weakness planes by using contact elements. This advantage makes FEM tools very appropriate for synthetically generating microseismicity, which can then be evaluated for mode, focal mechanism, and magnitude. The results of the simulations highlight the critical parameters involved in shearing and opening cemented natural fractures in unconventionals - which is a critical component of stimulation and production optimization for these plays. According to the results, the ideal orientation of natural fractures with respect to hydraulic fracture from shear

  5. Numerical investigation of seismic wave propagation in fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weidong

    The geometric features and physical characteristics of fractures in rock masses are often considered major factors controlling the production of oil and gas. Therefore, it is important to detect fractures in oil and gas reservoirs. Of the various geophysical methods, seismic methods are particularly attractive for fracture detection and imaging because of the sensitivity of elastic waves to the mechanical compliance associated with fractures. Based on the effects of fracture on the velocities and amplitudes of seismic waves, several studies have shown the potential for using seismic tomography and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques to characterize fracture systems in reservoirs. In this thesis, seismic wave propagation through a fracture system is numerically investigated by the finite-difference method. When seismic waves propagate in a medium with single fractures of infinite and finite length, the head wave and the dispersive interface waves (symmetric and antisymmetric modes) along the fracture are strongly excited by the explosion source if the seismic source is moved close to the fracture with low stiffness. In a fracture waveguide, fracture channel waves are supported by the waveguide, even in the absence of a velocity contrast between the fracture waveguide and surrounding host rock. The particular modes generated strongly depend on the polarization of the seismic source. When the seismic source is vertically (horizontally) polarized, antisymmetric (symmetric) modes are excited. In addition, if the thickness of the fracture waveguide increases, a complex particle motion of the fracture channel waves develops because the fracture channel waves partly couple with the interface waves along the fractures. For seismic wave propagation through a multi-fracture system consisting of equally spaced fractures, both an explicit fracture model and an equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium model were used to model the fracture system. In comparison to

  6. Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Alloyed with Varying Nitrogen Content. Part II: Fatigue Life and Fracture Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Reddy, G. V.; Sandhya, R.; Sankaran, S.; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    Influence of nitrogen content on low cycle fatigue life and fracture behavior of 316LN stainless steel (SS) alloyed with 0.07 to 0.22 wt pct nitrogen is presented in this paper over a range of total strain amplitudes ( ±0.25 to 1.0 pct) in the temperature range from 773 K to 873 K (500 °C to 600 °C). The combined effect of nitrogen and strain amplitude on fatigue life is observed to be complex i.e., fatigue life either decreases/increases with increase in nitrogen content or saturates/peaks at 0.14 wt pct N depending on strain amplitude and temperature. Coffin-Manson plots (CMPs) revealed both single-slope and dual-slope strain-life curves depending on the test temperature and nitrogen content. 316LN SS containing 0.07 and 0.22 wt pct N showed nearly single-slope CMP at all test temperatures, while 316LN SS with 0.11 and 0.14 wt pct N exhibited marked dual-slope behavior at 773 K (500 °C) that changes to single-slope behavior at 873 K (600 °C). The changes in slope of CMP are found to be in good correlation with deformation substructural changes.

  7. Bathyal demersal fishes of Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone region (49-54°N) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: II. Baited camera lander observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Nicola J.; Linley, Thomas D.; Jamieson, Alan J.; Bagley, Philip M.; Blades, Hannah; Box, Tetrienne; Chambers, Rosanna; Ford, Alexander; Shields, Mark A.; Priede, Imants G.

    2013-12-01

    Demersal fishes appearing at baited cameras at 2500 m depth either side of the axis of the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 54°N and 49°, north and south of the Charlie Gibbs fracture Zone respectively, showed significant differences in species composition between north and south. A total of 19 taxa were observed, with Hydrolagus affinis, Bathyraja richardsoni, Halosauropsis macrochir, Histobranchus bathybius, Synaphobranchus kaupii, Coryphaenoides armatus, Corphaenoides brevibarbis, Coryphaenoides mediterraneus/leptolepis, Antimora rostrata and Spectrunculus crassa occurring at all locations. The total species assemblage comprised 40% of species captured by trawl at the same locations indicating a high proportion of scavenging species on the MAR. The most abundant was C. armatus showing shorter arrival times and larger body size in the north, suggestive of higher population density and higher food availability. The next most abundant species A. rostrata however showed faster arrival in the south but larger size in the North. No differences could be discerned between stations at the same latitude east and west of MAR axis.

  8. Tabular fracture clusters: Dynamic fracturing produced by volatile expulsion, Sierra Nevada Batholith, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, P.; Tikoff, B.

    2010-10-01

    An undocumented type of fracture system - Tabular Fracture Clusters (TFCs) - occurs in the Cathedral Peak granodiorite, Sierra Nevada Batholith, CA. TFCs are linear zones of sub-parallel, densely spaced fractures, approximately 4-40 cm wide and 3-100 m long. TFCs occur in highest density adjacent to the Johnson granite porphyry, which intruded the Cathedral Peak granodiorite. Individual fractures in TFCs exhibit only opening-mode displacement. Microstructural analysis indicates that TFC fractures contain micro-breccia of angular clasts of host rock. Fine-grained zeolite and quartz are observed along many of the fractures within TFCs, all of which are absent in the host rock. The characteristics of TFCs suggest that they differ from previously documented fracture systems in the Sierra Nevada Batholith. The dense spacing, nature of the fractures, and association of TFCs with miarolitic cavities provide compelling evidence that TFCs formed in response to volatile overpressure from the adjacent Johnson granite porphyry. We attribute the formation of TFCs to dynamic fracturing, based on the clustered nature of the extension fractures and the geometric similarities of TFCs to other dynamic fracturing arrays.

  9. Bone fracture in a rat femoral fracture model is associated with the activation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, QIANKUN; LUO, DEQING; LI, TENG; LIU, ZHIRONG; ZOU, WEITAO; WANG, LEI; LIN, DASHENG; LIAN, KEJIAN

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, which is a mechanism for the turnover of intracellular molecules and organelles, protects cells during stress responses; however, the role of autophagy in the stages of bone fracture remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the process of autophagy in bone tissue at different time-points after fracture. A femur fracture model was established in male adult Wistar rats via surgery. The protein expression of microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II) was analyzed in a femur fracture (experimental) group and a sham-surgery group using immunofluorescence. The protein expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to investigate the cell proliferation in bone tissue following fracture via immunohistochemical analysis. The correlation between cell proliferation and autophagy was analyzed using linear regression. LC3-II protein was constitutively expressed in the sham-surgery group; however, compared with the expression in the sham-surgery group, the LC3-II expression in the experimental group was significantly increased at each time-point (P<0.05). Similarly, immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in each section was significantly increased following fracture injury (P<0.01). A comparison of the LC3-II- and PCNA-positive rates in the experimental group rats at each time-point revealed a linear correlation (R2=0.43, P<0.01). In conclusion, surgically induced fracture in rats is associated with an increase in LC3-II and PCNA protein expression during the initial stages of fracture injury, and a correlation exists between the expression of the two proteins. These results suggest that potential treatment aimed at improving fracture healing should target the process of autophagy. PMID:26640535

  10. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  11. Aspects of the Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube Modified Epoxy Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirjalili, Vahid

    .% of Single Walled CNT (SWNT). Finally, the CNT-modified epoxy resin was used to manufacture carbon fibre laminates by resin film infusion and prepreg technologies. The Mode I and Mode II delamination properties of the CNT-modified composite increased by 140% and 127%, respectively. In contrast, this improvement was not observed for the base CNT-modified polymers, used to manufacture the composite laminates. A qualitative analysis of the fractured surface using a Scanning Electron Microscope revealed a good dispersion in the composites samples, confirming the importance of processing to harness the full potential of carbon nanotubes for toughening polymer composites.

  12. Revised stability constant, spectroscopic properties and binding mode of Zn(II) to FluoZin-3, the most common zinc probe in life sciences.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, I; Krężel, A; Goch, W; Zhukov, I; Paczkowska, I; Bal, W

    2016-08-01

    2-[2-[2-[2-[bis(carboxylatomethyl)amino]-5-methoxyphenoxy]ethoxy]-4-(2,7-difluoro-3-oxido-6-oxo-4a,9a-dihydroxanthen-9-yl)anilino]acetate (FluoZin-3) is used very broadly in life sciences as intra- and extracellular Zn(II) sensor selective for Zn(II) over Co(II), Ca(II) and Mg(II) ions at their physiological concentrations. It has been used for determination of relative and absolute levels of exchangeable Zn(II) in cells and extracellular fluids. Despite its popularity, the knowledge of its acid/base and Zn(II) coordination abilities and of its spectroscopic properties remained very limited. Also the published conditional dissociation constant ((C)Kd) values at pH7.4 are slightly discrepant, (15nM or 8.9nM). In this work we determined the (C)Kd for Zn(II) complexation by FluoZin-3 at pH7.4 with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as competitor using two independent methods: fluorimetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For the first time, we investigated FluoZin-3 alone and complexed with Zn(II) in the wide range of pH, determining the total of eight pKa values from fluorescence spectra and from various regions of UV-Vis spectra. The validated values of (C)Kd (9.1±0.4nM; -log (C)Kd=8.04) and of the absolute (pH-independent) stability constant log βZnL (8.16±0.05) were provided by fluorescence spectroscopy experiments performed at 1μM concentrations. Our experiments demonstrated that both of aminocarboxylate moieties of FluoZin-3 bind the Zn(II) ion synergistically. PMID:27216451

  13. Studies in interactive communication. II - The effects of four communication modes on the linguistic performance of teams during cooperative problem solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapanis, A.; Parrish, R. N.; Ochsman, R. B.; Weeks, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-man teams solved credible, 'real world' problems for which computer assistance has been or could be useful. Conversations were carried on in one of four modes of communication: typewriting, handwriting, voice, and natural unrestricted communication. Performance was assessed on three classes of dependent measures: time to solution, behavioral measures of activity, and linguistic measures. Significant differences among the communication modes were found in each of the three classes. This paper is concerned mainly with the results of the linguistic analyses. Linguistic performance was assessed with 182 measures, most of which turned out to be redundant and some of which were useless or meaningless. Those that remain show that although problems can be solved faster in the oral modes than in the hard-copy modes, the oral modes are characterized by many more messages, sentences, words, and unique words; much higher communication rates; but lower type-token ratios. Although a number of significant problem and job-role effects were found, there were relatively few significant interactions of modes with thsse variables. It appears, therefore, that the mode effects hold for both problems and for both job roles assigned to the subjects.

