Science.gov

Sample records for mode stability analysis

  1. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  2. Fuzzy Current-Mode Control and Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a current-mode control (CMC) methodology is developed for a buck converter by using a fuzzy logic controller. Conventional CMC methodologies are based on lead-lag compensation with voltage and inductor current feedback. In this paper the converter lead-lag compensation will be substituted with a fuzzy controller. A small-signal model of the fuzzy controller will also be developed in order to examine the stability properties of this buck converter control system. The paper develops an analytical approach, introducing fuzzy control into the area of CMC.

  3. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  4. Dynamical investigation and parameter stability region analysis of a flywheel energy storage system in charging mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yong-Li; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behavior analysis of the electromechanical coupling characteristics of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with a permanent magnet (PM) brushless direct-current (DC) motor (BLDCM) is studied. The Hopf bifurcation theory and nonlinear methods are used to investigate the generation process and mechanism of the coupled dynamic behavior for the average current controlled FESS in the charging mode. First, the universal nonlinear dynamic model of the FESS based on the BLDCM is derived. Then, for a 0.01 kWh/1.6 kW FESS platform in the Key Laboratory of the Smart Grid at Tianjin University, the phase trajectory of the FESS from a stable state towards chaos is presented using numerical and stroboscopic methods, and all dynamic behaviors of the system in this process are captured. The characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated based on the Routh stability criterion and nonlinear dynamic theory. It is shown that the Hopf bifurcation is directly due to the loss of control over the inductor current, which is caused by the system control parameters exceeding certain ranges. This coupling nonlinear process of the FESS affects the stability of the motor running and the efficiency of energy transfer. In this paper, we investigate into the effects of control parameter change on the stability and the stability regions of these parameters based on the averaged-model approach. Furthermore, the effect of the quantization error in the digital control system is considered to modify the stability regions of the control parameters. Finally, these theoretical results are verified through platform experiments.

  5. High-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: stabilization and mode matching analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Alavi, S. K.; Alt, W.; Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Meschede, D.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background photons. We expect that our results contribute toward the integration of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities into compact and robust quantum-enabled devices in the future.

  6. Global mode analysis of axisymmetric bluff-body wakes: Stabilization by base bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Rojas, E.; Sevilla, A.; Martínez-Bazán, C.; Chomaz, J.-M.

    2009-11-01

    The flow around a slender body with a blunt trailing edge is unstable in most situations of interest. Usually the flow instabilities are generated within the wake behind the bluff body, inducing fluctuating forces and introducing the possibility of resonance mechanisms with modes of the structure. Base bleed is a simple and well-known means of stabilizing the wake. In the present research, we investigate the global instability properties of the laminar-incompressible flow that develops behind a cylinder with sharp edges and axis aligned with the free stream using a spectral domain decomposition method. In particular, we describe the flow instability characteristics as a function of the Reynolds number, Re=ρW∞D/μ, and the bleed coefficient, defined as the bleed-to-free-stream velocity ratio, Cb=Wb/W∞, where D is the diameter of the body and ρ and μ the density and viscosity of the free stream, respectively. For a truncated cylinder of aspect ratio L /D=5, where L is the length of the body, our calculations reveal the presence of a first steady bifurcation in the wake at Re≃391, as well as a second oscillatory one at Re≃715 with an associated Strouhal number St≃0.0905 for the most unstable azimuthal mode |m|=1. In addition, we report the existence of two critical values of the bleed coefficient Cb1∗(Re,|m |) and Cb2∗(Re,|m |)stabilize both the first and second bifurcations in the range of Reynolds numbers under study, 0≤Re≤2200. Finally, the numerical results for the oscillatory mode obtained for a bulletlike body of aspect ratio L /D=2 without base bleed are compared with experiments performed in a wind tunnel using hot-wire anemometry, showing the limitations of using an axisymmetric basic flow at Reynolds numbers higher than the critical one corresponding to the first steady bifurcation in the global stability analysis.

  7. Stability analysis of detuned Gaussian modes in lasers and optically bistable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shenlu

    1988-08-01

    Using analytic and numerical methods, we analyze the stability of steady-state Gaussian modes of a system consisting of a detuned laser cavity filled with homogeneously broadened two-level atoms. In the mean field limit and high-Q cavity approximation, we derive expressions for the free-running laser (FRL) eigenvalues, and determine the region of instability; for an optically bistable system (OBS) we obtain the equation satisfied by the eigenvalues and the conditions for optical bistability.

  8. Stabilization of Ballooning Modes by Nonparaxial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Zvonkov, A.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.

    2005-01-15

    An analysis is made of the effect of high-curvature stabilizing nonparaxial elements (cells) on the MHD plasma stability in open confinement systems and in confinement systems with closed magnetic field lines. It is shown that the population of particles trapped in such cells has a stabilizing effect not only on convective (flute) modes but also on ballooning modes, which govern the maximum possible {beta} value. In the kinetic approach, which distinguishes between the effects of trapped and passing particles, the maximum possible {beta} values consistent with stability can be much higher than those predicted by the MHD model.

  9. Modeling and Analysis for Tearing Mode Stability in DIII-D Hybrid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungjin; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Na, Yong-Su; DIII-D Team

    2014-10-01

    Plasma rotation in DIII-D hybrid scenario plasmas is found to change the stability of tearing modes (TMs) in a profound manner. It is important to understand the onset threshold and the evolution of TMs for developing a high-performance steady-state fusion reactor. The modified Rutherford equation (MRE) estimates the growth rate of an island and is used to analyze the TM stability. The change in TM stability was investigated in hybrid plasmas with various conditions including rotation, normalized beta, q profile, and so on. The measured island width is larger in low q95 cases and increased as plasma rotation was reduced. The island width calculated by MRE with TM stability index Δ' assumed from its poloidal mode number, -m/r, showed a good agreement during high rotation, but could not be matched to the experimental island width at lower rotation. Simulations of TMs using resistive MHD codes such as NIMROD and PEST3 will also be presented and compared with experiments to determine the possibility for predicting TM onset by Δ' calculation. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  10. Stability analysis of internal ideal modes in low-shear tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlberg, C.; Graves, J. P.

    2007-11-15

    The stability of internal, ideal modes in tokamaks with low magnetic shear in the plasma core is analyzed. For equilibria with large aspect ratio, a parabolic pressure profile and a flat q profile in the core, an exact solution of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability equations is found. The solution includes the eigenfunctions and the complete spectra of two distinctly different MHD phenomena: A family of fast-growing, Mercier-unstable global eigenmodes localized in a low-shear region with q<1, and another, related family of stable, global eigenmodes existing in plasmas with q>1 in the core. In the latter case the solution in addition includes one unstable eigenmode, if beta is larger than a critical value depending on the width of the low-shear region and on the q-profile in the edge region.

  11. Stability of Alfven gap modes in burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Freidberg, J.P. )

    1992-06-01

    A stability analysis is carried out for energetic particle-Alfven gap modes. Three modes have been identified: the toroidicity, ellipticity, and noncircular triangularity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE, EAE, and NAE). In highly elongated plasma cross sections with {kappa}{minus}1{similar to}1, the EAE may be a more robust mode than the TAE and NAE. It is found that electron Landau damping in highly elongated plasmas has a strong stabilizing influence on the {ital n}=1 EAE, while ion Landau damping stabilizes the {ital n}=1 TAE in high-density regimes. Furthermore, the NAE turns out to be stable for all currently proposed ignition experiments. The stability analysis of a typical burning plasma device, Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) (Phys. Scr. {bold T16}, 89 (1987)) shows that {ital n}{gt}1 gap modes can pose a serious threat to the achievement of ignition conditions.

  12. Energetic Ion Interactions with Tearing Mode Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, Michael; Brennan, Dylan

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the interactions between energetic ions and pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes in high beta tokamaks. Previous studies have shown that energetic ions interact with and affect the tearing mode stability, in a mechanism similar to those of ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall modes. The 2/1 tearing mode is found to be damped or stabilized in the presence of energetic ions, with the most significant effects on the slow-growing resistive mode. To gain an understanding of the underlying physics of these effects, we have investigated a combination of reduced analytics and numerical simulations. In the reduced model, a high aspect ratio, step function equilibrium is investigated, where the dynamics of high-energy ions interacting with the tearing mode is implemented through integration over the pressure step. In the simulations, a series of experimentally relevant D-shaped equilibria with fixed monotonic safety factor and varying peaked pressure profiles is analyzed using the δf hybrid kinetic-mhd code in NIMROD. Results show a damping effect from the ions that is consistent between the reduced model and the simulations. The stabilizing effect is mainly due to trapped particle resonance, causing the tearing mode to have a finite frequency. US DOE Grant DE- SC0004125.

  13. Ballooning Stability of Separatrix Spanning Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; Baver, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Umansky, M. V.; Lodestro, L. L.; Goldston, R. J.; Nichols, J. H.

    2013-10-01

    The ideal ballooning stability of the near-separatrix tokamak plasma and its possible relation to the Greenwald density limit, as discussed in, motivates the present work. We consider a sequence of CORSICA-generated equilibrium shapes with varying elongation and examine the marginal stability of infinite-n and finite-n separatrix-spanning modes using the 2DX and ArbiTER eigenvalue codes. The elongation scaling of the result provides a test of the proposed density-limit theory. A new computationally efficient technique for dealing with the phase variation of moderate-n modes across the branch cut in field-line following coordinates will also be discussed. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FG02-97ER54392 and DE-SC0006562.

  14. Stability of zero modes in parafermion chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Adam S.; Mong, Roger S. K.; Alicea, Jason; Fendley, Paul

    2014-10-01

    One-dimensional topological phases can host localized zero-energy modes that enable high-fidelity storage and manipulation of quantum information. Majorana fermion chains support a classic example of such a phase, having zero modes that guarantee twofold degeneracy in all eigenstates up to exponentially small finite-size corrections. Chains of "parafermions"—generalized Majorana fermions—also support localized zero modes, but, curiously, only under much more restricted circumstances. We shed light on the enigmatic zero-mode stability in parafermion chains by analytically and numerically studying the spectrum and developing an intuitive physical picture in terms of domain-wall dynamics. Specifically, we show that even if the system resides in a gapped topological phase with an exponentially accurate ground-state degeneracy, higher-energy states can exhibit a splitting that scales as a power law with system size, categorically ruling out exact localized zero modes. The transition to power-law behavior is described by critical behavior appearing exclusively within excited states.

  15. Internal tilting mode stability of non-sperical spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.

    1980-06-01

    Fixed boundary tilting mode stability is analyzed for spheromak with arbitrarily shaped cross section. A prolate spheromak can be stabilized against tilting mode by adding a conducting shell of triangular or trapesoidal half-cross section.

  16. On Ideal Stability of Cylindrical Localized Interchange Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V

    2007-05-15

    Stability of cylindrical localized ideal pressure-driven interchange plasma modes is revisited. Converting the underlying eigenvalue problem into the form of the Schroedinger equation gives a new simple way of deriving the Suydam stability criterion and calculating the growth rates of unstable modes. Near the marginal stability limit the growth rate is exponentially small and the mode has a double-peak structure.

  17. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  18. Gyrokinetic Stability Studies of the Microtearing Mode in the National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Redi, M. H.; Budny, R. V.; Rewoldt, G.; Dorland, W.

    2005-10-19

    Insight into plasma microturbulence and transport is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), following a study of drift wave modes on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves, which cause transport of heat and particles. Understanding this transport is important because the containment of heat and particles is required for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. Microtearing modes may cause high heat transport through high electron thermal conductivity. It is hoped that microtearing will be stable along with good electron transport in the proposed low collisionality International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Stability of the microtearing mode is investigated for conditions at mid-radius in a high density NSTX high performance (H-mode) plasma, which is compared to the proposed ITER plasmas. The microtearing mode is driven by the electron temperature gradient, and believed to be mediated by ion collisions and magnetic shear. Calculations are based on input files produced by TRXPL following TRANSP (a time-dependent transport analysis code) analysis. The variability of unstable mode growth rates is examined as a function of ion and electron collisionalities using the parallel gyrokinetic computational code GS2. Results show the microtearing mode stability dependence for a range of plasma collisionalities. Computation verifies analytic predictions that higher collisionalities than in the NSTX experiment increase microtearing instability growth rates, but that the modes are stabilized at the highest values. There is a transition of the dominant mode in the collisionality scan to ion temperature gradient character at both high and low collisionalities. The calculations suggest that plasma electron thermal confinement may be greatly improved in the low-collisionality ITER.

  19. Application of small-signal modeling and measurement techniques to the stability analysis of an integrated switching-mode power system. [onboard Dynamics Explorer Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, R. C.; Owen, H. A., Jr.; Wilson, T. G.; Rodriguez, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small-signal modeling techniques are used in a system stability analysis of a breadboard version of a complete functional electrical power system. The system consists of a regulated switching dc-to-dc converter, a solar-cell-array simulator, a solar-array EMI filter, battery chargers and linear shunt regulators. Loss mechanisms in the converter power stage, including switching-time effects in the semiconductor elements, are incorporated into the modeling procedure to provide an accurate representation of the system without requiring frequency-domain measurements to determine the damping factor. The small-signal system model is validated by the use of special measurement techniques which are adapted to the poor signal-to-noise ratio encountered in switching-mode systems. The complete electrical power system with the solar-array EMI filter is shown to be stable over the intended range of operation.

  20. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghit, Slimen; Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  1. Dual-mode temperature compensation technique for laser stabilization to a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Fescenko, I; Alnis, J; Schliesser, A; Wang, C Y; Kippenberg, T J; Hänsch, T W

    2012-08-13

    Frequency stabilization of a diode laser locked to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) reference resonator made of a MgF2 single crystal is demonstrated. The strong thermal dependence of the difference frequency between two orthogonally polarized TE an TM modes (dual-mode frequency) of the optically anisotropic crystal material allows sensitive measurement of the resonator's temperature within the optical mode volume. This dual-mode signal was used as feedback for self-referenced temperature stabilization to nanokelvin precision, resulting in frequency stability of 0.3 MHz/h at 972 nm, which was measured by comparing with an independent ultrastable laser. PMID:23038559

  2. MAP stability, design, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Andrews, S. F.; O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(2) Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L(2), aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. Thruster plume impingement torques that could affect the performance of the thruster modes were estimated and simulated, and a simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  3. Ballooning Modes in the Systems Stabilized by Divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.; Zvonkov, A.V.

    2005-01-15

    MHD stability of a plasma in systems with closed magnetic field lines and open systems containing the nonparaxial stabilizing cells with large field lines curvature, in particular, divertors is analyzed. It is shown that population of particles trapped in such cells has a stabilizing effect not only on flute modes, but also on ballooning modes that determine the {beta} limit. At kinetic description that accounts for different effect of trapped and passing particles on perturbations, {beta} limit permitted by stability may be much greater then it follows from MHD model.

  4. Global MHD Mode Stabilization and Control for Tokamak Disruption Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Park, Y. S.; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Goumiri, I.; Grierson, B.; Holcomb, C.

    2015-11-01

    The near-complete elimination of plasma disruptions in fusion-producing tokamaks is the present ``grand challenge'' for stability research. Meeting this goal requires multiple approaches, important components of which are prediction, stabilization, and control of global MHD instabilities. Research on NSTX and its upgrade is synergizing these elements to make quantified progress on this challenge. Initial results from disruption characterization and prediction analyses describe physical disruption event chains in NSTX. Analysis of NSTX and DIII-D experiments show that stabilization of global modes is dominated by precession drift and bounce orbit resonances respectively. Stability therefore depends on the plasma rotation profile. A model-based rotation profile controller for NSTX-U using both neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity is shown in simulations to evolve profiles away from unstable states. Active RWM control is addressed using dual field component sensor feedback and a model-based RWM state-space controller. Comparison of measurements and synthetic diagnostics is examined for off-normal event handling. A planned 3D coil system upgrade can allow RWM control close to the ideal n = 1 with-wall limit. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Competing stability modes in vortex structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Stephen; Gostelow, J. Paul; Rona, Aldo; McMullan, W. Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Nose cones and turbine blades have rotating components and represent very practical geometries for which the behavior of vortex structures is not completely understood. These two different physical cases demonstrate a common theme of competition between mode and vortex types. The literature concerning boundary-layer transition over rotating cones presents clear evidence of an alternative instability mode leading to counter-rotating vortex pairs, consistent with a centrifugal instability. This is in contrast to co-rotating vortices present over rotating disks that arise from crossflow effects. It is demonstrated analytically that this mode competes with the crossflow mode and is dominant only over slender cones. Predictions are aligned with experimental measurements over slender cones. Concurrent experimental work on the flow over swept cylinders shows that organized fine-scale streamwise vorticity occurs more frequently on convex surfaces than is appreciated. The conventional view of purely two-dimensional laminar boundary layers following blunt leading edges is not realistic and such boundary layers need to be treated three-dimensionally, particularly when sweep is present. The vortical structures are counter-rotating for normal cylinders and co-rotating under high sweep conditions. Crossflow instabilities may have a major role to play in the transition process but the streamline curvature mode is still present, and seemingly unchanged, when the boundary layer becomes turbulent.

  6. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.; Krishnaswami, J.; Hartley, R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes ideal and resistive studies of high-beta plasmas and of the second stability region. Emphasis is focused on supershot'' plasmas in TFIR where MHD instabilities are frequently observed and which spoil their confinement properties. Substantial results are described from the analysis of these high beta poloidal plasmas. During these studies, initial pressure and safety factor profiles were obtained from the TRANSP code, which is used extensively to analyze experimental data. Resistive MBD stability studies of supershot equilibria show that finite pressure stabilization of tearing modes is very strong in these high {beta}p plasmas. This has prompted a detailed re-examination of linear tearing mode theory in which we participated in collaboration with Columbia University and General Atomics. This finite pressure effect is shown to be highly sensitive to small scale details of the pressure profile. Even when an ad hoc method of removing this stabilizing mechanism is implemented, however, it is shown that there is only superficial agreement between resistive MBD stability computation and the experimental data. While the mode structures observed experimentally can be found computationally, there is no convincing correlation with the experimental observations when the computed results are compared with a large set of supershot data. We also describe both the ideal and resistive stability properties of TFIR equilibria near the transition to the second region. It is shown that the highest {beta} plasmas, although stable to infinite-n ideal ballooning modes, can be unstable to the so called infernal'' modes associated with small shear. The sensitivity of these results to the assumed pressure and current density profiles is discussed. Finally, we describe results from two collaborative studies with PPPL. The first involves exploratory studies of the role of the 1/1 mode in tokamaks and, secondly, a study of sawtooth stabilization using ICRF.

  7. Stabilization of the resistive shell mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Aydemir, A.

    1995-02-01

    The stability of current-driven external-kink modes is investigated in a tokamak plasma surrounded by an external shell of finite electrical conductivity. According to conventional theory, the ideal mode can be stabilized by placing the shell sufficiently close to the plasma, but the non-rotating ``resistive shell mode,`` which grows on the characteristic L/R time of the shell, always persists. It is demonstrated, using both analytic and numerical techniques, that a combination of strong edge plasma rotation and dissipation somewhere inside the plasma is capable of stabilizing the resistive shell mode. This stabilization mechanism does not necessarily depend on toroidicity or presence of resonant surfaces inside the plasma.

  8. Linear stability of low mode number tearing modes in the banana collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R. , Abingdon, OX14 3DB, England )

    1989-12-01

    The semicollisional layer equations governing the linear stability of small mode number tearing modes in a low beta, large aspect ratio, tokamak equilibrium are derived from an expansion of the gyrokinetic equation. In this analysis only the cases where the ion Larmor radius is either much less than, or much greater than, the layer width are considered. Both the electrons and the ions are assumed to lie in the banana collisionality regime. One interesting feature of the derived layer equations, in the limit of small ion Larmor radius, is a substantial reduction in the effective collisionality of the system due to neoclassical ion dynamics. Next, using a shooting code, a dispersion relation is obtained from the layer equations in the limits of small ion Larmor radius and a vanishingly small fraction of trapped particles. As expected, strong semicollisional stabilization of the mode is found, but, in addition, a somewhat weaker destabilizing effect is obtained in the transition region between the collisional and semicollisional regimes.

  9. Stability of Alfvén gap modes in burning plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1992-06-01

    A stability analysis is carried out for energetic particle-Alfvén gap modes. Three modes have been identified: the toroidicity, ellipticity, and noncircular triangularity induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE, EAE, and NAE). In highly elongated plasma cross sections with κ-1˜1, the EAE may be a more robust mode than the TAE and NAE. It is found that electron Landau damping in highly elongated plasmas has a strong stabilizing influence on the n=1 EAE, while ion Landau damping stabilizes the n=1 TAE in high-density regimes. Furthermore, the NAE turns out to be stable for all currently proposed ignition experiments. The stability analysis of a typical burning plasma device, Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) [Phys. Scr. T16, 89 (1987)] shows that n>1 gap modes can pose a serious threat to the achievement of ignition conditions.

  10. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  11. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  12. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.W.; Lao, L.L.; Taylor, T.S.

    1994-11-01

    A new code demonstrates the stabilization of MHD ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation. A shifted-circle model is used to elucidate the physics and numerically reconstructed equilibria are used to analyze DIII-D discharges. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (d{Omega}/dq where {Omega} is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and, in the shifted circle model, direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is a fraction of the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub A} = V{sub A}/qR. Shear stabilization is also demonstrated for an equilibrium reconstruction of a DIII-D VH-mode.

  13. Ideal Stability of the Tokamak H--mode Edge Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, H. R.

    1998-11-01

    Tokamak performance is often controlled by stability of the edge plasma. Consistent with ``stiff'' transport models, the confinement in tokamak discharges is strongly correlated with the magnitude of the edge pressure pedestal which is limited by MHD stability. Furthermore, the high performance ELM-free H--modes are terminated by low toroidal mode number n, MHD modes driven by high edge pressure gradient, and edge current. We have evaluated low n modes using the δ W code GATO, and both high edge pressure gradient and high edge current density are found to destabilize the n=1, 2, and 3 ideal modes. We have included the self-consistent bootstrap current in the equilibria generation, and have completed a thorough survey of the effects of plasma shape and edge pressure profiles on the edge ballooning stability. The bootstrap current density helps to provide access to the second regime of stability, which is easier for: higher elongation, intermediate triangularity, larger aspect ratio, narrower pedestal width, and higher q_95. The intermediate n stability is being evaluated using a high-mode-number peeling/ ballooning mode model,(J.W. Connor, R.J. Hastie, H.R. Wilson, and R.L. Miller, Phys. Plasmas 5), 2687 (1998). where a critical role is played by the edge current density. This edge model describes the interaction of peeling mode (current driven) and ballooning mode (pressure driven) effects at high, but finite, mode number; a modified ballooning mode formalism is shown to be valid at the plasma edge. Based upon this edge model, a 2D eigenvalue code has been written to determine the stability of these modes for arbitrary shape cross sections, and edge pressure and current profiles including bootstrap current effects. This model suggests a power threshold for L--H transitions and provides a plausible explanation for an ELM cycle. Results will be presented for the pressure gradient and edge current density stability boundaries for a range of shapes and pedestal widths

  14. Stability of n = 1 internal modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1983-12-01

    An extensive numerical study has been carried out for internal modes with toroidal mode number unity. These are internal kink modes, when the q = 1 surface falls within the plasma, and have a ballooning characteristic when q/sub axis/ > 1. Both modes show a dependence on the pressure and have a second region of stability at high ..beta... A parameter survey has been conducted, varying the geometry, i.e., aspect ratio, ellipticity, triangularity, etc. and the current profiles, through the pressure and safety factor. The principal results show that the modes are dependent on the geometry and are strongly stabilized by high-order, noncircular effects. Broader pressure profiles and reduced shear are favorable for limiting the instability.

