Sample records for model combustion chamber

  1. Combustion chamber for internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isida

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a combustion chamber for an internal combustion engine, comprising: a main combustion chamber hollowed out of the top of a piston; a subsidiary combustion chamber hollowed out of the piston top, the subsidiary combustion chamber communicating with and disposed in side by side relationship to the main combustion chamber; a fuel injection nozzle located generally between the

  2. Combustion chamber for internal combustion engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kawamura

    1988-01-01

    A combustion chamber for internal combustion engines, of the type including means for producing swirl within the combustion chamber is described comprising: a combustion chamber provided in the head portion of a piston in the form of a cavity recessed in the axial direction of the piston; fuel injection nozzle means disposed in the combustion chamber and positioned eccentrically with

  3. Combustion chamber for internal combustion engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Yanagisawa; Y. Sato

    1989-01-01

    A combustion chamber is described for an internal combustion engine, comprising: a main combustion chamber defined by a recess in the top of a piston of the engine, the main combustion chamber being formed with its opening diameter progressively enlarged downwards in the axial direction of the main combustion chamber, and a lip part formed along the periphery of the

  4. MODELING COMBUSTION CHAMBER DYNAMICS OF IMPINGING STREAM VORTEX ENGINES FUELED WITH HYDRAZINE-ALTERNATIVE HYPERGOLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-C. Chen; M. J. Nusca; M. J. McQuaid

    To advance the development of Impinging Stream Vortex Engines (ISVEs) for tactical missile propulsion system applications, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling capability has been developed and employed to simulate the combustion chamber dynamics of various ISVE designs. Simulations of first- generation ISVE configurations fueled with mono- methylhydrazine\\/red fuming nitric acid (MMH\\/RFNA) led to insights that inspired a combustion chamber

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF AN IDEAL REACTOR MODEL IN A SECONDARY COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracer analysis was applied to a secondary combustion chamber of a rotary kiln incinerator simulator to develop a computationally inexpensive networked ideal reactor model and allow for the later incorporation of detailed reaction mechanisms. Tracer data from sulfur dioxide trace...

  6. Engine combustion chamber structure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanaka

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a combustion chamber structure comprising an upper wall surface which is shaped like a pent-roof and into which an intake passage opens, a piston having on a head portion thereof a bulged portion conforming to the upper wall surface in shape, a first bowl portion which is formed substantially at the center of the bulged portion and

  7. Engine combustion chamber structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.

    1988-09-13

    This patent describes a combustion chamber structure comprising an upper wall surface which is shaped like a pent-roof and into which an intake passage opens, a piston having on a head portion thereof a bulged portion conforming to the upper wall surface in shape, a first bowl portion which is formed substantially at the center of the bulged portion and which is substantially semispherical in shape, a pair of second bowl portions which respectively extend on opposite sides of the first bowl portion to the corresponding ends of the bulged portion of the piston along the edge of the bulged portion and are in communication with the first bowl portion, a swirl generating means which is adapted to generate a swirl of intake air in the combustion chamber when the engine load is light, and a spark plug disposed to substantially face the center of the first bowl portion from the upper wall surface; the swirl generating means being adapted to generate the swirl of intake air in a tangential direction in the combustion chamber; and the diameter of the first bowl portion being larger than the width of the second bowl portion.

  8. Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber

    E-print Network

    Nicoud, Franck

    Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber C. Sensiau to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n - formulation for the coupling between acoutics and combustion. The parameters n and are computed from a LES

  9. Internal combustion engine with rotary combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. N. Hansen; P. C. Cross

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine comprising: a block having at least one cylindrical wall surrounding a piston chamber, piston means located in the piston chamber, means operable to reciprocate the piston means in the chamber, head means mounted on the block covering the chamber. The head means having an air and fuel intake passage, an exhaust gas passage,

  10. Internal combustion engine with rotary combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. N. Hansen; P. C. Cross

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine comprising: a block having at least one cylindrical wall surrounding a piston chamber, piston means located in the piston chamber means operable to reciprocate the piston means in the chamber, head means mounted on the block covering the chamber. The head means has an air and fuel intake passage, and exhaust gas passage,

  11. Combustion chamber for an internal-combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ishida

    1987-01-01

    A combustion chamber for an internal-combustion engine is described comprising: a main combustion chamber defined by a first recess in the top surface of the crown of a piston; an auxiliary combustion chamber defined by a second recess in the top surface of the crown of the piston beside the main combustion chamber, the volume of the auxiliary combustion chamber

  12. Internal combustion engine with dual combustion chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simay

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a spark-ignition. The overhead valve type internal combustion engine comprises: a cylinder closed at the top by a semi-spherical cylinder head; a piston reciprocating within the cylinder with the piston; cylinder and cylinder head defining at least one combustion chamber; and wherein the cylinder head includes an intake valve aperture, an exhaust valve aperture, and a spark

  13. Combustion chamber system for kerosine internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Yagi; J. Ootani; M. Araki; F. Yoshida

    1986-01-01

    A combustion chamber system is described for an overhead valve type kerosine internal combustion engine, comprising: a cylinder head; a piston slidable in a cylinder; a main combustion chamber defined by a lower surface of a cylinder head and an upper surface of the piston; an auxiliary combustion chamber defined within the cylinder head and spaced from the main combustion

  14. Internal combustion engine with rotary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.N.; Cross, P.C.

    1986-09-23

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine comprising: a block having at least one cylindrical wall surrounding a piston chamber, piston means located in the piston chamber means operable to reciprocate the piston means in the chamber, head means mounted on the block covering the chamber. The head means has an air and fuel intake passage, and exhaust gas passage, a rotary valve assembly operatively associated with the head means for controlling the flow of air and fuel into the rotary valve assembly and piston chamber and the flow of exhaust gas from rotary valve assembly and the piston chamber. The means has a housing with a bore open to the piston chamber accommodating the rotary valve assembly, the valve assembly comprising a cylindrical sleeve located in the bore, the sleeve having an inner surface, an ignition hole, and intake and exhaust ports aligned with the intake passage and exhaust gas passage, spark generating means mounted on the housing operable to generate a spark. The rotatable valving means is located within the sleeve for controlling the flow of air and fuel into the rotary valve assembly and piston chamber and the flow of exhaust gases out of the rotary valve assembly and piston chamber.

  15. Open-chamber combustion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D. P.; Meyer, R. C.

    1994-04-01

    The test program was undertaken to research trade-offs between engine design and operational parameters on open-chamber, premixed spark-ignited gas engines, with a primary focus on combustion effects. This included combustion chamber designs which are conceptually diametrically opposed -- a high squish design typical of diesel engines and a virtually quiescent design. The reader should note that these data are somewhat abstract compared to conventional engines, because the Labeco test engine has exceptionally high friction and the lean-burn data were run unboosted.

  16. Modeling of Solid Waste Flow and Mixing on the Traveling Grate of a Waste-to- energy Combustion Chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MASATO NAKAMURA; N. J. THEMELIS

    Mixing of the highly non-homogeneous municipal solid wastes (MSW) on the traveling grate of mass-burn combustion chambers assists the combustion process in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. A matrix-based Markov chain model was developed to simulate particle flow and mixing as the solid waste particles travel over a reverse acting Martin grate. The model was used to project the pathway of a

  17. Chamber construction for internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Jr. Leydorf; M. A. Pulick

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of assembling an internal combustion engine, comprising: (a) defining a three piece construction to define the combustion chambers, camshaft case, water jacket, and crankshaft case of the internal combustion engine. The three pieces consist of a cast metal monoblock defining combustion chambers aligned along a central plane. The monoblock contains wear resistant surfaces comprising cylinder bores,

  18. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  19. Modeling of heat conduction within chamber walls for multidimensional internal combustion engine simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Liu; R. D. Reitz

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional (axisymmetric) transient heat conduction in components computer program (HCC) was successfully developed for predicting engine combustion chamber wall temperatures. The alternating direction explicit (ADE) Saul'yev method, an explicit, unconditionally stable finite difference method, was used in the code. Special treatments for the head gasket and the piston-liner air gap, the piston movement, and a grid transformation for describing

  20. Internal combustion engine with two-stage combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sertich

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in an internal combustion engine of the type in which a piston reciprocates within a cylinder toward a top dead center position to compress a charge of fuel within a combustion chamber, within which combustion chamber the charge is ignited by ignition means so as to burn and drive the piston away from the top

  1. A model for predicting spatially and time resolved convective heat transfer in bowl-in-piston combustion chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Morel; R. Keribar

    1985-01-01

    A new model for convective in-cylinder heat transfer has been developed which calculates heat transfer coefficients based on a description of the in-cylinder flow field. The combustion chamber volume is divided into three regions in which differential equations for angular momentum, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation are solved. The resultant heat transfer coefficients are strongly spatially non-uniform, unlike those

  2. Non-grey radiation in a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehtarnavaz, H.; Dang, A. L.; Chiu, H. H.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of radiation on droplets gasification in liquid rocket combustion chambers has been studied. The modeling includes a Legendre pseudo-spectral collocation approximation to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The band model has been utilized to account for non-grey emitting and absorbing gases present in the comustion chamber. The GEMCHIP II code has been utilized to study the fuel and oxidizer droplets combustion and interaction. The submodels within this code are capable of accounting for group combustion and conjugate effects between many droplets. The radiative model has been coupled with the GEMCHIP II code accounting for radial effects only, to provide the tool for studying the combustion-radiation coupling effects in a bipropellant system. The results indicate that the gasification/combustion process will be enhanced upstream of the chamber causing thicker flame sheet and associated higher combustion efficiency.

  3. External combustion engine having a combustion expansion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duva, Anthony W.

    1993-03-01

    This patent application discloses an external combustion engine having a combustion expansion chamber. The engine includes a combustion chamber for generating a high-pressure, energized gas from a monopropellant fuel, and a cylinder for receiving the energized gas through a rotary valve to perform work on a cylinder disposed therein. A baffle plate is positioned between the combustion area and expansion area for reducing the pressure of the gas. The combustion area and expansion area are separated by a baffle plate having a flow area which is sufficiently large to eliminate the transmission of pressure pulsations from the combustion area to the expansion area while being small enough to provide for substantially complete combustion in the combustion area. The engine is particularly well suited for use in a torpedo.

  4. Rocket Combustion Chambers Resist Thermal Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved design concept developed for combustion chambers for rocket engines, described in three reports. Provides compliance allowing unrestrained thermal expansion in circumferential direction. Compliance lengthens life of rocket engine by reducing amount of thermal deformation caused by repeated firings.

  5. Exhaust gas reaction chambers for internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Sakurai; T. Okura; M. Tanaka

    1979-01-01

    An internal-combustion spark-ignition V-8 piston engine has a main exhaust gas reaction chamber positioned between the two banks of cylinders. Each cylinder has a main combustion chamber and an auxiliary combustion chamber connected by a torch nozzle restriction. Valved intake passages supply lean mixture to the main combustion chambers and rich mixture to the auxiliary combustion chamber. Valved exhaust passages

  6. Internal combustion engine squish jet combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a internal combustion engine block having a piston and cylinder head, one of which has: (a) a substantially cylindrical bowl opening into the face thereof; (b) a pair of squish jet passages having respective inlets communicating with the face thereof, and respective, transversely spaced, outlets directed substantially tangentially into the bowl, the outlet of a first one

  7. A model for predicting spatially and time resolved convective heat transfer in bowl-in-piston combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, T.; Keribar, R.

    1985-01-01

    A new model for convective in-cylinder heat transfer has been developed which calculates heat transfer coefficients based on a description of the in-cylinder flow field. The combustion chamber volume is divided into three regions in which differential equations for angular momentum, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation are solved. The resultant heat transfer coefficients are strongly spatially non-uniform, unlike those calculated from standard correlations, which assume spatial uniformity. When spatially averaged, the heat transfer coefficient is much more peaked near TDC of the compression stroke as compared to that predicted by standard correlations. This is due to the model's dependence on gas velocity and turbulence, both of which are amplified near TDC. The new model allows a more accurate calculation of the spatial distribution of the heat fluxes. This capability is essential for calculation of heat transfer and of component thermal loading and temperatures.

  8. Internal combustion engine squish jet combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.

    1986-02-25

    This patent describes a internal combustion engine block having a piston and cylinder head, one of which has: (a) a substantially cylindrical bowl opening into the face thereof; (b) a pair of squish jet passages having respective inlets communicating with the face thereof, and respective, transversely spaced, outlets directed substantially tangentially into the bowl, the outlet of a first one of the pair being directed upwardly, and the outlet of second one of the pair being directed downwardly from a position above the outlet of the first one, so that a counter-rotating, bilevel swirl can be produced in the bowl by the squish jet outlets.

  9. Engine Knock and Combustion Chamber Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, Karl

    1939-01-01

    The present report is confined to the effect of the combustion chamber shape on engine knock from three angles, namely: 1) The uniformity of flame-front movement as affected by chamber design and position of the spark plug; 2) The speed of advance of the flame as affected by turbulence and vibrations; 3) The reaction processes in the residual charge as affected by the walls.

  10. Mathematical modelling of physical and chemical processes of coal combustion in chamber furnaces of boiler aggregates based on the package of applied programs FIRE 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A. V.; Starchenko, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    The furnace processes of the combustion of poly-fraction high-ashes Ekibastuz coal in the furnace chamber of the boiler aggregate PK-39 and of the combustion of highly humid brown Berezov's coal in the furnace of the BKZ-210-140 boiler are investigated by mathematical modeling using the package of applied programs FIRE 3D [1-3]. Results of the numerical modeling of the processes of aerodynamics, heat exchange, and combustion in the furnace volume and their comparison with the results of nature tests are presented.

  11. Combustion chamber floatwall panel attachment arrangement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Griffin

    1984-01-01

    The abstract discloses an attachment arrangement in a combustion chamber of a gas turbine powerplant, having a double wall structure formed by a separate combustor shell and at least one floatwall panel. The arrangement includes a pair of hook-like projections protruding from the panel and through the shell and a pair of thin plates for interengaging the hook-like projections on

  12. Radiation Effects on Flow Characteristics in Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, M. Q.; Gross, Klaus W.

    1989-01-01

    A JANNAF sponsored workshop was held to discuss the importance and role of radiative heat transfer in rocket combustion chambers. The potential impact of radiative transfer on hardware design, reliability, and performance was discussed. The current state of radiative transfer prediction capability in CFD modeling was reviewed and concluded to be substantially lacking in both the physical models used and the radiative property data available. There is a clear need to begin to establish a data base for making radiation calculations in rocket combustion chambers. A natural starting point for this effort would be the NASA thermochemical equilibrium code (CEC).

  13. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall be flushed with a suitable solvent after the stem is pulled...

  14. Internal combustion engine with auxiliary chamber having variable size openings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Yagi; K. Inoue

    1975-01-01

    A three-valve spark-ignition internal combustion piston engine has an auxiliary combustion chamber connected to each main combustion chamber through a torch nozzle. The intake valve for the auxiliary chamber is provided with a skirt for varying the effective size of the torch nozzle under controlled turning movement of the intake valve stem. The effective size of a restricted opening which

  15. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 ...Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been...

  16. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 ...Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been...

  17. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 57.7807 Section 57.7807 ...Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been...

  18. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 ...Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been...

  19. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 ...Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been...

  20. Stability analysis of a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of combustion instability in an annular combustion chamber are investigated. A modified Galerkin method was used to produce a set of modal amplitude equations from the general nonlinear partial differential acoustic wave equation. From these modal amplitude equations, the two variable perturbation method was used to develop a set of approximate equations of a given order of magnitude. These equations were modeled to show the effects of velocity sensitive combustion instabilities by evaluating the effects of certain parameters in the given set of equations. By evaluating these effects, parameters which cause instabilities to occur in the combustion chamber can be ascertained. It is assumed that in the annular combustion chamber, the liquid propellants are injected uniformly across the injector face, the combustion processes are distributed throughout the combustion chamber, and that no time delay occurs in the combustion processes.

  1. Study of vortex core precession in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of swirling flow of lean propane/air flame in a model combustion chamber at atmospheric pressure. To study the unsteady turbulent flow, the particle image velocimetry technique was used. It was concluded that dynamics of high swirl flows with and without combustion was determined by a global helical mode, complying with a precessing double-spiral coherent vortex structure. The studied low swirl flame had similar size and stability characteristics, but amplitude of the coherent helical structure substantially oscillated in time. The oscillations were associated with intermittently appearing central recirculation zone that was absent in the nonreacting flow. It is expected that the low swirl flow without the permanent central recirculation zone should be more sensitive to an external active control. In particular, this result may be useful for suppression of thermoacoustic resonance in combustion chambers.

  2. Study of vortex core precession in combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of swirling flow of lean propane/air flame in a model combustion chamber at atmospheric pressure. To study the unsteady turbulent flow, the particle image velocimetry technique was used. It was concluded that dynamics of high swirl flows with and without combustion was determined by a global helical mode, complying with a precessing double-spiral coherent vortex structure. The studied low swirl flame had similar size and stability characteristics, but amplitude of the coherent helical structure substantially oscillated in time. The oscillations were associated with intermittently appearing central recirculation zone that was absent in the nonreacting flow. It is expected that the low swirl flow without the permanent central recirculation zone should be more sensitive to an external active control. In particular, this result may be useful for suppression of thermoacoustic resonance in combustion chambers.

  3. Fast-burn combustion chamber design for natural gas engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Evans; J. Blaszczyk

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this paper compares the performance and emissions of the UBC Squish-Jet fast-burn combustion chamber with a baseline bowl-in-piston (BIP) chamber. It was found that the increased turbulence generated in the fastburn combustion chambers resulted in 5 to 10% faster burning of the air-fuel mixture compared to a conventional BIP chamber. The faster burning was particularly noticeable

  4. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  5. Combustion chamber struts can be effectively transpiration cooled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. H.

    1966-01-01

    Vapor-deposited sintering technique increases the feasible temperature range of transpiration-cooled structural members in combustion chambers. This technique produces a porous mass of refractory metal wires around a combustion chamber structural member. This mass acts as a transpiration-cooled surface for a thick-walled tube.

  6. Wave instabilities in combustion and thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, W. S.; Chung, T. J.

    1990-06-01

    A new theory and computations for combustion instability analysis are presented. The basic theoretical foundation stems from the concept of entropy-controlled energy growth or decay. Third order perturbation expansion is performed on the entropy-controlled acoustic energy equation to obtain the stability integrodifferential equation for the energy growth factor in terms of the linear, second, and third order energy growth rate parameters. These parameters are calculated from Navier-Stokes solutions with space and time averages performed on as many Navier-Stokes time steps as required to cover at least one peak wave period. Applications are made for one-dimensional Navier-Stokes solution for the Space Shuttle main engine thrust chamber, with cross section area variations taken into account.

  7. NASA Teams With Army in Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photograph depicts one of over thirty tests conducted on the Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) test stand 115, a joint effort between NASA's MSFC and the U.S. Army AMCOM of Redstone Arsenal. The engine tests were conducted to evaluate an irnovative, 'self-cooled', vortex combustion chamber, which relies on tangentially injected propellants from the chamber wall producing centrifugal forces that keep the relatively cold liquid propellants near the wall.

  8. A new combustion chamber for fast-burn applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.; Cameron, C.

    1986-01-01

    A new combustion chamber design is proposed in which it is possible to control the scale and intensity of turbulence generated just prior to ignition. A single cylinder engine has been fitted with the new chamber, and measurements of the turbulence field with a hot-wire anemometer are presented. The chamber design has been compared to a conventional bowl-in-piston design under both motoring and fired operation. Hot-wire measurements showed an increase in turbulence intensity of 50% and a reduction in the length scale of turbulence compared to the conventional chamber. Cylinder pressure measurements indicated that the mass-burn rate is increased with the new chamber, particularly during the early stage of combustion. During operation at 1140 rpm with the new chamber, peak cylinder pressure was 4% higher and occurred 3/sup 0/ earlier than for the conventional chamber.

  9. Fabrication of Composite Combustion Chamber/Nozzle for Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawerence, T.; Beshears, R.; Burlingame, S.; Peters, W.; Prince, M.; Suits, M.; Tillery, S.; Burns, L.; Kovach, M.; Roberts, K.; Clinton, R. G., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center for the X-34 vehicle began as a low cost engine development program for a small booster system. One of the key components to reducing the engine cost was the development of an inexpensive combustion chamber/nozzle. Fabrication of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and nozzle was considered too expensive and time consuming. In looking for an alternate design concept, the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Project provided an extensive background with ablative composite materials in a combustion environment. An integral combustion chamber/nozzle was designed and fabricated with a silica/phenolic ablative liner and a carbon/epoxy structural overwrap. This paper describes the fabrication process and developmental hurdles overcome for the Fastrac engine one-piece composite combustion chamber/nozzle.

  10. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  11. A new combustion chamber for fast-burn applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Evans; C. Cameron

    1986-01-01

    A new combustion chamber design is proposed in which it is possible to control the scale and intensity of turbulence generated just prior to ignition. A single cylinder engine has been fitted with the new chamber, and measurements of the turbulence field with a hot-wire anemometer are presented. The chamber design has been compared to a conventional bowl-in-piston design under

  12. Combustion Chamber/Nozzle Assembly and Fabrication Process Therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An integral lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly for a rocket engine has a refractory metal shell defining a chamber of generally frusto-conical contour. The shell communicates at its larger end with a rocket body, and terminates at its smaller end in a tube of generally cylindrical contour, which is open at its terminus and which serves as a nozzle for the rocket engine. The entire inner surface of the refractory metal shell has a thermal and oxidation barrier layer applied thereto. An ablative silica phenolic insert is bonded to the exposed surface of the thermal and oxidation barrier layer. The ablative phenolic insert provides a chosen inner contour for the combustion chamber and has a taper toward the open terminus of the nozzle. A process for fabricating the integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly is simple and efficient, and results in economy in respect of both resources and time.

  13. Fabrication process for combustion chamber/nozzle assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly for a rocket engine has a refractory metal shell defining a chamber of generally frusto-conical contour. The shell communicates at its smaller end with a rocket body, and terminates at its larger end in a generally contact contour, which is open at its terminus and which serves as a nozzle for the rocket engine. The entire inner surface of the refractory metal shell has a thermal and oxidation barrier layer applied thereto. An ablative silica phenolic insert is bonded to the exposed surface of the thermal and oxidation barrier layer. The ablative phenolic insert provides a chosen inner contour for the combustion chamber and has a taper toward the open terminus of the nozzle. A process for fabricating the integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly is simple and efficient, and results in economy in respect of both resources and time.

  14. Rocket combustion chamber life-enhancing design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA continues to pursue technologies which can lead to an increase in life and reduce the costs of fabrication of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The joint NASA/Air Force Advanced Launch System Program has set its prime objectives to be high reliability and low cost for their new advanced booster engine. In order to meet these objectives, NASA will utilize the results of several ongoing programs to provide the required technologies. An overview is presented of those programs which address life enhancing design concepts for the combustion chamber. Seven different design concepts, which reduce the thermal strain and/or increase the material strength of the combustion chamber liner wall are discussed. Subscale rocket test results are presented, where available, for life enhancing design concepts. Two techniques for reducing chamber fabrication costs are discussed, as well as issues relating to hydrocarbon fuels/combustion chamber liner materials compatibility.

  15. Hot fire fatigue testing results for the compliant combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, Albert J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen subscale rocket combustion chamber was designed incorporating an advanced design concept to reduce strain and increase life. The design permits unrestrained thermal expansion of a circumferential direction and, thereby, provides structural compliance during the thermal cycling of hot-fire testing. The chamber was built and test fired at a chamber pressure of 4137 kN/sq m (600 psia) and a hydrogen-oxygen mixture ratio of 6.0. Compared with a conventional milled-channel configuration, the new structurally compliant chamber had a 134 or 287 percent increase in fatigue life, depending on the life predicted for the conventional configuration.

  16. Fast-burn combustion chamber design for natural gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.; Blaszczyk, J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this paper compares the performance and emissions of the UBC Squish-Jet fast-burn combustion chamber with a baseline bowl-in-piston (BIP) chamber. It was found that the increased turbulence generated in the fastburn combustion chambers resulted in 5 to 10% faster burning of the air-fuel mixture compared to a conventional BIP chamber. The faster burning was particularly noticeable when operating with lean air-fuel mixtures. The study was conducted at a 1.7 mm clearance height and 10.2:1 compression ratio. Measurements were made over a range of air-fuel ratios from stoichiometric to the lean limit. At each operating point all engine performance parameters, and emissions of nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were recorded. At selected operating points a record of cylinder pressure was obtained and analyzed off-line to determine mass-burn rate in the combustion chamber. Two piston designs were tested at wide-open throttle conditions and 2000 rpm to determine the influence of piston geometry on the performance and emissions parameters. The UBC squish-jet combustion chamber design demonstrates significantly better performance parameters and lower emission levels than the conventional BIP design. Mass-burn fraction calculations showed a significant reduction in the time to burn the first 10% of the charge, which takes approximately half of the time to burn from 10 to 90% of the charge.

  17. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  18. Combustion Chamber Design for a Lean-Burn SI Engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Evans

    1992-01-01

    A combustion chamber designed to increase the burning rate of lean\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009air-fuel mixtures is described. The chamber utilizes squish motion\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009to generate a series of jets which significantly increase the turbulence\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009levels in the chamber during the early phase of combustion. The fuel\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009economy and exhaust emissions resulting from the new chamber design\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009are compared to a conventional bowl-in- piston

  19. Corrosion fatigue causes failure of gas turbine combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Elshawesh, F.; Elhoud, A.; Elmendelsi, T. [Petroleum Research Center, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Elwaer, A. [General Electricity Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Planning and Project Dept.

    1997-07-01

    Plates in the combustion chamber case of a gas turbine made of welded alloy 617 (UNS NO6617) and alloy Nimonic 75 (UNS N06075) failed by complete circumferential fracturing at the matrix-welding interface in the UNS N06075 plate. Fatigue cracks were first initiated at the outer subsurface within the intergranularly cracked coarse grains adjacent to the weld and then propagated because of combustion vibration during start-up operation conditions.

  20. EMISSIONS OF TRACE PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION FROM A PILOT-SCALE INCINERATOR SECONDARY COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed on a 73 kW rotary kiln incinerator simulator equipped with a 73 kW secondary combustion chamber (SCC) to examine emissions of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) resulting from incineration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and dichlorometh...

  1. Study of combustion in a divided chamber turbocharged diesel engine by experimental heat release analysis in its chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. D. Rakopoulos; K. A. Antonopoulos; D. C. Rakopoulos; E. G. Giakoumis

    2006-01-01

    A heat release analysis of experimental pressure diagrams, appropriate for divided chamber diesel engines, is developed and used to obtain heat release rate profiles during the combustion process in each of the two combustion chambers. Attention is paid to the correct processing of the data, due to the inherent complexity of the mass interchange between the two chambers. The analysis

  2. Optical Power Source Derived from Engine Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical power source is disclosed that collects the spectra of the light emissions created in a combustion chamber to provide its optical output signals that serve the needs of optical networks. The light spectra is collected by a collection ring serving as an optical waveguide.

  3. Combustion interaction with radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Jassowski, D. M.; Barlow, R.; Lucht, R.; Mccarty, K.

    1990-01-01

    Over 15 hours of thruster operation at temperatures between 1916 and 2246 C without failure or erosion has been demonstrated using iridium-coated rhenium chamber materials with nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine propellants operating over a mixture ratio range of 1.60-2.05. Research is now under way to provide a basic understanding of the mechanisms which make high-temperature operation possible and to extend the capability to a wider range of conditions, including other propellant combinations and chamber materials. Techniques have been demonstrated for studying surface fracture phenomena. These include surface Raman and Auger for study of oxide formation, surface Raman and X-ray diffraction to determine the oxide phase, Auger to study oxide stoichiometry, and sputter Auger to study interdiffusion of alloy species.

  4. Adherent Thermal Barrier For Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    In improved method, fabrication begins with machining of aluminum mandrel to requisite cylindrical shape. Heat-barrier coating - yttria-stablized zirconia - plasma-sprayed on mandrel to thickness of 0.076 mm. Nickel/chromium layer about 0.025 mm thick sprayed on zirconia. Thin zirconia coating reduces maximum operating temperature of copper wall of chamber from 844 to 334 K. At lower temperature, copper liner stronger and undergoes less strain and less tendency to distort and crack.

  5. Woodstove for heated air forced into a secondary combustion chamber and method of operating same

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.E.; Spolek, G.A.; Wasser, J.H.; Butts, N.L.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a woodstove comprising a primary combustion chamber for receiving a load of wood fuel, a secondary combustion chamber in fluid flow relation with the primary chamber, fan means for forcing air from outside the woodstove into the secondary chamber, the air from outside the woodstove forced into the secondary chamber being heated prior to entering the secondary chamber, and means for controlling the fan means in response to the temperature of gases in the secondary chamber.

  6. Numerical simulations of industrial-scale combustion chamber - LES versus RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Jasi?ski, Daniel; Bajer, Konrad

    2011-12-01

    In this work we focus on the simulation of the process of biomass syngas combustion in the industrial combustion chamber directly linked with gasification chamber, where this gas is continuously producing from the biomass. Conflicting demands from the engineers to have rapid results and hints how to ensure the best conditions for combustion of this particular fuel and to lower the emission of pollutants, with simultaneously deep view inside the process and its stability motivates us to use both the RANS and LES techniques of turbulence modelling, compare it and take their advantages. We designed and performed series of 3D numerical simulations of both cold flow and combustion in complex geometry of industrial burner. It seems to us that the proper approach for modelling of biomass syngas combustion is steady flamelets model. Simulations performed with RANS closure are used as the initialisation of LES models, but their main goal is to predict the long-time oscillation of pressure and temperature observed in the working combustion chamber. On the other hand the main goal of the simulations with LES closure is to predict the proper level of short-time behaviour of the flame and local phenomena.

  7. Launch Vehicle with Combustible Polyethylene Case Gasification Chamber Design Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemets, V.

    A single-stage launch vehicle equipped with a combustible tank shell of polyethylene and a moving propulsion plant is proposed. The propulsion plant is composed of a chamber for the gasification of the shell, a compressor of pyrolysed polyethylene and a magnetic powder obturator. It is shown that the “dental” structure of the gasification chamber is necessary to achieve the necessary contact area with the polyethylene shell. This conclusion is drawn from consideration of the thermo- physical properties of polyethylene, calculating quasisteady temperature field in the gasification chamber, estimating gasification rate of polyethylene, launch vehicle shortening rate and area of gasification. Experimental determination of the gasification rate is described. The gasification chamber specific mass as well as the propulsion plant weight-to-thrust ratio are estimated under some assumptions concerning the obturator and compressor. Combustible launch vehicles are compared with conventional launch vehicles taking into consideration their payload mass ratios. Combustible launchers are preferable as small launchers for micro and nano satellites. Reusable versions of such launchers seem suitable if polyethylene tank shells filled with metal or metal hydride fine dusts are used.

  8. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

  9. Heat transfer in rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Cheng, G.; Farmer, R.

    1993-11-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis was used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and film coolant flows. These components were analyzed, and the analyses verified when appropriate test data were available. The component analyses are being synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, the FDNS code, was used to make the analyses. Particular attention was given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and are being used to describe the flame structure near the injector faceplate.

  10. Toward the Impact of Fuel Evaporation-Combustion Interaction on Spray Combustion in Gas Turbine Combustion Chambers. Part I: Effect of Partial Fuel Vaporization on Spray Combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amsini Sadiki; W. Ahmadi; Mouldi Chrigui; J. Janicka

    \\u000a This work aims at investigating the impact of the interaction between evaporation process and combustion on spray combustion\\u000a characteristics in gas turbine combustion chambers. It is subdivided into two parts. The first part studies how the evaporation\\u000a process affects the behavior of partially pre-vaporized spray combustion. The second part attempts to answer the question\\u000a how the fuel evaporation process behaves

  11. Numerical simulations of industrial-scale combustion chamber - LES versus RANS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamil Kwiatkowski; Daniel Jasi?ski; Konrad Bajer

    2011-01-01

    In this work we focus on the simulation of the process of biomass syngas combustion in the industrial combustion chamber directly linked with gasification chamber, where this gas is continuously producing from the biomass.Conflicting demands from the engineers to have rapid results and hints how to ensure the best conditions for combustion of this particular fuel and to lower the

  12. Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*

    E-print Network

    Yang, Vigor

    1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A) #12;2 COMBUSTION IN MESO-SCALE VORTEX CHAMBERS Ming-hsun Wu, Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A with the chemical energy varying from 25 to 174W. For the largest combustion volume, hydrogen and hydrocarbons

  13. Structural analysis of thermal fatigue failures on rocket combustion chambers by the finite element method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomoyuki Hashimoto

    1991-01-01

    Accurately estimating the thermal stress and strain levels in rocket combustion chambers is an important factor for increasing their safety and reliability. At the NAL, two thermal fatigue failures have occurred in water cooled combustion chambers. This paper examines the cause of the failures and chamber deformations using an inelastic structural analysis incorporating the Finite Element Method (FEM). Both the

  14. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber are considered. A formal framework is provided within which practical problems can be treated with a minimum of effort and expense. The general conservation equations were expanded in two small parameters, one characterizing the mean flow field and one measuring the amplitude of oscillations, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation. The unsteady pressure and velocity fields were expressed as syntheses of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes. This procedure yielded a representation of a general unsteady field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators. The system of nonlinear equations was treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. The analysis is applicable to any combustion chamber. The most interesting applications are probably to solid rockets, liquid rockets, or thrust augmentors on jet engines.

  15. Combustion Modeling in Internal Combustion Engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FRANK J. ZELEZNIK

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to

  16. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  17. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.

    1999-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to stabilize the combustion of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. The first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion due ineffective acoustic cavity designs. The thrust chamber exhibited unstable combustion in the first-tangential mode and its harmonics. Combustion was stabilized by increasing the volume of the acoustic cavities and by plugging the dump-cooling orifices so that the cavities were uncooled. Although the first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion, prior and subsequent long-duration performance tests of the Fastrac thrust chamber were spontaneously stable. Stability considerations during the injector faceplate design were based on the Hewitt correlation.

  18. Comparison of LES, RANS and experiments in an aeronautical gas turbine combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Boudier; L. Y. M. Gicquel; T. Poinsot; D. Bissières; C. Bérat

    2007-01-01

    Although Large Eddy Simulations (LES) have demonstrated their potential in simple academic combustion chambers, their application to real gas turbine chambers requires specific developments and validations. In this study, three specific aspects of such chambers are discussed: multiple inlets, multi-perforated plates and film cooling. LES are used in an industry-like chamber and results are compared with predictions provided by Reynolds

  19. Mechanisms of coke formation in gas turbine combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Brandauer, M.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen

    1996-04-01

    New gas turbine combustor designs are developed to reduce pollutant and NO{sub x} emissions. In these new combustors, the formation of carbonaceous deposits, especially in prevaporizers, affects the reliability and effectiveness of operation. To avoid deposits, a detailed knowledge of the origins and mechanisms of formation is required. To obtain a deeper insight, the phenomena were studied systematically. The deposits under consideration show differing characteristics suggesting more than one formation mechanism in the combustor. Consequently, the primary goal was to identify the formation mechanisms and, subsequently, to simulate the mechanisms under well-defined conditions in bench tests for determining the relevant parameters of deposit build-up. The mechanisms of formation were identified based on the properties of the deposits in the combustion chamber. In order to characterize the deposits, physical and chemical analysis techniques were utilized. In summary, tests and numerical predictions identified two major paths of formation: a deposit build-up resulting from flame products such as soot or coked droplets and a deposit build-up resulting from liquid fuel impinging the wall accompanied with chemical reactions at the wall. The deposits caused by fuel droplet impingement were intensively studied in bench tests. In analyzing the processes, the influence of wall temperature, fuel composition, and the oxygen content in the environment is shown in detail. In addition, the importance of thermal instabilities of the fuel, previously studied under fuel supply system conditions, is demonstrated for a deposit formation inside a combustion chamber.

  20. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  1. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  2. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  3. NiAl-based approach for rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Gayda, John (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layered component, such as a rocket engine combustion chamber, includes NiAl or NiAl-based alloy as a structural layer on the hot side of the component. A second structural layer is formed of material selected from Ni-based superalloys, Co-based alloys, Fe-based alloys, Cu, and Cu-based alloys. The second material is more ductile than the NiAl and imparts increased toughness to the component. The second material is selected to enhance one or more predetermined physical properties of the component. Additional structural layers may be included with the additional material(s) being selected for their impact on physical properties of the component.

  4. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  5. Evaluation of the Migrating Combustion Chamber (MCC) engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. M.; Morar, Dorin

    1993-01-01

    The Belvoir Research, Development and Engineering Center (BRDEC) tested three Migrating Combustion Chamber (MCC) engines built by Engine Research Associates (ERA) for Natick RD and E Center. The MCC concept attempts to provide a lightweight, quiet engine having a cool exhaust gas stream. The cool exhaust is attained by capturing additional energy from expansion beyond that achievable in conventional engines by the use of gas porting to multiple expansion chambers; this provides a more efficient engine operation than is otherwise attainable for the configuration. The testing included determining the engine torque-speed-power characteristics and the Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) under a variety of load conditions. Startability and operability were concerns; starting under normal ambient conditions was difficult. All testing was performed using a 10:1 fuel/oil mixture of low lead gasoline with AMZOIL synthetic lubricating oil for two-stroke engines. The maximum power achieved was 0.25 horsepower at 4,400 rpm. The peak torque observed was 69 oz.-in. at 3,200 rpm. It was not possible to make noise and vibration measurements during the testing cycle, but they appeared to be low. The MCC engines tested had relatively short lives, operating for less than 25 hours. Performance and durability improvements are necessary before this MCC design can be considered as a viable alternative to commercially available two-cycle engines.

  6. Modifications of a Composite-Material Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.

    2005-01-01

    Two short reports discuss modifications of a small, lightweight combustion chamber that comprises a carbon/carbon composite outer shell and an iridium/ rhenium inner liner. The first report discusses chamber design modifications made as results of hot-fire tests and post-test characterization. The Books & Reports 32 NASA Tech Briefs, June 2005 modifications were intended to serve a variety of purposes, including improving fabrication, reducing thermal-expansion mismatch stresses, increasing strength-to-weight ratios of some components, and improving cooling of some components. The second report discusses (1) the origin of stress in the mismatch between the thermal expansions of the Ir/Re liner and a niobium sleeve and flange attached to the carbon/ carbon shell and (2) a modification intended to relieve the stress. The modification involves the redesign of an inlet connection to incorporate a compressible seal between the Ir/Re liner and the Nb flange. A nickel alloy was selected as the seal material on the basis of its thermal-expansion properties and its ability to withstand the anticipated stresses, including the greatest stresses caused by the high temperatures to be used in brazing during fabrication.