  14. Bilateral Clavicle Fractures: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kavin; Sharma, Vijay; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral clavicle fractures are uncommonly reported in the literature with the incidence being less than 0.5% of all the clavicle fractures. Bilateral clavicle fractures are caused either by high-energy transfer of compression forces across both shoulder girdles or by a direct trauma to one clavicle followed by that to the other clavicle. These fractures could be missed due to their association with more severe chest injuries or a more symptomatically displaced fracture on one side or due to inadequate chest radiographs. We report three cases of traumatic bilateral clavicle fractures with three modes of injuries in different age groups. All the fractures were treated conservatively with good functional outcomes without any sequelae. Bilateral clavicle fractures should be actively sought by every trauma team with proper clinical examination and chest radiographs including both shoulder joints in high-energy trauma cases or with bilateral shoulder compression injuries. PMID:27504365

  15. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... the radius bone, just below your elbow. A fracture is a break in your bone. The most common cause of a radial head fracture is falling with an outstretched arm.

  16. Hand fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000552.htm Hand fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... need to be repaired with surgery. Types of hand fractures Your fracture may be in one of ...

  17. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. II. The rejection of common mode forces

    SciTech Connect

    Comandi, G.L.; Toncelli, R.; Chiofalo, M.L.; Bramanti, D.; Nobili, A.M.

    2006-03-15

    'Galileo Galilei on the ground' (GGG) is a fast rotating differential accelerometer designed to test the equivalence principle (EP). Its sensitivity to differential effects, such as the effect of an EP violation, depends crucially on the capability of the accelerometer to reject all effects acting in common mode. By applying the theoretical and simulation methods reported in Part I of this work, and tested therein against experimental data, we predict the occurrence of an enhanced common mode rejection of the GGG accelerometer. We demonstrate that the best rejection of common mode disturbances can be tuned in a controlled way by varying the spin frequency of the GGG rotor.

  18. Fracture surface characteristics of off-axis composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    The fracture surface characteristics of off-axis high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composite specimens were studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The specimens were subjected to tensile loading at various angles (0-90 deg) to the fiber direction. SEM photomicrographs of the fractured surfaces revealed three different load angle regions with distinct fracture characteristics. Based on these revelations, criteria were established which can be used to characterize fracture surfaces with respect to a predominant 'single-stress' fracture mode.

  19. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Coordination mode of pentadentate ligand derivative of 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol with nickel(II) and copper(II) metal ions: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and fungicidal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gautam, Seema; Kumar, Amit; Madan, Molly

    2015-02-01

    Complexes of nickel(II), and copper(II) were synthesized with pantadentate ligand i.e. 3,3‧-thiodipropionicacid-bis(5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol) (L). The ligand was synthesized by the condensation of thiodipropionic acid and 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol in 1:2 ratio, respectively. Synthesized ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, mass, 1H NMR, IR, and molecular modeling. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment, IR, electronic spectra, ESR, and molecular modeling. The newly synthesized complexes possessed general composition [M(L)X2] where M = Ni(II), Cu(II), L = pantadentate ligand and X = Cl-, CH3COO-. The IR spectral data indicated that the ligand behaved as a pantadentate ligand and coordinated to the metal ion through N2S3 donor atoms. The molar conductance value of Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes in DMSO corresponded to their electrolytic behavior. On the basis of spectral study, octahedral and tetragonal geometry was assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, respectively. In vitro fungicidal study of ligand and its complexes was investigated against fungi Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candidia krusei, and Candida tropicalis by means of well diffusion method.

  1. Auger spectroscopy of fracture surfaces of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, H. L.; Harris, J. M.; Szalkowski, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Results of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) studies of fracture surfaces in a series of ceramic materials, including Al2O3, MgO, and Si3N4, which were formed using different processing techniques. AES on the fractured surface of a lunar sample is also discussed. Scanning electron micrograph fractography is used to relate the surface chemistry to the failure mode. Combined argon ion sputtering and AES studies demonstrate the local variations in chemistry near the fracture surface. The problems associated with doing AES in insulators are also discussed, and the experimental techniques directed toward solving them are described.

  2. Mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of off-axis fiber composites. 1: Experimental investigation. [at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical behavior, fracture surfaces, and fracture modes of unidirectional high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composites subjected to off-axis tensile loads were investigated experimentally. The investigation included the generation of stress-strain-to-fracture data and scanning electron microscope studies of the fractured surfaces. The results led to the identification of fracture modes and distinct fracture surface characteristics for off-axis tensile loading. The results also led to the formulation of critical for identifying and characterizing these fracture modes and their associated fracture surfaces. The results presented and discussed herein were used in the theoretical investigation and comparisons described in Part 2. These results should also provide a good foundation for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in both off-axis and angle-plied laminates.

  3. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  4. The treatment of pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrew; Mulpuri, Kishore; Abel, Mark F; Braun, Stuart; Bueche, Matthew; Epps, Howard; Hosalkar, Harish; Mehlman, Charles T; Scherl, Susan; Goldberg, Michael; Turkelson, Charles M; Wies, Janet L; Boyer, Kevin

    2012-05-01

    Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, 14 recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice and management of supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children. Two each of these recommendations are graded Weak and Consensus; eight are graded Inconclusive. The two Moderate recommendations include nonsurgical immobilization for acute or nondisplaced fractures of the humerus or posterior fat pad sign, and closed reduction with pin fixation for displaced type II and III and displaced flexion fractures. PMID:22553104

  5. The Octarepeat Domain of the Prion Protein Binds Cu(II) with Three Distinct Coordination Modes at pH 7.4

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Madhuri; Walter, Eric D.; Newell, Dustin J.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Peisach, Jack; Gerfen, Gary J.; Bennett, Brian; Antholine, William E.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds Cu2+ in its N-terminal octarepeat domain. This unusual domain is comprised of four or more tandem repeats of the fundamental sequence PHGGGWGQ. Previous work from our laboratories demonstrates that at full copper occupancy, each HGGGW segment binds a single Cu2+. However, several recent studies suggest that low copper occupancy favors different coordination modes, possibly involving imidazoles from histidines in adjacent octapeptide segments. This is investigated here using a combination of X-band EPR, S-band EPR, and ESEEM, along with a library of modified peptides designed to favor different coordination interactions. At pH 7.4, three distinct coordination modes are identified. Each mode is fully characterized to reveal a series of copper-dependent octarepeat domain structures. Multiple His coordination is clearly identified at low copper stoichiometry. In addition, EPR detected copper–copper interactions at full occupancy suggest that the octarepeat domain partially collapses, perhaps stabilizing this specific binding mode and facilitating cooperative copper uptake. This work provides the first complete characterization of all dominant copper coordination modes at pH 7.4. PMID:16144413

  6. Effects of transformed ferrite growth on the tensile fracture characteristics of a dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W. C.; Kim, C. H.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of transformed ferrite growth on the tensile fracture characteristics of a dual-phase steel were investigated by observing crack initiation, propagation, and fracture behaviors. Crack initiation occurred by decohesion between martensite and ferrite. However, cracks propagated along the ferrite-martensite interface in a high temperature quenched specimen, whereas in specimens quenched from lower temperature cracks propagated into the martensite particle. Tensile fracture behaviors were not strongly influenced by the cooling rate. At both cooling rates of 5.6 and 0.1 °C/sec, specimens quenched from high temperature fractured by partially brittle fracture mode, but fracture mode changed to ductile mode as the quenching temperature decreased. The effect of transformed ferrite on the fracture mode was not substantially different from that of retained ferrite. However, the crack initiation and propagation was influenced by the variation in martensite distribution caused by different growth behavior of transformed ferrite.

  7. Delamination fracture and acoustic emission in carbon, aramid and glass-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dharan, C.K.H.

    1987-02-01

    Results of an investigation into the opening mode (Mode I) delamination fracture behavior of carbon, aramid and glass-epoxy composites are described. The effect of loading rate and reinforcement geometry (unidirectional vs woven) on fracture toughness was determined, and observation of the fracture surface was used to derive possible microfailure modes. The results show that the crack energy release rate for a woven composite was greater than that of unidirectionally reinforced composites. Acoustic emission was employed to detect crack initiation in an attempt to obtain correlation with the delamination fracture toughness. The earliest signal appeared to correlate well with the delamination fracture toughness, indicating that the processes involved in fracture initiation determines the magnitude of the steady state fracture toughness. Results show that the three materials tested behave in different ways (i.e., have different failure modes) during delamination, suggesting that a single theory cannot be expected to explain delamination in all composite materials.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Fracture Propagation in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P.; Borowski, E.; Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fracture in geomaterials is a critical behavior that affects the long-term structural response of geosystems. The processes involving fracture initiation and growth in rocks often span broad time scales and size scales, contributing to the complexity of these problems. To better understand fracture behavior, the authors propose an initial investigation comparing the fracture testing techniques of notched three-point bending (N3PB), short rod (SR), and double torsion (DT) on geomaterials using computational analysis. Linear softening cohesive fracture modeling (LCFM) was applied using ABAQUS to computationally simulate the three experimental set-ups. By applying material properties obtained experimentally, these simulations are intended to predict single-trace fracture growth. The advantages and limitations of the three testing techniques were considered for application to subcritical fracture propagation taking into account the accuracy of constraints, load applications, and modes of fracture. This work is supported as part of the Geomechanics of CO2 Reservoir Seals, a DOE-NETL funded under Award Number DE-FOA-0001037. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Fracture Toughness Determination of Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc Rock Specimen via Griffith Energy Criterion Incorporating Realistic Fracture Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Nu-wen; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD) specimen has been suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics to measure the mode I fracture toughness of rocks, and has been widely adopted in laboratory tests. Nevertheless, a certain discrepancy has been observed in results when compared with those derived from methods using straight through cracked specimens, which might be due to the fact that the fracture profiles of rock specimens cannot match the straight through crack front as assumed in the measuring principle. In this study, the progressive fracturing of the CCNBD specimen is numerically investigated using the discrete element method (DEM), aiming to evaluate the impact of the realistic cracking profiles on the mode I fracture toughness measurements. The obtained results validate the curved fracture fronts throughout the fracture process, as reported in the literature. The fracture toughness is subsequently determined via the proposed G-method originated from Griffith's energy theory, in which the evolution of the realistic fracture profile as well as the accumulated fracture energy is quantified by DEM simulation. A comparison between the numerical tests and the experimental results derived from both the CCNBD and the semi-circular bend (SCB) specimens verifies that the G-method incorporating realistic fracture profiles can contribute to narrowing down the gap between the fracture toughness values measured via the CCNBD and the SCB method.

  10. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino)--a case report.