  15. Stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1994-02-01

    The stability properties of m {ge} 2 tearing instabilities in tokamak plasmas are analyzed. A boundary layer theory is used to find asymptotic solutions to the ideal external kink equation which are used to obtain a simple analytic expression for the tearing instability parameter {Delta}{prime}. This calculation generalizes previous work on this topic by considering more general toroidal equilibria (however, toroidal coupling effects are ignored). Constructions of {Delta}{prime} are obtained for plasmas with finite beta and for islands that have nonzero width. A simple heuristic estimate is given for the value of the saturated island width when the instability criterion is violated. A connection is made between the calculation of the asymptotic matching parameter in the finite beta and island width case to the nonlinear analog of the Glasser effect.

  16. Stability of TAE modes in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E.J.; Chu, M.S.; Lao, L.L.; Turnbull, A.D.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Duong, H.H.

    1992-09-01

    TAE modes driven by neutral beam injection have been observed in DIII-D. The measured frequency agrees very well with theoretical predictions for DIII-D discharges. At large amplitude these instabilities can lead to loss of over 50% of the beam power, as well as large loss of non-resonant MeV fusion products. The threshold value of fast ion beta for destabilization and the observed range of unstable mode numbers are in reasonable agreement with predictions for the mode growth rate. Continuum damping dominates at low mode numbers, while damping by electron kinetic effects dominates at high mode numbers. Preliminary experiments suggest that TAB modes can be stabilized by current profile control.

  17. Stability of gyrotron operation in very high-order modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, O. V.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.

    2012-06-15

    This study was motivated by the desire to increase the power, which can be delivered by gyrotrons in long pulse and continuous regimes. Since the admissible power level is determined by the density of ohmic losses in resonator walls, to increase the radiated power a gyrotron should operate in higher order modes. Using an existing gyrotron developed for plasma experiments in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor as a base model, the stability of operation of such a gyrotron in modes with larger number of radial variations was studied. It is shown that the power level achievable in such gyrotrons in stable single mode regimes is close to 1.5 MW. The power level 1.7-1.8 MW can be realized in regimes where the oscillations of the desired mode are accompanied by excitation of distant sidebands whose power is about 1% level of the power of the operating mode. Finally, in the case of operation at the 2-MW level, either the desired mode loses its stability and is replaced by less efficient oscillations of a mode with a smaller azimuthal index or oscillations of the operating mode are accompanied by excitation of sidebands with equally spaced frequencies.

  18. Critical Δ' for stability of viscoresistive tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Hastie, R. J.; Porcelli, F.; Tebaldi, C.

    2008-07-01

    An analytic expression for the stability threshold of linear tearing modes is derived. The magnetized plasma is described in terms of a standard viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamic model. The analytic derivation requires an extension of the standard layer equation that represents an approximation of the full model in the vicinity of the reconnecting layer. The analytic result is checked against numerical simulations, showing excellent agreement.

  19. Improving Tiltrotor Whirl-Mode Stability with Rotor Design Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Peyran, R. J; Johnson, Wayne; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Further increases in tiltrotor speeds are limited by coupled wing/rotor whirl-mode aeroelastic instability. Increased power, thrust, and rotor efficiency are not enough: the whirl-mode stability boundary must also be improved. With current technology, very stiff, thick wings of limited aspect ratio are essential to meet the stability requirements, which severely limits cruise efficiency and maximum speed. Larger and more efficient tiltrotors will need longer and lighter wings, for which whirl-mode flutter is a serious design issue. Numerous approaches to improving the whirl-mode airspeed boundary have been investigated, including tailored stiffness wings, active stability augmentation, variable geometry rotors, highly swept tips, and at one extreme, folding rotors. The research reported herein began with the much simpler approach of adjusting the chordwise positions of the rotor blade aerodynamic center and center of gravity, effected by offsetting the airfoil quarter chord or structural mass with respect to the elastic axis. The research was recently extended to include variations in blade sweep, control system stiffness, and pitch-flap coupling (delta(sub 3)). As an introduction to the subject, and to establish a baseline against which to measure stability improvements, this report will first summarize results. The paper will then discuss more advanced studies of swept blades and control-system modifications.

  20. Ballooning mode stability in the Hall-magnetohydrodynamics model

    SciTech Connect

    Torasso, R.; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2005-03-01

    The governing equations of the ballooning modes are derived within the Hall-magneto-hydrodynamics (HMHD) model and given a standard Hamiltonian form, which is then used to derive sufficient conditions for stability. In most cases, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stability implies HMHD stability, as is the case for tokamak configurations if the pressure is a monotone increasing function of density and the entropy is monotone decreasing. The same result holds for general MHD plasmas with constant entropy and for incompressible plasmas. However, in the case of (compressible) closed-line systems such as the field-reversed configuration, or in a typical magnetospheric magnetic field, MHD ballooning stability does not guarantee HMHD stability. For the explicitly solvable configuration of the Z pinch it is in fact shown that the plasma can be MHD stable but HMHD unstable.

  1. Evolutionary bi-stability in pathogen transmission mode

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, F.; Fraaije, B. A.; van den Berg, F.; Shaw, M. W.

    2010-01-01

    Many pathogens transmit to new hosts by both infection (horizontal transmission) and transfer to the infected host's offspring (vertical transmission). These two transmission modes require specific adaptations of the pathogen that can be mutually exclusive, resulting in a trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission. We show that in mathematical models such trade-offs can lead to the simultaneous existence of two evolutionary stable states (evolutionary bi-stability) of allocation of resources to the two modes of transmission. We also show that jumping between evolutionary stable states can be induced by gradual environmental changes. Using quantitative PCR-based estimates of abundance in seed and vegetative parts, we show that the pathogen of wheat, Phaeosphaeria nodorum, has jumped between two distinct states of transmission mode twice in the past 160 years, which, based on published evidence, we interpret as adaptation to environmental change. The finding of evolutionary bi-stability has implications for human, animal and other plant diseases. An ill-judged change in a disease control programme could cause the pathogen to evolve a new, and possibly more damaging, combination of transmission modes. Similarly, environmental changes can shift the balance between transmission modes, with adverse effects on human, animal and plant health. PMID:20129975

  2. Simulation and Analysis of the Hybrid Operating Mode in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Indireshkumar, K.

    2005-09-22

    The hybrid operating mode in ITER is examined with 0D systems analysis, 1.5D discharge scenario simulations using TSC and TRANSP, and the ideal MHD stability is discussed. The hybrid mode has the potential to provide very long pulses and significant neutron fluence if the physics regime can be produced in ITER. This paper reports progress in establishing the physics basis and engineering limitation for the hybrid mode in ITER.

  3. SDO Delta H Mode Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Starin, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    While on orbit, disturbance torques on a three axis stabilized spacecraft tend to increase the system momentum, which is stored in the reaction wheels. Upon reaching the predefined momentum capacity (or maximum wheel speed) of the reaction wheel, an external torque must be used to unload the momentum. The purpose of the Delta H mode is to manage the system momentum. This is accomplished by driving the reaction wheels to a target momentum state while the attitude thrusters, which provide an external torque, are used to maintain the attitude. The Delta H mode is designed to meet the mission requirements and implement the momentum management plan. Changes in the requirements or the momentum management plan can lead to design changes in the mode. The momentum management plan defines the expected momentum buildup trend, the desired momentum state and how often the system is driven to the desired momentum state (unloaded). The desired momentum state is chosen based on wheel capacity, wheel configuration, thruster layout and thruster sizing. For the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the predefined wheel momentum capacity is a function of the jitter requirements, power, and maximum momentum capacity. Changes in jitter requirements or power limits can lead to changes in the desired momentum state. These changes propagate into the changes in the momentum management plan and therefore the Delta H mode design. This paper presents the analysis and design performed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Delta H mode. In particular, the mode logic and processing needed to meet requirements is described along with the momentum distribution formulation. The Delta H mode design is validated using the Solar Dynamics Observatory High Fidelity simulator. Finally, a summary of the design is provided along with concluding remarks.

  4. Feedback stabilization system for pulsed single longitudinal mode tunable lasers

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Raymond, Thomas D.

    1991-10-01

    A feedback stabilization system for pulse single longitudinal mode tunable lasers having an excited laser medium contained within an adjustable length cavity and producing a laser beam through the use of an internal dispersive element, including detection of angular deviation in the output laser beam resulting from detuning between the cavity mode frequency and the passband of the internal dispersive element, and generating an error signal based thereon. The error signal can be integrated and amplified and then applied as a correcting signal to a piezoelectric transducer mounted on a mirror of the laser cavity for controlling the cavity length.

  5. Modal sensitivity analysis for single mode operation in large mode area fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sévigny, Benoit; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Garneau, Marc; Faucher, Mathieu; Lizé, Yannick Keith; Holehouse, Nigel

    2008-02-01

    Most of the current large mode area (LMA) fibers are few-moded designs using a large, low numerical aperture (N.A.) core, which promotes mode coupling between core modes and increases bending losses (coupling with claddingmodes), which is undesirable both in terms ofmode area and beamquality. Furthermore, short LMA fiber lengths and small cladding diameters are needed to minimize nonlinear effects and maximize pump absorption respectively in high-power pulsed laser systems. Although gain fiber coiling is a widely used technique to filter-out unwanted modes in LMA fibers, coupling between modes can still occur in component leads and relay fibers. In relay fiber, light coupled into higher-order modes can subsequently be lost in the coiling or continue as higher-order modes, which has the overall effect of reducing the effective transmission of the LP 01 mode and degrading the beam quality. However, maximum transmission of the LP 01 mode is often required in order to have the best possible beam quality (minimal M2). Launching in an LMA fiber with a mode field adapter (MFA)1 provides an excellent way of ensuring maximum LP 01 coupling, but preservation of this mode requires highmodal stability in the output fiber. Small cladding, low N.A. LMA fibers have the disadvantage of being extremely sensitive to external forces in real-life applications, which is unwanted for systems where highly sensitive mode coupling can occur. In this paper, we present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of mode coupling sensitivity in LMA fibers as a function of fiber parameters such as N.A., core diameter and cladding diameter. Furthermore, we present the impact of higher N.A. as a solution to increase mode stability in terms of its effect on peak power, effective mode area and coupling efficiency.

  6. Graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in nonflat branes with stabilized modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tanmoy; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-04-01

    We consider a generalized two brane Randall-Sundrum model where the branes are endowed with nonzero cosmological constant. In this scenario, we re-examine the modulus stabilization mechanism and the nature of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton modes. Our result reveals that while the KK mode graviton masses may change significantly with the brane cosmological constant, the Goldberger-Wise stabilization mechanism, which assumes a negligible backreaction on the background metric, continues to hold even when the branes have a large cosmological constant. The possibility of having a global minimum for the modulus is also discussed. Our results also include an analysis for the radion mass in this nonflat brane scenario.

  7. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  8. Stability of Finite-n Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modes Using the GATO Stability Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Wong, S. K.; Lao, L. L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chance, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    This work extends the capability of the GATO stability code(L.C.Bernard et al.), Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981). to analyze realistic numerical tokamak equilibria for their stability to higher n ( ~5--10) MHD modes. This is motivated by the experimental evidence of these modes being relevant for both plasma termination and the behavior of ELMs. The ballooning angle transformation(R. Gruber et al.), Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 363 (1981). is applied to the displacement variables in the GATO representation. The potential energy matrix is constructed with the inclusion of extra mapping quantities. The vacuum energy computed from the Green's function is also modified to couple to the transformed displacement at the plasma boundary. The resultant eigenvalue problem is solved with the modified boundary condition in the poloidal direction suitable for these transformed variables. The dependence of the plasma stability as a function of toroidal mode number and plasma equilibrium properties will be presented.

  9. Profile stabilization of tilt mode in a Field Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.; Tajima, T.; Barnes, D.C.

    1993-06-01

    The possibility of stabilizing the tilt mode in Field Reversed Configurations without resorting to explicit kinetic effects such as large ion orbits is investigated. Various pressure profiles, P({Psi}), are chosen, including ``hollow`` profiles where current is strongly peaked near the separatrix. Numerical equilibria are used as input for an initial value simulation which uses an extended Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that includes viscous and Hall terms. Tilt stability is found for specific hollow profiles when accompanied by high values of separatrix beta, {beta}{sub sep}. The stable profiles also have moderate to large elongation, racetrack separatrix shape, and lower values of 3, average ratio of Larmor radius to device radius. The stability is unaffected by changes in viscosity, but the neglect of the Hall term does cause stable results to become marginal or unstable. Implications for interpretation of recent experiments are discussed.

  10. Principal elementary mode analysis (PEMA).

    PubMed

    Folch-Fortuny, Abel; Marques, Rodolfo; Isidro, Inês A; Oliveira, Rui; Ferrer, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) has been widely applied in fluxomics to compress data into a few latent structures in order to simplify the identification of metabolic patterns. These latent structures lack a direct biological interpretation due to the intrinsic constraints associated with a PCA model. Here we introduce a new method that significantly improves the interpretability of the principal components with a direct link to metabolic pathways. This method, called principal elementary mode analysis (PEMA), establishes a bridge between a PCA-like model, aimed at explaining the maximum variance in flux data, and the set of elementary modes (EMs) of a metabolic network. It provides an easy way to identify metabolic patterns in large fluxomics datasets in terms of the simplest pathways of the organism metabolism. The results using a real metabolic model of Escherichia coli show the ability of PEMA to identify the EMs that generated the different simulated flux distributions. Actual flux data of E. coli and Pichia pastoris cultures confirm the results observed in the simulated study, providing a biologically meaningful model to explain flux data of both organisms in terms of the EM activation. The PEMA toolbox is freely available for non-commercial purposes on http://mseg.webs.upv.es. PMID:26905301

  11. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  12. Stability and ELM Characterization in I-Mode Pedestals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walk, J. R.; Hughes, J. W.; Snyder, P. B.; Hubbard, A. E.; Terry, J. L.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Baek, S. G.; Cziegler, I.; Edlund, E.

    2014-10-01

    The I-mode is a novel high-confinement regime explored on Alcator C-Mod, notable for its formation of an H-mode-like temperature pedestal without the accompanying density pedestal, maintaining L-mode particle confinement. I-mode exhibits a number of desirable properties for a reactor regime: among them, it naturally lacks large ELMs, avoiding the need for externally-applied ELM suppression. However, under certain conditions small, intermittent ELM-like events are seen. These events exhibit a range of phenomena in terms of edge and pedestal behavior, particularly for the ELM trigger - the majority of events are synchronized with the sawtooth heat pulse reaching the edge. The stationary pedestal structure is stable against peeling-ballooning MHD as calculated by ELITE in all cases, necessitating treatment of transient pedestal modification to characterize these events. We characterize these ELM events in terms of edge behavior, particularly the modification of the temperature pedestal, edge turbulence and fluctuations, and peeling-ballooning MHD stability. This work is supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  13. Active control for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.; La Haye, R.J.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Welander, A.S.

    2006-05-15

    This work describes active control algorithms used by DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to stabilize and maintain suppression of 3/2 or 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational q surface. The DIII-D NTM control system can determine the correct q-surface/ECCD alignment and stabilize existing modes within 100-500 ms of activation, or prevent mode growth with preemptive application of ECCD, in both cases enabling stable operation at normalized beta values above 3.5. Because NTMs can limit performance or cause plasma-terminating disruptions in tokamaks, their stabilization is essential to the high performance operation of ITER [R. Aymar et al., ITER Joint Central Team, ITER Home Teams, Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The DIII-D NTM control system has demonstrated many elements of an eventual ITER solution, including general algorithms for robust detection of q-surface/ECCD alignment and for real-time maintenance of alignment following the disappearance of the mode. This latter capability, unique to DIII-D, is based on real-time reconstruction of q-surface geometry by a Grad-Shafranov solver using external magnetics and internal motional Stark effect measurements. Alignment is achieved by varying either the plasma major radius (and the rational q surface) or the toroidal field (and the deposition location). The requirement to achieve and maintain q-surface/ECCD alignment with accuracy on the order of 1 cm is routinely met by the DIII-D Plasma Control System and these algorithms. We discuss the integrated plasma control design process used for developing these and other general control algorithms, which includes physics-based modeling and testing of the algorithm implementation against simulations of actuator and plasma responses. This systematic design/test method and modeling environment enabled successful mode suppression by the NTM control system upon first-time use in an

  14. Phase stabilization of an actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A phase-resolved system based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has to incorporate a phase-stabilized wavelength-swept light source. The phase variation is induced by fluctuation of a beginning swept frequency. The conventional phase-sensitive SS-OCTs use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in order to avoid A-scan trigger fluctuations. However this method does not always solve the trigger fluctuation problem. In actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLLs), the beginning swept frequency fluctuates by abrupt frequency change between the end of a sweep and the beginning of the subsequent one. To overcome this issue, we proposes a new phase stabilization method. By employing the method with an auxiliary reference configuration, the sweeping phase has successfully stabilized because the timing jitter is calculated by interference signals from the auxiliary reference path. In this research, we have proposed the phase stabilization method that has nanometer sensitivity with millisecond response. In addition, the method has successfully suppressed the depth dependence of phase instability.

  15. Fishbone instability and kink mode stabilization in nonperturbative simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai

    2011-10-01

    Two phenomena relying on the nonperturbative treatment of the fast ion terms are the fishbone instability and ideal kink mode stabilization. We employ the global NOVA-KN hybrid kinetic-MHD code to study the stability properties of these low-n solutions, such as the resonant (fishbone) and non-resonant (ideal) branches. The nonperturbative approach treats fast ions with their realistic drift orbits numerically by computing the moments of their perturbed pressure tensors in order to include them into the eigenmode equation. We introduce this technique together with the new conforming velocity space grid to efficiently evaluate the wave-particle interaction matrix. The used method results in both resonant and modified non-resonant branches, which are further studied to understand their stability properties in the presence of energetic ions [C.Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports, v.211,p.1 (1992)]. We include the destabilizing effects from energetic beam ions and alpha particles, which seem to be important for the studied instabilities. A model used for beam ion distribution is also presented. We study the properties of those branches in details. The applications to the modified burning ITER plasma are discussed to understand how far the stability region is in the operating space from its nominal values. This work is supported by US DOE contract no. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Failure mode analysis to predict product reliability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemanick, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mode analysis (FMA) is described as a design tool to predict and improve product reliability. The objectives of the failure mode analysis are presented as they influence component design, configuration selection, the product test program, the quality assurance plan, and engineering analysis priorities. The detailed mechanics of performing a failure mode analysis are discussed, including one suggested format. Some practical difficulties of implementation are indicated, drawn from experience with preparing FMAs on the nuclear rocket engine program.

  17. The stability of tidally deformed neutron stars to three- and four-mode coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Zimmerman, Aaron; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2014-01-20

    It has recently been suggested that the tidal deformation of a neutron star excites daughter p- and g-modes to large amplitudes via a quasi-static instability. This would remove energy from the tidal bulge, resulting in dissipation and possibly affecting the phase evolution of inspiralling binary neutron stars and hence the extraction of binary parameters from gravitational wave observations. This instability appears to arise because of a large three-mode interaction among the tidal mode and high-order p- and g-modes of similar radial wavenumber. We show that additional four-mode interactions enter into the analysis at the same order as the three-mode terms previously considered. We compute these four-mode couplings by finding a volume-preserving coordinate transformation that relates the energy of a tidally deformed star to that of a radially perturbed spherical star. Using this method, we relate the four-mode coupling to three-mode couplings and show that there is a near-exact cancellation between the destabilizing effect of the three-mode interactions and the stabilizing effect of the four-mode interaction. We then show that the equilibrium tide is stable against the quasi-static decay into daughter p- and g-modes to leading order. The leading deviation from the quasi-static approximation due to orbital motion of the binary is considered; while it may slightly spoil the near-cancellation, any resulting instability timescale is at least of order the gravitational wave inspiral time. We conclude that the p-/g-mode coupling does not lead to a quasi-static instability, and does not impact the phase evolution of gravitational waves from binary neutron stars.

  18. Active Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode on the DIII-D Device

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M; Bialek, J; Chance, M S; Chu, M S; Fredrickson, E D; Garofalo, A M; Gryaznevich, M; Hatcher, R E; Jensen, T H; Johnson, L C; Lahaye, R J; Lazarus, E A; Makowski, M A; Manickam, J; Navratil, G A; Scoville, J T; Strait, E J; Turnbull, A D; Walker, M L

    2000-11-01

    A proof of principle magnetic feedback stabilization experiment has been carried out to suppress the resistive wall mode (RWM), a branch of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink mode under the influence of a stabilizing resistive wall, on the DIII-D tokamak device. The RWM was successfully suppressed and the high beta duration above the no wall limit was extended to more than 50 times the resistive wall flux diffusion time. It was observed that the mode structure was well preserved during the time of the feedback application. Several lumped parameter formulations were used to study the feedback process. The observed feedback characteristics are in good qualitative agreement with the analysis. These results provide encouragement to future efforts towards optimizing the RWM feedback methodology in parallel to what has been successfully developed for the n = 0 vertical positional control. Newly developed MHD codes have been extremely useful in guiding the experiments and in providing possible paths for the next step.

  19. The role of pressure flattening in calculating tearing mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Calculations of tearing mode stability in tokamaks split conveniently into one in an external region, where marginally stable ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is applicable, and one in a resonant layer around the rational surface where sophisticated kinetic physics is needed. These two regions are coupled by the stability parameter Δ‧. Axisymmetric pressure and current perturbations localized around the rational surface significantly alter Δ‧. Equations governing the changes in the external solution and Δ‧ are derived for arbitrary perturbations in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. These equations can be used in two ways: (i) the Δ‧ can be calculated for a physically occurring perturbation to the pressure or current; (ii) alternatively we can use these equations to calculate Δ‧ for profiles with a pressure gradient at the rational surface in terms of the value when the perturbation removes this gradient. It is the second application we focus on here since resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) codes do not contain the appropriate layer physics and therefore cannot predict stability for realistic hot plasma directly. They can, however, be used to calculate Δ‧. Existing methods (Ham et al 2012 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 025009) for extracting Δ‧ from resistive codes are unsatisfactory when there is a finite pressure gradient at the rational surface and favourable average curvature because of the Glasser stabilizing effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 18 875). To overcome this difficulty we introduce a specific artificial pressure flattening function that allows the earlier approach to be used. The technique is first tested numerically in cylindrical geometry with an artificial favourable curvature. Its application to toroidal geometry is then demonstrated using the toroidal tokamak tearing mode stability code T7 (Fitzpatrick et al 1993 Nucl. Fusion 33 1533) which employs an approximate analytic equilibrium. The prospects for applying this

  20. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    A new {Delta}{sup {prime}} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon}{le}0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of the finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth {ital et al.} [H. P. Furth {ital et al.}, Phys. Fluids {bold 16}, 1054 (1973)] results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{sup {prime}}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric elements, stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low-{beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Globally exponential stability and stabilization of interconnected Markovian jump system with mode-dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaohui; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problems of globally exponential stability and stabilization with H∞ performance for a class of interconnected Markovian jump system with mode-dependent delays in interconnection. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, delay-range-dependent globally mean-square exponential stability conditions are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Based on the obtained conditions, state feedback control utilizing global state information and state feedback control utilizing global state information of decentralised observers are developed to render the closed-loop interconnected Markovian jump time-delay system globally exponential stable with H∞ performance. Numerical simulation of a power system, composed of three coupled machines, is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  2. Liapunov stability analysis of spinning flexible spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, F. J.; Likins, P.