  7. Prevention of Over-Pressurization During Combustion in a Sealed Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Niehaus, Justin E.; Olson, Sandra L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Johnston, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of flammable material in a sealed chamber invariably leads to an initial pressure rise in the volume. The pressure rise is due to the increase in the total number of gaseous moles (condensed fuel plus chamber oxygen combining to form gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor) and, most importantly, the temperature rise of the gas in the chamber. Though the rise in temperature and pressure would reduce with time after flame extinguishment due to the absorption of heat by the walls and contents of the sealed spacecraft, the initial pressure rise from a fire, if large enough, could lead to a vehicle over-pressure and the release of gas through the pressure relief valve. This paper presents a simple lumped-parameter model of the pressure rise in a sealed chamber resulting from the heat release during combustion. The transient model considers the increase in gaseous moles due to combustion, and heat transfer to the chamber walls by convection and radiation and to the fuel-sample holder by conduction, as a function of the burning rate of the material. The results of the model are compared to the pressure rise in an experimental chamber during flame spread tests as well as to the pressure falloff after flame extinguishment. The experiments involve flame spread over thin solid fuel samples. Estimates of the heat release rate profiles for input to the model come from the assumed stoichiometric burning of the fuel along with the observed flame spread behavior. The sensitivity of the model to predict maximum chamber pressure is determined with respect to the uncertainties in input parameters. Model predictions are also presented for the pressure profile anticipated in the Fire Safety-1 experiment, a material flammability and fire safety experiment proposed for the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). Computations are done for a range of scenarios including various initial pressures and sample sizes. Based on these results, various mitigation approaches are suggested to prevent vehicle over-pressurization and help guide the definition of the space experiment.

  8. CFD Analysis of Spray Combustion and Radiation in OMV Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE), developed by TRW, for the Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propellants are pressure fed into the combustion chamber through a single pintle injection element. The performance of this engine is dependent on the pintle geometry and a number of complex physical phenomena and their mutual interactions. The most important among these are (1) atomization of the liquid jets into fine droplets; (2) the motion of these droplets in the gas field; (3) vaporization of the droplets (4) turbulent mixing of the fuel and oxidizer; and (5) hypergolic reaction between MMH and NTO. Each of the above phenomena by itself poses a considerable challenge to the technical community. In a reactive flow field of the kind occurring inside the VTE, the mutual interactions between these physical processes tend to further complicate the analysis. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive mathematical modeling methodology to analyze the flow field within the VTE. Using this model, the effect of flow parameters on various physical processes such as atomization, spray dynamics, combustion, and radiation is studied. This information can then be used to optimize design parameters and thus improve the performance of the engine. The REFLEQS CFD Code is used for solving the fluid dynamic equations. The spray dynamics is modeled using the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The discrete ordinate method with 12 ordinate directions is used to predict the radiative heat transfer in the OMV combustion chamber, nozzle, and the heat shield. The hypergolic reaction between MMH and NTO is predicted using an equilibrium chemistry model with 13 species. The results indicate that mixing and combustion is very sensitive to the droplet size. Smaller droplets evaporate faster than bigger droplets, leading to a well mixed zone in the combustion chamber. The radiative heat flux at combustion chamber and nozzle walls are an order of negligible less than the conductive heat flux. Simulations performed with the heat shield show that a negligible amount of fluid is entrained into the heat shield region. However, the heat shield is shown to be effective in protecting the OMV structure surrounding the engine from the radiated heat.

  9. A numerical and experimental study of the squish-jet combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Lappas; R L Evans

    2006-01-01

    The fluid flow characteristics near top dead centre (TDC) were numerically simulated for three different combustion chambers designed to generate squish flow and enhance turbulence generation in spark ignition engines. One of the combustion chambers was a plain bowl-in-piston type while the remaining two were different configurations of the squish-jet chamber, which has a unique geometry for forming jets that

  10. Elimination of Intermediate-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the combustion performance of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. The thrust chamber exhibited benign, yet marginally unstable combustion. The marginally unstable combustion was characterized by chamber pressure oscillations with large amplitudes and a frequency that was too low to be identified as acoustic or high-frequency combustion instability and too high to be identified as chug or low-frequency combustion instability. The source of the buzz or intermediate-frequency combustion instability was traced to the fuel venturi whose violently noisy cavitation caused resonance in the feedline downstream. Combustion was stabilized by increasing the throat diameter of the fuel venturi such that the cavitation would occur more quietly.

  11. Thermodynamics and combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Modeling fluid phase phenomena blends the conservation equations of continuum mechanics with the property equations of thermodynamics. The thermodynamic contribution becomes especially important when the phenomena involve chemical reactions as they do in combustion systems. The successful study of combustion processes requires (1) the availability of accurate thermodynamic properties for both the reactants and the products of reaction and (2) the computational capabilities to use the properties. A discussion is given of some aspects of the problem of estimating accurate thermodynamic properties both for reactants and products of reaction. Also, some examples of the use of thermodynamic properties for modeling chemically reacting systems are presented. These examples include one-dimensional flow systems and the internal combustion engine.

  12. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  13. Trapped Vortex Combustion Chamber: Design and Experimental Investigations Using Hydrogen as Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, D. B.; Channiwala, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The design of trapped vortex combustion chamber was undertaken as a part of ongoing research on micro combustion chamber using hydrogen as fuel. The reacting experimental studies were then carried out on the designed chamber. The fuel was injected directly into the cavity. The combustion was first initiated in the cavity with 3 % of the main flow air supplied in reverse direction to the fuel flow. The combustion in cavity was of rich type. Temperature levels in the range of 900 K were encountered in the cavity. Thereafter, diffusion combustion was initiated using the flame generated in the cavity. The temperature levels in this stage were in the range of 1,800 K. The overall pressure drop for a trapped vortex combustor was less than 5 % at all operating parameters.

  14. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Combustion Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a modular, multi-user, two-rack facility dedicated to combustion and fluids science in the US Laboratory Destiny on the International Space Station. FCF is a permanent facility that is capable of accommodating up to ten combustion and fluid science investigations per year. FCF research in combustion and fluid science supports NASA's Exploration of Space Initiative for on-orbit fire suppression, fire safety, and space system fluids management. The Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) is one of two racks in the FCF. The CIR major structural elements include the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR), Experiment Assembly (optics bench and combustion chamber), Air Thermal Control Unit (ATCU), Rack Door, and Lower Structure Assembly (Input/Output Processor and Electrical Power Control Unit). The load path through the rack structure is outlined. The CIR modal survey was conducted to validate the load path predicted by the CIR finite element model (FEM). The modal survey is done by experimentally measuring the CIR frequencies and mode shapes. The CIR model was test correlated by updating the model to represent the test mode shapes. The correlated CIR model delivery is required by NASA JSC at Launch-10.5 months. The test correlated CIR flight FEM is analytically integrated into the Shuttle for a coupled loads analysis of the launch configuration. The analysis frequency range of interest is 0-50 Hz. A coupled loads analysis is the analytical integration of the Shuttle with its cargo element, the Mini Payload Logistics Module (MPLM), in the Shuttle cargo bay. For each Shuttle launch configuration, a verification coupled loads analysis is performed to determine the loads in the cargo bay as part of the structural certification process.

  15. Infrared thermographic image processing for the operation and control of heterogeneous combustion chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Manca; M. Rovaglio

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of temperature in a combustion chamber, using conventional devices such as thermocouples, can be misleading. An infrared thermographic camera can achieve a non-intrusive measure. Having acquired a still image of, for example, a klin, it can be used to produce a map of the effective temperature of the waste bed, walls, and combustion gases. This paper describes a

  16. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  17. Numerical simulation and investigation of working process features in high-duty combustion chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. P. Kalmykov; A. A. Larionov; D. A. Sidlerov; L. A. Yanchilin

    2008-01-01

    Basic concepts of a numerical simulation method of two-phase turbulent flows with combustion are stated. Results of computations\\u000a in gas generators and combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines operating on oxygen and methane are presented.\\u000a Features of the processes of evaporation, mixture, flow, and combustion of the propellant within chambers with tree types\\u000a of injectors, i.e., coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant

  18. An Extended Combustion Model for the Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Andres-Mih?il?, Mihai; Matei, Pericle Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    The paper consists in modelling and simulation of the combustion in a turbojet engine in order to find optimal characteristics of the burning process and the optimal shape of combustion chambers. The main focus of this paper is to find a new configuration of the aircraft engine combustion chambers, namely an engine with two main combustion chambers, one on the same position like in classical configuration, between compressor and turbine and the other, placed behind the turbine but not performing the role of the afterburning. This constructive solution could allow a lower engine rotational speed, a lower temperature in front of the first stage of the turbine and the possibility to increase the turbine pressure ratio by extracting the flow stream after turbine in the inner nozzle. Also, a higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines could be obtained.

  19. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used to scope the overall problem and provide input to further studies using fluid dynamics and other more sophisticated tools.

  20. Structurally-compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental/analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, R. S.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Galford, G. R.; Arya, V. K.

    1993-01-01

    A new, structurally-compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested, and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase in life over that of rectangular channel designs, the current state-of-the-art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gives rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal/durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives have corroborated the experimental observations.

  1. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Schock

    1984-01-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle

  2. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed.

  3. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed.

  4. Status on the Verification of Combustion Stability for the J-2X Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hinerman, Tim; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Hulka, Jim; Barnett, Greg; Dodd, Fred; Martin, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Development is underway of the J -2X engine, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for use on the Space Launch System. The Engine E10001 began hot fire testing in June 2011 and testing will continue with subsequent engines. The J -2X engine main combustion chamber contains both acoustic cavities and baffles. These stability aids are intended to dampen the acoustics in the main combustion chamber. Verification of the engine thrust chamber stability is determined primarily by examining experimental data using a dynamic stability rating technique; however, additional requirements were included to guard against any spontaneous instability or rough combustion. Startup and shutdown chug oscillations are also characterized for this engine. This paper details the stability requirements and verification including low and high frequency dynamics, a discussion on sensor selection and sensor port dynamics, and the process developed to assess combustion stability. A status on the stability results is also provided and discussed.

  5. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners while maintaining the superior CuCrNb properties are also presented.

  6. Liquid oxygen/hydrogen testing of a single swirl coaxial injector element in a windowed combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Makel, D.

    1993-06-01

    A modular, high pressure, liquid rocket single element combustion chamber was developed at Aerojet for use with nonintrusive combustion diagnostics. The hardware is able to accommodate full-size injection elements and includes a recessed annular injector around the single element to provide a source for hot gas background flow, which reduces recirculation in the chamber and provides additional injection mass to elevate chamber pressure. Experiments are being conducted to develop the diagnostics required to characterize a single-element combustion spray field for combustion modeling, benchmark data for CFD model validation, and development of the transfer functions between single element cold flow and multielement hot fire. The latter task is being pursued using an injector element identical to elements that had been previously cold-flow tested in single element tests to ambient backpressure and hot fire tested in a multielement injector. Preliminary tests conducted to date without hydrogen flowing through the annular coaxial orifice of the single element show the general flow characteristics of a reacting, unconfined, liquid oxygen hollow cone swirl spray.

  7. Comparative evaluation of gas-turbine engine combustion chamber starting and stalling characteristics for mechanical and air-injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyatlov, I. N.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of propellant atomization with and without air injection in the combustion chamber nozzle of a gas turbine engine is studied. Test show that the startup and burning performance of these combustion chambers can be improved by using an injection during the mechanical propellant atomization process. It is shown that the operational range of combustion chambers can be extended to poorer propellant mixtures by combined air injection mechanical atomization of the propellant.

  8. Study on Combustion Chamber Geometry Effects in an HCCI Engine using High-Speed Cycle-Resolved Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Vressner; Anders Hultqvist; Bengt Johansson

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to see how geometry generated turbulence affects the Rate of Heat Release (ROHR) in an HCCI engine. HCCI combustion is limited in load due to high peak pressures and too fast combustion. If the speed of combustion can be decreased the load range can be extended. Therefore two different combustion chamber geometries were investigated,

  9. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-24999

  10. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-24999

  11. Novel application of a combustion chamber for experimental assessment of biomass burning emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusini, Ilaria; Pallozzi, E.; Corona, P.; Ciccioli, P.; Calfapietra, C.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass burning is an important ecological factor in the Mediterranean ecosystem and a significant source of several atmospheric gases and particles. This paper demonstrates the performance of a recently developed combustion chamber, showing its capability in estimating the emission from wildland fire through a case study with dried leaf litter of Quercus robur. The combustion chamber was equipped with a thermocouple, a high resolution balance, an epiradiometer, two different sampling lines to collect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particles, and a portable analyzer to measure carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. VOCs were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after enrichment on adsorption traps, but also monitored on-line with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Preliminary qualitative analyses of emissions from burning dried leaf litter of Q. robur found CO and CO2 as the main gaseous species emitted during the flaming and smoldering stages. Aromatic VOCs, such as benzene and toluene, were detected together with several oxygenated VOCs, like acetaldehyde and methanol. Moreover, a clear picture of the carbon balance during the biomass combustion was obtained with the chamber used. The combustion chamber will allow to distinguish the contribution of different plant tissues to the emissions occurring during different combustion phases.

  12. Linear and non-linear pressure oscillations in baffled combustion chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Wicker; M. W. Yoon; V. Yang

    1995-01-01

    Linear and non-linear analyses of acoustic waves in baffled combustion chambers have been developed by means of perturbation-expansion techniques. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation derived from the conservation equations for a two-phase mixture, and accommodates all influences of non-linear gas dynamics and combustion responses. Several specific effects of baffles are presented as mechanisms by which baffles

  13. Atmospheric behaviour of oil-shale combustion fly ash in a chamber study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Teinemaa; Uuve Kirso; Michael R. Strommen; Richard M. Kamens

    2002-01-01

    There are huge world deposits of oil shale, however, little is known about the fate of atmospheric oil-shale combustion fly ash. In the present work, oil-shale combustion fly-ash aerosol was investigated under simulated daytime and nighttime conditions. Fly-ash particles collected from the Baltic Power Plant (Estonia) were injected directly to a 190m3 outdoor Teflon film chamber. The initial concentration of

  14. Numerical investigation of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a plant oil stove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritz, B.; Werler, M.; Wirbser, H.; Gabi, M.

    2013-10-01

    Recently a low cost cooking device for developing and emerging countries was developed at KIT in cooperation with the company Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH. After constructing an innovative basic design further development was required. Numerical investigations were conducted in order to investigate the flow inside the combustion chamber of the stove under variation of different geometrical parameters. Beyond the performance improvement a further reason of the investigations was to rate the effects of manufacturing tolerance problems. In this paper the numerical investigation of a plant oil stove by means of RANS simulation will be presented. In order to reduce the computational costs different model reduction steps were necessary. The simulation results of the basic configuration compare very well with experimental measurements and problematic behaviors of the actual stove design could be explained by the investigation.

  15. SSME thrust chamber modeling with Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Edwards, J.; Gross, K.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of predicting two-dimensional, compressible and reacting flow in the combustion chamber and nozzle of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is demonstrated. A nonorthogonal body fitted coordinate system has been used to represent the combustor and nozzle geometry. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the entire thrust chamber with the k-epsilon turbulence model accounting for compressibility and large pressure gradients effects. Results of the computational test cases reveal all expected features of the transonic nozzle flows including location of sonic line, internal shock and boundary layer build-up. Calculated performance parameters such as thrust, flow rate, and specific impulse are also in reasonble agreement with available data. The results show promising potential of solving full Navier-Stokes equations with heat transfer and two-phase combustion in truly comprehensive modeling of rocket engines.

  16. Liquid oxygen\\/hydrogen testing of a single swirl coaxial injector element in a windowed combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hulka; D. Makel

    1993-01-01

    A modular, high pressure, liquid rocket single element combustion chamber was developed at Aerojet for use with nonintrusive combustion diagnostics. The hardware is able to accommodate full-size injection elements and includes a recessed annular injector around the single element to provide a source for hot gas background flow, which reduces recirculation in the chamber and provides additional injection mass to

  17. Numerical analysis of bipropellant combustion in orbit maneuvering vehicle thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H. H.; Jiang, T. L.; Krebsback, A. N.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    The combustion and aerodynamic processes of liquid-liquid bipropellant; monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide in the combustion chamber of a variable thrust engine (VTE) have been examined to assess the flow structure, combustion characteristics, and wall heat transfer under the simulated engine operations at two power levels. The Generalized Elliptic Multi-phase flow with Chemical reaction, Heat transfer and Interfacial Processes (GEM-CHIP) code and the Bipropellant Combustion (BICOMB) code, which is the GEMCHIP algorithm reformulated in the frame work of a body fitted coordinate system, have been used for the numerical study. Combustion flow structure with non-premixed type injection that simulates the impingement type injector is predicted and the results are compared with that of the premixed injector.

  18. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines.

    PubMed

    He, D F; Zhang, Y Z; Shiwa, M; Moriya, S

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber. PMID:23387673

  19. Experimental determination of turbulence in a GH2-GOX rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, P.; Russell, R.; Ohara, J.

    1974-01-01

    The intensity of turbulence and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient for a gaseous rocket combustion chamber have been determined from the experimental measurements of the tracer gas diffusion. A combination of Taylor's turbulent diffusion theory and Spalding's numerical method for solving the conservation equations of fluid mechanics was used to calculate these quantities. Taylor's theory was extended to consider the inhomogeneity of the turbulence field in the axial direction of the combustion chamber. An exponential function was used to represent the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. The results indicate that the maximum value of the intensity of turbulence is about 15% and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient drops to about 0.12 in one inch of the chamber length.

  20. Modelling of combustion processes in small liquid bipropellant thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, H. L.

    1992-07-01

    A thruster combustion chamber model is developed, which predicts the performance of small bipropellant thrusters. This was a part of a more general small bipropellant thruster development program. An overview of the model is presented, and the theoretical background and approach described. Correlations with test firing results are discussed, along with the corresponding physical processes.

  1. Hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow modelling in rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    A predictive tool for hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow evolution in small rocket combustion chambers is described. It encompasses a computational technique for the gas-phase governing equations, a discrete particle method for liquid bipropellant sprays, and constitutive models for combustion chemistry, interphase exchanges, and unlike impinging hypergolic spray interactions. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenological modeling of the hypergolic liquid bipropellant gasification processes. Sample computations with the N2H4-N2O4 propellant system are given in order to show some of the capabilities and inadequacies of this tool.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  3. Three-dimensional computer modeling of hydrogen injection and combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The hydrodynamics of hydrogen gas injection into a fixed-volume combustion chamber is analyzed and simulated using KIVA-3, a three-dimensional, reactive flow computer code. Comparisons of the simulation results are made to data obtained at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratory-California (SNL-CA). Simulation of the gas injection problem is found to be of comparable difficulty as the liquid fuel injection in diesel engines. The primary challenge is the large change of length scale from the flow of gas in the orifice to the penetration in the combustion chamber. In the current experiments, the change of length scale is about 4,000. A reduction of the full problem is developed that reduces the change in length scale in the simulation to about 400, with a comparable improvement in computational times. Comparisons of the simulation to the experimental data shows good agreement in the penetration history and pressure rise in the combustion chamber. At late times the comparison is sensitive to the method of determination of the penetration in the simulations. In a comparison of the combustion modeling of methane and hydrogen, hydrogen combustion is more difficult to model, and currently available kinetic models fail to predict the observed autoignition delay at these conditions.

  4. Robust Low Cost Aerospike/RLV Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Ellis, David; McKechnie

    1999-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. At the same time, fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of a shrinking NASA budget. In recent years, combustion chambers of equivalent size to the Aerospike chamber have been fabricated at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using innovative, relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Typically, such combustion chambers are made of the copper alloy NARloy-Z. However, current research and development conducted by NASA-Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has identified a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. In fact, researchers at NASA-LeRC have demonstrated that powder metallurgy (P/M) Cu-8Cr-4Nb exhibits better mechanical properties at 1,200 F than NARloy-Z does at 1,000 F. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost, VPS process to deposit Cu-8Cr-4Nb with mechanical properties that match or exceed those of P/M Cu-8Cr-4Nb. In addition, oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings can be incorporated as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. Tensile properties of Cu-8Cr-4Nb material produced by VPS are reviewed and compared to material produced previously by extrusion. VPS formed combustion chamber liners have also been prepared and will be reported on following scheduled hot firing tests at NASA-Lewis.

  5. The N.A.C.A. Combustion Chamber Gas-sampling Valve and Some Preliminary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Buckley, E C

    1933-01-01

    A gas sampling valve of the inertia-operated type was designed for procuring samples of the gases in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines at identical points in successive cycles so that the analysis of the gas samples thus procured may aid in the study of the process of combustion. The operation of the valve is described. The valve was used to investigate the CO2 content of gases taken from the quiescent combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine when operating with two different multiple-orifice fuel injection nozzles. An analysis of the gas samples thus obtained shows that the state of quiescence in the combustion chamber is maintained during the combustion of the fuel.

  6. Analysis of Combustion Chamber Deposits by ESI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J G; Shields, S J; Roos, J W

    2001-06-14

    Combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) in internal combustion engines have been studied by various techniques to understand the relationship of performance degradation with deposit quantity and structure. XPS, XAS, NMR, and elemental analysis have offered insight into the bulk structure of C, H, N, O and metal components [1]. MS has offered some information about compound structure, but results are limited due to the insolubility and complexity of the materials. Recent advances in MS have opened new possibilities for analysis of CCDs. Here we report initial findings on the carbon structure of these deposits determined by ESI-TOF-MS and MADLI-TOF-MS.

  7. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, G. David

    1991-01-01

    The results of dynamic tests using methane and NASA-Z copper test specimen under conditions that simulate those expected in the cooling channels of a regeneratively cooled LOX/hydrocarbon booster engine operating at chamber pressures up to 3000 psi are presented. Methane with less than 0.5 ppm sulfur contamination has little or no effect on cooling channel performance. At higher sulfur concentrations, severe corrosion of the NASA-Z copper alloy occurs and the cuprous sulfide Cu2S, thus formed impedes mass flow rate and heat transfer efficiency. Therefore, it is recommended that the methane specification for this end use set the allowable sulfur content at 0.5 ppm (max). Bulk high purity liquid methane that meets this low sulfur requirement is currently available from only one producer. Pricing, availability, and quality assurance are discussed in detail. Additionally, it was found that dilute sodium cyanide solutions effectively refurbish sulfur corroded cooling channels in only 2 to 5 minutes by completely dissolving all the Cu2S. Sulfur corroded/sodium cyanide refurbished channels are highly roughened and the increased surface roughness leads to significant improvements in heat transfer efficiency with an attendant loss in mass flow rate. Both the sulfur corrosion and refurbishment effects are discussed in detail.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of the Fuel Injection in Scramjet Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, B. J. R.; Drikakis, D.

    2011-08-01

    Fuel injection in a typical scramjet combustion chamber is a very challenging flow to characterise either in ex- perimental or computational studies. It involves multi- species compressible turbulent features with complex coherent flow structures arising as a result of sonic fuel injection transverse or inclined to the free-stream supersonic flow. In this paper the fuel injection in the HyShot- II combustion chamber is studied using an Implicit LES method employing a modified very high order accurate numerical method. To gain accurate mean inflow boundary conditions, a thermally perfect gas formulation has been employed in preliminary simulations of the inlet ramp and cowl configuration. The results of these simulations are presented and validated against wind tunnel data.

  9. Full-Scale GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liner Preform Fabricated Successfully

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Goudy, Rick

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) has been under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center for several years. The alloy possesses a unique combination of good thermal conductivity, high elevated temperature strength, long creep life, and long low-cycle- fatigue. The alloy is also more oxidation resistant than pure copper and most competitive alloys. The combination of properties has attracted attention from major rocket engine manufacturers who are interested in the alloy for the combustion chamber liner in their next generation of regeneratively cooled engines. Before GRCop-84 can be used in a main combustion chamber application, it must be demonstrated that the alloy can be made successfully to the large sizes and proper shape needed and that it retain useful properties. Recent efforts have successfully demonstrated the ability to fabricate a liner preform via metal spinning that retains the alloy s strength even in the welded sections.

  10. Turbulence in a gaseous hydrogen-liquid oxygen rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebas, J.; Tou, P.; Ohara, J.

    1975-01-01

    The intensity of turbulence and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient for a LOX-GH2 rocket combustion chamber was determined from experimental measurements of tracer gas diffusion. A combination of Taylor's turbulent diffusion theory and a numerical method for solving the conservation equations of fluid mechanics was used to calculate these quantities. Taylor's theory was extended to consider the inhomogeneity of the turbulence field in the axial direction of the combustion chamber, and an exponential function was used to represent the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. The results indicate that the value of the intensity of turbulence reaches a maximum of 14% at a location about 7" downstream from the injector. The Lagrangian correlation coefficient associated with this value is given by the above exponential expression where alpha = 10,000/sec.

  11. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Travis, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit

    1997-08-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data.

  12. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  13. Friction Stir Welding of GR-Cop 84 for Combustion Chamber Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn K.; Carter, Robert; Ellis, David L.; Goudy, Richard

    2004-01-01

    GRCop-84 is a copper-chromium-niobium alloy developed by the Glenn Research Center for liquid rocket engine combustion chamber liners. GRCop-84 exhibits superior properties over conventional copper-base alloys in a liquid hydrogen-oxygen operating environment. The Next Generation Launch Technology program has funded a program to demonstrate scale-up production capabilities of GR-Cop 84 to levels suitable for main combustion chamber production for the prototype rocket engine. This paper describes a novel method of manufacturing the main combustion chamber liner. The process consists of several steps: extrude the GR-Cop 84 powder into billets, roll the billets into plates, bump form the plates into cylinder halves and friction stir weld the halves into a cylinder. The cylinder is then metal spun formed to near net liner dimensions followed by finish machining to the final configuration. This paper describes the friction stir weld process development including tooling and non-destructive inspection techniques, culminating in the successful production of a liner preform completed through spin forming.

  14. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-07-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  15. Spray combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    Concern over the future availability of high quality liquid fuels or use in furnaces and boilers prompted the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider alternate fuels as replacements for the high grade liquid fuels used in the 1970's and 1980's. Alternate fuels were defined to be combinations of a large percentage of viscous, low volatility fuels resulting from the low end of distillation mixed with a small percentage of relatively low viscosity, high volatility fuels yielded by the high end of distillation. The addition of high volatility fuels was meant to promote desirable characteristics to a fuel that would otherwise be difficult to atomize and burn and whose combustion would yield a high amount of pollutants. Several questions thus needed to be answered before alternate fuels became commercially viable. These questions were related to fuel atomization, evaporation, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation. This final report describes the results of the most significant studies on ignition and combustion of alternative fuels.

  16. Computational study of the sensitivity to ignition characteristics of the resonance in DI diesel engine combustion chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto Broatch; Xandra Margot; Antonio Gil

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study is to give insight about the influence of the piston bowl geometry and the fuel ignition features on the resonance of direct injection diesel engines combustion chambers in order to provide support to the experimental findings on combustion noise. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The resonance due to the burned gases oscillations

  17. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with no apparent wear. Material physical properties and the hot firing tests are reviewed.

  18. Progress towards diesel combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rutland, C.J.; Ayoub, N.; Han, Z. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Progress on the development and validation of a CFD model for diesel engine combustion and flow is described. A modified version of the KIVA code is used for the computations, with improved submodels for liquid breakup, drop distortion and drag, spray/wall impingement with rebounding, sliding and breaking-up drops, wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, multistep kinetics ignition and laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion models, Zeldovich NOx formation, and soot formation with Nagle Strickland-Constable oxidation. The code also considers piston-cylinder-liner crevice flows and allows computations of the intake flow process in the realistic engine geometry with two moving intake valves. Significant progress has been made using a modified RNG {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulence model, and a multicomponent fuel vaporization model and a flamelet combustion model have been implemented. Model validation experiments have been performed using a single-cylinder heavy duty truck engine that features state-of-the-art high pressure electronic fuel injection and emissions instrumentation. In addition to cylinder pressure, heat release, and emissions measurements, new combustion visualization experiments have also been performed using an endoscope system that takes the place of one of the exhaust valves. Modifications to the engine geometry for optical access were minimal, thus ensuring that the results represent the actual engine. The intake flow CFD modeling results show that the details of the intake flow process influence the engine performance. Comparisons with the measured engine cylinder pressure, heat release, soot and NOx emission data, and the combustion visualization flame images show that the CFD model results are generally in good agreement with the experiments. In particular, the model is able to correctly predict the soot-NOx trade-off trend as a function of injection timing. 44 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  20. Structural Analysis of Combustion Models

    E-print Network

    Tóth, J; Zsély, I

    2013-01-01

    Using ReactionKinetics, a Mathematica based package a few dozen detailed models for combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methanol are investigated. Essential structural characteristics are pulled out, and similarities and differences of the mechanisms are highlighted. These investigations can be used before or parallel with usual numerical investigations, such as pathway analysis, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, or simulation.

  1. Advanced CFD modelling of pulverised biomass combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Zahirovic; R. Scharler; I. Obernberger

    In this paper, the development and application of a CFD model for pulverised biomass combustion is presented. As a first step, the Discrete Phase Model (DPM) of the commercial CFD software FLUENT, originally developed for the combustion of pulverised coal, was investigated regarding its capability to predict pulverised biomass combustion. Based on these investigations, a more detailed sub- model for

  2. Experimental performance of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at high combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thrust coefficient of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 MPa (1800 to 2400 psia). A nozzle with a modified Rao contour and an expansion area ratio of 1025:1 was tested with hydrogen and oxygen at altitude conditions. The same nozzle, truncated to an area ratio of 440:1, was also tested. Values of thrust coefficient are presented along with characteristic exhaust velocity efficiencies, nozzle wall temperatures, and overall thruster specific impulse.

  3. Design of a pyrometer for temperature measurements on the solid fuel combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, W. J. A. M.; Wijchers, T.

    1987-10-01

    A pyrometer was developed for the measurement of the flame temperature of the solid fuel combustion chamber. The principle of the design is based on the measurement of the spectral intensity at two wavelengths, 577 and 830 nm, emitted by the soot in the flame. The ratio of the intensities is a univocal measure of the color temperature at these wavelengths. The apparatus is small, robust and user friendly. Calibration currents which imitate the output of the detectors are used to control the electronic circuits. The preliminary measuring accuracy between 1400 and 2800 K is about 20 K if the pyrometer is calibrated every 4 months using a qualified tungsten ribbon lamp.

  4. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  5. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Arrieta, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A document describes the low-cost manufacturing of C103 niobium alloy combustion chambers, and the use of a high-temperature, oxidation-resistant coating that is superior to the standard silicide coating. The manufacturing process involved low-temperature spray deposition of C103 on removable plastic mandrels produced by rapid prototyping. Thin, vapor-deposited platinum-indium coatings were shown to substantially improve oxidation resistance relative to the standard silicide coating. Development of different low-cost plastic thrust chamber mandrel materials and prototyping processes (selective laser sintering and stereolithography) yielded mandrels with good dimensional accuracy (within a couple of mils) for this stage of development. The feasibility of using the kinetic metallization cold-spray process for fabrication of free-standing C1O3 thrusters on removable plastic mandrels was also demonstrated. The ambient and elevated temperature mechanical properties of the material were shown to be reasonably good relative to conventionally processed C103, but the greatest potential benefit is that coldsprayed chambers require minimal post-process machining, resulting in substantially lower machining and material costs. The platinum-iridium coating was shown to provide greatly increased oxidation resistance over the silicide when evaluated through oxyacetylene torch testing to as high as 300 F (= 150 C). The iridium component minimizes reaction with the niobium alloy chamber at high temperatures, and provides the high-temperature oxidation resistance needed at the throat.

  6. Numerical modeling of pulverized coal combustion at thermal power plant boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askarova, Aliya; Bolegenova, Saltanat; Maximov, Valeryi; Beketayeva, Meruyert; Safarik, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    The paper deals with development and application the numerical model for solution of processes at combustion chamber of the thermal power plant boiler. Mathematical simulation is based on solution of physical and chemical processes occuring at burning pulverized coal in the furnace model. Three-dimensional flows, heat and mass transfer, chemical kinetics of the processes, effects of thermal radiation are considered. Obtained results give quantitative information on velocity distributions, temperature and concentration profiles of the components, the amount of combustion products including harmful substances. The numerical model becomes a tool for investigation and design of combustion chambers with high-efficiency and reliable operation of boiler at thermal power plants.

  7. Combustion Instabilities Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch is investigating active control strategies to mitigate or eliminate the combustion instabilities prevalent in lean-burning, low-emission combustors. These instabilities result from coupling between the heat-release mechanisms of the burning process and the acoustic flow field of the combustor. Control design and implementation require a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It must capture the essential physics of the system, yet be as simple as possible. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based simulation has been developed which may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used, along with a single reactive species transport equation to simulate coupled thermoacoustic oscillations. A very simple numerical integration scheme was chosen to reduce computing time. Robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to simulate various flow conditions (e.g., valves, open ends, and choked inflow) as well as to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during large flow-field oscillations. The accompanying figure shows a sample simulation result. A combustor with an open inlet, a choked outlet, and a large constriction approximately two thirds of the way down the length is shown. The middle plot shows normalized, time-averaged distributions of the relevant flow quantities, and the bottom plot illustrates the acoustic mode shape of the resulting thermoacoustic oscillation. For this simulation, the limit cycle peak-to-peak pressure fluctuations were 13 percent of the mean. The simulation used 100 numerical cells. The total normalized simulation time was 50 units (approximately 15 oscillations), which took 26 sec on a Sun Ultra2.

  8. Calculating the parameters of self-oscillations in the vertical combustion chamber of the blast-furnace air heater during unstable combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basok, B. I.; Gotsulenko, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    A procedure for simplified calculation of the parameters of self-oscillations excited during unstable (vibrating) combustion in the vertical combustion chambers of blast-furnace air heaters is developed. The proposed procedure is based on an independent nonlinear dynamic system similar to the equations from the theory of a blade supercharger stalling and surging mode. The head characteristic considered in the blade supercharger stalling and surging theory determines the part of the supercharger drive rotation energy that is converted into the head developed by the supercharger. In the considered system, the supercharger head characteristic is replaced by the combustion chamber head characteristic. Being a function of flow rate, this characteristic describes the part of heat supplied to flow that is converted to the flow head. Unlike the supercharger head characteristic, which is determined by experiment, the combustion chamber head characteristic is determined by calculation, due to which it becomes much easier to calculate the parameters of self-oscillations according to the proposed procedure. In particular, an analysis of the periodic solutions of the obtained dynamic system made it possible to determine the pattern in which the amplitude of considered self-oscillations depends on the surge impedance of the vertical combustion chamber.

  9. Formation, ignition, and combustion of a stratified-charge fuel-air mixture in an open-chamber combustion bomb. [Thesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1975-01-01

    The interrelated processes of mixture formation, ignition, and the early stages of combustion that occur in one type of open-chamber, stratified-charge engines were studied experimentally by simulating engine conditions in a constant-volume combustion bomb. The apparatus designed and developed for this research permits a well-controlled single injection of liquid fuel into a steady-state environment of hot, high-pressure, fan-driven swirling air

  10. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  11. Numerical models on shallow magma chamber formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Zoe; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2013-04-01

    A magma chamber can be defined as a body within the crust that is either partially or totally molten which is injected with new magma from a deep-seated reservoir. A shallow magma chamber acts as a sink as it receives magma from the deeper reservoir, and as a source for volcanic eruptions. Most shallow magma chambers appear to develop from sills, and some, such as many mid-ocean ridge magma chambers, maintain the sill geometry through their lifetimes. For a sill to function as a magma chamber, certain conditions must be met: (1) The sill thickness must be in the order of tens of metres. This thickness is reached by either a) when a complex of thinner sills amalgamates or b) magma accumulates due to multiple dyke arrests at the contact with the sill. (2) The sill must receive a fairly constant magma replenishment so the chamber remains partially or (more rarely) totally molten. Here, we present numerical models based on geophysical data on how an individual sill can evolve into a magma chamber. Sills generally exhibit a concave-upward or straight geometry, although they may take other forms e.g. stepped, saucer-shaped, or concave-downward. Seismic studies suggest that many shallow ocean-ridge magma chambers have a moderately smooth geometry (ellipsoidal) rather than an irregular network of dykes and sills. Our numerical results indicate as follows: Firstly, the deflection of dykes into sills is most favoured in the upper crust where there are many layers generating stress barriers/delaminations due to elastic mismatch, that is, contrasting mechanical properties. Secondly, a sill grows primarily by elastic-plastic deformation of the host rock in which it is emplaced, while host rock anatexis/stoping may generate space for some large sills. The elastic-plastic expansion is partly reflected in upward bending of the overburden and partly in downward bending of the underburden. Thirdly, while the initial sill stays liquid or 'soft', subsequent dyke injections become arrested at the contact with the sill and their magmas become partly absorbed into the sill, which thereby grows. Fourthly, the sill must remain totally or at least partially molten, which requires a high injection rate of dykes feeding the sills to have a chance of developing into a shallow magma chamber. A high dyke injection rate is most likely to be reached at high extension rates, such as at fast-spreading ridges. This may be one reason for the common sill-like magma chambers being located at fast-spreading ridges.

  12. Particle-Bound PAH Emission from the Exhaust of Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari Lamjiri, M.; Medrano, Y. S.; Guillaume, D. W.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are harmful, semi-volatile organic compounds which are generated due to the incomplete combustion of organic substances. PAHs are of concern as a pollutant because some of these compounds are carcinogenic and mutagenic even at low levels. Most of the PAHs are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. The PAHs carcinogenic potential can be increased by the adsorption onto small size particles (< 1?m) which can easily get into the bronchioles and alveoli of the lungs. PAHs associated with sub-micron particles are mostly generated from high temperature sources like combustion chambers. In this current study, the presence of 16 priority PAHs (listed by United States Environmental Protection Agency) which are attached to the particulates emitted from the exhaust of the jet engine are evaluated. The engine was operated at different swirl numbers (S; the ratio of tangential air flow to axial air flow) to investigate the effect of this parameter on the effluent of combustion chamber. The samples were collected using two instruments simultaneously: a particle analyzer and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposited Impactor (MOUDI). Particle analyzer was used to count the number of particles in different sizes and MOUDI was used to collect particles with respect to their size as they were emitted from the exhaust. The MOUDI's aluminum substrates were weighed before and after the experiment in order to measure the mass of particles that were collected during the sampling period. The concentration of PAHs associated with the particles was measured by extracting the particles with dichloromethane followed by analysis via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In general, lower molecular weight PAHs emitted from the exhaust of combustion chamber are mostly in gas phase while PAHs of higher molecular weight are adsorbed onto particles. Preliminary results from GC/MS confirm the presence of higher molecular weight PAHs like Benzo[a]pyrene in most of the samples. Better recirculation between air and fuel in higher swirl numbers results in better combustion. In higher swirl numbers, the temperature of the combustion process increases which leads to a more complete combustion. Another result of higher swirl number is a longer residence time which allows the organic substances in the fuel to remain in the reaction longer and also leads to a more complete combustion. The preliminary results from particle analyzer show that the abundance ratio of smaller particles to larger particles increases at higher swirl numbers. For example, at swirl 86, the abundance ratio of 0.3 micron particles to 0.7 micron particles was 400 while at swirl 0, this ratio was 35. Smaller particles have higher specific surface area which allows for more PAH adsorption. The preliminary results show that operating the jet engine at higher swirl numbers can have positive or negative effects on particle-bound PAH emissions. Higher temperature and residence time as well as better mixture of fuel and air can reduce PAH emission while generating more small size particles can increase surface available for PAH adsorption and, as a result, increases PAH emission. In future experiments, particle-bound PAHs of different swirl numbers will be compared in order to find a swirl number range which generates fewer Particle-bound PAHs.

