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Sample records for model combustion chamber

  1. Comprehensive modeling of a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P.-Y.; Fisher, S.; Chang, Y. M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model for the simulation of detailed three-phase combustion flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber is presented. The three phases involved are: a multispecies gaseous phase, an incompressible liquid phase, and a particulate droplet phase. The gas and liquid phases are continuum described in an Eulerian fashion. A two-phase solution capability for these continuum media is obtained through a marriage of the Implicit Continuous Eulerian (ICE) technique and the fractional Volume of Fluid (VOF) free surface description method. On the other hand, the particulate phase is given a discrete treatment and described in a Lagrangian fashion. All three phases are hence treated rigorously. Semi-empirical physical models are used to describe all interphase coupling terms as well as the chemistry among gaseous components. Sample calculations using the model are given. The results show promising application to truly comprehensive modeling of complex liquid-fueled engine systems.

  2. Computational Modeling of the Working Process in the Combustion Chamber for Casing-Head Gas Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachev, N. L.; Betinskaya, O. A.; Bul‧bovich, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper considers problems of computational modeling of the working process in multizone combustion chambers (CC) forming a part of gas-turbine power plants for recovering casing-head and other process gases. To investigate the turbulent flow and combustion, we use the LES method with a Smagorinskii subnet model. Various schemes of feeding components into combustion and dilution zones are considered. A comparison is made between the calculated and experimental data on the temperature in the combustion zone.

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF AN IDEAL REACTOR MODEL IN A SECONDARY COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracer analysis was applied to a secondary combustion chamber of a rotary kiln incinerator simulator to develop a computationally inexpensive networked ideal reactor model and allow for the later incorporation of detailed reaction mechanisms. Tracer data from sulfur dioxide trace...

  4. Internal combustion engine with multiple combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, D.J.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes a two-cycle compression ignition engine. It comprises one cylinder, a reciprocable piston moveable in the cylinder, a piston connecting rod, a crankshaft for operation of the piston connecting rod, a cylinder head enclosing the cylinder, the upper surface of the piston and the enclosing surface of the cylinder head defining a cylinder clearance volume, a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber located in the cylinder head. This patent describes improvement in means for isolating the combustion process for one full 360{degrees} rotation of the crankshaft; wherein the combustion chambers alternatively provide for expansion of combustion products in the respective chambers into the cylinder volume near top dead center upon each revolution of the crankshaft.

  5. Functional mathematical model of a hydrogen-driven combustion chamber for a scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    A functional mathematical model of a hydrogen-driven combustion chamber for a scramjet is described. The model is constructed with the use of one-dimensional steady gas-dynamic equations and parametrization of the channel configuration and the governing parameters (fuel injection into the flow, fuel burnout along the channel, dissipation of kinetic energy, removal of some part of energy generated by gases for modeling cooling of channel walls by the fuel) with allowance for real thermophysical properties of the gases. Through parametric calculations, it is found that fuel injection in three cross sections of the channel consisting of segments with weak and strong expansion ensures a supersonic velocity of combustion products in the range of free-stream Mach numbers M∞ = 6-12. It is demonstrated that the angle between the velocity vectors of the gaseous hydrogen flow and the main gas flow can be fairly large in the case of distributed injection of the fuel. This allows effective control of the mixing process. It is proposed to use the exergy of combustion products as a criterion of the efficiency of heat supply in the combustion chamber. Based on the calculated values of exergy, the critical free-stream Mach number that still allows scramjet operation is estimated.

  6. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  7. Gas turbine combustion chamber with air scoops

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, S.E.; Smed, J.P.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes a gas turbine combustion chamber. It comprises: means for admission of fuel to the upstream end thereof and discharge of hot gases from the downstream end thereof, and a combustion chamber wall, having an outer surface, with apertures therethrough, and air scoops provided through the apertures to direct air into the combustion chamber.

  8. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  9. Internal flow-field measurements in a model can-type gas-turbine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutmos, P.; McQuirk, J. J.; Vafidis, C.

    LDA measurements of the three mean velocity components and the corresponding turbulence intensities have been made to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the flow-field in a water model of a can-type gas turbine combustion chamber. The combustor geometry comprised a swirl driven primary zone, annulus fed rows of primary and secondary jets and an exit contraction nozzle. Flow visualization revealed a stable and symmetric vortex established within the primary zone via the combined effects of the inlet swirl and primary jet impingement. High levels of turbulence kinetic energy were generated within the vortex as well as near the location where the jets impinged. Large streamline curvature, anisotropy of the turbulence structure and very rapid transfer of momentum from the radial to the axial direction were associated with this primary region. In the downstream dilution zone a shallower jet trajectory was observed and the larger turbulence kinetic energy levels could be identified in this region with the shear layers formed between the bulk flow emerging from the primary zone and the incoming secondary jets. Moderate levels of spatial non-uniformities were measured at the exit from the nozzle.

  10. Non-grey radiation in a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehtarnavaz, H.; Dang, A. L.; Chiu, H. H.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of radiation on droplets gasification in liquid rocket combustion chambers has been studied. The modeling includes a Legendre pseudo-spectral collocation approximation to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The band model has been utilized to account for non-grey emitting and absorbing gases present in the comustion chamber. The GEMCHIP II code has been utilized to study the fuel and oxidizer droplets combustion and interaction. The submodels within this code are capable of accounting for group combustion and conjugate effects between many droplets. The radiative model has been coupled with the GEMCHIP II code accounting for radial effects only, to provide the tool for studying the combustion-radiation coupling effects in a bipropellant system. The results indicate that the gasification/combustion process will be enhanced upstream of the chamber causing thicker flame sheet and associated higher combustion efficiency.

  11. Advanced technology application for combustion chamber concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, Kathy S.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall is engaged in the development of an Advanced Main Combustion Chamber under the aegis of the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Technology Program. AMCC is to be a robust and highly reliable combustion-chamber prototype costing one-third as much as current designs of comparable performance; it will be associated with a reduction of fabrication time by one-half. Attention is presently given to the three component-manufacturing processes used: single-piece investment casting for the structural jacket and manifolds; vacuum plasma spraying, for the combustion liner, and an alternative, platelet-compounded liner.

  12. Engine Knock and Combustion Chamber Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, Karl

    1939-01-01

    The present report is confined to the effect of the combustion chamber shape on engine knock from three angles, namely: 1) The uniformity of flame-front movement as affected by chamber design and position of the spark plug; 2) The speed of advance of the flame as affected by turbulence and vibrations; 3) The reaction processes in the residual charge as affected by the walls.

  13. Investigation of Ignition and Combustion Processes of Diesel Engines Operating with Turbulence and Air-storage Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Hans

    1938-01-01

    The flame photographs obtained with combustion-chamber models of engines operating respectively, with turbulence chamber and air-storage chambers or cells, provide an insight into the air and fuel movements that take place before and during combustion in the combustion chamber. The relation between air velocity, start of injection, and time of combustion was determined for the combustion process employing a turbulence chamber.

  14. The effect of turbulence model variation on flame propagation in a particular 4-valve engine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Z.; Masonicic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper some initial results concerning the evolution of flame propagation in 4-valve engines with tilted valves were presented. Results were obtained by dint of multidimensional modeling of reactive flows in arbitrary geometry with moving boundaries. During induction fluid flow pattern was characterized with organized tumble motion followed by small but clearly legible deterioration in the vicinity of BDC. During compression the fluid flow pattern is entirely three-dimensional and fully controlled by vortex motion located in the central part of the chamber. The effect of turbulence model variation on flame propagation was tackled as well. Namely, some results obtained with eddy-viscosity model i.e. standard k-ɛ model were compared with results obtained with k-ξ-f model of turbulence in domain of 4-valve engine in-cylinder flow. Some interesting results emerged rendering impetus for further quest in the near future. In the case of combustion all differences ensuing from turbulence model variation, encountered in the case of non-reactive flow were annihilated entirely. Namely the interplay between fluid flow pattern and flame propagation is invariant as regards both turbulence models applied.

  15. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 57.7807... and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall...

  16. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 57.7807... and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall...

  17. Pressure scaling effects in a scramjet combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Stalker, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The test results obtained for a model scramjet over a range of pressure levels corresponding to different flight altitudes involve enthalpies that vary from the ignition limit, at the low temperature end, to temperatures where the dissociation of combustion products severely limits heat release. The minimum temperature is noted to be highly pressure-sensitive; above the ignition limit, the amount of heat release increased markedly with pressure and with combustion chamber length. A FEM computer code has been used to model the mixing and combustion processes.

  18. High-pressure promoted combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor); Stoltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the preferred embodiment of the promoted combusiton chamber disclosed herein, a thick-walled tubular body that is capable of withstanding extreme pressures is arranged with removable upper and lower end closures to provide access to the chamber for dependently supporting a test sample of a material being evaluated in the chamber. To facilitate the real-time analysis of a test sample, several pressure-tight viewing ports capable of withstanding the simulated environmental conditions are arranged in the walls of the tubular body for observing the test sample during the course of the test. A replaceable heat-resistant tubular member and replaceable flame-resistant internal liners are arranged to be fitted inside of the chamber for protecting the interior wall surfaces of the combustion chamber during the evaluation tests. Inlet and outlet ports are provided for admitting high-pressure gases into the chamber as needed for performing dynamic analyses of the test sample during the course of an evaluation test.

  19. Evaluation of multi-dimensional flux models for radiative transfer in cylindrical combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcuk, Nevin

    1993-02-01

    Four flux-type models for radiative heat transfer in cylindrical configurations were applied to the prediction of radiative flux density and source term of a cylindrical enclosure problem based on data reported previously on a pilot-scale experimental combustor with steep temperature gradients. The models, which are Schuster-Hamaker type four-flux model derived by Lockwood and Spalding, two Schuster-Schwarzschild type four-flux models derived by Siddall and Selcuk and Richter and Quack and spherical harmonics approximation, were evaluated from the viewpoint of predictive accuracy by comparing their predictions with exact solutions produced previously. The comparisons showed that spherical harmonics approximation produces more accurate results than the other models with respect to the radiative energy source term and that the four-flux models of Lockwood and Spalding and Siddall and Selcuk for isotropic radiation field are more accurate with respect to the prediction of radiative flux density to the side wall.

  20. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion...

  1. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion...

  2. Stability analysis of a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of combustion instability in an annular combustion chamber are investigated. A modified Galerkin method was used to produce a set of modal amplitude equations from the general nonlinear partial differential acoustic wave equation. From these modal amplitude equations, the two variable perturbation method was used to develop a set of approximate equations of a given order of magnitude. These equations were modeled to show the effects of velocity sensitive combustion instabilities by evaluating the effects of certain parameters in the given set of equations. By evaluating these effects, parameters which cause instabilities to occur in the combustion chamber can be ascertained. It is assumed that in the annular combustion chamber, the liquid propellants are injected uniformly across the injector face, the combustion processes are distributed throughout the combustion chamber, and that no time delay occurs in the combustion processes.

  3. Nonlinear saturation of thermoacoustic oscillations in annular combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardo, Giulio; Juniper, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Continuous combustion systems such as aeroplane engines can experience self-sustained pressure oscillations, called thermoacoustic oscillations. Quite often the combustion chamber is rotationally symmetric and confined between inner and outer walls, with a fixed number of burners equispaced along the annulus, at the chamber inlet. We focus on thermoacoustic oscillations in the azimuthal direction, and discuss the nonlinear saturation of the system towards 2 types of solutions: standing waves (with velocity and pressure nodes fixed in time and in space) and spinning waves (rotating waves, in clockwise or anti-clockwise direction). We neglect the effect of the transverse velocity oscillating in the azimuthal direction in the combustion chamber, and focus the model on the nonlinear effect that the longitudinal velocity, just upstream of each burner, has on the fluctuating heat-release response in the chamber. We present a low-order analytical framework to discuss the stability of the 2 types of solutions. We discuss how the stability and amplitudes of the 2 solutions depend on: 1) the acoustic damping in the system; 2) the number of injectors equispaced in the annulus; 3) the nonlinear response of the flames.

  4. Observation of LOX/Hydrogen Combustion Flame in a Rocket Chamber during Chugging Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masaki; Masuya, Goro

    To obtain concrete information on the mechanism of unstable combustion of liquid oxygen-hydrogen rocket engines, a rectangular rocket chamber with four glass windows was developed. The chamber was designed to simulate a 100-kN-sized cylindrical rocket chamber. Combustion tests were conducted at a chamber pressure of 1.7MPa. Combustion flames and oxygen jets were visualized with a high-speed video at a rate of 4,000 frame/s during low frequency unstable combustion. Oxygen jet images with a backlight, combustion flame and intensity of combustion flame were obtained. Stability analysis based on the double time lag model by Szuch was conducted to assist the understanding of the mechanism of unstable combustion.

  5. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  6. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  7. Combustion chamber struts can be effectively transpiration cooled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. H.

    1966-01-01

    Vapor-deposited sintering technique increases the feasible temperature range of transpiration-cooled structural members in combustion chambers. This technique produces a porous mass of refractory metal wires around a combustion chamber structural member. This mass acts as a transpiration-cooled surface for a thick-walled tube.

  8. Formed platelets for low cost regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Wendel M.

    1992-02-01

    The ongoing work performed to demonstrate the fabrication feasibility of a formed platelet regeneratively cooled combustion chamber liner is described. The combustion chambers are fabricated in three or four axial sections from formed platelet stacks joined together. The platelets are etched, stacked, and bonded into flat panels that contain the regen passages. The flat panels are formed into the final contour with a die. The formed platelet approach takes advantage of the inherent low cost, high accuracy, and thin wall capability of photoetched platelet technology to fabricate long life, low cost rocket combustion chambers. Combustion chamber liner sections were fabricated with extremely thin (tw = 0.20 mm (0.008-in.)) hot gas side walls and very high aspect ratio coolant channels (aspect ratio greater than 10:1). Combustion chamber liner sections were formed of both Zr-Cu and stainless steel. The results of both the forming of individual panels and the joining of panels together are discussed. Work performed demonstrating the feasibility of rocket combustion chamber liners from formed platelets is described. A discussion of the benefits of chamber liners so constructed and of a chamber producing 176,000 N (40 Klbf) of thrust currently fabricated is presented. The results of a study examining the forming of large scale platelet panels for an Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) liner are included.

  9. Heat flows to the combustion chamber walls in detonation and turbulent combustion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskii, F. A.

    1991-02-01

    Measuremens of heat flows to the walls of an annular combustion chamber under conditions of combustion and continuous detonation are reported for a propane-oxygen mixture. It is shown that specific heat flows to the chamber walls under conditions of detonation are significantly lower than those observed during ordinary combustion. The experimental equipment and details of the experimental procedure are described.

  10. Ducted combustion chamber for direct injection engines and method

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Charles

    2015-03-03

    An internal combustion engine includes an engine block having a cylinder bore and a cylinder head having a flame deck surface disposed at one end of the cylinder bore. A piston connected to a rotatable crankshaft and configured to reciprocate within the cylinder bore has a piston crown portion facing the flame deck surface such that a combustion chamber is defined within the cylinder bore and between the piston crown and the flame deck surface. A fuel injector having a nozzle tip disposed in fluid communication with the combustion chamber has at least one nozzle opening configured to inject a fuel jet into the combustion chamber along a fuel jet centerline. At least one duct defined in the combustion chamber between the piston crown and the flame deck surface has a generally rectangular cross section and extends in a radial direction relative to the cylinder bore substantially along the fuel jet centerline.

  11. Combustion chamber and thermal vapor stream producing apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Sperry, John S.; Krajicek, Richard W.; Cradeur, Robert R.

    1978-01-01

    A new and improved method and apparatus for burning a hydrocarbon fuel for producing a high pressure thermal vapor stream comprising steam and combustion gases for injecting into a subterranean formation for the recovery of liquefiable minerals therefrom, wherein a high pressure combustion chamber having multiple refractory lined combustion zones of varying diameters is provided for burning a hydrocarbon fuel and pressurized air in predetermined ratios injected into the chamber for producing hot combustion gases essentially free of oxidizing components and solid carbonaceous particles. The combustion zones are formed by zones of increasing diameters up a final zone of decreasing diameter to provide expansion zones which cause turbulence through controlled thorough mixing of the air and fuel to facilitate complete combustion. The high pressure air and fuel is injected into the first of the multiple zones where ignition occurs with a portion of the air injected at or near the point of ignition to further provide turbulence and more complete combustion.

  12. Fabrication of Composite Combustion Chamber/Nozzle for Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawerence, T.; Beshears, R.; Burlingame, S.; Peters, W.; Prince, M.; Suits, M.; Tillery, S.; Burns, L.; Kovach, M.; Roberts, K.; Clinton, R. G., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center for the X-34 vehicle began as a low cost engine development program for a small booster system. One of the key components to reducing the engine cost was the development of an inexpensive combustion chamber/nozzle. Fabrication of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and nozzle was considered too expensive and time consuming. In looking for an alternate design concept, the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Project provided an extensive background with ablative composite materials in a combustion environment. An integral combustion chamber/nozzle was designed and fabricated with a silica/phenolic ablative liner and a carbon/epoxy structural overwrap. This paper describes the fabrication process and developmental hurdles overcome for the Fastrac engine one-piece composite combustion chamber/nozzle.