    1973-01-01

    The attitude stability of a class of spinning flexible spacecraft in a force-free environment is analyzed. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid core having attached to it a flexible appendage idealized as a collection of elastically interconnected particles. Liapunov stability theorems are employed with the Hamiltonian of the system, constrained through the angular momentum integral so as to admit complete damping, used as a testing function. The Hamiltonian is written in terms of modal coordinates as interpreted by the hybrid coordinate formulation, thus allowing truncation to a level amenable to literal stability analysis. Testing functions are constructed for a spacecraft with an arbitrary (discretized) appendage, and closed form stability criteria are generated for the first mode of a restricted appendage model lying in a plane which contains the center of mass and is orthogonal to the spin axis. The criteria are (except for idealized cases on the stability boundary line in the parameter space) both necessary and sufficient for stability for any spacecraft characterized by the planar appendage model, such as a spacecraft containing solar panels and/or radial booms.

  3. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1997-12-01

    A new {Delta}{prime} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon} {le} 0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth et al. results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{prime}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric element stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low {beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. Double tearing modes in toroidal geometries are examined as well. Furthermore, m {ge} 2 tearing mode stability criteria are compared with three dimensional initial value MHD simulation by the FAR code.

  4. Linear Analysis of Drift Ballooning Modes in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangri, Varun; Kritz, Arnold; Rafiq, Tariq; Pankin, Alexei

    2012-10-01

    The H-mode pedestal structure depends on the linear stability of drift ballooning modes (DBMs) in many H-mode pedestal models. Integrated modeling that uses these pedestal models requires fast evaluation of linear stability of DBMs. Linear analysis of DBMs is also needed in the computations of effective diffusivities associated with anomalous transport that is driven by the DBMs in tokamak edge plasmas. In this study several numerical techniques of linear analysis of the DBMs are investigated. Differentiation matrix based spectral methods are used to compute the physical eigenvalues of the DBMs. The model for DBMs used here consists of six differential equations [T. Rafiq et al. Phys. Plasmas, 17, 082511, (2010)]. It is important to differentiate among non-physical (numerical) modes and physical modes. The determination of the number of eigenvalues is solved by a computation of the `nearest' and `ordinal' distances. The Finite Difference, Hermite and Sinc based differentiation matrices are used. It is shown that spectral collocation methods are more accurate than finite difference methods. The technique that has been developed for calculating eigenvalues is quite general and is relevant in the computation of other modes that utilize the ballooning mode formalism.

  5. Numerical stability of the electromagnetic quasinormal and quasibound modes of Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicova, Denitsa; Fiziev, Plamen

    2015-07-01

    The proper understanding of the electromagnetic counterpart of gravity-waves emitters is of serious interest to the multimessenger astronomy. In this article, we study the numerical stability of the quasinormal modes (QNM) and quasibound modes (QBM) obtained as solutions of the Teukolsky Angular Equation and the Teukolsky Radial Equation with appropriate boundary conditions. We use the epsilon-method for the system featuring the confluent Heun functions to study the stability of the spectra with respect to changes in the radial variable. We find that the QNM and QBM are stable in certain regions of the complex plane, just as expected, while the third ``spurious'' spectrum was found to be numerically unstable and thus unphysical. This analysis shows the importance of understanding the numerical results in the framework of the theory of the confluent Heun functions, in order to be able to distinguish the physical spectra from the numerical artifacts.

  6. The effect of gain medium length on dynamic mode stability in semiconductor lasers with a long intra-cavity filter.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kee; Lee, Chul Wook; Shin, Jang Wook; Sim, Eun Deok; Kim, Jong-Hoi; Lee, Dong Hun; Bang, Dong Soo; Baek, Yong Soon

    2009-12-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the effect of the physical length of gain medium on dynamic mode stability in semiconductor lasers with an intra-cavity filter. In simulation, two types of analysis models were used to examine the lasing properties and to analyze the dynamic mode stability of the external-cavity system, respectively. In experiment, two different kinds of the structures were fabricated and their spectra were analyzed. Both simulation and measurement results show clearly the length of the gain medium has a critical influence on the stability around the peak wavelength of the filter. PMID:20052209

  7. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  8. A generalized hydrodynamic model for acoustic mode stability in viscoelastic plasma fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, B.; Haloi, A.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model to investigate acoustic-mode excitation and stability in simplified strongly coupled bi-component plasma is proposed. The goal is centered in seeing the viscoelasticity-influences on the instability properties. The dispersive and nondispersive features are methodologically explored followed by numerical illustrations. It is seen that, unlike usual plasma acoustic mode, here the mode stability is drastically modified due to the considered viscoelastic effects contributed from both the electronic and ionic fluids. For example, it is found that there exists an excitation threshold value on angular wavenumber, K ≈3 in the K-space on the Debye scale, beyond which only dispersive characteristic features prevail. Further, it is demonstrated that the viscoelastic relaxation time plays a stabilizing influential role on the wave dynamics. In contrast, it is just opposite for the effective viscoelastic relaxation effect. Consistency with the usual viscoelasticity-free situations, with and without plasma approximation taken into account, is also established and explained. It is identified and conjectured that the plasma fluid viscoelasticity acts as unavoidable dispersive agency in attributing several new characteristics to acoustic wave excitation and propagation. The analysis is also exploited to derive a quantitative glimpse on the various basic properties and dimensionless numbers of the viscoelastic plasma. Finally, extended implications of our results tentative to different cosmic, space and astrophysical situations, amid the entailed facts and faults, are highlighted together with indicated future directions.

  9. Resistive stability of 2/1 modes near 1/1 resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; La Haye, R. J.; Lao, L. L.; Osborne, T. H.; Galkin, S. A.

    2007-05-15

    The stability of resistive modes is examined using reconstructions of experimental equilibria in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], revealing the important physics in mode onset as discharges evolve to instability. Experimental attempts to access the highest {beta} in tokamak discharges, including 'hybrid' discharges, are typically terminated by the growth of a large 2/1 tearing mode. Model equilibria, based on experimental reconstructions from one of these discharges with steady state axial q{sub 0}{approx_equal}1, are generated varying q{sub 0} and pressure. For each equilibrium, the PEST-III code [A. Pletzer, A. Bondeson, and R. L. Dewar, J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] is used to determine the ideal magnetohydrodynamic solution including both tearing and interchange parities. This outer region solution must be matched to the resistive inner layer solutions at the rational surface to determine resistive mode stability. From this analysis it is found that the approach to q=1 simultaneously causes the 2/1 mode to become unstable and the nonresonant 1/1 displacement to become large, as the ideal {beta} limit rapidly decreases toward the experimental value. However, the 2/2 harmonic on axis, which is also large and is coupled to the saturated steady state 3/2 mode, is thought to contribute to the current drive sustaining q{sub 0} above 1 in these hybrid discharges. Thus, the approach to the q=1 resonance is self-limiting in this context. This work suggests that sustaining q{sub 0} slightly above 1 will avoid the 2/1 instability and will allow access to significantly higher {beta} values in these discharges.

  10. Stability analysis of ecomorphodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärenbold, F.; Crouzy, B.; Perona, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to shed light on the influence of riverbed vegetation on river morphodynamics, we perform a linear stability analysis on a minimal model of vegetation dynamics coupled with classical one- and two-dimensional Saint-Venant-Exner equations of morphodynamics. Vegetation is modeled as a density field of rigid, nonsubmerged cylinders and affects flow via a roughness change. Furthermore, vegetation is assumed to develop following a logistic dependence and may be uprooted by flow. First, we perform the stability analysis of the reduced one-dimensional framework. As a result of the competitive interaction between vegetation growth and removal through uprooting, we find a domain in the parameter space where originally straight rivers are unstable toward periodic longitudinal patterns. For realistic values of the sediment transport parameter, the dominant longitudinal wavelength is determined by the parameters of the vegetation model. Bed topography is found to adjust to the spatial pattern fixed by vegetation. Subsequently, the stability analysis is repeated for the two-dimensional framework, where the system may evolve toward alternate or multiple bars. On a fixed bed, we find instability toward alternate bars due to flow-vegetation interaction, but no multiple bars. Both alternate and multiple bars are present on a movable, vegetated bed. Finally, we find that the addition of vegetation to a previously unvegetated riverbed favors instability toward alternate bars and thus the development of a single course rather than braiding.

  11. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.; Krishnaswami, J.; Hartley, R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes ideal and resistive studies of high-beta plasmas and of the second stability region. Emphasis is focused on ``supershot`` plasmas in TFIR where MHD instabilities are frequently observed and which spoil their confinement properties. Substantial results are described from the analysis of these high beta poloidal plasmas. During these studies, initial pressure and safety factor profiles were obtained from the TRANSP code, which is used extensively to analyze experimental data. Resistive MBD stability studies of supershot equilibria show that finite pressure stabilization of tearing modes is very strong in these high {beta}p plasmas. This has prompted a detailed re-examination of linear tearing mode theory in which we participated in collaboration with Columbia University and General Atomics. This finite pressure effect is shown to be highly sensitive to small scale details of the pressure profile. Even when an ad hoc method of removing this stabilizing mechanism is implemented, however, it is shown that there is only superficial agreement between resistive MBD stability computation and the experimental data. While the mode structures observed experimentally can be found computationally, there is no convincing correlation with the experimental observations when the computed results are compared with a large set of supershot data. We also describe both the ideal and resistive stability properties of TFIR equilibria near the transition to the second region. It is shown that the highest {beta} plasmas, although stable to infinite-n ideal ballooning modes, can be unstable to the so called ``infernal`` modes associated with small shear. The sensitivity of these results to the assumed pressure and current density profiles is discussed. Finally, we describe results from two collaborative studies with PPPL. The first involves exploratory studies of the role of the 1/1 mode in tokamaks and, secondly, a study of sawtooth stabilization using ICRF.

  12. Stability, causality, and quasinormal modes of cosmic strings and cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Alan B.; Abdalla, E.; Molina, C.

    2010-02-15

    In this work we consider the evolution of a massive scalar field in cylindrically symmetric space-times. Quasinormal modes have been calculated for static and rotating cosmic cylinders. We found unstable modes in some cases. Rotating as well as static cosmic strings, i.e., without regular interior solutions, do not display quasinormal oscillation modes. We conclude that rotating cosmic cylinder space-times that present closed timelike curves are unstable against scalar perturbations.

  13. Stability of coupled tearing and twisting modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    A dispersion relation is derived for resistive modes of arbitrary parity in a tokamak plasma. At low mode amplitude, tearing and twisting modes which have nonideal MHD behavior at only one rational surface at a time in the plasma are decoupled via sheared rotation and diamagnetic flows. At higher amplitude, more unstable {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes develop which have nonideal behavior simultaneously at many surfaces. Such modes possess tearing parity layers at some of the nonideal surfaces, and twisting parity layers at others, but mixed parity layers are generally disallowed. At low mode number, {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes are likely to have tearing parity layers at all of the nonideal surfaces in a very low-{beta} plasma, but twisting parity layers become more probable as the plasma {beta} is increased. At high mode number, unstable twisting modes which exceed a critical amplitude drive conventional magnetic island chains on alternate rational surfaces, to form an interlocking structure in which the O-points and X-points of neighboring chains line up.

  14. Interactive multi-mode blade impact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, A.; Cornell, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical methodology used in developing an analysis for the response of turbine engine fan blades subjected to soft-body (bird) impacts is reported, and the computer program developed using this methodology as its basis is described. This computer program is an outgrowth of two programs that were previously developed for the purpose of studying problems of a similar nature (a 3-mode beam impact analysis and a multi-mode beam impact analysis). The present program utilizes an improved missile model that is interactively coupled with blade motion which is more consistent with actual observations. It takes into account local deformation at the impact area, blade camber effects, and the spreading of the impacted missile mass on the blade surface. In addition, it accommodates plate-type mode shapes. The analysis capability in this computer program represents a significant improvement in the development of the methodology for evaluating potential fan blade materials and designs with regard to foreign object impact resistance.

  15. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  16. Dynamics and stabilization of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Min-Rui; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Tun; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2015-10-01

    The discrete iterative map model of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load (CCL), containing the output voltage feedback and ramp compensation, is established in this paper. Based on this model the complex dynamics of this converter is investigated by analyzing bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov exponent spectrum. The effects of ramp compensation and output voltage feedback on the stability of the converter are investigated. Experimental results verify the simulation and theoretical analysis. The stability boundary and chaos boundary are obtained under the theoretical conditions of period-doubling bifurcation and border collision. It is found that there are four operation regions in the peak current-mode controlled buck converter with CCL due to period-doubling bifurcation and border-collision bifurcation. Research results indicate that ramp compensation can extend the stable operation range and transfer the operating mode, and output voltage feedback can eventually eliminate the coexisting fast-slow scale instability. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371033), the Fok Ying-Tung Education Foundation for Young Teachers in the Higher Education Institutions of China (Grant No. 142027), the Sichuan Provincial Youth Science and Technology Fund, China (Grant Nos. 2014JQ0015 and 2013JQ0033), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. SWJTU11CX029).

  17. On the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramponi, G.; Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.

    1999-09-01

    The control of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks by means of electron cyclotron current drive and heating is investigated. The nonlinear evolution of the amplitude in absence and in presence of the stabilizing terms of an auxiliary current inside the island and of the associate heating is solved self-consistently with the evolution of the rotation frequency for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) reference magnetic equilibrium [ITER-JCT and Home Teams, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 37, A19 (1995)]. It is shown that, unless the wall braking torque is neutralized by external means, neoclassical tearing modes in ITER will be locked in a very short time. On the other hand, for rotating islands, the beneficial effect of modulating the current source in phase with the island rotation is pointed out, after an analysis of the time scales of the relevant phenomena (time response of the driven current, island rotation frequency, power pulse duration, and inductive response of the plasma). Consideration is given to different effects that may reduce the efficiency of the control of the flux reconnection rate and to the benefits of wall stabilization associated to the island rotation frequency. A quantitative assessment of the EC (electron cyclotron) power required to keep the island width at a reasonable level is given, both in absence and in presence of wall stabilization.

  18. Gyrokinetic verification of the persistence of kinetic ballooning modes in the magnetohydrodynamic second stability regime

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) has been shown in previous work to be unstable within the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) region (in s-{alpha} space) of second stability [Hirose et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3993 (2004)]. In this work we verify this result using the gyrokinetic code GS2 [Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)] treating both ions and electrons as kinetic species and retaining the magnetosonic perturbation B{sub parallel}. Growth rates calculated using GS2 differ significantly from the previous differential/shooting code analysis. Calculations without B{sub parallel} find the stability region is preserved, while the addition of B{sub parallel} causes the mode to be more unstable than previously calculated within the region of MHD second stability. The inclusion of parallel ion current and B{sub parallel} into the shooting code does not account for the GS2 results. The evidence presented in this paper leads us to the conclusion that the adiabatic electron approximation employed in previous studies is found to be unsuitable for this type of instability. Based on the findings of this work, the KBM becomes an interesting instability in the context of internal transport barriers, where {alpha} is often large and magnetic shear is small (positive or negative)

  19. Criteria for Second Stability for Ballooning Modes in Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson; C.C.Hegna

    2004-07-06

    An expression determining how variations in the pressure-gradient and average magnetic shear affect ballooning stability for a stellarator equilibrium is presented. The procedure for determining the marginal stability boundaries, for each field line, depends only on the equilibrium and a single ballooning eigenfunction calculation. This information is sufficient to determine if increasing pressure-gradient is stabilizing or destabilizing and to predict whether the configuration possess a second stable region.

  20. Stabilizing Gyroscopic Modes in Magnetic-Bearing-Supported Flywheels by Using Cross-Axis Proportional Gains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, Timothy P.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2006-01-01

    For magnetic-bearing-supported high-speed rotating machines with significant gyroscopic effects, it is necessary to stabilize forward and backward tilt whirling modes. Instability or low damping of these modes can prevent the attainment of desired shaft speed. We show analytically that both modes can be stabilized by using cross-axis proportional gains and high- and low-pass filters in the magnetic bearing controller. Furthermore, at high shaft speeds, where system phase lags degrade the stability of the forward-whirl mode, a phasor advance of the control signal can partially counteract the phase lag. In some range of high shaft speed, the derivative gain for the tilt modes (essential for stability for slowly rotating shafts) can be removed entirely. We show analytically how the tilt eigenvalues depend on shaft speed and on various controller feedback parameters.

  1. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  2. 3-D simulations of limiter stabilization of high-beta external kink-tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.; Ohyabu, N.

    1984-03-01

    The effects of finite-size poloidal limiters, toroidal limiters, and general mushroom limiters are examined for high-beta finite-resistivity tokamak plamas in free boundary. Even for a linear stability analysis, a 3-D simulation is necessary, in which many poloidal and toroidal modes are coupled because of the limiter constraint and finite-beta. When the plasma pressure and resistivity are small, a poloidal limiter is effective in reducing the growth rate with a small limiter-size, while a toroidal limiter requires a large size for a comparable effect. As the plasma pressure or resistivity increases, a toroidal limiter becomes more effective in reducing the growth rate than a poloidal limiter of the same size. A small optimized mushroom limiter might have a stabilizing effect similar to a conducting shell.

  3. Kinetic analysis of MHD ballooning modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the stability properties of the appropriate kinetically generalized form of MHD ballooning modes together with the usual trapped-particle drift modes is presented. The calculations are fully electromagnetic and include the complete dynamics associated with compressional ion acoustic waves. Trapped-particle effects along with all forms of collisionless dissipation are taken into account without approximations. The influence of collisions is estimated with a model Krook operator. Results from the application of this analysis to realistic tokamak operating conditions indicate that unstable short-wavelength modes with significant growth rates can extend from ..beta.. = 0 to value above the upper ideal-MHD-critical-beta associated with the so-called second stability regime. Since the strength of the relevant modes appears to vary gradually with ..beta.., these results support a soft beta limit picture involving a continuous (rather than abrupt or hard) modification of anomalous transport already present in low-..beta..-tokamaks. However, at higher beta the increasing dominance of the electromagnetic component of the perturbations indicated by these calculations could also imply significantly different transport scaling properties.

  4. The AlGaAs single-mode stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botez, D.; Ladany, I.

    1983-01-01

    Single-mode spectral behavior with aging in constricted double heterojunction (CDH) lasers was studied. The CDH lasers demonstrated excellent reliability ( or = 1 million years extrapolated room-temperature MTTF) and single-mode operation after 10,000 hours of 70 C aging. The deleterious effects of laser-fiber coupling on the spectra of the diodes were eliminated through the use of wedge-shaped fibers. A novel high-power large optical cavity (LOC)-type laser was developed: the terraced-heterostructure (TH)-LOC laser, which provides the highest power into a single-mode (i.e., 50 mW CW) ever reported.

  5. Utilizing resonant magnetic perturbations to enhance neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by rf current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Qingquan; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Wang, Jinfang; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xiaojing

    2015-09-01

    A new method to stabilize the rotating neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) by using both the rf current drive and the static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) is investigated. When a non-uniform mode rotation is induced by the RMP, the stabilization of NTM by the rf current is found to be enhanced if the RMP phase has a half period difference from that of the rf wave deposition along the helical angle. The required rf current for mode stabilization is reduced by about one third if an appropriate RMP amplitude is applied.

  6. Failure Mode Identification Through Clustering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Research has shown that nearly 80% of the costs and problems are created in product development and that cost and quality are essentially designed into products in the conceptual stage. Currently, failure identification procedures (such as FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis), FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis) and FTA (Fault Tree Analysis)) and design of experiments are being used for quality control and for the detection of potential failure modes during the detail design stage or post-product launch. Though all of these methods have their own advantages, they do not give information as to what are the predominant failures that a designer should focus on while designing a product. This work uses a functional approach to identify failure modes, which hypothesizes that similarities exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of the product/component. In this paper, a statistical clustering procedure is proposed to retrieve information on the set of predominant failures that a function experiences. The various stages of the methodology are illustrated using a hypothetical design example.

  7. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  8. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  9. Ballooning mode stability for self-consistent pressure and current profiles at the H-mode edge

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Osborne, T.H.; Taylor, T.S.

    1997-11-01

    The edge pressure gradient (H-mode pedestal) for computed equilibria in which the current density profile is consistent with the bootstrap current may not be limited by the first regime ballooning limit. The transition to second stability is easier for: higher elongation, intermediate triangularity, larger ratio, pedestal at larger radius, narrower pedestal width, higher q{sub 95}, and lower collisionality.

  10. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  11. Growth and stabilization of drift-tearing modes in weakly collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso\\ad{a}, D.; Ottaviani, M.; Porcelli\\ad{a}, F.

    2002-09-01

    In the limit where the electron drift-wave frequency exceeds the electron-ion collision frequency, drift-tearing modes are found to grow with a linear growth rate independent of resistivity and proportional to the product of the electron inertial skin depth and the ion sound Larmor radius. The stabilization of these modes in collisionless and semi-collisional regimes is investigated. The stabilization mechanism is related to the coupling and propagation of drift-acoustic perturbations away from the reconnecting mode-rational surface. Analytic and numerical solutions of the four-field reduced fluid model in the slab geometry approximation with constant electron temperature and negligible ion temperature are presented. The actual stability threshold can occur at values of the normalized tearing mode stability parameter Δ' as high as 102.\\pacs{52.35.P}} \\fnm{1}{Permanent address: Istituto Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  12. Resistive toroidal stability of internal kink modes in circular and shaped tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondeson, A.; Vlad, G.; Lütjens, H.

    1992-07-01

    The linear resistive magnetohydrodynamical stability of the n=1 internal kink mode in tokamaks is studied numerically. The stabilizing influence of small aspect ratio [Holmes et al., Phys. Fluids B 1, 788 (1989)] is confirmed, but it is found that shaping of the cross section influences the internal kink mode significantly. For finite pressure and small resistivity, curvature effects at the q=1 surface make the stability sensitively dependent on shape, and ellipticity is destabilizing. Only a very restricted set of finite pressure equilibria is completely stable for q0 < 1. A typical result is that the resistive kink mode is slowed down by toroidal effects to a weak resistive tearing/interchange mode. It is suggested that weak resistive instabilities are stabilized during the ramp phase of the sawteeth by effects not included in linear resistive magnetohydrodynamics. Possible mechanisms for triggering a sawtooth crash are discussed.