  13. The effects of intake valve detergent structure on combustion chamber deposits (CCD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, S.R.; Maxey, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    Combustion chamber deposits (CCD) have been heavily researched in the past with regard to Octane Requirement Increase (ORI). New concerns about their role in combustion chamber deposit interference (CCDI) and their potential contribution to exhaust emissions have reinforced interest in defining the underlying factors that contribute to CCD. In this study, intake valve detergents were evaluated in the absence of any fluidizer in L-6 1987 BMW 325e engines using 10,000 mile tests run with a BMW IVD driving cycle. The chemical structure of detergents used to reduce Intake Valve Deposits (IVD) has been systematically varied to determine its effect on the quantity and the composition of CCD. In general, chemical changes in the intake valve detergent had little effect on the amount and chemical composition of CCD. The composition of CCD was determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). All CCDs produced with fuels containing intake valve detergents showed the same types and similar levels of organic oxygen, sulfur and aromatic carbon. The CCDs did not contain intact additive backbone fragments or detergent head groups. The only distinguishing feature of these CCDs was the varying nitrogen content that appeared to depend on the type and number of amine groups in the detergent. However, the types of nitrogen present in the CCDs were chemically different from those present in the initial detergent suggesting that, although some of the nitrogen in the detergent head group remains in the CCD, it is chemically transformed.

  14. Multi-injector modeling of transverse combustion instability experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Kevin J.

    Concurrent simulations and experiments are used to study combustion instabilities in a multiple injector element combustion chamber. The experiments employ a linear array of seven coaxial injector elements positioned atop a rectangular chamber. Different levels of instability are driven in the combustor by varying the operating and geometry parameters of the outer driving injector elements located near the chamber end-walls. The objectives of the study are to apply a reduced three-injector model to generate a computational test bed for the evaluation of injector response to transverse instability, to apply a full seven-injector model to investigate the inter-element coupling between injectors in response to transverse instability, and to further develop this integrated approach as a key element in a predictive methodology that relies heavily on subscale test and simulation. To measure the effects of the transverse wave on a central study injector element two opposing windows are placed in the chamber to allow optical access. The chamber is extensively instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulations are used to model the experiment. Specifically three-dimensional, detached eddy simulations (DES) are used. Two computational approaches are investigated. The first approach models the combustor with three center injectors and forces transverse waves in the chamber with a wall velocity function at the chamber side walls. Different levels of pressure oscillation amplitudes are possible by varying the amplitude of the forcing function. The purpose of this method is to focus on the combustion response of the study element. In the second approach, all seven injectors are modeled and self-excited combustion instability is achieved. This realistic model of the chamber allows the study of inter-element flow dynamics, e.g., how the resonant motions in the injector tubes are coupled through the transverse pressure waves in the chamber. The computational results are analyzed and compared with experiment results in the time, frequency and modal domains. Results from the three injector model show how applying different velocity forcing amplitudes change the amplitude and spatial location of heat release from the center injector. The instability amplitudes in the simulation are able to be tuned to experiments and produce similar modal combustion responses of the center injector. The reaction model applied was found to play an important role in the spatial and temporal heat release response. Only when the model was calibrated to ignition delay measurements did the heat release response reflect measurements in the experiment. While insightful the simulations are not truly predictive because the driving frequency and forcing function amplitude are input into the simulation. However, the use of this approach as a tool to investigate combustion response is demonstrated. Results from the seven injector simulations provide an insightful look at the mechanisms driving the instability in the combustor. The instability was studied over a range of pressure fluctuations, up to 70% of mean chamber pressure produced in the self-exited simulation. At low amplitudes the transverse instability was found to be supported by both flame impingement with the side wall as well as vortex shedding at the primary acoustic frequency. As instability level grew the primary supporting mechanism shifted to just vortex impingement on the side walls and the greatest growth was seen as additional vortices began impinging between injector elements at the primary acoustic frequency. This research reveals the advantages and limitations of applying these two modeling techniques to simulate multiple injector experiments. The advantage of the three injector model is a simplified geometry which results in faster model development and the ability to more rapidly study the injector response under varying velocity amplitudes. The possibly faster run time is offset though by the need to run multiple cases to calibrate the

  15. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  16. Modelling of Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion of Hydrogen using Conditional Moment Closure Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, M. M.; Aziz Hairuddin, A.; Wandel, Andrew P.; Yusaf, T. F.

    2012-09-01

    Most of the electricity generation and energy for transport is still generated by the conversion of chemical to mechanical energy by burning the fuels in the combustion chamber. Regulation for pollution and the demand for more fuel economy had driven worldwide researcher to focus on combustion efficiency. In order to reduce experimental cost, accurate modelling and simulation is very critical step. Taylor series expansion was utilised to reduce the error term for the discretization. FORTRAN code was used to execute the discretized partial differential equation. Hydrogen combustion was simulated using Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model. Combustion of hydrogen with oxygen was successfully simulated and reported in this paper.

  17. Ignition in conditions where a jet of fuel-air mixture interacts with the wall of a diesel combustion chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Baev; A. A. Buzukov; B. P. Timoshenko

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the ignition delay and the limitting detonation temperature of fuel-air mixture on the geometric characteristics of the wall of a diesel combustion chamber at which a high-speed jet is incident is investigated experimentally on a motorless setup. It is shown that, to facilitate ignition in the characteristic conditions of diesel startup, glancing initial incidence of the jet

  18. ANALYSIS OF THE TURBULENT, NON-PREMIXED COMBUSTION OF NATURAL GAS IN A CYLINDRICAL CHAMBER WITH AND WITHOUT THERMAL RADIATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. V. SILVA; F. H. R. FRANÇA; H. A. VIELMO

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a numerical simulation of the non-premixed combustion of natural gas in atmospheric air in an axis-symmetric cylindrical chamber, focusing on the effect of thermal radiation on the temperature and chemical species concentration fields and the heat transfer. The simulation is based on the solution of the mass, energy, momentum and the chemical species conservation equations. Thermal radiation

  19. A Theoretical Investigation on the Effects of Combustion Chamber Geometry and Engine Speed on Soot and NOx Emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. De Risi; D. F. Manieri; D. Laforgia

    The objective of the present investigation is to assess the influence of the combustion chambers geometry and engine speed on the velocity flow fields, temperature distribution and NOx and soot emissions mechanism of formation. The investigation has been carried out both experimentally and by numerical simulations. A modified version of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) Code KIVA-3V has been used

  20. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC) has been tasked with developing a 60,000 pound thrust, pump-fed, LOX/RP-1 engine under the Advanced Space Transportation Program(ASTP). This government-led design has been designated the Fastrac engine. The X-34 vehicle will use the Fastrac engine as the main propulsion system. The X-34 will be a suborbital vehicle developed by the Orbital Sciences Corporation. The X-34 vehicle will be launched from an L-1011 airliner. After launch, the X-34 vehicle will be able to climb to altitudes up to 250,000 feet and reach speeds up to Mach 8, over a mission range of 500 miles. The overall length, wingspan, and gross takeoff weight of the X-34 vehicle are 58.3 feet, 27.7 feet and 45,000 pounds, respectively. This report summarizes the plan of achieving a Fastrac thrust chamber assembly(TCA) stable bomb test that meets the JANNAF standards, the Fastrac TCA design, and the combustion instabilities exhibited by the Fastrac TCA during testing at MSFC's test stand 116 as determined from high-frequency fluctuating pressure measurements. This report also summarizes the characterization of the combustion instabilities from the pressure measurements and the steps taken to eliminate the instabilities.

  1. Physical and mathematical simulation of aerodynamics and combustion in the furnace chambers of power installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Burdukov, A. P.; Dekterev, A. A.; Markovich, D. M.; Shtork, S. I.

    2011-09-01

    The possibilities of studying flows and heat transfer in various power installations using dedicated computer programs developed at the Institute of Thermal Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences are shown. The results obtained from studies of processes in furnace chambers carried out on the experimental models of E-500 and P-67 boilers are presented.

  2. Optimization of a model internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris M. Aizenbud; Yehuda B. Band; Oded Kafri

    1982-01-01

    We optimize the operating conditions of a model internal combustion engine to obtain maximal efficiency. The model engine consists of a cylinder equipped with a piston containing a working fluid, coupled to a heat bath and heated by internal combustion with a rate of heating that is very weakly dependent on the temperature and pressure of the working fluid. We

  3. 1025:1 Area Ratio Nozzle Evaluated at High Combustion Chamber Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A recently completed experimental test program obtained performance data on an optimally contoured nozzle with an exit-to-throat area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 mPa (1800 to 2400 psia). Testing was conducted in the altitude test capsule at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Rocket Engine Test Facility (RETF), and results were compared with analytical performance predictions. This testing builds on previous work with this nozzle at Lewis, where testing was completed at nominal chamber pressure of 350 psia. High-area-ratio nozzles have long been sought as a means to increase the performance of spacebased rocket engines. However, as the area ratio increases, the physical size and weight of the nozzle also increase. As a result, engine and vehicle designers must make tradeoffs between nozzle size and performance enhancement. Until this test program, very little experimental data existed on the performance of the high-area-ratio nozzles used in rocket engine designs. The computer codes being used by rocket engine designers rely on data extrapolated from tests of low-area-ratio nozzles, and these extrapolations do not always provide the accuracy needed for a reliable design assessment. Therefore, we conducted this high-area-ratio nozzle testing program to provide performance data for use in rocket engine design and analysis computer codes. The nozzle had a nominal 2.54-cm- (1-in.-) diameter throat, an exit diameter of 81.3-cm (32.0-in.) at an exit-to-throat area ratio of 1025, and a length of 128.6 cm (50.6 in.). Testing was conducted in an altitude test capsule to simulate the static pressure at altitude by vacuum pumping. Data such as propellant mass flow, oxidizer-to-fuel mixture, and thrust were measured. These measurements were then used to calculate performance factors such as the thrust coefficient, the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, and the vacuum specific impulse. In addition, the nozzle temperature was measured to calculate the amount of heat transferred from the combustion gases to the nozzle.

  4. Supersonic combustion studies using a multivariate quadrature based method for combustion modeling

    E-print Network

    Raman, Venkat

    Supersonic combustion studies using a multivariate quadrature based method for combustion modeling function (PDF) of thermochemical variables can be used for accurately computing the combustion source term of predictive models for supersonic combustion is a critical step in design and development of scramjet engines

  5. Utilizing Chamber Data for Developing and Validating Climate Change Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Controlled environment chambers (e.g. growth chambers, SPAR chambers, or open-top chambers) are useful for measuring plant ecosystem responses to climatic variables and CO2 that affect plant water relations. However, data from chambers was found to overestimate responses of C fluxes to CO2 enrichment. Chamber data may be confounded by numerous artifacts (e.g. sidelighting, edge effects, increased temperature and VPD, etc) and this limits what can be measured accurately. Chambers can be used to measure canopy level energy balance under controlled conditions and plant transpiration responses to CO2 concentration can be elucidated. However, these measurements cannot be used directly in model development or validation. The response of stomatal conductance to CO2 will be the same as in the field, but the measured response must be recalculated in such a manner to account for differences in aerodynamic conductance, temperature and VPD between the chamber and the field.

  6. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility. Interim final report, 7 November 1986-31 October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

  7. The influence of some synfuels on the performance and thermal loading of a pre-combustion chamber diesel engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radwan

    1985-01-01

    Blends of different proportions of straight run naphtha\\/gas oil and BTX\\/Gas oil were used in a four-stroke pre-combustion chamber diesel engine in order to illustrate the aspects of performance and thermal loading likely to arise when using syncrudes, multifuel or coal derived fuel. The engine was instrumented for performance monitoring as well as for heat flux and metal temperature measurement

  8. THE EFFECT ON THE THERMAL EFFICIENCY OF LIME ADDED TO THE COMBUSTION CHAMBER FOR RETENTION ON SULPHUR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vecihi Pamuk; Zafer Gencer; Hayri Yalçin

    1996-01-01

    In order to prevent the emission of SOx, with the flue gas, certain amount of the sulphur of the coal can be retained by adding an adequate amount of lime in the combustion chamber. In this study, two series of experiments were conducted by adding lime at the molar ratios of CaO\\/S = 0·5 to 2·0 using Ankara-Beypazan lignites, which

  9. Numerical analysis of thermal turbulent flow in the bowl-in-piston combustion chamber of a motored engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Horng-Wen Wu; Shiang-Wuu Perng

    2004-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient turbulent thermal flow has been presented for the bowl-in-piston combustion chamber in a motored engine employing the Large Eddy Simulation which was implemented into the SIMPLE-C algorithm coupled with pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods. The operating conditions for an engine are changed by various compression ratios (taken as 6.8, 8.7, and 10.6) and initial swirl ratios

  10. Analysis of the Effect of Geometry Generated Turbulence on HCCI Combustion by Multi-Zone Modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S M Aceves; D L Flowers; J Martinez-Frias; F Espinosa-Loza; M Christensen; B Johansson; R P Hessel

    2004-01-01

    This paper illustrates the applicability of a sequential fluid mechanics, multi-zone chemical kinetics model to analyze HCCI experimental data for two combustion chamber geometries with different levels of turbulence: a low turbulence disc geometry (flat top piston), and a high turbulence square geometry (piston with a square bowl). The model uses a fluid mechanics code to determine temperature histories in

  11. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chambers of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  12. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I-P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  13. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 2: a Study of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in Rocket Engine Preburners Using a Heterogeneous Stirred Tank Reactor Model. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.

    1988-01-01

    During the shutdown of the space shuttle main engine, oxygen flow is shut off from the fuel preburner and helium is used to push the residual oxygen into the combustion chamber. During this process a low frequency combustion instability, or chug, occurs. This chug has resulted in damage to the engine's augmented spark igniter due to backflow of the contents of the preburner combustion chamber into the oxidizer feed system. To determine possible causes and fixes for the chug, the fuel preburner was modeled as a heterogeneous stirred tank combustion chamber, a variable mass flow rate oxidizer feed system, a constant mass flow rate fuel feed system and an exit turbine. Within the combustion chamber gases were assumed perfectly mixed. To account for liquid in the combustion chamber, a uniform droplet distribution was assumed to exist in the chamber, with mean droplet diameter determined from an empirical relation. A computer program was written to integrate the resulting differential equations. Because chamber contents were assumed perfectly mixed, the fuel preburner model erroneously predicted that combustion would not take place during shutdown. The combustion rate model was modified to assume that all liquid oxygen that vaporized instantaneously combusted with fuel. Using this combustion model, the effect of engine parameters on chamber pressure oscillations during the SSME shutdown was calculated.

  14. Validation of High Aspect Ratio Cooling in a 89 kN (20,000 lb(sub f)) Thrust Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    In order to validate the benefits of high aspect ratio cooling channels in a large scale rocket combustion chamber, a high pressure, 89 kN (20,000 lbf) thrust, contoured combustion chamber was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Rocket Engine Test Facility. The combustion chamber was tested at chamber pressures from 5.5 to 11.0 MPa (800-1600 psia). The propellants were gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen at a nominal mixture ratio of six, and liquid hydrogen was used as the coolant. The combustion chamber was extensively instrumented with 30 backside skin thermocouples, 9 coolant channel rib thermocouples, and 10 coolant channel pressure taps. A total of 29 thermal cycles, each with one second of steady state combustion, were completed on the chamber. For 25 thermal cycles, the coolant mass flow rate was equal to the fuel mass flow rate. During the remaining four thermal cycles, the coolant mass flow rate was progressively reduced by 5, 6, 11, and 20 percent. Computer analysis agreed with coolant channel rib thermocouples within an average of 9 percent and with coolant channel pressure drops within an average of 20 percent. Hot-gas-side wall temperatures of the chamber showed up to 25 percent reduction, in the throat region, over that of a conventionally cooled combustion chamber. Reducing coolant mass flow yielded a reduction of up to 27 percent of the coolant pressure drop from that of a full flow case, while still maintaining up to a 13 percent reduction in a hot-gas-side wall temperature from that of a conventionally cooled combustion chamber.

  15. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Emissions of Combustion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu Hemant

    Atmospheric aerosols exert a large influence on the Earth's climate and cause adverse public health effects, reduced visibility and material degradation. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), defined as the aerosol mass arising from the oxidation products of gas-phase organic species, accounts for a significant fraction of the submicron atmospheric aerosol mass. Yet, there are large uncertainties surrounding the sources, atmospheric evolution and properties of SOA. This thesis combines laboratory experiments, extensive data analysis and global modeling to investigate the contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SVOC and IVOC) from combustion sources to SOA formation. The goals are to quantify the contribution of these emissions to ambient PM and to evaluate and improve models to simulate its formation. To create a database for model development and evaluation, a series of smog chamber experiments were conducted on evaporated fuel, which served as surrogates for real-world combustion emissions. Diesel formed the most SOA followed by conventional jet fuel / jet fuel derived from natural gas, gasoline and jet fuel derived from coal. The variability in SOA formation from actual combustion emissions can be partially explained by the composition of the fuel. Several models were developed and tested along with existing models using SOA data from smog chamber experiments conducted using evaporated fuel (this work, gasoline, fischertropschs, jet fuel, diesels) and published data on dilute combustion emissions (aircraft, on- and off-road gasoline, on- and off-road diesel, wood burning, biomass burning). For all of the SOA data, existing models under-predicted SOA formation if SVOC/IVOC were not included. For the evaporated fuel experiments, when SVOC/IVOC were included predictions using the existing SOA model were brought to within a factor of two of measurements with minor adjustments to model parameterizations. Further, a volatility-only model suggested that differences in the volatility of the precursors were able to explain most of the variability observed in the SOA formation. For aircraft exhaust, the previous methods to simulate SOA formation from SVOC and IVOC performed poorly. A more physically-realistic modeling framework was developed, which was then used to show that SOA formation from aircraft exhaust was (a) higher for petroleum-based than synthetically derived jet fuel and (b) higher at lower engine loads and vice versa. All of the SOA data from combustion emissions experiments were used to determine source-specific parameterizations to model SOA formation from SVOC, IVOC and other unspeciated emissions. The new parameterizations were used to investigate their influence on the OA budget in the United States. Combustion sources were estimated to emit about 2.61 Tg yr-1 of SVOC, 1VOC and other unspeciated emissions (sixth of the total anthropogenic organic emissions), which are predicted to double SOA production from combustion sources in the United States. The contribution of SVOC and IVOC emissions to global SOA formation was assessed using a global climate model. Simulations were performed using a modified version of GISS GCM 11'. The modified model predicted that SVOC and IVOC contributed to half of the OA mass in the atmosphere. Their inclusion improved OA model-measurement comparisons for absolute concentrations, POA-SOA split and volatility (gas-particle partitioning) globally suggesting that atmospheric models need to incorporate SOA formation from SVOC and IVOC if they are to reasonably predict the abundance and properties of aerosols. This thesis demonstrates that SVOC/IVOC and possibly other unspeciated organics emitted by combustion sources are very important precursors of SOA and potentially large contributors to the atmospheric aerosol mass. Models used for research and policy applications need to represent them to improve model-predictions of aerosols on climate and health outcomes. The improved modeling frameworks developed in this dissertation are suitable for implementa

  16. Three-dimensional combustion modeling in municipal solid-waste incinerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Chen; Y. J. Tsai; J. C. Lou

    1999-01-01

    The impetus from public concerns and stringent emission standards requires optimization of the design and operation of incinerators. Consequently, if the burning process within the combustion chamber can be well characterized and modeled, then performance improvements and cost savings of new and existing systems can be realized. Three-dimensional flame structures and mixing behaviors of turbulent burning flows in a municipal

  17. Modelling the combustion of pulverized biomass in an industrial combustion test furnace

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Ma; J. M. Jones; M. Pourkashanian; A. Williams

    2007-01-01

    A CFD model that simulates the combustion of biomass in existing pf coal fired furnaces has been developed and model results for the combustion of a typical wood in a 1MW industrial test facility have been presented. The model is primarily based on coal combustion submodels using an Eulerian–Lagrangian frame of reference. Biomass specific constants that define the submodels have

  18. Discharge Chamber Primary Electron Modeling Activities in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steuber, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Designing discharge chambers for ion thrusters involves many geometric configuration decisions. Various decisions will impact discharge chamber performance with respect to propellant utilization efficiency, ion production costs, and grid lifetime. These hardware design decisions can benefit from the assistance of computational modeling. Computational modeling for discharge chambers has been limited to two-dimensional codes that leveraged symmetry for interpretation into three-dimensional analysis. This paper presents model development activities towards a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation to aid discharge chamber design decisions. Specifically, of the many geometric configuration decisions toward attainment of a worthy discharge chamber, this paper focuses on addressing magnetic circuit considerations with a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation as a tool. With this tool, candidate discharge chamber magnetic circuit designs can be analyzed computationally to gain insight into factors that may influence discharge chamber performance such as: primary electron loss width in magnetic cusps, cathode tip position with respect to the low magnetic field volume, definition of a low magnetic field region, and maintenance of a low magnetic field region across the grid span. Corroborating experimental data will be obtained from mockup hardware tests. Initially, simulated candidate magnetic circuit designs will resemble previous successful thruster designs. To provide opportunity to improve beyond previous performance benchmarks, off-design modifications will be simulated and experimentally tested.

  19. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism. PMID:24486615

  20. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.; Bastein, L.; Price, P.N.

    2010-02-19

    This review examines current approximations and approaches that underlie the evaluation of transport properties for combustion modeling applications. Discussed in the review are: the intermolecular potential and its descriptive molecular parameters; various approaches to evaluating collision integrals; supporting data required for the evaluation of transport properties; commonly used computer programs for predicting transport properties; the quality of experimental measurements and their importance for validating or rejecting approximations to property estimation; the interpretation of corresponding states; combination rules that yield pair molecular potential parameters for unlike species from like species parameters; and mixture approximations. The insensitivity of transport properties to intermolecular forces is noted, especially the non-uniqueness of the supporting potential parameters. Viscosity experiments of pure substances and binary mixtures measured post 1970 are used to evaluate a number of approximations; the intermediate temperature range 1 < T* < 10, where T* is kT/{var_epsilon}, is emphasized since this is where rich data sets are available. When suitable potential parameters are used, errors in transport property predictions for pure substances and binary mixtures are less than 5 %, when they are calculated using the approaches of Kee et al.; Mason, Kestin, and Uribe; Paul and Warnatz; or Ern and Giovangigli. Recommendations stemming from the review include (1) revisiting the supporting data required by the various computational approaches, and updating the data sets with accurate potential parameters, dipole moments, and polarizabilities; (2) characterizing the range of parameter space over which the fit to experimental data is good, rather than the current practice of reporting only the parameter set that best fits the data; (3) looking for improved combining rules, since existing rules were found to under-predict the viscosity in most cases; (4) performing more transport property measurements for mixtures that include radical species, an important but neglected area; (5) using the TRANLIB approach for treating polar molecules and (6) performing more accurate measurements of the molecular parameters used to evaluate the molecular heat capacity, since it affects thermal conductivity, which is important in predicting flame development.

  1. Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Overlay Coatings for GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liners for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Barrett, C.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B.; Robinson,; Thorn, G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as combustor chamber liners and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. Protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The development of this coatings technology has involved a combination of modeling, coatings development and characterization, and process optimization. Coatings have been low pressure plasma sprayed on GRCop-84 substrates of various geometries and shapes. Microstructural, mechanical property data and thermophysical results on the coated substrates are presented and discussed.

  2. High-Area-Ratio Rocket Nozzle at High Combustion Chamber Pressure: Experimental and Analytical Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smith, Timothy D.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on an optimally contoured nozzle with an area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 1800 to 2400 psia and mixture ratios of 3.89 to 6.15. This report compares the experimental performance, heat transfer, and boundary layer total pressure measurements with theoretical predictions of the current Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) developed methodology. This methodology makes use of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle performance code. Comparisons of the TDK-predicted performance to experimentally attained thrust performance indicated that both the vacuum thrust coefficient and the vacuum specific impulse values were approximately 2.0-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 1025:1 configurations, and approximately 0.25-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 440:1 configuration. Nozzle wall temperatures were measured on the outside of a thin-walled heat sink nozzle during the test fittings. Nozzle heat fluxes were calculated front the time histories of these temperatures and compared with predictions made with the TDK code. The heat flux values were overpredicted for all cases. The results range from nearly 100 percent at an area ratio of 50 to only approximately 3 percent at an area ratio of 975. Values of the integral of the heat flux as a function of nozzle surface area were also calculated. Comparisons of the experiment with analyses of the heat flux and the heat rate per axial length also show that the experimental values were lower than the predicted value. Three boundary layer rakes mounted on the nozzle exit were used for boundary layer measurements. This arrangement allowed total pressure measurements to be obtained at 14 different distances from the nozzle wall. A comparison of boundary layer total pressure profiles and analytical predictions show good agreement for the first 0.5 in. from the nozzle wall; but the further into the core flow that measurements were taken, the more that TDK overpredicted the boundary layer thickness.

  3. THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATIVE AVIATION FUELS IN AN AERO-ENGINE COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Uryga; M. Pourkashanian; D. Borman; E. Catalanotti; C. W. Wilson

    2009-01-01

    When considering alternative fuels for aviation, factors such as the overall efficiency of the combustion process and the levels of emissions emitted to the atmosphere, need to be critically evaluated. The physical and chemical properties of a fuel influence the combustion efficiency and emissions and therefore need to be considered. The energy content of a biofuel, which is influenced negatively

  4. Ventilation characterization of the Consumer Product Safety Commission combustion test chamber facility. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dols

    1990-01-01

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is evaluating pollutant emissions from kerosene and methane heaters using a test chamber. Under an interagency agreement with CPSC, the Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) measured the air exchange rate of the chamber under various ventilation system operating conditions, the extent of air mixing

  5. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. V; Combustion-Chamber Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gensenheyner, Robert M.; Berdysz, Joseph J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of the TG-1OOA gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet rm-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and.correcte& horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, over-all total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, ana the frac%ional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. The scatter of combustion- efficiency data tended to obscure any effect of altitude or ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horse-powers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio an& the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horse-powers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.

  6. Modeling LiH Combustion in Solid Fuelled Scramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, Domenico; Bruno, Claudio

    Lithium Hydride is a hydrogen-rich compound with potential application as fuel, thanks to its high density and low molecular weight. It reacts exothermically with many substances and contains H2, suggesting its use where a much higher density (compared to that of LH2) would be beneficial. In this work LiH (solid at STP) has thus investigated as potential candidate for solid fuelled scramjets (SFSCRJ). Its thermochemical properties and issues associated to its combustion in a hot supersonic stream have been investigated; results show clearly that Li, released by thermal decomposition, plays a key role in the LiH performance. In fact, above the auto-ignition point liquid Li combustion with air increases local temperature and promotes LiH decomposition. To understand quantitatively these effects, a simplified physical model describing LiH “vaporization” and combustion was built and used in simulations of a notional SCRJ chamber by means of a CFD code. Results are intriguing: an intense and stable flame zone is predicted to be present over and downstream of the grain and high temperatures (of order 2900 K) are obtainable. Moreover, specific impulse and thrust density predicted at a flight Mach = 7 are also interesting, being 10,000 m/s and 200-300 m/s, respectively.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Mixing and Combustion Processes in a Supersonic Model Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, S.; Paukner, D.; Hupfer, A.; Kau, H.-P.

    2011-08-01

    To improve the understanding of mixing and combustion processes in the investigated model combustor and deliver validation data for numerical simulations experiments on staged injection and combustion were conducted. The combustion chamber is integrated in a direct-connected test facility which offers the possibility of continuous operation. Within the first part of the combustion chamber the strut injector is located. In the divergent part of the chamber the eight interchangeable wall injectors are located, four on the lower wall and four on the upper wall. Wall injectors were chosen as second stage to exploit the unburnt oxygen close to the walls. To evaluate the combustor performance the wall pressure distribution was measured. Due to large windows within the sidewalls around 80% of the combustor is optically accessible. For the mixing studies helium was injected through the wall injectors and Schlieren images were taken to show the change in the shock system and evaluate the penetration depth. The test results were compared to three-dimensional numerical simulations using a commercial CFD-tool. Furthermore combustion tests with injection of gaseous hydrogen were conducted.

  8. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center

    1995-12-31

    Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

  9. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gopalendu Pal

    2010-01-01

    Radiation calculations are important in combustion due to the high temperatures encountered but has not been studied in sufficient detail in the case of turbulent flames. Radiation calculations for such problems require accurate, robust, and computationally efficient models for the solution of radiative transfer equation (RTE), and spectral properties of radiation. One more layer of complexity is added in predicting

  10. Evaluated Kinetic Data for Combustion Modelling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Baulch; C. J. Cobos; R. A. Cox; C. Esser; P. Frank; Th. Just; J. A. Kerr; M. J. Pilling; J. Troe; R. W. Walker; J. Warnatz

    1992-01-01

    This compilation contains critically evaluated kinetic data on elementary homogeneous gas phase chemical reactions for use in modelling combustion processes. Data sheets are presented for some 196 reactions. Each data sheet sets out relevant thermodynamic data, rate coefficient measurements, an assessment of the reliability of the data, references, and recommended rate parameters. Tables summarizing the preferred rate data are also

  11. Modelling ionization chamber response to nonstandard beam configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantot, L.; Seuntjens, J.

    2008-02-01

    Novel technologies aiming at improving target dose coverage while minimising dose to organs at risk use delivery of radiation fields that significantly deviate from reference conditions defined in protocols such as TG-51 and TRS-398. The use of ionization chambers for patient-specific quality assurance of these new delivery procedures calibrated in reference conditions increases the uncertainties on dose delivery. The conversion of the dose to the chamber cavity to the dose to water becomes uncertain; and the geometrical details of the chamber, as well as the details of the delivery, are expected to be significant. In this study, a realistic model of the Exradin® A12 Farmer chamber is simulated. A framework is applied for the calculation of ionization chamber response to arbitrarily modulated fields as a summation of responses to pencil beams. This approach is used with the chamber model and tested against measurements in static open fields and dynamic MLC IMRT fields. As a benchmark test of the model, quality conversion factors values calculated by Monte-Carlo simulation with the chamber model are in agreement within 0.1 % and 0.4 % with those in the AAPM TG-51, for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams, respectively. Pencil-beam kernels show a strong dependence on the geometrical details of the chamber. Kernel summations with open fields show a relative agreement within 4.0 % with experimental data; the agreement is within 2.0 % for dynamic MLC IMRT beams. Simulations show a strong sensitivity of chamber response on positioning uncertainties, sometimes leading to dose uncertainties of 15 %.

  12. Recent progress in modeling solid propellant combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Beckstead

    2006-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been achieved in the last ten years with respect to modeling the combustion of solid propellants.\\u000a The vastly increased performance of computing capabilities has allowed utilization of calculation approaches that were previously\\u000a only conceptual. The paper will discuss three areas of emphasis: first, numerical modeling of premixed flames using detailed\\u000a kinetic mechanisms; second, development of packing models

  13. Combustion space modeling of an aluminum furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, Brian M. (ANL); Zhou, C.Q. (Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, IN); Quenette, Antoine (ANL).; Han, Quinyou (ORNL).; King, Paul E.

    2005-02-01

    Secondary aluminum production (melting from aluminum ingots, scraps, etc.) offers significant energy savings and environmental benefits over primary aluminum production since the former consumes only five percent of the energy used in the latter process. The industry, however, faces technical challenges of further improving furnace melting efficiency and has been lacking tools that can help understand combustion process in detail and that will facilitate furnace design. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has played increasingly important roles in evaluating industrial processes. As part of a larger program run by SECAT, a CFD model has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to simulate fuel combustion, heat transfer (including thermal radiation), gaseous product flow (mainly CO2 and H2O), and production/transport of pollutant species/greenhouse gases in an aluminum furnace. Using this code, the surface heat fluxes are calculated and then transferred to a melt code. In order to have a high level of confidence in the computed results, the output from the code will be compared and validated against in-furnace measurements made in the Albany furnace. Once validated, the combustion code may be used to perform inexpensive parametric studies to investigate methods to optimize furnace performance. This paper will present results from the combustion modeling of an aluminum furnace as well as results from several parametric studies.

  14. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  15. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. 5; Combustion-Chamber Characterisitcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisenheyner, Robert M.; Berdysz, Joseph J.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and corrected horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, overall total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horsepowers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horsepowers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.

  16. Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

  17. Advanced Combustion Modeling for Complex Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Frank Stanford

    2005-01-01

    The next generation of aircraft engines will need to pass stricter efficiency and emission tests. NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has set an ambitious goal of 70% reduction of NO(x) emissions and a 15% increase in fuel efficiency of aircraft engines. We will demonstrate the state-of-the-art combustion tools developed a t Stanford's Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) as part of this program. In the last decade, CTR has spear-headed a multi-physics-based combustion modeling program. Key technologies have been transferred to the aerospace industry and are currently being used for engine simulations. In this demo, we will showcase the next-generation combustion modeling tools that integrate a very high level of detailed physics into advanced flow simulation codes. Combustor flows involve multi-phase physics with liquid fuel jet breakup, evaporation, and eventual combustion. Individual components of the simulation are verified against complex test cases and show excellent agreement with experimental data.

  18. Application of C/C composites to the combustion chamber of rocket engines. Part 1: Heating tests of C/C composites with high temperature combustion gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yukio; Kusaka, Kazuo; Ueda, Shuichi; Suemitsu, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kude, Yukinori

    1995-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) has various superior properties, such as high specific strength, specific modulus, and fracture strength at high temperatures of more than 1800 K. Therefore, C/C composite is expected to be useful for many structural applications, such as combustion chambers of rocket engines and nose-cones of space-planes, but C/C composite lacks oxidation resistivity in high temperature environments. To meet the lifespan requirement for thermal barrier coatings, a ceramic coating has been employed in the hot-gas side wall. However, the main drawback to the use of C/C composite is the tendency for delamination to occur between the coating layer on the hot-gas side and the base materials on the cooling side during repeated thermal heating loads. To improve the thermal properties of the thermal barrier coating, five different types of 30-mm diameter C/C composite specimens constructed with functionally gradient materials (FGM's) and a modified matrix coating layer were fabricated. In this test, these specimens were exposed to the combustion gases of the rocket engine using nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) / monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) to evaluate the properties of thermal and erosive resistance on the thermal barrier coating after the heating test. It was observed that modified matrix and coating with FGM's are effective in improving the thermal properties of C/C composite.

  19. Mathematical model of chalcocite particle combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Shook; G. G. Richards; J. K. Brimacombe

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the combustion of a single chalcocite particle (particle diameter between\\u000a 10 and 100 microns) in air, oxygen, and oxygen-SO2 mixtures. Neglecting temperature and composition gradients within the particle, the model computes the thermal and compositional\\u000a changes of the particle as a function of time. Five chemical reactions were considered to describe the

  20. Comparison of High Aspect Ratio Cooling Channel Designs for a Rocket Combustion Chamber with Development of an Optimized Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical investigation on the effect of high aspect ratio (height/width) cooling channels, considering different coolant channel designs, on hot-gas-side wall temperature and coolant pressure drop for a liquid hydrogen cooled rocket combustion chamber, was performed. Coolant channel design elements considered were: length of combustion chamber in which high aspect ratio cooling was applied, number of coolant channels, and coolant channel shape. Seven coolant channel designs were investigated using a coupling of the Rocket Thermal Evaluation code and the Two-Dimensional Kinetics code. Initially, each coolant channel design was developed, without consideration for fabrication, to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature from a given conventional cooling channel baseline. These designs produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions up to 22 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 7.5 percent from the baseline. Fabrication constraints for milled channels were applied to the seven designs. These produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions of up to 20 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 2 percent. Using high aspect ratio cooling channels for the entire length of the combustion chamber had no additional benefit on hot-gas-side wall temperature over using high aspect ratio cooling channels only in the throat region, but increased coolant pressure drop 33 percent. Independent of coolant channel shape, high aspect ratio cooling was able to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature by at least 8 percent, with as low as a 2 percent increase in coolant pressure drop. ne design with the highest overall benefit to hot-gas-side wall temperature and minimal coolant pressure drop increase was the design which used bifurcated cooling channels and high aspect ratio cooling in the throat region. An optimized bifurcated high aspect ratio cooling channel design was developed which reduced the hot-gas-side wall temperature by 18 percent and reduced the coolant pressure drop by 4 percent. Reductions of coolant mass flow rate of up to 50 percent were possible before the hot-gas-side wall temperature reached that of the baseline. These mass flow rate reductions produced coolant pressure drops of up to 57 percent.

  1. Modeling the lubrication of the piston ring pack in internal combustion engines using the deterministic method

    E-print Network

    Chen, Haijie

    2011-01-01

    Piston ring packs are used in internal combustion engines to seal both the high pressure gas in the combustion chamber and the lubricant oil in the crank case. The interaction between the piston ring pack and the cylinder ...

  2. Internal combustion engine with one or more compression caps between piston and cylinder head and deflection means in the combustion chamber through which rotary flow is induced in the charge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine cylinder construction for providing a vertically oriented rotational swirl of a gas fuel charge in a combustion chamber immediately before ignition. It consists of: (A) an engine cylinder having a repicrocable piston disposed and closed at its upper end by a cylinder head having side-by-side intake and exhaust valves; (B) a recessed, oval-shaped

  3. Experimental verification of computer spray-combustion models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurick, W. H.; Clayton, R. M.; Rupe, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical model formulation, representing performance of spray-combustion device, is based on understanding of atomization, mixing, vaporization, and combustion which occurs in device. Report lists results of correlations of computed values with values obtained from experiments with rocket combustor. Technique offers excellent method for evaluating validity and ranges of applicability of combustion models.