    PubMed

    Swar, M O; Srikrishna, B V

    1995-09-01

    Achondrogenesis is a lethal form of congenital chondrodystophy characterised by extreme micromelia. Definitive clinical and radiographic criteria have been established to differentiate Type II Achondrogenesis (Langer-Saldino) from type I Achondrogenesis (Parenti-Fraccaro). The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive for both types. We are presenting a case of Type II Achondrogenesis, a still born male to consanguinous parents. The clinical features included an enlarged head, protuberant abdomen and short stubby limbs. The mother had earlier delivered two still born males presumably with similar features. Radiographic characteristics of absence of rib fractures and well ossified iliac bones with concave medial margins and absent or deficient ossification of the sacrum, ischiae, and pubic bones differentiated Type II Achondrogenesis from Type I Achondrogenesis. PMID:8798967

  11. Experimental Analysis of Hybrid Fracture in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobich, J. K.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Previous triaxial extension experiments investigating the transition from extension fracture to shear fracture in low porosity, polycrystalline Carrara marble demonstrate abrupt changes in strength and a continuous transition in fracture orientation and morphology with increasing confining pressure, Pc. New tests on Berea sandstone investigate the same transition in a porous aggregate. Notch cut cylinders (30 mm neck diameter) of Berea sandstone (18% porosity, 0.15 mm average grain size, 80% quartz, 20% feldspar, and trace rutile and kaolinite) were extended in a triaxial apparatus from 0 to 160 MPa confining pressure at a rate of 20 μ m/s. Stress at fracture is characterized by the least compressive principal stress, S3, and maximum compressive principal stress, S1 (S1=Pc). An abrupt change in fracture strength at Pc=50 MPa corresponds to a change from pure macroscopic extension fracture to mixed-mode opening and shear (hybrid) fracture. Within the extension fracture regime, S3 at failure becomes slightly more tensile with an increase in Pc, unlike the constant tensile strength observed for marble. Within the hybrid and shear fracture regimes, S3 at failure becomes more compressive with an increase in Pc. The angle between the fracture surface and S1 increases continuously with Pc, consistent with the marble results. In both rock types, hybrid fractures appear as linked, stepped extension fractures; the length of extensional segments decreases with increasing pressure. The abrupt change in failure strength at the transition from extension to hybrid modes in both rock types likely reflects the increase in mean stress that suppresses the propagation of extension fractures, and the interaction between closely-spaced stepped cracks. In the extension fracture regime, the different dependence of fracture strength on Pc for sandstone and marble may reflect differences in grain scale deformation mechanisms.

  12. The effect of low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound in induced fracture of rat tibiae

    PubMed Central

    Fontes-Pereira, Aldo José; Teixeira, Renato da Costa; de Oliveira, Antônio Jorge Barbosa; Pontes, Roberto Waldesmand Farias; de Barros, Rui Sérgio Monteiro; Negrão, José Nazareno Cunha

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible effects of low-intensity ultrasound on induced tibia fracture of rats in a dose commonly used in physical therapy treatments. METHODS: Twenty male Wistar rats were divided into two groups with 10 animals each. In the ultrasound group (USG), the animals were submitted to bone fracture and treatment with therapeutic ultrasound (TUS). Ultrasonic parameters are: frequency of 1.0 MHz, intensity of 0.2 W/cm2, pulsed mode at 20%, applied in stationary form during 10 minutes on the fracture region, for five weeks. The control group (CG) was submitted to bone fracture but not treated with ultrasound. RESULTS: The radiographies showed better consolidation in USG compared to CG. The statistical tests for alkaline phosphatase and serum calcium did not show significant difference between groups. CONCLUSION: According to this study, TUS, applied with these parameters (not commonly used for bone therapy) accelerates bone healing, confirmed by radiography, yet the biochemical analysis was not conclusive. One reason for this inconsistency may have been some inadequacy of the biochemical protocol, currently under investigation. Level of Evidence II, Prospective comparative study. PMID:24453637

  13. In vitro study to compare impact fracture resistance of intact root-treated teeth.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A V; King, P A; Setchell, D J

    1990-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effect on impact fracture resistance of three methods for restoration of root-treated lower incisor teeth with otherwise intact natural crowns. In a control group (Group I) laterally condensed gutta-percha filled the entire root canal, whereas part of the root filling was removed to enable insertion of a 1 mm diameter post in the other two groups. Stainless steel posts were placed in Group II and experimental carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFRC) in Group III. A composite resin luting agent was used to lute the posts, and standardized composite resin restorations were placed in each access cavity. Fifteen specimens of each group were tested to failure with a single impact force applied at 90 degrees to the mid-point inciso-cervically on the labial surface. The peak force, peak energy, and first peak total energy required to fracture each specimen were recorded. The results showed no significant difference between the three groups, nor was a difference in the mode or site of fracture observed. The results suggested that there is no advantage from the point of view of fracture mechanics in 'restoring' intact root-treated teeth with either stainless steel or carbon fibre reinforced carbon rods. PMID:2098347

  14. Tibial spine fractures: an analysis of outcome in surgically treated type III injuries.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, K J; Dowdall, J; Grannell, M; McCabe, J P

    1999-05-01

    We analysed the outcome of open reduction and internal fixation of type III tibial spine fractures, assessing treatment and determining a treatment protocol. A total of 10 patients presented over 3 years to our institution with a mean age of 15 years (range 10-21), a male-to-female ratio of 8:2. left to right 6:4 and anterior to posterior spine fracture 9:1. Only one patient had associated meniscal injury noted at arthroscopy (no treatment required). The mode of injury was road traffic accidents four, sports injuries three and falls three. The mean follow-up was 9 months. There were seven excellent results and three good results. Those patients with good results exhibited either minimal quadriceps weakness, extensor lag (< 10 degrees) or antero-posterior laxity. This reflects the experience of other authors in dealing with these injuries in younger patients. There is widespread agreement that types I and II should be treated by plaster cast alone and that is also the policy at our institution. We recommend a routine treatment protocol in type III injuries of (1) examination under anaesthesia, (2) arthroscopy (evaluating the fracture, cruciate integrity and other associated injuries), (3) open reduction and screw fixation and (4) vigorous physiotherapy/rehabilitation of all type III fractures, as we feel this provides the best possible outcome in these injuries. PMID:10476299

  15. Can the spinal instability neoplastic score prior to spinal radiosurgery predict compression fractures following stereotactic spinal radiosurgery for metastatic spinal tumor?: a post hoc analysis of prospective phase II single-institution trials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Ho; Tatsui, Claudio E; Ghia, Amol J; Amini, Behrang; Li, Jing; Zavarella, Salvatore M; Tannir, Nizar M; Brown, Paul D; Rhines, Laurence D

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the predictability of vertebral compression fracture (VCF) development applying the spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) prior to delivery of stereotactic spinal radiosurgery (SSRS) for spinal metastases. From two prospective cohorts of SSRS for spinal metastases, we selected patients with a low degree of cord compression or cauda equine from C3 to S1 and analyzed 79 patients enrolled according to binary SINS criteria. The primary endpoint was the development of a de novo VCF or progression of an existing fracture after SSRS. We identified 32 fractures (40.5 %): 19 de novo and 13 progressive. The mean time to fracture after SSRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.4-34.1 months). In 41 patients with low SINS (0-6), 7 patients (17.1 %) developed a fracture after SSRS. In 38 patients with high SINS (7-12), 25 (65.8 %) developed a fracture. Among the 32 fractures, 15 were symptomatic. Patients with high SINS were more likely to experience symptomatic fractures (31.6 %) than were patients with lower SINS (7.4 %). On univariate and multivariate analysis, 24-month fracture-free rates were 78.7 and 33.7 % in low and high SINS group, respectively and high SINS was found to be a significant risk factor for VCFs and symptomatic fractures (respectively, HR 5.6, p = 0.04; HR 5.3, p = 0.01). SINS is a useful tool for predicting the development of VCF after SSRS for spinal metastases. Prophylactic cement augmentation should not be considered for patients with lower SINS, since the risk of fracture is low. PMID:26643804

  16. Studies on the mode of action of phenylmercuric borate on Escherichia coli. II. Biochemical localization and inhibition of some metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Cortat, M

    1978-06-01

    The biochemical localization of phenylmercuric borate (PHB) on Escherichia coli shows that this disinfectant associates essentially with proteins. Protein electrophoresis demonstrates that each protein contains PHB, and that SH groups play a very important role in its fixation. The quantity of PHB able to associate with proteins is so large that many other electron donor groups must react with it. Moreover, it appears that concentration of PHB on cytoplasmic membrane results rather from the privileged position of this structure than from special physicochemical properties. The great reactivity of PHB towards proteins leads to numerous inhibitions and confers upon this antibacterial drug a very complex mode of action. Four important metabolic activities have been tested in the presence of PHB, namely: respiration, protein-synthesis, RNA synthesis and DNA synthesis. These four metabolic functions are rapidly and totally inhibited at low concentrations of PHB. The complexity of the mode of action of PHB makes the adaptation of bacteria to this disinfectant more difficult. In addition, in the case of plasmid dependent resistence, PHB, with its complexe mode of action, does not favour such a selection in opposition to the antibiotics which generally have a more specific mode of action. PMID:358680

  17. Nonlinear estimation of kinetic parameters for solid-state hydrolysis of water-soluble drugs. II: Rational presentation mode below the critical moisture content.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, S; Carstensen, J T

    1990-09-01

    A logical presentation mode for accelerated data obtained at low relative humidities has been developed. A model is proposed leading to an equation relating the percent decomposition, x, at time t, to the temperature (T, K), and the water vapor (P, mmHg) in an open system. The data presented support the equation. PMID:2273463

  18. Models of fracture lineaments - Joint swarms, fracture corridors and faults in crystalline rocks, and their genetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielsen, Roy H.; Braathen, Alvar

    2014-07-01

    Fracture lineaments in crystalline and metamorphic rocks of southern Norway can be subdivided into joint swarms, fracture corridors and faults, depending on displacement, the fracture mode and patterns, and the presence of fault rocks. Their physical appearance as lineaments seen by remote sensing is not discernible, as they define km-long and narrow tabular zones of high fracture intensity. Intrinsically, fracture zonation becomes better expressed from joint swarms to fracture corridors and especially faults as a consequence of increasing accumulate strain. Joint swarms and fracture corridors commonly reveal a symmetric fracture zonation on both sides of its core, whereas inclined extensional faults tend to have asymmetric patterns with enhanced strain and a wider damage zone in the hanging wall. Fracture lineament can be mapped in subzones A-B (core), which are typically some cm up to some tens of meters wide. Common structural elements are fault rocks/shear zones, lenses, and a network of fractures often with very high fracture frequency. Secondary minerals are common. Outside this, subzones C-D (damage zone) are commonly 20-50-m\\ wide with lower fracture intensity of lineament-parallel fracturing, defining the topographic boundary of the lineament. Mineralisation is rarer. The transitional subzone E of multi-orientation fractures defines the transition to the background fracture system. We propose a model for the classification and development of fracture lineaments, applying their architecture (intrinsic geometry, spatial fracture pattern and spatial distribution of fault rocks) as tools for the systematic description. This links fault growth processes and mechanisms that can be ascribed to strain hardening and softening scenarios in a model of fault architecture.