  13. Effects of magnetosonic perturbations on electron temperature gradient driven modes and the stability of skin depth sized electron ballooning modes

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.

    2007-11-15

    The effect of the magnetosonic perturbation {delta}B{sub parallel} on the growth of electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) modes and electron temperature gradient driven ballooning modes [Hirose, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49, 145 (2007)] is investigated using local gyrokinetic analysis and numerical solution, with supporting simulations from the initial value code GS2 [Kotschenreuther, et al., Comp. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)]. The effect of {delta}B{sub parallel} on the ETG mode is found to depend on the competition between two physical processes related to magnetosonic compression. Local analysis of the ballooning mode appears to significantly overestimate growth rates of this instability. The electron temperature gradient driven ballooning mode has been observed in GS2 simulations. However, this work supports the conclusion that this instability will be subdominant to the ETG mode in normal tokamak regimes.

  14. Neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing mode by current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoqing Wang, Shaojie; Yang, Weihong

    2014-02-15

    The neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing modes by current modulation have been investigated. Neoclassical effects enhance the resistivity and reduce the resistive diffusion time of the modulation current. Therefore, the oscillating current can penetrate deeper into the plasma. With an oscillating loop voltage, the plasma oscillates radially at the Ware-pinch velocity. These neoclassical effects improve the efficiency of tearing mode stabilization by the current modulation.

  15. Nonlinear Stability and Saturation of Ballooning Modes in Tokamaks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Brochard, G.; Wilson, H. R.

    2016-06-01

    The theory of tokamak stability to nonlinear "ballooning" displacements of elliptical magnetic flux tubes is presented. Above a critical pressure profile the energy stored in the plasma may be lowered by finite (but not infinitesimal) displacements of such tubes (metastability). Above a higher pressure profile, the linear stability boundary, such tubes are linearly and nonlinearly unstable. The predicted saturated flux tube displacement can be of the order of the pressure gradient scale length. Plasma transport from these displaced flux tubes may explain the rapid loss of confinement in some experiments.

  16. Nonlinear Stability and Saturation of Ballooning Modes in Tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Ham, C J; Cowley, S C; Brochard, G; Wilson, H R

    2016-06-10

    The theory of tokamak stability to nonlinear "ballooning" displacements of elliptical magnetic flux tubes is presented. Above a critical pressure profile the energy stored in the plasma may be lowered by finite (but not infinitesimal) displacements of such tubes (metastability). Above a higher pressure profile, the linear stability boundary, such tubes are linearly and nonlinearly unstable. The predicted saturated flux tube displacement can be of the order of the pressure gradient scale length. Plasma transport from these displaced flux tubes may explain the rapid loss of confinement in some experiments. PMID:27341237

  17. Lake Urmia Bridge Stability Assessment: Results from Terrasar-X Spotlight Mode Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, F.; Motagh, M.; Vajedian, S.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigate stability of Lake Urmia bridge, locally also known as Shahid Kalantari's highway bridge, in northwest of Iran using high-resolution satellite radar imagery. The radar dataset includes 22 SAR images acquired in SpotLight mode from 2014 to 2015 in an ascending orbit by TerraSAR-X satellite. A high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area was constructed from a pair of TanDEM-X bi-static data on June 2012 to remove the effect of topography from interferometry observations. The analysis of X-band interferograms shows high number of displacement fringes, which are interpreted as being caused by thermal dilation due to temperature differences in the imaged area between two SAR acquisitions. This effect, which can often be observed in single interferograms, have important impact on time-series products and should be considered for deformation analysis of bridge structures.

  18. Linear stability analysis of inclined two-layer stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negretti, M. Eletta; Socolofsky, Scott A.; Jirka, Gerhard H.

    2008-09-01

    Two-layer stratified flows are commonly observed in geophysical and environmental contexts. At the interface between the two layers, both velocity shear and buoyancy interplay, resulting in various modes of instability. Results from a temporal linear stability analysis of a two-layer stratified exchange flow under the action of a mean advection are presented, investigating the effect of a mild bottom slope on the stability of the interface. The spatial acceleration is directly included in the governing stability equations. The results demonstrate that increasing the bottom slope has a similar effect on the stability of the flow as does increasing the ratio R of the thickness of the velocity mixing layer δν to that of the density layer δρ as it causes the flow to be more unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The transition from Kelvin-Helmholtz modes to stable flow occurs at lower Richardson numbers and wavenumbers compared to the horizontal two-layer flow. Kelvin-Helmholtz modes are decreasingly amplified for 1modes are first amplified and then damped as the Richardson number increases. This suggests that the behavior of the Richardson number alone is not sufficient to predict the stability tendency of the interface.

  19. Impact of ion diamagnetic drift on ideal ballooning mode stability in rotating tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, N.

    2016-04-01

    Drift magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations have been derived in order to investigate the ion diamagnetic drift effect on the stability to ideal MHD modes in rotating plasmas. These drift MHD equations have been simplified with the Frieman-Rotenberg formalism under the incompressible assumption, and a new code, MINERVA-DI, has been developed to solve the derived extended Frieman-Rotenberg equation. Benchmark results of the MINERVA-DI code show good agreements with the analytic theory discussing the stability to an internal kink mode and that to a ballooning mode in static plasmas. The stability analyses of the ballooning mode with respect to toroidal rotation with the ion diamagnetic drift effect have been performed using MINERVA-DI. The stabilizing effect by the ion diamagnetic drift is found to be negligible when the rotation frequency is large compared to the ion diamagnetic drift frequency. The direction of plasma rotation affects the ballooning mode stability when the ion diamagnetic drift effect is taken into account. It is identified that there are two physics mechanisms responsible for the dependence of MHD stability on the rotation direction. One is the correction of the dynamic pressure effect on MHD stability by the ion diamagnetic drift, and the other is the change of the MHD eigenmode structure by the combined effect of plasma rotation and ion diamagnetic drift.

  20. A proof for the mode stability of a self-similar wave map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, O.; Donninger, R.; Xia, X.

    2016-08-01

    We study the fundamental self-similar solution to the SU(2) sigma model, found by Shatah and Turok–Spergel. We give a rigorous proof for its mode stability. Based on earlier results by the second author, the present paper constitutes the last building block for a completely rigorous proof of the nonlinear stability of the Shatah–Turok–Spergel wave map.

  1. Plasma shape and finite {beta} effects on stability thresholds of the ion temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Jhowry, B.; Andersson, J.; Dastgeer, S.

    2004-12-01

    The stability of electromagnetic ion temperature gradient driven modes with emphasis on the lower and upper stability thresholds is investigated by a collisionless magnetized plasma in both circular and noncircular geometry. The stability properties are discussed and the results are compared for finite {beta} effects, arbitrary elongation, and Shafranov shift rate parameters. It has been found that the lower stability thresholds are weakly dependent on the (combined) effects of Shafranov shift rate, finite {beta}, and elongation whereas the second (upper) stability regime shows substantial dependence depending on parameter regimes.

  2. Failure modes and effects analysis automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhieh, Cynthia H.; Cutts, Dannie E.; Purves, R. Byron

    1988-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) assistant was implemented as a knowledge based system and will be used during design of the Space Station to aid engineers in performing the complex task of tracking failures throughout the entire design effort. The three major directions in which automation was pursued were the clerical components of the FMEA process, the knowledge acquisition aspects of FMEA, and the failure propagation/analysis portions of the FMEA task. The system is accessible to design, safety, and reliability engineers at single user workstations and, although not designed to replace conventional FMEA, it is expected to decrease by many man years the time required to perform the analysis.

  3. Feasibility of large-{beta} tokamak stability to ballooning modes due to nonmonotonic q-profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, M.V.; Yurchenko, E.I.

    1994-12-01

    The stability of high-temperature nondissipative plasmas to the flute instability ballooning modes in tokamak-like toroidal configurations is investigated at high plasma pressures. The analytical criterion of ballooning-mode stability at large toroidal numbers, discovered by O.P. Pogutse and E.I. Yurchenko, is used for stability assessment. In contrast to systems with monotonic safety-factor q-profiles, nonmonotonic q-profile systems are found to allow a considerable increase in the critical plasma pressure, provided that the pressure profile is properly chosen. The most preferred pressure profiles prove to be the peaked profiles. 13 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Control-oriented modelling for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization via minimum-seeking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, W.; Schuster, E.

    2012-07-01

    Suppression of magnetic islands driven by the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is necessary for efficient and sustained operation of tokamak fusion reactors. Compensating for the lack of bootstrap current, due to the pressure profile flattening in the magnetic island, by a localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been proved experimentally as an effective method to stabilize NTMs. The effectiveness of this method is limited in practice by the uncertainties in the width of the island, the relative position between the island and the beam, and the ECCD power threshold for NTM stabilization. Heuristic search and suppress algorithms have been proposed and shown effective in improving the alignment of the ECCD beam with the island, using only an estimate of the island width. Making use of this estimate, real-time, non-model-based, extremum-seeking optimization algorithms have also been proposed not only for beam steering but also for power modulation in order to minimize the island-beam misalignment and the time required for NTM stabilization. A control-oriented dynamic model for the effect of ECCD on the magnetic island is proposed in this work to enable both control design and performance analysis of these minimum-seeking type of controllers. The model expands previous work by including the impact of beam modulation parameters such as the island-beam phase mismatch and the beam duty-cycle on the island width dynamics.

  5. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) to measure the amount of intact active ingredient, identify degradation products and measure their amounts. Some analyses were conducted by an independent analytical laboratory, but certain (Schedule) medications could not be shipped to their facility and were analyzed at JSC. RESULTS Nine medications were analyzed with respect to active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and degradant amounts. Results were compared to the USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities content for every FDA-approved medication. One medication met USP requirements at 5 months after its expiration date. Four of the nine (44% of those tested) medications tested met USP requirements up to 8 months post-expiration. Another 3 medications (33% of those tested) met USP guidelines 2-3 months before expiration. One medication, a compound classed by the FDA as a dietary supplement and sometimes used as a sleep aid, failed to meet USP requirements at 11 months post-expiration. CONCLUSION Analysis of each medication at a single time point provides limited information on the stability of a medication stored in particular conditions; it is not possible to predict how long a medication may be safe and effective from these data. Notwithstanding, five of the nine medications tested (56%) met USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities at least 5 months past expiration dates. The single compound that failed to meet USP requirements is not regulated as strictly as prescription medications are during manufacture; it is unknown if this medication would have met the requirements prior to flight. Notably, it was the furthest beyond its expiration date. Only more comprehensive analysis of flight-aged samples compared to appropriate ground controls will permit determination of spaceflight effects on medication stability.

  6. Is there a mode stability paradox for neutrino perturbations of Kerr black holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düztaş, Koray

    2016-08-01

    Adopting the notation of Teukolsky and Press, we derive the connection relation for asymptotic solutions of the massless Dirac equation on a Kerr background. We show that, unlike bosonic fields, the connection relation for massless Dirac fields (neutrino) provides a rigorous proof of mode stability. The same relation also implies that every incoming mode can be absorbed by the black hole or there is no superradiance. Recent works on overspinning black holes have shown that this can lead to the formation of naked singularities. We argue that the fact that both the mode stability of the black hole under neutrino perturbations and the instability of the event horizon (therefore the instability of the black hole) can be derived from the same connection relation leads to a paradox. In other words mode, stability implies event horizon instability as far as neutrino perturbations are concerned.

  7. Analysis of nonlinear structures via mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gieseke, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    An effective procedure for NASTRAN was developed that permits any number of substructures of any size to be synthesized for the purpose of developing normal modes of vibration of the complete structural system. The technique is extended to permit modal transient analysis of the subdivided system. This latter procedure permits the use of NASTRAN's ability to include nonlinear forces in the problem. The five-phase process is accomplished using standard NASTRAN rigid formats with problem-independent alter packages and DMAP sequences.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW Stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-12-01

    The pursuit of steady-state economic production of thermonuclear fusion energy has led to research on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode. Advances in both experiment and theory, together with improvements in diagnostics, heating and feedback methods have led to substantial and steady progress in the understanding and stabilization of these instabilities. Many of the theory and experimental techniques and results that have been developed are useful not only for the stabilization of the resistive wall mode. They can also be used to improve the general performance of fusion confinement devices. The conceptual foundations and experimental results on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode are reviewed.

  9. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  10. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y.Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-15

    An array of saddle coils having N{sub c}=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n,n{sup '} that fulfill the condition |n-n{sup '}|=N{sub c} are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  11. Stabilization of tearing modes in DIII-D by localized electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, T. C.; La Haye, R. J.; Humphreys, D. A.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.

    2001-10-01

    Tearing modes have been shown to limit β and confinement in conventional ELMing H-mode tokamak regimes. The tearing modes grow from a "seed" island due to the destabilizing effect of pressure flattening in the island leading to a reduction in the local bootstrap current. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated stabilization of m=3/n=2 tearing modes in the presence of sawteeth through localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Variation of the deposition location indicates the ECCD remains localized despite the beam traversing an ELMing edge. The effect of the ECCD on the mode is consistent with predictions that the ECCD must be within the island for stabilization. The calculated EC current density (JEC) is greater than the calculated local bootstrap current density (JBS) also in accord with predictions. A closed-loop feedback scheme has been successfully operated for the first time using position control and magnetic signals as the actuator and sensor, respectively.

  12. Mechanism of Stabilization of Ballooning Modes by Toroidal Rotation Shear in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.; Tokuda, S.

    2005-05-06

    A ballooning perturbation in a toroidally rotating tokamak is expanded by square-integrable eigenfunctions of an eigenvalue problem associated with ballooning modes in a static plasma. Especially a weight function is chosen such that the eigenvalue problem has only the discrete spectrum. The eigenvalues evolve in time owing to toroidal rotation shear, resulting in a countably infinite number of crossings among them. The crossings cause energy transfer from an unstable mode to the infinite number of stable modes; such transfer works as the stabilization mechanism of the ballooning mode.

  13. Classical m/n = 2/1 Tearing Mode Stability Based on Initial Island Growth Rate of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in DIII-D ITER Baseline Scenario Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Meneghini, O.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Turco, F.; Solomon, W. M.

    2014-10-01

    Deleterious m/n = 2/1 tearing modes appear in some slowly evolving ITER baseline scenario DIII-D discharges. The destabilization is here interpreted as due to an initially positive (destabilizing) classical tearing index. Examples of 2/1 tearing occurring after at least 3 seconds into discharges are analyzed. Island width evolution is evaluated by the Mirnov magnetic probe arrays using the motional Stark effect EFIT equilibrium reconstructions and is calibrated by the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic. The magnetics analysis code EIGSPEC is used to sort out multiple modes and determine the precise point at which the m/n = 2/1 mode begins to grow. The classical stability index is determined from the modified Rutherford equation (MRE) by taking the helically perturbed bootstrap components (including both curvature and small island effects) and subtracting from the initial normalized island growth rate. The data is well described by the imbalance of the sum of the destabilizing classical tearing and the helically perturbed bootstrap current terms with the sum of the stabilizing curvature and ``ion polarization'' effects. Comparison of the empirically determined classical index will be made with that from the linear stability code PEST3 using kinetic EFITs from experiment. This work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-06-OR23100, DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Linear stability of the tearing mode with two-fluid and curvature effects in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Maget, Patrick; Garbet, Xavier; Luetjens, Hinrich; Beyer, Peter

    2012-09-15

    Curvature and diamagnetic effects are both recognized to have a stabilizing influence on tearing modes in the linear regime. In this paper, we investigate the impact of these effects on the linear stability of a (2, 1) magnetic island using non-linear two-fluid MHD simulations and we apply our results to Tore Supra experiments where its stability is not well understood from the single fluid MHD model. Simulations show an initial increase of the linear growth rate and then its reduction until full stability as diamagnetic frequency increases. This mechanism is therefore a plausible explanation for experimental observations where the (2, 1) mode was not observed although the single fluid model predicted its growth. Our simulations also show the importance of curvature for an efficient stabilization. A simple analytical model is derived to support the numerical results.

  15. Transition prediction using three dimensional stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Several methods of transition prediction by linear stability analysis are compared. The spectral stability analysis code SALLY is used to analyze flows over laminar flow control wings. It is shown that transition by the envelope method and a new modified wave packet method are comparable in reliability but that the envelope method is more efficient computationally.

  16. Access to a New Super H-mode Regime By Manipulation of Pedestal Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Wayne

    2015-11-01

    A physics understanding of constraints on the H-mode pedestal has enabled access to higher pedestal pressure on DIII-D and the potential for more favorable scenarios for future devices. The pedestal height is limited due to coupled peeling-ballooning modes (PBMs) and the highest pressure consistent with PBM stability is obtained at the transition between the peeling and ballooning branch. When PBM and kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) constraints are coupled in the EPED pedestal model, the effect of shaping on the maximum pedestal pressure is amplified and can lead to a splitting of predicted pedestal solutions into an H-mode and ``Super H-mode'' (SH) root, where the SH root with higher and wider pedestal can be reached following a specific density trajectory. On DIII-D, a theory-guided search for SH-mode has resulted in pedestal heights twice that of regular H-mode at the same density, accessed by controlling the edge bootstrap current with increasing density. EPED calculations of the pedestal height versus density are in quantitative agreement with experiment. SH-mode was first achieved with a Quiescent H-mode edge, enabling a smooth trajectory through pedestal parameter space. While elimination of ELMs is beneficial for SH-mode, it may not be a requirement, as recent experiments maintained high pedestals with ELMs triggered by lithium granule injection. Experiments exploiting SH-mode by coupling it with a high performance core have resulted in plasmas with H-mode confinement factors > 1 . 2 , normalized beta ~3 and normalized pedestal beta twice that required for ITER. With higher pedestals, SH-mode improves prospects for steady-state scenarios with high bootstrap fraction and increased ideal wall stability limit, and may simultaneously provide a solution to maintaining high confinement at high density. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  18. Importance of centrifugal effects for the internal kink mode stability in toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlberg, C.

    2009-11-15

    Analytical theory and two different magnetohydrodynamical stability codes are used in a study of the effects of toroidal plasma rotation on the stability of the ideal, internal kink mode in tokamaks. The focus of the paper is on the role that the centrifugal effects on the plasma equilibrium play for the stability of this mode, and results from one code where centrifugal effects are self-consistently included (CASTOR-FLOW) [E. Strumberger et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, 1156 (2005)] are compared with the results from another code where such effects are not taken into account (MISHKA-F) [I. T. Chapman et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 062511 (2006)]. It is found that, even at rather modest flow speeds, the centrifugal effects are very important for the stability of the internal kink mode. While the results from the two codes can be quite similar for certain profiles in the plasma, completely opposite results are obtained for other profiles. A very good agreement between analytical theory and the numerical results are, both for inconsistent and consistent equilibria, found for plasmas with large aspect ratio. From the analytical theory, the distinctly different stability properties of equilibria with and without centrifugal effects included can be traced to the stabilizing effect of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) induced by the plasma rotation. This GAM exists solely as a consequence of the nonuniform plasma density and pressure created by the centrifugal force on the flux surfaces, and a stabilizing coupling of the internal kink instability to this mode cannot therefore take place if the centrifugal effects are not included in the equilibrium. In addition to the GAM stabilization, the effects of the radial profiles of the plasma density and rotation velocity are also found to be significant, and the importance of these effects increases with decreasing aspect ratio.

  19. Effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability in rotamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Goss, J.; Kalaria, D.; Huang, T. S.

    2011-08-15

    To study the effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability, a series of experiments with linearly ramping the axial current I{sub z}, which makes field-reversed configuration (FRC) to spherical tokamak (ST) transition, have been conducted in rotamak. Results clearly demonstrate that the tilt mode can be completely suppressed by small I{sub z} around 0.4 kA (in comparison with 2.0 kA plasma current). An unknown new mode with larger magnetic perturbations is triggered when I{sub z} reaches 0.5 kA. This instability mode keeps saturation while plasma current is boosted when I{sub z} is in the range of 0.6-1.4 kA. When I{sub z} exceeds 1.6 kA, the new mode suddenly disappears and discharge is free from instability modes.

  20. Stability Analysis for HIFiRE Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.; Kimmel, Roger; Adamczak, David; Borg, Matthew; Stanfield, Scott; Smith, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The HIFiRE-1 flight experiment provided a valuable database pertaining to boundary layer transition over a 7-degree half-angle, circular cone model from supersonic to hypersonic Mach numbers, and a range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. This paper reports selected findings from the ongoing computational analysis of the measured in-flight transition behavior. Transition during the ascent phase at nearly zero degree angle of attack is dominated by second mode instabilities except in the vicinity of the cone meridian where a roughness element was placed midway along the length of the cone. The growth of first mode instabilities is found to be weak at all trajectory points analyzed from the ascent phase. For times less than approximately 18.5 seconds into the flight, the peak amplification ratio for second mode disturbances is sufficiently small because of the lower Mach numbers at earlier times, so that the transition behavior inferred from the measurements is attributed to an unknown physical mechanism, potentially related to step discontinuities in surface height near the locations of a change in the surface material. Based on the time histories of temperature and/or heat flux at transducer locations within the aft portion of the cone, the onset of transition correlated with a linear N-factor, based on parabolized stability equations, of approximately 13.5. Due to the large angles of attack during the re-entry phase, crossflow instability may play a significant role in transition. Computations also indicate the presence of pronounced crossflow separation over a significant portion of the trajectory segment that is relevant to transition analysis. The transition behavior during this re-entry segment of HIFiRE-1 flight shares some common features with the predicted transition front along the elliptic cone shaped HIFiRE-5 flight article, which was designed to provide hypersonic transition data for a fully 3D geometric configuration. To compare and contrast the

  1. Failure-Modes-And-Effects Analysis Of Software Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Hartline, Thomas; Minor, Terry; Statum, David; Vice, David

    1996-01-01

    Rigorous analysis applied early in design effort. Method of identifying potential inadequacies and modes and effects of failures caused by inadequacies (failure-modes-and-effects analysis or "FMEA" for short) devised for application to software logic.

  2. Particle simulation on radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror. I. Parallel antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Y.; Abe, H.

    1988-04-01

    A two- and one-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code (PS2M) (H. Abe and S. Nakajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, xxx (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied parallel to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The parallel electric field E/sub parallel/ perturbs the electron velocity v/sub parallel/ parallel to the magnetic field and also induces a perpendicular magnetic field perturbation B/sub perpendicular/. The unstable growth of the flute mode in the absence of such a radio frequency electric field is first studied as a basis for comparison. The ponderomotive force originating from the time-averaged product is then shown to stabilize the flute modes. The stabilizing wave power threshold, the frequency dependency, and the dependence on delchemically bondE/sub parallel/chemically bond all agree with the theoretical predictions.