  4. On the ChapmanJouguet Limit for a Combustion Model

    E-print Network

    On the Chapman­Jouguet Limit for a Combustion Model Bernard Hanouzet \\Lambda , Roberto Natalini y and Alberto Tesei z Abstract We study the limiting behaviour of solutions to a simple model for combustion detonations and deflagrations with respect to the reaction rate. Key words and phrases: combustion

  5. FLUCTUATIONS OF THE FRONT IN A STOCHASTIC COMBUSTION MODEL

    E-print Network

    Quastel, Jeremy

    FLUCTUATIONS OF THE FRONT IN A STOCHASTIC COMBUSTION MODEL #1; (FLUCTUATIONS DU FRONT DANS UN MODÈLE DE COMBUSTION) FRANCIS COMETS 1 , JEREMY QUASTEL 2 AND ALEJANDRO F. RAMÍREZ 3 Abstract. We consider an interacting particle system on the one dimensional lattice Z modeling combustion. The process

  6. Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames Y. Liu, A. P. Dowling, T. D, Nantes, France 2321 #12;Turbulent combustion processes generate sound radiation due to temporal changes, this temporal correlation and its role in the modeling of combustion noise spectrum are studied by analyzing

  7. Numerical Investigation of the Performance of a Supersonic Combustion Chamber and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, M. C.; Chun, J.; Scheuermann, T.; Weigand, B.; Wolfersdorf, J. v.

    2009-01-01

    Scramjet powered vehicles can decrease costs for access to space but substantial obstacles still exist in their realization. For example, experiments in the relevant Mach number regime are difficult to perform and flight testing is expensive. Therefore, numerical methods are often employed for system layout but they require validation against experimental data. Here, we validate the commercial code CFD++ against experimental results for hydrogen combustion in the supersonic combustion facility of the Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics (ITLR) at the Universität Stuttgart. Fuel is injected through a lobed a strut injector, which provides rapid mixing. Our numerical data shows reasonable agreement with experiments. We further investigate effects of varying equivalence ratios on several important performance parameters.

  8. Gas-phase measurements of combustion interaction with materials for radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, R. S.; Lucht, R. P.; Jassowski, D. M.; Rosenberg, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Foil samples of Ir and Pt are exposed to combustion products in a controlled premixed environment at atmospheric pressure. Electrical heating of the foil samples is used to control the surface temperature and to elevate it above the radiative equilibrium temperature within the test apparatus. Profiles of temperature and OH concentration in the boundary layer adjacent to the specimen surface are measured by laser-induced fluorescence. Measured OH concentrations are significantly higher than equilibrium concentrations calculated for the known mixture ratio and the measured temperature profiles. This result indicates that superequilibrium concentrations of H-atoms and O-atoms are also present in the boundary layer, due to partial equilibrium of the rapid binary reactions of the H2/O2 chemical kinetic system. These experiments are conducted as part of a research program to investigate fundamental aspects of the interaction of combustion gases with advanced high-temperature materials for radiation-cooled thrusters.

  9. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  10. Multidimensional Modelling of Diesel Combustion: Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Shi; Rolf D Reitz

    \\u000a With the exponentially increasing computational power of modern computers, multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics\\u000a (CFD) has found more and more applications in diesel engine research, design and development since its initiation in the late\\u000a 1970s. Enhanced understandings of the physical processes of diesel combustion and correspondingly improved numerical models\\u000a and methods have both driven simulations using multi-dimensional CFD tools from qualitative

  11. Modeling and identification of the combustion pressure process in internal combustion engines; 2: Experimental results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. T. Connolly; A. E. Yagle

    1993-01-01

    In Connolly and Yagle they presented a new model relating cylinder combustion pressure to crankshaft angular velocity in an internal combustion engine, primarily the fluctuations in velocity near the cylinder firing frequency. There are three aspects to this model. First, by changing the independent variable from time to crankshaft angle, a nonlinear differential equation becomes a linear first-order differential equation.

  12. Modelling auto ignition of hydrogen in a jet ignition pre-chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto A. Boretti

    2010-01-01

    Spark-less jet ignition pre-chambers are enablers of high efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected when coupled with direct injection of main chamber fuel, thus permitting always lean burn bulk stratified combustion. Towards the end of the compression stroke, a small quantity of hydrogen is injected within the pre-chamber, where it mixes with the air entering from the

  13. Benchmark ExperimentalDatabase for Multiphase Combustion Model

    E-print Network

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Benchmark ExperimentalDatabase for Multiphase Combustion Model Input and Validation: Baseline Doppler Interferometer 2.3. FourierTransformInfrared Spectrometer Spray CombustionReactor -Baseline Case 3 for the combustion airflowrate (56.7m3h-'). Table 5. The locations and mean values of the wall temperatures. Table 6

  14. A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion B. Fiorinaa , R. Vicquelina to turbulent combustion regimes by including subgrid scale wrinkling effects in the flame front propagation Simulation, Turbulent premixed combustion, Tabulated chemistry 1. Introduction Flame ignition and extinction

  15. Comparison of different combustion models in enclosure fire simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Xue; J. C. Ho; Y. M. Cheng

    2001-01-01

    In this study, three combustion models, the volumetric heat source (VHS) model, the eddy break-up model and the presumed probability density function (prePDF) model, are examined in enclosure fire simulation. The combustion models are compared and evaluated for their performance in predicting three typical enclosure fires, a room fire, a shopping mall fire and a tunnel fire. High Reynolds number

  16. An ignition and combustion model based on the level-set method for spark ignition engine multidimensional modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhichao; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    To improve the prediction accuracy of the spark ignition and combustion processes in spark ignition engines, improved ignition and flame propagation models have been developed and implemented in the CFD code, KIVA-3V. An equation to calculate the spark ignition kernel growth rate is derived that considers the effects of the spark ignition discharge energy and flow turbulence on the ignition kernel growth. In addition, a flamelet combustion model based on the G equation combustion model was developed and implemented. To test the ignition and combustion models, they were applied to a homogeneous charge pancake-shaped-combustion-chamber engine, in which experimental heat flux data from probes in the engine head and cylinder liner were available. By comparing the flame arrival timings with the simulation predictions, the ignition and combustion models were validated. In addition, the models were also applied to a homogeneous charge propane-fueled SI engine. Good agreement with experimental cylinder pressures and NO{sub x} data was obtained as a function of ignition timing, engine speed, and EGR levels. (author)

  17. Design and testing of a model CELSS chamber robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark; Dezego, Shawn; Jones, Kinzy; Kewley, Christopher; Langlais, Mike; Mccarthy, John; Penny, Damon; Bonner, Tom; Funderburke, C. Ashley; Hailey, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    A robot system for use in an enclosed environment was designed and tested. The conceptual design will be used to assist in research performed by the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Design specifications include maximum load capacity, operation at specified environmental conditions, low maintenance, and safety. The robot system must not be hazardous to the sealed environment, and be capable of stowing and deploying within a minimum area of the CELSS chamber facility. This design consists of a telescoping robot arm that slides vertically on a shaft positioned in the center of the CELSS chamber. The telescoping robot arm consists of a series of links which can be fully extended to a length equal to the radius of the working envelope of the CELSS chamber. The vertical motion of the robot arm is achieved through the use of a combination ball screw/ball spline actuator system. The robot arm rotates cylindrically about the vertical axis through use of a turntable bearing attached to a central mounting structure fitted to the actuator shaft. The shaft is installed in an overhead rail system allowing the entire structure to be stowed and deployed within the CELSS chamber. The overhead rail system is located above the chamber's upper lamps and extends to the center of the CELSS chamber. The mounting interface of the actuator shaft and rail system allows the entire actuator shaft to be detached and removed from the CELSS chamber. When the actuator shaft is deployed, it is held fixed at the bottom of the chamber by placing a square knob on the bottom of the shaft into a recessed square fitting in the bottom of the chamber floor. A support boot ensures the rigidity of the shaft. Three student teams combined into one group designed a model of the CELSS chamber robot that they could build. They investigated materials, availability, and strength in their design. After the model arm and stand were built, the class performed pre-tests on the entire system. A stability pre-test was used to determine whether the model robot arm would tip over on the stand when it was fully extended. Results showed the stand tipped when 50 Newtons were applied horizontally to the top of the vertical shaft while the arm was fully extended. This proved that it was stable. Another pre-test was the actuator slip test used to determine if there is an adequate coefficient of friction between the actuator drive wheels and drive cable to enable the actuator to fully extend and retract the arm. This pre-test revealed that the coefficient of friction was not large enough to prevent slippage. Sandpaper was glued to the drive wheel and this eliminated the slippage problem. The class preformed a fit test in the CELSS chamber to ensure that the completed robot arm is capable of reaching the entire working envelope. The robot was centered in the chamber and the arm was fully extended to the sides of the chamber. The arm was also able to retract to clear the drain pipes separating the upper and lower plant trays.

  18. Design and testing of a model CELSS chamber robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mark; Dezego, Shawn; Jones, Kinzy; Kewley, Christopher; Langlais, Mike; McCarthy, John; Penny, Damon; Bonner, Tom; Funderburke, C. Ashley; Hailey, Ruth

    1994-08-01

    A robot system for use in an enclosed environment was designed and tested. The conceptual design will be used to assist in research performed by the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Design specifications include maximum load capacity, operation at specified environmental conditions, low maintenance, and safety. The robot system must not be hazardous to the sealed environment, and be capable of stowing and deploying within a minimum area of the CELSS chamber facility. This design consists of a telescoping robot arm that slides vertically on a shaft positioned in the center of the CELSS chamber. The telescoping robot arm consists of a series of links which can be fully extended to a length equal to the radius of the working envelope of the CELSS chamber. The vertical motion of the robot arm is achieved through the use of a combination ball screw/ball spline actuator system. The robot arm rotates cylindrically about the vertical axis through use of a turntable bearing attached to a central mounting structure fitted to the actuator shaft. The shaft is installed in an overhead rail system allowing the entire structure to be stowed and deployed within the CELSS chamber. The overhead rail system is located above the chamber's upper lamps and extends to the center of the CELSS chamber. The mounting interface of the actuator shaft and rail system allows the entire actuator shaft to be detached and removed from the CELSS chamber. When the actuator shaft is deployed, it is held fixed at the bottom of the chamber by placing a square knob on the bottom of the shaft into a recessed square fitting in the bottom of the chamber floor. A support boot ensures the rigidity of the shaft. Three student teams combined into one group designed a model of the CELSS chamber robot that they could build. They investigated materials, availability, and strength in their design. After the model arm and stand were built, the class performed pre-tests on the entire system. A stability pre-test was used to determine whether the model robot arm would tip over on the stand when it was fully extended. Results showed the stand tipped when 50 Newtons were applied horizontally to the top of the vertical shaft while the arm was fully extended. chamber to ensure that the completed robot arm is capable of reaching the entire working envelope. -The robot was centered in the chamber and the arm was fully extended to the sides of the chamber. The arm was also able to retract to clear the drain pipes separating the upper and lower plant trays.

  19. Rotary internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Le, L.K.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine comprising; a rotary compressor mechanism; a rotary expander mechanism; and combustion chamber means disposed between the compressor mechanism and the expander mechanism, whereby compressed air is delivered to the combustion chamber through the compressor discharge port, and pressurized gas is delivered from the combustion chamber into the expander mechanism through the pressurized gas intake port.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Spray Combustion with an Unstructured-Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Liaw, P.; Shih, M. H.; Wang, T. S.

    1996-01-01

    The present unstructured-grid method follows strictly the basic finite volume forms of the conservation laws of the governing equations for the entire flow domain. High-order spatially accurate formulation has been employed for the numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. A two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model is also incorporated in the unstructured-grid solver. The convergence of the resulted linear algebraic equation is accelerated with preconditioned Conjugate Gradient method. A statistical spray combustion model has been incorporated into the present unstructured-grid solver. In this model, spray is represented by discrete particles, rather than by continuous distributions. A finite number of computational particles are used to predict a sample of total population of particles. Particle trajectories are integrated using their momentum and motion equations and particles exchange mass, momentum and energy with the gas within the computational cell in which they are located. The interaction calculations are performed simultaneously and eliminate global iteration for the two-phase momentum exchange. A transient spray flame in a high pressure combustion chamber is predicted and then the solution of liquid-fuel combusting flow with a rotating cup atomizer is presented and compared with the experimental data. The major conclusion of this investigation is that the unstructured-grid method can be employed to study very complicated flow fields of turbulent spray combustion. Grid adaptation can be easily achieved in any flow domain such as droplet evaporation and combustion zone. Future applications of the present model can be found in the full three-dimensional study of flow fields of gas turbine and liquid propulsion engine combustion chambers with multi-injectors.

  1. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  2. Detailed models for timing and efficiency in resistive plate chambers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Werner Riegler; Christian Lippmann

    2003-01-01

    We discuss detailed models for detector physics processes in Resistive Plate Chambers, in particular including the effect of attachment on the avalanche statistics. In addition, we present analytic formulas for average charges and intrinsic RPC time resolution. Using a Monte Carlo simulation including all the steps from primary ionization to the front-end electronics we discuss the dependence of efficiency and

  3. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Lean Premixed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, S.L.; •Givi, P.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    The joint velocity-scalar-frequency probability density function (PDF) methodology is employed for prediction of a bluff-body stabilized lean premixed methane-air flame. A reduced mechanism with CO and NO chemistry is used to describe fuel oxidation. The predicted mean and rms values of the velocity, temperature and concentrations of major and minor species are compared with laboratory measurements. This technical effort was performed in support of the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s on-going research in “Assessment of Turbo-Chemistry Models for Gas Turbine Combustion Emissions” under the RDS contract DE-AC26-04NT41817.

  4. Analysis of the Effect of Geometry Generated Turbulence on HCCI Combustion by Multi-Zone Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Christensen, M; Johansson, B; Hessel, R P

    2004-12-13

    This paper illustrates the applicability of a sequential fluid mechanics, multi-zone chemical kinetics model to analyze HCCI experimental data for two combustion chamber geometries with different levels of turbulence: a low turbulence disc geometry (flat top piston), and a high turbulence square geometry (piston with a square bowl). The model uses a fluid mechanics code to determine temperature histories in the engine as a function of crank angle. These temperature histories are then fed into a chemical kinetic solver, which determines combustion characteristics for a relatively small number of zones (40). The model makes the assumption that there is no direct linking between turbulence and combustion. The results show that the multi-zone model yields good results for both the disc and the square geometries. The model makes good predictions of pressure traces and heat release rates. The experimental results indicate that the high turbulence square geometry has longer burn duration than the low turbulence disc geometry. This difference can be explained by the sequential multi-zone model, which indicates that the cylinder with the square bowl has a thicker boundary layer that results in a broader temperature distribution. This broader temperature distribution tends to lengthen the combustion, as cold mass within the cylinder takes longer to reach ignition temperature when compressed by the expansion of the first burned gases. The multi-zone model, which makes the basic assumption that HCCI combustion is controlled by chemical kinetics, is therefore capable of explaining the experimental results obtained for different levels of turbulence, without considering a direct interaction between turbulence and combustion. A direct connection between turbulence and HCCI combustion may still exists, but it seems to play a relatively minor role in determining burn duration at the conditions analyzed in this paper.

  5. On the TFNS Subgrid Models for Liquid-Fueled Turbulent Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach capable of capturing unsteady flow structures important for turbulent mixing in the combustion chamber and two different subgrid models used to emulate the major processes occurring in the turbulence-chemistry interaction. These two subgrid models are termed as LEM-like model and EUPDF-like model (Eulerian probability density function), respectively. Two-phase turbulent combustion in a single-element lean-direct-injection (LDI) combustor is calculated by employing the TFNS/LEM-like approach as well as the TFNS/EUPDF-like approach. Results obtained from the TFNS approach employing these two different subgrid models are compared with each other, along with the experimental data, followed by more detailed comparison between the results of an updated calculation using the TFNS/LEM-like model and the experimental data.

  6. Unsteady combustion modelling of energetic solids, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Massa, L.; Brewster, M. Q.

    2004-09-01

    The mathematical problem of unsteady combustion of a homogeneous solid propellant with zero-order, high activation-energy, single-step decomposition and zero-activation-energy, quasi-steady gas-phase reaction is considered. Two approximate decomposition models, simple pyrolysis and leading-order asymptotic, are compared with each other and with the full, distributed reaction solution. It is shown that the leading-order asymptotic model is a reasonably good approximation of the exact solution for steady, linear-oscillatory and, with some additional limitations noted herein, nonlinear transient combustion conditions. Further, it is shown that the pyrolysis model can be made equivalent to the leading-order asymptotic model locally, i.e. for given pressure and temperature conditions, at the sensitivity parameter or linear behaviour level, but not beyond. Several misconceptions and unresolved issues associated with these models are resolved. It is shown that when equivalence is enforced, which necessarily involves a non-zero—usually negative—Jacobian parameter, ns, the previously held approximate relation between the pyrolysis and bulk decomposition activation energies, Es ap Ec/2, is not valid. Rather, the value of Es may exceed that of Ec. Other clarifications include the demonstration of an asymptotic inconsistency among reported leading-order model sensitivity parameters that gives rise to an error of the order of 10% in certain parameters (r, dgr, ns). A blow-off behaviour is also shown to exist in the zero-activation-energy, gas-phase sub-model that can appear under nonlinear dynamic burning conditions. It is also demonstrated that previously reported nonlinear, high-frequency oscillatory behaviour associated with the leading-order asymptotic model is an artefact of the approximate asymptotic solution and not physical.

  7. Circulating fluidized bed combustion in the turbulent regime: Modeling of carbon combustion efficiency and sulfur retention

    SciTech Connect

    Adanez, J.; Gayan, P.; Grasa, G.; Diego, L.F. de; Armesto, L.; Cabanillas, A.

    1999-07-01

    In this work carbon combustion efficiencies and sulfur retentions in CFBC under the turbulent regime were studied. Experimental results were obtained from the combustion of a lignite and an anthracite with a limestone in a CBF pilot plant with 20 cm internal diameter and 6.5 m height. The effect of operating conditions such as coal and limestone particle size distributions, temperature, excess air, air velocity and Ca/S molar ratio on carbon combustion efficiency and sulfur retention was studied. On the other hand, a mathematical model for the carbon combustion efficiencies and sulfur retentions in circulating fluidized bed combustors operating under the turbulent regime was developed. The model has been developed considering the hydrodynamics behavior of a turbulent bed, the kinetics of carbon combustion and sulfur retention in the riser. The hydrodynamics characteristics of the turbulent regime were previously studied in a cold pilot plant and equations to determine the axial and radial voidage in the bed were proposed. A core-annulus structure in the dilute region of the bed was found in this regime. Carbon combustion and sulfur retention were modeled by modifying a model developed for fast beds and taking into account turbulent regime characteristics. The experimental results of carbon combustion efficiencies and sulfur retentions were compared with those predicted by the model and a good correlation was found for all the conditions used.

  8. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels of nonideal cycles. ZMOTTO has restart capabilities and permits multicycle calculations with parameters varying from cycle to cycle. ZMOTTO is written in FORTRAN IV (IBM Level H) but has also been compiled with IBM VSFORTRAN (1977 standard). It was developed on an IBM 3033 under the TSS operating system and has also been implemented under MVS. Approximately 412K of 8 bit bytes of central memory are required in a nonpaging environment. ZMOTTO was developed in 1985.

  9. Utility boiler's combustion performance modeling based on modular RBF network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi Li; Xiangfeng Wang; Xuewei Gao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the utility boiler' s combustion process, a method for its combustion performance modeling based on modular Redial Basis Function(RBF) Neural Network is proposed in this paper. The whole modeling can be divided into two stages: first, get the mathematical model of carbon content of fly ash, exhaust flue gas temperature and their related input parameters; second, take the

  10. NOX EMISSIONS MODELING IN BIOMASS COMBUSTION GRATE FURNACES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Albrecht; R. J. M. Bastiaans; J. A. van Oijen; L. P. H. de Goey

    A new flamelet combustion model is developed for the modeling of NOx emissions in biomass grate furnaces. The model describes the combustion chemistry using premixed flamelets. The chemical system is mapped on two controlling variables: the mixture fraction and a reaction progress variable. The species mass fractions and temperature are tabulated as functions of the controlling variables in a pre-processing

  11. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbook, C K; Mehl, M

    2008-10-30

    Hydrocarbon fuels for advanced combustion engines consist of complex mixtures of hundreds or even thousands of different components. These components can be grouped into a number of chemically distinct classes, consisting of n-paraffins, branched paraffins, cyclic paraffins, olefins, oxygenates, and aromatics. Biodiesel contains its own unique chemical class called methyl esters. The fractional amounts of these chemical classes are quite different in gasoline, diesel fuel, oil-sand derived fuels and bio-derived fuels, which contributes to the very different combustion characteristics of each of these types of combustion systems. The objectives of this project are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  12. Insights into Conventional and Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Using Combustion Trajectory Prediction Model 

    E-print Network

    Bittle, Joshua A

    2014-04-18

    Attempting to bridge the gap between typical off-line engine simulations and online real-time control strategies a computationally efficient model has been created that predicts the combustion trajectory (path through the ?-T plane). To give...

  13. Insights into Conventional and Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Using Combustion Trajectory Prediction Model

    E-print Network

    Bittle, Joshua A

    2014-04-18

    Attempting to bridge the gap between typical off-line engine simulations and online real-time control strategies a computationally efficient model has been created that predicts the combustion trajectory (path through the ?-T plane). To give...

  14. Analysis of the injection process in direct injected natural gas engines. Part 2: Effects of injector and combustion chamber design

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, M.J.; Jeske, F.R. (Ricardo North America, Burr Ridge, IL (United States))

    1994-10-01

    A study of natural gas (NG) direct injection (DI) processes in engines has been performed using multidimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis. The purpose was to investigate the effects of key engine design parameters on the mixing in DI NG engines. Full three-dimensional calculations of injection into a medium heavy-duty diesel engine cylinder were performed. Perturbations on a baseline engine configuration were considered. In spite of single plume axisymmetric injection calculations that show mixing improves as nozzle hole size is reduced: plume merging caused by having too many nozzle holes has a severe negative impact on mixing; and increasing the number of injector holes strengthens plume deflection toward the cylinder head, which also adversely affects mixing. The optimal number of holes for a quiescent engine was found to be that which produces the largest number of separate NG plumes. Increasing the nozzle angle to reduce plume deflection can adversely affect mixing due to reduced jet radial penetration. Increasing the injector tip height is an effective approach to eliminating plume deflection and improving mixing. Extremely high-velocity squish flows, with penetration to the center of the piston bowl, are necessary to have a significant impact on mixing. Possible improvements in mixing can be realized by relieving the center of the piston bowl in typical Mexican hat bowl designs. CFD analysis can effectively be used to optimize combustion chamber geometry by fitting the geometry to computed plume shapes.

  15. Modeling complex chemical effects in turbulent nonpremixed combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nigel S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all of the energy derived from the consumption of combustibles occurs in systems which utilize turbulent fluid motion. Since combustion is largely related to the mixing of fluids and mixing processes are orders of magnitude more rapid when enhanced by turbulent motion, efficiency criteria dictate that chemically powered devices necessarily involve fluid turbulence. Where combustion occurs concurrently with mixing at an interface between two reactive fluid bodies, this mode of combustion is called nonpremixed combustion. This is distinct from premixed combustion where flame-fronts propagate into a homogeneous mixture of reactants. These two modes are limiting cases in the range of temporal lag between mixing of reactants and the onset of reaction. Nonpremixed combustion occurs where this lag tends to zero, while premixed combustion occurs where this lag tends to infinity. Many combustion processes are hybrids of these two extremes with finite non-zero lag times. Turbulent nonpremixed combustion is important from a practical standpoint because it occurs in gas fired boilers, furnaces, waste incinerators, diesel engines, gas turbine combustors, and afterburners etc. To a large extent, past development of these practical systems involved an empirical methodology. Presently, efficiency standards and emission regulations are being further tightened (Correa 1993), and empiricism has had to give way to more fundamental research in order to understand and effectively model practical combustion processes (Pope 1991). A key element in effective modeling of turbulent combustion is making use of a sufficiently detailed chemical kinetic mechanism. The prediction of pollutant emission such as oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) and sulphur (SO(x)) unburned hydrocarbons, and particulates demands the use of detailed chemical mechanisms. It is essential that practical models for turbulent nonpremixed combustion are capable of handling large numbers of 'stiff' chemical species equations.

  16. LDV measurements of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a 4-valve D.I. diesel engine with axisymmetric piston-bowls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Payri; J. M. Desantes; J. V. Pastor

    1996-01-01

    LDV measurements of the tangential and radial velocity components have been performed to investigate the flow patterns inside\\u000a a 4-valve single cylinder diesel engine for various engine speeds, swirl numbers and piston-bowl geometries, under conditions\\u000a similar to those of a production engine. The work focused on the near-wall region of the axisymmetric combustion chambers\\u000a where the strong swirl-squish and spray-wall

  17. A biomass combustion-gasification model: Validation and sensitivity analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Bettagli; D. Fiaschi; U. Desideri

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the gasification and combustion of biomass and waste materials. A model for the analysis of the chemical kinetics of gasification and combustion processes was developed with the main objective of calculating the gas composition at different operating conditions. The model was validated with experimental data for sawdust gasification. After having set

  18. Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants

    E-print Network

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants M. Leskens , R.h.Bosgra@tudelft.nl, p.m.j.vandenhof@tudelft.nl Keywords : nonlinear model predictive control, municipal solid waste combus- tion Abstract : Combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW; = household waste) is used to reduce

  19. LES of supersonic combustion in a scramjet engine model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Berglund; C. Fureby

    2007-01-01

    In this study, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has been used to examine supersonic flow and combustion in a model scramjet combustor. The LES model is based on an unstructured finite volume discretization, using total variational diminishing flux reconstruction, of the filtered continuity, momentum, enthalpy, and passive\\/reactive scalar equations, used to describe the combustion process. The configuration used is similar to

  20. Lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation

    E-print Network

    Yan, Bo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Ying, Yang-Jun; Li, Hua; 10.1007/s11467-013-0286-z

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation. In this model the fluid behavior is described by a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model by Gan et al. [Physica A, 2008, 387: 1721]. The chemical reaction is described by the Lee-Tarver model [Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 2362]. The reaction heat is naturally coupled with the flow behavior. Due to the separation of time scales in the chemical and thermodynamic processes, a key technique for a successful simulation is to use the operator-splitting scheme. The new model is verified and validated by well-known benchmark tests. As a specific application of the new model, we studied the simple steady detonation phenomenon. To show the merit of LB model over the traditional ones, we focus on the reaction zone to study the non-equilibrium effects. It is interesting to find that, at the von Neumann peak, the system is nearly in its thermodynamic equilibrium. At the two sides of the von Neumann peak, the system deviates from its equilibri...

  1. Combustion system CFD modeling at GE Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrus, D.; Mongia, H.; Tolpadi, Anil K.; Correa, S.; Braaten, M.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses key features of current combustion system CFD modeling capabilities at GE Aircraft Engines provided by the CONCERT code; CONCERT development history; modeling applied for designing engine combustion systems; modeling applied to improve fundamental understanding; CONCERT3D results for current production combustors; CONCERT3D model of NASA/GE E3 combustor; HYBRID CONCERT CFD/Monte-Carlo modeling approach; and future modeling directions.

  2. A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  3. Two-chamber lattice model for thermodiffusion in polymer solutions

    E-print Network

    Jutta Luettmer-Strathmann

    2003-04-27

    When a temperature gradient is applied to a polymer solution, the polymer typically migrates to the colder regions of the fluid as a result of thermal diffusion (Soret effect). However, in recent thermodiffusion experiments on poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) in a mixed ethanol/water solvent it is observed that for some solvent compositions the polymer migrates to the cold side, while for other compositions it migrates to the warm side. In order to understand this behavior, we have developed a two-chamber lattice model approach to investigate thermodiffusion in dilute polymer solutions. For a short polymer chain in an incompressible, one-component solvent we obtain exact results for the partitioning of the polymer between a warm and a cold chamber. In order to describe mixtures of PEO, ethanol, and water, we have extended this simple model to account for compressibility and hydrogen bonding between PEO and water molecules. For this complex system, we obtain approximate results for the composition in the warmer and cooler chambers that allow us to calculate Soret coefficients for given temperature, pressure, and solvent composition. The sign of the Soret coefficient is found to change from negative (polymer enriched in warmer region) to positive (polymer enriched in cooler region) as the water content of the solution is increased, in agreement with experimental data. We also investigate the temperature dependence of the Soret effect and find that a change in temperature can induce a change in the sign of the Soret coefficient. We note a close relationship between the solvent quality and the partitioning of the polymer between the two chambers, which may explain why negative Soret coefficients for polymers are so rarely observed.

  4. Utilization of LOTUS computer program for rotary kiln, secondary combustion chamber and off-gas system design for a mixed and LLW incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N.; Voshell, M.E.

    1987-04-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of the LOTUS 1-2-3 spreadsheet as used in the design of an incineration facility. The program is used to calculate material and energy balances, excess air requirements, and temperature control requirements. The flexibility of the LOTUS system in exploring a variety of design scenarios is discussed. The spreadsheet models a rotary kiln which burns solids and liquids and a secondary combustion chamber which burns liquids. The incineration facility uses a wet scrubbing off-gas system for particulates and acid gas removal and control. The computer program is extremely useful for calculating excess air and fuel oil requirements for incineration system temperature control and for determining off-gas system flow rates. The single most important factor is that once all the chemical equations for all wastes to be fired have been developed and the spreadsheet set up, any number of cases may be evaluated. This is essential to compare the effects of feed components on flue gas volume, quantities of acid gases and metal oxides generated, and particulate loading, all of which affect the proper sizing, selection and cost of equipment.

  5. INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS (ICE) MODEL, VERSION 6.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) Model was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for use by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) in preparing future assessments of industrial boiler emissions. The ICE Model user's manual includes a summar...

  6. Modeling and control of internal combustion engines using intelligent techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaun H. Lee; Robert J. Howlett; Simon D. Walters; Cyril Crua

    2007-01-01

    This article will compare two different fuzzy-derived techniques for controlling small internal combustion engine and modeling fuel spray penetration in the cylinder of a diesel internal combustion engine. The first case study is implemented using conventional fuzzy-based paradigm, where human expertise and operator knowledge were used to select the parameters for the system. The second case study used an adaptive

  7. Heterogeneous Continuum Model of Aluminum Particle Combustion in Explosions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Kuhl; J. B. Bell; V. E. Beckner

    2010-01-01

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an\\u000a explosion. It combines gasdynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated\\u000a by Nigmatulin. Interphase mass, momentum, and energy exchange are prescribed by the phenomenological model of Khasainov. It\\u000a incorporates a combustion model

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation

    E-print Network

    Bo Yan; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yangjun Ying; Hua Li

    2013-05-10

    In this paper we present a lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation. In this model the fluid behavior is described by a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model by Gan et al. [Physica A, 2008, 387: 1721]. The chemical reaction is described by the Lee-Tarver model [Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 2362]. The reaction heat is naturally coupled with the flow behavior. Due to the separation of time scales in the chemical and thermodynamic processes, a key technique for a successful simulation is to use the operator-splitting scheme. The new model is verified and validated by well-known benchmark tests. As a specific application of the new model, we studied the simple steady detonation phenomenon. To show the merit of LB model over the traditional ones, we focus on the reaction zone to study the non-equilibrium effects. It is interesting to find that, at the von Neumann peak, the system is nearly in its thermodynamic equilibrium. At the two sides of the von Neumann peak, the system deviates from its equilibrium in opposite directions. In the front of von Neumann peak, due to the strong compression from the reaction product behind the von Neumann peak, the system experiences a sudden deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium. Behind the von Neumann peak, the release of chemical energy results in thermal expansion of the matter within the reaction zone, which drives the system to deviate the thermodynamic equilibrium in the opposite direction. From the deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium, defined in this paper, one can understand more on the macroscopic effects of the system due to the deviation from its thermodynamic equilibrium.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Ying, Yang-Jun; Li, Hua

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a lattice Boltzmann model for combustion and detonation. In this model the fluid behavior is described by a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model by Gan et al. [Physica A, 2008, 387: 1721]. The chemical reaction is described by the Lee-Tarver model [Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 2362]. The reaction heat is naturally coupled with the flow behavior. Due to the separation of time scales in the chemical and thermodynamic processes, a key technique for a successful simulation is to use the operator-splitting scheme. The new model is verified and validated by well-known benchmark tests. As a specific application of the new model, we studied the simple steady detonation phenomenon. To show the merit of LB model over the traditional ones, we focus on the reaction zone to study the non-equilibrium effects. It is interesting to find that, at the von Neumann peak, the system is nearly in its thermodynamic equilibrium. At the two sides of the von Neumann peak, the system deviates from its equilibrium in opposite directions. In the front of von Neumann peak, due to the strong compression from the reaction product behind the von Neumann peak, the system experiences a sudden deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium. Behind the von Neumann peak, the release of chemical energy results in thermal expansion of the matter within the reaction zone, which drives the system to deviate the thermodynamic equilibrium in the opposite direction. From the deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium, ? m *, defined in this paper, one can understand more on the macroscopic effects of the system due to the deviation from its thermodynamic equilibrium.

  10. Computational experience with a three-dimensional rotary engine combustion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1990-04-01

    A new computer code was developed to analyze the chemically reactive flow and spray combustion processes occurring inside a stratified-charge rotary engine. Mathematical and numerical details of the new code were recently described by the present authors. The results are presented of limited, initial computational trials as a first step in a long-term assessment/validation process. The engine configuration studied was chosen to approximate existing rotary engine flow visualization and hot firing test rigs. Typical results include: (1) pressure and temperature histories, (2) torque generated by the nonuniform pressure distribution within the chamber, (3) energy release rates, and (4) various flow-related phenomena. These are discussed and compared with other predictions reported in the literature. The adequacy or need for improvement in the spray/combustion models and the need for incorporating an appropriate turbulence model are also discussed.

  11. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  12. Modelling the combustion of charcoal in a model blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yansong; Shiozawa, Tomo; Yu, Aibing; Austin, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The pulverized charcoal (PCH) combustion in ironmaking blast furnaces is abstracting remarkable attention due to various benefits such as lowering CO2 emission. In this study, a three-dimensional CFD model is used to simulate the flow and thermo-chemical behaviours in this process. The model is validated against the experimental results from a pilot-scale combustion test rig for a range of conditions. The typical flow and thermo-chemical phenomena is simulated. The effect of charcoal type, i.e. VM content is examined, showing that the burnout increases with VM content in a linear relationship. This model provides an effective way for designing and optimizing PCH operation in blast furnace practice.

  13. A new double-chamber model of ion channels. Beyond the Hodgkin and Huxley model.

    PubMed

    Do?owy, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a new double-chamber model (DCM) of ion channels. The model ion channel consists of a series of three pores alternating with two chambers. The chambers are net negatively charged. The chamber's electric charge originates from dissociated amino acid side chains and is pH dependent. The chamber's net negative charge is compensated by cations present inside the chamber and in a diffuse electric layer outside the chamber. The pore's permeability is constant independent of time. One pore of the sodium channel and one of the potassium channel is a voltage-sensing pore. Due to the channel's structure, ions flow through the pores and chambers in a time-dependent manner. The model reproduces experimental voltage clamp and action potential data. The current flowing through a single sodium channel is less then one femtoampere. The DCM is considerably simpler then the Hodgkin and Huxley model (HHM) used to describe the electrophysiological properties of an axon. Unlike the HHM, the DCM can explain refractoriness, anode break excitation, accommodation and the effect of pH and temperature on the channels without additional parameters. In the DCM, the axon membrane shows repetitive activity depending on the channel density, sodium to potassium channel ratio and external potassium concentration. In the DCM, the action potential starts from 'hot spot areas' of higher channel densities and a higher sodium to potassium channel ratio, and then propagates through the whole axon. PMID:12949615

  14. Numerical Modeling for Combustion of Thermoplastic Materials in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Kathryn M.

    1997-01-01

    A time-dependent, three-dimensional model is under development to predict the temperature field, burning rate, and bubble bursting characteristics of burning thermoplastic materials in microgravity. Model results will be compared with experiments performed under microgravity and normal gravity conditions. The model will then be used to study the effects of variations in material properties and combustion conditions on burning rate and combustion behavior.

  15. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF FINGERING PATTERN FORMATION IN A COMBUSTION MODEL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MODELING AND SIMULATION OF FINGERING PATTERN FORMATION IN A COMBUSTION MODEL LINA HU, CLAUDE-MICHEL BRAUNER, JIE SHEN, AND GREGORY I. SIVASHINSKY Abstract. We consider a model of gas-solid combustion background. Combustion is basically a process of fast oxidation accompanied by substantial heat release

  16. Oxy-combustion of pulverized coal : modeling of char combustion kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Haynes, Brian S. (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia); Geier, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    In this study, char combustion of pulverized coal under oxy-fuel combustion conditions was investigated on the basis of experimentally observed temperature-size characteristics and corresponding predictions of numerical simulations. Using a combustion-driven entrained flow reactor equipped with an optical particle-sizing pyrometer, combustion characteristics (particle temperatures and apparent size) of pulverized coal char particles was determined for combustion in both reduced oxygen and oxygen-enriched atmospheres with either a N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} bath gas. The two coals investigated were a low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous coal (Utah Skyline) and a low-sulfur subbituminous coal (North Antelope), both size-classified to 75-106 {micro}m. A particular focus of this study lies in the analysis of the predictive modeling capabilities of simplified models that capture char combustion characteristics but exhibit the lowest possible complexity and thus facilitate incorporation in existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation codes. For this purpose, char consumption characteristics were calculated for char particles in the size range 10-200 {micro}m using (1) single-film, apparent kinetic models with a chemically 'frozen' boundary layer, and (2) a reacting porous particle model with detailed gas-phase kinetics and three separate heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of char-oxidation and gasification. A comparison of model results with experimental data suggests that single-film models with reaction orders between 0.5 and 1 with respect to the surface oxygen partial pressure may be capable of adequately predicting the temperature-size characteristics of char consumption, provided heterogeneous (steam and CO{sub 2}) gasification reactions are accounted for.