  13. Fabrication of Composite Combustion Chamber/Nozzle for Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, T.; Beshears, R.; Burlingame, S.; Peters, W.; Prince, M.; Suits, M.; Tillery, S.; Burns, L.; Kovach, M.; Roberts, K.

    2001-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center for the X-34 vehicle began as a low cost engine development program for a small booster system. One of the key components to reducing the engine cost was the development of an inexpensive combustion chamber/nozzle. Fabrication of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and nozzle was considered too expensive and time consuming. In looking for an alternate design concept, the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Project provided an extensive background with ablative composite materials in a combustion environment. An integral combustion chamber/nozzle was designed and fabricated with a silica/phenolic ablative liner and a carbon/epoxy structural overwrap. This paper describes the fabrication process and developmental hurdles overcome for the Fastrac engine one-piece composite combustion chamber/nozzle.

  14. Performance of Several Combustion Chambers Designed for Aircraft Oil Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joachim, William F; Kemper, Carlton

    1928-01-01

    Several investigations have been made on single-cylinder test engines to determine the performance characteristics of four types of combustion chambers designed for aircraft oil engines. Two of the combustion chambers studied were bulb-type precombustion chambers, the connecting orifice of one having been designed to produce high turbulence by tangential air flow in both the precombustion chamber and the cylinder. The other two were integral combustion chambers, one being dome-shaped and the other pent-roof shaped. The injection systems used included cam and eccentric driven fuel pumps, and diaphragm and spring-loaded fuel-injection valves. A diaphragm type maximum cylinder pressure indicator was used in part of these investigations with which the cylinder pressures were controlled to definite valves. The performance of the engines when equipped with each of the combustion chambers is discussed. The best performance for the tests reported was obtained with a bulb-type combustion chamber designed to give a high degree of turbulence within the bulb and cylinder. (author)

  15. Nondestructive Inspection Using Neutron for Regenerative Cooling Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Sato, Masaki; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Iikura, Hiroshi; Matsubayashi, Masatoshi

    The regenerative cooling combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine is exposed to large temperature difference between the combustion gas and the coolant such as liquid hydrogen. It induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated over cyclic firing tests in the chamber wall. To evaluate the strain and the deformation of chamber walls is important since the chamber life usually relates to such strain and deformation. The primary objective of the present study is to establish a method to obtain experimental data on strains and deformations for correlation with the numerical data. In this study, residual strains and radiographs of a combustion chamber were obtained by applying a neutron diffraction method and a neutron radiography. Furthermore, two-dimensional nonlinear finite element method (FEM) analyses were conducted to calculate the residual strain in the chamber wall. From data of strain measurements, the feasibility of a neutron diffraction method for a combustion chamber was shown because the data from a X-ray diffraction method and FEM analyses qualitatively corresponded with those from a neutron diffraction method. Concerning neutron radiography, a higher resolution was necessary to observe chamber wall deformation.

  16. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  17. Pyrolysis reactor and fluidized bed combustion chamber

    DOEpatents

    Green, Norman W.

    1981-01-06

    A solid carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in a descending flow pyrolysis reactor in the presence of a particulate source of heat to yield a particulate carbon containing solid residue. The particulate source of heat is obtained by educting with a gaseous source of oxygen the particulate carbon containing solid residue from a fluidized bed into a first combustion zone coupled to a second combustion zone. A source of oxygen is introduced into the second combustion zone to oxidize carbon monoxide formed in the first combustion zone to heat the solid residue to the temperature of the particulate source of heat.

  18. The numerical solution of flow field of short-annular combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Ning, H.

    1986-05-01

    The recirculating flow field of a short-annular combustion chamber has been studied. The body-fitting coordinate system and the 'simple' method combined with a constant viscosity model have been employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in a regime containing a complicated curved boundary. The result could provide the theoretical reference for the design and improvement of short-annular combustion chambers.

  19. Structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber: Experimental and analytical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Arya, Vinod K.; Kazaroff, John M.; Halford, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A new, structurally compliant rocket engine combustion chamber design has been validated through analysis and experiment. Subscale, tubular channel chambers have been cyclically tested and analytically evaluated. Cyclic lives were determined to have a potential for 1000 percent increase over those of rectangular channel designs, the current state of the art. Greater structural compliance in the circumferential direction gave rise to lower thermal strains during hot firing, resulting in lower thermal strain ratcheting and longer predicted fatigue lives. Thermal, structural, and durability analyses of the combustion chamber design, involving cyclic temperatures, strains, and low-cycle fatigue lives, have corroborated the experimental observations.

  20. Fabrication process for combustion chamber/nozzle assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly for a rocket engine has a refractory metal shell defining a chamber of generally frusto-conical contour. The shell communicates at its smaller end with a rocket body, and terminates at its larger end in a generally contact contour, which is open at its terminus and which serves as a nozzle for the rocket engine. The entire inner surface of the refractory metal shell has a thermal and oxidation barrier layer applied thereto. An ablative silica phenolic insert is bonded to the exposed surface of the thermal and oxidation barrier layer. The ablative phenolic insert provides a chosen inner contour for the combustion chamber and has a taper toward the open terminus of the nozzle. A process for fabricating the integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly is simple and efficient, and results in economy in respect of both resources and time.

  1. Combustion Chamber/Nozzle Assembly and Fabrication Process Therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An integral lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly for a rocket engine has a refractory metal shell defining a chamber of generally frusto-conical contour. The shell communicates at its larger end with a rocket body, and terminates at its smaller end in a tube of generally cylindrical contour, which is open at its terminus and which serves as a nozzle for the rocket engine. The entire inner surface of the refractory metal shell has a thermal and oxidation barrier layer applied thereto. An ablative silica phenolic insert is bonded to the exposed surface of the thermal and oxidation barrier layer. The ablative phenolic insert provides a chosen inner contour for the combustion chamber and has a taper toward the open terminus of the nozzle. A process for fabricating the integral, lightweight combustion chamber/nozzle assembly is simple and efficient, and results in economy in respect of both resources and time.

  2. Hot fire fatigue testing results for the compliant combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, Albert J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen subscale rocket combustion chamber was designed incorporating an advanced design concept to reduce strain and increase life. The design permits unrestrained thermal expansion of a circumferential direction and, thereby, provides structural compliance during the thermal cycling of hot-fire testing. The chamber was built and test fired at a chamber pressure of 4137 kN/sq m (600 psia) and a hydrogen-oxygen mixture ratio of 6.0. Compared with a conventional milled-channel configuration, the new structurally compliant chamber had a 134 or 287 percent increase in fatigue life, depending on the life predicted for the conventional configuration.

  3. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  4. SSME main combustion chamber and nozzle flowfield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.; Smith, S. D.; Prozan, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation is presented of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools which would accurately analyze main combustion chamber and nozzle flow. The importance of combustion phenomena and local variations in mixture ratio are fully appreciated; however, the computational aspects of the gas dynamics involved were the sole issues addressed. The CFD analyses made are first compared with conventional nozzle analyses to determine the accuracy for steady flows, and then transient analyses are discussed.

  5. Experimental biomass burning emission assessment by combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusini, Ilaria; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Corona, Piermaria; Ciccioli, Paolo; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of several atmospheric gases and particles and it represents an important ecological factor in the Mediterranean ecosystem. In this work we describe the performances of a recently developed combustion chamber to show the potential of this facility in estimating the emission from wildland fire showing a case study with leaves, small branches and litter of two representative species of Mediterranean vegetation, Quercus pubescens and Pinus halepensis. The combustion chamber is equipped with a thermocouple, a high resolution balance, an epiradiometer, two different sampling lines to collect organic volatile compounds (VOCs) and particles, a sampling line connected to a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass-Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a portable analyzer to measure CO and CO2 emission. VOCs emission were both analyzed with GC-MS and monitored on-line with PTR-MS. The preliminary qualitative analysis of emission showed that CO and CO2 are the main gaseous species emitted during the smoldering and flaming phase, respectively. Many aromatics VOCs as benzene and toluene, and many oxygenated VOC as acetaldehyde and methanol were also released. This combustion chamber represents an important tool to determine the emission factor of each plant species within an ecosystem, but also the contribution to the emissions of the different plant tissues and the kinetics of different compound emissions during the various combustion phases. Another important feature of the chamber is the monitoring of the carbon balance during the biomass combustion.

  6. Combustion interaction with radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Jassowski, D. M.; Barlow, R.; Lucht, R.; Mccarty, K.

    1990-01-01

    Over 15 hours of thruster operation at temperatures between 1916 and 2246 C without failure or erosion has been demonstrated using iridium-coated rhenium chamber materials with nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine propellants operating over a mixture ratio range of 1.60-2.05. Research is now under way to provide a basic understanding of the mechanisms which make high-temperature operation possible and to extend the capability to a wider range of conditions, including other propellant combinations and chamber materials. Techniques have been demonstrated for studying surface fracture phenomena. These include surface Raman and Auger for study of oxide formation, surface Raman and X-ray diffraction to determine the oxide phase, Auger to study oxide stoichiometry, and sputter Auger to study interdiffusion of alloy species.

  7. Hot fire test results of subscale tubular combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced, subscale, tubular combustion chambers were built and test fired with hydrogen-oxygen propellants to assess the increase in fatigue life that can be obtained with this type of construction. Two chambers were tested: one ran for 637 cycles without failing, compared to a predicted life of 200 cycles for a comparable smooth-wall milled-channel liner configuration. The other chamber failed at 256 cycles, compared to a predicted life of 118 cycles for a comparable smooth-wall milled-channel liner configuration. Posttest metallographic analysis determined that the strain-relieving design (structural compliance) of the tubular configuration was the cause of this increase in life.

  8. EMISSIONS OF TRACE PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION FROM A PILOT-SCALE INCINERATOR SECONDARY COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed on a 73 kW rotary kiln incinerator simulator equipped with a 73 kW secondary combustion chamber (SCC) to examine emissions of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) resulting from incineration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and dichlorometh...

  9. The combustion behavior of diesel/CNG mixtures in a constant volume combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmansyah; Aziz, A. R. A.; Heikal, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The stringent emissions and needs to increase fuel efficiency makes controlled auto-ignition (CAI) based combustion an attractive alternative for the new combustion system. However, the combustion control is the main obstacles in its development. Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) that employs two fuels with significantly different in reactivity proven to be able to control the combustion. The RCCI concept applied in a constant volume chamber fuelled with direct injected diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) was tested. The mixture composition is varied from 0 - 100% diesel/CNG at lambda 1 with main data collection are pressure profile and combustion images. The results show that diesel-CNG mixture significantly shows better combustion compared to diesel only. It is found that CNG is delaying the diesel combustion and at the same time assisting in diesel distribution inside the chamber. This combination creates a multipoint ignition of diesel throughout the chamber that generate very fast heat release rate and higher maximum pressure. Furthermore, lighter yellow color of the flame indicates lower soot production in compared with diesel combustion.

  10. Launch Vehicle with Combustible Polyethylene Case Gasification Chamber Design Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemets, V.

    A single-stage launch vehicle equipped with a combustible tank shell of polyethylene and a moving propulsion plant is proposed. The propulsion plant is composed of a chamber for the gasification of the shell, a compressor of pyrolysed polyethylene and a magnetic powder obturator. It is shown that the “dental” structure of the gasification chamber is necessary to achieve the necessary contact area with the polyethylene shell. This conclusion is drawn from consideration of the thermo- physical properties of polyethylene, calculating quasisteady temperature field in the gasification chamber, estimating gasification rate of polyethylene, launch vehicle shortening rate and area of gasification. Experimental determination of the gasification rate is described. The gasification chamber specific mass as well as the propulsion plant weight-to-thrust ratio are estimated under some assumptions concerning the obturator and compressor. Combustible launch vehicles are compared with conventional launch vehicles taking into consideration their payload mass ratios. Combustible launchers are preferable as small launchers for micro and nano satellites. Reusable versions of such launchers seem suitable if polyethylene tank shells filled with metal or metal hydride fine dusts are used.

  11. Promoted-Combustion Chamber with Induction Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin; Hagood, Richard; Lowery, Freida; Herald, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    An improved promoted-combustion system has been developed for studying the effects of elevated temperatures on the flammability of metals in pure oxygen. In prior promoted-combustion chambers, initial temperatures of metal specimens in experiments have been limited to the temperatures of gas supplies, usually near room temperature. Although limited elevated temperature promoted-combustion chambers have been developed using water-cooled induction coils for preheating specimens, these designs have been limited to low-pressure operation due to the hollow induction coil. In contrast, the improved promoted-combustion chamber can sustain a pressure up to 10 kpsi (69 MPa) and, through utilization of a solid induction coil, is capable of preheating a metal specimen up to its melting point [potentially in excess of 2,000 F (approximately equal to 1,100 C)]. Hence, the improved promoted combustion chamber makes a greater range of physical conditions and material properties accessible for experimentation. The chamber consists of a vertical cylindrical housing with an inner diameter of 8 in. (20.32 cm) and an inner height of 20.4 in. (51.81 cm). A threaded, sealing cover at one end of the housing can be unscrewed to gain access for installing a specimen. Inlet and outlet ports for gases are provided. Six openings arranged in a helical pattern in the chamber wall contain sealed sapphire windows for viewing an experiment in progress. The base of the chamber contains pressure-sealed electrical connectors for supplying power to the induction coil. The connectors feature a unique design that prevents induction heating of the housing and the pressure sealing surfaces; this is important because if such spurious induction heating were allowed to occur, chamber pressure could be lost. The induction coil is 10 in. (25.4 cm) long and is fitted with a specimen holder at its upper end. At its lower end, the induction coil is mounted on a ceramic base, which affords thermal insulation to

  12. Numerical simulations of industrial-scale combustion chamber - LES versus RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Jasiński, Daniel; Bajer, Konrad

    2011-12-01

    In this work we focus on the simulation of the process of biomass syngas combustion in the industrial combustion chamber directly linked with gasification chamber, where this gas is continuously producing from the biomass. Conflicting demands from the engineers to have rapid results and hints how to ensure the best conditions for combustion of this particular fuel and to lower the emission of pollutants, with simultaneously deep view inside the process and its stability motivates us to use both the RANS and LES techniques of turbulence modelling, compare it and take their advantages. We designed and performed series of 3D numerical simulations of both cold flow and combustion in complex geometry of industrial burner. It seems to us that the proper approach for modelling of biomass syngas combustion is steady flamelets model. Simulations performed with RANS closure are used as the initialisation of LES models, but their main goal is to predict the long-time oscillation of pressure and temperature observed in the working combustion chamber. On the other hand the main goal of the simulations with LES closure is to predict the proper level of short-time behaviour of the flame and local phenomena.

  13. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-07-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  14. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Cheng, G. C.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analyses verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analyses will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Since test data from the NLS development program are not available, new validation heat transfer data have been sought. Suitable data were obtained from a Rocketdyne test program on a model hydrocarbon/oxygen engine. Simulations of these test data will be presented. Recent interest in the hybrid motor have established the need for analyses of ablating solid fuels in the combustion chamber. Analysis of a simplified hybrid motor will also be presented.

  15. Numerical simulation of variable thrust engine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tsung L.; Chiang, Wei-Tang; Jang, Shyh-Dihng

    1992-07-01

    Numerical computations have been conducted for the combustion and fluid-dynamic processes of a variable thrust engine's combustion chamber at the choking condition for two different power levels. The engine in question is to be used by an orbital-maneuvering vehicle. Physical submodels are used in order to account for the two-phase interaction between bipropellant droplet flows and gas-phase flow; nozzle throat conditions are determined by both mass-conservation and thermodynamic relations. In view of the results obtained, the conventional association between fineness of fuel spray and the maximization of combustor efficiency requires reassessment.

  16. Formed platelets for low cost regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, W. M.; Hayes, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Formed platelet technology can be used to fabricate LO2/LH2-fueled rocket propulsion chambers with higher heat capacity, higher cycle life, and lower pressure drops, in conjunction with lower costs due to the application of high volume production methods. The formed-platelet combustor liner is an assembly of identical platelets, each of which is composed of diffusion-bonded, photoetched laminae with coolant flow passages; the platelets are also joined by diffusion bonding to form the combustor's circumference. Attention is given to the fabrication of a platelet combustion chamber generating 40 Klbf of thrust.

  17. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  18. Heat exchanger. [rocket combustion chambers and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger, as exemplified by a rocket combustion chamber, is constructed by stacking thin metal rings having microsized openings therein at selective locations to form cooling passages defined by an inner wall, an outer wall and fins. Suitable manifolds are provided at each end of the rocket chamber. In addition to the cooling channel openings, coolant feed openings may be formed in each of rings. The coolant feed openings may be nested or positioned within generally U-shaped cooling channel openings. Compression on the stacked rings may be maintained by welds or the like or by bolts extending through the stacked rings.