  19. Laboratory Hydraulic Fracture Characterization Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, M.

    2013-05-01

    network. Source mechanisms were identified using a simplified moment tensor analysis which utilizes the first AE arrival characteristics to determine crack type classifications from a unified decomposition of eigenvalues. The AE event source mechanism locations were plotted to determine if spatial relationships exist and to delineate tensile, shear and mixed mode fractures throughout the testing. Based on the classification of the AE data and the moment tensor analysis, an algorithm was developed to predict the location, extent and geometry of the induced fracture. Differing factors were investigated on how they affect the distribution of tensile and shear fractures including viscosity of fracturing fluid, brittleness of source material, homogeneity of source material, presence of natural fractures and stress conditions. Post-test sample coring and slicing were performed to validate the AE event source locations and the fracture characterization algorithm. Fracture and reservoir condition data from the cores and slices were plotted with the AE event source mechanism locations to validate hypotheses regarding spatial relationships of source mechanisms and test conditions. It was shown that the proposed algorithm can reliably delineate hydraulic fracture characteristics in terms of location, extent and geometry.

  20. Dual MHC class I and class II restriction of a single T cell receptor: distinct modes of tolerance induction by two classes of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Arsov, I; Vukmanović, S

    1999-02-15

    In the final stages of thymic development, immature T cells undergo three distinct processes (positive selection, negative selection, and lineage commitment) that all depend on interactions of thymocyte TCRs with MHC molecules. It is currently thought that TCRs are preferentially restricted by either MHC class I or class II molecules. In this report, we present direct evidence that the TCR previously described as H-Y/H-2Db specific cross-reacts with H-2IAb if expressed in CD4+ cells. We also demonstrate an increase in thymocyte numbers in H-Y TCR-trangenic mice deficient in MHC class II, suggesting a relatively discrete form of negative selection by MHC class II compared with that induced by H-Y/H-2Db. We propose that inability to generate CD4+ T cells expressing H-Y TCR in different experimental settings may be due to tolerance to self-MHC class II. These results, therefore, support an intriguing possibility that tolerance to self may influence and/or interfere with the outcome of the lineage commitment. PMID:9973472

  1. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01

    This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

  2. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts

  3. Un mode de découverte inhabituel d'hyperparathyroïdie primaire: fractures multiples sur tumeurs brunes secondaires à un adénome parathyroïdien ectopique médiastinal

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Asmaa; Guerboub, Ahmed Anas; Arsalane, Adil; Biyi, Abdelhamid; Moussaoui, Souad El; Belmejdoub, Ghizlaine

    2015-01-01

    La tumeur brune est une entité clinique bénigne apparaissant comme une manifestation squelettique rare de l'hyperparathyroïdie primaire. Il s'agit d'une cause inhabituelle de fractures pathologiques. Nous rapportons ici le cas clinique d'un patient âgé de 20 ans chez qui l'hyperparathyroïdie primitive a été découverte devant des tumeurs brunes multiples. PMID:26966486

  4. Stress-induced ligand field distribution and consequent multi-mode spin crossover in Fe II(phen) 2(NCS) 2 and Fe II[HB(pz) 3] 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Ohshita, Tadashi; Isobe, Tetsuhiko; Senna, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Naoki; Inoue, Hidenari

    2001-09-01

    Changes in the nature of spin crossover caused by mechanical stressing exerted on the crystalline powders were studied for Fe II(phen) 2(NCS) 2 (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and Fe II[HB(pz) 3] 2 (pz = pyrazol-1-yl) by means of a multi-component fitting of the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility. The analysis revealed the development and broadening of the ligand field distribution as a consequence of mechanical stressing. This was confirmed by the broadening of Mössbauer and far-infrared spectra.

  5. Dynamic fracture of adhesively bonded composite structures using cohesive zone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhecha, Dhaval P.

    Using experimental data obtained from standard fracture test configurations, theoretical and numerical tools are developed to mathematically describe non-self-similar progression of cracks without specifying an initial crack. A cohesive-decohesive zone model, similar to the cohesive zone model known in the fracture mechanics literature as the Dugdale-Barenblatt model, is adopted to represent the degradation of the material ahead of the crack tip. This model unifies strength-based crack initiation and fracture-mechanics-based crack progression. The cohesive-decohesive zone model is implemented with an interfacial surface material that consists of an upper and a lower surface that are connected by a continuous distribution of normal and tangential nonlinear elastic springs that act to resist either Mode I opening, Mode II sliding, Mode III sliding, or a mixed anode. The initiation of fracture is determined by the interfacial strength and the progression of the crack is determined by the critical energy release rate. The adhesive is idealized with an interfacial surface material to predict interfacial fracture. The interfacial surface material is positioned within the bulk material to predict discrete cohesive cracks. The interfacial surface material is implemented through an interface element, which is incorporated in ABAQUS using the user defined element (UEL) option. A procedure is established to formulate a rate dependent model based on experiments carried out on compact tension test specimens. The rate dependent model is incorporated into the interface element approach to capture the unstable crack growth observed in experiments under quasi-static loading conditions. The compact tension test gives the variation of the fracture toughness with the rate of loading, this information is processed and a relationship between the fracture toughness and the rate of the opening displacement is established. The cohesive-decohesive zone model is implemented through a

  6. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  7. Lattice vibration modes in type-II superlattice InAs/GaSb with no-common-atom interface and overlapping vibration spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Henan; Yue, Naili; Zhang, Yong; Qiao, Pengfei; Zuo, Daniel; Kesler, Ben; Chuang, Shun Lien; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Justice, James D.; Dupuis, Russell

    2015-06-01

    Heterostructures like InAs /GaSb superlattices (SLs) are distinctly different from well-studied ones like GaAs /AlAs SLs in terms of band alignment, common interface atom, and phonon spectrum overlapping of the constituents, which manifests as stark differences in their electronic and vibrational properties. This paper reports a comprehensive examination of all four types of phonon modes (confined, quasiconfined, extended, and interface) that have long been predicted for the InAs /GaSb SL, with the observation and interpretation of a set of phonon modes by performing cleaved edge μ -Raman study with polarization analysis. Furthermore, we show a signature of symmetry reduction from D2 d for GaAs /AlAs SL to C2 v for InAs/GaSb SL revealed as a phonon-polariton effect.

  8. Transients from initial conditions based on Lagrangian perturbation theory in N-body simulations II: the effect of the transverse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatekawa, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    We study the initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations for precision cosmology. In general, Zel'dovich approximation has been applied for the initial conditions of N-body simulations for a long time. These initial conditions provide incorrect higher-order growth. These error caused by setting up the initial conditions by perturbation theory is called transients. We investigated the impact of transient on non-Gaussianity of density field by performing cosmological N-body simulations with initial conditions based on first-, second-, and third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory in previous paper. In this paper, we evaluates the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory for several statistical quantities such as power spectrum and non-Gaussianty. Then we clarified that the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory is quite small.

  9. FTIR spectra and normal-mode analysis of a tetranuclear Manganese adamantane-like complex in two electrochemically prepared oxidation states: Relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Hendrik; Dube, Christopher E.; Armstrong, William H.; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-03-19

    The IR spectra and normal-mode analysis of the adamantane-like compound [Mn4O6(bpea)4]n+ in two oxidation states, MnIV4 and MnIIIMnIV3, that are relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II are presented. Mn-O vibrational modes are identified with isotopic exchange, 16O->18O, of the mono-(mu)-oxo bridging atoms in the complex. IR spectra of the MnIIIMnIV3 species are obtained by electrochemical reduction of the MnIV4 species using a spectroelectrochemical cell, based on attenuated total reflection [Visser et al. Anal Chem 2001, 73, 4374-4378]. A novel method of subtraction is used to reduce background contributions from solvent and ligand modes, and the difference and double-difference spectra are used in identifying Mn-O bridging modes that are sensitive to oxidation state change. Two strong IR bands are observed for the MnIV4 species at 745 and 707 cm-1 and a weaker band at 510 cm-1. Upon reduction, the MnIIIMnIV3 species exhibits two strong IR bands at 745 and 680 cm-1, and several weaker bands are observed in the 510 - 425 cm-1 range. A normal mode analysis is performed to assign all the relevant bridging modes in the oxidized MnIV4 and reduced MnIIIMnIV3 species. The calculated force constants for the MnIV4 species are = 3.15 mdynAngstrom, = 0.55 mdyn/Angstrom, and = 0.20 mdyn/Angstrom. The force constants for the MnIIIMnIV3 species are = 3.10 mdyn/Angstrom, = 2.45 mdyn/Angstrom, = 0.40, and = 0.15 mdyn/Angstrom. This study provides insights for the identification of Mn-O modes in the IR spectra of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex during its catalytic cycle.

  10. Fracture characteristics of balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc A.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the failure modes of high altitude scientific balloons through an investigation of the fracture characteristics of the thin polyethylene films. Two films were the subject of the evaluation, Winzen Int.'s Stratafilm SF-85 and Raven Industries' Astro-E. Research began with an investigation of the film's cold brittleness point and it's effect on the ultimate strength and elasticity of the polyethylene film. A series of preliminary investigations were conducted to develop an understanding of the material characteristics. The primary focus of this investigation was on the notch sensitivity of the films. Simple stress strain tests were also conducted to enable analysis employing fracture toughness parameters. Studies were conducted on both film types at 23 C (room temperature), -60 C, -90 C, and -120 C.

  11. Composite materials: Fatigue and fracture (sixth volume)

    SciTech Connect

    Armanios, E.A.

    1997-12-31

    The symposium featured presentations covering metal matrix composites, fatigue, and damage progression, strength and residual properties, damage tolerance and fracture analysis, mode mixity and delamination, property characterization and environmental effects, and standardization and design. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  12. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Moschovidis, Z.; Parker, C.