  3. The stability of ballooning modes in tokamaks with internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, A.J.; Szwer, D.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2005-09-15

    Modern tokamaks can produce transport barriers (TBs) - localized regions with an increased energy confinement. Previous studies have been unable to examine the stability of internal TBs to radially extended short-wavelength magnetohydrodynamic instabilities ('ballooning modes'), for the usual case with a sheared plasma flow and a magnetic shear that passes through zero near the TB. An established technique is adapted to study this situation, finding instability if (1) there is a low-pressure gradient, and if (2) the nearest 'resonant surface' at which a Fourier mode is resonant, is sufficiently close. Surprisingly, flow shear is no more stabilizing than for magnetic shears of order one. This is explained. Without a strongly stabilizing mechanism, ballooning modes will fundamentally limit a TB's radial extent, preventing them from extending across the entire plasma radius.

  4. Linear mode stability of the Kerr-Newman black hole and its quasinormal modes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Óscar J C; Godazgar, Mahdi; Santos, Jorge E

    2015-04-17

    We provide strong evidence that, up to 99.999% of extremality, Kerr-Newman black holes (KNBHs) are linear mode stable within Einstein-Maxwell theory. We derive and solve, numerically, a coupled system of two partial differential equations for two gauge invariant fields that describe the most general linear perturbations of a KNBH. We determine the quasinormal mode (QNM) spectrum of the KNBH as a function of its three parameters and find no unstable modes. In addition, we find that the lowest radial overtone QNMs that are connected continuously to the gravitational ℓ=m=2 Schwarzschild QNM dominate the spectrum for all values of the parameter space (m is the azimuthal number of the wave function and ℓ measures the number of nodes along the polar direction). Furthermore, the (lowest radial overtone) QNMs with ℓ=m approach Reω=mΩH(ext) and Imω=0 at extremality; this is a universal property for any field of arbitrary spin |s|≤2 propagating on a KNBH background (ω is the wave frequency and ΩH(ext) the black hole angular velocity at extremality). We compare our results with available perturbative results in the small charge or small rotation regimes and find good agreement. PMID:25933301

  5. Modal analysis of turborotors using planar modes - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, E. J.; Choy, K. C.; Allaire, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    The generalized dynamic equations of motion have been obtained by the direct stiffness method for multimass flexible rotor bearing systems including the effects of gyroscopic moments, disk skew, and rotor acceleration. A set of undamped critical speed mode shapes calculated from the average horizontal and vertical bearing stiffness is used to transform the equations of motion into a set of coupled modal equations of motion. The modal equations are coupled by the generalized bearing coefficients and the gyroscopic moments. An analysis using only undamped critical speeds or decoupled modal analysis assuming proportional damping may lead to erroneous results. This paper presents a rapid method of calculating rotor resonance speeds with their corresponding amplification factors, stability and unbalance response of turborotors. Examples of the application of this modal approach are presented and results are compared to those of other methods such as matrix transfer analysis.

  6. Stability criteria for edge flute modes in the two-fluid regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. )

    1993-05-01

    Necessary and sufficient stability criteria for flute modes localized at the edge of toroidal plasmas are obtained from the Braginskii's two-fluid equations without taking into account the collisional effects. It is assumed that the plasma pressure tends to vanish, but its gradient remains finite at the edge of the plasma. The results show that the free-boundary edge flute modes (namely, the peeling modes) are more dangerous than the fixed-boundary modes (namely, the Mercier modes). Numerical investigation of the criterion for peeling modes shows that the finite ion-gyroradius effect can substantially stabilize the modes, especially for the case [Delta][ge]0, where the equilibrium quantity [Delta][equivalent to]1/2+[ital S][sup [minus]1][lt][bold j][center dot][bold B][vert bar][del][ital v][vert bar][sup [minus]2][gt], with [ital S] denoting the global shear, [bold B] the magnetic field, [bold j] the current density, [ital v] the volume inside the reference magnetic surface, and [lt]...[gt] denoting the average over the magnetic surface. Equilibria with [Delta][ge]0 are shown to be more stable to the peeling modes than those with [Delta][le]0.

  7. Mode signature and stability for a Hamiltonian model of electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Tassi, E.; Morrison, P. J.

    2011-03-15

    Stability properties and mode signature for equilibria of a model of electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are investigated by Hamiltonian techniques. After deriving new infinite families of Casimir invariants, associated with the noncanonical Poisson bracket of the model, a sufficient condition for stability is obtained by means of the Energy-Casimir method. Mode signature is then investigated for linear motions about homogeneous equilibria. Depending on the sign of the equilibrium 'translated' pressure gradient, stable equilibria can either be energy stable, i.e., possess definite linearized perturbation energy (Hamiltonian), or spectrally stable with the existence of negative energy modes. The ETG instability is then shown to arise through a Krein-type bifurcation, due to the merging of a positive and a negative energy mode, corresponding to two modified drift waves admitted by the system. The Hamiltonian of the linearized system is then explicitly transformed into normal form, which unambiguously defines mode signature. In particular, the fast mode turns out to always be a positive energy mode, whereas the energy of the slow mode can have either positive or negative sign. A reduced model with stable equilibria shear flow that possess a continuous spectrum is also analyzed and brought to normal form by a special integral transform. In this way it is seen how continuous spectra can have signature as well.

  8. Long-term stabilization of single longitudinal mode in external cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hanyi; Zhou Jianying; Wu Yuanxing; Li Jian; Pang Zhengwu; Zhou Bingkun

    1988-05-01

    Long-term frequency stabilization of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) external cavity semiconductor laser has been demonstrated by using multisegment composite-cavity configuration and automatic frequency control loop with feedback to control the external cavity length. The time period of mode-hopping free SLM operation has been observed to be more than 24 hours with a frequency shift of about 28 MHz and a linewidth of less than 200 kHz.

  9. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the tokamak high-confinement-mode edge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, H. R.; Connor, J. W.; Field, A. R.; Fielding, S. J.; Miller, R. L.; Lao, L. L.; Ferron, J. R.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-05-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of the tokamak edge is analyzed, with particular emphasis on radially localized instabilities; it is proposed that these are responsible for edge pressure gradient limits and edge localized modes (ELMS). Data and stability calculations from DIII-D [to appear in Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Fusion Energy, Yokohama (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1998), Paper No. IAEA-F1-CN-69/EX8/1] tokamak equilibria indicate that two types of instability are important: the ballooning mode (driven by pressure gradient) and the peeling mode (driven by current density). The characteristics of these instabilities, and their coupling, are described based on a circular cross-section, large aspect ratio model of the tokamak equilibrium. In addition, preliminary results are presented from an edge MHD stability code which is being developed to analyze general geometry tokamak equilibria; an interpretation of the density threshold to access the high-confinement-mode (H-mode), observed on COMPASS-D [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 38, 1091 (1996)] is provided by these results. Experiments on DIII-D and the stability calculations indicate how to control ELMs by plasma shaping.

  10. Solar seismology. I - The stability of the solar p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Keeley, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    The stability of the radial p-modes of the sun is investigated by computing nonadiabatic eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a solar envelope model which extends from an inner radius of about 0.3 solar radius out to an optical depth of about 0.0003. The calculations take into account in a crude fashion the response of the convective flux to the oscillation. The dynamical effect of turbulence in the convection zone is parametrized in terms of a turbulent shear viscosity. The results show that if damping by turbulent viscosity is neglected, all modes with periods longer than 6 minutes are unstable. The familiar kappa-mechanism, which operates in the H ionization-H(-) opacity region, is the dominant source of driving of the oscillations. Modes with periods shorter than 6 minutes are stabilized by radiative damping in the solar atmosphere. When turbulent dissipation of pulsational energy is included, all modes are predicted to be stable. However, the margin of stability is very small. In view of the large uncertainty that must be assigned to the estimate of turbulent damping, it is concluded that theoretical calculations cannot unequivocally resolve the question of the stability of the solar p-modes.

  11. Global gyrokinetic stability of collisionless microtearing modes in large aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Chowdhury, J.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2014-08-15

    Linear full radius gyrokinetic calculations show the existence of unstable microtearing modes (MTMs) in purely collisionless, high temperature, large aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. The present study takes into account fully gyrokinetic highly passing ions and electrons. The global 2-D structures of the collisionless mode with full radius coupling of the poloidal modes is obtained and compared with another electromagnetic mode, namely, the Alfvén Ion Temperature Gradient (AITG) mode (or Kinetic Ballooning Mode, KBM) for the same equilibrium profile. Several important characteristics of the modes are brought out and compared, such as a clear signature in the symmetry properties of the two modes, the plasma–β dependence, and radial and poloidal length scales of the electrostatic and magnetic vector potential fluctuations. Extensive parameter scans for this collisionless microtearing mode reveal the scaling of the growth rate with β and the electron temperature gradient η{sub e}. Scans at different β values show an inverse relationship between the η{sub e} threshold and β, leading to a stability diagram, and implying that the mode might exist at moderate to strong temperature gradients for finite β plasmas in large aspect ratio tokamaks. In contrast to small aspect ratio tokamaks where the trapped electron magnetic drift resonance is found to be important, in large aspect ratio tokamaks, a strong destabilization due to the magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons is observed and is identified as a possible collisionless drive mechanism for the collisionless MTM.

  12. Global stability analysis of electrified jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero-Rodriguez, Javier; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Electrospinning is a common process used to produce micro and nano polymeric fibers. In this technique, the whipping mode of a very thin electrified jet generated in an electrospray device is nhanced in order to increase its elongation. In this work, we use a theoretical Eulerian model that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the midline of the jet, its radius and convective velocity. The model equations result from balances of mass, linear and angular momentum applied to any differential slice of the jet together with constitutive laws for viscous forces and moments, as well as appropriate expressions for capillary and electrical forces. As a first step towards computing the complete nonlinear, transient dynamics of the electrified jet, we have performed a global stability analysis of the forementioned equations and compared the results with experimental data obtained by Guillaume et al. [2011] and Guerrero-Millán et al. [2014]. The support of the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain (Project DPI 2010-20450-C03-02) is acknowledged.

  13. Electrostatic Analysis of The Nucleosome Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Adams, David; Onufriev, Alexey

    2007-03-01

    The wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone octomer of a nucleosome core particle (NCP) plays a vital role in many cellular processes, such as transcription, replication, and cell differentiation. The exact mechanisms underlying the associated transitions in the NCP are still not well understood. We present a simple, two-state electrostatic model of the NCP that agrees with a number of experiments and suggests mechanisms that could initiate DNA unwrapping in vivo. We present and discuss a 2D phase diagram of the system as a function of ambient salt concentration and the net charge of the histone octomer. The model also predicts the free energy of a NCP at physiological conditions. The stability of the system is strongly dependent on the charge of the histone octomer, hinting at possible modes of control in in vivo (acetylation and/or pH changes). The model permits analytical solutions in the low and high salt limits. The analysis of these solutions suggests simple physical mechanisms behind the observed folding and unfolding behavior at environmental solvent conditions.

  14. Beat note stabilization of mode-locked lasers for quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Islam, R; Campbell, W C; Choi, T; Clark, S M; Conover, C W S; Debnath, S; Edwards, E E; Fields, B; Hayes, D; Hucul, D; Inlek, I V; Johnson, K G; Korenblit, S; Lee, A; Lee, K W; Manning, T A; Matsukevich, D N; Mizrahi, J; Quraishi, Q; Senko, C; Smith, J; Monroe, C

    2014-06-01

    We stabilize a chosen radio frequency beat note between two optical fields derived from the same mode-locked laser pulse train in order to coherently manipulate quantum information. This scheme does not require access or active stabilization of the laser repetition rate. We implement and characterize this external lock, in the context of two-photon stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine ground states of trapped 171Yb(+) quantum bits. PMID:24876022

  15. Mode estimation and adaptive feedforward control for stabilization of a flexible gun tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandegrift, Mark W.; DiRenzo, Michael T.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper we describe an approach for designing a pointing and stabilization system for an unbalanced, flexible gun. Our approach is based upon classical control techniques as well as system identification and adaptive feedforward techniques. Adaptive algorithms identify the flexible modes of the system and estimate the dynamics unbalance. This information is used to update the control law in order to improve the stabilization accuracy of the system.

  16. Influence of vibration modes on control system stabilization for space shuttle type vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using conventional autopilot techniques to stabilize the vibration modes at the liftoff flight condition for two space shuttle configurations. One configuration is called the dual flyback vehicle in which both the orbiter and booster vehicles have wings and complete flyback capability. The other configuration is called the solid motor vehicle win which the orbiter only has flyback. The results of the linear stability analyses for each of the vehicles are summarized.

  17. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  18. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ{sup ^}≡μ/μ{sub 0}≤4 (μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ{sub 0} is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ{sup ^}=1. This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ{sup ^}>1, the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ{sup ^}=1, and this “external” effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow (s/d{sub w}≫1) and fast (s/d{sub w}≪1) “ferromagnetic” rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and d{sub w} is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ{sup ^}, and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  19. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ ̂≡μ/μ0≤4 ( μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ0 is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ ̂=1 . This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ ̂>1 , the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ ̂=1 , and this "external" effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow ( s /dw≫1 ) and fast ( s /dw≪1 ) "ferromagnetic" rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and dw is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ ̂ , and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  20. Pulse-width stabilization of a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, S. R.; Roxlo, C. B.; Salour, M. M.; Bebelaar, D.

    1980-06-01

    Using an analog feedback loop acting on the mode-locker frequency of a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser, a substantial decrease of pulse-width variations at frequencies up to 10 kHz at the cost of an increase in higher-frequency noise was observed. A digital loop acting on the cavity length decreased noise at low frequencies. Using these methods, reproducible and stabilized frequency-tunable subpicosecond pulses were generated, and the effects of noise in the mode-locking frequency of the pumping Ar(+) laser and drift in the cavity length of the dye laser were determined.

  1. Transient analysis mode participation for modal survey target mode selection using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Ibrahim, Omar M.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Goodnight, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Many methods have been developed to aid analysts in identifying component modes which contribute significantly to component responses. These modes, typically targeted for dynamic model correlation via a modal survey, are known as target modes. Most methods used to identify target modes are based on component global dynamic behavior. It is sometimes unclear if these methods identify all modes contributing to responses important to the analyst. These responses are usually those in areas of hardware design concerns. One method used to check the completeness of target mode sets and identify modes contributing significantly to important component responses is mode participation. With this method, the participation of component modes in dynamic responses is quantified. Those modes which have high participation are likely modal survey target modes. Mode participation is most beneficial when it is used with responses from analyses simulating actual flight events. For spacecraft, these responses are generated via a structural dynamic coupled loads analysis. Using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP, a method has been developed for calculating mode participation based on transient coupled loads analysis results. The algorithm has been implemented to be compatible with an existing coupled loads methodology and has been used successfully to develop a set of modal survey target modes.

  2. Neoclassical Tearing Mode Analysis in Spherical Tokamak Burning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Daiki; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Shoji, Tatsuo

    For stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), non-resonant helical field (NRHF) is investigated. The time variation of magnetic island is described by modified Rutherford equation. In this work, plasma parameter change due to NTM is analyzed using 1.5-dimensional transport code TOTAL. In ST plasma, magnetic island at 3/2 mode grows by bootstrap current and the central temperature decreases. If NRHF is added, the effect of bootstrap current decreases and NTM is stabilized.

  3. Stabilization of the resistive wall mode using a fake rotating shell

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Jensen, T.H.

    1996-12-31

    The goal of an advanced tokamak design is to simultaneously maximize the fusion reactivity (i.e., the plasma {beta}), the plasma energy confinement, and the non-inductive bootstrap current. The eventual aim is, of course, to achieve a steady-state fusion reactor in which all of the toroidal current is maintained in the plasma by non-inductive means. The {beta} limits in advanced tokamak designs are invariably set by low mode-number external-kink modes. The full potential of such designs is only realized when the stabilizing effect of a close-fitting conducting shell is incorporated into the MHD stability calculations. This is only reasonable provided that the so-called {open_quotes}resistive wall mode{close_quotes} is stabilized. Stabilization of this mode has been achieved in present-day tokamaks by spinning the plasma rapidly. Unfortunately, such a scheme is not reactor relevant. A more promising approach is to apply external feedback in order to make a resistive shell placed around the plasma act like a perfect conductor. A scheme is outlined by which a network of feedback controlled conductors surrounding the plasma can be made to act like a rotating shell, as far as its interaction with the plasma is concerned. This {open_quotes}fake{close_quotes} rotating shell, when combined with a stationary conventional shell (e.g., the vacuum vessel), can completely stabilize the resistive wall mode. The gain, bandwidth, current, and power requirements of the feedback amplifiers axe extremely modest. A previously proposed stabilization scheme (the intelligent shell) is also investigated, and is compared with the fake rotating shell concept. The main disadvantage of the former scheme is that it requires extremely high gain amplification.

  4. Analysis of longwall pillar stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, C.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a new method for longwall pillar design, developed primarily from underground measurements. This dissertation addresses three areas of direct relevance to longwall pillar design: (1) The magnitude, time-of-arrival, and distribution of the abutment loads applied to longwall pillars; (2) The strength and behavior of coal pillars; (3) The relationship between pillar sizing and entry stability, and other factors affecting the roof/pillar/floor interaction during longwall mining. The research focused on two field studies performed in adjacent longwall panels at a West Virginia coal mine. In each study, measurements of pillar stress, pillar deformation, and entry stability were obtained during and after the approach of the longwall face. Other research included detailed reanalyses of field data from other studies, an in-depth comparative study of available longwall pillar design methods, numerical modeling to determine post-development longwall pillar loads, and an evaluation of two index tests used to determine coal strength. The proposed longwall pillar design method incorporates a new approach to estimating abutment loads hat was developed from the research. The method also employs existing empirical pillar strength formulas that were shown to be applicable to longwall pillars. The proposed design method represents an improvement over the existing methods, because it can be used with designs employing combinations of differently sized pillars, and because it can calculate stability factors for the several different service functions of pillars around a longwall.

  5. Stability investigations of airfoil flow by global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morzynski, Marek; Thiele, Frank

    1992-01-01

    As the result of global, non-parallel flow stability analysis the single value of the disturbance growth-rate and respective frequency is obtained. This complex value characterizes the stability of the whole flow configuration and is not referred to any particular flow pattern. The global analysis assures that all the flow elements (wake, boundary and shear layer) are taken into account. The physical phenomena connected with the wake instability are properly reproduced by the global analysis. This enhances the investigations of instability of any 2-D flows, including ones in which the boundary layer instability effects are known to be of dominating importance. Assuming fully 2-D disturbance form, the global linear stability problem is formulated. The system of partial differential equations is solved for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The equations, written in the pure stream function formulation, are discretized via FDM using a curvilinear coordinate system. The complex eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are evaluated by an iterative method. The investigations performed for various Reynolds numbers emphasize that the wake instability develops into the Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is shown to be connected with the first mode obtained from the non-parallel flow stability analysis. The higher modes are reflecting different physical phenomena as for example Tollmien-Schlichting waves, originating in the boundary layer and having the tendency to emerge as instabilities for the growing Reynolds number. The investigations are carried out for a circular cylinder, oblong ellipsis and airfoil. It is shown that the onset of the wake instability, the waves in the boundary layer, the shear layer instability are different solutions of the same eigenvalue problem, formulated using the non-parallel theory. The analysis offers large potential possibilities as the generalization of methods used till now for the stability analysis.

  6. Localized stability criterion for kink modes in systems with small shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hastie, R.J.; Johnson, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    A localized magnetohydrodynamic stability criterion for ideal kink instabilities is determined for systems where the safety factor has a local minimum on a rational surface with no pressure gradient. These modes are stable in the cylindrical limit, but toroidal effects can make them unstable. They could provide a partial explanation for the rapid current penetration observed in tokamaks. 7 refs.

  7. Real-time Stability Analysis for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, Alan

    2015-11-01

    ITER is intended to operate at plasma parameters approaching the frontier of achievable stability limits. And yet, plasma disruptions at ITER must be kept to a bare minimum to avoid damage to its plasma-facing structures. These competing goals necessitate real-time plasma stability analysis and feedback control at ITER. This work aims to develop a mechanism for real-time analysis of a large and virulent class of disruptions driven by the rapid growth of ideal MHD unstable modes in tokamak equilibria. Such modes will be identified by a parallelized, low-latency implementation of A.H. Glasser's well-tested DCON (Direct Criterion of Newcomb) code, which measures the energetics of modes in the bulk plasma fluid, as well as M.S. Chance's VACUUM code, which measures the same in the vacuum between the plasma and tokamak chamber wall. Parallelization of these codes is intended to achieve a time-savings of 40x, thereby reducing latency to a timescale of order 100ms and making the codes viable for ideal MHD stability control at ITER. The hardware used to achieve this parallelization will be an Intel Xeon Phi server with 77 cores (308 threads). Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  9. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%-70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  10. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  11. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  12. Stability study of a gyrotron-traveling-wave amplifier based on a lossy dielectric-loaded mode-selective circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Du Chaohai; Liu Pukun

    2009-07-15

    The millimeter microwave source of gyrotron-traveling-wave amplifier (gyro-TWT) is capable of generating high power coherent radiation in a broad bandwidth, while its performance is severely deteriorated by the stability problems. This paper focuses on modeling and the stability analysis of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Ka-band TE{sub 01} mode gyro-TWT based on an interaction circuit alternately loaded with lossy ceramic shells and metal rings. The propagation characteristics of the interaction circuit is analyzed first, based on which the boundary impedance method is employed to build an equivalent uniform lossy circuit. Then the stability of the interaction system is studied using linear and nonlinear theories. The analysis reveals that, due to the special waveguide structure and the dielectric loss, the propagation characteristics of the complex waveguide are similar to that of a uniform lossy circuit. The analysis of the absolute instabilities characterizes the roles the forward-backward-wave components played. The study indicates that the lowest threshold current of the absolute instabilities is higher than the operating current, which brings the system high stability. The reliability of the analysis is proved by the consistency between the analysis and the NRL experimental results.

  13. On the stability of the internal kink mode in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Fogaccia, G.; Romanelli, F.

    1995-01-01

    The stability of the internal kink mode is investigated taking into account the kinetic response associated to the trapped thermal ions. Ion--ion collisions and diamagnetic effects in the layer are also considered. A significant stabilizing contribution is obtained, even at low-{beta} values, on the mode, which might be stable, on present experiments, even though predicted unstable according to the Bussac criterion [Bussac {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 35}, 1638 (1975)]. In addition, a trapped-ion instability is found, characterized by mode frequency of the order of the trapped-ion bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Tood, A.M.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes both ideal and resistive MHD stability studies of supershot plasmas in TFTR. The MHD equilibrium and stability modeling of TFTR plasmas has concentrated on those experiments where the safety factor, q, profile was inferred from motional Stark effect measurements (MSE). These are conveniently divided into two groups, first where q is less than unity over some fraction of the plasma radius and, secondly, where q everywhere exceed unity. In the first case, the experimental result that qanalysis pose a major challenge to the validity of ideal MHD theory since these plasmas are usually observed to be free of any coherent 1/1 instability. In the second case where q>l we revisit the resistive stability properties of low {beta}, high q{sub edge} supershots again using MSE q-profiles as a starting point. We find that 2/1 and 3/2 tearing modes can be excited in some circumstances and that the MSE profiles are typically near marginal stability to each of these modes.