  19. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  20. Explosion-induced combustion of hydrocarbon clouds in a chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2001-02-06

    The interaction of the detonation of a solid HE-charge with a non-premixed cloud of hydro-carbon fuel in a chamber was studied in laboratory experiments. Soap bubbles filled with a flammable gas were subjected to the blast wave created by the detonation of PETN-charges (0.2 g < mass < 0.5 g). The dynamics of the combustion system were investigated by means of high-speed photography and measurement of the quasi-static chamber pressure.

  1. Advanced Main Combustion Chamber structural jacket strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, L. M.; Perkins, L. A.; Denniston, C. L.; Price, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The structural analysis of the Advanced Main Combustion Chamber (AMCC) is presented. The AMCC is an advanced fabrication concept of the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber (MCC). Reduced cost and fabrication time of up to 75 percent were the goals of the AMCC with cast jacket with vacuum plasma sprayed or platelet liner. Since the cast material for the AMCC is much weaker than the wrought material for the MCC, the AMCC is heavier and strength margins much lower in some areas. Proven hand solutions were used to size the manifolds cutout tee areas for combined pressure and applied loads. Detailed finite element strength analyses were used to size the manifolds, longitudinal ribs, and jacket for combined pressure and applied local loads. The design of the gimbal actuator strut attachment lugs were determined by finite element analyses and hand solutions.

  2. Method of fabricating a rocket engine combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Mckechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Power, Christopher A. (Inventor); Daniel, Ronald L., Jr. (Inventor); Saxelby, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for making a combustion chamber for a rocket engine wherein a copper alloy in particle form is injected into a stream of heated carrier gas in plasma form which is then projected onto the inner surface of a hollow metal jacket having the configuration of a rocket engine combustion chamber is described. The particles are in the plasma stream for a sufficient length of time to heat the particles to a temperature such that the particles will flatten and adhere to previously deposited particles but will not spatter or vaporize. After a layer is formed, cooling channels are cut in the layer, then the channels are filled with a temporary filler and another layer of particles is deposited.

  3. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

  4. Pressure pulsations in combustion chambers of large gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Verhage, A.J.L.; Stevens, P.M.P.

    1998-07-01

    Flame instabilities and pressure pulsations have been measured in three different types of gas turbine combustors. These are the single and twin silo (such as the ABB GT13E and the Siemens V94.2), the annular combustion chamber (ABB GT 13E2, Siemens V84.3A, etc), and the multi-can combustors common on GEC-EGT gas turbines. Pressure pulsations are mostly resonant. They are interpreted with help of an acoustical model. Non-resonant modes at low frequencies (flame flicker) are ascribed to imperfect mixing especially in premix burners. At higher frequencies they are often due to vortices from the burners. Modifications of the burners, changes in the geometry of the liners and the addition of acoustical dampers are means to abate flame instabilities and the associated resonances. Judicious ways to run the gas turbine can help to avoid them. The efficiency of acoustical dampers of the Helmholtz type has been investigated experimentally and with model predictions.

  5. Progress in Fabrication of Rocket Combustion Chambers by VPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2004-01-01

    Several documents in a collection describe aspects of the development of advanced materials and fabrication processes intended to enable the manufacture of advanced rocket combustion chambers and nozzles at relatively low cost. One concept discussed in most of the documents is the fabrication of combustion-chamber liners by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) of an alloy of 88Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate atomic percentages) -- a concept that was reported in "Improved Alloy for Fabrication of Combustion Chambers by VPS" (MFS-26546). Another concept is the deposition of graded-composition wall and liner structures by VPS in order to make liners integral parts of wall structures and to make oxidation- and thermal-protection layers integral parts of liners: The VPS process is started at 100 percent of a first alloy, then the proportion of a second alloy is increased gradually from zero as deposition continues, ending at 100 percent of the second alloy. Yet another concept discussed in one of the documents is the VPS of oxidation-protection coats in the forms of nickel-and-chromium-containing refractory alloys on VPS-deposited 88Cu/8Cr/4Nb liners.

  6. Stability analysis of a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability problems in a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber are examined. A modified Galerkin method was used to produce a set of modal amplitude equations from the general nonlinear partial differential acoustic wave equation in order to analyze the problem of instability. From these modal amplitude equations, the two variable perturbation method was used to develop a set of approximate equations of a given order of magnitude. These equations were modeled to show the effects of velocity sensitive combustion instabilities by evaluating the effects of certain parameters in the given set of equations.

  7. SSME main combustion chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.; Fryk, E. E.; Newell, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Typically, low cycle fatigue life is a function of the cyclic strain range, the material properties, and the operating temperature. The reusable life is normally defined by the number of strain cycles that can be accrued before severe material degradation occurs. Reusable life is normally signified by the initiation or propagation of surface cracks. Hot-fire testing of channel wall combustors has shown significant mid-channel wall thinning or deformation during accrued cyclic testing. This phenomenon is termed cyclic-creep and appears to be significantly accelerated at elevated surface temperatures. This failure mode was analytically modelled. The cyclic life of the baseline SSME-MCC based on measured calorimeter heat transfer data, and the life sensitivity of local hot spots caused by injector effects were determined. Four life enhanced designs were assessed.

  8. Low-Cost, High-Performance Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Ultramet designed and fabricated a lightweight, high-temperature combustion chamber for use with cryogenic LOX/CH4 propellants that can deliver a specific impulse of approx.355 seconds. This increase over the current 320-second baseline of nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine (NTO/MMH) will result in a propellant mass decrease of 55 lb for a typical lunar mission. The material system was based on Ultramet's proven oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture, which has been hot-fire tested with stoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen for hours. Instead of rhenium, however, the structural material was a niobium or tantalum alloy that has excellent yield strength at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Phase I demonstrated alloys with yield strength-to-weight ratios more than three times that of rhenium, which will significantly reduce chamber weight. The starting materials were also two orders of magnitude less expensive than rhenium and were less expensive than the C103 niobium alloy commonly used in low-performance engines. Phase II focused on the design, fabrication, and hot-fire testing of a 12-lbf thrust class chamber with LOX/CH4, and a 100-lbf chamber for LOX/CH4. A 5-lbf chamber for NTO/MMH also was designed and fabricated.

  9. Analysis of jet-propulsion-engine combustion-chamber pressure losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Shames, Harold

    1947-01-01

    The development and the use of a chart for estimating the pressure losses in jet-engine combustion chambers are described. By means of the chart, the pressure losses due to fluid friction and to momentum changes in the air flow accompanying combustion can be separately evaluated. The pressure-loss chart is based on the assumption that the pressure losses in the actual combustion chamber can be matched by those of an equivalent combustion chamber of constant cross-sectional area. The concept of the equivalent combustion chamber serves as a convenient basis for comparing the pressure-loss characteristics of combustion chambers of a variety of designs. The over-all pressure losses computed from the pressure-loss chart are within 7 percent of the experimental values for the three types of combustion chambers considered herein.

  10. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  11. Flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers. The computations are performed using an elliptic solver incorporates the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Heat production by combustion is simulated by adding heat generation source terms in the energy equation. And it is assumed that heat generation occurs only a section of the furnace. A number of different inlet conditions with different geometries are considered, and the changes of flow structure, temperature distribution, convective heat flux rate are presented and compared. The results show that, in general, heat transfer in the reversed flow combustion chamber can be improved by properly chosen geometry for the required output.

  12. Effects of fuel and additives on combustion chamber deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.M.; Pocinki, S.B.

    1994-10-01

    The effects of gasoline composition, as represented in typical regular and premium unleaded gasolines and fuel additives, on Combustion Chamber Deposits (CCD) were investigated in BMW and Ford tests. In addition, the influences of engine lubricant oil and ethanol oxygenate on CCD were examined in Ford 2.3L engine dynamometer tests. Also, additive effects of packages based on mineral oil fluidizers versus synthetic fluidizers were studied in several different engines for CCD. Finally, a new method for evaluating the effect of fluidizers on valve sticking is introduced. 6 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Thermal Model of the Promoted Combustion Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Flammability of metals in high pressure, pure oxygen environments, such as rocket engine turbopumps, is commonly evaluated using the Promoted Combustion Test (PCT). The PCT emphasizes the ability of an ignited material to sustain combustion, as opposed to evaluating the sample's propensity to ignite in the first place. A common arrangement is a rod of the sample material hanging in a chamber in which a high pressure, pure oxygen environment is maintained. An igniter of some energetically combusting material is fixed to the bottom of the rod and fired. This initiates combustion, and the sample burns and melts at its bottom tip. A ball of molten material forms, and this ball detaches when it grows too large to be supported by surface tension with the rod. In materials which do not sustain combustion, the combustion then extinguishes. In materials which do sustain combustion, combustion re-initiates from molten residue left on the bottom of the rod, and the melt ball burns and grows until it detaches again. The purpose of this work is development of a PCT thermal simulation model, detailing phase change, melt detachment, and the several heat transfer modes. Combustion is modeled by a summary rate equation, whose parameters are identified by comparison to PCT results. The sensitivity of PCT results to various physical and geometrical parameters is evaluated. The identified combustion parameters may be used in design of new PCT arrangements, as might be used for flammability assessment in flow-dominated environments. The Haynes 214 nickel-based superalloy, whose PCT results are applied here, burns heterogeneously (fuel and oxidizer are of different phases; combustion takes place on the fuel surface). Heterogeneous combustion is not well understood. (In homogeneous combustion, the metal vaporizes, and combustion takes place in an analytically treatable cloud above the surface). Thermal modeling in heterogeneous combustion settings provides a means for linking test

  14. Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Taler, J.; Taler, D.

    2009-07-01

    The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

  15. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  16. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and regeneratively cooled nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    A conjugate heat transfer computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to describe regenerative cooling in the main combustion chamber and nozzle and in the injector faceplate region for a launch vehicle class liquid rocket engine was developed. An injector model for sprays which treats the fluid as a variable density, single-phase media was formulated, incorporated into a version of the FDNS code, and used to simulate the injector flow typical of that in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Various chamber related heat transfer analyses were made to verify the predictive capability of the conjugate heat transfer analysis provided by the FDNS code. The density based version of the FDNS code with the real fluid property models developed was successful in predicting the streamtube combustion of individual injector elements.

  17. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  18. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  19. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.

    1999-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to stabilize the combustion of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. The first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion due ineffective acoustic cavity designs. The thrust chamber exhibited unstable combustion in the first-tangential mode and its harmonics. Combustion was stabilized by increasing the volume of the acoustic cavities and by plugging the dump-cooling orifices so that the cavities were uncooled. Although the first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion, prior and subsequent long-duration performance tests of the Fastrac thrust chamber were spontaneously stable. Stability considerations during the injector faceplate design were based on the Hewitt correlation.

  20. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines require materials that can meet high temperatures while resisting the corrosive oxidation-reduction reaction of combustion known as blanching, the main cause of engine failure. A project was initiated at NASA-Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) to combine three existing technologies to build and demonstrate an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber that would provide a 100 mission life. Technology developed in microgravity research to build cartridges for space furnaces was utilized to vacuum plasma spray (VPS) a functional gradient coating on the hot wall of the combustion liner as one continuous operation, eliminating any bondline between the coating and the liner. The coating was NiCrAlY, developed previously as durable protective coatings on space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine blades. A thermal model showed that 0.03 in. NiCrAlY applied to the hot wall of the combustion liner would reduce the hot wall temperature 200 F, a 20% reduction, for longer life. Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy, which was developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), and which possesses excellent high temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability, was utilized as the liner material in place of NARloy-Z. The Cu-8Cr-4Nb material exhibits better mechanical properties at 650 C (1200 F) than NARloy-Z does at 538 C (1000 F). VPS formed Cu-8Cr-4Nb combustion chamber liners with a protective NiCrAlY functional gradient coating have been hot fire tested, successfully demonstrating a durable coating for the first time. Hot fire tests along with tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of the VPS formed combustion chamber liners and witness panel specimens are discussed.

  1. NiAl-Based Approach For Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Gayda, John (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layered component, such as a rocket engine combustion chamber, includes NiAl or NiAl-based alloy as a structural layer on the hot side of the component. A second structural layer is formed of material selected form Ni-based superalloys, Co-based alloys, Fe-based alloys, Cu, and Cu-based alloys. The second material is more ductile than the NiAl and imparts increased toughness to the component. The second material is selected to enhance one or more predetermined physical properties of the component. Additional structural layers may be included with the additional material(s) being selected for their impact on physical properties of the component.

  2. NiAl-based approach for rocket combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Gayda, John (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layered component, such as a rocket engine combustion chamber, includes NiAl or NiAl-based alloy as a structural layer on the hot side of the component. A second structural layer is formed of material selected from Ni-based superalloys, Co-based alloys, Fe-based alloys, Cu, and Cu-based alloys. The second material is more ductile than the NiAl and imparts increased toughness to the component. The second material is selected to enhance one or more predetermined physical properties of the component. Additional structural layers may be included with the additional material(s) being selected for their impact on physical properties of the component.

  3. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  4. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-11-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  5. Modifications of a Composite-Material Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.

    2005-01-01

    Two short reports discuss modifications of a small, lightweight combustion chamber that comprises a carbon/carbon composite outer shell and an iridium/ rhenium inner liner. The first report discusses chamber design modifications made as results of hot-fire tests and post-test characterization. The Books & Reports 32 NASA Tech Briefs, June 2005 modifications were intended to serve a variety of purposes, including improving fabrication, reducing thermal-expansion mismatch stresses, increasing strength-to-weight ratios of some components, and improving cooling of some components. The second report discusses (1) the origin of stress in the mismatch between the thermal expansions of the Ir/Re liner and a niobium sleeve and flange attached to the carbon/ carbon shell and (2) a modification intended to relieve the stress. The modification involves the redesign of an inlet connection to incorporate a compressible seal between the Ir/Re liner and the Nb flange. A nickel alloy was selected as the seal material on the basis of its thermal-expansion properties and its ability to withstand the anticipated stresses, including the greatest stresses caused by the high temperatures to be used in brazing during fabrication.

  6. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  7. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  8. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  9. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  10. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Miscellaneous Boiler Repairs § 59.15-5 Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or...

  11. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  12. CFD Analysis of Spray Combustion and Radiation in OMV Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE), developed by TRW, for the Orbit Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propellants are pressure fed into the combustion chamber through a single pintle injection element. The performance of this engine is dependent on the pintle geometry and a number of complex physical phenomena and their mutual interactions. The most important among these are (1) atomization of the liquid jets into fine droplets; (2) the motion of these droplets in the gas field; (3) vaporization of the droplets (4) turbulent mixing of the fuel and oxidizer; and (5) hypergolic reaction between MMH and NTO. Each of the above phenomena by itself poses a considerable challenge to the technical community. In a reactive flow field of the kind occurring inside the VTE, the mutual interactions between these physical processes tend to further complicate the analysis. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive mathematical modeling methodology to analyze the flow field within the VTE. Using this model, the effect of flow parameters on various physical processes such as atomization, spray dynamics, combustion, and radiation is studied. This information can then be used to optimize design parameters and thus improve the performance of the engine. The REFLEQS CFD Code is used for solving the fluid dynamic equations. The spray dynamics is modeled using the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The discrete ordinate method with 12 ordinate directions is used to predict the radiative heat transfer in the OMV combustion chamber, nozzle, and the heat shield. The hypergolic reaction between MMH and NTO is predicted using an equilibrium chemistry model with 13 species. The results indicate that mixing and combustion is very sensitive to the droplet size. Smaller droplets evaporate faster than bigger droplets, leading to a well mixed zone in the

  13. Prevention of Over-Pressurization During Combustion in a Sealed Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Niehaus, Justin E.; Olson, Sandra L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Johnston, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of flammable material in a sealed chamber invariably leads to an initial pressure rise in the volume. The pressure rise is due to the increase in the total number of gaseous moles (condensed fuel plus chamber oxygen combining to form gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor) and, most importantly, the temperature rise of the gas in the chamber. Though the rise in temperature and pressure would reduce with time after flame extinguishment due to the absorption of heat by the walls and contents of the sealed spacecraft, the initial pressure rise from a fire, if large enough, could lead to a vehicle over-pressure and the release of gas through the pressure relief valve. This paper presents a simple lumped-parameter model of the pressure rise in a sealed chamber resulting from the heat release during combustion. The transient model considers the increase in gaseous moles due to combustion, and heat transfer to the chamber walls by convection and radiation and to the fuel-sample holder by conduction, as a function of the burning rate of the material. The results of the model are compared to the pressure rise in an experimental chamber during flame spread tests as well as to the pressure falloff after flame extinguishment. The experiments involve flame spread over thin solid fuel samples. Estimates of the heat release rate profiles for input to the model come from the assumed stoichiometric burning of the fuel along with the observed flame spread behavior. The sensitivity of the model to predict maximum chamber pressure is determined with respect to the uncertainties in input parameters. Model predictions are also presented for the pressure profile anticipated in the Fire Safety-1 experiment, a material flammability and fire safety experiment proposed for the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). Computations are done for a range of scenarios including various initial pressures and sample sizes. Based on these results, various

  14. Elimination of Intermediate-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the combustion performance of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. The thrust chamber exhibited benign, yet marginally unstable combustion. The marginally unstable combustion was characterized by chamber pressure oscillations with large amplitudes and a frequency that was too low to be identified as acoustic or high-frequency combustion instability and too high to be identified as chug or low-frequency combustion instability. The source of the buzz or intermediate-frequency combustion instability was traced to the fuel venturi whose violently noisy cavitation caused resonance in the feedline downstream. Combustion was stabilized by increasing the throat diameter of the fuel venturi such that the cavitation would occur more quietly.