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  13. Fracture characterisation using geoelectric null-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Pierik; Negro, François; Szalai, Sándor; Milnes, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The term "geoelectric null-array" is used for direct current electrode configurations yielding a potential difference of zero above a homogeneous half-space. This paper presents a comparative study of the behaviour of three null-arrays, midpoint null-array (MAN), Wenner-γ null-array and Schlumberger null-array in response to a fracture, both in profiling and in azimuthal mode. The main objective is to determine which array(s) best localise fractures or best identify their orientation. Forward modelling of the three null-arrays revealed that the Wenner-γ and Schlumberger null-arrays localise vertical fractures the most accurately, whilst the midpoint null-array combined with the Schlumberger null-array allows accurate orientation of a fracture. Numerical analysis then served as a basis to interpret the field results. Field test measurements were carried out above a quarry in Les Breuleux (Switzerland) with the three null-arrays and classical arrays. The results were cross-validated with quarry-wall geological mapping. In real field circumstances, the Wenner-γ null-array proved to be the most efficient and accurate in localising fractures. The orientations of the fractures according to the numerical results were most efficiently determined with the midpoint null-array, whilst the Schlumberger null-array adds accuracy to the results. This study shows that geoelectrical null-arrays are more suitable than classical arrays for the characterisation of fracture geometry.

  14. Rate-Dependent Embedded Discontinuity Approach Incorporating Heterogeneity for Numerical Modeling of Rock Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksala, Timo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the embedded discontinuity approach is applied in finite element modeling of rock in compression and tension. For this end, a rate-dependent constitutive model based on (strong) embedded displacement discontinuity model is developed to describe the mode I, mode II and mixed mode fracture of rock. The constitutive model describes the bulk material as linear elastic until reaching the elastic limit. Beyond the elastic limit, the rate-dependent exponential softening law governs the evolution of the displacement jump. Rock heterogeneity is incorporated in the present approach by random description of the mineral texture of rock. Moreover, initial microcrack population always present in natural rocks is accounted for as randomly-oriented embedded discontinuities. In the numerical examples, the model properties are extensively studied in uniaxial compression. The effect of loading rate and confining pressure is also tested in the 2D (plane strain) numerical simulations. These simulations demonstrate that the model captures the salient features of rock in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The developed method has the computational efficiency of continuum plasticity models. However, it also has the advantage, over these models, of accounting for the orientation of introduced microcracks. This feature is crucial with respect to the fracture behavior of rock in compression as shown in this paper.

  15. Epidemiology of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel Ari

    2014-05-01

    As the world population of older adults-in particular those over age 85-increases, the incidence of fragility fractures will also increase. It is predicted that the worldwide incidence of hip fractures will grow to 6.3 million yearly by 2050. Fractures result in significant financial and personal costs. Older adults who sustain fractures are at risk for functional decline and mortality, both as a function of fractures and their complications and of the frailty of the patients who sustain fractures. Identifying individuals at high risk provides an opportunity for both primary and secondary prevention. PMID:24721358

  16. Influence of the temperature and strain rate on the structure and fracture mode of high-strength steels upon the simulation of the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazilova, U. A.; Il'in, A. V.; Kruglova, A. A.; Motovilina, G. D.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2015-06-01

    Structural changes and the main features of the fracture of the base metal and the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone of the welded joints of high-strength steels have been studied by simulating the thermal cycle of welding and post-welding heat treatment. The effects of the simultaneous action of heating for high-temperature tempering and of deformation allowing the estimation of the impact of residual welding stresses have been studied. The probable reasons of the formation of cracks in welds upon the postwelding tempering have been determined.

  17. structured exploratory data analysis (SEDA) for determining mode of inheritance of quantitative traits. II. simulation studies on the effect of ascertaining families through high-valued probands.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Williams, P T

    1981-01-01

    An understanding of the effect of selecting families through a high-valued proband on the major gene index (MGI), the offspring between parents function (OBP), and the pairwise midparental correlation coefficient (MPCC) is developed. It is shown that the interpretations of these statistics must be carefully modified to adjust for the biases created by the selection criteria. Computer simulations are used to examine sporadic, multifactorial, and major gene models, under moderate (85%) and extreme (95%) proband selection. Additional insights may be acquired into the nature of mode of inheritance by comparing and contrasting selected and unselected of populations. PMID:7211842

  18. Adhesion and interfacial fracture toughness between hard and soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbar, Nima; Wolf, Kurt; Orana, Argjenta; Fennimore, Roy; Zong, Zong; Meng, Juan; Papandreou, George; Maryanoff, Cynthia; Soboyejo, Wole

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study of adhesion between hard and soft layers that are relevant to medical devices such as drug-eluting stents and semiconductor applications. Brazil disk specimens were used to measure the interfacial fracture energies between model parylene C and 316L stainless steel over a wide range of mode mixities. The trends in the overall fracture energies are predicted using a combination of adhesion theories and fracture mechanics concepts. The measured interfacial fracture energies are shown to be in good agreement with the predictions.

  19. Interface fracture and composite deformation of model laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew R.

    Model laminates were studied to improve the understanding of composite mechanical behavior. NiAl/Mo and NiAl/Cr model laminates, with a series of interfaces, were bonded at 1100°C. Reaction layers were present in all laminates, varying in thickness with bonding conditions. Interface fracture strengths and resistances were determined under primarily mode II loading conditions using a novel technique, the asymmetrically-loaded shear (ALS) test, in which one layer of the laminate was loaded in compression, producing a stable interface crack. The NiAl/Mo interface was also fractured in four-point bending. A small amount of plasticity was found to play a role in crack initiation. During steady-state mode II interface fracture of NiAl/Mo model laminates, large-scale slip was observed near the crack tip in the NiAl adjacent to the interface. After testing, the local slope and curvature of the interface were characterized at intervals along the interface and at slip locations to qualitatively describe local stresses present at and just ahead of the crack tip. The greatest percentage of slip occurred where closing forces on the crack tip were below the maximum value and were decreasing with crack growth. A mechanism for crack propagation is presented describing the role of large-scale slip in crack propagation. The mechanical response of structural laminates in 3-D stress states, as would be present in a polycrystalline aggregate composed of lamellar grains, are lacking. In order to understand the response of laminates composed of hard and soft phases, Pb/Zn laminates were prepared and tested in compression with varying lamellar orientation relative to the loading axis. A model describing the mechanical response in a general state assuming elastic-perfectly plastic isotropic layers was developed. For the 90° laminate, a different approach was applied, using the friction hill concepts used in forging analyses. With increasing ratios of cross-sectional radius to layer

  20. Metaphyseo-diaphyseal junction fracture of distal humerus in children.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Agarwal, Amit; Aggarwal, Sameer; Dhatt, Sarvdeep

    2012-03-01

    Six metaphyseo-diaphyseal junction fractures of distal humerus and 182 supracondylar fractures of humerus treated in our institute over a period of 5 years were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical data regarding child's age, neurovascular status, mechanism of injury, mode of treatment, and ultimate clinical outcome were collected for both these fractures and a comparison was made. Oblique (n=2), comminuted (n=3), and transverse types (n=1) of fracture patterns were identified at distal humeral metaphyseo-diaphyseal junction. The oblique and comminuted fractures were managed by closed reduction and plaster of Paris cast, whereas the only transverse fracture was treated by closed reduction and Kirschner wire fixation. In contrast, 125 patients of supracondylar fractures were treated by closed reduction and plaster of Paris cast and the remaining 57 fractures needed Kirschner wire fixation after closed reduction. Assessment by Flynn criteria after 1 year after of injury revealed better functional outcome in metaphyseo-diaphyseal junction fractures. Although transverse fractures are unstable and may require surgical fixation; oblique and comminuted fractures at the metaphyseo-diaphyseal junction of distal humerus can be managed conservatively. PMID:21897299

  1. Atomic simulation of cracks under mixed mode loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1984-01-01

    A discrete atomic model of a crack tip in iron under mixed mode loads is examined. The results indicate that the behavior of the crack at the atomic scale as a function of the ratio of mode I to mode II component of load is quite complex. In general, crack tip plasticity appears to increase as the mode II component of load increases.

  2. Mixed-Mode-Bending Delamination Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Reeder, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Mixed-mode-bending delamination apparatus generates two types of delamination stress simultaneously in specimen from single externally applied point load. In technique, indivial mode I and mode II contributions to delamination in specimen analyzed by use of simple beam-theory equations, eliminating need for time-consuming, difficult numerical analysis. Allows wider range of mode I/mode II ratios than possible with many other methods. Mixed-mode delamination testing of interest in all fields utilizing composite materials, used mostly in aerospace field, but also used in automobiles, lightweight armored military vehicles, boats, and sporting equipment. Useful in general lumber, plywood, and adhesive industries, as well.

  3. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling. II. RPA response functions and collective modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spin and density response functions in the random phase approximation are derived by linearizing the kinetic equation including a magnetic field, the spin-orbit coupling, and mean fields with respect to an external electric field. Different polarization functions appear describing various precession motions showing Rabi satellites due to an effective Zeeman field. The latter turns out to consist of the mean-field magnetization, the magnetic field, and the spin-orbit vector. The collective modes for charged and neutral systems are derived and a threefold splitting of the spin waves dependent on the polarization and spin-orbit coupling is shown. The dielectric function including spin-orbit coupling, polarization, and magnetic fields is presented analytically for long wavelengths and in the static limit. The dynamical screening length as well as the long-wavelength dielectric function shows an instability in charge modes, which are interpreted as spin segregation and domain formation. The spin response describes a crossover from damped oscillatory behavior to exponentially damped behavior dependent on the polarization and collision frequency. The magnetic field causes ellipsoidal trajectories of the spin response to an external electric field and the spin-orbit coupling causes a rotation of the spin axes. The spin-dephasing times are extracted and discussed in dependence on the polarization, magnetic field, spin-orbit coupling, and single-particle relaxation times.

  4. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  5. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series To use the sharing features on ... to slide 4 out of 4 Indications Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  6. Forearm Fractures in Children

    MedlinePlus

    .org Forearm Fractures in Children The forearm is the part of the arm between the wrist and the elbow. It is ... two bones: the radius and the ulna. Forearm fractures are common in childhood, accounting for more than ...

  7. Nasal fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000554.htm Nasal fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... that gives your nose its shape. A nasal fracture occurs when the bony part of your nose ...

  8. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  9. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  10. Hydraulic fracturing and geothermal energy development in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Suyama, J.; Takahashi, H.

    1982-09-01

    This paper is a review of research and development on geothermal energy extraction in Japan especially on hydraulic fracturing. First recent geothermal developments in Japan are outlined in Part I. An increase in the production rate of geothermal wells may be highly dependent on the geothermal well stimulation technology based on hydraulic fracturing. The hydraulic fracturing technique must be developed also for geothermal energy to be extracted from hot, dry rock masses. In Part II, the research on hydraulic fracturing and field application are reviewed.