  17. Oxy-combustion of pulverized coal : modeling of char-combustion kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Haynes, Brian S. (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia); Geier, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    In this study, char combustion of pulverized coal under oxy-fuel combustion conditions was investigated on the basis of experimentally observed temperature-size characteristics and corresponding predictions of numerical simulations. Using a combustion-driven entrained flow reactor equipped with an optical particle-sizing pyrometer, combustion characteristics (particle temperatures and apparent size) of pulverized coal char particles was determined for combustion in both reduced oxygen and oxygen-enriched atmospheres with either a N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} bath gas. The two coals investigated were a low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous coal (Utah Skyline) and a low-sulfur subbituminous coal (North Antelope), both size-classified to 75-106 {micro}m. A particular focus of this study lies in the analysis of the predictive modeling capabilities of simplified models that capture char combustion characteristics but exhibit the lowest possible complexity and thus facilitate incorporation in existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation codes. For this purpose, char consumption characteristics were calculated for char particles in the size range 10-200 {micro}m using (1) single-film, apparent kinetic models with a chemically 'frozen' boundary layer, and (2) a reacting porous particle model with detailed gas-phase kinetics and three separate heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of char-oxidation and gasification. A comparison of model results with experimental data suggests that single-film models with reaction orders between 0.5 and 1 with respect to the surface oxygen partial pressure may be capable of adequately predicting the temperature-size characteristics of char consumption, provided heterogeneous (steam and CO{sub 2}) gasification reactions are accounted for.

  18. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Joel Meier (Niskayuna, NY); Mosbacher, David Matthew (Cohoes, NY); Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian (Troy, NY); Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan (Mason, OH)

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  19. Open cycle, internal combustion Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Thring, R.H.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes an internal- combustion fluid engine. It comprises means, including a hot piston, for defining a combustion chamber; means for causing combustion within the combustion chamber; means, including a cold piston, for defining a compression chamber for pressurizing a fluid; inlet control means for controlling flow of the fluid into the compression chamber; cooling means for maintaining lower temperature in the compression chamber than in the combustion chamber; means, comprising linkage between the hot piston and the cold piston, for varying the volume of the compression chamber in relation to the volume of the combustion chamber in a manner characteristic of a conventional Stirling engine; a manifold connected in fluid communication between the combustion chamber and the compression chamber for enabling flow of the fluid from the compression chamber to the compression chamber; transfer control means for controlling the flow of the fluid from the compression chamber to the combustion chamber.

  20. Understanding Air: Climate Change and Modeling Combustion with LEGO® Bricks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2012-06-15

    In this lesson, students learn about the components of air and the chemical reactions that release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. They model combustion using LEGO bricks, and explore the connection between carbon dioxide, climate change, and environmental health.

  1. Computational Model of Forward and Opposed Smoldering Combustion in Microgravity 

    E-print Network

    Rein, Guillermo; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Urban, David

    2006-08-06

    A novel computational model of smoldering combustion capable of predicting both forward and opposed propagation is developed. This is accomplished by considering the one-dimensional, transient, governing equations for ...

  2. Operating manual for coaxial injection combustion model. [for the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. D.; Schuman, M. D.; Chadwick, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    An operating manual for the coaxial injection combustion model (CICM) is presented as the final report for an eleven month effort designed to provide improvement, to verify, and to document the comprehensive computer program for analyzing the performance of thrust chamber operation with gas/liquid coaxial jet injection. The effort culminated in delivery of an operation FORTRAN IV computer program and associated documentation pertaining to the combustion conditions in the space shuttle main engine. The computer program is structured for compatibility with the standardized Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) performance evaluation procedure. Use of the CICM in conjunction with the JANNAF procedure allows the analysis of engine systems using coaxial gas/liquid injection.

  3. Modeling of combustion and ignition of solid-propellant ingredients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Merrill W. Beckstead; Karthik Puduppakkama; Piyush Thakre; Vigor Yang

    2007-01-01

    Techniques for modeling energetic-material combustion and ignition have evolved tremendously in the last two decades and have been successfully applied to various solid-propellant ingredients. There has been a paradigm shift in the predictive capability of solid-propellant combustion models as the field has advanced from a simple and global-kinetics approach to a detailed approach that employs elementary reaction mechanisms in the

  4. A model for steady-state HNF combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    A simple model for the combustion of solid monopropellants is presented. The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: high activation energy, and low activation energy. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of the model are compared with experimental results of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF) combustion.

  5. Modelling and experiments of straw combustion in a grate furnace

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P van der Lans; L. T Pedersen; A Jensen; P Glarborg; K Dam-Johansen

    2000-01-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model for the combustion of straw in a cross-current, moving bed was developed as part of a tool for optimizing operating conditions and design parameters. To verify the model and to increase the understanding of straw bed combustion, laboratory fixed-bed experiments were performed in a 15cm diameter and 137cm long vertical reactor. Air was introduced through the

  6. Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The process whereby a substance is combined with oxygen with the production of heat. Burning is a familiar example of this process. The energy required to propel chemical rockets is provided by the combustion of fuel with an oxidant at very high temperatures. A common oxidant is liquid oxygen (often denoted by LOX). Others include hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen tetroxide....

  7. Internal combustion engines and method of operating an internal combustion engine using staged combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1991-01-01

    A method of operating an internal combustion engine with a split chamber design for stage combustion comprising the steps of: forming at least one primary combustion chamber and at least one secondary combustion chamber in association with a cylinder means having at least two regions formed therein and piston means within the engine, causing air within the cylinder means to

  8. Up the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Scale to Demonstrate a Robust, Long Life, Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber, or...Up the Downstairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Advanced vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technology, utilized to successfully apply thermal barrier coatings to space shuttle main engine turbine blades, was further refined as a functional gradient material (FGM) process for space furnace cartridge experiments at 1600 C and for robust, long life combustion chambers for liquid rocket engines. A VPS/FGM 5K (5,000 lb. thrust) thruster has undergone 220 hot firing tests, in pristine condition, showing no wear, blanching or cooling channel cracks. Most recently, this technology has been applied to a 40K thruster, with scale up planned for a 194K Ares I, J-2X engine.

  9. Combustion device of an internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Okuma

    1986-01-01

    A combustion device of an internal combustion engine is described which consists of: a cylinder, a cylinder head closing one end of the cylinder; and a piston reciprocable in the cylinder; the head and piston having stepped portions adapted to interfit as the piston approaches the head so as to define a compression chamber, and a combustion chamber of greater

  10. Thermodynamic Model of Aluminum Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, . L

    2006-06-19

    Thermodynamic states encountered during combustion of Aluminum powder in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions were analyzed with the Cheetah code. Results are displayed in the Le Chatelier diagram: the locus of states of specific internal energy versus temperature. Accuracy of the results was confirmed by comparing the fuel and products curves with the heats of detonation and combustion, and species composition as measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Results were fit with analytic functions u = f(T) suitable for specifying the thermodynamic properties required for gas-dynamic models of combustion in explosions.

  11. Thermophysics Characterization of Kerosene Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2001-01-01

    A one-formula surrogate fuel formulation and its quasi-global combustion kinetics model are developed to support the design of injectors and thrust chambers of kerosene-fueled rocket engines. This surrogate fuel model depicts a fuel blend that properly represents the general physical and chemical properties of kerosene. The accompanying gaseous-phase thermodynamics of the surrogate fuel is anchored with the heat of formation of kerosene and verified by comparing a series of one-dimensional rocket thrust chamber calculations. The quasi-global combustion kinetics model consists of several global steps for parent fuel decomposition, soot formation, and soot oxidation and a detailed wet-CO mechanism to complete the combustion process. The final thermophysics formulations are incorporated with a computational fluid dynamics model for prediction of the combustion efficiency of an unielement, tripropellant combustor and the radiation of a kerosene-fueled thruster plume. The model predictions agreed reasonably well with those of the tests.

  12. Combustion instabilities in the transition region of an unstable model rocket combustor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stanford C Rosen

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous methane and 90% hydrogen peroxide at an equivalence ratio of 0.8 were used to study combustion instabilities in the region where the system transitioned from stable to unstable combustion. A variable geometry unstable rocket combustor was used at a chamber pressure of 210 psi. The combustor consists of a coaxial shear injector and a simple dump plane combustor. The

  13. Evaluation of a turbulent combustion model for internal combustion engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Traci, R.M.; Su, F.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Multidimensional numerical models of internal combustion engine processes require closure approximations for the effective turbulent reaction rates for the reactive mixture. In this paper, an engineering level approach, called the ''Eddy-Burn-Rate'' model, is proposed which attempts to reconcile the multiscale effects of turbulence on flame propagation. Two rate limiting steps are considered: an entrainment or mixing step and a burn or microscale reaction step. The model treats mixing via a two-equation second order closure turbulence model and defines a time constant for the fuel oxidation reaction based on laminar flame consumption on the Taylor micro-scale. The Eddy-Burn Rate model is evaluated against alternative turbulent reaction rate closure methods as well as data from two different combustion bombs.

  14. Multidimensional modeling of convective heat transfer with application to IC (internal combustion) engines

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, M.J.; Morel, T.

    1987-06-18

    The objective of this project is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the convective heat transfer process in complex, unsteady turbulent reacting flows, typical of those which occur in internal combustion engines. The specific area of research will be the representation of heat transfer in detailed multi-dimensional Navier-Stokes models, and modeling of turbulent transport mechanisms. The detailed tasks will include a review of relevant prior work. Based on this review, and original work done under this contract, several modeling approaches will be formulated and further studied and tested. The tests will be carried out on flow cases which have relevance to engine flows, and for which reliable experimental data exist. Such data will be sought and identified. The analytical studies will lead to the determination of the best modeling approaches to be used for heat transfer simulation in internal combustion engines. Following that, a detailed study will be carried out of spatial and temporal heat flux distribution in a representative engine. This will be complemented by a parametric study of engine heat transfer dependence on intake flow details, combustion chamber geometry, engine speed and engine load.

  15. Internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Perrin; H. Bergmann

    1984-01-01

    An externally auto-ignited four-stroke internal combustion engine which includes a combustion chamber disposed in an upper surface of a piston such that, in an upper dead-center position of the piston, the combustion chamber receives almost all of the fuel-air mixture. The combustion chamber includes a planar bottom portion and has a cross-sectional shape of a truncated cone expanding in a

  16. Modeling the effects of auxiliary gas injection and fuel injection rate shape on diesel engine combustion and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Daniel Kelly

    1998-11-01

    The effect of auxiliary gas injection and fuel injection rate-shaping on diesel engine combustion and emissions was studied using KIVA a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics code. Auxiliary gas injection (AGI) is the injection of a gas, in addition to the fuel injection, directly into the combustion chamber of a diesel engine. The objective of AGI is to influence the diesel combustion via mixing to reduce emissions of pollutants (soot and NO x). In this study, the accuracy of modeling high speed gas jets on very coarse computational grids was addressed. KIVA was found to inaccurately resolve the jet flows near walls. The cause of this inaccuracy was traced to the RNG k - ? turbulence model with the law-of-the-wall boundary condition used by KIVA. By prescribing the lengthscale near the nozzle exit, excellent agreement between computed and theoretical jet penetration was attained for a transient gas jet into a quiescent chamber at various operating conditions. The effect of AGI on diesel engine combustion and emissions was studied by incorporating the coarse grid gas jet model into a detailed multidimensional simulation of a Caterpillar 3401 heavy-duty diesel engine. The effects of AGI timing, composition, amount, orientation, and location were investigated. The effects of AGI and split fuel injection were also investigated. AGI was found to be effective at reducing soot emissions by increasing mixing within the combustion chamber. AGI of inert gas was found to be effective at reducing emissions of NOx by depressing the peak combustion temperatures. Finally, comparison of AGI simulations with experiments were conducted for a TACOM-LABECO engine. The results showed that AGI improved soot oxidation throughout the engine cycle. Simulation of fuel injection rate-shaping investigated the effects of three injection velocity profiles typical of unit-injector type, high-pressure common-rail type, and accumulator-type fuel injectors in the Caterpillar 3401 heavy-duty diesel engine. Pollutant emissions for the engine operating with different injection velocity profiles reflected the sensitivity of diesel engines to the location of pollutants within the combustion chamber, as influenced by the fuel injection.

  17. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  18. 3-DIMENSIONAL Numerical Modeling on the Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Biodiesel in Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenming; An, Hui; Amin, Maghbouli; Li, Jing

    2014-11-01

    A 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling is conducted on a direct injection diesel engine fueled by biodiesel using multi-dimensional software KIVA4 coupled with CHEMKIN. To accurately predict the oxidation of saturated and unsaturated agents of the biodiesel fuel, a multicomponent advanced combustion model consisting of 69 species and 204 reactions combined with detailed oxidation pathways of methyl decenoate (C11H22O2), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H20O2) and n-heptane (C7H16) is employed in this work. In order to better represent the real fuel properties, the detailed chemical and thermo-physical properties of biodiesel such as vapor pressure, latent heat of vaporization, liquid viscosity and surface tension were calculated and compiled into the KIVA4 fuel library. The nitrogen monoxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) formation mechanisms were also embedded. After validating the numerical simulation model by comparing the in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate curves with experimental results, further studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of combustion chamber design on flow field, subsequently on the combustion process and performance of diesel engine fueled by biodiesel. Research has also been done to investigate the impact of fuel injector location on the performance and emissions formation of diesel engine.

  19. Cfd Modelling Of Combustion And Heat Transfer In Compartment Fires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Lewis; J. B. Moss; P. A. Rubini

    1997-01-01

    The field modelling of compartment fires incorporates increasingly complex representations of the physical and chemical processes which may occur and these models, in turn, demand detailed evaluation. The influence of alternative descriptions of combustion in the fire source and the introduction of a ray tracing radiation model (discrete transfer ) are assessed in this paper within the framework of progressively

  20. Modeling of an internal combustion engine for control analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey A. Cook; Barry K. Powell

    1988-01-01

    Recent activity in nonthermodynamic modeling of automotive internal combustion engines with spark ignition, which are inherently nonlinear, is reviewed. A fundamental nonlinear model of the engine is presented, and a linear control-oriented model is derived from the nonlinear process. Techniques for experimental verification are examined, and a practical linear engine example incorporating multirate sampling is illustrated

  1. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Mosbach; Matthew S. Celnik; Abhijeet Raj; Markus Kraft; Hongzhi R. Zhang; Shuichi Kubo; Kyoung-Oh Kim

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry

  2. Internal combustion engines and method of operating an internal combustion engine using staged combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    A method of operating an internal combustion engine with a split chamber design for stage combustion comprising the steps of: forming at least one primary combustion chamber and at least one secondary combustion chamber in association with a cylinder means having at least two regions formed therein and piston means within the engine, causing air within the cylinder means to flow through the at least one primary combustion chamber at a predetermined rate and volume; admitting a predetermined amount of fuel to the at least one primary combustion chamber to form a fuel/air mixture, therein; igniting the fuel/air mixture within the at least one primary combustion chamber to generate a first stage of combustion; causing the flow of the the ignited fuel/air mixture to the at least one secondary combustion chamber for continued burning of the fuel/air mixture in a second stage of combustion within the at least one secondary combustion chamber. This patent also describes a split chamber, staged combustion internal combustion engine. It comprises means defining a cylinder having at least two regions formed therein, piston means; combustion chambers; fuel delivery means; and means for igniting the fuel in the primary combustion chamber.

  3. Modeling of Transient Flow Mixing of Streams Injected into a Mixing Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voytovych, Dmytro M.; Merkle, Charles L.; Lucht, Robert P.; Hulka, James R.; Jones, Gregg W.

    2006-01-01

    Ignition is recognized as one the critical drivers in the reliability of multiple-start rocket engines. Residual combustion products from previous engine operation can condense on valves and related structures thereby creating difficulties for subsequent starting procedures. Alternative ignition methods that require fewer valves can mitigate the valve reliability problem, but require improved understanding of the spatial and temporal propellant distribution in the pre-ignition chamber. Current design tools based mainly on one-dimensional analysis and empirical models cannot predict local details of the injection and ignition processes. The goal of this work is to evaluate the capability of the modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools in predicting the transient flow mixing in pre-ignition environment by comparing the results with the experimental data. This study is a part of a program to improve analytical methods and methodologies to analyze reliability and durability of combustion devices. In the present paper we describe a series of detailed computational simulations of the unsteady mixing events as the cold propellants are first introduced into the chamber as a first step in providing this necessary environmental description. The present computational modeling represents a complement to parallel experimental simulations' and includes comparisons with experimental results from that effort. A large number of rocket engine ignition studies has been previously reported. Here we limit our discussion to the work discussed in Refs. 2, 3 and 4 which is both similar to and different from the present approach. The similarities arise from the fact that both efforts involve detailed experimental/computational simulations of the ignition problem. The differences arise from the underlying philosophy of the two endeavors. The approach in Refs. 2 to 4 is a classical ignition study in which the focus is on the response of a propellant mixture to an ignition source, with emphasis on the level of energy needed for ignition and the ensuing flame propagation issues. Our focus in the present paper is on identifying the unsteady mixing processes that provide the propellant mixture in which the ignition source is to be placed. In particular, we wish to characterize the spatial and temporal mixture distribution with a view toward identifying preferred spatial and temporal locations for the ignition source. As such, the present work is limited to cold flow (pre-ignition) conditions

  4. Combustion model for staged circulating fluidized bed boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jianhua; Lu, Qinggang; Wang, Bo; Pan, Zhonggang; Wang, Dasan

    1997-03-01

    A mathematical model for atmospheric staged circulating fluidized bed combustion, which takes fluid dynamics, combustion, heat transfer, pollutants formation and retention, into account was developed in the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics (IET) recently. The model of gas solid flow at the bottom of the combustor was treated by the two-phase theory of fluidized bed and in the upper region as a core-annulus flow structure. The chemical species CO, CO2, H2, H2O, CH4, O2 and N2 were considered in the reaction process. The mathematical model consisted of sub-models of fluid namics, coal heterogeneous and gas homogeneous chemical reactions, heat transfer, particle fragmentation and attrition, mass and energy balance etc. The developed code was applied to simulate an operating staged circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler of early design and the results were in good agreement with the operating data. The main submodels and simulation results are given in this paper.

  5. Double-distribution-function discrete Boltzmann model for combustion

    E-print Network

    Chuandong Lin; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2015-06-21

    A 2-dimensional discrete Boltzmann model for combustion is presented. Mathematically, the model is composed of two coupled discrete Boltzmann equations for two species and a phenomenological evolution equation for chemical reaction process. Physically, the model is equivalent to a Navier-Stokes model supplemented by a coarse-grained model for the thermodynamic nonequilibrium behaviours. This model adopts $16$ discrete velocities. It works for both subsonic and supersonic combustion phenomena with flexible specific heat ratio. To discuss the physical accuracy of the coarse-grained model for nonequilibrium behaviours, three other discrete velocity models are used for comparisons. Numerical results are compared with analytical solutions based on both the first-order and second-order truncations of the distribution function. It is confirmed that the physical accuracy increases with the increasing moment relations needed by nonequlibrium manifestations. Furthermore, a criterion of transition from incomplete to complete combustion is obtained. Compared with the single distribution function model, this model can simulate incomplete combustion, decomposition and combination reactions.

  6. Comparison of numerical methods and combustion models for LES of a ramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, A.; Reichstadt, S.; Bertier, N.; Gicquel, L.; Vuillot, F.; Poinsot, T.

    2009-06-01

    Ramjets are very sensitive to instabilities and their numerical predictions can only be addressed adequately by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). With this technique, solvers can be implicit or explicit and handle structured, unstructured or hybrid meshes, etc. Turbulence and combustion models are other sources of differences. The impact of these options is here investigated for the ONERA ramjet burner. To do so, two LES codes developed by ONERA and CERFACS compute one stable operating condition. Preliminary LES results of the two codes underline the overall robustness of LES. Mean flow features at the various critical sections are reasonably well predicted by both codes. Disagreement mainly appear in the chamber where combustion positions differ pointing to the importance of the combustion and subgrid mixing models. The two LES produce different energy containing motions. With CEDRE, a low frequency dominates while AVBP produces different ranges of low frequencies that can be linked with acoustic modes of the configuration. To cite this article: A. Roux et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  7. KINETIC MODELING OF NOX FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION AND COMBUSTIBLES BURNOUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a model of the gas-phase chemistry involved in the combustion of simple hydrocarbon fuels and the interconversion of fixed nitrogen species. One focus of the work was on modeling the chemistry involved in reburning and other advanced NOx control strategies. A...

  8. Boiler using combustible fluid

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  9. Spectral optimization and uncertainty quantification in combustion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David Allan

    Reliable simulations of reacting flow systems require a well-characterized, detailed chemical model as a foundation. Accuracy of such a model can be assured, in principle, by a multi-parameter optimization against a set of experimental data. However, the inherent uncertainties in the rate evaluations and experimental data leave a model still characterized by some finite kinetic rate parameter space. Without a careful analysis of how this uncertainty space propagates into the model's predictions, those predictions can at best be trusted only qualitatively. In this work, the Method of Uncertainty Minimization using Polynomial Chaos Expansions is proposed to quantify these uncertainties. In this method, the uncertainty in the rate parameters of the as-compiled model is quantified. Then, the model is subjected to a rigorous multi-parameter optimization, as well as a consistency-screening process. Lastly, the uncertainty of the optimized model is calculated using an inverse spectral optimization technique, and then propagated into a range of simulation conditions. An as-compiled, detailed H2/CO/C1-C4 kinetic model is combined with a set of ethylene combustion data to serve as an example. The idea that the hydrocarbon oxidation model should be understood and developed in a hierarchical fashion has been a major driving force in kinetics research for decades. How this hierarchical strategy works at a quantitative level, however, has never been addressed. In this work, we use ethylene and propane combustion as examples and explore the question of hierarchical model development quantitatively. The Method of Uncertainty Minimization using Polynomial Chaos Expansions is utilized to quantify the amount of information that a particular combustion experiment, and thereby each data set, contributes to the model. This knowledge is applied to explore the relationships among the combustion chemistry of hydrogen/carbon monoxide, ethylene, and larger alkanes. Frequently, new data will become available, and it will be desirable to know the effect that inclusion of these data has on the optimized model. Two cases are considered here. In the first, a study of H2/CO mass burning rates has recently been published, wherein the experimentally-obtained results could not be reconciled with any extant H2/CO oxidation model. It is shown in that an optimized H2/CO model can be developed that will reproduce the results of the new experimental measurements. In addition, the high precision of the new experiments provide a strong constraint on the reaction rate parameters of the chemistry model, manifested in a significant improvement in the precision of simulations. In the second case, species time histories were measured during n-heptane oxidation behind reflected shock waves. The highly precise nature of these measurements is expected to impose critical constraints on chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbon combustion. The results show that while an as-compiled, prior reaction model of n-alkane combustion can be accurate in its prediction of the detailed species profiles, the kinetic parameter uncertainty in the model remains to be too large to obtain a precise prediction of the data. Constraining the prior model against the species time histories within the measurement uncertainties led to notable improvements in the precision of model predictions against the species data as well as the global combustion properties considered. Lastly, we show that while the capability of the multispecies measurement presents a step-change in our precise knowledge of the chemical processes in hydrocarbon combustion, accurate data of global combustion properties are still necessary to predict fuel combustion.

  10. Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

    1996-07-01

    Major progress was achieved in the last year in advancing the modeling capabilities of hydrogen-fueled engines, both in support of the multi-laboratory project with SNL and LLNL to develop a high-efficiency, low emission powerplant and to provide the engine design tools to industry and research laboratories for hydrogen-fueled engines and stationary power generators. The culmination of efforts on many fronts was the excellent comparison of the experimental data from the Onan engine, operated by SNL.These efforts include the following. An extensive study of the intake flow culminated in a major understanding of the interdependence of the details of the intake port design and the engine operating condition on the emissions and efficiency. This study also resulted in design suggestions for future engines and general scaling laws for turbulence that enables the KIVA results to be applied to a wide variety of operating conditions. The research on the turbulent combustion of hydrogen brought into perspective the effect of the unique aspects of hydrogen combustion and their influence on possible models of turbulent combustion. The effort culminated in a proposed model for turbulent hydrogen combustion that is in agreement with available literature. Future work will continue the development in order to provide a generally predictive model for hydrogen combustion. The application of the combustion model to the Onan experiments elucidated the observed improvement of the efficiency of the engine with the addition of a shroud on the intake valve. This understanding will give guidance to future engine design for optimal efficiency. Finally, a brief summary is given of the extensions and refinements of the KIVA-3 code, in support of future designers of hydrogen-fueled engines.

  11. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  12. Develop an alternate energy source thru use of a poultry litter pelletizer and a combustion chamber to heat poultry houses. Final technical project report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, M.W.; Mercier, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Poultry litter in a pelletized form is an acceptable energy source. The machinery and mechanism to process the litter, the combustion chamber with supporting controls and equipment, is practical and marketable. The controlling factor is economic demand. With the price of fossil fuel diminishing and with the labor cost and energy cost to process the litter, it is not economically desirable to pay the equivalent of $1.50 per gallon. It would not be economically competitive with present heating power plants because of its high initial cost, the cost of labor to maintain a pellet supply and the undesirable feature of solid fuel versus liquid fuel. This system could not be fully competitive with present systems until fuel pric

  13. A mixing controlled direct chemistry (MCDC) model for diesel engine combustion modelling using large eddy simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuxin Zhang; Christopher J. Rutland

    2012-01-01

    A mixing controlled direct chemistry (MCDC) combustion model with sub-grid scale (SGS) mixing effects and chemical kinetics has been evaluated for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of diesel engine combustion. The mixing effect is modelled by a mixing timescale based on mixture fraction variance and sub-grid scalar dissipation rate. The SGS scalar dissipation rate is modelled using a similarity term and

  14. Validation of a Monte Carlo model of a NACP-02 plane-parallel ionization chamber model using electron backscatter experiments.

    PubMed

    Chin, E; Shipley, D; Bailey, M; Seuntjens, J; Palmans, H; Dusautoy, A; Verhaegen, F

    2008-04-21

    The accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results relies on validating the MC models used in the calculations. In this work, a MC model for the NACP-02 plane-parallel ionization chamber was built and validated against megavoltage electron backscatter experiments using materials of water, graphite, aluminium and copper. Electron energies ranged between 6-18 MeV and the chamber's air cavity was at the depth of maximum dose, z(max). A chamber model based on manufacturer's specifications resulted in systematic discrepancies of several percents between measured and simulated backscatter factors. Tuning of the MC chamber model against backscatter factors to improve agreement increased the chamber's front window mass thickness by 35% over the reported value of 104 mg cm(-2) in the IAEA's TRS-398 absorbed dose protocol. The large increase in chamber window mass thickness was verified by measurements on a disassembled NACP-02 chamber. The new backscatter factor results based on the tuned MC NACP-02 chamber model matched the experimental results within 1-2 standard deviations. We conclude therefore that for MC simulations near z(max), tuning of the NACP-02 chamber model against experimental backscatter measurements is an acceptable method for validating the chamber model. PMID:18364552

  15. Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop a engine design capability based on KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Modelling of liquefied petroleum gas spray development, evaporation and combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A P F Yoong; A P Watkins

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper is the computational part of a joint experimental\\/computational investigation of the possible utilization of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in a direct injection internal combustion engine. Many aspects of spray modelling have been investigated in the research. This paper concentrates on the implementation of three aspects, namely (a) the incorporation of LPG (butane or propane)

  17. Neural Transplantation Model Using Integration Co-culture Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimba, Kenta; Saito, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akimasa; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Regenerative medicine is a promising therapy for injuries and diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Implantation of stem cell-derived neurons into the recipient tissue is one of the key processes of the therapy. How the implanted cells establish functional connections with the intact neurons, and whether the established connections are maintained stably for a long time, remain unknown. Here, we report a novel co-culture device for visualizing interconnections between primary and differentiated neuronal cultures, and long-term monitoring of neuronal activity. A circular micro-chamber surrounded by another chamber is aligned on a microelectrode array (MEA). These chambers are interconnected through 36 micro-tunnels. Stem cell-derived neurons were cultured in the inner circular chamber, and primary neurons taken from mouse cortices were cultured in the surrounding chamber. Neurites outgrew into the micro-tunnels from both primary and differentiated neurons. The immunofluorescence images indicate that synaptic connections are formed between them. Propagation of electrical activity was observed 6 days after starting co-culture. More than half of the spontaneous activity was initiated from primary neurons, and probability of activity propagation to the stem cell-derived neurons gradually increased with culture days. These results suggest that our device is feasible for long-term monitoring of interaction between stem cell-derived cells and the recipient tissue.

  18. On modelling combustion, radiation and soot processes in compartment fires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. H. Yeoh; R. K. K. Yuen; S. C. P. Chueng; W. K. Kwok

    2003-01-01

    A Reynolds-Averaging-Navier–Stokes Computational-Fluid-Dynamics-based fire model is developed to solve a turbulent buoyant fire in a single-, two- and multi-compartment structure. The model is evaluated as part of a complete prediction procedure involving the modelling of the simultaneously occurring flow, convection, combustion, soot generation and burnout and radiation phenomena. Computational results are compared against available experimental data. Proper handling of the

  19. Reliable and efficient numerical simulation of a model of tissue differentiation in a bone chamber1

    E-print Network

    ) are in many aspects very similar. In particular the aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells, their subsequentReliable and efficient numerical simulation of a model of tissue differentiation in a bone chamber1 of peri-implant tissue differentiation, a repeated sampling bone chamber has been developed. Mathematical

  20. COMPENSATING FOR WALL EFFECTS IN IAQ (INDOOR AIR QUALITY) CHAMBER TESTS BY MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents mechanistic mathematical models that account for two phenomena: interior surfaces of a state-of-the-art emissions test chamber acting as a transient sink for organic emissions; the effect of increasing chamber concentration on the emission rate of the source. A...

  1. COMPENSATING FOR SINK EFFECTS IN EMISSIONS TEST CHAMBERS BY MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents mechanistic mathematical models that account for two phenomena: (1) interior surfaces of a state-of-the-art emissions test chamber acting as a transient sink for organic emissions; and (2) the effect of increasing chamber concentration on the emission rate of t...

  2. Two-chamber lattice model for thermodiffusion in polymer solutions Jutta Luettmer-Strathmanna)

    E-print Network

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    Two-chamber lattice model for thermodiffusion in polymer solutions Jutta Luettmer to the colder regions of the fluid as a result of thermal diffusion Soret effect . However, in recent it migrates to the warm side. In order to understand this behavior, we have developed a two-chamber lattice

  3. Thermal analysis simulation for a spin-motor used in the advanced main combustion chamber vacuum plasma spray project using the SINDA computer program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary H. McDonald

    1990-01-01

    One of the many design challenges of this project is predicting the thermal effects due to the environment inside the vacuum chamber on the turntable and spin motor spindle assembly. The objective of the study is to model the spin motor using the computer program System Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA). By formulating the appropriate input information concerning the motor's

  4. A regenerative multiple zone model for HCCI combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hamosfakidis, Vasileios; Im, Hong G.; Assanis, Dennis N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    A new conserved scalar approach, the so-called regenerative multiple zone (RMZ) model, is introduced to simulate combustion in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines with significant products of combustion. In this approach, two conserved scalars are introduced, the mixture fraction Z and the initial exhaust gas fraction J, to determine uniquely the state of the reactive system as a function of the two conserved scalars and time. For the numerical solution of the HCCI combustion, the conserved scalar plane is divided into different zones, which represent homogeneous reactors with constant initial exhaust gas level. Particularly, the zones are created based on the distribution of the initial exhaust gases and are mixed and regenerated at every time step during combustion in order to account for the history effects which are due to the finite rate chemistry. A proper methodology to create and initialize the new zones during the combustion, the so-called zone creation strategy (ZCS), is also proposed. For validation, the RMZ model is implemented in the 2DRD code, which is a computational fluid dynamics code that solves the governing equations for a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion problem. Initially, the consistency of the new model is validated in a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion (RD) case. Subsequently, the necessity for a proper zone creation strategy is demonstrated by a two-dimensional RD case. Next, a parametric study is performed to investigate the sensitivity of the new model on the maximum number of zones that is used. Finally, the limitations as well as the advantages of the RMZ model are discussed. (author)

  5. Improving the performance of industrial boiler using artificial neural network modeling and advanced combustion control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yul Yunazwin Nazaruddin; Abdullah Nur Aziz; Wisnu Sudibjo

    2008-01-01

    In heat generation process, performance improvement is a critical factor and essential. An alternative solution is by designing an advanced combustion controller based on neural-predictive control strategy. However, for accomplishing such goal it requires adequate boiler model as well as combustion model. Although heat transfer and combustion processes in boiler are too complex to be analytically described with mathematical model,

  6. TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I -PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-print Network

    Daripa, Prabir

    TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I - PRELIMINARY RESULTS of Mathematics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 ABSTRACT A combustion model using three mixture fractions has been developed for accurate simulation of coal:manure combustion. This model treats coal

  7. Modeling of Combustion in Spray-Guided Spark-Ignition Engines

    E-print Network

    Peters, Norbert

    Modeling of Combustion in Spray-Guided Spark-Ignition Engines Rainer Dahms #12;#12;Modeling of Combustion in Spray-Guided Spark-Ignition Engines Von der Fakult¨at f¨ur Maschinenwesen der Rheinisch with enduring motivation. #12;#12;Modeling of Combustion in Spray-Guided Spark-Ignition Engines Zusammenfassung

  8. Experimental and analytical study to model temperature profiles and stoichiometry in oxygen-enriched in-situ combustion 

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Jose Ramon

    2004-09-30

    A new combustion zone analytical model has been developed in which the combustion front temperature may be calculated. The model describes in the combustion zone, the amount of fuel burned based on reaction kinetics, the fuel concentration...

  9. Internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lowther

    1980-01-01

    An internal combustion engine method and apparatus are described wherein most or all of the air compression required for combustion is done outside of the internal combustion engine and out of heat exchange contact with the combustion chamber. The engine includes direct regeneration of exhaust heat and the compressor includes means for varying the compression ratio thereof in response to

  10. A comprehensive combustion model for biodiesel-fueled engine simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakora, Jessica L.

    Engine models for alternative fuels are available, but few are comprehensive, well-validated models that include accurate physical property data as well as a detailed description of the fuel chemistry. In this work, a comprehensive biodiesel combustion model was created for use in multi-dimensional engine simulations, specifically the KIVA3v R2 code. The model incorporates realistic physical properties in a vaporization model developed for multi-component fuel sprays and applies an improved mechanism for biodiesel combustion chemistry. A reduced mechanism was generated from the methyl decanoate (MD) and methyl-9-decenoate (MD9D) mechanism developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It was combined with a multi-component mechanism to include n-heptane in the fuel chemistry. The biodiesel chemistry was represented using a combination of MD, MD9D and n-heptane, which varied for a given fuel source. The reduced mechanism, which contained 63 species, accurately predicted ignition delay times of the detailed mechanism over a range of engine-specific operating conditions. Physical property data for the five methyl ester components of biodiesel were added to the KIVA library. Spray simulations were performed to ensure that the models adequately reproduce liquid penetration observed in biodiesel spray experiments. Fuel composition impacted liquid length as expected, with saturated species vaporizing more and penetrating less. Distillation curves were created to ensure the fuel vaporization process was comparable to available data. Engine validation was performed against a low-speed, high-load, conventional combustion experiments and the model was able to predict the performance and NOx formation seen in the experiment. High-speed, low-load, low-temperature combustion conditions were also modeled, and the emissions (HC, CO, NOx) and fuel consumption were well-predicted for a sweep of injection timings. Finally, comparisons were made between the results of biodiesel composition (palm vs. soy) and fuel blends (neat vs. B20). The model effectively reproduced the trends observed in the experiments.

  11. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  12. An extended CFD model to predict the pumping curve in low pressure plasma etch chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning; Wu, Yuanhao; Han, Wenbin; Pan, Shaowu

    2014-12-01

    Continuum based CFD model is extended with slip wall approximation and rarefaction effect on viscosity, in an attempt to predict the pumping flow characteristics in low pressure plasma etch chambers. The flow regime inside the chamber ranges from slip wall (Kn ˜ 0.01), and up to free molecular (Kn = 10). Momentum accommodation coefficient and parameters for Kn-modified viscosity are first calibrated against one set of measured pumping curve. Then the validity of this calibrated CFD models are demonstrated in comparison with additional pumping curves measured in chambers of different geometry configurations. More detailed comparison against DSMC model for flow conductance over slits with contraction and expansion sections is also discussed.

  13. Multiple Mapping Conditioning: A New Modelling Framework for Turbulent Combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Cleary; A. Y. Klimenko

    \\u000a Multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) is a relatively new addition to the list of models for turbulent combustion that unifies\\u000a the features of the probability density function, conditional moment closure and mapping closure models. This chapter presents\\u000a the major concepts and theory of MMC without the detailed derivations which can be found in the cited literature. While the\\u000a fundamental basis remains

  14. MODELLING THE PROPAGATION OF FORWARD AND OPPOSED SMOULDERING COMBUSTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guillermo Rein; Jose L. Torero; A. Carlos Fernandez-Pello

    A computational study has been carried out to investigate smouldering ignition and propagation in polyurethane foam. The one-dimensional, transient, governing equations for smouldering combustion in a porous fuel are solved accounting for improved solid-phase chemical kinetics. Forward and opposed smouldering modes are examine and the model describes well both propagation modes. Specifically, the model predicts the reaction-front thermal and species

  15. Effective modeling and simulation of internal combustion engine control systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Rabbath; H. Desira; K. Butts

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated software-hardware solution to effectively model and simulate internal combustion engine control systems. The solution is based on RT-LABTM. The characteristics of the proposed modeling and simulation approach are the preservation of accuracy in the face of relatively large fixed simulation steps and the achievement of real-time and faster than real-time simulation execution. The results of

  16. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valeri I. Golovitchev; Junfeng Yang

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously.

  17. Numerical modeling of LOX/methane impingement, evaporation, and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpal, Naimishkumar

    A computational fluid dynamics approach is used to model the impingement and subsequent combustion of LOX/LCH4 "green" propellants. The objective of this investigation is to assess the capabilities of current state-of-the-art CFD codes, here STAR-CCM+ v5.2, to model the associated multi-phase, multi-component, reacting flow field. The two multiphase methods, Volume of Fluid and Lagrangian Discrete Droplet, are evaluated to model the like-on-like and unlike doublet impingement configurations. Subsequently, droplet combustion simulation is performed in Lagrangian-Eulerian coupled framework using integrated models including Standard Eddy Break-Up combustion, quasi-steady evaporation, and RANS k-epsilon turbulence models. For an oxidizer-to-fuel ratio of3.4, flame temperatures of2880 K and 2670 K are predicted for two different kinds of Lagrangian injectors, point and cone, respectively, which, as expected, is less than the Chemical Equilibrium Analysis prediction of 3000 K. Besides recommendations in current methodology, an outline of modeling multi-species reaction in immiscible multiphase domain is presented.