  15. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  16. Frequency stabilization of a mode-locked waveguide laser using the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanto, M. L.; Malowicki, J. E.; Bussjager, R. J.; Repak, P. L.; Kramer, K. A.; Casimir, D.; Hayduk, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    The generation of stable mode-locked pulses in the 1550 nm regime is required for high resolution signal processing used in transient probes, optical clocks, and optical A-D converters. More recently the frequency combs comprising these pulses have been applied to innovative methods of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) in the optical domain. Temporal stability, however, limits the performance in some of those applications. We show here that a Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique applied to a mode-locked Erbium Doped Waveguide Laser (EDWL) effectively stabilizes the frequency comb for extended time intervals. The ultra-compact waveguide configuration offers greater packaging flexibility. The system performance in terms of temporal stability is also found to compare favorably with those of a high grade commercial erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL).

  17. Stabilization of the resistive wall mode using a fake rotating shell

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Jensen, T.H.

    1995-11-01

    Tokamak plasma performance can, in theory, be greatly improved if the so called resistive wall mode is stabilized. This can be achieved by spinning the plasma rapidly, but such a scheme is not reactor relevant. A more promising approach is to apply external feedback in order to make a resistive shell placed around the plasma act like a perfect conductor. A scheme is outlined by which a network of feedback controlled conductors surrounding the plasma can be made to act like a rotating shell. This fake rotating shell combined with a stationary conventional shell (e.g. the vacuum vessel) can completely stabilize the resistive wall mode. The gain, bandwidth, current, and power requirements of the feedback amplifiers are extremely modest. A previously proposed stabilization scheme (the intelligent shell) is also investigated, and is compared with the fake rotating shell concept. The main disadvantage of the former scheme is that it requires a high gain.

  18. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  19. ELM triggering by energetic particle driven mode in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Asakura, N.; Isayama, A.; Oyama, N.; the JT-60 Team

    2013-07-01

    In the JT-60U high-β plasmas above the no-wall β limit, a triggering of an edge localized mode (ELM) by an energetic particle (EP)-driven mode has been observed. This EP-driven mode is thought to be driven by trapped EPs and it has been named EP-driven wall mode (EWM) on JT-60U (Matsunaga et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 045001). When the EWM appears in an ELMy H-mode phase, ELM crashes are reproducibly synchronized with the EWM bursts. The EWM-triggered ELM has a higher repetition frequency and less energy loss than those of the natural ELM. In order to trigger an ELM by the EP-driven mode, some conditions are thought to be needed, thus an EWM with large amplitude and growth rate, and marginal edge stability. In the scrape-off layer region, several measurements indicate an ion loss induced by the EWM. The ion transport is considered as the EP transport through the edge region. From these observations, the EP contributions to edge stability are discussed as one of the ELM triggering mechanisms.

  20. Linear stability analysis of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Orszag, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    A compressible stability analysis computer code is developed. The code uses a matrix finite-difference method for local eigenvale solution when a good guess for the eigenvalue is available and is significantly more computationally efficient than the commonly used inital-value approach. The local eigenvalue search procedure also results in eigenfunctions and, at little extra work, group velocities. A globally convergent eigenvalue procedure is also developed that may be used when no guess for the eigenvalue is available. The global problem is formulated in such a way that no unstable spurious modes appear so that the method is suitable for use in a black-box stability code. Sample stability calculations are presented for the boundary layer profiles of an LFC swept wing.

  1. Algorithm Summary and Evaluation: Automatic Implementation of Ringdown Analysis for Electromechanical Mode Identification from Phasor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Lin, Jenglung; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2010-02-28

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability. Prony analysis has been successfully applied on ringdown data to monitor electromechanical modes of a power system using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. To facilitate an on-line application of mode estimation, this paper develops a recursive algorithm for implementing Prony analysis and proposed an oscillation detection method to detect ringdown data in real time. By automatically detecting ringdown data, the proposed method helps guarantee that Prony analysis is applied properly and timely on the ringdown data. Thus, the mode estimation results can be performed reliably and timely. The proposed method is tested using Monte Carlo simulations based on a 17-machine model and is shown to be able to properly identify the oscillation data for on-line application of Prony analysis. In addition, the proposed method is applied to field measurement data from WECC to show the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  2. MHD stability of ITER H-mode confinement with pedestal bootstrap current effects taken into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S. M.; Hatch, D.; Liu, X.

    2015-11-01

    We have shown that the bootstrap current can have significant effects both on tokamak equilibrium and stability (Nucl. Fusion 53, 063009 (2013)). For ITER H-mode discharges pedestal density is low and consequently bootstrap current is large. We reconstruct numerically ITER equilibria with bootstrap current taken into account. Especially, we have considered a more realistic scenario in which density and temperature profiles can be different. The direct consequence of bootstrap current effects on equilibrium is the modification of local safety factor profile at pedestal. This results in a dramatic change of MHD mode behavior. The stability of ITER numerical equilibria is investigated with AEGIS code. Both low-n and peeling-ballooning modes are investigated. Note that pressure gradient at pedestal is steep. High resolution computation is needed. Since AEGIS code is an adaptive code, it can well handle this problem. Also, the analytical continuation technique based on the Cauchy-Riemann condition of dispersion relation is applied, so that the marginal stability conditions can be determined. Both numerical scheme and results will be presented. The effects of different density and temperature profiles on ITER H-mode discharges will be discussed. This research is supported by U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Science: Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  3. Jacobi stability analysis of the Lorenz system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Ho, Chor Yin; Leung, Chun Sing; Yip, Stan

    2015-06-01

    We perform the study of the stability of the Lorenz system by using the Jacobi stability analysis, or the Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory. The Lorenz model plays an important role for understanding hydrodynamic instabilities and the nature of the turbulence, also representing a nontrivial testing object for studying nonlinear effects. The KCC theory represents a powerful mathematical method for the analysis of dynamical systems. In this approach, we describe the evolution of the Lorenz system in geometric terms, by considering it as a geodesic in a Finsler space. By associating a nonlinear connection and a Berwald type connection, five geometrical invariants are obtained, with the second invariant giving the Jacobi stability of the system. The Jacobi (in)stability is a natural generalization of the (in)stability of the geodesic flow on a differentiable manifold endowed with a metric (Riemannian or Finslerian) to the non-metric setting. In order to apply the KCC theory, we reformulate the Lorenz system as a set of two second-order nonlinear differential equations. The geometric invariants associated to this system (nonlinear and Berwald connections), and the deviation curvature tensor, as well as its eigenvalues, are explicitly obtained. The Jacobi stability of the equilibrium points of the Lorenz system is studied, and the condition of the stability of the equilibrium points is obtained. Finally, we consider the time evolution of the components of the deviation vector near the equilibrium points.

  4. Active control of ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization in coupled NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, Scott; Held, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Actively controlled ECCD applied in or near magnetic islands formed by NTMs has been successfully shown to control/suppress these modes, despite uncertainties in island O-point locations (where induced current is most stabilizing) relative to the RF deposition region. Integrated numerical models of the mode stabilization process can resolve these uncertainties and augment experimental efforts to determine optimal ITER NTM stabilization strategies. The advanced SWIM model incorporates RF effects in the equations/closures of extended MHD as 3D (not toroidal or bounce-averaged) quasilinear diffusion coefficients. Equilibration of driven current within the island geometry is modeled using the same extended MHD dynamics governing the physics of island formation, yielding a more accurate/self-consistent picture of island response to RF drive. Additionally, a numerical active feedback control system gathers data from synthetic diagnostics to dynamically trigger & spatially align the RF fields. Computations which model the RF deposition using ray tracing, assemble the 3D QL operator from ray & profile data, calculate the resultant xMHD forces, and dynamically realign the RF to more efficiently stabilize modes are presented; the efficacy of various control strategies is also discussed. Supported by the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling (CEMM); see also https://cswim.org.

  5. Pedestal confinement and stability in JET-ILW ELMy H-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, C. F.; Saarelma, S.; Casson, F. J.; Challis, C.; de la Luna, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Joffrin, E.; Simpson, J.; Beurskens, M.; Chapman, I.; Hobirk, J.; Leyland, M.; Lomas, P.; Lowry, C.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Sips, A. C. C.; Urano, H.

    2015-09-01

    New experiments in 2013-2014 have investigated the physics responsible for the decrease in H-mode pedestal confinement observed in the initial phase of JET-ILW operation (2012 Experimental Campaigns). The effects of plasma triangularity, global beta and neutrals on pedestal confinement and stability have been investigated systematically. The stability of JET-ILW pedestals is analysed in the framework of the peeling-ballooning model and the model assumptions of the pedestal predictive code EPED. Low D neutrals content in the plasma, achieved either by low D2 gas injection rates or by divertor configurations with optimum pumping, and high beta are necessary conditions for good pedestal (and core) performance. In such conditions the pedestal stability is consistent with the peeling-ballooning paradigm. Moderate to high D2 gas rates, required for W control and stable H-mode operation with the ILW, lead to increased D neutrals content in the plasma and additional physics in the pedestal models may be required to explain the onset of the ELM instability. The changes in H-mode performance associated with the change in JET wall composition from C to Be/W point to D neutrals and low-Z impurities playing a role in pedestal stability, elements which are not currently included in pedestal models. These aspects need to be addressed in order to progress towards full predictive capability of the pedestal height.

  6. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  7. Stability analysis of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Hari Mohan Late, Ravikiran; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2015-05-15

    We have explored the structural stability of bare and hydrogenated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs). In order to investigate the structural stability, we calculate the cohesive energy for bare, one-edge and both edges H-terminated ZBNNRs with different widths. It is found that the ZBNNRs with width Nz=8 are energetically more favorable than the lower-width counterparts (Nz<8). Bare ZBNNRs have been found energetically most stable as compared to the edge terminated ribbons. Our analysis reveals that the structural stability is a function of ribbon-width and it is not affected significantly by the type of edge-passivation (one-edge or both-edges)

  8. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  9. Recent progress with microtubule stabilizers: new compounds, binding modes and cellular activities

    PubMed Central

    Rohena, Cristina C.

    2014-01-01

    Nature has yielded numerous classes of chemically distinct microtubule stabilizers. Several of these, including paclitaxel (Taxol) and docetaxel (Taxotere), are important drugs used in the treatment of cancer. New microtubule stabilizers and novel formulations of these agents continue to provide advances in cancer therapy. In this review we cover recent progress from late 2008 to August 2013 in the chemistry and biology of these diverse microtubule stabilizers focusing on the wide range of organisms that produce these compounds, their mechanisms of inhibiting microtubule-dependent processes, mechanisms of drug resistance, and their interactions with tubulin including their distinct binding sites and modes. A new potential role for microtubule stabilizers in neurodegenerative diseases is reviewed. PMID:24481420

  10. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  11. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  12. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  13. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  14. Broad-area laser diode with stable single-mode output and wavelength stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappez, Thomas; Ghibaudo, Elise; Rondeau, Philippe; Schlotterbeck, Jean-Pierre; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    High power single-mode pump laser diodes operating around 980nm are key components for Erbium-doped devices. Much effort is still currently devoted to improve both their wavelength stability and their achievable output power, while maintaining a stable single-mode operation. Usually, the emission wavelength is stabilized by an external Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). This configuration requires free-space optics between the laser diode output facet and the fiber or a lensed fiber to ensure an efficient coupling efficiency. This constraint increases fabrication costs, dimensions and mechanical instabilities. Moreover, the maximum achievable output power is limited because a high optical power density can damage the laser facets. To increase the achievable output power, a solution consists in using Broad-Area Laser Diodes (BALD), which are multimode emitters that are composed of large active ribbons with width of some hundreds of micrometers. The objective is then to improve the beam quality by locking the BALD emission on its transverse fundamental mode. We propose in this article to insert an integrated adiabatic transition between the multimode laser and a single-mode FBG. This taper, made by ion-exchange in glass, provides a coupling efficiency of -22.0dB from the multimode laser emission to the single-mode fiber. An optical feedback of -34dB demonstrates the stabilization of the BALD spectrum at the Bragg wavelength. The spectrum of the device is characterized by a maximum side-mode suppression ratio of 35dB, a RMS spectral width of (0.16 +/- 0.04) nm and a frequency shift with current of -12GHz/100mA.

  15. Mode stability in photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers with large κ{sub 1D}L

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yong Okino, Tsuyoshi; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu; Kitamura, Kyoko; Peng, Chao

    2014-01-13

    We study mode stability in photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PCSELs) with large coupling-coefficient-length product κ{sub 1D}L(>6). We observe that mode competition occurs at high current levels above threshold. Our combined experimental and theoretical study provides the first evidence of the mode competition originating from the high-order band-edge modes. The decreased threshold margin between these competing high-order modes and the main lasing mode with increasing cavity length as well as the spatial hole burning effect may deteriorate the single-mode stability. Our finding is essential for designing single-mode high-power PCSELs for which the strategy to suppress the high-order modes must be considered.

  16. Identification of a low plasma-rotation threshold for stabilization of the resistive-wall mode.

    PubMed

    Takechi, M; Matsunaga, G; Aiba, N; Fujita, T; Ozeki, T; Koide, Y; Sakamoto, Y; Kurita, G; Isayama, A; Kamada, Y

    2007-02-01

    The plasma rotation necessary for stabilization of resistive-wall modes (RWMs) is investigated by controlling the toroidal plasma rotation with external momentum input by injection of tangential neutral beams. The observed threshold is 0.3% of the Alfvén velocity and much smaller than the previous experimental results obtained with magnetic braking. This low critical rotation has a very weak beta dependence as the ideal wall limit is approached. These results indicate that for large plasmas such as in future fusion reactors with low rotation, the requirement of the additional feedback control system for stabilizing RWM is much reduced. PMID:17358869

  17. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  18. Exploring the Frequency Stability Limits of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators for Metrological Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Baumgartel, Lukas; Grudinin, Ivan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators are attracting increasing interest as promising frequency reference cavities. Unlike commonly used Fabry-Perot cavities, however, they are filled with a bulk medium whose properties have a significant impact on the stability of its resonance frequencies. In this context that has to be reduced to a minimum. On the other hand, a small monolithic resonator provides opportunity for better stability against vibration and acceleration. this feature is essential when the cavity operates in a non-laboratory environment. In this paper, we report a case study for a crystalline resonator, and discuss the a pathway towards the inhibition of vibration-and acceleration-induced frequency fluctuations.

  19. Marginal Stability Diagrams for Infinite-n Ballooning Modes in Quasi-symmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson; C.C. Hegna; R. Torasso; A. Ware

    2003-12-05

    By perturbing the pressure and rotational-transform profiles at a selected surface in a given equilibrium, and by inducing a coordinate variation such that the perturbed state is in equilibrium, a family of magnetohydrodynamic equilibria local to the surface and parameterized by the pressure gradient and shear is constructed for arbitrary stellarator geometry. The geometry of the surface is not changed. The perturbed equilibria are analyzed for infinite-n ballooning stability and marginal stability diagrams are constructed that are analogous to the (s; alpha) diagrams constructed for axi-symmetric configurations. The method describes how pressure and rotational-transform gradients influence the local shear, which in turn influences the ballooning stability. Stability diagrams for the quasi-axially-symmetric NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment), a quasi-poloidally-symmetric configuration and the quasi-helically-symmetric HSX (Helically Symmetric Experiment) are presented. Regions of second-stability are observed in both NCSX and the quasi-poloidal configuration, whereas no second stable region is observed for the quasi-helically symmetric device. To explain the different regions of stability, the curvature and local shear of the quasi-poloidal configuration are analyzed. The results are seemingly consistent with the simple explanation: ballooning instability results when the local shear is small in regions of bad curvature. Examples will be given that show that the structure, and stability, of the ballooning mode is determined by the structure of the potential function arising in the Schroedinger form of the ballooning equation.

  20. User's manual for the coupled mode version of the normal modes rotor aeroelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, R. R.; Carlson, R. G.; Landgrebe, A. J.; Egolf, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    This User's Manual was prepared to provide the engineer with the information required to run the coupled mode version of the Normal Modes Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis Computer Program. The manual provides a full set of instructions for running the program, including calculation of blade modes, calculations of variable induced velocity distribution and the calculation of the time history of the response for either a single blade or a complete rotor with an airframe (the latter with constant inflow).

  1. Cancellation of drift kinetic effects between thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Drift kinetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is computationally investigated using MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K following the non-perturbative approach (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503), for both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas. Toroidal precessional drift resonance effects from trapped energetic ions (EIs) and various kinetic resonances between the mode and the guiding center drift motions of thermal particles are included into the self-consistent toroidal computations. The results show cancellation effects of the drift kinetic damping on the RWM between the thermal particles and EIs contributions, in both RFP and tokamak plasmas, even though each species alone can provide damping and stabilize RWM instability by respective kinetic resonances. The degree of cancellation generally depends on the EIs equilibrium distribution, the particle birth energy, as well as the toroidal flow speed of the plasma.

  2. Enhancement of Voltage Stability of DC Smart Grid During Islanded Mode by Load Shedding Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassor, Thabit Salim; Senjyu, Tomonobu; Yona, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the voltage stability of a DC smart grid based on renewable energy resources during grid connected and isolated modes. During the islanded mode the load shedding, based on the state of charge of the battery and distribution line voltage, was proposed for voltage stability and reservation of critical load power. The analyzed power system comprises a wind turbine, a photovoltaic generator, storage battery as controllable load, DC loads, and power converters. A fuzzy logic control strategy was applied for power consumption control of controllable loads and the grid-connected dual active bridge series resonant converters. The proposed DC Smart Grid operation has been verified by simulation using MATLAB® and PLECS® Blockset. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  4. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  5. Feedback stabilization of the resistive shell mode in a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1997-07-01

    Stabilization of the {open_quotes}resistive shell mode{close_quotes} is vital to the success of the {open_quotes}advanced tokamak{close_quotes} concept. The most promising reactor relevant approach is to apply external feedback using, for instance, the previously proposed {open_quotes}fake rotating shell{close_quotes} scheme [R. Fitzpatrick and T. H. Jensen, Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 2641 (1996)]. This scheme, like other simple feedback schemes, only works if the feedback controlled conductors are located inside the {open_quotes}critical radius{close_quotes} at which a perfectly conducting shell is just able to stabilize the ideal external kink mode. In general, this is not possible in a reactor, since engineering constraints demand that any feedback controlled conductors be placed {ital outside} the neutron shielding blanket (i.e., relatively far from the edge of the plasma). It is demonstrated that the fake rotating shell feedback scheme can be modified so that it works even when the feedback controlled conductors are located well beyond the critical radius. The gain, bandwidth, current, and total power requirements of such a feedback system for a reactor sized plasma are estimated to be less than 100, a few Hz, a fews tens of kA, and a few MW, respectively. These requirements could easily be met using existing technology. It is concluded that feedback stabilization of the resistive shell mode is possible in a tokamak fusion reactor. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Bi-global Stability Analysis of Compressible Open Cavity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiyang; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    The effect of compressibility on stability characteristics of rectangular open cavity flows is numerically examined. In our earlier work with two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of open cavity flows, we found that increasing Mach number destabilizes the flow in the subsonic regime but stabilizes the flow in the transonic regime. To further examine the compressibility effect, linear bi-global stability analysis is performed over the same range of Mach numbers to investigate the influence of three-dimensional instabilities in flows over open cavities with length-to-depth ratios of 2 and 6. We identify dominant eigenmodes for varied Mach numbers and spanwise wavelengths with respect to two-dimensional stable and unstable steady states. Over a range of spanwise wavelengths, we reveal the growth/damp rates and frequencies of the dominant global modes. Based on the insights from the present analysis, we compare our findings from global stability analysis with our companion three-dimensional flow control experiments aimed at reducing pressure fluctuation caused by cavity flow unsteadiness. This work was supported by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0091).

  7. J-integral evaluation for 2D mixed-mode crack problems employing a meshfree stabilized conforming nodal integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoyuki; Suzuki, Hirotaka; Sadamoto, Shota; Sannomaru, Shogo; Yu, Tiantang; Bui, Tinh Quoc

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) in-plane mixed-mode fracture mechanics problems are analyzed employing an efficient meshfree Galerkin method based on stabilized conforming nodal integration (SCNI). In this setting, the reproducing kernel function as meshfree interpolant is taken, while employing the SCNI for numerical integration of stiffness matrix in the Galerkin formulation. The strain components are smoothed and stabilized employing Gauss divergence theorem. The path-independent integral ( J-integral) is solved based on the nodal integration by summing the smoothed physical quantities and the segments of the contour integrals. In addition, mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIFs) are extracted from the J-integral by decomposing the displacement and stress fields into symmetric and antisymmetric parts. The advantages and features of the present formulation and discretization in evaluation of the J-integral of in-plane 2D fracture problems are demonstrated through several representative numerical examples. The mixed-mode SIFs are evaluated and compared with reference solutions. The obtained results reveal high accuracy and good performance of the proposed meshfree method in the analysis of 2D fracture problems.

  8. Closed-loop ARS mode for scanning ion conductance microscopy with improved speed and stability for live cell imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Goo-Eun; Noh, Hanaul; Shin, Yong Kyun; Kahng, Se-Jong; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Hong-Bae; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2015-06-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an increasingly useful nanotechnology tool for non-contact, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens such as cellular membranes. In particular, approach-retract-scanning (ARS) mode enables fast probing of delicate biological structures by rapid and repeated approach/retraction of a nano-pipette tip. For optimal performance, accurate control of the tip position is a critical issue. Herein, we present a novel closed-loop control strategy for the ARS mode that achieves higher operating speeds with increased stability. The algorithm differs from that of most conventional (i.e., constant velocity) approach schemes as it includes a deceleration phase near the sample surface, which is intended to minimize the possibility of contact with the surface. Analysis of the ion current and tip position demonstrates that the new mode is able to operate at approach speeds of up to 250 μm s-1. As a result of the improved stability, SICM imaging with the new approach scheme enables significantly improved, high resolution imaging of subtle features of fixed and live cells (e.g., filamentous structures & membrane edges). Taken together, the results suggest that optimization of the tip approach speed can substantially improve SICM imaging performance, further enabling SICM to become widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies at the nanoscale level.

  9. The structure and stability of mode-2 internal solitary-like waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Magda; Davies, Peter; Hoebers, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    Recent observational examples of Mode-2 internal solitary-like waves (ISWs) in the ocean (e.g. Yang et al., 2009; Schroyer et al., 2010) have motivated modelling studies. The present laboratory study investigates the structure and stability of mode-2 ISWs. A rank-ordered train of mode-2 ISWs is generated using a lock release configuration. The pycnocline is centred either on the mid-depth of the water column (the 0% offset case) or it is offset in the positive vertical direction by a fraction of 5%, 10% or 20% of the total fluid depth. It is found that offsetting the pycnocline has little effect on the basic wave properties but it does significantly affect wave stability. Instability takes the form of small K-H-like billows in the rear of the wave and small scale overturning in the core of the wave. In the 0% offset case, instability occurs on both the upper and lower interfaces of the pycnocline and is similar in extent and vigour over the two interfaces. As the offset percentage is increased, however, instability is more pronounced on the lower interface with little or no evidence of instability being observed on the upper interface. In the 20% offset case a mode-1 tail is associated with the wave and the wave characteristics resemble qualitatively the recent field observations of Shroyer et al., (2010).