  15. Thermodynamics and combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Modeling fluid phase phenomena blends the conservation equations of continuum mechanics with the property equations of thermodynamics. The thermodynamic contribution becomes especially important when the phenomena involve chemical reactions as they do in combustion systems. The successful study of combustion processes requires (1) the availability of accurate thermodynamic properties for both the reactants and the products of reaction and (2) the computational capabilities to use the properties. A discussion is given of some aspects of the problem of estimating accurate thermodynamic properties both for reactants and products of reaction. Also, some examples of the use of thermodynamic properties for modeling chemically reacting systems are presented. These examples include one-dimensional flow systems and the internal combustion engine.

  16. Transpiring Cooling of a Scram-Jet Engine Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Song, Kyo D.; Ries,Heidi

    1997-01-01

    The peak cold-wall heating rate generated in a combustion chamber of a scram-jet engine can exceed 2000 Btu/sq ft sec (approx. 2344 W/sq cm). Therefore, a very effective heat dissipation mechanism is required to sustain such a high heating load. This research focused on the transpiration cooling mechanism that appears to be a promising approach to remove a large amount of heat from the engine wall. The transpiration cooling mechanism has two aspects. First, initial computations suggest that there is a reduction, as much as 75%, in the heat flux incident on the combustion chamber wall due to the transpirant modifying the combustor boundary layer. Secondly, the heat reaching the combustor wall is removed from the structure in a very effective manner by the transpirant. It is the second of these two mechanisms that is investigated experimentally in the subject paper. A transpiration cooling experiment using a radiant heating method, that provided a heat flux as high as 200 Btu/sq ft sec ( approx. 234 W/sq cm) on the surface of a specimen, was performed. The experiment utilized an arc-lamp facility (60-kW radiant power output) to provide a uniform heat flux to a test specimen. For safety reasons, helium gas was used as the transpirant in the experiments. The specimens were 1.9-cm diameter sintered, powdered-stainless-steel tubes of various porosities and a 2.54cm square tube with perforated multi-layered walls. A 15-cm portion of each specimen was heated. The cooling effectivenes and efficiencies by transpiration for each specimen were obtained using the experimental results. During the testing, various test specimens displayed a choking phenomenon in which the transpirant flow was limited as the heat flux was increased. The paper includes a preliminary analysis of the transpiration cooling mechanism and a scaling conversion study that translates the results from helium tests into the case when a hydrogen medium is used.

  17. Structural Benchmark Tests of Composite Combustion Chamber Support Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Thesken, John C.; Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.

    2005-01-01

    A series of mechanical load tests was completed on several novel design concepts for extremely lightweight combustion chamber support structures at the NASA Glenn Research Center (http://www.nasa.gov/glenn/). The tests included compliance evaluation, preliminary proof loadings, high-strain cyclic testing, and finally residual strength testing of each design (see the photograph on the left). Loads were applied with single rollers (see the photograph on the right) or pressure plates (not shown) located midspan on each side to minimize the influence of contact stresses on corner deformation measurements. Where rollers alone were used, a more severe structural loading was produced than the corresponding equal-force pressure loading: the maximum transverse shear force existed over the entire length of each side, and the corner bending moments were greater than for a distributed (pressure) loading. Failure modes initiating at the corner only provided a qualitative indication of the performance limitations since the stress state was not identical to internal pressure. Configurations were tested at both room and elevated temperatures. Experimental results were used to evaluate analytical prediction tools and finite-element methodologies for future work, and they were essential to provide insight into the deformation at the corners. The tests also were used to assess fabrication and bonding details for the complicated structures. They will be used to further optimize the design of the support structures for weight performance and the efficacy of corner reinforcement.

  18. SSME Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) hot oil dewaxing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akpati, Anthony U.

    1995-01-01

    In an attempt to comply with the changing environmental regulations, a process was developed for the replacement of perchloroethylene in the dewaxing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) and other associated hardware filled with the Rigidax (R) casting compound. Rigidax (R) is a hard blue-dyed, calcium carbonate filled thermoplastic casting compound (melting point 77 C) that is melted and poured into hardware cavities to prevent contamination during material removal processes, i.e. machining, grinding, drilling, and deburring. Additionally, it serves as a maskant for designated areas during electroforming processes. Laboratory testing was conducted to evaluate seven alternate fluids for the replacement of perchloroethylene in the dewaxing process. Based upon successful laboratory results, a mineral oil was selected for testing on actual hardware. The final process developed involves simultaneous immersion and flushing of the MCC channels using a distinct eight stage process. A nonvolatile hydrocarbon analysis of a solvent flush sample is performed to determine the hardware cleanliness for comparison to the previous perchloroethylene dewaxing process.

  19. SSME Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) 'Hot Oil' Dewaxing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akpati, Anthony U.

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to comply with the changing environmental regulations, a process was developed for the replacement of perchloroethylene in the dewaxing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) and other associated hardware filled with the Rigidax(registered mark) casting compound. Rigidax(registered mark) is a hard blue-dyed, calcium carbonate filled thermoplastic casting compound (melting point 77 C) that is melted and poured into hardware cavities to prevent contamination during material removal processes, i.e. machining, grinding, drilling, and deburring. Additionally, it serves as a maskant for designated areas during electroforming processes. Laboratory testing was conducted to evaluate seven alternate fluids for the replacement of perchloroethylene in the dewaxing process. Based upon successful laboratory results, a mineral oil was selected for testing on actual hardware. The final process developed involves simultaneous immersion and flushing of the MCC channels using a distinct eight stage process. A nonvolatile hydrocarbon analysis of a solvent flush sample is performed to determine the hardware cleanliness for comparison to the previous perchloroethylene dewaxing process.

  20. Simulations of shock-induced mixing& combustion of an acetylene cloud in a chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J B; Day, M S; Beckner, V E; Kuhl, A L; Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H

    2001-02-06

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of the interaction of a blast wave with an acetylene bubble in a closed chamber. We model the system using the inviscid Euler equations for a mixture of ideal gases. The formulation specifies the thermodynamic behavior of the system using a Chemkin interface and includes the capability to model combustion as the ambient air mixes with the acetylene. The simulations are performed using a three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement algorithm based on a second-order Godunov integration scheme. Simulations are compared with experimental measurements for the same configuration.

  1. Combustion of liquid fuel in the counter-swirled jets of a gas turbine plant annular combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanovskii, A. G.; Semichastnyi, N. N.; Sokolov, K. Iu.

    1986-03-01

    Tests were carried out on an annular combustion chamber rig with a stabilizer of the type used in the GTN-25 gas turbine plant to determine the feasibility of burning a liquid fuel (diesel fuel, GOST 4749-73) in a combustion chamber of this type. Very high performance was obtained for a number of important characteristics of the microflame combustion process in counterswirled jets where all the air was supplied through the front unit of the chamber. However, the tests did not make it possible to solve some of the problems which arise when operating under full-scale conditions, such as the required high combustion efficiency under variable operating conditions of a gas turbine plant; elimination of soot formation at the walls of the stabilizer and the internal surfaces of the pipes supplying fuel to the atomizers; and a decrease in smoking under conditions of excess air factor.

  2. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Combustion Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a modular, multi-user, two-rack facility dedicated to combustion and fluids science in the US Laboratory Destiny on the International Space Station. FCF is a permanent facility that is capable of accommodating up to ten combustion and fluid science investigations per year. FCF research in combustion and fluid science supports NASA's Exploration of Space Initiative for on-orbit fire suppression, fire safety, and space system fluids management. The Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) is one of two racks in the FCF. The CIR major structural elements include the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR), Experiment Assembly (optics bench and combustion chamber), Air Thermal Control Unit (ATCU), Rack Door, and Lower Structure Assembly (Input/Output Processor and Electrical Power Control Unit). The load path through the rack structure is outlined. The CIR modal survey was conducted to validate the load path predicted by the CIR finite element model (FEM). The modal survey is done by experimentally measuring the CIR frequencies and mode shapes. The CIR model was test correlated by updating the model to represent the test mode shapes. The correlated CIR model delivery is required by NASA JSC at Launch-10.5 months. The test correlated CIR flight FEM is analytically integrated into the Shuttle for a coupled loads analysis of the launch configuration. The analysis frequency range of interest is 0-50 Hz. A coupled loads analysis is the analytical integration of the Shuttle with its cargo element, the Mini Payload Logistics Module (MPLM), in the Shuttle cargo bay. For each Shuttle launch configuration, a verification coupled loads analysis is performed to determine the loads in the cargo bay as part of the structural certification process.

  3. Combustion-chamber Performance Characteristics of a Python Turbine-propeller Engine Investigated in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Carl E

    1951-01-01

    Combustion-chamber performance characteristics of a Python turbine-propeller engine were determined from investigation of a complete engine over a range of engine speeds and shaft horsepowers at simulated altitudes. Results indicated the effect of engine operating conditions and altitude on combustion efficiency and combustion-chamber total pressure losses. Performance of this vaporizing type combustion chamber was also compared with several atomizing type combustion chambers. Over the range of test conditions investigated, combustion efficiency varied from approximately 0.95 to 0.99.

  4. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  5. Vacuum Plasma Spray Forming of Copper Alloy Liners for Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form combustion chambers from copper alloys NARloy-Z and GRCop-84. Vacuum plasma spray forming is of particular interest in the forming of CuCrNb alloys such as GRCop-84, developed by NASA s Glenn Research Center, because the alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods. This limitation is related to the levels of chromium and niobium in the alloy, which exceed the solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintained the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics was powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. This paper discusses the techniques used to form combustion chambers from CuCrNb and NARloy-Z, which will be used in regeneratively cooled liquid rocket combustion chambers.

  6. Redesign and Test of an SSME Turbopump for the Large Throat Main Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunde, K. J.; Lee, G. A.; Eastland, A. H.; Rojas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The preburner oxidizer turbopump for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) was successfully redesigned for use with the Large Throat Main Combustion Chamber (LTMCC) and tested in air utilizing rapid prototyping. The redesign increases the SSME's operating range with the current Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) while achieving full operational range with the LTMCC. The use of rapid prototyping and air testing to validate the redesign demonstrated the ability to design, fabricate and test designs rapidly and at a very low cost.

  7. Reduction of combustion emissions using hydrogen peroxide in a pilot scale combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.I.; Corredor, L.F.; Tamara, W.

    1997-12-31

    A hydrogen peroxide injection system was designed and installed in the stack of a 5,274 million J/hr industrial pilot plant scale combustion chamber using natural gas as fuel. The concentration of peroxide in the gas stream was precisely controlled by continuous injection using an electromagnetic dosage pump, the liquid 50% peroxide solution was finely dispersed into the gases by a water cooled custom designed delivery system with a spray nozzle at the tip. Residence times between 0.1 and 1.8 seconds and concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} between 280 ppm and 4,000 ppm were used during the test runs. CEMS for total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, as well as an ultrasonic gas flow monitor were used to measure the effect of hydrogen peroxide in reducing the emissions of these pollutants. Destruction removal efficiencies between 25% and 100% were observed for hydrocarbons, and concentrations of CO, as well as NO{sub x}. were reduced about 50%. The results indicate that this labscale proved technology yields similar results in reducing combustion emissions in pilot applications, and also a reliable injection system has been developed and tested successfully.

  8. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  9. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed.

  10. Development and application of noninvasive technology for study of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.; Abramchuk, T. V.; Shipigusev, V. A.; Andreeva, T. P.; Gumerov, A. R.; Ilyin, A. N.; Gubaidullin, I. T.

    2015-05-01

    The paper formulates the issue of development of experimental base with noninvasive optical-electronic tools for control of combustion in a combustion chamber of gas turbine engine. The design and specifications of a pilot sample of optronic system are explained; this noninvasive system was created in the framework of project of development of main critical technologies for designing of aviation gas turbine engine PD-14. The testbench run data are presented.

  11. An Extended Combustion Model for the Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Andres-Mihăilă, Mihai; Matei, Pericle Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    The paper consists in modelling and simulation of the combustion in a turbojet engine in order to find optimal characteristics of the burning process and the optimal shape of combustion chambers. The main focus of this paper is to find a new configuration of the aircraft engine combustion chambers, namely an engine with two main combustion chambers, one on the same position like in classical configuration, between compressor and turbine and the other, placed behind the turbine but not performing the role of the afterburning. This constructive solution could allow a lower engine rotational speed, a lower temperature in front of the first stage of the turbine and the possibility to increase the turbine pressure ratio by extracting the flow stream after turbine in the inner nozzle. Also, a higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines could be obtained.

  12. Considerations of Air Flow in Combustion Chambers of High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1932-01-01

    The air flow in combustion chambers is divided into three fundamental classes - induced, forced, and residual. A generalized resume is given of the present status of air flow investigations and of the work done at this and other laboratories to determine the direction and velocity of air movement in auxiliary and integral combustion chambers. The effects of air flow on engine performance are mentioned to show that although air flow improves the combustion efficiency, considerable induction, friction, and thermal losses must be guarded against.

  13. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  14. Status on the Verification of Combustion Stability for the J-2X Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hinerman, Tim; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Hulka, Jim; Barnett, Greg; Dodd, Fred; Martin, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Development is underway of the J -2X engine, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for use on the Space Launch System. The Engine E10001 began hot fire testing in June 2011 and testing will continue with subsequent engines. The J -2X engine main combustion chamber contains both acoustic cavities and baffles. These stability aids are intended to dampen the acoustics in the main combustion chamber. Verification of the engine thrust chamber stability is determined primarily by examining experimental data using a dynamic stability rating technique; however, additional requirements were included to guard against any spontaneous instability or rough combustion. Startup and shutdown chug oscillations are also characterized for this engine. This paper details the stability requirements and verification including low and high frequency dynamics, a discussion on sensor selection and sensor port dynamics, and the process developed to assess combustion stability. A status on the stability results is also provided and discussed.

  15. Application of Chaboche Model in Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asraff, Ahmedul Kabir; Suresh Babu, Sheela; Babu, Aneena; Eapen, Reeba

    2015-12-01

    Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines are commonly used in space technology. Thrust chamber is one of the most important subsystems of a rocket engine. The thrust chamber generates propulsive thrust force for flight of the rocket by ejection of combustion products at supersonic speeds. Often double walled construction is employed for these chambers. The thrust chamber investigated here has its hot inner wall fabricated out of a high thermal conductive material like copper alloy and outer wall made of stainless steel. Inner wall is subjected to high thermal and pressure loads during operation of engine due to which it will be in the plastic regime. Main reasons for the failure of such chambers are fatigue in the plastic range (called as low cycle fatigue since the number of cycles to failure will be low in plastic range), creep and thermal ratcheting. Elasto plastic material models are required to simulate the above effects through a cyclic stress analysis. This paper gives the details of cyclic stress analysis carried out for the thrust chamber using different plasticity model combinations available in ANSYS (Version 15) FE code. The best model among the above is applied in the cyclic stress analysis of two dimensional (plane strain and axisymmetric) and three dimensional finite element models of thrust chamber. Cyclic life of the chamber is calculated from stress-strain graph obtained from above analyses.

  16. Vacuum Plasma Spray of CuCrNb Alloy for Advanced Liquid - Fuel Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The copper-8 atomic percent chromium-4 atomic percent niobium (CuCrNb) alloy was developed by Glenn Research Center (formally Lewis Research Center) as an improved alloy for combustion chamber liners. In comparison to NARloy-Z, the baseline (as in Space Shuttle Main Engine) alloy for such liners, CuCrNb demonstrates mechanical and thermophysical properties equivalent to NARloy-Z, but at temperatures 100 C to 150 C (180 F to 270 F) higher. Anticipated materials related benefits include decreasing the thrust cell liner weight 5% to 20%, increasing the service life at least two fold over current combustion chamber design, and increasing the safety margins available to designers. By adding an oxidation and thermal barrier coating to the liner, the combustion chamber can operate at even higher temperatures. For all these benefits, however, this alloy cannot be formed using conventional casting and forging methods because of the levels of chromium and niobium, which exceed their solubility limit in copper. Until recently, the only forming process that maintains the required microstructure of CrNb intermetallics is powder metallurgy formation of a billet from powder stock, followed by extrusion. This severely limits its usefulness in structural applications, particularly the complex shapes required for combustion chamber liners. Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) has been demonstrated as a method to form structural articles including small combustion chambers from the CuCrNb alloy. In addition, an oxidation and thermal barrier layer can be formed integrally on the hot wall of the liner that improve performance and extend service life. This paper discusses the metallurgy and thermomechanical properties of VPS formed CuCrNb versus the baseline powder metallurgy process, and the manufacturing of small combustion chamber liners at Marshall Space Flight Center using the VPS process. The benefits to advanced propulsion initiatives of using VPS to fabricate combustion chamber liners

  17. A review of internal combustion engine combustion chamber process studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of internal combustion stratified-charge engines is highly dependent on the in-cylinder fuel-air mixing processes occurring in these engines. Current research concerning the in-cylinder airflow characteristics of rotary and piston engines is presented. Results showing the output of multidimensional models, laser velocimetry measurements and the application of a holographic optical element are described. Models which simulate the four-stroke cycle and seal dynamics of rotary engines are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-24999

  18. Liquid oxygen/hydrogen testing of a single swirl coaxial injector element in a windowed combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Makel, D.