  11. Wavefront Imaging in Fractured Transversely-Isotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fractures in the Earth's crust are a source of stress-dependent mechanical anisotropy that affect seismic wave attenuation and velocity. While many theoretical and experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in single or multi- fractured isotropic rocks, few studies have examined the seismic response of a fractured anisotropic medium. Fractures and layering each contribute to the mechanical anisotropy of the crust. The coexistence of these two sources of anisotropy complicates the interpretation of the seismic properties of crustal rock. In this study, laboratory wavefront imaging was performed to capture the seismic response of layered media containing multiple parallel fractures. We determined that whether the observed anisotropy is dominated by the matrix anisotropy or by the fracture orientation depends on the applied stress and that late-arriving guided-modes provide information on the orientation of the fractures. Four cubic garolite samples (~102 mm on edge) each containing 5 parallel fractures were used in this study. The fractures were oriented normal, parallel or at acute angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees) to the layering. The fracture and layer spacing were approximately 10mm and 0.5mm, respectively. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Stress was applied to the samples with a servo-controlled loading machine. Two spherically-focused water-coupled transducers (central frequency 1MHz) were used; one as a fixed-source and the other as a translating receiver. Each sample was scanned over a 60mm×60mm region in 1 mm increments to map out the arriving wavefront (i.e. 3600 signals were recorded) as a function of time. The measured wavefront in the intact reference sample (which contained no fractures) was elliptical with the major axis parallel to the layers as expected and was stress-independent. When the fracture samples were subjected to low stress (<4 MPa), the observed seismic

  12. Structure of the active subunit of the yeast exosome core, Rrp44: diverse modes of substrate recruitment in the RNase II nuclease family.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Esben; Basquin, Jerome; Tomecki, Rafal; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Conti, Elena

    2008-03-28

    The eukaryotic exosome is a macromolecular complex essential for RNA processing and decay. It has recently been shown that the RNase activity of the yeast exosome core can be mapped to a single subunit, Rrp44, which processively degrades single-stranded RNAs as well as RNAs containing secondary structures. Here we present the 2.3 A resolution crystal structure of S. cerevisiae Rrp44 in complex with single-stranded RNA. Although Rrp44 has a linear domain organization similar to bacterial RNase II, in three dimensions the domains have a different arrangement. The three domains of the classical nucleic-acid-binding OB fold are positioned on the catalytic domain such that the RNA-binding path observed in RNase II is occluded. Instead, RNA is threaded to the catalytic site via an alternative route suggesting a mechanism for RNA-duplex unwinding. The structure provides a molecular rationale for the observed biochemical properties of the RNase R family of nucleases. PMID:18374646

  13. Streaming potential modeling in fractured rock: Insights into the identification of hydraulically active fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, D.; Linde, N.; Jougnot, D.; Irving, J.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous field experiments suggest that the self-potential (SP) geophysical method may allow for the detection of hydraulically active fractures and provide information about fracture properties. However, a lack of suitable numerical tools for modeling streaming potentials in fractured media prevents quantitative interpretation and limits our understanding of how the SP method can be used in this regard. To address this issue, we present a highly efficient two-dimensional discrete-dual-porosity approach for solving the fluid flow and associated self-potential problems in fractured rock. Our approach is specifically designed for complex fracture networks that cannot be investigated using standard numerical methods. We then simulate SP signals associated with pumping conditions for a number of examples to show that (i) accounting for matrix fluid flow is essential for accurate SP modeling and (ii) the sensitivity of SP to hydraulically active fractures is intimately linked with fracture-matrix fluid interactions. This implies that fractures associated with strong SP amplitudes are likely to be hydraulically conductive, attracting fluid flow from the surrounding matrix.

  14. Pediatric Open Fractures.

    PubMed

    Trionfo, Arianna; Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Herman, Martin J

    2016-07-01

    Open fractures in children are rare and are typically associated with better prognoses compared with their adult equivalents. Regardless, open fractures pose a challenge because of the risk of healing complications and infection, leading to significant morbidity even in the pediatric population. Therefore, the management of pediatric open fractures requires special consideration. This article comprehensively reviews the initial evaluation, classification, treatment, outcomes, and controversies of open fractures in children. PMID:27241379

  15. Waterflood-induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, B.J.; Niko, H.

    1987-01-01

    Fracturing occurs quite often in water injection wells, with sometimes unforeseen consequences on waterflood sweep efficiency. One of the causes of fracturing is often the cooling of hot formations by cold injection water. A special version of a thermal reservoir simulator for prototype applications has thus been constructed that is capable of dealing with propagating waterflood-induces hydraulic fractures. With this simulator, fracture propagation and the effect of growing fractures on the sweep efficiency are studied. Infinite fracture conductivity is assumed. The limitation to a very high leak-off fractures justifies disregarding the changes in fracture volume. Fracture growth is calculated using the concept of a critical stress intensity factor. Both poro- and thermo-elastic changes in the horizontal stresses are calculated numerically and their influence on the fracture initiation/propagation is continuously taken into account. In addition, a model of fracture wall impairment because of filter-cake build-up due to poor quality injection water is included. Results are presented for both thermal and isothermal situations. It is observed in isothermal cases that the voidage replacement ratio (volume balance during injection) determined to a great extent the length to which the fracture eventually may grow.

  16. Fractured tooth (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A tooth can be chipped or fractured during an accident or a bad fall. A tooth that is chipped or not badly fractured can usually be handled on a nonemergency basis. A tooth that is badly fractured may have exposed nerve ...

  17. BENCHMARKING FAST-TO-ALFVEN MODE CONVERSION IN A COLD MHD PLASMA. II. HOW TO GET ALFVEN WAVES THROUGH THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Shelley C.; Cally, Paul S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2012-05-20

    Alfven waves may be difficult to excite at the photosphere due to low-ionization fraction and suffer near-total reflection at the transition region (TR). Yet they are ubiquitous in the corona and heliosphere. To overcome these difficulties, we show that they may instead be generated high in the chromosphere by conversion from reflecting fast magnetohydrodynamic waves, and that Alfvenic TR reflection is greatly reduced if the fast reflection point is within a few scale heights of the TR. The influence of mode conversion on the phase of the reflected fast wave is also explored. This phase can potentially be misinterpreted as a travel speed perturbation with implications for the practical seismic probing of active regions.

  18. Interlaminar Fracture Toughness Evaluation in Glass/Epoxy Composites Using Acoustic Emission and Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedifar, Milad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Najafabadi, Mehdi Ahmadi; Toudeshky, Hossein Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Delamination is one of the most common modes of failure in laminated composites and it leads to the loss of structural strength and stiffness. In this paper, mode I, mode II, and mixed of these pure modes were investigated using mechanical data, Finite Element Method (FEM) and Acoustic Emission (AE) signals. Experimental data were obtained from in situ monitoring of glass/epoxy laminated composites with different lay-ups when subjected to different modes of failure. The main objective was to investigate the behavior of delamination propagation and to evaluate the critical value of the strain energy which is required for onset of the delamination ( G C). For the identification of interlaminar fracture toughness of the specimens, four methods were used: (a) ASTM standard methods, (b) FEM analysis, (c) AE method, and (d) sentry function method which is a function of mechanical and AE behaviors of the specimens. The results showed that the G C values obtained by the sentry function method and FEM analysis were in a close agreement with the results of nonlinearity methods which is recommended in the ASTM standards. It was also found that the specimens under different loading conditions and various lay-up have different G C values. These differences are related to different stress components distribution in the specimens which induce various damage mechanisms. Accordingly, stress components distribution obtained from FEM analyses were in agreement with SEM observations of the damaged surfaces of the specimens.

  19. Synthesis of CuO by Cu-CPPs with the determination of Cu(II) coordination modes from a novel complex of [Cu(terpyOH){sub 2}]·(HBTC)·2H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu Chen, Gang Han, Li; Pei, Jian

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we investigated the synthesis of CuO microrods by simple calcination of copper-based coordination polymer particles (Cu-CPPs) at high temperature in air. The photocatalytic activity of the CuO microrods was tested by the decomposition of aqueous solution of RhB, which was completely decomposed by irradiation with light. To analyze the relationship of metal ions and ligands in the Cu-CPPs, the single crystal of [Cu(terpyOH){sub 2}]∙(HBTC)∙2H{sub 2}O (1) (terpyOH=4′-hydroxy-2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine, BTC=1,3,5-benzene tricarboxylate) was first prepared and characterized by X-ray single crystal structural analysis. A variety of hydrogen bonds constructing the 3D complex structure in [Cu(terpyOH){sub 2}]∙(HBTC)∙2H{sub 2}O (1) were observed. - Graphical abstract: Demonstrating a general method to synthesize CuO microrods via simple calcination of Cu-CPPs and Cu(II) coordination modes from a novel complex of [Cu(terpyOH){sub 2}]∙(HBTC)·2H{sub 2}O constructed by hydrogen bonding. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation of microrods CuO from thermal treatment of Cu-CPPs through an “escape-by-crafty-scheme” strategy has been studied. • Determination of Cu(II) coordination modes in Cu-CPPs from a novel complex of [Cu(terpyOH){sub 2}]∙(HBTC) 2H{sub 2}O. • Invested the behave of hydrogen bonding to construct the 3D complex structure. • Commendable photodegradation performance was observed.

  20. Anisotropic mode-dependent damage of cortical bone using the extended finite element method (XFEM).

    PubMed

    Feerick, Emer M; Liu, Xiangyi Cheryl; McGarry, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Anisotropic damage initiation criteria were developed for extended finite element method (XFEM) prediction of crack initiation and propagation in cortical bone. This anisotropic damage model was shown to accurately predict the dependence of crack propagation patterns and fracture toughness on mode mixity and on osteon orientations, as observed experimentally. Four initiation criteria were developed to define crack trajectories relative to osteon orientations and max principal stress for single and mixed mode fracture. Alternate failure strengths for tensile and compressive loading were defined to simulate the asymmetric failure of cortical bone. The dependence of cortical bone elasticity and failure properties on osteon orientation is analogous to the dependence of composite properties on fibre orientation. Hence, three of the criteria developed in the present study were based upon the Hashin damage criteria. The fourth criterion developed was defined in terms of the max principal stress. This criterion initiated off axis crack growth perpendicular to the direction of the max principal stress. The unique set of parameters calibrated accurately predicted; (i) the relationship between fracture energy and osteon alignment, (ii) the alternate crack patterns for both varying osteon orientations and loading angle. Application of the developed anisotropic damage models to cortical bone screw pullout highlights the potential application for orthopaedic device design evaluation. PMID:23455165

  1. Fracture process zone of brittle composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental-numerical analysis was used to study the fracture process zone (FPZ) trailing the crack tip in brittle composites. Two major parts are included in this dissertation. Part 1 is a static mode 1 fracture analysis of ceramic matrix composites. Part 2 is a mixed mode 1 and mode 2 dynamic fracture analysis of concrete. In Part 1, the FPZ which trailed a stably growing crack in SiC(w)/Al2O3 ceramic matrix composite was investigated through a hybrid experimental-numerical analysis. Surface displacements on the sides of three-point bend and wedge loaded-double cantilever beam (WL-DCB) specimens with chevron notch starter cracks were measured with moire interferometry during crack growth. The three-point bend specimens were precracked by the single edge precrack bend (SEPB) method. The experimental data was then input to two and three dimensional finite element models of the three-point bend and WL-DCB specimens, respectively, to determine by an inverse analysis the crack closure stress (CCS) versus crack opening displacement (COD) relations for SiC(w)/Al2O3. Energy dissipation rates in the trailing process zone plus the matrix fracture and fiber breakage accounted for about 80 percent of the release energy rate with the remainder being dissipated through the frontal process zone. In Part 2, a hybrid experimental-numerical procedure was used to analyze rapid crack growth in an impact loaded three-point bend concrete specimen with an offset straight precrack. Two-beam dynamic moire interferometry was used to record eight sequential moire patterns of the horizontal or vertical displacements by a ultra-high speed camera with an exposure of 2 microseconds and a framing rate of 100,000 frames/sec. The fracture responses of ceramic composites and concrete were both characterized by FPZ models which are the dominant fracture energy dissipation mechanism in this type of brittle composite.