  18. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  19. CALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 165 Reconstruction of subgrid models for nonpremixed combustion

    E-print Network

    CALTECH ASCI TECHNICAL REPORT 165 Reconstruction of subgrid models for nonpremixed combustion J. P. Medallo, S. Sarkar and C. Pantano #12;Reconstruction subgrid models for nonpremixed combustion J. P 2003; published 16 September 2003 Large-eddy simulation of combustion problems involves highly

  20. A Multi-FhJid CFD Turbulent Entrainment Combustion Model: Formulation and One-Dimensional Results

    E-print Network

    regulations for spark· ignited (SI) internal combustion engines requires understanding the complex chemical models for combustion have provided a framework for investigating modifications to existing engines it become feasible to apply these simulation tools to model the combustion portion of the engine cycle

  1. Numerical Modelling of a Pulse Combustion Burner: Limiting Conditions of Stable

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    in the burner system. Self-sustained pulse combustion and high-intensity sound waves result if the systemNumerical Modelling of a Pulse Combustion Burner: Limiting Conditions of Stable Operation P.A. van a mathematical analysis of a simple model for thermal pulse combustion and determines conditions under which

  2. Turbulent hydrocarbon combustions kinetics - Stochastic modeling and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Farmer, R. C.; Tucker, Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Idealized reactors, that are designed to ensure perfect mixing and are used to generate the combustion kinetics for complex hydrocarbon fuels, may depart from the ideal and influence the kinetics model performance. A complex hydrocarbon kinetics model that was established by modeling a jet-stirred combustor (JSC) as a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), is reevaluated with a simple stochastic process in order to introduce the unmixedness effect quantitatively into the reactor system. It is shown that the comparisons of the predictions and experimental data have improved dramatically with the inclusion of the unmixedness effect in the rich combustion region. The complex hydrocarbon kinetics is therefore verified to be mixing effect free and be applicable to general reacting flow calculations.

  3. Internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Quentin A. (P.O. Box 6477, San Antonio, TX 78209); Mecredy, Henry E. (1630-C W. 6th, Austin, TX 78703); O'Neal, Glenn B. (6503 Wagner Way, San Antonio, TX 78256)

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  4. Numerical simulation of syngas combustion with a multi-spark ignition system in a diesel engine adapted to work at the Otto cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Gamiño; J. Aguillón

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on the construction of a 2D dynamic model, taking into consideration the turbulent flux combustion reactions of syngas inside a combustion chamber and its displacement through the cylinder of a diesel engine model OM 447 LA converted to Otto cycle operation. The engine has a multi-spark ignition system. The geometry of both the chamber and cylinder is

  5. Combustion turbine dynamic model validation from tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. N. Hannett; Afzal Khan

    1993-01-01

    Studies have been conducted on the Alaskan Railbelt System to examine the hydrothermal power system response after the hydroelectric power units at Bradley Lake are installed. The models and data for the generating units for the initial studies were not complete. Typical models were used, but their response appeared to be faster than judged by operating experience. A testing program

  6. Reciprocating internal combustion engine with continuous combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vogelsang

    1976-01-01

    The design of a reciprocating internal combustion engine having a continuous combustion is given. The combustion chamber must be connected with the cylinders of the engine by suitable transfer ports for supplying the gaseous medium to the cylinders and for discharging the burned mixture. In order to obtain a high efficiency, the transfer ports should be as short as possible.

  7. Combustion-gas recirculation system

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lacon, IL)

    2007-10-09

    A combustion-gas recirculation system has a mixing chamber with a mixing-chamber inlet and a mixing-chamber outlet. The combustion-gas recirculation system may further include a duct connected to the mixing-chamber inlet. Additionally, the combustion-gas recirculation system may include an open inlet channel with a solid outer wall. The open inlet channel may extend into the mixing chamber such that an end of the open inlet channel is disposed between the mixing-chamber inlet and the mixing-chamber outlet. Furthermore, air within the open inlet channel may be at a pressure near or below atmospheric pressure.

  8. Multiple traveling waves in a combustion model

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, S.P. (Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

    1988-11-01

    A model reaction scheme, consisting of two simple competing reactions A ..-->.. P/sub 1/ and A ..-->.. P/sub 2/, is studied using Arrhenius kinetics with a cut-off to handle the cold boundary difficulty. It is shown that for approximate values of the parameters in the problem, the model equations have three distinct traveling wave solutions. The middle solution, presumably unstable, is obtained from a singularly perturbed problem by rigorous matching.

  9. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Fluids Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is one of two racks in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. The FIR is dedicated to the scientific investigation of space system fluids management supporting NASA s Exploration of Space Initiative. The FIR hardware was modal tested and FIR finite element model updated to satisfy the International Space Station model correlation criteria. The final cross-orthogonality results between the correlated model and test mode shapes was greater than 90 percent for all primary target modes.

  10. Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion

    E-print Network

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion Dagfinn combustion have been proposed as an alternative to conventional gas turbine cycles for achieving CO2-capture for CO2 sequestration purposes. While combustion instabilities is a problem in modern conventional gas

  11. A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion

    E-print Network

    A comparison of various models in predicting ignition delay in single-particle coal combustion a b s t r a c t In this paper, individual coal particle combustion under laminar conditions and compared with experimental data. Ó 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Combustion Theory and Modelling Vol. 11, No. 5, October 2007, 697714

    E-print Network

    Heil, Matthias

    Combustion Theory and Modelling Vol. 11, No. 5, October 2007, 697­714 Flame propagation in a small, to the emerging micro-combustion technology, and to the understanding of the effect of small scales; Turbulent combustion 1. Introduction The propagation of premixed flames in the presence of a flow whose

  13. Computing combustion noise by combining Large Eddy Simulations with analytical models for the propagation of waves

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Computing combustion noise by combining Large Eddy Simulations with analytical models +++++ Presented by Ignacio Duran Abstract Two mechanisms control combustion noise generation as shown by Marble. A method to calculate combustion-generated noise has been implemented in a tool called CHORUS. The method

  14. Combustion Theory and Modelling Vol. 12, No. 2, April 2008, 349365

    E-print Network

    Heil, Matthias

    Combustion Theory and Modelling Vol. 12, No. 2, April 2008, 349­365 Premixed flames. Introduction An important realistic aspect in combustion is the reversibility of the chemical reactions, since. This is all the more true for the combustion of high caloric fuels, such as hydrogen with oxygen, where

  15. Cluster tools with chamber revisiting-modeling and analysis using timed Petri nets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wlodek M. Zuberek

    2004-01-01

    Timed Petri nets are formal models of discrete concurrent systems. Since the durations of all activities are included in the model descriptions, many performance characteristics can be derived from such models. In the case of cluster tools, net models represent the flow of wafers through the chambers of the tool as well as consecutive actions performed by the robotic transporter.

  16. Simulation of quasi-dimensional combustion model for predicting diesel engine performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kunpeng Qi; Liyan Feng; Xianyin Leng; Baoguo Du; Wuqiang Long

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the precision of quasi-dimensional combustion model for predicting diesel engine performance and promote the real time operating performance of the simulation model, a new phase-divided spray mixing model is proposed and the quasi-dimensional combustion model of diesel engine working process is developed. The software MATLAB\\/Simulink is utilized to build the quasi-dimensional combustion model of diesel engine

  17. Development of Supersonic Combustion Experiments for CFD Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, Robert; Bivolaru, Daniel; Tedder, Sarah; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an experiment to acquire data for developing and validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence in supersonic combusting flows. The intent is that the flow field would be simple yet relevant to flows within hypersonic air-breathing engine combustors undergoing testing in vitiated-air ground-testing facilities. Specifically, it describes development of laboratory-scale hardware to produce a supersonic combusting coaxial jet, discusses design calculations, operability and types of flames observed. These flames are studied using the dual-pump coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) - interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. This technique simultaneously and instantaneously measures temperature, composition, and velocity in the flow, from which many of the important turbulence statistics can be found. Some preliminary CARS data are presented.

  18. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  19. The modeling of the combustion of high-ash coal–char particles suitable for pressurised fluidized bed combustion: shrinking reacted core model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond Everson; Hein Neomagus; Rufaro Kaitano

    2005-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken involving the combustion of high-ash coal\\/char particles under conditions suitable for pressurised fluidised bed combustion, in order to evaluate an overall combustion model. The use of very poor quality feedstocks (greater than 40% ash, low calorific value and high sulphur content) in conventional pulverised fuel combustors (PFC) could be technically difficult and un-economical, and has the

  20. CARS study of linewidths of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules at high temperatures in a pulsed high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M [German Aerospace Research Centre, DLR, Hardthausen (Germany)

    2005-03-31

    The results of measurements of individual line widths of the Q-branch of a hydrogen molecule and the corresponding coefficients of broadening caused by collisions with water molecules at T = 2700 K in a repetitively pulsed high-pressure (50-200 atm) hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber are presented. CARS spectra of individual Q{sub 1}-Q{sub 7} hydrogen lines, pressure pulses, and the broadband CARS spectra of the entire Q-branch of hydrogen are recorded simultaneously during a single laser pulse. The shape of line profiles was analysed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The temperature in the volume being probed was determined from the 'broadband' CARS spectra. The entire body of the experimental results gives information on the spectral linewidths, temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber during CARS probing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Assessment of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) - Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas Changju; Liu, Nan-suey

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementations of the linear-eddy model (LEM) and an Eulerian FDF/PDF model in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of turbulent combustion. The impacts of these two models, along with the so called laminar chemistry model, are then illustrated via the preliminary results from two combustion systems: a nine-element gas fueled combustor and a single-element liquid fueled combustor.

  2. Combustion Group Group members

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy 2014 #12;Combustion Group Combustion Physics and Modeling Pollutants, Emissions, and Soot Formation Thermoacoustics and Combustion Dynamics Research focus § Examine mechanisms responsible for flame stabilization

  3. Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Colo, J [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stanley, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-09-24

    During the third quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made in the chemistry department at OSU on the calculation of thermodynamic properties for a number of model organic compounds. Modelling work was carried out at Brown to adapt a thermodynamic model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally applied to pitch carbonization, to the prediction of coke texture in coal combustion. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. This modelling approach shows promise for the mechanistic prediction of the rank dependence of char structure and will therefore be pursued further. Crystalline ordering phenomena were also observed in a model char prepared from phenol-formaldehyde carbonized at 900{degrees}C and 1300{degrees}C using high-resolution TEM fringe imaging. Dramatic changes occur in the structure between 900 and 1300{degrees}C, making this char a suitable candidate for upcoming in situ work on the hot stage TEM. Work also proceeded on molecular dynamics simulations at Boston University and on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at Ohio State.

  4. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion

    E-print Network

    Aiguo Xu; Chuandong Lin; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2015-03-13

    To probe both the Hydrodynamic Non-Equilibrium (HNE) and Thermodynamic Non-Equilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) version of Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Model(LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Beside describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some non-conserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various non-equilibrium behaviours, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increase the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses.

  5. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Chuandong; Zhang, Guangcai; Li, Yingjun

    2015-04-01

    To probe both the hydrodynamic nonequilibrium (HNE) and thermodynamic nonequilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) version of lattice Boltzmann kinetic model (LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Aside from describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum, and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some nonconserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model, both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various nonequilibrium behaviors, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs, and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increases the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses. PMID:25974611

  6. Structure Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

    2000-12-30

    This unique collaborative project has taken a very fundamental look at the origin of structure, and combustion reactivity of coal chars. It was a combined experimental and theoretical effort involving three universities and collaborators from universities outside the U.S. and from U.S. National Laboratories and contract research companies. The project goal was to improve our understanding of char structure and behavior by examining the fundamental chemistry of its polyaromatic building blocks. The project team investigated the elementary oxidative attack on polyaromatic systems, and coupled with a study of the assembly processes that convert these polyaromatic clusters to mature carbon materials (or chars). We believe that the work done in this project has defined a powerful new science-based approach to the understanding of char behavior. The work on aromatic oxidation pathways made extensive use of computational chemistry, and was led by Professor Christopher Hadad in the Department of Chemistry at Ohio State University. Laboratory experiments on char structure, properties, and combustion reactivity were carried out at both OSU and Brown, led by Principle Investigators Joseph Calo, Robert Essenhigh, and Robert Hurt. Modeling activities were divided into two parts: first unique models of crystal structure development were formulated by the team at Brown (PI'S Hurt and Calo) with input from Boston University and significant collaboration with Dr. Alan Kerstein at Sandia and with Dr. Zhong-Ying chen at SAIC. Secondly, new combustion models were developed and tested, led by Professor Essenhigh at OSU, Dieter Foertsch (a collaborator at the University of Stuttgart), and Professor Hurt at Brown. One product of this work is the CBK8 model of carbon burnout, which has already found practical use in CFD codes and in other numerical models of pulverized fuel combustion processes, such as EPRI's NOxLOI Predictor. The remainder of the report consists of detailed technical discussion organized into chapters whose organization is dictated by the nature of the research performed. Chapter 2 is entitled 'Experimental Work on Char Structure, Properties, and Reactivity', and focuses on fundamental structural studies at Brown using both phenollformaldehyde resin chars as model carbons and real coal chars. This work includes the first known in site high resolution TEM studies of carbonization processes, and some intriguing work on 'memory loss', a form of interaction between annealing and oxidation phenomena in chars. Chapter 3 entitled 'Computational Chemistry of Aromatic Oxidation Pathways' presents in detail the OSU work targeted at understanding the elementary molecular pathways of aromatic oxidation. Chapter 4 describes the 'Mesoscale Structural Models', using a combination of thermodynamic (equilibrium) approaches based on liquid crystal theory and kinetic simulations accounting for the effects of limited layer mobility in many fossil fuel derived carbons containing cross-linking agents. Chapter 5 entitled 'Combustion Modeling' presents work on extinction in the late stages of combustion and the development and features of the CBK8 model.

  7. The effects of topography on magma chamber deformation models: Application to Mt. Etna and radar interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles A. Williams; Geoff Wadge

    1998-01-01

    We have used a three-dimensional elastic finite element model to examine the effects of topography on the surface deformation predicted by models of magma chamber deflation. We used the topography of Mt. Etna to control the geometry of our model, and compared the finite element results to those predicted by an analytical solution for a pressurized sphere in an elastic

  8. Matching conditional moments in PDF modelling of nonpremixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, A.Y. [Mechanical Engineering Division, The University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    The rate of generation of fluctuations with respect to the scalar values conditioned on the mixture fraction, which significantly affects turbulent nonpremixed combustion processes, is examined. Simulation of the rate in a major mixing model is investigated and the derived equations can assist in selecting the model parameters so that the level of conditional fluctuations is better reproduced by the models. A more general formulation of the multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) model that distinguishes the reference and conditioning variables is suggested. This formulation can be viewed as a methodology of enforcing certain desired conditional properties onto conventional mixing models. Examples of constructing consistent MMC models with dissipation and velocity conditioning as well as of combining MMC with large eddy simulations (LES) are also provided.

  9. Simulating Combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Merker; C. Schwarz; G. Stiesch; F. Otto

    2006-01-01

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air\\/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be

  10. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 2. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J.I.; Niiya, K.Y.

    1987-09-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational concequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. This is Volume 2 of the report, which contains data plots of all the test programs.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of the SiFRP Ablator for the Combustion Chamber Heat Shields of Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Kenichi

    To design the LOX/LNG ablative combustor, it is indispensable to build up the mathematical ablation model. In this paper, the mathematical model of SiFRP has been developed, which successfully predicts the penetration depth of both charred and decomposed zones and also the temperature profiles in the various kinds of experimental results which have been conducted to verify the model. Using this model, the peripheral-zone temperature profiles in the combustor, that is to say, combustor wall heat flux profiles, are estimated to reproduce the char penetration depth which has encountered in the ground firing tests, and the model has been successfully applied to design a LOX/LNG combustor.

  12. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this paper reviews new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions. PMID:21597604

  13. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion stability, performance, and thermal operation over a wide thrust chamber throttling range.

  14. Thermophysics Characterization of Kerosene Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2000-01-01

    A one-formula surrogate fuel formulation and its quasi-global combustion kinetics model are developed to support the design of injectors and thrust chambers of kerosene-fueled rocket engines. This surrogate fuel model depicts a fuel blend that properly represents the general physical and chemical properties of kerosene. The accompanying gaseous-phase thermodynamics of the surrogate fuel is anchored with the heat of formation of kerosene and verified by comparing a series of one-dimensional rocket thrust chamber calculations. The quasi-global combustion kinetics model consists of several global steps for parent fuel decomposition, soot formation, and soot oxidation, and a detailed wet-CO mechanism. The final thermophysics formulations are incorporated with a computational fluid dynamics model for prediction of the combustor efficiency of an uni-element, tri-propellant combustor and the radiation of a kerosene-fueled thruster plume. The model predictions agreed reasonably well with those of the tests.

  15. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of an explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility outside the firing chamber must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation while the chamber door is open. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured to provide information for the final design. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic.

  16. The study of PDF turbulence models in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1991-01-01

    In combustion computations, it is known that the predictions of chemical reaction rates are poor if conventional turbulence models are used. The probability density function (pdf) method seems to be the only alternative that uses local instantaneous values of the temperature, density, etc., in predicting chemical reaction rates, and thus is the only viable approach for more accurate turbulent combustion calculations. The fact that the pdf equation has a very large dimensionality renders finite difference schemes extremely demanding on computer memories and thus impractical. A logical alternative is the Monte Carlo scheme. Since CFD has a certain maturity as well as acceptance, it seems that the use of a combined CFD and Monte Carlo scheme is more beneficial. Therefore, a scheme is chosen that uses a conventional CFD flow solver in calculating the flow field properties such as velocity, pressure, etc., while the chemical reaction part is solved using a Monte Carlo scheme. The discharge of a heated turbulent plane jet into quiescent air was studied. Experimental data for this problem shows that when the temperature difference between the jet and the surrounding air is small, buoyancy effect can be neglected and the temperature can be treated as a passive scalar. The fact that jet flows have a self-similar solution lends convenience in the modeling study. Futhermore, the existence of experimental data for turbulent shear stress and temperature variance make the case ideal for the testing of pdf models wherein these values can be directly evaluated.

  17. Multidimensional Modeling of Diesel Ignition and Combustion Usinga Multistep Kinetics Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S.-C. Kong; R. D. Reitz

    1993-01-01

    Ignition and combustion mechanisms in diesel engines were studied\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009using the KIVA code, with modifications to the combustion, heat transfer,\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009crevice flow, and spray models. A laminar-and-turbulent characteristic-time\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009combustion model that has been used successfully for spark-ignited\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009engine studies was extended to allow predictions of ignition and\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009combustion in diesel engines. A more accurate prediction of ignition\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009delay was achieved

  18. Experimental investigation of a lightweight rocket chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgleish, John E; Tischler, Adelbert O

    1953-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a jacketed rocket combustion chamber that was fabricated by hydraulic-forming from sheet metal. Rocket combustion chambers made by this method have been used successfully. Runs with these combustion chambers have been made at over-all heat-transfer rates 1.7 Btu per square inch per second with water cooling and also ammonia as a regenerative coolant.

  19. Thrust Chamber Modeling Using Navier-Stokes Equations: Code Documentation and Listings. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daley, P. L.; Owens, S. F.

    1988-01-01

    A copy of the PHOENICS input files and FORTRAN code developed for the modeling of thrust chambers is given. These copies are contained in the Appendices. The listings are contained in Appendices A through E. Appendix A describes the input statements relevant to thrust chamber modeling as well as the FORTRAN code developed for the Satellite program. Appendix B describes the FORTRAN code developed for the Ground program. Appendices C through E contain copies of the Q1 (input) file, the Satellite program, and the Ground program respectively.

  20. Modeling of nonlinear complex stiffness of dual-chamber pneumatic spring for precision vibration isolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Joon

    2007-04-01

    Dual-chamber pneumatic springs are widely in the vibration isolation systems for precision instruments such as optical devices or nano-scale equipments owing to their superior stiffness- and damping-characteristics. In order to facilitate their design optimization or active control, a more accurate mathematical model or complex stiffness is needed. So far nonlinearities have not been dealt with. Experimental results we obtained rigorously for a dual-chamber pneumatic spring exhibit significantly amplitude dependent nonlinear behavior, which cannot be described by linear models in earlier researches. In this paper, an improvement for the complex stiffness model is presented by taking two major considerations. One is to consider the amplitude-dependent complex stiffness of diaphragm necessarily employed for prevention of air leakage. The other is to use a dynamic model for oscillating flow in capillary tube connecting the two pneumatic chambers instead of unidirectional flow model. The proposed nonlinear complex stiffness model, which reflects dependency on both frequency and excitation amplitude is shown to be very valid by comparison with the experimental measurements. Such an accurate nonlinear model for the dual-chamber pneumatic springs would contribute to more effective design or control of vibration isolation systems.

  1. Development of an Oil Gallery Cooling Model for Internal Combustion Engines Considering the Cocktail Shaker Effect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takeshi Yoshikawa; Rolf D. Reitz

    2009-01-01

    An internal combustion engine oil gallery cooling model was developed, which can predict average heat transfer coefficients by considering the cocktail shaker effect due to the reciprocal motion of the engine piston. The model prediction showed good agreement with available experimental data. Using the gallery cooling model and a computational fluid dynamics code which was developed to predict the combustion

  2. A stochastic model for the indicated pressure process and the dynamics of the internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Rizzoni

    1989-01-01

    Some of the research problems pertaining to cyclic combustion variability are reformulated from a perspective markedly different from the fluid dynamic and thermodynamic models which traditionally characterize this research: a system viewpoint is embraced to construct a stochastic model for the cylinder pressure process and the dynamics of the internal combustion engine. A deterministic model for the dynamics of the

  3. Validation of model based active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Fleifil, M.; Ghoneim, Z.; Ghoniem, A.F.

    1998-07-01

    The demand for efficient, company and clean combustion systems have spurred research into the fundamental mechanisms governing their performance and means of interactively changing their performance characteristics. Thermoacoustic instability which is frequently observed in combustion systems with high power density, when burning close to the lean flammability limit, or using exhaust gas recirculation to meet more stringent emissions regulations, etc. Its occurrence and/or means to mitigate them passively lead to performance degradation such as reduced combustion efficiency, high local heat transfer rates, increase in the mixture equivalence ratio or system failure due to structural damage. This paper reports on their study of the origin of thermoacoustic instability, its dependence on system parameters and the means of actively controlling it. The authors have developed an analytical model of thermoacoustic instability in premixed combustors. The model combines a heat release dynamics model constructed using the kinematics of a premixed flame stabilized behind a perforated plate with the linearized conservation equations governing the system acoustics. This formulation allows model based controller design. In order to test the performance of the analytical model, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing the system has been carried out using the principle of harmonic separation and focusing on the dominant unstable mode. This leads to a system of ODEs governing the thermofluid variables. Analytical predictions of the frequency and growth ate of the unstable mode are shown to be in good agreement with the numerical simulations as well s with those obtained using experimental identification techniques when applied to a laboratory combustor. The authors use these results to confirm the validity of the assumptions used in formulating the analytical model. A controller based on the minimization of a cost function using the LQR technique has been designed using the analytical model and implemented on a bench top laboratory combustor. The authors show that the controller is capable of suppressing the pressure oscillations in the combustor with a settling time much shorter than what had been attained before and without exciting secondary peaks.

  4. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates—a comparison of model predictions with experimental data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren K. Kær

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional “walking-column” approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer

  5. A modeling study of pulverized coal combustion in COâ\\/Oâ atmospheres

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Berry; C. S. Wang; K. C. Chang; A. M. Wolsky

    1986-01-01

    In this modeling study, a one-dimensional coal combustion or gasification (1-DICOG) computer code was used to simulate differences in the combustion performance of pulverized coal resulting from the substitution of various COâ\\/Oâ mixtures as a replacement for air in the combustion process. Predictions using this simple, one-dimensional model were compared with actual performance data from tests designed by Argonne National

  6. Fluidized bed combustion of solid organic wastes and low-grade coals: Research and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Borodulya, V.A.; Dikalenko, V.I.; Palchonok, G.I.; Stanchits, L.K. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus). A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst.

    1995-12-31

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate devolatilization and combustion of single spherical particles of wood, hydrolytic lignin from ethanol production, leather processing sewage sludge, and low-grade Belarusian brown coals in a fluidized bed of sand. A two-phase model of fluidized bed combustion of biowaste is proposed. The model takes into account combustion of both volatiles and char in the bed as well as in the freeboard. Experimentally obtained characteristics of devolatilization and char combustion are used as parameters of the model proposed.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of Combustion Characteristics of Real Biodiesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C V; Westbrook, C K

    2009-04-08

    Biodiesel fuels are of much interest today either for replacing or blending with conventional fuels for automotive applications. Predicting engine effects of using biodiesel fuel requires accurate understanding of the combustion characteristics of the fuel, which can be acquired through analysis using reliable detailed reaction mechanisms. Unlike gasoline or diesel that consists of hundreds of chemical compounds, biodiesel fuels contain only a limited number of compounds. Over 90% of the biodiesel fraction is composed of 5 unique long-chain C{sub 18} and C{sub 16} saturated and unsaturated methyl esters. This makes modeling of real biodiesel fuel possible without the need for a fuel surrogate. To this end, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed for determining the combustion characteristics of a pure biodiesel (B100) fuel, applicable from low- to high-temperature oxidation regimes. This model has been built based on reaction rate rules established in previous studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Computed results are compared with the few fundamental experimental data that exist for biodiesel fuel and its components. In addition, computed results have been compared with experimental data for other long-chain hydrocarbons that are similar in structure to the biodiesel components.

  8. A chemical kinetic modeling study of chlorinated hydrocarbon combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1990-09-05

    The combustion of chloroethane is modeled as a stirred reactor so that we can study critical emission characteristics of the reactor as a function of residence time. We examine important operating conditions such as pressure, temperature, and equivalence ratio and their influence on destructive efficiency of chloroethane. The model uses a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism that we have developed previously for C{sub 3} hydrocarbons. We have added to this mechanism the chemical kinetic mechanism for C{sub 2} chlorinated hydrocarbons developed by Senkan and coworkers. In the modeling calculations, sensitivity coefficients are determined to find which reaction-rate constants have the largest effect on destructive efficiency. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Lessons from patient-specific 3D models of the cardiac chambers after the Mustard operation

    PubMed Central

    Chapron, Julien; Hosny, Hatem; Torii, Ryo; Sedky, Yasser; Donya, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2013-01-01

    The recent ability to create detailed 3D models of the atrial and ventricular chambers using CT, MRI and rapid prototyping offers unique opportunities to study the size and shape of the different cardiac chambers both before and following operation for complex cardiac anomalies. We here describe the techniques for creating detailed 3D models of the heart and demonstrate the utility of these techniques in a patient studied after the Mustard operation. This can give important insights into the changes in size and shape of the different chambers and the patterns of blood flow from the pulmonary and systemic veins to the ‘appropriate’ ventricle. This information in turn could be extremely helpful in understanding and optimizing the overall hemodynamic function after the Mustard operation. PMID:24749115

  10. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J.I.; Niiya, K.Y.

    1987-09-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

  11. Spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chigier, N. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    A survey is presented of the most recent developments in the field of spray combustion. Topics discussed are: physical processes of atomization; drop clusters; droplet arrays and streams; ideal sprays; cloud combustion; theoretical models of spray diffusion flames; spray diagnostic techniques; measurement of drop temperature; and spray combustion measurements. 67 refs.

  12. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Zhang, Hongzhi R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, 1495 East 100 South, Kennecott Research Building, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kubo, Shuichi [Frontier Research Center, Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kim, Kyoung-Oh [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku 1200, Susono, Shizuoka 480-1193 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot formation process. (author)

  13. Liquid rocket combustion computer model with distributed energy release. DER computer program documentation and user's guide, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, L. P.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing rocket engine performance was developed. The program is concerned with the formation, distribution, flow, and combustion of liquid sprays and combustion product gases in conventional rocket combustion chambers. The capabilities of the program to determine the combustion characteristics of the rocket engine are described. Sample data code sheets show the correct sequence and formats for variable values and include notes concerning options to bypass the input of certain data. A seperate list defines the variables and indicates their required dimensions.

  14. Hypersonic combustion of hydrogen in a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Stalker, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported on shock-tunnel experiments testing the feasibility of hypersonic combustion and thrust generation in a hydrogen scramjet model. Tests with a constant-area duct show that hypersonic combustion is possible with a central injection at static intake pressures of about 20 kPa. The results of a comparison made between model configurations with nominal combustion-chamber intake Mach numbers of 4 and 6 indicated that the hypersonic duct gives a better performance at flight enthalpies above 7 mJ/kg. It is argued that the lower temperatures associated with hypersonic flow produce more efficient combustion.

  15. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  16. Some Remarks on Modeling of the Early Stage of Cloud Formation in a Simulation Chamber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel N. Saad; Josef Podzimek; John C. Carstens

    1976-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to describe the early stage of cloud formation in a relatively small simulation chamber. The results for adiabatic expansion show a tendency for the cloud droplet spectrum to narrow, similar to the results obtained by other authors. The influence of updraft fluctuations is not as important as the fluctuation of temperature which depends upon

  17. Steady state thermal model for the hot chamber injection system in the pressure die casting process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Rosindale; K. Davey

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional numerical model that is used to predict the steady state thermal behaviour of the metal injection system of a hot chamber pressure die casting machine. The behaviour of the injection system is considered in conjunction with that of the die. The boundary element method (BEM) is employed, as surface temperatures are of primary importance. The

  18. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications.

    PubMed

    Golovitchev, Valeri I; Yang, Junfeng

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously. We compiled the liquid fuel properties, and the existing detailed mechanism of methyl butanoate ester (MB, C(5)H(10)O(2)) oxidation was supplemented by sub-mechanisms for two proposed fuel constituent components, C(7)H(16) and C(7)H(8)O (and then, by mp2d, C(4)H(6)O(2) and propyne, C(3)H(4)) to represent the combustion model for rapeseed methyl ester described by the chemical formula, C(19)H(34)O(2) (or C(19)H(36)O(2)). The main fuel vapor thermal properties were taken as those of methyl palmitate C(19)H(36)O(2) in the NASA polynomial form of the Burcat database. The special global reaction was introduced to "crack" the main fuel into its constituent components. This general reaction included 309 species and 1472 reactions, including soot and NO(x) formation processes. The detailed combustion mechanism was validated using shock-tube ignition-delay data under diesel engine conditions. For constant volume and diesel engine (Volvo D12C) combustion modeling, this mechanism could be reduced to 88 species participating in 363 reactions. PMID:19409477

  19. Model predictive control as a tool for improving the process operation of MSW combustion plants.

    PubMed

    Leskens, M; van Kessel, L B M; Bosgra, O H

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feasibility study is presented on the application of the advanced control strategy called model predictive control (MPC) as a tool for obtaining improved process operation performance for municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion plants. The paper starts with a discussion of the operational objectives and control of such plants, from which a motivation follows for applying MPC to them. This is followed by a discussion on the basic idea behind this advanced control strategy. After that, an MPC-based combustion control system is proposed aimed at tackling a typical MSW combustion control problem and, using this proposed control system, an assessment is made of the improvement in performance that an MPC-based MSW combustion control system can provide in comparison to conventional MSW combustion control systems. This assessment is based on simulations using an experimentally obtained process and disturbance model of a real-life large-scale MSW combustion plant. PMID:15896951

  20. Optimisation of a model internal combustion engine with linear phenomenological heat transfer law

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Chen; H. Song; F. Sun; C. Wu

    2010-01-01

    The optimal motion of a model internal combustion engine with a piston fitted inside a cylinder containing an ideal gas is examined. The gas is heated at a given rate f(t) and coupled to a heat bath with linear phenomenological heat transfer law q ? ?(T) for a finite amount of time. The optimal motion of the model internal combustion

  1. Temperature-enthalpy approach to the modelling of self-propagating combustion synthesis of materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Bhattacharya

    1992-01-01

    A new temperature-enthalpy approach has been proposed to model self-propagating combustion synthesis of advanced materials. This approach includes the effect of phase change which might take place during a combustion process. The effect of compact porosity is also modelled based on the conduction, convection and radiation in the local scale. Various parametric studies are made to analyse numerically the effects

  2. Modeling of scalar dissipation rates in flamelet models for low temperature combustion engine simulations

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Saurabh; Pal, Pinaki; Im, Hong G

    2014-01-01

    The flamelet approach offers a viable framework for combustion modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines under stratified mixture conditions. Scalar dissipation rate acts as a key parameter in flamelet-based combustion models which connects the physical mixing space to the reactive space. The aim of this paper is to gain fundamental insights into turbulent mixing in low temperature combustion (LTC) engines and investigate the modeling of scalar dissipation rate. Three direct numerical simulation (DNS) test cases of two-dimensional turbulent auto-ignition of a hydrogen-air mixture with different correlations of temperature and mixture fraction are considered, which are representative of different ignition regimes. The existing models of mean and conditional scalar dissipation rates, and probability density functions (PDFs) of mixture fraction and total enthalpy are a priori validated against the DNS data.

  3. Modeling and Verification of a Dual Chamber Implantable Pacemaker

    E-print Network

    Alur, Rajeev

    pace- maker as a case study for modeling and verification of control algorithms for medical devices design and certification of software for medical devices. Keywords: Medical Devices, Implantable-2006, the percentage of software-related causes in medical device re- calls have grown from 10% to 21% [1]. During

  4. Modelling and simulation of two-chamber microbial fuel cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingzhi Zeng; Yeng Fung Choo; Byung-Hong Kim; Ping Wu

    2010-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer great promise for simultaneous treatment of wastewater and energy recovery. While past research has been based extensively on experimental studies, modelling and simulation remains scarce. A typical MFC shares many similarities with chemical fuel cells such as direct ascorbic acid fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells. Therefore, an attempt is made to develop a

  5. Using a Phenomenological Computer Model to Investigate Advanced Combustion Trajectories in a CIDI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Green Jr, Johney Boyd [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes results from simulations of conventional, high-dilution, and high-efficiency clean combustion in a diesel engine based on a two-zone phenomenological model. The two-zone combustion model is derived from a previously published multi-zone model, but it has been further simplified to increase computational speed by a factor of over 100. The results demonstrate that this simplified model is still able to track key aspects of the combustion trajectory responsible for NOx and soot production. In particular, the two-zone model in combination with highly simplified global kinetics correctly predicts the importance of including oxygen mass fraction (in addition to equivalence ratio and temperature) in lowering emissions from high-efficiency clean combustion. The methodology also provides a convenient framework for extracting information directly from in-cylinder pressure measurements. This feature is likely to be useful for on-board combustion diagnostics and controls. Because of the possibility for simulating large numbers of engine cycles in a short time, models of this type can provide insight into multi-cycle and transient combustion behavior not readily accessible to more computationally intensive models. Also the representation of the combustion trajectory in 3D space corresponding to equivalence ratio, flame temperature, and oxygen fraction provides new insight into optimal combustion management.

  6. Heat regenerative external combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duva, Anthony W.

    1993-10-01

    A heat regenerative external combustion engine is disclosed. The engine includes fuel inlet means which extends along the exhaust passage and/or combustion chamber in order to preheat the fuel, To provide for preheating by gases in both the combustion chamber and the exhaust passage, the combustion chamber is arranged annularly around the drive shaft and between the cylinders. This configuration also is advantageous in that it reduces the noise of combustion. The engine of the invention is particularly well-suited for use in a torpedo.

  7. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  8. Modeling reacting gases and aftertreatment devices for internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depcik, Christopher David

    As more emphasis is placed worldwide on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, automobile manufacturers have to create more efficient engines. Simultaneously, legislative agencies want these engines to produce fewer problematic emissions such as nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. In response, newer combustion methods, like homogeneous charge compression ignition and fuel cells, are being researched alongside the old standard of efficiency, the compression ignition or diesel engine. These newer technologies present a number of benefits but still have significant challenges to overcome. As a result, renewed interest has risen in making diesel engines cleaner. The key to cleaning up the diesel engine is the placement of aftertreatment devices in the exhaust. These devices have shown great potential in reducing emission levels below regulatory levels while still allowing for increased fuel economy versus a gasoline engine. However, these devices are subject to many flow control issues. While experimental evaluation of these devices helps to understand these issues better, it is impossible to solve the problem through experimentation alone because of time and cost constraints. Because of this, accurate models are needed in conjunction with the experimental work. In this dissertation, the author examines the entire exhaust system including reacting gas dynamics and aftertreatment devices, and develops a complete numerical model for it. The author begins by analyzing the current one-dimensional gas-dynamics simulation models used for internal combustion engine simulations. It appears that more accurate and faster numerical method is available, in particular, those developed in aeronautical engineering, and the author successfully implements one for the exhaust system. The author then develops a comprehensive literature search to better understand the aftertreatment devices. A number of these devices require a secondary injection of fuel or reductant in the exhaust stream. Accordingly, the author develops a simple post-cylinder injection model which can be easily tuned to match experimental findings. In addition, the author creates a general catalyst model which can be used to model virtually all of the different aftertreatment devices. Extensive validation of this model with experimental data is presented along with all of the numerical algorithms needed to reproduce the model.

  9. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D. (Rochester Hills, MI); Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  10. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout. PMID:23278063

  11. Modeling the combustion behavior of hazardous waste in a rotary kiln incinerator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxiang; Pijnenborg, Marc J A; Reuter, Markus A; Verwoerd, Joep

    2005-01-01

    Hazardous wastes have complex physical forms and chemical compositions and are normally incinerated in rotary kilns for safe disposal and energy recovery. In the rotary kiln, the multifeed stream and wide variation of thermal, physical, and chemical properties of the wastes cause the incineration system to be highly heterogeneous, with severe temperature fluctuations and unsteady combustion chemistry. Incomplete combustion is often the consequence, and the process is difficult to control. In this article, modeling of the waste combustion is described by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Through CFD simulation, gas flow and mixing, turbulent combustion, and heat transfer inside the incinerator were predicted and visualized. As the first step, the waste in various forms was modeled to a hydrocarbon-based virtual fuel mixture. The combustion of the simplified waste was then simulated with a seven-gas combustion model within a CFD framework. Comparison was made with previous global three-gas combustion model with which no chemical behavior can be derived. The distribution of temperature and chemical species has been investigated. The waste combustion model was validated with temperature measurements. Various operating conditions and the influence on the incineration performance were then simulated. Through this research, a better process understanding and potential optimization of the design were attained. PMID:16194906

  12. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of a 60-kg explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for, most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic. During tension, the reinforcing steel remained elastic, but the concrete elastic limit was exceeded in two areas, the center spans of the ceiling and the north wall, where elastic safety factors as low as 0.66 were obtained, thus indicating that the concrete would be expected to crack in those areas. Indeed, visual post-test inspection of those areas revealed tight cracks in the concrete.