    1993-06-01

    A modular, high pressure, liquid rocket single element combustion chamber was developed at Aerojet for use with nonintrusive combustion diagnostics. The hardware is able to accommodate full-size injection elements and includes a recessed annular injector around the single element to provide a source for hot gas background flow, which reduces recirculation in the chamber and provides additional injection mass to elevate chamber pressure. Experiments are being conducted to develop the diagnostics required to characterize a single-element combustion spray field for combustion modeling, benchmark data for CFD model validation, and development of the transfer functions between single element cold flow and multielement hot fire. The latter task is being pursued using an injector element identical to elements that had been previously cold-flow tested in single element tests to ambient backpressure and hot fire tested in a multielement injector. Preliminary tests conducted to date without hydrogen flowing through the annular coaxial orifice of the single element show the general flow characteristics of a reacting, unconfined, liquid oxygen hollow cone swirl spray.

  19. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) and new ``green'' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lbf) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O2/H2 propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  20. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-22

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) and new 'green' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lb{sub f}) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  1. Composite propellant combustion modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of theoretical and experimental studies of composite propellant combustion. The theoretical investigations include a model of the combustion of a nonmetallized ammonium perchlorate (AP) propellant (noting time scales for vapor-phase combustion and the condensed phase) and response functions in pressure-coupled oscillations. The experimental studies are discussed with reference to scale-modeling apparatus, flame standoff distance versus velocity as a function of pressure, and results from T-burner firings of a nonmetallized AP/polysulfide propellant. Research applications including problems with nitramine propellants, the feasibility of stop-restart rockets with salt quench, and combustion problems in large boosters are outlined.

  2. The effect of insulated combustion chamber surfaces on direct-injected diesel engine performance, emissions, and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Daniel W.; Vinyard, Shannon; Keribar, Rifat

    1988-01-01

    The combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, direct-injected diesel engine was insulated with ceramic coatings to determine the effect of low heat rejection (LHR) operation on engine performance, emissions, and combustion. In comparison to the baseline cooled engine, the LHR engine had lower thermal efficiency, with higher smoke, particulate, and full load carbon monoxide emissions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were reduced across the load range. The nitrous oxide emissions increased at some part-load conditions and were reduced slightly at full loads. The poor LHR engine performance was attributed to degraded combustion characterized by less premixed burning, lower heat release rates, and longer combustion duration compared to the baseline cooled engine.

  3. Two-phase flow predictions of the turbulent flow in a combustion chamber including particle-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Michael; Alletto, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Relying on large-eddy simulation (LES) and an efficient algorithm to track a huge number of Lagrangian particles through turbulent flow fields in general complex 3D domains, the flow in a pipe and a model combustion chamber is tackled. The influence of particle-fluid (two-way coupling) as well as particle-particle interactions (four-way coupling) is investigated. The latter is modeled based on deterministic collision detection. First, the LES results of a particle-laden vertical pipe flow with a specular wall and a mass loading of 110% are evaluated based on DNS data from the literature. Second, the predicted LES data of a ring combustion chamber at two different mass loadings (22% and 110%) are analyzed and compared with experimental measurements.

  4. Formation of detonation in a pulse combustion chamber with a porous obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhussan, Kh.; Assad, M. S.; Penyazkov, O. G.; Sevruk, K. L.

    2012-09-01

    A study has been made of the influence of a porous obstacle on deflagration-to-detonation transition in a pulse combustion chamber of small length. Dependences of the detonation-wave velocity on the distance have been obtained for two samples of a porous material (steel spheres and a ceramic porous body). It has been shown that the use of an insert from a porous material leads to a reduction of 40% in the predetonation distance without changing substantially the structure of the pulse combustion chamber.

  5. Hydrocarbon-fuel/copper combustion chamber liner compatibility, corrosion prevention, and refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.; Homer, G. D.; Franklin, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of combustion product/combustion chamber compatibility in the case of a LOX/liquid hydrocarbon booster engine based on copper-alloy thrust chamber which is regeneratively cooled by the fuel. It is found that sulfur impurities in the fuel are the primary causes of copper corrosion, through formation of Cu2S; sulfur levels as low as 1 ppm can result in sufficiently severe copper corrosion to degrade cooling channel performance. This corrosion can be completely eliminated, however, through the incorporation of an electrodeposited gold coating on the copper cooling-channel walls.

  6. Numerical analysis of bipropellant combustion in liquid thrust chambers by an Eulerian-Eulerian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dang, A. L.; Navaz, H. K.; Rangel, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The liquid thrust chambers performance (LTCP) code is used for parametric studies of flow and combustion in liquid rocket engines. Multiphase flow equations are solved in an Eulerian-Eulerian framework, and multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated. The discretization scheme is fully implicit and is based on the total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme, which is accurate, robust, very efficient and capable of handling steep gradients and stiff chemistry. Effects of injection velocity and chamber size have been considered, and the effect of group combustion on the evaporation rate has been studied for a dense spray.

  7. Novel application of a combustion chamber for experimental assessment of biomass burning emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusini, Ilaria; Pallozzi, E.; Corona, P.; Ciccioli, P.; Calfapietra, C.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass burning is an important ecological factor in the Mediterranean ecosystem and a significant source of several atmospheric gases and particles. This paper demonstrates the performance of a recently developed combustion chamber, showing its capability in estimating the emission from wildland fire through a case study with dried leaf litter of Quercus robur. The combustion chamber was equipped with a thermocouple, a high resolution balance, an epiradiometer, two different sampling lines to collect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particles, and a portable analyzer to measure carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. VOCs were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after enrichment on adsorption traps, but also monitored on-line with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Preliminary qualitative analyses of emissions from burning dried leaf litter of Q. robur found CO and CO2 as the main gaseous species emitted during the flaming and smoldering stages. Aromatic VOCs, such as benzene and toluene, were detected together with several oxygenated VOCs, like acetaldehyde and methanol. Moreover, a clear picture of the carbon balance during the biomass combustion was obtained with the chamber used. The combustion chamber will allow to distinguish the contribution of different plant tissues to the emissions occurring during different combustion phases.

  8. Numerical investigation of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a plant oil stove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritz, B.; Werler, M.; Wirbser, H.; Gabi, M.

    2013-10-01

    Recently a low cost cooking device for developing and emerging countries was developed at KIT in cooperation with the company Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH. After constructing an innovative basic design further development was required. Numerical investigations were conducted in order to investigate the flow inside the combustion chamber of the stove under variation of different geometrical parameters. Beyond the performance improvement a further reason of the investigations was to rate the effects of manufacturing tolerance problems. In this paper the numerical investigation of a plant oil stove by means of RANS simulation will be presented. In order to reduce the computational costs different model reduction steps were necessary. The simulation results of the basic configuration compare very well with experimental measurements and problematic behaviors of the actual stove design could be explained by the investigation.

  9. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Fuels in a Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-23

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30 % of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and - by means of the hot detonation products - energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm3, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum powder, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or sucrose and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in three different chambers of 4-1, 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume. In general, the booster charge was sufficient to initiate burning of the fuel. This modifies the pressure signatures measured with a number of wall gages and increases the quasi-static overpressure level obtained in the chambers. On the one hand the time-scale and the yield of the pressure rise depend on the fuel and its characteristics. On the other hand they also depend on the flow dynamics in the chamber, which is dominated by shock reverberations, and thus on the chamber geometry and volume. The paper gives a survey of the experimental results and discusses the possible influences of some basic parameters.

  10. Low-cycle fatigue analysis of a cooled copper combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elastoplastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of regeneratively cooled rocket engine combustion chamber. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the engine operating cycle. The strain range was used in conjunction with OFHC copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict engine low-cycle fatigue life. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen chamber which was fatigue tested to failure at the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  11. Coal-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustion chamber

    DOEpatents

    Gall, Robert L.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a fuel-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustor. In accordance with the present invention a perforated conveyor belt is utilized in place of the fixed grid normally disposed at the lower end of the fluidized bed combustion zone. The conveyor belt is fed with fuel, e.g. coal, at one end thereof so that the air passing through the perforations dislodges the coal from the belt and feeds the coal into the fluidized zone in a substantially uniform manner.

  12. Progress in analytical methods to predict and control azimuthal combustion instability modes in annular chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerheim, M.; Nicoud, F.; Poinsot, T.

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal low-frequency thermoacoustic unstable modes in combustion chambers have been intensively studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically, leading to significant progress in both understanding and controlling these acoustic modes. However, modern annular gas turbines may also exhibit azimuthal modes, which are much less studied and feature specific mode structures and dynamic behaviors, leading to more complex situations. Moreover, dealing with 10-20 burners mounted in the same chamber limits the use of high fidelity simulations or annular experiments to investigate these modes because of their complexity and costs. Consequently, for such circumferential acoustic modes, theoretical tools have been developed to uncover underlying phenomena controlling their stability, nature, and dynamics. This review presents recent progress in this field. First, Galerkin and network models are described with their pros and cons in both the temporal and frequency framework. Then, key features of such acoustic modes are unveiled, focusing on their specificities such as symmetry breaking, non-linear modal coupling, forcing by turbulence. Finally, recent works on uncertainty quantifications, guided by theoretical studies and applied to annular combustors, are presented. The objective is to provide a global view of theoretical research on azimuthal modes to highlight their complexities and potential.

  13. Experimental determination of turbulence in a GH2-GOX rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, P.; Russell, R.; Ohara, J.

    1974-01-01

    The intensity of turbulence and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient for a gaseous rocket combustion chamber have been determined from the experimental measurements of the tracer gas diffusion. A combination of Taylor's turbulent diffusion theory and Spalding's numerical method for solving the conservation equations of fluid mechanics was used to calculate these quantities. Taylor's theory was extended to consider the inhomogeneity of the turbulence field in the axial direction of the combustion chamber. An exponential function was used to represent the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. The results indicate that the maximum value of the intensity of turbulence is about 15% and the Lagrangian correlation coefficient drops to about 0.12 in one inch of the chamber length.

  14. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Shiwa, M.; Moriya, S.

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber.

  15. Development of eddy current testing system for inspection of combustion chambers of liquid rocket engines.

    PubMed

    He, D F; Zhang, Y Z; Shiwa, M; Moriya, S

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system using a high sensitive anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor was developed. In this system, a 20 turn circular coil with a diameter of 3 mm was used to produce the excitation field. A high sensitivity AMR sensor was used to measure the magnetic field produced by the induced eddy currents. A specimen made of copper alloy was prepared to simulate the combustion chamber of liquid rocket. Scanning was realized by rotating the chamber with a motor. To reduce the influence of liftoff variance during scanning, a dual frequency excitation method was used. The experimental results proved that ECT system with an AMR sensor could be used to check liquid rocket combustion chamber. PMID:23387673

  16. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R. |

    1997-08-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data.

  17. Combustion and flow modelling applied to the OMV VTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    A predictive tool for hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow evolution in the OMV VTE (orbital maneuvering vehicle variable thrust engine) is described. It encompasses a computational technique for the gas phase governing equations, a discrete particle method for liquid bipropellant sprays, and constitutive models for combustion chemistry, interphase exchanges, and unlike impinging liquid hypergolic stream interactions. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenological modelling of the hypergolic liquid bipropellant gasification processes. An application to the OMV VTE combustion chamber is given in order to show some of the capabilities and inadequacies of this tool.

  18. Hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow modelling in rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    A predictive tool for hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow evolution in small rocket combustion chambers is described. It encompasses a computational technique for the gas-phase governing equations, a discrete particle method for liquid bipropellant sprays, and constitutive models for combustion chemistry, interphase exchanges, and unlike impinging hypergolic spray interactions. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenological modeling of the hypergolic liquid bipropellant gasification processes. Sample computations with the N2H4-N2O4 propellant system are given in order to show some of the capabilities and inadequacies of this tool.

  19. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  20. Lean stability augmentation study. [on gas turbine combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical conceptual design study and an experimental test program were conducted to investigate techniques and develop technology for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. The use of hot gas pilots, catalyzed flameholder elements, and heat recirculation to augment lean stability limits was considered in the conceptual design study. Tests of flameholders embodying selected concepts were conducted at a pressure of 10 arm and over a range of entrance temperatures simulating conditions to be encountered during stratospheric cruise. The tests were performed using an axisymmetric flametube test rig having a nominal diameter of 10.2 cm. A total of sixteen test configurations were examined in which lean blowout limits, pollutant emission characteristics, and combustor performance were evaluated. The use of a piloted perforated plate flameholder employing a pilot fuel flow rate equivalent to 4 percent of the total fuel flow at a simulated cruise condition resulted in a lean blowout equivalence ratio of less than 0.25 with a design point (T sub zero = 600k, Phi = 0.6) NOx emission index of less than 1.0 g/kg.

  1. Three-dimensional computer modeling of hydrogen injection and combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.; Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    The hydrodynamics of hydrogen gas injection into a fixed-volume combustion chamber is analyzed and simulated using KIVA-3, a three-dimensional, reactive flow computer code. Comparisons of the simulation results are made to data obtained at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratory-California (SNL-CA). Simulation of the gas injection problem is found to be of comparable difficulty as the liquid fuel injection in diesel engines. The primary challenge is the large change of length scale from the flow of gas in the orifice to the penetration in the combustion chamber. In the current experiments, the change of length scale is about 4,000. A reduction of the full problem is developed that reduces the change in length scale in the simulation to about 400, with a comparable improvement in computational times. Comparisons of the simulation to the experimental data shows good agreement in the penetration history and pressure rise in the combustion chamber. At late times the comparison is sensitive to the method of determination of the penetration in the simulations. In a comparison of the combustion modeling of methane and hydrogen, hydrogen combustion is more difficult to model, and currently available kinetic models fail to predict the observed autoignition delay at these conditions.

  2. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, G. David

    1991-01-01

    The results of dynamic tests using methane and NASA-Z copper test specimen under conditions that simulate those expected in the cooling channels of a regeneratively cooled LOX/hydrocarbon booster engine operating at chamber pressures up to 3000 psi are presented. Methane with less than 0.5 ppm sulfur contamination has little or no effect on cooling channel performance. At higher sulfur concentrations, severe corrosion of the NASA-Z copper alloy occurs and the cuprous sulfide Cu2S, thus formed impedes mass flow rate and heat transfer efficiency. Therefore, it is recommended that the methane specification for this end use set the allowable sulfur content at 0.5 ppm (max). Bulk high purity liquid methane that meets this low sulfur requirement is currently available from only one producer. Pricing, availability, and quality assurance are discussed in detail. Additionally, it was found that dilute sodium cyanide solutions effectively refurbish sulfur corroded cooling channels in only 2 to 5 minutes by completely dissolving all the Cu2S. Sulfur corroded/sodium cyanide refurbished channels are highly roughened and the increased surface roughness leads to significant improvements in heat transfer efficiency with an attendant loss in mass flow rate. Both the sulfur corrosion and refurbishment effects are discussed in detail.

  3. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur. PMID:26239103

  4. Spray combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    Concern over the future availability of high quality liquid fuels or use in furnaces and boilers prompted the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider alternate fuels as replacements for the high grade liquid fuels used in the 1970's and 1980's. Alternate fuels were defined to be combinations of a large percentage of viscous, low volatility fuels resulting from the low end of distillation mixed with a small percentage of relatively low viscosity, high volatility fuels yielded by the high end of distillation. The addition of high volatility fuels was meant to promote desirable characteristics to a fuel that would otherwise be difficult to atomize and burn and whose combustion would yield a high amount of pollutants. Several questions thus needed to be answered before alternate fuels became commercially viable. These questions were related to fuel atomization, evaporation, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation. This final report describes the results of the most significant studies on ignition and combustion of alternative fuels.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  6. Robust Low Cost Aerospike/RLV Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Ellis, David; McKechnie

    1999-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. At the same time, fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of a shrinking NASA budget. In recent years, combustion chambers of equivalent size to the Aerospike chamber have been fabricated at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using innovative, relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Typically, such combustion chambers are made of the copper alloy NARloy-Z. However, current research and development conducted by NASA-Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has identified a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. In fact, researchers at NASA-LeRC have demonstrated that powder metallurgy (P/M) Cu-8Cr-4Nb exhibits better mechanical properties at 1,200 F than NARloy-Z does at 1,000 F. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost, VPS process to deposit Cu-8Cr-4Nb with mechanical properties that match or exceed those of P/M Cu-8Cr-4Nb. In addition, oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings can be incorporated as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. Tensile properties of Cu-8Cr-4Nb material produced by VPS are reviewed and compared to material produced previously by extrusion. VPS formed combustion chamber liners have also been prepared and will be reported on following scheduled hot firing tests at NASA-Lewis.