  2. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  3. Work of fracture of a composite resin: fracture-toughening mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Carmen; Osorio, Raquel; Toledano, Manuel; de Aza, Salvador

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate those mechanical parameters able to describe the fracture behavior of dental composite resins. A commercially available fine-particle micro-hybrid resin composite was used. Classical parameters as Young's modulus, strength distribution, and critical stress intensity factor were considered. Strength values were determined using the diametrical compression of discs test and for the critical stress intensity factor both unstable and controlled fracture tests were used. Controlled fracture tests allowed determining the work of fracture. Microstructure was studied by optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The obtained properties have been Young's modulus, 17.7 +/- 0.6 GPa; Weibull modulus, m = 14 (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 17 and 10); characteristic strength 51 MPa (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 53 and 49 MPa); critical stress intensity factor in mode I, K(IC) = 1.3 +/- 0.1 and work of fracture, gamma(wof) = 8-9 J/m(2). Pores and bubbles formed during the packing of the composite were identified as critical defects in the tested specimens. Crack deflection and branching have been identified as toughening mechanisms. Classical mechanical parameters (Young's modulus, hardness...) are not able to efficiently predict the major clinical failure mode of composite resins by fatigue. Work of fracture analysis, which is dependant on microstructural parameters such as particle size and shape, have to be included when testing mechanical properties of dental composite resins in future research studies. PMID:18465813

  4. Epidemiology of clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Postacchini, Franco; Gumina, Stefano; De Santis, Pierfrancesco; Albo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of 535 isolated clavicle fractures treated in a hospital of a large metropolis during an 11-year period was performed. Data regarding patient's age and sex, side involved, mechanism of injury, and season in which the fracture occurred were obtained from the clinical records. Radiographic classification was performed with the Allman system. Clavicle fractures represented 2.6% of all fractures and 44% of those in the shoulder girdle. Most patients were men (68%), and the left side was involved in 61% of cases. Fractures of the middle third of the clavicle, which were the most common (81%), were displaced in 48% of cases and comminuted in 19%. Fractures of the medial third were the least common (2%). The prevalence of midclavicular fractures was found to decrease progressively with age, starting from the first decade of life when they represented 88.2% of all clavicle fractures and were undisplaced in 55.5% of cases. In adults, the incidence of displaced fractures, independent of location, was higher than that of undisplaced fractures. Traffic accidents were the most common cause of the injury. In the period under study, the incidence of fractures showed no significant change over time and no seasonal variation. PMID:12378163

  5. Bending fracture in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Lu, Hsin-Fang

    2008-12-10

    A novel approach was adopted to incur bending fracture in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Expanded graphite (EG) was made by intercalating and exfoliating natural graphite flakes. The EG was deposited with nickel particles, from which CNTs were grown by chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs were tip-grown, and their roots were fixed on the EG flakes. The EG flakes were compressed, and many CNTs on the surface were fragmented due to the compression-induced bending. Two major modes of the bending fracture were observed: cone-shaped and shear-cut. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the crack growth within the graphene layers. The bending fracture is characterized by two-region crack growth. An opening crack first appears around the outer-tube due to the bending-induced tensile stress. The crack then branches to grow along an inclined direction toward the inner-tube due to the presence of the shear stress in between graphene layers. An inner-tube pullout with inclined side surface is formed. The onset and development of the crack in these two regions are discussed. PMID:21730690

  6. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  7. Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines Regulates Post-Fracture Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rundle, Charles H.; Mohan, Subburaman; Edderkaoui, Bouchra

    2013-01-01

    There is now considerable experimental data to suggest that inflammatory cells collaborate in the healing of skeletal fractures. In terms of mechanisms that contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the fracture site, chemokines and their receptors have received considerable attention. Our previous findings have shown that Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (Darc), the non-classical chemokine receptor that does not signal, but rather acts as a scavenger of chemokines that regulate cell migration, is a negative regulator of peak bone density in mice. Furthermore, because Darc is expressed by inflammatory and endothelial cells, we hypothesized that disruption of Darc action will affect post-fracture inflammation and consequently will affect fracture healing. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated fracture healing in mice with targeted disruption of Darc and corresponding wild type (WT) control mice. We found that fracture callus cartilage formation was significantly greater (33%) at 7 days post-surgery in Darc-KO compared to WT mice. The increased cartilage was associated with greater Collagen (Col) II expression at 3 days post-fracture and Col-X at 7 days post-fracture compared to WT mice, suggesting that Darc deficiency led to early fracture cartilage formation and differentiation. We then compared the expression of cytokine and chemokine genes known to be induced during inflammation. Interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 were all down regulated in the fractures derived from Darc-KO mice at one day post-fracture, consistent with an altered inflammatory response. Furthermore, the number of macrophages was significantly reduced around the fractures in Darc-KO compared to WT mice. Based on these data, we concluded that Darc plays a role in modulating the early inflammatory response to bone fracture and subsequent cartilage formation. However, the early cartilage formation was not translated with an early bone formation at the

  8. Extending the Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor through Dual Mode Inverter Control -- Part II: Laboratory Proof-of-Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J.S.

    2001-10-29

    Previous theoretical work has shown that when all loss mechanisms are neglected the constant power speed range (CPSR) of a brushless dc motor (BDCM) is infinite when the motor is driven by the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) [1,2]. In a physical drive, losses, particularly speed-sensitive losses, will limit the CPSR to a finite value. In this paper we report the results of laboratory testing of a low-inductance, 7.5-hp BDCM driven by the DMIC. The speed rating of the test motor rotor limited the upper speed of the testing, and the results show that the CPSR of the test machine is greater than 6:1 when driven by the DMIC. Current wave shape, peak, and rms values remained controlled and within rating over the entire speed range. The laboratory measurements allowed the speed-sensitive losses to be quantified and incorporated into computer simulation models, which then accurately reproduce the results of lab testing. The simulator shows that the limiting CPSR of the test motor is 8:1. These results confirm that the DMIC is capable of driving low-inductance BDCMs over the wide CPSR that would be required in electric vehicle applications.

  9. Fracture and damage evolution of fluorinated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E. N.; Rae, P.; Orler, E. B.; Thissell, W. R.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Fluoropolymers are often semi-crystalline in nature, with their linear chains forming complicated phases near room temperature and ambient pressure. The most widely used fluorocarbon polymer for engineering applications is polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), due to its extremely low coefficient of friction, outstanding resistance to corrosion, and excellent electrical properties. The phase structure of PTFE is complex with four well-characterized crystalline phases (three observed at atmospheric pressure) and substantial molecular motion well below the melting point. The first-order transition at 19 C between phases II and IV is an unraveling in the helical conformation. Further rotational disordering and untwisting of the helices occurs above 30 C giving way to phase I. The mechanical behavior, including fracture and damage evolution, of PTFE depends on the chain and segment motions dictated by crystalline phase microstructure. The presence of three unique phases at ambient pressure near room temperature implies that failure during standard operating conditions may be strongly dependent on the phase. This paper presents a preliminary study of fracture and damage evolution in PTFE with the effects of temperature-induced phase on fracture mechanisms. The quasi-static fracture of PTFE in the atmospheric pressure regime, over a range of temperatures, was found to be strongly phase dependent: phase II exhibits brittle-fracture, phase IV displays ductile-fracture with crazing and some stable crack growth, and plastic flow dominates phase 1. The bulk failure properties are correlated to failure mechanisms through fractography of the fracture surfaces (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)).

  10. Acromial approach for treating glenoid fractures: A report of two cases and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    AO, RONGGUANG; YU, BAOQING; SHI, JIFEI; LI, ZEXIANG; ZHU, YALONG

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is usually recommended for displaced glenoid fractures, with open reduction and internal fixation as the standard operative treatment. Three approaches have been recommended in the reduction of glenoid fractures: Anterior, posterior and combined; however, a traditional approach may be difficult due to a high position or a comminuted Ideberg type III fracture. The combined approach results in a longer incision and more soft tissue injury when associated with an acromial fracture. The present study describes two complicated glenoid fractures: One case was a comminuted Ideberg type III fracture associated with an Ogawa type II acromial fracture; the second case was an Ideberg type IV fracture with associated superior shoulder suspensory complex injuries. In these cases, the acromial approach was modified to achieve satisfactory exposure and fixation of the complicated fracture. After a 1-year follow-up, the patients had a satisfactory outcome. PMID:26640532

  11. Gaseous detonation-driven fracture of tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tong Wa

    An experimental investigation of fracture response of aluminum 6061-T6 tubes under internal gaseous detonation loading has been carried out. The pressure load, with speeds exceeding 2 km/s, can be characterized as a pressure peak (ranging from 2 to 6 MPa) followed by an expansion wave. The unique combination of this particular traveling load and tube geometry produced fracture data not available before in the open literature. Experimental data of this type are useful for studying the fluid-structure-fracture interaction and various crack curving and branching phenomena, and also for validation for multi-physics and multi-scale modeling. Axial surface flaws were introduced to control the crack initiation site. Fracture threshold models were developed by combining a static fracture model and an extensively studied dynamic amplification factor for tubes under internal traveling loads. Experiments were also performed on hydrostatically loaded preflawed aluminum 6061-T6 tubes for comparison. Significantly different fracture behavior was observed and the difference was explained by fluid dynamics and energy considerations. The experiments yielded comparison on crack speeds, strain, and pressure histories. In other experiments, the specimens were also pre-torqued to control the propagation direction of the cracks. Measurements were made on the detonation velocity, strain history, blast pressure from the crack opening, and crack speeds. The curved crack paths were digitized. The Chapman-Jouguet pressure, initial axial flaw length, and torsion level were varied to obtain different crack patterns. The incipient crack kinking angle was found to be consistent with fracture under mixed-mode loading. High-speed movies of the fracture events and blast wave were taken and these were used in interpreting the quantitative data. Numerical simulations were performed using the commerical explicit finite-element software LS-Dyna. The detonation wave was modeled as a traveling boundary

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. PMID:26103519

  13. Determinants of affinity and mode of DNA binding at the carboxy terminus of the bacteriophage SPO1-encoded type II DNA-binding protein, TF1.