  10. Functionalization of small platinum nanoparticles with amines and phosphines: Ligand binding modes and particle stability.

    PubMed

    Wand, Patricia; Bartl, Johannes D; Heiz, Ueli; Tschurl, Martin; Cokoja, Mirza

    2016-09-15

    We report the binding mode of amines and phosphines on platinum nanoparticles. Protective ligands comprising different functional groups are systematically studied for the elucidation of ligand binding at different functionalization conditions. From the functionalization conditions it is concluded that the binding of amines to the nanoparticles occurs via the formation of a PtHN moiety or electrostatic interaction, which is supported by spectroscopic evidences. In particular from complex chemistry such a binding mode is surprising, as amines are expected to bind via their electron pair to the metal. Similar results from functionalization are observed for phosphine-protected nanoparticles, which suggest similar binding modes in these systems. In contrast to the strong covalent bond of the protection with thiols, considerable weakly binding systems result. The characteristics of the binding mode are reflected by the stability of the colloids and their catalytic properties. In the selective hydrogenation of 3-hexyne to 3-hexene thiolate-stabilized Pt particles are highly stable, but exhibit the lowest activity. On the other hand, amine- and phosphine-capped platinum nanoparticles show a significantly higher activity, but rapidly agglomerate. PMID:27288572

  11. Comparison of linear gyrokinetic and two-fluid stability analyses of DIII-D L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.; Bass, E. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from a linear stability study of the edge and near-edge regions of well-studied DIII-D tokamak L-mode discharges, using both the gyrokinetic-Maxwell equations (as implemented in the GYRO code) and a range of two-fluid models implemented in the BOUT++ code. The goal is to identify instabilities that may help explain the well-known systematic under-prediction of near-edge DIII-D transport and fluctuation levels by some gyrokinetic codes, in particular those driven by edge physics not included within the gyrokinetic models. We first compare local and global gyrokinetic stability results spanning the region of 0 . 7 <ΨN < 0 . 95 to corresponding predictions from Braginskii-like models implemented in BOUT++, focusing on the influence of magnetic shaping and collisionality scalings for a range of low- to moderate-n modes, consistent with the observed discrepancies in fluctuation spectra. The closed-field line results are then compared against equivalent results that extend across the separatrix to the open field line region 0 . 7 <ΨN < 1 . 05 , in order to assess whether inclusion of this region leads to any significant changes in linear stability. Progress on extending the linear analysis to inclusion of rotational and gyrofluid effects will also be reported.

  12. Stability and natural frequency of nonspherical mode of an encapsulated microbubble in a viscous liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqiao; Wang, Qianxi

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles (EMBs) subject to an ultrasound wave have wide and important medical applications, including sonography, drug delivery, and sonoporation. The nonspherical shape oscillation of an EMB, termed as shape modes, is one of the core mechanisms of these applications and therefore its natural frequency is a fundamentally important parameter. Based on the linear stability theory, we show that shape modes of an EMB in a viscous Newtonian liquid are stable. We derive an explicit expression for the natural frequency of shape modes, in terms of the equilibrium radius of an EMB, and the parameters of the external liquid, coating, and internal gases. The expression is validated by comparing to the numerical results obtained from the dynamic equations of shape modes of an EMB. The natural frequency of shape modes shifts appreciably due to the viscosity of the liquid, and this trend increases with the mode number. The significant viscous effects are due to the no-slip condition for the liquid flow at the surface of an EMB. Our results show that when subject to an acoustic wave, the shape instability for an EMB is prone to appear if 2ωk/ωd = n, where ωk is the natural frequency of shape modes, ωd is the driving frequency of the acoustic wave, and n is a natural number. The effects of viscosity on the natural frequency is thus critical in setting the driving frequency of ultrasound to avoid or activate shape modes of EMBs, which should be considered in the applications of medical ultrasound.

  13. Passively stabilized 215-W monolithic CW LMA-fiber laser with innovative transversal mode filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzki, Fabian; Jauregui, Cesar; Voigtländer, Christian; Thomas, Jens U.; Limpert, Jens; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    We report on the development of a high power monolithic CW fiber oscillator with an output power of 215 W in a 20μm core diameter few-mode Large Mode Area fiber (LMA). The key parameters for stable operation are reviewed. With these optimizations the root mean square of the output power fluctuations can be reduced to less than 0.5 % on a timescale of 20 s, which represents an improvement of more than a factor 5 over a non-optimized fiber laser. With a real-time measurement of the mode content of the fiber laser it can be shown that the few-mode nature of LMA fibers is the main factor for the residual instability of our optimized fiber laser. The root of the problem is that Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) written in multimode fibers exhibit a multi-peak reflexion spectrum in which each resonance corresponds to a different transversal mode. This reflectivity spectrum stimulates multimode laser operation, which results in power and pointing instabilities due to gain competition between the different transversal modes . To stabilize the temporal and spatial behavior of the laser output, we propose an innovative passive in-fiber transversal mode filter based on modified FBG-Fabry Perot structure. This structure provides different reflectivities to the different transversal modes according to the transversal distribution of their intensity profile. Furthermore, this structure can be completely written into the active fiber using fs-laser pulses. Moreover, this concept scales very well with the fiber core diameter, which implies that there is no performance loss in fibers with even larger cores. In consequence this structure is inherently power scalable and can, therefore, be used in kW-level fiber laser systems.

  14. Anderson Localization of Ballooning Modes, Quantum Chaos and the Stability of Compact Quasiaxially Symmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; J.L. Johnson; S. Klasky; J. Canik; R.L. Dewar; W.A. Cooper

    2001-10-31

    The radially local magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability of a compact, quasiaxially symmetric stellarator (QAS), is examined just above the ballooning beta limit with a method that can lead to estimates of global stability. Here MHD stability is analyzed through the calculation and examination of the ballooning mode eigenvalue isosurfaces in the 3-space [s, alpha, theta(subscript ''k'')]; s is the edge normalized toroidal flux, alpha is the field line variable, and q(subscript ''k'') is the perpendicular wave vector or ballooning parameter. Broken symmetry, i.e., deviations from axisymmetry, in the stellarator magnetic field geometry causes localization of the ballooning mode eigenfunction, and gives rise to new types of nonsymmetric eigenvalue isosurfaces in both the stable and unstable spectrum. For eigenvalues far above the marginal point, isosurfaces are topologically spherical, indicative of strong ''quantum chaos.'' The complexity of QAS marginal isosurfaces suggests that finite Larmor radius stabilization estimates will be difficult and that fully three-dimensional, high-n MHD computations are required to predict the beta limit.

  15. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  16. Black hole lasers, a mode analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, Antonin; Parentani, Renaud

    2010-04-15

    We show that the black hole laser effect discovered by Corley and Jacobson should be described in terms of frequency eigenmodes that are spatially bound. The spectrum contains a discrete and finite set of complex frequency modes, which appear in pairs and which encode the laser effect. In addition, it contains real frequency modes that form a continuous set when space is infinite, and which are only elastically scattered, i.e., not subject to any Bogoliubov transformation. The quantization is straightforward, but the calculation of the asymptotic fluxes is rather involved. When the number of complex frequency modes is small, our expressions differ from those given earlier. In particular, when the region between the horizons shrinks, there is a minimal distance under which no complex frequency mode exists, and no radiation is emitted. Finally, we relate this effect to other dynamical instabilities found for rotating black holes and in electric fields, and we give the conditions to get this type of instability.

  17. The beam-mode stability of periodic functionally-graded-material shells conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huijie; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Wen, Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wen, Xisen

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of beam-mode stability of fluid-conveying shell systems are investigated in this paper for shells with clamped-free (cantilevered) boundary conditions. An FEM algorithm is developed to conduct the investigation. A periodic shell structure of functionally graded material (FGM), termed as PFGM shell here, is designed so as to enhance the stability for the shell system, and to eliminate the stress concentration problems that exist in periodic structures. Results show that by the introduction of periodic design the critical velocities can be raised over several desired ranges of the dimensionless fluid density β, and the stress concentration is effectively reduced in the PFGM shell. Finally, the effects of the geometric shape, material parameters and spring supports on the dynamical stability are probed.

  18. Digital multi-channel stabilization of four-mode phase-sensitive parametric multicasting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Kuo, Bill P P; Myslivets, Evgeny; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2014-07-28

    Stable four-mode phase-sensitive (4MPS) process was investigated as a means to enhance two-pump driven parametric multicasting conversion efficiency (CE) and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Instability of multi-beam, phase sensitive (PS) device that inherently behaves as an interferometer, with output subject to ambient induced fluctuations, was addressed theoretically and experimentally. A new stabilization technique that controls phases of three input waves of the 4MPS multicaster and maximizes CE was developed and described. Stabilization relies on digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) specifically was developed to control pump phases to guarantee stable 4MPS operation that is independent of environmental fluctuations. The technique also controls a single (signal) input phase to optimize the PS-induced improvement of the CE and SNR. The new, continuous-operation DPLL has allowed for fully stabilized PS parametric broadband multicasting, demonstrating CE improvement over 20 signal copies in excess of 10 dB. PMID:25089457

  19. Mod 1 wind turbine generator failure modes and effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was directed primarily at identifying those critical failure modes that would be hazardous to life or would result in major damage to the system. Each subsystem was approached from the top down, and broken down to successive lower levels where it appeared that the criticality of the failure mode warranted more detail analysis. The results were reviewed by specialists from outside the Mod 1 program, and corrective action taken wherever recommended.

  20. Stock market stability: Diffusion entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhuang, Yangyang; He, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we propose a method to analyze the stock market stability based on diffusion entropy, and conduct an empirical analysis of Dow Jones Industrial Average. Empirical results show that this method can reflect the volatility and extreme cases of the stock market.

  1. Stability Analysis of the Impoundment of Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slávik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    An impoundment is an engineering construction used for the safe deposition of unexploitable waste from industrial and mining facilities. In terms of the legislative requirements of the Slovak Republic, a "Measurements Project" must be developed for each impoundment. In this document the prerequisites for the safe operation of an impoundment, the limit and critical values of the monitored phenomena and the facts influencing the safety of the impoundment and the area endangered by such a site are also defined. The safety and stability of an impoundment are verified according to a "Measurements Project" by considering stability at regular time intervals. This contribution presents, in the form of a parametric study, a stability analysis of an ash impoundment. The stability analysis provides an example of the utilization of an information database of the results of the regular monitoring of the geotechnical properties of the materials forming the impoundment's body and the surrounding rock mass. The stability of the impoundment is expressed for a recent state - without a continuous water level in its body and, at the same time, for a hypothetical limit and critical water level according to the valid "Handling Regulations".

  2. Electrostatic structures in space plasmas: Stability of two-dimensional magnetic bernstein-greene-kruskal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Soundararajan, S. J.; Yasin, E.

    2012-05-01

    Electrostatic structures have been observed in many regions of space plasmas, including the solar wind, the magnetosphere, the auroral acceleration region, and in association with shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection. Due to potentially large amplitude of electric fields within these structures, their effects on particle heating, scattering, or acceleration can be important. One possible theoretical description of some of these structures is the concept of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes, which are exact nonlinear solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations in collisionless kinetic theory. BGK modes have been studied extensively for many decades, predominately in one dimension (1D), although there have been observations showing that some of these structures have clear 3D features. While there have been approximate solutions of higher dimensional BGK modes, an exact 3D BGK mode solution in a finite magnetic field has not been found yet. Recently we have constructed exact solutions of 2D BGK modes in a magnetized plasma with finite magnetic field strength in order to gain insights of the ultimate 3D theory [Ng, Bhattacharjee, and Skiff, Phys. Plasmas 13, 055903 (2006)]. Based on the analytic form of these solutions, as well as Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations, we will present numerical studies of their stability for different levels of background magnetic field strength.

  3. Liquid rocket spray combustion stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    A computational approach to the analysis of spray combustion stability in liquid rocket combustors is proposed which is based on the unsteady quasi-two-dimensional Euler equations with interphase source terms derived from a Lagrangian treatment of the combusting spray. Based on a preliminary evaluation, the computational methodology presented here is a promising research tool and a potential design/development aid for investigating the stability characteristics of liquid rocket engines. The method is characterized by low numerical noise; the Lagrangian treatment of the spray offers improved flexibility for the direct modeling of spray combustion.

  4. Master stability analysis in transient spatiotemporal chaos.

    PubMed

    Wackerbauer, Renate

    2007-11-01

    The asymptotic stability of spatiotemporal chaos is difficult to determine, since transient spatiotemporal chaos may be extremely long lived. A master stability analysis reveals that the asymptotic state of transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Gray-Scott system and in the Bär-Eiswirth system is characterized by negative transverse Lyapunov exponents on the attractor of the invariant synchronization manifold. The average lifetime of transient spatiotemporal chaos depends on the number of transverse directions that are unstable along a typical excitation cycle. PMID:18233739

  5. Shear-ballooning stability analysis of low-. beta. plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-11-01

    A model of magnetic configurations that has both shear and variation of the field curvature along the magnetic field is constructed. The stability analysis of this system is performed by expanding the perturbation functions to phi/sub 0/ which is constant along the field and phi/sub 1/ which is sinusoidally varied along the field line. The shear term is retained in the form of differntial operations in zeta, the coordinate parallel to the pressure gradient. After several simplifications, the equation reduces itself to the fourth order differential equation. The eigenvalue of this equation is numerically obtained. The calculated critical ..beta.. plotted versus the well depth parameter, h, makes a smooth transition between h < 0 (maximum average B) and h > 0 (minimum average B). Using the same technique, the nondivergent solution to the localized shear mode (Suydam mode) is also obtained by retaining the inertia term.

  6. Flight stability analysis under changes in insect morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noest, Robert; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-11-01

    Insect have an amazing ability to control their flight, being able to perform both fast aerial maneuvers and stable hovering. The insect's neural system has developed various mechanism by which it can control these flying feats, but we expect that insect morphology is equally important in facilitating the aerial control. We perform a computational study using a quasi-steady instantaneous flapping flight model which allows us to freely adapt the insect's morphological parameters. We picked a fruit fly as the basis for the body shape and wing motion, and study the effect of changes to the morphology for a range of wing stroke amplitudes. In each case we determine the periodic flight mode, with the period equal to a single wing beat, and do a Floquet stability analysis of the flight. To interpret our results we will compare the changed morphology to related insects. We discuss the implications of the insects location on the stability diagram.

  7. CFD analysis of baffle flame stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Farmer, Richard C.

    1991-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics analysis of ignition and combustion in baffle flame stabilized combustors was developed in order to increase the understanding of combustion efficiency and stability. The objectives of this investigation were to develop and verify a computational model of the ignition and combustion of typical augmenter configurations and to generalize the model for application to the combustion occurring in a generic gas turbine engine with augmenters, upstream vitiation, and a downstream chocked nozzle. Triangular bar and cone stabilized flames were simulated. Quasi-global propane and methane kinetics models were employed in the computation. A more detailed methane-air kinetics model was also used. An ignition procedure was devised by initially providing a 1200 K hot spot near the base to start the flame. The recirculation zone lengths of cold and hot flows were well predicted. Time averaged flow quantities were used for data comparisons since the predicted recirculating zones of the reacting flows were unsteady.

  8. ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization via active control in coupled NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, S. E.; Held, E. D.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-10-01

    Actively controlled electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) applied within magnetic islands formed by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) has been shown to control or suppress these modes. In conjunction with ongoing experimental efforts, the development and verification of integrated numerical models of this mode stabilization process is of paramount importance in determining optimal NTM stabilization strategies for ITER. In the advanced model developed by the SWIM Project, the equations/closures of extended (not reduced) MHD contain new terms arising from 3D (not toroidal or bounce-averaged) RF-induced quasilinear diffusion. The quasilinear operator formulation models the equilibration of driven current within the island using the same extended MHD dynamics which govern the physics of island formation, yielding a more accurate and self-consistent picture of 3D island response to RF drive. Results of computations which model ECRF deposition using ray tracing, assemble the 3D quasilinear operator from ray/profile data, and calculate the resultant forces within the extended MHD code will be presented. We also discuss the efficacy of various numerical active feedback control systems, which gather data from synthetic diagnostics to dynamically trigger and spatially align RF fields.

  9. Stabilization of the resistive wall mode using a fake rotating shell

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Jensen, T.H.

    1996-07-01

    Tokamak plasma performance can, in theory, be greatly improved if the so-called {open_quote}{open_quote}resistive wall mode{close_quote}{close_quote} is stabilized. This can be achieved by spinning the plasma rapidly, but such a scheme would be difficult to implement in a reactor setting. A more promising approach is to apply external feedback in order to make a resistive shell placed around the plasma act like a perfect conductor. A scheme is outlined by which a network of feedback controlled conductors surrounding the plasma can be made to act like a {ital rotating} shell. This fake rotating shell combined with a stationary conventional shell (e.g., the vacuum vessel) can completely stabilize the resistive wall mode. The gain, bandwidth, current, and power requirements of the feedback amplifiers are extremely modest. A previously proposed stabilization scheme (the intelligent shell) is also investigated, and is compared with the fake rotating shell concept. The main disadvantage of the former scheme is that it requires a high gain. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Numerical Calculations Demonstrating Complete Stabilization of the Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Wall Mode by Longitudinal Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2009-05-20

    The cylindrical ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability problem, including ow and a resistive wall, is cast in the standard mathematical form, ωA∙x = B∙x, without discretizing the vacuum regions surrounding the plasma. This is accomplished by means of a finite element expansion for the plasma perturbations, by coupling the plasma surface perturbations to the resistive wall using a Green's function approach, and by expanding the unknown vector, x, to include the perturbed current in the resistive wall as an additional degree of freedom. The ideal MHD resistive wall mode (RWM) can be stabilized when the plasma has a uniform equilibrium ow such that the RWM frequency resonates with the plasma's Doppler-shifted sound continuum modes. The resonance induces a singularity in the parallel component of the plasma perturbations, which must be adequately resolved. Complete stabilization within the ideal MHD model (i.e. without parallel damping being added) is achieved as the grid spacing in the region of the resonance is extrapolated to 0 step size

  11. Mode analysis in optics through fractional transforms.

    PubMed

    Alieva, T; Bastiaans, M J

    1999-09-01

    The relationship between the mode content and the fractional Fourier and fractional Hankel transforms of a function is established. It is shown that the Laguerre-Gauss spectrum of a rotationally symmetric wave front can be determined from the wave front's fractional Hankel transforms taken at the optical axis. PMID:18073985

  12. Further Development of Rotating Rake Mode Measurement Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The Rotating Rake mode measurement system was designed to measure acoustic duct modes generated by a fan stage. After analysis of the measured data, the mode amplitudes and phases were quantified. For low-speed fans within axisymmetric ducts, mode power levels computed from rotating rake measured data would agree with the far-field power levels on a tone by tone basis. However, this agreement required that the sound from the noise sources within the duct propagated outward from the duct exit without reflection at the exit and previous studies suggested conditions could exist where significant reflections could occur. To directly measure the modes propagating in both directions within a duct, a second rake was mounted to the rotating system with an offset in both the axial and the azimuthal directions. The rotating rake data analysis technique was extended to include the data measured by the second rake. The analysis resulted in a set of circumferential mode levels at each of the two rake microphone locations. Radial basis functions were then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode amplitudes for the modes propagating in both directions within the duct. The fit equations were also modified to allow evanescent mode amplitudes to be computed. This extension of the rotating rake data analysis technique was tested using simulated data, numerical code produced data, and preliminary in-duct measured data.

  13. Asian summer monsoon rainfall predictability: a predictable mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Lee, June-Yi; Xiang, Baoqiang

    2015-01-01

    To what extent the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) rainfall is predictable has been an important but long-standing issue in climate science. Here we introduce a predictable mode analysis (PMA) method to estimate predictability of the ASM rainfall. The PMA is an integral approach combining empirical analysis, physical interpretation and retrospective prediction. The empirical analysis detects most important modes of variability; the interpretation establishes the physical basis of prediction of the modes; and the retrospective predictions with dynamical models and physics-based empirical (P-E) model are used to identify the "predictable" modes. Potential predictability can then be estimated by the fractional variance accounted for by the "predictable" modes. For the ASM rainfall during June-July-August, we identify four major modes of variability in the domain (20°S-40°N, 40°E-160°E) during 1979-2010: (1) El Niño-La Nina developing mode in central Pacific, (2) Indo-western Pacific monsoon-ocean coupled mode sustained by a positive thermodynamic feedback with the aid of background mean circulation, (3) Indian Ocean dipole mode, and (4) a warming trend mode. We show that these modes can be predicted reasonably well by a set of P-E prediction models as well as coupled models' multi-model ensemble. The P-E and dynamical models have comparable skills and complementary strengths in predicting ASM rainfall. Thus, the four modes may be regarded as "predictable" modes, and about half of the ASM rainfall variability may be predictable. This work not only provides a useful approach for assessing seasonal predictability but also provides P-E prediction tools and a spatial-pattern-bias correction method to improve dynamical predictions. The proposed PMA method can be applied to a broad range of climate predictability and prediction problems.

  14. Timing stability enhancement of an Erbium Doped mode locked Fiber Laser using SESAM mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifi, G.; Khedr, M. Atta; Badr, Y.; Danailov, M.; Sigalotti, P.; Cinquegrana, P.; Alsous, M. B.; Galaly, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on an examination of pulse timing stability of a home built Erbium Doped Fiber Laser (EDFL) passively mode locked via nonlinear polarization rotation by inserting semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) in laser cavity. A very low root mean square (RMS) timing jitter (less than 27 fsec) and faster self-starting mode locking have been established. In order to get clear, low noise signal for time resolving measurements, synchronization of EDFL laser with an external high precision electronic oscillator have been established. Subsequently, it is synchronized and optically cross-correlated with a Ti:Sapphire laser source (Micra). The measured relative timing jitter was found to be less than 65 fsec. In this way, the two, well synchronized Ti:Sapphire and EDFL laser pulses prove to be a powerful tool for time resolving measurements.

  15. Stability of short, single-mode erbium-doped fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, M.; Gilbert, S.L.

    1997-07-01

    We conducted a detailed study of the stability of short, erbium-doped fiber lasers fabricated with two UV-induced Bragg gratings written into the doped fiber. We find that the relative intensity noise of single-longitudinal-mode fiber grating lasers is approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of a single-frequency 1.523-{mu}m helium-neon laser. The frequency noise spectrum contains few resonances, none of which exceeds 0.6 kHz/Hz{sup 1/2} rms; the integrated rms frequency noise from 50 Hz to 63 kHz is 36 kHz. We also demonstrate a simple method for monitoring the laser power and number of oscillating modes during laser fabrication. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  16. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  17. A multimode analytic cylindrical model for the stabilization of the resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, I. G.