  13. Assessment of RANS-based turbulent combustion models for prediction of gas turbine emissions: turbulence model and reaction mechanism effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Nanduri; I. B. Celik; P. A. Strakey; D. R. Parsons

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess current, commonly applied turbulence and combustion models with respect to their performance in gas-turbine combustion (GTC). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-based turbulence and chemistry models are two primary factors influencing the uncertainty in predicting turbulent combustion characteristics, especially for GTC. RANS-based methods are the design tools of choice in the gas turbine industry

  14. Modeling extinction and reignition in turbulent nonpremixed combustion using a doubly-conditional moment closure approach

    E-print Network

    Pitsch, Heinz

    Modeling extinction and reignition in turbulent nonpremixed combustion using a doubly variable into the first-moment, singly conditional moment closure model to describe extinction direct numerical simulation experiments exhibiting local extinction/reignition events is described

  15. Combustion modelling opportunities and challenges for oxy-coal carbon capture technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Edge; M. Gharebaghi; R. Irons; R. Porter; M. Pourkashanian; D. Smith; P. Stephenson; A. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Oxy-coal combustion is one of the leading technologies for carbon capture and storage. This paper presents a review of the opportunities and challenges surrounding the development of oxy-coal combustion models and discusses historical and recent advances in specific areas related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), including char oxidation, radiation, pollutant formation and removal (Hg, NOx and SOx), and the impact

  16. Models of Filtration Combustion of Gases with Allowance for Flame Turbulence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. I. Futko

    2002-01-01

    The basic system of equations describing the combustion process inside a porous body as well as in the wave regime of filtration combustion of gases is refined on the basis of the Damköhler theory for turbulent burning rate. Better agreement of the models and available experimental data on the mass burning rate in such systems is obtained. The correction for

  17. Thermochemistry of Aluminum Species for Combustion Modeling from Ab Initio Molecular Orbital Calculations

    E-print Network

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Thermochemistry of Aluminum Species for Combustion Modeling from Ab Initio Molecular Orbital initio methods for computational thermochemistry have been applied to aluminum compounds expected to be present during combustion of aluminum particles. The computed enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K agree

  18. Heat release model for the combustion of diesel oil emulsions in DI diesel engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jamil Ghojel; Damon Honnery

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosing the combustion process in internal combustion engines using cylinder pressure, fuel delivery pressure and injector needle lift data is a well-established and widely used procedure in engine and fuel performance tests. Of the models developed, the first law single zone is the simplest and easiest tool to use for quick preliminary analysis of engine performance. It can yield valuable

  19. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  20. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  1. Experimental and numerical modeling study of engine combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L. Chau; D. A. Rotman; F. W. Schipperrijn; A. K. Oppenheim; R. F. Sawyer; A. Iiyama; L. Q. Xia

    1987-01-01

    Square piston engine simulator experiments reveal flame kernel development and flame propagation for single event combustion. High speed color and black and white schlieren cinematography provide time and space resolved records for the combustion of intake manifold injected isopentane with air at a compression ratio of 6.6 to 1, engine speed of 900 rpm, spark and plasma ignition, and flat

  2. Motion-conversion mechanism for a four stroke oscillating piston internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pahis

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses a motor conversion method for an internal combustion engine. The engine includes rotor means having an opening provided therein, combustion chamber means formed on the rotor means, and means supported in the combustion chamber means for movement therewithin in response to the forces generated by the gases created when combustion takes place in the combustion chamber means

  3. Observing and modeling nonlinear dynamics in an internal combustion engine Engineering Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8088

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    Observing and modeling nonlinear dynamics in an internal combustion engine C. S. Daw* Engineering motivated, nonlinear map as a model for cyclic combustion variation in spark-ignited internal combustion combustion engines can exhibit substantial cycle-to-cycle variation in combustion energy release

  4. Simulating Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, G.; Schwarz, C.; Stiesch, G.; Otto, F.

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be used as the engineers testbench following the rules and recommendations described here.

  5. Effect of air distribution on solid fuel bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, J.T.; Hsu, W.S.; Yo, T.C. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    One important aspect of refuse mass-burn combination control is the manipulation of combustion air. Proper air manipulation is key to the achievement of good combustion efficiency and reduction of pollutant emissions. Experiments, using a small fix-grate laboratory furnace with cylindrical combustion chamber, were performed to investigate the influence of undergrate/sidewall air distribution on the combustion of beds of wood cubes. Wood cubes were used as a convenient laboratory surrogate of solid refuse. Specifically, for different bed configurations (e.g. bed height, bed voidage and bed fuel size, etc.), burning rates and combustion temperatures at different bed locations were measured under various air supply and distribution conditions. One of the significant results of the experimental investigation is that combustion, with air injected from side walls and no undergrate air, provide the most efficient combustion. On the other hand, combustion with undergrate air achieves higher combustion rates but with higher CO emissions. A simple one-dimensional model was constructed to derive correlations of combustion rate as functions of flue gas temperature and oxygen concentration. Despite the fact that the model is one dimensional and many detailed chemical and physical processes of combustion are not considered, comparisons of the model predictions and the experimental results indicate that the model is appropriate for quantitative evaluation of bed burning rates.

  6. Accuracy Quantification of the Loci-CHEM Code for Chamber Wall Heat Fluxes in a G02/GH2 Single Element Injector Model Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Westra, Doug; Lin, Jeff; Tucker, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A robust rocket engine combustor design and development process must include tools which can accurately predict the multi-dimensional thermal environments imposed on solid surfaces by the hot combustion products. Currently, empirical methods used in the design process are typically one dimensional and do not adequately account for the heat flux rise rate in the near-injector region of the chamber. Computational Fluid Dynamics holds promise to meet the design tool requirement, but requires accuracy quantification, or validation, before it can be confidently applied in the design process. This effort presents the beginning of such a validation process for the Loci- CHEM CPD code. The model problem examined here is a gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) shear coaxial single element injector operating at a chamber pressure of 5.42 MPa. The GO2/GH2 propellant combination in this geometry represents one the simplest rocket model problems and is thus foundational to subsequent validation efforts for more complex injectors. Multiple steady state solutions have been produced with Loci-CHEM employing different hybrid grids and two-equation turbulence models. Iterative convergence for each solution is demonstrated via mass conservation, flow variable monitoring at discrete flow field locations as a function of solution iteration and overall residual performance. A baseline hybrid grid was used and then locally refined to demonstrate grid convergence. Solutions were also obtained with three variations of the k-omega turbulence model.

  7. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Oxidizer-Rich Staged Combustion Injector Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Canino, J. V.; Heister, S. D.; Garrison, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the unsteady hydrodynamic characteristics of coaxial swirl atomizers of interest in oxidizer-rich staged combustion (ORSC) liquid rocket engines. To this end, the pseudo-density (homogeneous flow) treatment combined with the Marker-and-Cell (MAC) numerical algorithm has been used to develop an axisymmetric with swirl, two-phase, unsteady model. The numerical model is capable of assessing the time-dependent orifice exit conditions and internal mixing for arbitrary fuel and oxidizer gas injection conditions. Parametric studies have been conducted to determine the effect of geometry, gas properties, and liquid properties on the exit massflow rate and velocity. It has been found that the frequency at which the liquid film oscillates increases as the density ratio and thickness increase, decreases as film thickness and liquid swirl velocity increase, and is unaffected by the mixing length. Additionally, it has been determined that the variation in the massflow rate increases as the liquid swirl velocity and liquid film thickness increase, and decreases as the density ratio, collar thickness, and mixing length increase.

  8. Mathematical modeling of swirling flames of pulverized coal: What can combustion engineers expect from modeling?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Weber; A. A. F. Peters; P. P. Breithaupt; B. M. Visser

    1995-01-01

    The present study is concerned with mathematical modeling of swirling pulverized coal flames. The attention is focused on the near burner zone properties of high- and low-NOâ flames issued from an Aerodynamically Air Staged Burner of 3.4 MW thermal input. The swirling combusting flows are calculated using the κ-ε model and second-order models of turbulence. The Eulerian balance equations for

  9. Solution Combustion Synthesis Impregnated Layer Combustion Synthesis is a Novel

    E-print Network

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    Solution Combustion Synthesis Impregnated Layer Combustion Synthesis is a Novel Methodology Engineering University of Notre Dame University of Notre Dame #12;Outline: Overview of combustion synthesis Reaction system Combustion front analaysis Theoretical model results Conclusions Acknowledgements #12

  10. Discrete model of gas-free spin combustion of a powder mixture.

    PubMed

    Klimenok, Kirill L; Rashkovskiy, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a discrete model of gas-free combustion of a cylindrical sample which reproduces in detail a spin combustion mode. It is shown that a spin combustion, in its classical sense as a continuous spiral motion of heat release zones on the surface of the sample, does not exist. Such a concept has arisen due to the misinterpretation of the experimental data. This study shows that in fact a spinlike combustion is realized, at which two energy release zones appear on the lateral surface of the sample and propagate circumferentially in the opposite directions. After some time two new heat release zones are formed on the next layer of the cylinder surface and make the same counter-circular motion. This process continues periodically and from a certain angle it looks like a spiral movement of the luminous zone along the lateral surface of the sample. The model shows that on approaching the combustion limit the process becomes more complicated and the spinlike combustion mode shifts to a more complex mode with multiple zones of heat release moving in different directions along the lateral surface. It is shown that the spin combustion mode appears due to asymmetry of initial conditions and always transforms into a layer-by-layer combustion mode with time. PMID:25679655

  11. Discrete model of gas-free spin combustion of a powder mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenok, Kirill L.; Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a discrete model of gas-free combustion of a cylindrical sample which reproduces in detail a spin combustion mode. It is shown that a spin combustion, in its classical sense as a continuous spiral motion of heat release zones on the surface of the sample, does not exist. Such a concept has arisen due to the misinterpretation of the experimental data. This study shows that in fact a spinlike combustion is realized, at which two energy release zones appear on the lateral surface of the sample and propagate circumferentially in the opposite directions. After some time two new heat release zones are formed on the next layer of the cylinder surface and make the same counter-circular motion. This process continues periodically and from a certain angle it looks like a spiral movement of the luminous zone along the lateral surface of the sample. The model shows that on approaching the combustion limit the process becomes more complicated and the spinlike combustion mode shifts to a more complex mode with multiple zones of heat release moving in different directions along the lateral surface. It is shown that the spin combustion mode appears due to asymmetry of initial conditions and always transforms into a layer-by-layer combustion mode with time.

  12. Modeling of internal combustion engine based cogeneration systems for residential applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hycienth I. Onovwiona; V. Ismet Ugursal; Alan S. Fung

    2007-01-01

    A parametric model that can be used in the design and techno-economic evaluation of internal combustion engine (ICE) based cogeneration systems for residential use is presented. The model, which is suitable to be incorporated into a building simulation program, includes sub-models for internal combustion engines and generators, electrical\\/thermal storage systems, and secondary system components (e.g. controllers), and is capable of

  13. Evaluation of char combustion models: measurement and analysis of variability in char particle size and density

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Maloney; Esmail R. Monazam; Kent H. Casleton; Christopher R. Shaddix

    2008-08-01

    Char samples representing a range of combustion conditions and extents of burnout were obtained from a well-characterized laminar flow combustion experiment. Individual particles from the parent coal and char samples were characterized to determine distributions in particle volume, mass, and density at different extent of burnout. The data were then compared with predictions from a comprehensive char combustion model referred to as the char burnout kinetics model (CBK). The data clearly reflect the particle- to-particle heterogeneity of the parent coal and show a significant broadening in the size and density distributions of the chars resulting from both devolatilization and combustion. Data for chars prepared in a lower oxygen content environment (6% oxygen by vol.) are consistent with zone II type combustion behavior where most of the combustion is occurring near the particle surface. At higher oxygen contents (12% by vol.), the data show indications of more burning occurring in the particle interior. The CBK model does a good job of predicting the general nature of the development of size and density distributions during burning but the input distribution of particle size and density is critical to obtaining good predictions. A significant reduction in particle size was observed to occur as a result of devolatilization. For comprehensive combustion models to provide accurate predictions, this size reduction phenomenon needs to be included in devolatilization models so that representative char distributions are carried through the calculations.

  14. 2D Thermo-mechanical Modelling Sheds New Light on the Geochemical Evolution of Melt within Crustal Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roele, K. H.; Morgan, J. V.; Jackson, M.

    2014-12-01

    An axisymmetric, two-dimensional numerical model has been developed that describes heat and mass transport within crustal magma chambers during repeated intrusion of mafic sills. The model includes mass transport (melt segregation) via buoyancy driven flow of melt along grain boundaries and compaction of the crystalline matrix. Results demonstrate that the majority of the magma chamber is in a mush state at low to moderate intrusion rates, consistent with previous thermal models. However, the melt segregation processes included here lead to periodic formation of high melt fraction (magma) layers within the mush which could be tapped from the chamber to erupt or ascend to a shallower reservoir. Moreover, the magma composition is chemically evolved because melt reacts with the crystal mush as it migrates upwards into cooler regions of the chamber. Eruptible magma is therefore present in the chamber at lower mafic intrusion rates than has been predicted by purely thermal models because (i) segregation causes melt to accumulate in discrete layers and (ii) the evolved magma composition remains liquid at lower temperatures. Moreover, differentiation of the magma is driven primarily by mush processes rather than by fractional crystallisation, as is assumed to dominate in traditional models of liquid-filled magma chambers. Such magma chambers can only be maintained by very high intrusion rates of new mafic material. We will use our new 2D thermo-mechanical code to model the growth of the magma chamber beneath the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, which has previously been investigated using a thermal-only model and constraints from seismic refraction data. The model results show that melt segregation leads to decoupling of the maximum temperature and melt fraction. Its addition will therefore provide improved estimates of the dimensions and frequency of successive magma injections into the chamber, as well as shed light on the evolution of potentially eruptible magma and magmatic fluid with time.

  15. Internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Rascov, A.J.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine, comprising: (a) a housing (b) a first cylinder chamber associated with the housing; (c) a first piston assembly fitted in the first cylinder chamber, comprising a first piston head and a second piston head joined by a first tube, the first tube including a central portion; (d) a fist piston chamber constructed in the first cylinder chamber wherein the longitudinal axes of the first piston chamber and the first cylinder chamber are colinear, the first piston chamber bounded by a top plate, a bottom plate and side walls; (e) a second cylinder chamber associated with the housing wherein the longitudinal axis of the second cylinder chamber is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the first cylinder chamber; (f) a second piston assembly fitted in the second cylinder chamber, comprising a third piston head and a fourth piston head joined by a second tube, the second tube including a central portion; (g) a second piston chamber constructed in the second cylinder chamber wherein the longitudinal axes of the second piston chamber and second cylinder chamber are colinear, the second piston chamber bounded by a top plate, a bottom plate and side walls.

  16. Multiple piston expansion chamber engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.W.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine. This engine consists of a cylinder with an auxiliary piston reciprocating in the cylinder; a working piston reciprocating within the auxiliary piston; an auxiliary chamber above the auxiliary piston; a combustion chamber above the working piston and providing a dwell for the auxiliary piston at TDC starting from when the working piston is between 40 degrees before to about TDC and on passing TDC entering an expansion stroke. The auxiliary piston remains at TDC until the working piston expansion stroke is underway and at a point where the working piston is between 20 and 160 degrees past TDC during the expansion stroke at which point the auxiliary piston leaves TDC and moves toward BDC. A controller communicating with the combustion chamber and the auxiliary chamber to prevent communication of combusted products from the combustion chamber above the working piston to the chamber above the auxiliary piston while the auxiliary piston is at TDC. The piston at TDC permits communication only during the working piston expansion stroke continuing past the point between 20 and 160 degrees past TDC, and a following exhaust stroke of the working piston so as to utilize energy of expansion from the auxiliary piston as it expands until the working piston has passed through BDC and returns to about TDC during the exhaust stroke of the working piston.

  17. Multiple piston expansion chamber engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.W.

    1987-12-29

    An internal combustion engine is described wherein combustion, expansion and exhaust functions are performed in a cylinder comprised of an auxiliary piston reciprocating in the cylinder, a sleeve valve reciprocating within the auxiliary piston, a working piston reciprocating within the sleeve valve and leading the auxiliary piston, an auxiliary chamber above the auxiliary piston and a combustion chamber above the working piston. The sleeve valve controlling communication of the auxiliary chamber with the combustion chamber to prevent communication of combusted products from the chamber above the working piston to the chamber above the auxiliary piston from when the working piston is at about TDC until a subsequent expansion stroke of the working piston is underway and at a point between 30 and 160 degrees past TDC and with the auxiliary piston being at about TDC at this same instant when the working piston is at the point and the communication then is commenced. To permit communication only during the expansion stroke continuing past the point and a following exhaust stroke of the working piston so as to utilize energy of expansion from the auxiliary piston as it expands until the working piston has passed through BDC and returns to about TDC during the exhaust stroke of the working piston.

  18. Modelling the Propagation of Forward and Opposed Smouldering Combustion 

    E-print Network

    Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    A computational study has been carried out to investigate smouldering ignition and propagation in polyurethane foam. The one-dimensional, transient, governing equations for smouldering combustion in a porous fuel are ...

  19. Establishing global error bounds for model reduction in combustion

    E-print Network

    Oxberry, Geoffrey Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    In addition to theory and experiment, simulation of reacting flows has become important in policymaking, industry, and combustion science. However, simulations of reacting flows can be extremely computationally demanding ...

  20. Gasification and combustion modeling for porous char particles

    E-print Network

    Singer, Simcha Lev

    2012-01-01

    Gasification and combustion of porous char particles occurs in many industrial applications. Reactor-scale outputs of importance depend critically on processes that occur at the particle-scale. Because char particles often ...

  1. A Kinetic Model of Carbon Burnout in Pulverized Coal Combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Hurt; Jian-Kuan Sun; Melissa Lunden

    1998-01-01

    The degree of carbon burnout is an important operating characteristic of full-scale suspension-fired coal combustion systems. Prediction of carbon loss requires special char combustion kinetics valid through the very high conversions targeted in industry (typically >99.5%), and valid for a wide range of particle temperature histories occurring in full-scale furnaces. The present paper presents high-temperature kinetic data for five coal

  2. Multiphase CFD-based models for chemical looping combustion process: Fuel reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jonghwun (ANL); Gamwo, I.K.

    2008-04-21

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a flameless two-step fuel combustion that produces a pure CO2 stream, ready for compression and sequestration. The process is composed of two interconnected fluidized bed reactors. The air reactor which is a conventional circulating fluidized bed and the fuel reactor which is a bubbling fluidized bed. The basic principle is to avoid the direct contact of air and fuel during the combustion by introducing a highly-reactive metal particle, referred to as oxygen carrier, to transport oxygen from the air to the fuel. In the process, the products from combustion are kept separated from the rest of the flue gases namely nitrogen and excess oxygen. This process eliminates the energy intensive step to separate the CO2 from nitrogen-rich flue gas that reduce the thermal efficiency. Fundamental knowledge of multiphase reactive fluid dynamic behavior of the gas–solid flow is essential for the optimization and operation of a chemical looping combustor. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase CFD-based models have not been adapted to chemical looping combustion processes in the open literature. In this study, we have developed the reaction kinetics model of the fuel reactor and implemented the kinetic model into a multiphase hydrodynamic model, MFIX, developed earlier at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Simulated fuel reactor flows revealed high weight fraction of unburned methane fuel in the flue gas along with CO2 and H2O. This behavior implies high fuel loss at the exit of the reactor and indicates the necessity to increase the residence time, say by decreasing the fuel flow rate, or to recirculate the unburned methane after condensing and removing CO2.

  3. Variable compression ratio internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.D.

    1991-01-29

    This patent describes a variable compression ratio internal combustion engine having at least one cylinder, a piston disposed in the cylinder and a cylinder head disposed at one end of the cylinder. The cylinder head has a combustion chamber and a piston chamber contiguous with the top of the cylinder. A movable piston disposed in the piston chamber to change the effective volume of the combustion chamber. A closed end of the piston chamber is connected to one of the engine's source of pressurized fluid. A solenoid valve is disposed between the source of pressurized fluid and the piston chamber. Energization of the solenoid valve is controlled by a controller to open the solenoid valve when the combustion chamber has a low pressure to displace the movable piston to increase the compression ratio of the engine and to open the solenoid valve when the combustion chamber has a high or peak pressure to displace the movable piston to decrease the compression ratio.

  4. Predicting Equilibrium Mineral Assemblages in Contact Metamorphism By Integrating Thermodynamic and Numerical Models of Magma Chamber Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M.; Álvarez-Valero, A.; Geyer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive field studies indicate that exposed crustal-level magma chambers generate contact metamorphic aureoles in a variety of widths, from a few centimeters to upwards of a kilometer. To examine the large variation in metamorphic signatures, we modeled an instantaneously emplaced magma chamber at various depths in dry, compositionally representative carbonate and silicic crusts. The chamber contained magmas of rhyolitic, andesitic, dacitic, and basaltic composition, and cooling was modeled in prolate, spherical, and sill-like geometries. This combination created a time series of crustal temperature (T) and pressure (P) conditions driven by conductive cooling of the magma chamber. The spatial P-T relations were overlain with representative metapelitic and calcareous P-T pseudosections. Our results indicate that magma chambers will exhibit thinner aureoles with increasing depth of emplacement, due to the higher initial crustal temperature from the geothermal gradient. In addition, sill-like and prolate magma chambers exhibit significant variation in aureole thickness, with contacts on their outermost ends generating thin aureoles while contacts closer to their centers generate very thick aureoles. These results indicate that magma intrusion geometry plays a dominant role in controlling the local impacts of contact metamorphism. While future models will investigate the more complex thermodynamic effects of hydrated crusts, current results demonstrate that the combination of relatively simple geothermal models with petrologic datasets can generate predictions for the maximum metamorphic grade and geometry of magma chamber aureoles.

  5. Modelling the photooxidation of ULP, E5 and E10 in the CSIRO smog chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Stephen J.; Azzi, Merched; Angove, Dennys E.; Jamie, Ian M.

    2010-12-01

    The photooxidation of fuel vapour was investigated in a smog chamber and simulated using three chemical mechanisms, the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.1), SAPRC-99 and the Carbon Bond chemical mechanism (CB05). Three varieties of fuel were used, unleaded petrol (ULP) and two ULP-ethanol blends which contained 5% and 10% ethanol (E5, E10). The fuel vapours were introduced into the chamber using two methods, by injecting the vapours from wholly evaporated fuel directly, and by injecting the headspace vapour from fuel equilibrated at 38 °C. The chamber experiments were simulated using the selected mechanisms and comparisons made with collected experimental data. The SAPRC-99 mechanism reproduced ?(O 3-NO) more accurately for almost all fuel types and injection modes, with negligible model error for both injection modes. The average model error for MCM simulations was -16% and for CB05 the average model error was -34%. The predictions for the CB05 mechanism varied depending on injection mode, the ?(O 3-NO) model error for wholly evaporated experiments was -44%, compared to -24% for headspace vapour experiments. The difference in aromatic content between experiments of different injection modes was likely to be the cause of the difference in model error for CB05. The model error for all headspace experiments was dependent upon the initial carbon monoxide concentrations. The results for ?(O 3-NO) were matched by the prediction of other key products, with formaldehyde predicted to within 20% by both SAPRC and the MCM. The addition of ethanol to the base SAPRC mechanism altered the predictions of ?(O 3-NO) by less than 2%. Changes observed in the concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were consistent with the expected yields from ethanol oxidation.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of Upset-Inducing Disturbances for Digital Systems in an Electromagnetic Reverberation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a modeling and simulation approach for disturbance patterns representative of the environment experienced by a digital system in an electromagnetic reverberation chamber. The disturbance is modeled by a multi-variate statistical distribution based on empirical observations. Extended versions of the Rejection Samping and Inverse Transform Sampling techniques are developed to generate multi-variate random samples of the disturbance. The results show that Inverse Transform Sampling returns samples with higher fidelity relative to the empirical distribution. This work is part of an ongoing effort to develop a resilience assessment methodology for complex safety-critical distributed systems.

  7. Low emission combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Paul; A. Paul

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a combustion system for internal combustion engines having a cylinder and at least one piston reciprocal in the cylinder. It comprises a combustion chamber having the regions wherein the piston has a piston head with an outer perimeter portion, a central recessed portion and a baffle with convergent radial slots over the recessed portion, the piston cooperation

  8. Multiple piston expansion chamber engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.W.

    1986-04-08

    This patent describes a multiple piston expansion chamber in an internal combustion engine wherein combustion, expansion and exhaust functions are performed in a cylinder. This cylinder consists of an auxiliary piston reciprocating in the cylinder, a sleeve valve reciprocating within the auxiliary piston, a working piston reciprocating within the sleeve valve. Leading the auxiliary piston is an auxiliary chamber above the auxiliary piston and a combustion chamber above the working piston. The sleeve valve controls communication of the auxiliary chamber with the combustion chamber to prevent communication of combusted products from the chamber above the working piston to the chamber above the auxiliary piston from when the working piston is at about TDC until a subsequent expansion stroke of the working piston is underway to a point about midway to BDC. When the auxiliary piston is at about TDC at this same instant when the working piston is at the point and the communication then is commenced. In order to permit communication only during the expansion stroke from continuing past the point and a following exhaust stroke of the working piston so as to utilize energy of expansion from the auxiliary piston as it expands until the working piston has passed through BDC and returns to about TDC during the exhaust stroke of the working piston. The controlling means comprises a circular sealing surface on an upward viewing surface of the sleeve valve adjacent to the working piston to prevent communication of the respective chambers. Also provided in the chambers is a dwell of the sleeve valve at its TDC between when the respective pistons each reach their TDC.

  9. Numerical modelling by the Stokes--DEM coupled simulation for a roof at hot magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, M.; Nishiura, D.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of a granular media has been suggested to play an important role in a reheated magma chamber by a hot intrusion (e.g. Burgisser and Bergantz, 2011). Although several mechanisms, such as Rayleigh Taylor instability, unzipping, and rhythmic convection (e.g. Shibano et.al. 2012, 2013), have been proposed for characterizing upward migration process in a crystalline magma chamber, their contributions in the long geodynamical time scale are not clear yet. Thus we perform numerical simulations to investigate the thermal evolution of the magma chamber with basal intrusion in three dimensions. In order to solve high-viscosity fluid and particle dynamics for modelling a melt--crystal jammed state of the magma, we have developed a coupled Stokes--DEM simulation code with two key techniques: formulation of particle motion without inertia and semi-implicit treatment of particle motion in the fluid equation (Furuichi and Nishiura 2014). Our simulation can successfully handle sinking particles in a high-viscosity fluid. We examine different types of the granular media heated from the bottom with varying parameters. We especially focus on pattern of the settling particles against the melt density contrast between upper and lower region.

  10. Rotary internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kollen

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a rotary internal combustion engine operating on fuel and air, comprising: a housing having a pair of communicating parallel axis rotor chambers; a pair of parallel axis rotors, one in each rotor chamber of the housing, the rotors each having on its outer periphery circumferentially spaced axial teeth with intervening circumferentially spaced axial passages. The rotors are

  11. Regularities of heat transfer in the gas layers of a steam boiler furnace flame. Part II. Gas layer radiation laws and the procedure for calculating heat transfer in furnaces, fire boxes, and combustion chambers developed on the basis of these laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The article presents the results stemming from the scientific discovery of laws relating to radiation from the gas layers generated during flame combustion of fuel and when electric arc burns in electric-arc steel-melting furnaces. The procedure for calculating heat transfer in electric-arc and torch furnaces, fire-boxes, and combustion chambers elaborated on the basis of this discovery is described.

  12. Internal combustion engine with auxiliary piston for generating turbulence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Nohira; H. Oki; S. Ito

    1979-01-01

    An internal combustion engine is provided with an auxiliary piston reciprocating within an auxiliary chamber for generating turbulence in a gas mixture contained within a main combustion chamber. Forward motion of the auxiliary piston causes the injection of a gas into the main combustion chamber through a communicating passageway when the main piston approaches top dead center of the compression

  13. Longitudinal Mode Aeroengine Combustion Instability: Model and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem more completely (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the casual dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment and be designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic, and thermo-fluid features, ensuring that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  14. Comprehensive mechanisms for combustion chemistry: Experiment, modeling, and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F.L.; Yetter, R.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work are conducted in large diameter flow reactors, at pressures from one to twenty atmospheres, temperatures from 550 K to 1200 K, and with observed reaction times from 10{sup {minus}2} to 5 seconds. Gas sampling of stable reactant, intermediate, and product species concentrations provides not only substantial definition of the phenomenology of reaction mechanisms, but a significantly constrained set of kinetic information with negligible diffusive coupling. Analytical techniques used for detecting hydrocarbons and carbon oxides include gas chromatography (GC), and gas infrared (NDIR) and FTIR methods are utilized for continuous on-line sample detection of light absorption measurements of OH have also been performed in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR), and a variable pressure flow (VPFR) reactor is presently being instrumented to perform optical measurements of radicals and highly reactive molecular intermediates. The numerical aspects of the work utilize zero and one-dimensional pre-mixed, detailed kinetic studies, including path, elemental gradient sensitivity, and feature sensitivity analyses. The program emphasizes the use of hierarchical mechanistic construction to understand and develop detailed kinetic mechanisms. Numerical studies are utilized for guiding experimental parameter selections, for interpreting observations, for extending the predictive range of mechanism constructs, and to study the effects of diffusive transport coupling on reaction behavior in flames. Modeling using well defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H{sub 2}/oxidant systems.

  15. An integrated model of magma chamber, conduit and column for the analysis of sustained explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, S.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Neri, A.; Palladino, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions comprise a complex series of processes involving withdrawal from the magma chamber, magma ascent along the conduit and eruption column dynamics. Numerous studies have modeled the different sub-domains of a volcanic system, but their interplay has seldom been analyzed. To this end, we developed C3 (C-cubed, that stands for Chamber, Conduit and Column), a new integrated model that describes the dynamics of an explosive eruption as a series of steady state regimes and as a function of geometry and initial conditions of the magma reservoir. We used Global Sensitivity Analysis to quantify the role of the relevant model parameters and describe the interplay between the different volcanic sub-domains. In particular, we analyzed the evolution of a sustained explosive eruption in order to identify the conditions for buoyant, super-buoyant and collapsing columns. Input data were based on field reconstructions of Quaternary explosive eruptions in the Vulsini Volcanic District (Roman Province, central Italy). Model results show that: 1) the column regime, although affected by complex interactions among several factors, mostly depends on the conduit radius, the volatile content (i.e. supersaturation concentration at the top of the chamber) and length of the conduit, in decreasing level of importance; 2) the amount of mass erupted is independent of the conduit radius and depends mostly on volatile supersaturation, the radius of the magma chamber, the length of the conduit and the overpressure at the conduit inlet; 3) the mass flow-rate, column height and duration of the eruption are largely controlled by the conduit radius; 4) the flow pressure and density at the conduit exit are mostly controlled by the conduit inlet overpressure at the onset of the eruption, and by the length of the conduit at the end of the eruption; 5) the exit velocity from the conduit is mostly controlled by the volatile content, the length of the conduit and the inlet overpressure. In this model framework, and with specific reference to selected Plinian events of the Vulsini Volcanic District, simulation results show that column collapse is not achieved for reasonable eruption durations (order of hours) and conduit widths (tens of meters). This is consistent with field reconstructions suggesting that column collapse did not likely occur and that pyroclastic flows were therefore generated by independent mechanisms from ring fissures and/or multiple vents concomitant to caldera collapse.

  16. An Integrated Model of Coal/Coke Combustion in a Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. S.; Guo, B. Y.; Yu, A. B.; Austin, P.; Zulli, P.

    2010-03-01

    A three-dimensional integrated mathematical model of the combustion of pulverized coal and coke is developed. The model is applied to the region of lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway-coke bed to simulate the operation of pulverized coal injection in an ironmaking blast furnace. The model integrates two parts: pulverized coal combustion model in the blowpipe-tuyere-raceway-coke bed and the coke combustion model in the coke bed. The model is validated against the measurements in terms of coal burnout and gas composition, respectively. The comprehensive in-furnace phenomena are simulated in the raceway and coke bed, in terms of flow, temperature, gas composition, and coal burning characteristics. In addition, underlying mechanisms for the in-furnace phenomena are analyzed. The model provides a cost-effective tool for understanding and optimizing the in-furnace flow-thermo-chemical characteristics of the PCI process in full-scale blast furnaces.

  17. Swirl control arrangement for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Yoshimura, T.; Terakasa, K.

    1987-03-24

    This patent describes, in an internal combustion engine having a combustion chamber, an induction system comprising: an induction passage leading to the combustion chamber; means for forming and air fuel mixture in one of the combustion chamber and the induction passage; an inlet valve which controls communication between the combustion chamber and the induction passage; a throttle valve disposed in the induction passage for controlling the amount of air which is inducted into the combustion chamber when the inlet valve is open; a swirl control valve disposed in the induction passage downstream of the throttle valve; a first sensor for sensing the pressure differential between the section of the induction passage upstream of the swirl control valve and the section of the induction passage downstream of the swirl control valve; a second sensor for sensing the air-fuel ration of the air-fuel mixture being combusted in the combustion chamber; a servo for controlling the position of the swirl control valve; and a control circuit responsive to the first and second sensors for controlling the servo in a manner to optimize the swirl generation within the combustion chamber for the air-fuel ratio of the air-fuel mixture being combusted in the combustion chamber.

  18. Combustion waves in a model with chain branching reaction and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubernov, V. V.; Sidhu, H. S.; Mercer, G. N.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper the travelling wave solutions in the adiabatic model with two-step chain branching reaction mechanism are investigated both numerically and analytically in the limit of equal diffusivity of reactant, radicals and heat. The properties of these solutions and their stability are investigated in detail. The behaviour of combustion waves are demonstrated to have similarities with the properties of nonadiabatic one-step combustion waves in that there is a residual amount of fuel left behind the travelling waves and the solutions can exhibit extinction. The difference between the nonadiabatic one-step and adiabatic two-step models is found in the behaviour of the combustion waves near the extinction condition. It is shown that the flame velocity drops down to zero and a standing combustion wave is formed as the extinction condition is reached. Prospects of further work are also discussed.

  19. Analysis of the dynamics of coal char combustion with ignition and extinction phenomena: Shrinking core model

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, A.K.; Gupta, P.; Saha, R.K. [National Institute for Technology, Durgapur (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-09-15

    Single-particle combustion of coal char is analyzed using a generalized shrinking core model. Finite volume method, which was earlier employed by the authors in solving moving boundary problems involving fluid-solid noncatalytic reactions in general, is used to solve fully transient mass and energy equations. The model takes into account convection and diffusion inside the particle as well as in the boundary layer. The computed results are compared with the experimental data of the authors for combustion of coal char in a fluidized bed combustor. The effects of parameters such as bulk temperature and initial particle radius on the combustion dynamics are examined. The phenomena of ignition and extinction are also investigated. Finally, the importance of Stefan flow, originating due to nonequimolar counterdiffusion, on combustion of coal char is analyzed.

  20. Fuel reforming for scramjet thermal management and combustion optimization

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fuel reforming for scramjet thermal management and combustion optimization E. DANIAU* , M. BOUCHEZ in a Scramjet combustion chamber. Another critical point is that mixing and combustion should be sufficiently

  1. Direct injection internal combustion engine of compression ignition type

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Saito; K. Kozuka; Y. Oshima; M. Yamada; N. Mori; K. Sugiyama; T. Aoyama

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a direct injection internal combustion engine of a compression ignition type in which air is sucked into a combustion chamber and compressed by a piston, and fuel is injected directly thereinto so as to be ignited and combusted, comprising: air intake means having swirling means for swirling intake air supplied to the combustion chamber; a piston having

  2. Model calculations for the airborne Fast Ice Nuclei CHamber FINCH-HALO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillius, B.; Bingemer, H.; Bundke, U.; Jaenicke, R.; Reimann, B.; Wetter, T.

    2009-04-01

    Ice nuclei (IN) initiate the formation of primary ice in tropospheric clouds. In mixed phase clouds the primary ice crystals can grow very fast by the Bergeron-Findeisen process (Findeisen, 1938) at the expense of evaporating water droplets, and form precipitation. Thus, IN are essential for the development of precipitation in mixed phase clouds in the middle latitude. However, the role of IN in the development of clouds is still poorly understood and needs to be studied (Levin and Cotton, 2007). A Fast Ice Nuclei CHamber (FINCH-HALO) for airborne operation on the High And LOng Range research aircraft (HALO) is under development at the Institute for Atmosphere and Environment University Frankfurt. IN particles are activated within the chamber at certain ice super-saturation and temperature by mixing three gas flows, a warm moist, a cold dry, and an aerosol flow. After activation the particles will grow within a processing chamber. In an optical depolarisation detector droplets and ice crystals are detected separately. The setup of the new FINCH-HALO instrument is based on the ground based IN counter FINCH (Bundke, 2008). In FINCH-HALO a new cooling unit is used. Thus, measurements down to -40°C are possible. Furthermore minor changes of the inlet section where the mixing occurs were done. The contribution will present 3D model calculations with FLUENT of the flow conditions in the new inlet section for different pressure levels during a flight typical for HALO. Growth rates of ice crystals in the chamber at different temperature and super-saturation will be shown. References: Bundke U., B. Nillius, R. Jaenicke, T. Wetter, H. Klein, H. Bingemer, (2008). The Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber FINCH, Atmospheric Research, doi:10.1016/j.atmosres.2008.02.008 Findeisen, R., (1938). Meteorologisch-physikalische Begebenheiten der Vereisung in der Atmosphäre. Hauptversammlung 1938 der Lilienthal-Gesellschaft. Levin, Z., W. Cotton, (2007). Aerosol pollution impact on precipitation: a scientific review. The WMO/IUGG International Aerosol Precipitation Science Assessment Group (IAPSAG). World Meteorological Organization, Geneva. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the German Research Foundation, SFB 641 "Tropospheric Ice Phase" TP A1, SPP 1294, BU 1432/3-1, JA 344/12-1, by the Helmholtz Association, VI-233 "Aerosol Cloud Interactions" and by the EU FP6 Infrastructure Project EUSAAR.