    PubMed Central

    Andera, L; Geiduschek, E P

    1994-01-01

    The role of the carboxy-terminal amino acids of the bacteriophage SPO1-encoded type II DNA-binding protein, TF1, in DNA binding was analyzed. Chain-terminating mutations truncating the normally 99-amino-acid TF1 at amino acids 96, 97, and 98 were constructed, as were missense mutations substituting cysteine, arginine, and serine for phenylalanine at amino acid 97 and tryptophan for lysine at amino acid 99. The binding of the resulting proteins to a synthetic 44-bp binding site in 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil DNA, to binding sites in larger SPO1 [5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil-containing] DNA fragments, and to thymine-containing homologous DNA was analyzed by gel retardation and also by DNase I and hydroxy radical footprinting. We conclude that the C tail up to and including phenylalanine at amino acid 97 is essential for DNA binding and that the two C-terminal amino acids, 98 and 99, are involved in protein-protein interactions between TF1 dimers bound to DNA. Images PMID:8113176

  14. In vitro and In vivo Anti-tumor Activities and DNA Binding Mode of Five Coordinated Cyclometallated Organoplatinum(II) Complexes Containing Biphosphine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Michael; Dou, Q. Ping; Xiao, Yan; Samouei, Hamidreza; Rashidi, Mehdi; Samari, Fayezeh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram

    2011-01-01

    New complexes [Pt(C^N)Cl(dppa)], 1, and [Pt(C^N)Cl(dppm)], 2, C^N, deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine; dppa, bis(diphenylphosphino)amine; dppm, bis(diphenylphosphino)methane, were suggested to have penta-coordinated geometry, as investigated by NMR and conductometry. Pharmacological effects of 1 and 2 were evaluated for their proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities under in vitro and in vivo conditions, showing significant proteasome-inhibitory activity against purified 20S proteasome, while 2 demonstrated superior inhibitory activity against cellular 26S proteasome. Consistently, this effect was associated with higher levels of proteasome target proteins and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cells. Importantly, preliminary studies show 1 and 2 were able to exert a similar effect in vivo by inhibiting the growth of breast cancer xenografts in mice, which was associated with proteasome inhibition and apoptosis induction. Interaction of 1 and 2 with herring sperm DNA was investigated by fluorimeteric emission suggesting that PtII-containing biphosphine complexes with DNA binding capabilities can also target and inhibit the tumor proteasome. PMID:21815643

  15. (15)N NMR spectroscopy unambiguously establishes the coordination mode of the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) in Ru(ii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Battistin, Federica; Balducci, Gabriele; Demitri, Nicola; Iengo, Elisabetta; Milani, Barbara; Alessio, Enzo

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the reactivity of three Ru(ii) precursors -trans,cis,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(dmso-O)2], cis,fac-[RuCl2(dmso-O)(dmso-S)3], and trans-[RuCl2(dmso-S)4] - towards the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) or its parent compound 4-methyl-2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine ligand (mpp), in which a methyl group replaces the carboxylic group on the pyrimidine ring. In principle, both cppH and mpp can originate linkage isomers, depending on how the pyrimidine ring binds to ruthenium through the nitrogen atom ortho (N(o)) or para (N(p)) to the group in position 4. The principal aim of this work was to establish a spectroscopic fingerprint for distinguishing the coordination mode of cppH/mpp also in the absence of an X-ray structural characterization. By virtue of the new complexes described here, together with the others previously reported by us, we successfully recorded {(1)H,(15)N}-HMBC NMR spectra at natural abundance of the (15)N isotope on a consistent number of fully characterized Ru(ii)-cppH/mpp compounds, most of them being stereoisomers and/or linkage isomers. Thus, we found that (15)N NMR chemical shifts unambiguously establish the binding mode of cppH and mpp - either through N(o) or N(p)- and can be conveniently applied also in the absence of the X-ray structure. In fact, coordination of cppH to Ru(ii) induces a marked upfield shift for the resonance of the N atoms directly bound to the metal, with coordination induced shifts (CIS) ranging from ca.-45 to -75 ppm, depending on the complex, whereas the unbound N atom resonates at a frequency similar to that of the free ligand. Similar results were found for the complexes of mpp. This work confirmed our previous finding that cppH has no binding preference, whereas mpp binds exclusively through N(p). Interestingly, the two cppH linkage isomers trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(p))] (5) and trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(o))] (6) were easily obtained in pure form by exploiting their different

  16. Fracture Strength of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Casting Post and Core and Glass-Fiber with Composite Core

    PubMed Central

    Saatian, Sedigheh

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prefabricated metal and ceramic posts can be used with different kinds of core materials as an alternative to the conventional casting post and cores. It is unclear how these post and core systems can withstand different kind of forces in the mouth. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of endodontically treated, crowned maxillary incisors restored with casting post and cores and glass- fiber post with composite core and to evaluate their mode of fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty caries free, human maxillary central incisors with incisoapical length of 23 ± 1 mm were divided into two groups. After root canal treatment procedures and decronation of teeth 2mm above cementoenamel junction, Grope 1 was restored with glass- fiber posts and composite cores and group 2 received casting post and cores. Teeth were prepared with a circumferential shoulder including a 1-2 mm ferrule and 0.5 mm bevel; all posts were cemented with an adhesive resin and teeth were restored with complete coverage crowns. Loads were applied at an angle of 135 degrees using a universal testing machine. Compression force was applied until the specimens fractured. RESULTS: The median fracture strengths of groups 1 and 2 were 459 and 686 respectively (p<0.5). In group I, all fractures occurred in incisal third of roots. In groups II, 40% of fractures were in apical third and middle of roots. CONCLUSION: Within the limitation of this study, the results suggested that glass fiber with composite cores can be used as an alternative to cast posts and cores in anterior teeth when creating 2mm ferrule effect was possible in normal occlusion. Clinical trial is required to verify these in vitro results. PMID:24470803

  17. The Role of Fibular Fixation in Distal Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Antin, S.M.; Akkimaradi, R.C.; Policepatil, Prasad; Naikawadi, Girish.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lower tibial extra-articular fractures of lower tibial extra-articular bone, treated with Minimally Invasive Percutaneous plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) may have certain advantages, though the modiality is technically demanding. Aim To assess the results of distal tibial fractures treated with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis utilizing precontoured dital medial tibial locking plates without fibular fracture fixation. Material and Methods The study was conducted during the period from june 2009 to june 2011. A series of 30 patients (22 men and 8 women) with concurrent distal tibia and fibula fractures who underwent minimally plate osteosynthesis utilizing precontoured distal tibial medial locking plates without fibular fracture fixation have been reviewed after surgery. 14 fractures were type A1, 6 type A2, and 4 type A3. Open Grade II fracture were 4 and Open Grade IIIA fracture is2. Results The mean follow-up duration was 2 years. The mean time to bone union was 20 weeks. No patient had shortening, hardware breakdown, or deep-seated infection. Out of 30 patients, 24 had excellent results, 6 had good results. Four patients had palpable screws, two patient had blisters which subsidized with conservative treatment. This minimally invasive technique for treatment of distal tibial fractures proved to be a feasible and worthwhile method of stabilization. Conclusion It appears from our study that fibula fixation is not required in non-syndesmotic distal metaphyseal extra articular fractures when fixed by locking plate using minimal invasive techniques. PMID:27190908

  18. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  19. Modeling of Interaction of Hydraulic Fractures in Complex Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, O. 2; Wu, R.; Weng, X.; Gu, H.; Cohen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. Multiple fracture branches can propagate at the same time and intersect/cross each other. Each open fracture exerts additional stresses on the surrounding rock and adjacent fractures, which is often referred to as "stress shadow" effect. The stress shadow can cause significant restriction of fracture width, leading to greater risk of proppant screenout. It can also alter the fracture propagation path and drastically affect fracture network patterns. It is hence critical to properly model the fracture interaction in a complex fracture model. A method for computing the stress shadow in a complex hydraulic fracture network is presented. The method is based on an enhanced 2D Displacement Discontinuity Method (DDM) with correction for finite fracture height. The computed stress field is compared to 3D numerical simulation in a few simple examples and shows the method provides a good approximation for the 3D fracture problem. This stress shadow calculation is incorporated in the UFM. The results for simple cases of two fractures are presented that show the fractures can either attract or expel each other depending on their initial relative positions, and compares favorably with an independent 2D non-planar hydraulic fracture model. Additional examples of both planar and complex fractures propagating from multiple perforation clusters are presented, showing that fracture interaction controls the fracture dimension and propagation pattern. In a formation with no or small stress anisotropy, fracture interaction can lead to dramatic divergence of the fractures as they tend to repel each other. However, when stress anisotropy is large, the fracture propagation direction is dominated by the stress field and fracture turning due to fracture interaction is limited. However, stress shadowing still has a strong effect

  20. TRITIUM EFFECTS ON WELDMENT FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Michael Tosten, M; Scott West, S

    2006-07-17

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L stainless steel and its weldments were measured. Fracture toughness data are needed for assessing tritium reservoir structural integrity. This report provides data from J-Integral fracture toughness tests on unexposed and tritium-exposed weldments. The effect of tritium on weldment toughness has not been measured until now. The data include tests on tritium-exposed weldments after aging for up to three years to measure the effect of increasing decay helium concentration on toughness. The results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel weldments have high fracture toughness and are resistant to tritium aging effects on toughness. For unexposed alloys, weldment fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. Tritium-exposed-and-aged base metals and weldments had lower toughness values than unexposed ones but still retained good toughness properties. In both base metals and weldments there was an initial reduction in fracture toughness after tritium exposure but little change in fracture toughness values with increasing helium content in the range tested. Fracture modes occurred by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed and tritium-exposed steels and welds. This corroborates further the resistance of Type 304L steel to tritium embrittlement. This report fulfills the requirements for the FY06 Level 3 milestone, TSR15.3 ''Issue summary report for tritium reservoir material aging studies'' for the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign (ESC). The milestone was in support of ESC L2-1866 Milestone-''Complete an annual Enhanced Surveillance stockpile aging assessment report to support the annual assessment process''.