    2008-09-01

    A dispersion relation concerning the stability of the resistive wall modes within a multimode cylindrical analytical model is presented. This paper generalizes the Fitzpatrick-Aydemir model (Fitzpatrick R and Aydemir A Y 1996 Nucl. Fusion 1 11) in the presence of an unlimited number of neighboring modes for a tokamak plasma column surrounded by a resistive shell and a feedback system consisting of a number of detector and active feedback coils. The model is applied to the HBT-EP tokamak (Cates C et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3133) with its peculiar feedback system disposal. Finally, an analytical dispersion relation is obtained that can be solved by using a simple MATLAB code.

  18. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, R; Auriemma, F; Fassina, A; Martines, E; Terranova, D; Sattin, F

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation. PMID:27203329

  19. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, R.; Auriemma, F.; Fassina, A.; Martines, E.; Terranova, D.; Sattin, F.

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation.

  20. Stability of semidiscrete approximations for hyperbolic initial-boundary-value problems: Stationary modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, Robert F.; Beam, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Spatially discrete difference approximations for hyperbolic initial-boundary-value problems (IBVPs) require numerical boundary conditions in addition to the analytical boundary conditions specified for the differential equations. Improper treatment of a numerical boundary condition can cause instability of the discrete IBVP even though the approximation is stable for the pure initial-value or Cauchy problem. In the discrete IBVP stability literature there exists a small class of discrete approximations called borderline cases. For nondissipative approximations, borderline cases are unstable according to the theory of the Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom (GKS) but they may be Lax-Richtmyer stable or unstable in the L sub 2 norm on a finite domain. It is shown that borderline approximation can be characterized by the presence of a stationary mode for the finite-domain problem. A stationary mode has the property that it does not decay with time and a nontrivial stationary mode leads to algebraic growth of the solution norm with mesh refinement. An analytical condition is given which makes it easy to detect a stationary mode; several examples of numerical boundary conditions are investigated corresponding to borderline cases.

  1. Stabilization of the external kink and control of the resistive wall mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, A.M.; Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.

    1999-01-01

    One promising approach to maintaining stability of high beta tokamak plasmas is the use of a conducting wall near the plasma to stabilize low-n ideal MHD instabilities. However, with a resistive wall, either plasma rotation or active feedback control is required to stabilize the more slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs). Experiments in the DIII-D, PBHX-M, and HBT-EP tokamaks have demonstrated that plasmas with a nearby conducting wall can remain stable to the n = 1 ideal external kink above the beta limit predicted with the wall at infinity, with durations in DIII-D up to 30 times {tau}{sub w}, the resistive wall time constant. More recently, detailed, reproducible observation of the n = 1 RWM has been possible in DIII-D plasmas above the no-wall beta limit. The DIII-D measurements confirm characteristics common to several RWM theories. The mode is destabilized as the plasma rotation at the q = 3 surface decreases below a critical frequency of 1 to 7 kHz. The measured mode growth times of 2 to 8 ms agree with measurements and numerical calculations of the dominant DIII-D vessel eigenmode time constants, {tau}{sub w}. From its onset, the RWM has little or no toroidal rotation and rapidly reduces the plasma rotation to zero. Both DIII-D and HBT-EP have adopted the smart shell concept as an initial approach to control of these slowly growing RWMs; external coils are controlled by a feedback loop designed to make the resistive wall appear perfectly conducting by maintaining a net zero radial field at the wall. Initial experiment results from DIII-D have yielded encouraging results.

  2. 3D passive stabilization of n = 0 MHD modes in EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Chen, S L; Villone, F; Xiao, B J; Barbato, L; Luo, Z P; Liu, L; Mastrostefano, S; Xing, Z

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is shown of the capability of non-axisymmetrical conducting structures in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to guarantee the passive stabilization of the n = 0 MHD unstable mode. Suitable numerical modeling of the experiments allows a clear interpretation of the phenomenon. This demonstration and the availability of computational tools able to describe the effect of 3D conductors will have a huge impact on the design of future fusion devices, in which the conducting structures closest to plasma will be highly segmented. PMID:27597182

  3. 3D passive stabilization of n = 0 MHD modes in EAST tokamak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. L.; Villone, F.; Xiao, B. J.; Barbato, L.; Luo, Z. P.; Liu, L.; Mastrostefano, S.; Xing, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is shown of the capability of non-axisymmetrical conducting structures in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to guarantee the passive stabilization of the n = 0 MHD unstable mode. Suitable numerical modeling of the experiments allows a clear interpretation of the phenomenon. This demonstration and the availability of computational tools able to describe the effect of 3D conductors will have a huge impact on the design of future fusion devices, in which the conducting structures closest to plasma will be highly segmented. PMID:27597182

  4. Effects due to nonlinear modification of driven current on tearing mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ge; Reiman, Allan; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can be destabilized by a helical perturbation in the boostrap current, and can result in large magnetic islands which are detrimental to confinement in toroidal plasma devices. NTM stability properties and dynamics can be strongly affected by current drive in various scenarios. The modified Rutherford equation is generally used to calculate the contributions from the current drive, without considering the self- consistent change in the driven current associated with the nonlinear effects. In this study, we evaluated the importance of such nonlinear effects as the effect of the change in Te on the current drive efficiency, and the nonlinear interaction of the current drive and the electric field.

  5. SUSTAINED STABILIZATION OF THE RESISTIVE WALL MODE BY PLASMA ROTATION IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    GAROFALO,A.M; STRAIT,E.J; JOHNSON,L.C; LA HAYE,R.J; LAZARUS,E.A; NAVRATIL,G.A; OKABAYASHI,M; SCOVILLE,J.T; TAYLOR,T.S; TURNBULL,A.D; AND THE DIII-D TEAM

    2001-10-01

    OAK-B135 A path to sustained stable operation, at plasma pressure up to twice the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) n = 1 free-boundary pressure limit, has been discovered in the DIII-D tokamak. Tuning the correction of the intrinsic magnetic field asymmetries so as to minimize plasma rotation decay during the high beta phase and increasing the angular momentum injection, have allowed maintaining the plasma rotation above that needed for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM). A new method to determine the improved magnetic field correction uses feedback to sense and minimize the resonant plasma response to the non-axisymmetric field. At twice the free-boundary pressure limit, a disruption precursor is observed, which is consistent with having reached the ''ideal wall'' pressure limit predicted by stability calculations.

  6. Bi-material crystalline whispering gallery mode microcavity structure for thermo-opto-mechanical stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itobe, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Mizumoto, Yuta; Kangawa, Hiroi; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated a calcium fluoride (CaF2) whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavity with a computer controlled ultra-precision cutting process. We observed a thermo-opto-mechanical (TOM) oscillation in the CaF2 WGM microcavity, which may influence the stability of the optical output when the cavity is employed for Kerr comb generation. We studied experimentally and numerically the mechanism of the TOM oscillation and showed that it is strongly dependent on cavity diameter. In addition, our numerical study suggests that a microcavity structure fabricated with a hybrid material (i.e. CaF2 and silicon), which is compatible with an ultra-high Q and high thermal conductivity, will allow us to reduce the TOM oscillation and stabilize the optical output.

  7. Effects of Rotor Design Variations on Tiltrotor Whirl-Mode Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultimate tiltrotor performance is constrained by coupled wing/rotor whirl-mode aeroelastic instability. A multifaceted research effort to alleviate those constraints is currently underway at NASA Ames Research Center. Design changes to the XV-15 rotor created large increases in the predicted stability boundary; alternatively, they allowed large increases in pitch-flap coupling (delta-three) for a given stability margin. A wind-tunnel experiment has been proposed to demonstrate the improvements at minimum cost. The design methods are also being applied to the V-22. This report summarizes the results to date for the V-22 and compares them to those for the XV-15. A proposed small-scale wind-tunnel model of the XV-15 proprotor is described.

  8. Stability threshold of ion temperature gradient driven mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S. C.

    2008-12-15

    For the first time in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration, the stability threshold of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) mode is studied by linear gyrokinetic theory. In comparison with tokamaks, the RFP configuration has a shorter connection length and stronger magnetic curvature drift. These effects result in a stronger instability driving mechanism and a larger growth rate in the fluid limit. However, the kinetic theory shows that the temperature slopes required for the excitation of ITG instability are much steeper than the tokamak ones. This is because the effect of Landau damping also becomes stronger due to the shorter connection length, which is dominant and ultimately determines the stability threshold. The required temperature slope for the instability may only be found in the very edge of the plasma and/or near the border of the dominant magnetic island during the quasi-single helicity state of discharge.

  9. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  10. Combustion stabilization, structure, and spreading in a laboratory dual-mode scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micka, Daniel James

    Dual-mode scramjets have the potential to provide efficient, air-breathing propulsion at high flight Mach numbers. Flame stabilization and spreading are a challenge in such engines due to the very high flow velocities. Combustion occurs in a complex regime where both flame properties and auto-ignition reactions are expected to be important. The focus of the current study is to improve the physical understanding of the combustion mechanism and its practical implication in such combustors. Topics of interest are the combustion stabilization locations, the detailed structure of the reaction zone, and the physical mechanisms controlling the heat release distribution. A facility was developed for the experimental investigation of a laboratory dual-mode scramjet combustor at conditions equivalent to flight Mach numbers of 4.3 to 5.5. The combustor contained flush wall fuel injection and a cavity flameholder, which are the basic flow elements in many proposed practical designs. The diagnostics used include high speed movies of the chemiluminescence, wall pressure measurements, and planar laser induced fluorescence of CH, and simultaneous OH/formaldehyde. The study revealed two distinct reaction zone structures that are caused by two flame anchoring locations. Cavity stabilized combustion occurs at low stagnation temperatures. For these conditions the reaction zone is anchored at the cavity leading edge and the flame spreading is controlled by premixed flame propagation. Jet-wake stabilized combustion occurs at high stagnation temperatures. The reaction zone is a lifted jet flame, which has a premixed base and a downstream diffusion flame. In all cases, initial auto-ignition reactions occur well upstream of the primary reaction zone, resulting in an auto-ignition assisted flame base. The results are useful for developing physics based models of the combustion.

  11. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  12. A Renormalisation Group Method. IV. Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series devoted to the development of a rigorous renormalisation group method for lattice field theories involving boson fields, fermion fields, or both. The third paper in the series presents a perturbative analysis of a supersymmetric field theory which represents the continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk on . We now present an analysis of the relevant interaction functional of the supersymmetric field theory, which permits a nonperturbative analysis to be carried out in the critical dimension . The results in this paper include: proof of stability of the interaction, estimates which enable control of Gaussian expectations involving both boson and fermion fields, estimates which bound the errors in the perturbative analysis, and a crucial contraction estimate to handle irrelevant directions in the flow of the renormalisation group. These results are essential for the analysis of the general renormalisation group step in the fifth paper in the series.

  13. Relaxation mode analysis and Markov state relaxation mode analysis for chignolin in aqueous solution near a transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Mitsutake, Ayori; Takano, Hiroshi

    2015-09-28

    It is important to extract reaction coordinates or order parameters from protein simulations in order to investigate the local minimum-energy states and the transitions between them. The most popular method to obtain such data is principal component analysis, which extracts modes of large conformational fluctuations around an average structure. We recently applied relaxation mode analysis for protein systems, which approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times from a simulation and enables investigations of the dynamic properties underlying the structural fluctuations of proteins. In this study, we apply this relaxation mode analysis to extract reaction coordinates for a system in which there are large conformational changes such as those commonly observed in protein folding/unfolding. We performed a 750-ns simulation of chignolin protein near its folding transition temperature and observed many transitions between the most stable, misfolded, intermediate, and unfolded states. We then applied principal component analysis and relaxation mode analysis to the system. In the relaxation mode analysis, we could automatically extract good reaction coordinates. The free-energy surfaces provide a clearer understanding of the transitions not only between local minimum-energy states but also between the folded and unfolded states, even though the simulation involved large conformational changes. Moreover, we propose a new analysis method called Markov state relaxation mode analysis. We applied the new method to states with slow relaxation, which are defined by the free-energy surface obtained in the relaxation mode analysis. Finally, the relaxation times of the states obtained with a simple Markov state model and the proposed Markov state relaxation mode analysis are compared and discussed. PMID:26429000

  14. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  15. Linear Stability Regime Analysis of the Compressible Reacting Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. J.; Reynolds, William C.; Mansour, N. N.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that a compressible reacting mixing layer can develop two peaks in the mean density weighted vorticity profile. Linear stability analyses show that at these peaks two distinct 'outer' instability modes appear in addition to the more common central mode, which exists unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting flows. The present study parametrically analyzes the effects of compressibility, heat release, stoichiometry, and density ratio on the amplification rate and obliquity of each stability mode. The mean profiles used in the spatial stability calculation are generated by self-similar solutions of the compressible boundary layer equations combined with the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry. It is shown that the influence of stoichiometry and density ratio on the peaks of the density weighted vorticity profile determines which modes will dominate. Of particular interest are the conditions where two modes are equally amplified, causing the mixing layer to develop into a 'colayer' structure.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Normal mode analysis and applications in biological physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.

    2010-10-01

    Normal mode analysis has become a popular and often used theoretical tool in the study of functional motions in enzymes, viruses, and large protein assemblies. The use of normal modes in the study of these motions is often extremely fruitful since many of the functional motions of large proteins can be described using just a few normal modes which are intimately related to the overall structure of the protein. In this review, we present a broad overview of several popular methods used in the study of normal modes in biological physics including continuum elastic theory, the elastic network model, and a new all-atom method, recently developed, which is capable of computing a subset of the low frequency vibrational modes exactly. After a review of the various methods, we present several examples of applications of normal modes in the study of functional motions, with an emphasis on viral capsids.

  17. Measured improvement of global magnetohydrodynamic mode stability at high-beta, and in reduced collisionality spherical torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Balbaky, A.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J. E.; Podestà, M.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Global mode stability is studied in high-β National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas to avoid disruptions. Dedicated experiments in NSTX using low frequency active magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy of applied rotating n = 1 magnetic fields revealed key dependencies of stability on plasma parameters. Observations from previous NSTX resistive wall mode (RWM) active control experiments and the wider NSTX disruption database indicated that the highest β{sub N} plasmas were not the least stable. Significantly, here, stability was measured to increase at β{sub N}∕l{sub i} higher than the point where disruptions were found. This favorable behavior is shown to correlate with kinetic stability rotational resonances, and an experimentally determined range of measured E × B frequency with improved stability is identified. Stable plasmas appear to benefit further from reduced collisionality, in agreement with expectation from kinetic RWM stabilization theory, but low collisionality plasmas are also susceptible to sudden instability when kinetic profiles change.

  18. Stability analysis of a polymer coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, A.; Hachem, E.; Demay, Y.; Agassant, J. F.

    2015-05-01

    A new coating process involving a short stretching distance (1 mm) and a high draw ratio (around 200) is considered. The resulting thin molten polymer film (around 10 micrometers) is set down on a solid primary film and then covered by another solid secondary film. In experimental studies, periodical fluctuation in the thickness of the coated layer may be observed. The processing conditions markedly influence the onset and the development of these defects and modeling will help our understanding of their origins. The membrane approach which has been commonly used for cast film modeling is no longer valid and two dimensional time dependent models (within the thickness) are developed in the whole domain (upstream die and stretching path). A boundary-value problem with a free surface for the Stokes equations is considered and stability of the free surface is assessed using two different numerical strategies: a tracking strategy combined with linear stability analysis involving computation of leading eigenvalues, and a Level Set capturing strategy coupled with transient stability analysis.

  19. Structure, Stability and ELM Dynamics of the H-Mode Pedestal in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Leonard, A W; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Thomas, D M; Boedo, J A; Casper, T A; Colchin, R J; Groebner, R J; Groth, M; Kempenaars, M H; Loarte, A; Saibene, G; VanZeeland, M A; Zeng, L; Xu, X Q

    2004-10-13

    Experiments are described that have increased understanding of the transport and stability physics that set the H-mode edge pedestal width and height, determine the onset of Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), and produce the nonlinear dynamics of the ELM perturbation in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL). Predictive models now exist for the n{sub e} pedestal profile and the p{sub e} height at the onset of Type-I ELMs, and progress has been made toward predictive models of the T{sub e} pedestal width and nonlinear ELM evolution. Similarity experiments between DIII-D and JET suggested that neutral penetration physics dominates in the relationship between the width and height of the n{sub e} pedestal while plasma physics dominates in setting the T{sub e} pedestal width. Measured pedestal conditions including edge current at ELM onset agree with intermediate-n peeling-ballooning (P-B) stability predictions. Midplane ELM dynamics data show the predicted (P-B) structure at ELM onset, large rapid variations of the SOL parameters, and fast radial propagation in later phases, similar to features in nonlinear ELM simulations.

  20. Studies of Feedback Stabilization of Axisymmetric Modes in Deformable Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, David John

    A new linear MHD stability code, NOVA-W, is described and applied to the study of the feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric mode in deformable tokamak plasmas. The NOVA-W code is a modification of the non-variational MHD stability code NOVA^1 that includes the effects of resistive passive conductors and active feedback circuits. The vacuum calculation has been reformulated in terms of the perturbed poloidal flux to allow the inclusion of perturbed toroidal currents outside the plasma. The boundary condition at the plasma-vacuum interface relates the instability displacement to the perturbed poloidal flux. This allows a solution of the linear MHD stability equations with the feedback effects included. The code has been tested for the case of passive stabilization against a simplified analytic model and against a different numerical calculation for a realistic tokamak configuration. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the NOVA-W results. The utility and performance of the NOVA-W code are demonstrated for calculations of varying configurations of passive conductors. Active feedback calculations are performed for the CIT tokamak design demonstrating the effect of varying the position of the flux loops which provide the measurements of vertical displacement. The results compare well to those of earlier calculations using a less efficient nonlinear code. The NOVA-W code is used to examine the effects of plasma deformability on feedback stabilization. It is seen that plasmas with shaped cross sections have unstable motion different from a rigid shift. Plasma equilibria with large triangularity show particularly significant deviations from a uniform rigid shift. Furthermore, the placement of passive conductors is shown to modify the non-rigid components of the motion in a way that reduces the stabilizing effects of these conductors. The eigenfunction is also modified under the effects of active feedback. This deformation is seen to depend strongly on the

  1. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability in cyclonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Inigo, Juan; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Cyclonic separators are used in a variety of industries to efficiently separate mixtures of fluid and solid phases by means of centrifugal forces and gravity. In certain circumstances, the vortex core of cyclonic flows is known to precess due to the instability of the flow, which leads to performance reductions. We aim to characterize the unsteadiness using linear stability analysis of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in a global framework. The system of equations, including the turbulence model, is linearised to obtain an eigenvalue problem. Unstable modes corresponding to the dynamics of the large structures of the turbulent flow are extracted. The analysis shows that the most unstable mode is a helical motion which develops around the axis of the flow. This result is in good agreement with LES and experimental analysis, suggesting the validity of the approach. Finally, an adjoint-based sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the regions of the flow that, when altered, have most influence on the frequency and growth-rate of the unstable eigenvalues.

  2. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  3. Stability analysis and trend study of a balloon tethered in a wind, with experimental comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bland, S. R.; Bennett, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A stability analysis and trend study for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. The linearized, stability-derivative type analysis includes balloon aerodynamics, buoyancy, mass (including apparent mass), and static forces resulting from the tether cable. The analysis has been applied to a balloon 7.64 m in length, and the results are compared with those from tow tests of this balloon. This comparison shows that the analysis gives reasonable predictions for the damping, frequencies, modes of motion, and stability boundaries exhibited by the balloon. A trend study for the 7.64-m balloon was made to illustrate how the stability boundaries are affected by changes in individual stability parameters. The trends indicated in this study may also be applicable to many other tethered-balloon systems.

  4. Self-stabilized and dispersion-compensated passively mode-locked Yb:Yttrium aluminum garnet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, A.; Guandalini, A.; Reali, G.

    2005-04-01

    Self-stabilized passive mode-locking of a diode-pumped Yb:yttrium aluminum garnet laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber was achieved using an off-phase-matching second-harmonic crystal. According to the numerical model, such a condition is accomplished by self-defocusing in the nonlinear crystal in the presence of positive intracavity dispersion. Robust mode locking with Fourier-limited 1.0-ps pulses was obtained, whereas mode locking, unassisted by the nonlinear crystal, yielded 2.2-ps pulses, with the laser operating near the edge of the stability region in order to minimize the saturation energy of the semiconductor device.

  5. Edge Stability and Performance of the ELM-Free Quiescent H-Mode and the Quiescent Double Barrier Mode on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    West, W P; Burrell, K H; Casper, T A; . Doyle, E J; Snyder, P B; Gohil, P; Lao, L L; Lasnier, C J; Leonard, A W; Nave, M F; Osborne, T H; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Zeng, L

    2004-12-03

    The quiescent H (QH) mode, an edge localized mode (ELM)-free, high-confinement mode, combines well with an internal transport barrier to form quiescent double barrier (QDB) stationary state, high performance plasmas. The QH-mode edge pedestal pressure is similar to that seen in ELMing phases of the same discharge, with similar global energy confinement. The pedestal density in early ELMing phases of strongly pumped counter injection discharges drops and a transition to QH-mode occurs, leading to lower calculated edge bootstrap current. Plasmas current ramp experiment and ELITE code modeling of edge stability suggest that QH-modes lie near an edge current stability boundary. At high triangularity, QH-mode discharges operate at higher pedestal density and pressure, and have achieved ITER level values of {beta}{sub PED} and {nu}*. The QDB achieves performance of {alpha}{sub N}H{sub 89} {approx} 7 in quasi-stationary conditions for a duration of 10 tE, limited by hardware. Recently we demonstrated stationary state QDB discharges with little change in kinetic and q profiles (q{sub 0} > 1) for 2 s, comparable to ELMing ''hybrid scenarios'', yet without the debilitating effects of ELMs. Plasma profile control tools, including electron cyclotron heating and current drive and neutral beam heating, have been demonstrated to control simultaneously the q profile development, the density peaking, impurity accumulation and plasma beta.

  6. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  7. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  8. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  9. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  10. Complete stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes with lower hybrid current drive on COMPASS-D. RF teams.

    PubMed

    Warrick, C D; Buttery, R J; Cunningham, G; Fielding, S J; Hender, T C; Lloyd, B; Morris, A W; O'Brien, M R; Pinfold, T; Stammers, K; Valovic, M; Walsh, M; Wilson, H R

    2000-07-17

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with modest powers ( approximately 10% of the total power input) has been used for the first time to completely stabilize performance limiting neoclassical tearing modes in many COMPASS-D tokamak discharges. The stabilizing effect in these experiments is consistent with a reduction in the free energy available in the current profile to drive tearing modes (i.e., the stability index, delta(')) resulting from favorable current gradients (from the LHCD driven current) around the rational surface. PMID:10991343