  7. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  8. Reduced order modeling and analysis of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanampudi, Gowtham Manikanta Reddy

    The coupling between unsteady heat release and pressure fluctuations in a combustor leads to the complex phenomenon of combustion instability. Combustion instability can lead to enormous pressure fluctuations and high rates of combustor heat transfer which play a very important role in determining the life and performance of engine. Although high fidelity simulations are starting to yield detailed understanding of the underlying physics of combustion instability, the enormous computing power required restricts their application to a few runs and fairly simple geometries. To overcome this, low order models are being employed for prediction and analysis. Since low order models cannot account for the coupling between heat release and pressure fluctuations, lower-order combustion response models are required. One such attempt is made through the work presented here using a commercial software COMSOL. The linearized Euler Equations with combustion response models were solved in the frequency domain implementing Arnoldi algorithm using 3D Finite Element solver COMSOL. This work is part of a larger effort to investigate a low order, computationally inexpensive and accurate solver which accounts for mean flow effects, complex boundary conditions and combustion response. This tool was tested against a number of cases presenting longitudinal instabilities. Further, combustion instabilities in transverse instability chamber were studied and are compared with experiments. Both sets of results are in good agreement with experiment. In addition, the effect of nozzle length on the mode shapes in transverse instability chamber was studied and presented.

  9. The N.A.C.A. Combustion Chamber Gas-sampling Valve and Some Preliminary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Buckley, E C

    1933-01-01

    A gas sampling valve of the inertia-operated type was designed for procuring samples of the gases in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines at identical points in successive cycles so that the analysis of the gas samples thus procured may aid in the study of the process of combustion. The operation of the valve is described. The valve was used to investigate the CO2 content of gases taken from the quiescent combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine when operating with two different multiple-orifice fuel injection nozzles. An analysis of the gas samples thus obtained shows that the state of quiescence in the combustion chamber is maintained during the combustion of the fuel.

  10. Numerical and experimental investigation of the methane film cooling in subscale combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimon, Y.; Negishi, H.; Koshi, M.; Suslov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of film cooling in a CH4/O2 subscale chamber with multiinjector elements and two kinds of film cooling slot dimensions are investigated using a calorimeter chamber in experiments and simulations, in which the finite rate chemistry with a reduced CH4/O2 reaction mechanism is taken into account. The computed wall heat flux and pressure distributions are compared to the experimental results, which overall show good agreement. A large slot dimension is shown to induce mixing with core flow. This mixing causes a low heat-flux distribution near face plate along with high combustion efficiency.

  11. Feasibility Study on Neutron Diffraction Method for Evaluation of Residual Strain Distribution of Regenerative Cooled Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masaki; Yoshida, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    The regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine is exposed to a large temperature difference between the hot gas (about 3500K) and the liquid hydrogen (about 20K). This induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated in the chamber wall throughout the cyclic firing tests. Evaluation of the stress and the strain distribution in a chamber wall is essential since chamber life is usually related to such stress and strain. In this study, the residual strain in a regenerative cooled combustion chamber wall was measured by applying the neutron diffraction method and the X-ray diffraction method. The measured data were compared with the numerical data by finite element analysis, and the feasibility of the neutron diffraction method for the regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine was evaluated.

  12. Full-Scale GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liner Preform Fabricated Successfully

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Goudy, Rick

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) has been under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center for several years. The alloy possesses a unique combination of good thermal conductivity, high elevated temperature strength, long creep life, and long low-cycle- fatigue. The alloy is also more oxidation resistant than pure copper and most competitive alloys. The combination of properties has attracted attention from major rocket engine manufacturers who are interested in the alloy for the combustion chamber liner in their next generation of regeneratively cooled engines. Before GRCop-84 can be used in a main combustion chamber application, it must be demonstrated that the alloy can be made successfully to the large sizes and proper shape needed and that it retain useful properties. Recent efforts have successfully demonstrated the ability to fabricate a liner preform via metal spinning that retains the alloy s strength even in the welded sections.

  13. Injector characterization for a gaseous oxygen-methane single element combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, M. P.; Silvestri, S.; Schlieben, G.; Kirchberger, C.; Haidn, O. J.; Knab, O.

    2016-07-01

    The results from an experimental investigation on an oxygen-methane single-injector combustion chamber are presented. They provide detailed information about the thermal loads at the hot inner walls of the combustion chamber at representative rocket engine conditions and pressures up to 20 bar. The present study aims to contribute to the understanding of the thermal transfer processes and to validate the in-house design tool Thermtest and a base for an attempt to simulate the flame behavior with large-eddy simulation (LES). Due to the complex flow phenomena linked to the use of cryogenic propellants, like extreme variation of flow properties and steep temperature gradients, in combination with intensive chemical reactions, the problem has been partially simplified by injecting gaseous oxygen (GOx) and gaseous methane (GCH4).

  14. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  15. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-07-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  16. Heat transfer in rocket engine combustion chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and regeneratively and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis will be used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and coolant channels and film coolant dumps. These components are being analyzed, and the analysis verified with appropriate test data. Finally, the component analysis will be synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. The FDNS code is being used to make the component analyses. Particular attention is being given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams and to the method of combining the detailed models to represent overall heating. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and will be described. Film cooling simulations of film coolant flows typical of the subscale Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) being experimentally studied by Pratt and Whitney have been made, and these results will be presented. Other film coolant experiments have also been simulated to verify the CFD heat transfer model being developed. The status of the study and its relevance as a new design tool are covered. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  17. Friction Stir Welding of GR-Cop 84 for Combustion Chamber Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn K.; Carter, Robert; Ellis, David L.; Goudy, Richard

    2004-01-01

    GRCop-84 is a copper-chromium-niobium alloy developed by the Glenn Research Center for liquid rocket engine combustion chamber liners. GRCop-84 exhibits superior properties over conventional copper-base alloys in a liquid hydrogen-oxygen operating environment. The Next Generation Launch Technology program has funded a program to demonstrate scale-up production capabilities of GR-Cop 84 to levels suitable for main combustion chamber production for the prototype rocket engine. This paper describes a novel method of manufacturing the main combustion chamber liner. The process consists of several steps: extrude the GR-Cop 84 powder into billets, roll the billets into plates, bump form the plates into cylinder halves and friction stir weld the halves into a cylinder. The cylinder is then metal spun formed to near net liner dimensions followed by finish machining to the final configuration. This paper describes the friction stir weld process development including tooling and non-destructive inspection techniques, culminating in the successful production of a liner preform completed through spin forming.

  18. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Scaling of the flowfield in a combustion chamber with a gas-gas injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Wei; Cai, Guo-Biao; Jin, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The scaling of the flowfield in a gas-gas combustion chamber is investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. To obtain the scaling criterion of the gas-gas combustion flowfield, formulation analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes equations for a gaseous multi-component mixing reaction flow is conducted and dimensional analysis on the gas-gas combustion phenomena is also carried out. The criterion implies that the size and the pressure of the gas-gas combustion chamber can be changed. Based on the criterion, multi-element injector chambers with different geometric sizes and at different chamber pressures ranging from 3 MPa to 20 MPa are numerically simulated. A multi-element injector chamber is designed and hot-fire tested at five chamber pressures from 1.64 MPa to 3.68 MPa. Wall temperature measurements are used to understand the similarity of combustion flowfields in the tests. The results have verified the similarities between combustion flowfields under different chamber pressures and geometries, with the criterion applied.

  19. Progress towards diesel combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rutland, C.J.; Ayoub, N.; Han, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Progress on the development and validation of a CFD model for diesel engine combustion and flow is described. A modified version of the KIVA code is used for the computations, with improved submodels for liquid breakup, drop distortion and drag, spray/wall impingement with rebounding, sliding and breaking-up drops, wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, multistep kinetics ignition and laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion models, Zeldovich NOx formation, and soot formation with Nagle Strickland-Constable oxidation. The code also considers piston-cylinder-liner crevice flows and allows computations of the intake flow process in the realistic engine geometry with two moving intake valves. Significant progress has been made using a modified RNG {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulence model, and a multicomponent fuel vaporization model and a flamelet combustion model have been implemented. Model validation experiments have been performed using a single-cylinder heavy duty truck engine that features state-of-the-art high pressure electronic fuel injection and emissions instrumentation. In addition to cylinder pressure, heat release, and emissions measurements, new combustion visualization experiments have also been performed using an endoscope system that takes the place of one of the exhaust valves. Modifications to the engine geometry for optical access were minimal, thus ensuring that the results represent the actual engine. The intake flow CFD modeling results show that the details of the intake flow process influence the engine performance. Comparisons with the measured engine cylinder pressure, heat release, soot and NOx emission data, and the combustion visualization flame images show that the CFD model results are generally in good agreement with the experiments. In particular, the model is able to correctly predict the soot-NOx trade-off trend as a function of injection timing. 44 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.; Sheppard, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  1. Experimental investigation of entropy waves during unstable combustion in the chamber of a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshenko, V.E.; Sil'verstov, V.M.

    1982-07-01

    This study attempts to detect entropy waves which have been suggested as a factor in the tense pressure vibrations caused during unstable combustions. A diagram of the test apparatus, burner, choke, transducer (to record vibration), amplifier, and spectrum analyzer are detailed. Temperature oscillations, the phase of oscillations, are measured by specified device. The test is based on the laws of Wien and Kirchoff which makes it possible to establish a relation between brightness and true temperature. By this measurement of the oscillations of gas temperatures it is established that at the outlet of a single-burner section of the combustion chamber of a gas turbine engine in the unstable combustion regime, there exist intense non-isentropic temperature oscillations of considerable amplitude. These are evidence of the presence of entropy waves.

  2. Problems of providing completeness of the methane-containing block-jet combustion in a rocket-ramjet engine's combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, Valeriy I.; Belotserkovets, Igor S.; Gusinin, Vjacheslav P.

    2009-11-01

    Some problems of methane-containing hydrocarbon fuel combustion are discussed. It seems that reduction of methane burnout zone length is one from main problems of designing new type engine. It is very important at the creation of combustion chambers of a rocket-ramjet engine for prospective space shuttle launch vehicles.

  3. Effect of combustion-chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio on theoretical performance of several rocket propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Virginia E

    1956-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of specific impulse to determine the separate effects of increasing the combustion-chamber pressure and the nozzle expansion ratio on the performance of the propellants, hydrogen-fluorine, hydrogen-oxygen, ammonia-fluorine and AN-F-58 fuel - white fuming nitric acid (95 percent). The results indicate that an increase in specific impulse obtainable with an increase in combustion-chamber pressure is almost entirely caused by the increased expansion ratio through the nozzle.

  4. Altitude-test-chamber Investigation of Performance of a 28-inch Ram-jet Engine I : Combustion and Operational Performance of Four Combustion-chamber Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillito, T B; Jones, W L; Henzel, J G , Jr

    1950-01-01

    An altitude-test-chamber investigation of a 28-inch-diameter ram-jet engine at a simulated flight Mach number of approximately 2.0 for altitudes of 40,000 to 50,000 feet was conducted at the NACA Lewis laboratory. Three different flame holders, varying in the number and size of the annular gutters, in conjunction with several fuel-injection systems were investigated. The combustion efficiency for the flame-holder fuel-injection system that provided the best over-all operational fuel-air-ratio range (0.03 to 0.075) was over 0.9 at a fuel-air ratio of about 0.065 for the altitude range investigated.

  5. Combustion Instabilities Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch is investigating active control strategies to mitigate or eliminate the combustion instabilities prevalent in lean-burning, low-emission combustors. These instabilities result from coupling between the heat-release mechanisms of the burning process and the acoustic flow field of the combustor. Control design and implementation require a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It must capture the essential physics of the system, yet be as simple as possible. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based simulation has been developed which may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used, along with a single reactive species transport equation to simulate coupled thermoacoustic oscillations. A very simple numerical integration scheme was chosen to reduce computing time. Robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to simulate various flow conditions (e.g., valves, open ends, and choked inflow) as well as to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during large flow-field oscillations. The accompanying figure shows a sample simulation result. A combustor with an open inlet, a choked outlet, and a large constriction approximately two thirds of the way down the length is shown. The middle plot shows normalized, time-averaged distributions of the relevant flow quantities, and the bottom plot illustrates the acoustic mode shape of the resulting thermoacoustic oscillation. For this simulation, the limit cycle peak-to-peak pressure fluctuations were 13 percent of the mean. The simulation used 100 numerical cells. The total normalized simulation time was 50 units (approximately 15 oscillations), which took 26 sec on a Sun Ultra2.

  6. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  7. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  8. Laser-assisted homogeneous charge ignition in a constant volume combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Weinrotter, Martin; Kofler, Henrich; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar; Wintner, Ernst

    2009-06-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a very promising future combustion concept for internal combustion engines. There are several technical difficulties associated with this concept, and precisely controlling the start of auto-ignition is the most prominent of them. In this paper, a novel concept to control the start of auto-ignition is presented. The concept is based on the fact that most HCCI engines are operated with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates in order to slow-down the fast combustion processes. Recirculated exhaust gas contains combustion products including moisture, which has a relative peak of the absorption coefficient around 3 μm. These water molecules absorb the incident erbium laser radiations ( λ=2.79 μm) and get heated up to expedite ignition. In the present experimental work, auto-ignition conditions are locally attained in an experimental constant volume combustion chamber under simulated EGR conditions. Taking advantage of this feature, the time when the mixture is thought to "auto-ignite" could be adjusted/controlled by the laser pulse width optimisation, followed by its resonant absorption by water molecules present in recirculated exhaust gas.

  9. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L.; Brewster, M.Q.; Son, S.F.; Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D.

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  10. Investigation of gaseous propellant combustion and associated injector/chamber design guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoon, D. F.; Ito, J. I.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Injector design criteria are provided for gaseous hydrogen-gaseous oxygen propellants. Design equations and procedures are presented which will allow an injector-chamber designer to a priori estimate of the performance, compatibility and stability characteristics of prototype injectors. The effects of chamber length, element geometry, thrust per element, mixture ratio, impingement angle, and element spacing were evaluated for four element concepts and their derivatives. The data from this series of tests were reduced to a single valued mixing function that describes the mixing potential of the various elements. Performance, heat transfer and stability data were generated for various mixture ratios, propellant temperatures, chamber pressures, contraction ratios, and chamber lengths. Applications of the models resulted in the design of procedures, whereby the performance and chamber heat flux can be calculated directly, and the injector stability estimated in conjunction with existing models.

  11. Inverse combustion force estimation based on response measurements outside the combustion chamber and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Mohd. Nor, Mohd. Jailani; Kamal Ariffin, Ahmad; Abdullah, Shahrir

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to vibration has various physiological effects on vehicle passengers. Engine is one of the main sources of vehicle vibration. The major causes of engine vibration are combustion forces transmitted through the pistons and connection rods. Evaluation of sources is the first step to attenuate this vibration. Assessment of these sources is not an easy task because internal parts of machinery are not accessible. Often, instrumentation for such systems is costly, time consuming and some modifications would be necessary. Aim of the first part of this paper was to validate an inverse technique and carry out mobility analysis on a vehicle crankshaft to achieve matrix of Frequency Response Functions (FRFs). Outcomes were implemented to reconstruct the applied force for single and multiple-input systems. In the second part, the validated inverse technique and FRFs were used to estimate piston forces of an operating engine. Bearings of crankshaft were chosen as nearest accessible parts to piston connecting rods. Accelerometers were connected to the bearings for response measurement during an ideal engine operation. These responses together with FRFs, which were estimated in the previous part, were utilised in the inverse technique. Tikhonov regularization was used to solve the ill-conditioned inverse system. Two methods, namely L-curve criterion and Generalized Cross Validation (GCV), were employed to find the regularization parameter for the Tikhonov method. The inverse problem was solved and piston forces applied to crankpins were estimated. Results were validated by pressure measurement inside a cylinder and estimating the corresponding combustion force. This validation showed that inverse technique and measurement outcomes were roughly in agreement. In presence of various noise, L-curve criterion conduces to more robust results compared to the GCV method. But in the absence of high correlation between sources ( f>600 HzHz), the GCV technique leads to more accurate

  12. Spray combustion models - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    Due to recent theoretical and experimental advances, modeling spray combustion can be contemplated as a means of supplementing traditional cut and try combustor development methods. This review describes spray models that are currently being developed and their validation. The review is limited to steady, turbulent two- and three-dimensional systems typified by furnaces and gas turbine combustors. Both locally homogeneous flow models, where the phases are assumed to be in kinematic and thermodynamic equilibrium at each point in the flow, and more complete two-phase flow models, which allow for finite rate processes between the phases, are considered.

  13. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1993-01-01

    Modeling plays a vital role in providing physical insights into behavior revealed by experiment. The program at the University of Illinois is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena through the analytical and numerical modeling of a variety of configurations undergoing experimental study in NASA's microgravity combustion program. Significant progress has been made in two areas: (1) flame-balls, studied experimentally by Ronney and his co-workers; (2) particle-cloud flames studied by Berlad and his collaborators. Additional work is mentioned below. NASA funding for the U. of Illinois program commenced in February 1991 but work was initiated prior to that date and the program can only be understood with this foundation exposed. Accordingly, we start with a brief description of some key results obtained in the pre - 2/91 work.