  3. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-31

    The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecule’s structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecule’s structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of molecular species in the hot environments of combustion processes, there are several features that make the Rydberg ionization spectroscopy uniquely useful. First, the Rydberg electron’s orbit is quite large and covers the entire molecule for most molecular structures of combustion interest. Secondly, the ionization does not change vibrational quantum numbers, so that even complicated and large molecules can be observed with fairly well resolved spectra. In fact, the spectroscopy is blind to vibrational excitation of the molecule. This has the interesting consequence for the study of chemical dynamics, where the molecules are invariably very energetic, that the molecular structures are observed unobstructed by the vibrational congestion that dominates other spectroscopies. This implies also that, as a tool to probe the time-dependent structural dynamics of chemically interesting molecules, Rydberg spectroscopy may well be better suited than electron or x-ray diffraction. With recent progress in calculating Rydberg binding energy spectra, we are approaching the point where the method can be evolved into a structure determination method. To implement the Rydberg ionization spectroscopy we use a molecular beam based, time-resolved pump-probe multi-photon ionization/photoelectron scheme in which a first laser pulse excites the molecule to a Rydberg state, and a probe pulse ionizes the molecule. A time-of-flight detector measures the kinetic energy spectrum of the photoelectrons. The photoelectron spectrum directly provides the binding energy of the electron, and thereby reveals the molecule’s time-dependent structural fingerprint. Only the duration of the laser pulses limits the time resolution. With a new laser system, we have now reached time resolutions better than 100 fs, although very deep UV wavelengths (down to 190 nm) have slightly longer instrument functions. The structural dynamics of molecules in Rydberg-excited states is obtained by delaying the probe ionization photon from the pump photon; the structural dynamics of molecules in their ground state or e

  4. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of non-premixed combustion in direct injection diesel engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Barths; C Hasse; N Peters

    2000-01-01

    An overview over flamelet modelling for turbulent non-premixed combustion is given. A short review of previous contributions to simulations of direct injection (DI) diesel engine combustion using the representative interactive flamelet concept is presented. A surrogate fuel consisting of 70 per cent (liquid volume) n-decane and 30 per cent ?-methyl-naphthalene is experimentally compared to real diesel fuel. The resemblance of

  5. Modeling and Control of Combustion Dynamics in Lean-Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying Huang; Vigor Yang

    2005-01-01

    A unified investigation, comprising both numerical simulation and analytical modeling, has been conducted to study the combustion dynamics in lean-premixed (LPM) swirl-stabilized combustors. The numerical analysis treats the conservation equations in three dimensions and takes into account finite-rate chemical reactions and variable thermophysical properties. Turbulence closure is achieved by means of a large-eddy simulation technique. Premixed turbulent combustion is treated

  6. Self-ignition and combustion modeling of initially nonpremixed turbulent systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Pires da Cruz; T. A. Baritaud; T. J. Poinsot

    2001-01-01

    A model to simulate numerically self-ignition and combustion of initially non-premixed turbulent systems is proposed. Its development is based on Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent mixing layers between cold fuel and a hot oxidizer. The direct numerical simulations are used to better understand the physical mechanisms controlling mixing, self-ignition, and establishment of combustion inside turbulent mixing layers. They are

  7. A parametric study on natural gas fueled HCCI combustion engine using a multi-zone combustion model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Yousefzadi Nobakht; R. Khoshbakhi Saray; Arash Rahimi

    2011-01-01

    Homogenous Charge Combustion Ignition (HCCI) is a good method for higher efficiency and to reduce NOx and particulate matter simultaneously in comparison to conventional internal combustion engines. In HCCI engines, there is no direct control method for auto ignition time. A common way to indirectly control the ignition timing in HCCI combustion engines is varying engine’s parameters which can affect

  8. Model reference neural network control for boiler combustion system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiu-Cheng Dong; Hai-Bin Wang; Xiao-Xiao Zhao

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult to have good performance for chain boiler combustion control system due to large delay time, varying coal's quality and steam load. A neural network identification method for nonlinear system's delay time is discussed. Using the abrupt mutation resulted from the training error sum square of the real output and the expected output of the network, this method

  9. Advanced laser diagnostics in combustion for prototype and modelling development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Bilger

    This paper addresses the questions of how advanced laser diagnostics for the measurement and imaging of scalar quantities are helping in the development of new high-performance combustors and engines. Such diagnostics have greatly improved our understanding of combustion processes but their early promise for aiding more directly the development process are perhaps unfulfilled as yet. Some examples of the direct

  10. Stochastic modelling of turbulent combustion for design optimization of gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehanna Ismail, Mohammed Ali

    The present work covers the development and the implementation of an efficient algorithm for the design optimization of gas turbine combustors. The purpose is to explore the possibilities and indicate constructive suggestions for optimization techniques as alternative methods for designing gas turbine combustors. The algorithm is general to the extent that no constraints are imposed on the combustion phenomena or on the combustor configuration. The optimization problem is broken down into two elementary problems: the first is the optimum search algorithm, and the second is the turbulent combustion model used to determine the combustor performance parameters. These performance parameters constitute the objective and physical constraints in the optimization problem formulation. The examination of both turbulent combustion phenomena and the gas turbine design process suggests that the turbulent combustion model represents a crucial part of the optimization algorithm. The basic requirements needed for a turbulent combustion model to be successfully used in a practical optimization algorithm are discussed. In principle, the combustion model should comply with the conflicting requirements of high fidelity, robustness and computational efficiency. To that end, the problem of turbulent combustion is discussed and the current state of the art of turbulent combustion modelling is reviewed. According to this review, turbulent combustion models based on the composition PDF transport equation are found to be good candidates for application in the present context. However, these models are computationally expensive. To overcome this difficulty, two different models based on the composition PDF transport equation were developed: an improved Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF algorithm and the generalized stochastic reactor model. Improvements in the Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF model performance and its computational efficiency were achieved through the implementation of time splitting, variable stochastic fluid particle mass control, and a second order time accurate (predictor-corrector) scheme used for solving the stochastic differential equations governing the particles evolution. The model compared well against experimental data found in the literature for two different configurations: bluff body and swirl stabilized combustors. The generalized stochastic reactor is a newly developed model. This model relies on the generalization of the concept of the classical stochastic reactor theory in the sense that it accounts for both finite micro- and macro-mixing processes. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. Numerical model describing the heat transfer between combustion products and ventilation-system duct walls

    SciTech Connect

    Bolstad, J.W.; Foster, R.D.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    A package of physical models simulating the heat transfer processes occurring between combustion gases and ducts in ventilation systems is described. The purpose of the numerical model is to predict how the combustion gas in a system heats up or cools down as it flows through the ducts in a ventilation system under fire conditions. The model treats a duct with (forced convection) combustion gases flowing on the inside and stagnant ambient air on the outside. The model is composed of five submodels of heat transfer processes along with a numerical solution procedure to evaluate them. Each of these quantities is evaluated independently using standard correlations based on experimental data. The details of the physical assumptions, simplifications, and ranges of applicability of the correlations are described. A typical application of this model to a full-scale fire test is discussed, and model predictions are compared with selected experimental data.

  12. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, IDEPA (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procedes et Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu Cedex (France); Soria, J. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, IDEPA (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Laboratoire Procedes et Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu Cedex (France)

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  13. Automated modeling of ecosystem CO2 fluxes based on closed chamber measurements: A standardized conceptual and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements are widely used for determining the CO2 exchange of small-scale or heterogeneous ecosystems. Among the chamber design and operational handling, the data processing procedure is a considerable source of uncertainty of obtained results. We developed a standardized automatic data processing algorithm, based on the language and statistical computing environment R© to (i) calculate measured CO2 flux rates, (ii) parameterize ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP) models, (iii) optionally compute an adaptive temperature model, (iv) model Reco, GPP and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and (v) evaluate model uncertainty (calibration, validation and uncertainty prediction). The algorithm was tested for different manual and automatic chamber measurement systems (such as e.g. automated NEE-chambers and the LI-8100A soil CO2 Flux system) and ecosystems. Our study shows that even minor changes within the modelling approach may result in considerable differences of calculated flux rates, derived photosynthetic active radiation and temperature dependencies and subsequently modeled Reco, GPP and NEE balance of up to 25%. Thus, certain modeling implications will be given, since automated and standardized data processing procedures, based on clearly defined criteria, such as statistical parameters and thresholds are a prerequisite and highly desirable to guarantee the reproducibility, traceability of modelling results and encourage a better comparability between closed chamber based CO2 measurements.

  14. A Review of Turbulent Combustion Modeling for Multidimensional In-CylinderCFD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. Haworth

    2005-01-01

    Multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has become an\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009accepted and indispensible tool in the analysis and design of next-generation\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009low-fuel-consumption, low-emissions internal combustion (IC) engines.\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009Turbulent combustion models have been developed to deal with the\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009wide variety of combustion phenomena that occur in spark- and compression-ignition,\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009homogeneous- and stratified-charge engines. IC-engine combustion\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009can vary from essentially premixed turbulent flame propagation,

  15. COMBUSTION ISSUES AND APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL MICROTHRUSTERS

    E-print Network

    Yang, Vigor

    1 COMBUSTION ISSUES AND APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL MICROTHRUSTERS Richard A. Yetter, Vigor Yang, Ming and the effects of downsizing on combustion performance. In particular, combustion of liquid nitromethane in a thruster combustion chamber with a volume of 108 mm3 and diameter of 5 mm was experimentally investigated

  16. Torsional vibration analysis of a multi-body single cylinder internal combustion engine model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Boysal; H. Rahnejat

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed multi-body numerical nonlinear dynamic model of a single cylinder internal combustion engine. The model comprises all rigid body inertial members, support bearings, joints, couplers, and connections between the various engine components, as well as means of vibration damping. The detailed model is parameterised, thus enabling virtual prototype testing of various engine designs, as well as

  17. Modelling the contribution of biogenic VOCs to new particle formation in the Jülich plant atmosphere chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, L.; Dal Maso, M.; Mogensen, D.; Roldin, P.; Rusanen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Mentel, T. F.; Wildt, J.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2014-11-01

    We used the MALTE-BOX model including near-explicit air chemistry and detailed aerosol dynamics to study the mechanisms of observed new particle formation events in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber. The modelled and measured H2SO4 (sulfuric acid) concentrations agreed within a factor of two. The modelled total monoterpene concentration was in line with PTR-MS observations, and we provided the distributions of individual isomers of terpenes, when no measurements were available. The aerosol dynamic results supported the hypothesis that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in the nucleation process. However, compared to kinetic H2SO4 nucleation, nucleation involving OH oxidation products of monoterpenes showed a better agreement with the measurements, with R2 up to 0.97 between modelled and measured total particle number concentrations. The nucleation coefficient for kinetic H2SO4 nucleation was 2.1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, while the organic nucleation coefficient was 9.0 × 10-14 cm3 s-1. We classified the VOC oxidation products into two sub-groups including extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). These ELVOCs and SVOCs contributed approximately equally to the particle volume production, whereas only ELVOCs made the smallest particles to grow in size. The model simulations revealed that the chamber walls constitute a major net sink of SVOCs on the first experiment day. However, the net wall SVOC uptake was gradually reduced because of SVOC desorption during the following days. Thus, in order to capture the observed temporal evolution of the particle number size distribution, the model needs to consider reversible gas-wall partitioning.

  18. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  19. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  20. TORSIONAL VIBRATION REDUCTION IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES USING CENTRIFUGAL PENDULUMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheng-Tang Lee; Steven W. Shaw

    The goal of the present work is to investigate the performance of tautochronic centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers (CPVA's) for reducing torsional vibration in internal combustion engines. A mathematical model is first built for the torsional dynamics of an in- line, four-stroke, four-cylinder engine, including the consideration of inertia effects of connecting rods and pistons, gas pressure inside the cylinder chambers,

  1. High-Resolution In Vivo Imaging of Fluorescent Proteins Using Window Chamber Models

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Shan, Siqing; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins enable in vivo characterization of a wide and growing array of morphological and functional biomarkers. To fully capitalize on the spatial and temporal information afforded by these reporter proteins, a method for imaging these proteins at high resolution longitudinally is required. This chapter describes the use of window chamber models as a means of imaging fluorescent proteins and other optical parameters. Such models essentially involve surgically implanting a window through which tumor or normal tissue can be imaged using existing microscopy techniques. This enables acquisition of high-quality images down to the cellular or subcellular scale, exploiting the diverse array of optical contrast mechanisms, while also maintaining the native microenvironment of the tissue of interest. This makes these techniques applicable to a wide array of problems in the biomedical sciences. PMID:22700402

  2. Analysis of cyclic combustion of the coal-water suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka

    2011-04-01

    Combustion technology of the coal-water suspension creates a number of new possibilities to organize the combustion process fulfilling contemporary requirements, e.g. in the environment protection. Therefore the in-depth analysis is necessary to examine the technical application of coal as a fuel in the form of suspension. The research undertakes the complex investigations of the continuous coal-water suspension as well as cyclic combustion. The cyclic nature of fuel combustion results from the movement of the loose material in the flow contour of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB): combustion chamber, cyclone and downcomer. The experimental results proved that the cyclic change of oxygen concentration around fuel, led to the vital change of both combustion mechanisms and combustion kinetics. The mathematical model of the process of fuel combustion has been presented. Its original concept is based on the allowance for cyclic changes of concentrations of oxygen around the fuel. It enables the prognosis for change of the surface and the centre temperatures as well as mass loss of the fuel during combustion in air, in the fluidized bed and during the cyclic combustion.

  3. Visualization and modeling of pilot injection and combustion in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ricart, L.M.; Reitz, R.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-09-01

    An endoscope-based image acquisition-and-processing camera system was used for diagnostics of pilot injection combustion in a single-cylinder heavy duty diesel engine. A study of the pilot injection or light load is of interest because the spray breakup, mixing and vaporization processes are less influenced by heat feedback from the flame than in full injection cases. This allows the spray process to be decoupled from the combustion process. The experimental cases were modeled using a version of the KIVA-II code that includes improvements in the turbulence, wall heat transfer, spray, ignition and combustion models. The combustion of the pilot injections was characterized by ignition sites located below the point where the spray impinges on the piston bowl surface for the injector configuration used in this study. Multiple ignition sites were observed and the majority of the combustion occurred at the bottom of the piston bowl, spreading along the bowl edge. As the start-of-injection timing was retarded some evidence of ignition above the impingement point was observed. However, these ignition sites did not develop into major combustion zones. Comparisons of the experimental results, which included pressure traces, heat release rates and the luminous flame images, and the numerical computations were made to assess the performance of current models in the KIVA-II code. Good agreement was obtained for the timing and location of ignition. The penetration of the flame observed in the luminous flame images was also captured in the predictions. A feature of the pilot injection that was not captured by the prediction is the spread of the flame along the edge of the piston bowl. The comparisons indicate that recent improvements in KIVA-II allow better prediction of the combustion of pilot injections.

  4. Method and apparatus for economizing fuel consumption in operating a multicylinder internal combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arrieta

    1984-01-01

    A method of economizing fuel consumption in operating an internal combustion engine having a group of combustion chambers of preselected numbers is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of consecutively introducing combustible fuel for ignition into each combustion chamber of the group to provide relatively high power availability for relatively high power demand, and of consecutively introducing combustible fuel for

  5. Combustion quasi-two zone predictive model for dual fuel engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. H. Abd Alla; H. A. Soliman; O. A. Badr; M. F. Abd Rabbo

    2001-01-01

    A quasi-two zone predictive model is developed in the present work for prediction of the combustion processes in dual fuel engines and some of their performance features. Methane is used as the main fuel while employing a small quantity of liquid fuel (pilot) injected through the conventional Diesel fuel system. This model emphasizes the effects of chemical kinetics activity of

  6. INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS (ICE) MODEL, VERSION 6.0. USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job ...

  7. INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS (ICE) MODEL, VERSION 6.0. SOFTWARE DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the software of the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, developed to support the EPA's analysis of acid deposition control alternatives. The model projects industrial fossil-fuel-fired boiler fuels, air emissions, and costs by state for 1985, 1990, 1...

  8. PARTICULATE EMISSIONS AND CONTROL IN FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION: MODELING AND PARAMETRIC PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a model, developed to describe the physical characteristics of the particulates emitted from fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems and to evaluate data on FBC particulate control systems. The model, which describes the particulate emissions profile from FBC,...

  9. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: In-situ combustion predictive model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Ray; J. D. Munoz

    1986-01-01

    The In-Situ Combustion Predictive Model (ICPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the National Petroleum Council (NPC) for its 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The architecture of the ICPM is similar to that of the other predictive models in the series (Paul et al., 1982; Aydelotte and Pope, 1983; Paul et al., 1984): an oil

  10. A crankshaft system model for structural dynamic analysis of internal combustion engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zissimos P. Mourelatos

    2001-01-01

    A system model for analyzing the dynamic behavior of an internal combustion engine crankshaft is described. The model couples the crankshaft structural dynamics, the main bearing hydrodynamic lubrication and the engine block stiffness using a system approach. A two-level dynamic substructuring technique is used to predict the crankshaft dynamic response based on the finite-element method. The dynamic substructuring uses a

  11. Analysis of the dynamics of coal char combustion with ignition and extinction phenomena: Shrinking core model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anup Kumar Sadhukhan; Parthapratim Gupta; Ranajit Kumar Saha

    2008-01-01

    Single-particle combustion of coal char is analyzed using a generalized shrinking core model. Finite volume method, which was earlier employed by the authors in solving moving boundary problems involving fluid-solid noncatalytic reactions in general, is used to solve fully transient mass and energy equations. The model takes into account convection and diffusion inside the particle as well as in the

  12. A comparative study of the effects of inhibitor stub length on solid rocket motor combustion chamber pressure oscillations: RSRM at T = 80 seconds, preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasman, D.; Burnette, D.; Holt, J.; Farr, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a continuing, time-accurate computational study of the combustion gas flow inside the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are presented. These computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses duplicate unsteady flow effects which interact in the RSRM to produce pressure oscillations, and resulting thrust oscillations, at nominally 15, 30, and 45 Hz. Results of the Navier-Stokes computations made at mean pressure and flow conditions corresponding to 80 seconds after motor ignition both with and without a protruding, rigid inhibitor at the forward joint cavity are presented here.

  13. Combustion Stability Analyses for J-2X Gas Generator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Protz, C. S.; Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in injection-coupled combustion instability of the gas generator assembly at the first longitudinal mode of the combustion chamber. In this paper, the longitudinal mode combustion instabilities observed on the workhorse test stand are discussed in detail. Aspects of this combustion instability have been modeled at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with several codes, including the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code and a new lumped-parameter MatLab model. To accurately predict the instability characteristics of all the chamber and injector geometries and test conditions, several features of the submodels in the ROCCID suite of calculations required modification. Finite-element analyses were conducted of several complicated combustion chamber geometries to determine how to model and anchor the chamber response in ROCCID. A large suite of sensitivity calculations were conducted to determine how to model and anchor the injector response in ROCCID. These modifications and their ramification for future stability analyses of this type are discussed in detail. The lumped-parameter MatLab model of the gas generator assembly was created as an alternative calculation to the ROCCID methodology. This paper also describes this model and the stability calculations.

  14. SU-E-T-17: A Mathematical Model for PinPoint Chamber Correction in Measuring Small Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T; Zhang, Y; Li, X; Heron, D.E.; Huq, M.Saiful [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measuring the cone output factor for stereotactic radiosurgery, ion chambers often result in underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of electron equilibrium. The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model, specifically for the pinpoint chamber, to calculate the correction factors corresponding to different type of small fields, including single cone-based circular field and non-standard composite fields. Methods: A PTW 0.015cc PinPoint chamber was used in the study. Its response in a certain field was modeled as the total contribution of many small beamlets, each with different response factor depending on the relative strength, radial distance to the chamber axis, and the beam angle. To get these factors, 12 cone-shaped circular fields (5mm,7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm) were irradiated and measured with the PinPoint chamber. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. These readings were then compared with the theoretical doses as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized-least-square optimization algorithm was developed to find out the beamlet response factors. After the parameter fitting, the established mathematical model was validated with the same MC code for other non-circular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the Monte Carlo calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for the PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurement of small fields. The current model is applicable only when the beam axis is perpendicular to the chamber axis. It can be applied to non-standard composite fields. Further validation with other type of detectors is being conducted.

  15. Modeling coal combustion behavior in an ironmaking blast furnace raceway: model development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, D.; Austin, P.R.; Zulli, P.; Guo B. [BlueScope Steel Research Laboratories, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    A numerical model has been developed and validated for the investigation of coal combustion phenomena under blast furnace operating conditions. The model is fully three-dimensional, with a broad capacity to analyze significant operational and equipment design changes. The model was used in a number of studies, including: Effect of cooling gas type in coaxial lance arrangements. It was found that oxygen cooling improves coal burnout by 7% compared with natural gas cooling under conditions that have the same amount of oxygen enrichment in the hot blast. Effect of coal particle size distribution. It was found that during two similar periods of operation at Port Kembla's BF6, a difference in PCI capability could be attributed to the difference in coal size distribution. Effect of longer tuyeres. Longer tuyeres were installed at Port Kembla's BF5, leading to its reline scheduled for March 2009. The model predicted an increase in blast velocity at the tuyere nose due to the combustion of volatiles within the tuyere, with implications for tuyere pressure drop and PCI capability. Effect of lance tip geometry. A number of alternate designs were studied, with the best-performing designs promoting the dispersion of the coal particles. It was also found that the base case design promoted size segregation of the coal particles, forcing smaller coal particles to one side of the plume, leaving larger coal particles on the other side. 11 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Temperature field simulation with stratification model of magma chamber under Los Humeros Caldera, Puebla, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M.P.; Verma, S.P.; Sanvicente, H. (Dept. de Geotermia, Div. Fuentes de Energia, Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Apdo. Postal 475, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62000 (MX))

    1990-01-01

    A simulation of the temperature field underlying Los Humeros caldera is obtained through numerical solution of the energy-conservation equation for a conductive heat flow process. The up-date information on geological, geochemical, geophysical and geochronological studies is used to estimate the parameters of the internal structure of the caldera. The simulation is carried out under a model of the stratification of a magma chamber. The existence of such a stratification is supported by geological and geochemical evidence. The boundary conditions, the equality of temperature and heat flux are programmed in the numeric solution of the energy-conservation equation by considering the boundary of a very small, finite thickness and smoothing the temperature curve at every step of calculation.

  17. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, John A.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives are to use existing hardware to verify and extend the database generated on the original test programs. The data to be obtained are the carbon deposition characteristics when methane is used at injection densities comparable to full scale values. The database will be extended to include liquid natural gas (LNG) testing at low injection densities for gas generator/preburner conditions. The testing will be performed at mixture ratios between 0.25 and 0.60, and at chamber pressures between 750 and 1500 psi.

  18. Modeling of single char combustion, including CO oxidation in its boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Longwell, J.P.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1994-10-25

    The combustion of a char particle can be divided into a transient phase where its temperature increases as it is heated by oxidation, and heat transfer from the surrounding gas to an approximately constant temperature stage where gas phase reaction is important and which consumes most of the carbon and an extinction stage caused by carbon burnout. In this work, separate models were developed for the transient heating where gas phase reactions were unimportant and for the steady temperature stage where gas phase reactions were treated in detail. The transient char combustion model incorporates intrinsic char surface production of CO and CO{sub 2}, internal pore diffusion and external mass and heat transfer. The model provides useful information for particle ignition, burning temperature profile, combustion time, and carbon consumption rate. A gas phase reaction model incorporating the full set of 28 elementary C/H/O reactions was developed. This model calculated the gas phase CO oxidation reaction in the boundary layer at particle temperatures of 1250 K and 2500 K by using the carbon consumption rate and the burning temperature at the pseudo-steady state calculated from the temperature profile model but the transient heating was not included. This gas phase model can predict the gas species, and the temperature distributions in the boundary layer, the CO{sub 2}/CO ratio, and the location of CO oxidation. A mechanistic heat and mass transfer model was added to the temperature profile model to predict combustion behavior in a fluidized bed. These models were applied to data from the fluidized combustion of Newlands coal char particles. 52 refs., 60 figs.

  19. Exhaust gas cleaning device for internal combustion engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Sakurai; S. Irimajiri

    1976-01-01

    An internal-combustion spark-ignition V-8 piston engine has an exhaust gas reaction chamber body positioned between its two banks of cylinders. Each cylinder has a main combustion chamber communicating with an auxiliary combustion chamber by means of a torch opening. A main intake manifold with branching portion over the reaction chamber communicates with main intake passages to supply a lean air-fuel

  20. Sulfur removal by sorbent injection in secondary combustion zones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. F. Egense; J. D. Kuenzly

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in an apparatus for combustion of sulfur-containing particulate carbonaceous fuel. Oxidizer gas and particulate fuel are introduced into a substantially cylindrical primary combustion chamber. The input velocities, mass-flow rates and combustion temperatures are regulated to minimize the concentration of volatilized and liquid slag in the output gaseous products of combustion. The walls of the combustion

  1. Thermal efficiency analysis in a hydrogen premixed combustion engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshio Shudo; Yasuo Nakajima; Takayuki Futakuchi

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen has higher flame velocity and shorter quenching distance than hydrocarbon fuels, and is supposed to have special characteristics in the combustion process of internal combustion engines. In this research, contributors to thermal efficiency in a hydrogen premixed spark ignition engine were analyzed and compared with methane combustion. Results showed hydrogen combustion had higher cooling loss to combustion chamber wall,

  2. Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Characteristics of Liquid Biofuels for Enhanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    E. Meeks; A. U. Modak; C.V. Naik; K. V. Puduppakkam; C. Westbrook; F. N. Egolfopoulos; T. Tsotsis; S. H. Roby

    2009-07-01

    The objectives of this project have been to develop a comprehensive set of fundamental data regarding the combustion behavior of biodiesel fuels and appropriately associated model fuels that may represent biodiesels in automotive engineering simulation. Based on the fundamental study results, an auxiliary objective was to identify differentiating characteristics of molecular fuel components that can be used to explain different fuel behavior and that may ultimately be used in the planning and design of optimal fuel-production processes. The fuels studied in this project were BQ-9000 certified biodiesel fuels that are certified for use in automotive engine applications. Prior to this project, there were no systematic experimental flame data available for such fuels. One of the key goals has been to generate such data, and to use this data in developing and verifying effective kinetic models. The models have then been reduced through automated means to enable multi-dimensional simulation of the combustion characteristics of such fuels in reciprocating engines. Such reliable kinetics models, validated against fundamental data derived from laminar flames using idealized flow models, are key to the development and design of optimal engines, engine operation and fuels. The models provide direct information about the relative contribution of different molecular constituents to the fuel performance and can be used to assess both combustion and emissions characteristics. During this project, we completed a major and thorough validation of a set of biodiesel surrogate components, allowing us to begin to evaluate the fundamental combustion characteristics for B100 fuels.

  3. Assessment of emissions prediction capability of RANS based PDF models for lean premixed combustion of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, D.R.; Nanduri, J.R.; Celik, Ismail; Strakey, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The high computational cost of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) makes Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods the current standard for turbulent combustion modeling. Empirical models for turbulence, turbulence-combustion interaction and chemical kinetics are, however, a major source of uncertainty in RANS based combustion simulation. While Probability Density Function (PDF) based models overcome some of these issues, most commercial codes do not take full advantage of these models. In this study, lean premixed combustion of methane in a bluff-body combustor is simulated using two different reduced chemical mechanisms (ARM9 and ARM19) combined with the composition PDF transport combustion model in the commercial code FLUENT. Two different turbulence models, namely the RNG k-? model and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are used and the results of the simulations are compared to experimental data. For all the models tested, the prediction of temperature and major species (CH4, O2, CO2, CO, H2, and H2O) was good when compared to experiments. While all of the model predictions for the intermediate species OH showed an order magnitude difference (compared to the experiments) close to the bluff body surface; downstream axial locations showed good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the experiments. In a trend similar to the previous study (Nanduri et al., 2007) using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) model, predicted values for NO emission radial profiles showed an average difference of ±5 ppm when compared to experimental values. The results were also compared to the results of a velocity-composition joint PDF model developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. In terms of emissions (NO and CO) predictions the relatively expensive composition PDF model in FLUENT did not give significant improvement when compared to the computationally cheaper EDC models. However, the velocity-composition joint PFD model used by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh did show significant improvement over EDC models in the prediction of NO. Both of the PDF models resulted in better qualitative and quantitative agreement in H2 prediction, thus showing the promise of PDF based models in simulating lean premixed combustion of fuel blends like hydrogen enriched natural gas.

  4. Identification of a non-linear internal combustion engine model for on-line indicated torque estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgio Rizzoni; Yuxuan Zhang

    1994-01-01

    In recent years considerable interest has been placed on the estimation of internal combustion engine torque both for control and diagnostic applications. This paper discusses a method for the identification of a non-linear model of the dynamics relating combustion pressure to crankshaft angular velocity. Such a model can be useful in the implementation of control strategies that require an estimate

  5. Modeling, Dynamic Simulation, and Controller Design for an Air-breathing Combustion System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bharani; Chandra Kumar; Nitin K. Gupta; N. Ananthkrishnan; V. S. Renganathan

    2009-01-01

    A novel, high-fidelity, low-order model is developed for an air-breathing combustion system designed for supersonic flight with a subsonic combustor. Individual components - intake, combustor, exhaust nozzle - are modeled with detailed models obtained from CFD, quasi-1D, or isentropic analysis, as the case may be. The components are then interlinked by a low-order global model that captures the physics of

  6. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Engine Research Center

    1992-03-01

    A three-dimensional computer code (KIVA) is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion: spray atomization, drop breakup/coalescence, multi-component fuel vaporization, spray/well interaction, ignition and combustion, wall heat transfer, unburned HC and NOx formation, soot and radiation and the intake flow process. Improved and/or new submodels which have been completed are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NOx, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Results to date show that adding the effects of unsteadiness and compressibility improves the accuracy of heat transfer predictions; spray drop rebound can occur from walls at low impingement velocities (e.g., in cold-starting); larger spray drops are formed at the nozzle due to the influence of vaporization on the atomization process; a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model has the flexibility to match measured engine combustion data over a wide range of operating conditions; and, finally the characteristic time combustion model can also be extended to allow predictions of ignition. The accuracy of the predictions is being assessed by comparisons with available measurements. Additional supporting experiments are also described briefly. To data, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure and heat flux data for homogeneous charge, spark-ignited and compression-ignited engines, and also limited comparisons for diesel engines. The model results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Engine Research Center)

    1992-03-01

    A three-dimensional computer code (KIVA) is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion: spray atomization, drop breakup/coalescence, multi-component fuel vaporization, spray/well interaction, ignition and combustion, wall heat transfer, unburned HC and NOx formation, soot and radiation and the intake flow process. Improved and/or new submodels which have been completed are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NOx, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Results to date show that adding the effects of unsteadiness and compressibility improves the accuracy of heat transfer predictions; spray drop rebound can occur from walls at low impingement velocities (e.g., in cold-starting); larger spray drops are formed at the nozzle due to the influence of vaporization on the atomization process; a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model has the flexibility to match measured engine combustion data over a wide range of operating conditions; and, finally the characteristic time combustion model can also be extended to allow predictions of ignition. The accuracy of the predictions is being assessed by comparisons with available measurements. Additional supporting experiments are also described briefly. To data, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure and heat flux data for homogeneous charge, spark-ignited and compression-ignited engines, and also limited comparisons for diesel engines. The model results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  8. Analytical Model for the Diffusion Process in a In-Situ Combustion Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Patricia; Reyes, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    The in-situ combustion process (ISC) is basically an air or oxygen enriched gas injection oil recovery process, inside an extraction well. In contrast to a conventional gas injection process, an ISC process consists in using heat to create a combustion front that raises the fuel temperature, decreasing its viscosity, making extraction easier. The oil is taken toward the productor by means of a vigorous gas thrust as well as a water thrust. To improve and enhance this technique in the field wells, it has been widely perform experimental laboratory tests, in which an in-situ combustion tube is designed to simulate the extraction process. In the present work we propose to solve analytically the problem, with a parabolic partial differential equation associated to the convection-diffusion phenomenon, equation which describes the in-situ combustion process. The whole mathematical problem is established by completing this equation with the correspong boundary and initial conditions, the thickness of the combustion zone, flow velocity, and more parameters. The theoretically obtained results are compared with those reported in literature. We further, fit the parameter of our model to the mentioned data taken from the literature.

  9. Two-piston internal combustion engine (JV2)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Velencei

    1987-01-01

    An internal combustion engine cylinder assembly comprising a first elongated cylinder having substantially vertically disposed interior walls defining an elongated firing chamber. The first piston means hoses within the firing chamber and adapted for vertical reciprocation within the firing chamber. Gas inlet channels means are in the lower portion of the firing chamber. A crankcase housing has gas compression chamber.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting combustion instability in continuous combustion systems

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Kelly J.; Thornton, Jimmy D.; Richards, George A.; Straub, Douglas L.

    2006-08-29

    An apparatus and method to sense the onset of combustion stability is presented. An electrode is positioned in a turbine combustion chamber such that the electrode is exposed to gases in the combustion chamber. A control module applies a voltage potential to the electrode and detects a combustion ionization signal and determines if there is an oscillation in the combustion ionization signal indicative of the occurrence of combustion stability or the onset of combustion instability. A second electrode held in a coplanar but spaced apart manner by an insulating member from the electrode provides a combustion ionization signal to the control module when the first electrode fails. The control module broadcasts a notice if the parameters indicate the combustion process is at the onset of combustion instability or broadcasts an alarm signal if the parameters indicate the combustion process is unstable.

  11. Methodology of a combined ground based testing and numerical modelling analysis of supersonic combustion flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Klaus; Karl, Sebastian; Martinez Schramm, Jan; Steelant, Johan

    2010-10-01

    In the framework of the European Commission co-funded LAPCAT (Long-Term Advanced Propulsion Concepts and Technologies) project, the methodology of a combined ground-based testing and numerical modelling analysis of supersonic combustion flow paths was established. The approach is based on free jet testing of complete supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) configurations consisting of intake, combustor and nozzle in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen (HEG) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and computational fluid dynamics studies utilising the DLR TAU code. The capability of the established methodology is demonstrated by applying it to the flow path of the generic HyShot II scramjet flight experiment configuration.

  12. Multi-dimensional modeling of the application of catalytic combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wen; Xie, Maozhao

    2006-12-01

    The detailed surface reaction mechanism of methane on rhodium catalyst was analyzed. Comparisons between numerical simulation and experiments showed a basic agreement. The combustion process of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine whose piston surface has been coated with catalyst (rhodium and platinum) was numerically investigated. A multi-dimensional model with detailed chemical kinetics was built. The effects of catalytic combustion on the ignition timing, the temperature and CO concentration fields, and HC, CO and NOx emissions of the HCCI engine were discussed. The results showed the ignition timing of the HCCI engine was advanced and the emissions of HC and CO were decreased by the catalysis.

  13. Measurement and analysis of combustion response to transverse combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, Brian R.

    This research aimed to gain a better understanding of the response of a gas-centered swirl coaxial injector to transverse combustion instability. The goals of the research were to develop a combustion chamber that would be able to spontaneously produce transverse combustion instability at elevated pressures and temperatures. Methods were also developed to analyze high-speed video images to understand the response of the injector. A combustion chamber was designed that produced high levels of instabilities. The chamber was capable of pressures as high as 1034 kPa (150 psi) and operated using decomposed 90% hydrogen peroxide and JP-8. The chamber used an array of seven gas-centered swirl coaxial injectors that exhibited linear instability to drive the transverse oscillations. The injector elements would operate in a monopropellant configuration flowing only decomposed hydrogen peroxide or in a bipropellant configuration. The location of the bipropellant injectors could be varied to change the level of the instability in the chamber from 10% of the chamber pressure up to 70% of the chamber pressure. A study element was placed in the center of the chamber where it was observed simultaneously by two high-speed video cameras which recorded a backlit video to show the location of the fuel spray and the location of the emitted CH* chemiluminescence. The videos were synchronized with high frequency pressure measurements to gain a full understanding of the physics in the combustion chamber. Results showed that the study element was coupled with the first mode velocity wave. This was expected due to the first mode velocity anti-node being located in the center of the chamber. The velocity is an absolute maximum twice during each cycle so the coupling with the second mode pressure was also investigated showing a possible coupling with both the velocity and pressure. The results of the first mode velocity showed that, as the velocity wave traveled through the chamber, the fuel spray was first displaced into an oxidizer rich region and secondly followed by a reaction in the direction of travel of the velocity wave as the peak velocity traveled through the region. The deflection into the oxidizer rich region was especially apparent in high-level instabilities. In low-level instabilities, the velocity wave was not strong enough to fully displace the fuel, and instead the oxidizer core was deflected into the fuel annulus causing a reaction in the direction of travel of the velocity wave. Neighboring oxidizer only injectors caused a lower reaction upstream as the neighboring oxidizer was deflected into the fuel annulus. The region of the fluctuating emitted light agreed well in size, shape and location with a correlation between the first mode velocity and combustion leading to the conclusion that the first mode is highly coupled with velocity. The second mode variance did not agree well with either the velocity or pressure correlation leading to a conclusion that it is coupled with both velocity and pressure. When comparing the variance to the pressure or velocity correlation, parts of the variance compared in shape and location to the pressure or velocity correlation, however, this was not true for all regions of response. This leads to a conclusion that both the pressure and velocity can be affecting the second mode. The second mode chemiluminescence emission occurs when the velocity is nearly zero in the chamber leading to the reaction to not be deflected and occurring downstream of the injector. At the same time, the second mode pressure is a minimum so an increase in mass flow could be responsible for the increased reaction. The methods and combustion chamber used to study the response of an injector can be used in the future to study any injector or combination of injectors placed at various locations in the chamber to study pressure or velocity coupling. The chemiluminescence data can be used to develop transfer functions for use in low fidelity computational models and can be used to validate high fidelity CFD.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of rice husk combustion in a fluidised bed combustor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rozainee; S. P. Ngo; Arshad A. Salema; K. G. Tan

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was carried out to determine the trajectories and residence time of burning rice husk particles in the fluidised bed combustor (FBC) at different secondary air flowrates. In FBC, the intra and extra-particle mass transfer resistance of the oxidising agent plays a major role in determining the combustion rate because of high temperature processing. Moreover, factors

  15. Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 4: Appendix IV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Grace; W. J. Frederick; M. Salcudean; R. A. Wessel

    1998-01-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished

  16. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Grace; W. J. Frederick; M. Salcudean; R. A. Wessel

    1998-01-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished

  17. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling, five-year report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Grace; W. J. Frederick; M. Salcudean; R. A. Wessel

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The project originated in October 1990 and was scheduled to run for

  18. Black Liquor Combustion Validated Recovery Boiler Modeling, Final Year Report, Volume 5: Appendix V

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Grace; W. J. Frederick; M. Salcudean; R. A. Wessel

    1998-01-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990 with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. Many of these objectives were accomplished

  19. Modeling internal combustion engines using a hyper-class of hybrid automata: A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vasileios F. Deligiannis; Stamatis A. Manesis

    2006-01-01

    The reciprocating internal combustion engine is by far the most common form of engine or prime mover. As with most engines, the usual aim is to achieve a high work output with a high efficiency, and hence, control design is imperative. Subsequently, essential is the existence of a simulation model in order to give designer the ability to explore the

  20. Computational Modeling of CO/CO2 Ratio Inside Single Char Particles during Pulverized Coal Combustion

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    of submicrometer-sized ash in coal combustion systems affects the emissions of toxic metals and the formationComputational Modeling of CO/CO2 Ratio Inside Single Char Particles during Pulverized Coal inside a burning pulverized coal particle, to better understand the effect of bulk gas composition