  14. Comparison of High Aspect Ratio Cooling Channel Designs for a Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical investigation on the effect of high aspect ratio (height/width) cooling channels, considering different coolant channel designs, on hot-gas-side wall temperature and coolant pressure drop for a liquid hydrogen cooled rocket combustion chamber, was performed. Coolant channel design elements considered were: length of combustion chamber in which high aspect ratio cooling was applied, number of coolant channels, and coolant channel shape. Seven coolant channel designs were investigated using a coupling of the Rocket Thermal Evaluation code and the Two-Dimensional Kinetics code. Initially, each coolant channel design was developed, without consideration for fabrication, to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature from a given conventional cooling channel baseline. These designs produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions up to 22 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 7.5 percent from the baseline. Fabrication constraints for milled channels were applied to the seven designs. These produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions of up to 20 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 2 percent. Using high aspect ratio cooling channels for the entire length of the combustion chamber had no additional benefit on hot-gas-side wall temperature over using high aspect ratio cooling channels only in the throat region, but increased coolant pressure drop 33 percent. Independent of coolant channel shape, high aspect ratio cooling was able to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature by at least 8 percent, with as low as a 2 percent increase in coolant pressure drop. The design with the highest overall benefit to hot-gas-side wall temperature and minimal coolant pressure drop cooling can now be done in relatively short periods of time with multiple iterations.

  15. Measurement of regression rate in hybrid rocket using combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Ramakrishna, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    An attempt was made in this paper to determine the regression rate of a hybrid fuel by using combustion chamber pressure. In this method, the choked flow condition at the nozzle throat of the hybrid rocket was used to obtain the mass of fuel burnt and in turn the regression rate. The algorithm used here is better than those reported in the literature as the results obtained were compared with the results obtained using the weight loss method and was demonstrated to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the weight loss method using the same motor and the same fuel and oxidizer combination. In addition, the O/F ratio obtained was in good agreement with those obtained using the weight loss method. The combustion efficiencies obtained were in good agreement with the average values.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of a Ceramic Lining for a Combustion Chamber for Gas-turbine Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, William H; Bobrowsky, A R

    1948-01-01

    Combustion chamber liners for gas turbines and experimental set-ups were tested for failure. A ceramic-lined test chamber was operated at fuel/air ratios up to 0.050. Thermal-shock evaluation indicated that a ceramic lining, which expands after firing, would crack but would not fall apart during operation. Refractoriness of the lining and the resistance to mechanical shock were adequate. In general, shell temperature reductions of approximately 400 deg F were effected by the use of this lining at fuel/air ratios of 0.016 and 0.050. The mechanism of failure of the ceramic lining was induced by sudden heating and cooling during operation.

  17. Corrosion prevention in copper combustion chamber liners of liquid oxygen/methane booster engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a protective gold coating for preventing the corrosion of copper combustion chamber liners in liquid oxygen/methane booster engines is discussed with reference to experimental results. Gold-plated and unplated copper alloy specimens were tested in a carbothermal test facility providing realistic simulations of booster engine cooling channel conditions, such as temperature, pressure, flow velocity, and heat flux. Metallographic examinations of the unplated specimens showed severe corrosion as a result of the reaction with the sulfur-containing contaminant in the fuel. In contrast, gold-plated specimens showed no corrosion under similar operating conditions.

  18. Experimental performance of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at high combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thrust coefficient of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 MPa (1800 to 2400 psia). A nozzle with a modified Rao contour and an expansion area ratio of 1025:1 was tested with hydrogen and oxygen at altitude conditions. The same nozzle, truncated to an area ratio of 440:1, was also tested. Values of thrust coefficient are presented along with characteristic exhaust velocity efficiencies, nozzle wall temperatures, and overall thruster specific impulse.

  19. Experimental investigation of fuel evaporation in the vaporizing elements of combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vezhba, I.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of the experimental apparatus and the methods used in the investigation of the degree of fuel (kerosene) evaporation in two types of vaporizing elements in combustion chambers. The results are presented as dependences of the degree of fuel evaporation on the factors which characterize the functioning of the vaporizing elements: the air surplus coefficient, the velocity of flow and temperature of the air at the entrance to the vaporizing element and the temperature of the wall of the vaporizing element.

  20. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Arrieta, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A document describes the low-cost manufacturing of C103 niobium alloy combustion chambers, and the use of a high-temperature, oxidation-resistant coating that is superior to the standard silicide coating. The manufacturing process involved low-temperature spray deposition of C103 on removable plastic mandrels produced by rapid prototyping. Thin, vapor-deposited platinum-indium coatings were shown to substantially improve oxidation resistance relative to the standard silicide coating. Development of different low-cost plastic thrust chamber mandrel materials and prototyping processes (selective laser sintering and stereolithography) yielded mandrels with good dimensional accuracy (within a couple of mils) for this stage of development. The feasibility of using the kinetic metallization cold-spray process for fabrication of free-standing C1O3 thrusters on removable plastic mandrels was also demonstrated. The ambient and elevated temperature mechanical properties of the material were shown to be reasonably good relative to conventionally processed C103, but the greatest potential benefit is that coldsprayed chambers require minimal post-process machining, resulting in substantially lower machining and material costs. The platinum-iridium coating was shown to provide greatly increased oxidation resistance over the silicide when evaluated through oxyacetylene torch testing to as high as 300 F (= 150 C). The iridium component minimizes reaction with the niobium alloy chamber at high temperatures, and provides the high-temperature oxidation resistance needed at the throat.

  1. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  2. Development and integration of a scalable low NOx combustion chamber for a hydrogen-fueled aerogas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, S.; Funke, H. H.-W.; Hendrick, P.; Recker, E.; Elsing, R.

    2013-03-01

    The usage of alternative fuels in aircraft industry plays an important role of current aero engine research and development processes. The micromix burning principle allows a secure and low NOx combustion of gaseous hydrogen. The combustion principle is based on the fluid phenomenon of jet in cross flow and achieves a significant lowering in NOx formation by using multiple miniaturized flames. The paper highlights the development and the integration of a combustion chamber, based on the micromix combustion principle, into an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36-300 with regard to the necessary modifications on the gas turbine and on the engine controller.

  3. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  4. Numerical modeling of pulverized coal combustion at thermal power plant boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askarova, Aliya; Bolegenova, Saltanat; Maximov, Valeryi; Beketayeva, Meruyert; Safarik, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    The paper deals with development and application the numerical model for solution of processes at combustion chamber of the thermal power plant boiler. Mathematical simulation is based on solution of physical and chemical processes occuring at burning pulverized coal in the furnace model. Three-dimensional flows, heat and mass transfer, chemical kinetics of the processes, effects of thermal radiation are considered. Obtained results give quantitative information on velocity distributions, temperature and concentration profiles of the components, the amount of combustion products including harmful substances. The numerical model becomes a tool for investigation and design of combustion chambers with high-efficiency and reliable operation of boiler at thermal power plants.

  5. Particle-Bound PAH Emission from the Exhaust of Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari Lamjiri, M.; Medrano, Y. S.; Guillaume, D. W.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are harmful, semi-volatile organic compounds which are generated due to the incomplete combustion of organic substances. PAHs are of concern as a pollutant because some of these compounds are carcinogenic and mutagenic even at low levels. Most of the PAHs are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. The PAHs carcinogenic potential can be increased by the adsorption onto small size particles (< 1μm) which can easily get into the bronchioles and alveoli of the lungs. PAHs associated with sub-micron particles are mostly generated from high temperature sources like combustion chambers. In this current study, the presence of 16 priority PAHs (listed by United States Environmental Protection Agency) which are attached to the particulates emitted from the exhaust of the jet engine are evaluated. The engine was operated at different swirl numbers (S; the ratio of tangential air flow to axial air flow) to investigate the effect of this parameter on the effluent of combustion chamber. The samples were collected using two instruments simultaneously: a particle analyzer and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposited Impactor (MOUDI). Particle analyzer was used to count the number of particles in different sizes and MOUDI was used to collect particles with respect to their size as they were emitted from the exhaust. The MOUDI's aluminum substrates were weighed before and after the experiment in order to measure the mass of particles that were collected during the sampling period. The concentration of PAHs associated with the particles was measured by extracting the particles with dichloromethane followed by analysis via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In general, lower molecular weight PAHs emitted from the exhaust of combustion chamber are mostly in gas phase while PAHs of higher molecular weight are adsorbed onto particles. Preliminary results from GC/MS confirm the presence of higher molecular weight PAHs like Benzo

  6. The effects of intake valve detergent structure on combustion chamber deposits (CCD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, S.R.; Maxey, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    Combustion chamber deposits (CCD) have been heavily researched in the past with regard to Octane Requirement Increase (ORI). New concerns about their role in combustion chamber deposit interference (CCDI) and their potential contribution to exhaust emissions have reinforced interest in defining the underlying factors that contribute to CCD. In this study, intake valve detergents were evaluated in the absence of any fluidizer in L-6 1987 BMW 325e engines using 10,000 mile tests run with a BMW IVD driving cycle. The chemical structure of detergents used to reduce Intake Valve Deposits (IVD) has been systematically varied to determine its effect on the quantity and the composition of CCD. In general, chemical changes in the intake valve detergent had little effect on the amount and chemical composition of CCD. The composition of CCD was determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). All CCDs produced with fuels containing intake valve detergents showed the same types and similar levels of organic oxygen, sulfur and aromatic carbon. The CCDs did not contain intact additive backbone fragments or detergent head groups. The only distinguishing feature of these CCDs was the varying nitrogen content that appeared to depend on the type and number of amine groups in the detergent. However, the types of nitrogen present in the CCDs were chemically different from those present in the initial detergent suggesting that, although some of the nitrogen in the detergent head group remains in the CCD, it is chemically transformed.

  7. Correlation of knocking characteristics of fuels in an engine having a hemispherical combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Biermann, Arnold E

    1940-01-01

    Data are presented to show the effects of inlet-air pressure, inlet-air temperature, and compression ratio on the maximum permissible performance obtained with having a hemispherical-dome combustion chamber. The five aircraft-engine fuels used have octane numbers varying from 90 to 100 plus 2 ml of tetraethyl lead per gallon. The data were obtained on a 5 1/4-inch by 4 3/4-inch liquid-cooled engine operating at 2,500 r.p.m. The compression ratio was varied from 6.0 to 8.9. The inlet-air temperature was varied from 110 to 310 F. For each set of conditions, the inlet-air pressure was increased until audible knock occurred and then reduced 2 inches of mercury before data were recorded. The results for each fuel can be correlated by plotting the calculated end-gas density factor against the calculated end-gas temperature. Measurements of spark-plugs, cutting off the switch to one spark plug lowered the electrode temperature of that plug from a value of 1,365 F to a value of 957 F. The results indicate that the surface temperatures of combustion-chamber areas which become new sources of ignition markedly increase after ignition.

  8. The FLAME Deluge: organic aerosol emission ratios from combustion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, Matthew; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Collett, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    A high level of variability has been identified amongst organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ER) from biomass burning (BB) under ambient conditions. However, it is difficult to assess the influences of potential drivers for this variability, given the wide range of conditions associated with wildfire measurements. Chamber experiments performed under controlled conditions provide a means of examining the effects of different fuel types and combustion conditions on OA emissions from biomass fuels. ERs have been characterised for 67 burns during the second Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME II), involving 19 different species from 6 fuel types widely consumed in BB events in the US each year. Average normalised dOA/dCO ratios show a high degree of variability, both between and within different fuel types and species, typically exceeding variability between separate plumes in ambient measurements. Relationships with source conditions were found to be complex, with little consistent influence from fuel properties and combustion conditions for the entire range of experiments. No strong correlation across all fires was observed between dOA/dCO and modified combustion efficiency (MCE), which is used as an indicator of the proportional contributions of flaming and smouldering combustion phases throughout each burn. However, a negative correlation exists between dOA/dCO and MCE for some coniferous species, most notably Douglas fir, for which there is also an apparent influence from fuel moisture content. Significant contrasts were also identified between combustion emissions from different fuel components of additional coniferous species. Changes in fire efficiency were also shown to dramatically alter emissions for fires with very similar initial conditions. Although the relationship with MCE is variable between species, there is greater consistency with the level of oxygenation in OA. The ratio of the m/z 44 fragment to total OA mass concentration (f44) as

  9. Modeling Combustion in Supersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Danehy, Paul M.; Bivolaru, Daniel; Gaffney, Richard L.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress of work to model high-speed supersonic reacting flow. The purpose of the work is to improve the state of the art of CFD capabilities for predicting the flow in high-speed propulsion systems, particularly combustor flow-paths. The program has several components including the development of advanced algorithms and models for simulating engine flowpaths as well as a fundamental experimental and diagnostic development effort to support the formulation and validation of the mathematical models. The paper will provide details of current work on experiments that will provide data for the modeling efforts along with with the associated nonintrusive diagnostics used to collect the data from the experimental flowfield. Simulation of a recent experiment to partially validate the accuracy of a combustion code is also described.

  10. Use, Assessment, and Improvement of the Loci-CHEM CFD Code for Simulation of Combustion in a Single Element GO2/GH2 Injector and Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Lin, Jeff; West, Jeff; Tucker, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation of a paper that documents a continuing effort at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to use, assess, and continually improve CFD codes to the point of material utility in the design of rocket engine combustion devices. This paper describes how the code is presently being used to simulate combustion in a single element combustion chamber with shear coaxial injectors using gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. The ultimate purpose of the efforts documented is to assess and further improve the Loci-CHEM code and the implementation of it. Single element shear coaxial injectors were tested as part of the Staged Combustion Injector Technology (SCIT) program, where detailed chamber wall heat fluxes were measured. Data was taken over a range of chamber pressures for propellants injected at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Several test cases are simulated as part of the effort to demonstrate use of the Loci-CHEM CFD code and to enable us to make improvements in the code as needed. The simulations presented also include a grid independence study on hybrid grids. Several two-equation eddy viscosity low Reynolds number turbulence models are also evaluated as part of the study. All calculations are presented with a comparison to the experimental data. Weaknesses of the code relative to test data are discussed and continuing efforts to improve the code are presented.

  11. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  12. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel investigation of Westinghouse 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 jet-propulsion engines V : combustion chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Bemrose

    1948-01-01

    Pressure losses through the combustion chamber and the combustion efficiency of the 19B-2 and 19B-8 jet-propulsion engines and the combustion efficiency of the 19XB-1 jet-propulsion engine are presented.Data were obtained from an investigation of the complete engine in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel over a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and tunnel Mach numbers from less than 0.100 to 0.455. The combustion-chamber pressure loss due to friction was higher for the 19B-2 combustion chamber than for the 19B-8. The 19B-2 combustion chamber had a screen of 40-percent open area interposed between the compressor outlet and the combustion-chamber inlet. The screen for the 19B-8 combustion chamber had a 60-percent open area, which except for a small difference in tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area represents the only point of difference between the standard 19B-2 and 19B-8 combustion chambers. The pressure loss due to heat addition to the flowing gases in the combustion chamber was approximately the same for the 19B-2 and 19B-8 configurations. Altitude and tunnel Mach number had no significant effect on the over-all total-pressure loss through the combustion chamber. A decrease in tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area (tail cone out) resulted in a decrease in combustion-chamber total-pressure loss at high engine speeds.

  13. PREMIXED FLAME PROPAGATION AND MORPHOLOGY IN A CONSTANT VOLUME COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, A; Wichman, IS

    2014-06-04

    This work presents an experimental and numerical investigation of premixed flame propagation in a constant volume rectangular channel with an aspect ratio of six (6) that serves as a combustion chamber. Ignition is followed by an accelerating cusped finger-shaped flame-front. A deceleration of the flame is followed by the formation of a "tulip"-shaped flame-front. Eventually, the flame is extinguished when it collides with the cold wall on the opposite channel end. Numerical computations are performed to understand the influence of pressure waves, instabilities, and flow field effects causing changes to the flame structure and morphology. The transient 2D numerical simulation results are compared with transient 3D experimental results. Issues discussed are the appearance of oscillatory motions along the flame front and the influences of gravity on flame structure. An explanation is provided for the formation of the "tulip" shape of the premixed flame front.

  14. New technique of the local heat flux measurement in combustion chambers of steam boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Sobota, Tomasz; Dzierwa, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    A new method for measurement of local heat flux to water-walls of steam boilers was developed. A flux meter tube was made from an eccentric tube of short length to which two longitudinal fins were attached. These two fins prevent the boiler setting from heating by a thermal radiation from the combustion chamber. The fins are not welded to the adjacent water-wall tubes, so that the temperature distribution in the heat flux meter is not influenced by neighbouring water-wall tubes. The thickness of the heat flux tube wall is larger on the fireside to obtain a greater distance between the thermocouples located inside the wall which increases the accuracy of heat flux determination. Based on the temperature measurements at selected points inside the heat flux meter, the heat flux absorbed by the water-wall, heat transfer coefficient on the inner tube surface and temperature of the water-steam mixture was determined.

  15. Demonstrating the self-healing behaviour of some selected ceramics under combustion chamber conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farle, A.; Boatemaa, L.; Shen, L.; Gövert, S.; Kok, J. B. W.; Bosch, M.; Yoshioka, S.; van der Zwaag, S.; Sloof, W. G.

    2016-08-01

    Closure of surface cracks by self-healing of conventional and MAX phase ceramics under realistic turbulent combustion chamber conditions is presented. Three ceramics namely; Al2O3, Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC are investigated. Healing was achieved in Al2O3 by even dispersion of TiC particles throughout the matrix as the MAX phases, Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC exhibit intrinsic self-healing. Fully dense samples (>95%) were sintered by spark plasma sintering and damage was introduced by indentation, quenching and low perpendicular velocity impact methods. The samples were exposed to the oxidizing atmosphere in the post flame zone of a turbulent flame in a combustion chamber to heal at temperatures of approx. 1000 °C at low pO2 levels for 4 h. Full crack-gap closure was observed for cracks up to 20 mm in length and more than 10 μm in width. The reaction products (healing agents) were analysed by scanning electron microscope, x-ray microanalysis and XRD. A semi-quantification of the healing showed that cracks in Al2O3/TiC composite (width 1 μm and length 100 μm) were fully filled with TiO2. In Ti2AlC large cracks were fully filled with a mixture of TiO2 and Al2O3. And in the Cr2AlC, cracks of up to 1.0 μm in width and more than 100 μm in length were also completely filled with Al2O3.

  16. Altitude-chamber Performance of British Roll-royce Nene II Engine IV : Effect of Operational Variables on Temperature Distribution at Combustion-chamber Outlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntley, Sidney C

    1950-01-01

    Temperature surveys were made at the combustion-chamber outlets of a British Rolls-Royce Nene II engine. The highest mean nozzle-vane and mean gas temperatures were found to occur at a radius approximately 75% of the nozzle-vane length from the inner ring of the nozzle-vane assembly. Variations in engine speed, jet-nozzle area, simulated altitude, and simulated flight speed altered the temperature level but did not materially affect the pattern of radial temperature distribution.

  17. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC) has been tasked with developing a 60,000 pound thrust, pump-fed, LOX/RP-1 engine under the Advanced Space Transportation Program(ASTP). This government-led design has been designated the Fastrac engine. The X-34 vehicle will use the Fastrac engine as the main propulsion system. The X-34 will be a suborbital vehicle developed by the Orbital Sciences Corporation. The X-34 vehicle will be launched from an L-1011 airliner. After launch, the X-34 vehicle will be able to climb to altitudes up to 250,000 feet and reach speeds up to Mach 8, over a mission range of 500 miles. The overall length, wingspan, and gross takeoff weight of the X-34 vehicle are 58.3 feet, 27.7 feet and 45,000 pounds, respectively. This report summarizes the plan of achieving a Fastrac thrust chamber assembly(TCA) stable bomb test that meets the JANNAF standards, the Fastrac TCA design, and the combustion instabilities exhibited by the Fastrac TCA during testing at MSFC's test stand 116 as determined from high-frequency fluctuating pressure measurements. This report also summarizes the characterization of the combustion instabilities from the pressure measurements and the steps taken to eliminate the instabilities.

  18. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  19. Subgrid Combustion Modeling for the Next Generation National Combustion Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh; Sankaran, Vaidyanathan; Stone, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In the first year of this research, a subgrid turbulent mixing and combustion methodology developed earlier at Georgia Tech has been provided to researchers at NASA/GRC for incorporation into the next generation National Combustion Code (called NCCLES hereafter). A key feature of this approach is that scalar mixing and combustion processes are simulated within the LES grid using a stochastic 1D model. The subgrid simulation approach recovers locally molecular diffusion and reaction kinetics exactly without requiring closure and thus, provides an attractive feature to simulate complex, highly turbulent reacting flows of interest. Data acquisition algorithms and statistical analysis strategies and routines to analyze NCCLES results have also been provided to NASA/GRC. The overall goal of this research is to systematically develop and implement LES capability into the current NCC. For this purpose, issues regarding initialization and running LES are also addressed in the collaborative effort. In parallel to this technology transfer effort (that is continuously on going), research has also been underway at Georgia Tech to enhance the LES capability to tackle more complex flows. In particular, subgrid scalar mixing and combustion method has been evaluated in three distinctly different flow field in order to demonstrate its generality: (a) Flame-Turbulence Interactions using premixed combustion, (b) Spatially evolving supersonic mixing layers, and (c) Temporal single and two-phase mixing layers. The configurations chosen are such that they can be implemented in NCCLES and used to evaluate the ability of the new code. Future development and validation will be in spray combustion in gas turbine engine and supersonic scalar mixing.

  20. Combustion Stability Verification for the Thrust Chamber Assembly of J-2X Developmental Engines 10001, 10002, and 10003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.; Hulka, J. R.; Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.; Hinerman, T. D.; Scholten, N.

    2015-01-01

    The J-2X engine, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant rocket engine available for future use on the upper stage of the Space Launch System vehicle, has completed testing of three developmental engines at NASA Stennis Space Center. Twenty-one tests of engine E10001 were conducted from June 2011 through September 2012, thirteen tests of the engine E10002 were conducted from February 2013 through September 2013, and twelve tests of engine E10003 were conducted from November 2013 to April 2014. Verification of combustion stability of the thrust chamber assembly was conducted by perturbing each of the three developmental engines. The primary mechanism for combustion stability verification was examining the response caused by an artificial perturbation (bomb) in the main combustion chamber, i.e., dynamic combustion stability rating. No dynamic instabilities were observed in the TCA, although a few conditions were not bombed. Additional requirements, included to guard against spontaneous instability or rough combustion, were also investigated. Under certain conditions, discrete responses were observed in the dynamic pressure data. The discrete responses were of low amplitude and posed minimal risk to safe engine operability. Rough combustion analyses showed that all three engines met requirements for broad-banded frequency oscillations. Start and shutdown transient chug oscillations were also examined to assess the overall stability characteristics, with no major issues observed.

  1. Altitude-wind-tunnel investigation of a 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine VI : combustion-chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Shames, Harold

    1948-01-01

    An analysis of the performance of the types A, B, and C combustion chambers of the 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine is presented. The data were obtained from investigations of the complete engine over a range of pressure altitudes from 5000 to 40,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.86. The combustion-chamber pressure losses, the effect of the losses on cycle efficiency, and the combustion efficiency are discussed.

  2. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes a simulation based on a time dependent, nonlinear control volume analysis. The combustion is modeled as a well-stirred reactor having finite kinetics. Flow properties and species in the nozzle, combustion, and tailpipe regions are determined using a control volume formulation of the conservation equation.

  3. 1025:1 Area Ratio Nozzle Evaluated at High Combustion Chamber Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A recently completed experimental test program obtained performance data on an optimally contoured nozzle with an exit-to-throat area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 mPa (1800 to 2400 psia). Testing was conducted in the altitude test capsule at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Rocket Engine Test Facility (RETF), and results were compared with analytical performance predictions. This testing builds on previous work with this nozzle at Lewis, where testing was completed at nominal chamber pressure of 350 psia. High-area-ratio nozzles have long been sought as a means to increase the performance of spacebased rocket engines. However, as the area ratio increases, the physical size and weight of the nozzle also increase. As a result, engine and vehicle designers must make tradeoffs between nozzle size and performance enhancement. Until this test program, very little experimental data existed on the performance of the high-area-ratio nozzles used in rocket engine designs. The computer codes being used by rocket engine designers rely on data extrapolated from tests of low-area-ratio nozzles, and these extrapolations do not always provide the accuracy needed for a reliable design assessment. Therefore, we conducted this high-area-ratio nozzle testing program to provide performance data for use in rocket engine design and analysis computer codes. The nozzle had a nominal 2.54-cm- (1-in.-) diameter throat, an exit diameter of 81.3-cm (32.0-in.) at an exit-to-throat area ratio of 1025, and a length of 128.6 cm (50.6 in.). Testing was conducted in an altitude test capsule to simulate the static pressure at altitude by vacuum pumping. Data such as propellant mass flow, oxidizer-to-fuel mixture, and thrust were measured. These measurements were then used to calculate performance factors such as the

  4. Numerical modelling of methane-powered micro-tubular, single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, N.; Decent, S. P.; Kendall, K.

    An experimentally validated, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, numerical model of micro-tubular, single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SC-SOFC) has been developed. The model incorporates methane full combustion, steam reforming, dry reforming and water-gas shift reaction followed by electrochemical oxidation of produced hydrogen within the anode. On the cathode side, parasitic combustion of methane along with the electrochemical oxygen reduction is implemented. The results show that the poor performance of single-chamber SOFC as compared to the conventional (dual-chamber) SOFC (in case of micro-tubes) is due to the mass transport limitation on the anode side. The gas velocity inside the micro-tube is far too low when compared to the gas-chamber inlet velocity. The electronic current density is also non-uniform over the cell length, mainly due to the short length of the anode current collector located at the cell outlet. Furthermore, the higher temperature near the cell edges is due to the methane combustion (very close to the cell inlet) and current collection point (at the cell outlet). Both of these locations could be sensitive to the silver current collecting wire as silver may rupture due to cell overheating.

  5. Utilizing Chamber Data for Developing and Validating Climate Change Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Controlled environment chambers (e.g. growth chambers, SPAR chambers, or open-top chambers) are useful for measuring plant ecosystem responses to climatic variables and CO2 that affect plant water relations. However, data from chambers was found to overestimate responses of C fluxes to CO2 enrichment. Chamber data may be confounded by numerous artifacts (e.g. sidelighting, edge effects, increased temperature and VPD, etc) and this limits what can be measured accurately. Chambers can be used to measure canopy level energy balance under controlled conditions and plant transpiration responses to CO2 concentration can be elucidated. However, these measurements cannot be used directly in model development or validation. The response of stomatal conductance to CO2 will be the same as in the field, but the measured response must be recalculated in such a manner to account for differences in aerodynamic conductance, temperature and VPD between the chamber and the field.

  6. Multi-injector modeling of transverse combustion instability experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Kevin J.

    Concurrent simulations and experiments are used to study combustion instabilities in a multiple injector element combustion chamber. The experiments employ a linear array of seven coaxial injector elements positioned atop a rectangular chamber. Different levels of instability are driven in the combustor by varying the operating and geometry parameters of the outer driving injector elements located near the chamber end-walls. The objectives of the study are to apply a reduced three-injector model to generate a computational test bed for the evaluation of injector response to transverse instability, to apply a full seven-injector model to investigate the inter-element coupling between injectors in response to transverse instability, and to further develop this integrated approach as a key element in a predictive methodology that relies heavily on subscale test and simulation. To measure the effects of the transverse wave on a central study injector element two opposing windows are placed in the chamber to allow optical access. The chamber is extensively instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulations are used to model the experiment. Specifically three-dimensional, detached eddy simulations (DES) are used. Two computational approaches are investigated. The first approach models the combustor with three center injectors and forces transverse waves in the chamber with a wall velocity function at the chamber side walls. Different levels of pressure oscillation amplitudes are possible by varying the amplitude of the forcing function. The purpose of this method is to focus on the combustion response of the study element. In the second approach, all seven injectors are modeled and self-excited combustion instability is achieved. This realistic model of the chamber allows the study of inter-element flow dynamics, e.g., how the resonant motions in the injector tubes are coupled through the transverse pressure

  7. Aerothermal environment induced by mismatch at the SSME main combustion chamber-nozzle joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; O'Farrell, J. M.; Olive, T. A.; Brown, G. B.; Holt, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    The computational study reported here is motivated by a Space Shuttle main engine hardware problem detected in post-flight and post-test inspections. Of interest are the potential for hot gas ingestion into the joint (G15) at the main combustion chamber-to-nozzle interface and the effect of particular goemetric nonuniformities on that gas ingestion. The flowfield in the G15 region involves supersonic flow past a rounded forward facing step preceded by a deep narrow cavity. This paper describes the physical problem associated with joint G15 and computational investigations of the G15 aerothermal environment. The associated flowfield was simulated in two and three space dimensions using the United Solutions Algorithm (USA) computational fluid dynamics code series. A benchmark calculation of experimentally measured supersonic flow over of a square cavity was performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the USA code in analyzing flows similar to the G15 computational flowfield. The G15 results demonstrate the mechanism for hot gas ingestion into the joint and reveal the sensitivity to salient geometric nonuniformities.

  8. Investigating combustion as a method of processing inedible biomass produced in NASA's biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.; Hinkle, C. R.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Project at the John F. Kennedy Space Center is a research program to integrate and evaluate biological processes to provide air, water, and food for humans in closed environments for space habitation. This project focuses on the use of conventional crop plants as grown in the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) for the production and recycling of oxygen, food, and water. The inedible portion of these crops has the potential to be converted to edible biomass or directly to the elemental constituents for direct recycling. Converting inedible biomass directly, by combustion, to carbon dioxide, water, and minerals could provide a baseline for estimating partitioning of the mass balance during recycling in a CELSS. Converting the inedible biomass to carbon dioxide and water requires the same amount of oxygen that was produced by photosynthesis. The oxygen produced during crop growth is just equal to the oxygen required to oxidize all the biomass produced during growth. Thus, the amount of oxygen produced that is available for human consumption is in proportion to the amount of biomass actually utilized by humans. The remaining oxygen must be available to oxidize the rest of the biomass back to carbon dioxide and water or the system will not be a regenerative one.

  9. Combustion modeling in SI engines with a peninsula-fractal combustion model

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.D.; Hall, M.J.; Dai, W.; Davis, G.C.

    1996-09-01

    In premixed turbulent combustion models, two mechanisms have been used to explain the increase in the flame speed due to the turbulence. The newer explanation considers the full range of turbulence scales which wrinkle the flame front so as to increase the flame front area and, thus, the flame propagation speed. The fractal combustion model is an example of this concept. The older mechanism assumes that turbulence enables the penetration of unburned mixtures across the flame front via entrainment into the burned mixture zone. The entrainment combustion or eddy burning model is an example of this mechanism. The results of experimental studies of combustion regimes and the flame structures in SI engines has confirmed that most combustion takes place at the wrinkled flame front with additional combustion taking place in the form of flame fingers or peninsulas. As the ratio of the turbulence intensity to the laminar flame speed increases, the importance of the flame peninsulas should become increasingly important. While it has been shown that fractal geometry can be used to account for flame wrinkling, it may be difficult to extend this concept to account for the additional surface area resulting from the flame peninsulas. However, the flame front convolution that results in flame peninsulas can be envisioned as entrainment combustion. In the present research an effort was made to combine the fractal combustion model and the entrainment combustion model to generate the peninsula-fractal combustion model, so as to improve burn rate predictions of SI engine codes.

  10. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  11. The Effect of Pulsed Injection on Shear Layer Dynamics in a Scramjet Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie

    One of the greatest problems that scramjet research faces is fuel air mixing. The residence time for a scramjet engine, or the time it takes for a volume of air to completely pass through the engine, is on the order of 0.1 ms. In that extremely short period of time fuel must be injected and fully mirco-mixed at stoichiometric ratios with the combustion chamber airflow. The fuel-air mixture must then be combusted and expanded through the nozzle to produce thrust. The goal of this research is to develop a new more efficient method of fuel air mixing within a scramjet combustion chamber. A possible way to speed up the mixing process of parallel injection without incurring the total pressure losses that would occur in normal injection is to inject the fuel from the rear side of a backward facing step. Backward facing steps in supersonic flow produce a Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan followed by a shear layer. The instabilities in this shear layer have dominant resonant frequencies. It is believed that if fuel is injected in pulses that impinge on the shear layer at these dominant resonant frequencies that the shear layer will resonate. When the shear layer resonates the vortices that form in the shear layer will grow in magnitude, thus mixing the injected fuel with the air. To test this hypothesis a new test section was designed and built that features a one inch step under which an injector can be housed. This new test section was installed in the supersonic facility at the University of Kansas. Two injectors were also designed that each feature a face plate, one with eight injection ports arranged in a ring and one with 5 injection ports. Between the face plate and a back plate there is a cavity that houses a rotating valve that is powered by a pneumatic motor. Five valves were built: one with 8 teeth, one with 16 teeth, one with 5 teeth that are the same size as the gaps between the teeth, one with 5 teeth where the teeth are 50% larger than the gaps, and one with 5

  12. Spray combustion model improvement study, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical and physical modeling in spray combustion. These modeling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, atomization, dense spray effects, and group vaporization. The present mathematical formulation can be easily implemented in any time-marching multiple pressure correction methodologies such as MAST code. A sequence of validation cases includes the nonevaporating, evaporating and_burnin dense_sprays.

  13. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  14. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chambers of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  15. A two-dimensional numerical study of the flow inside the combustion chamber of a motored rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I-P.; Yang, S. L.; Schock, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the unsteady, multidimensional flow inside the combustion chambers of an idealized, two-dimensional, rotary engine under motored conditions. The numerical study was based on the time-dependent, two-dimensional, density-weighted, ensemble-averaged conservation equations of mass, species, momentum, and total energy valid for two-component ideal gas mixtures. The ensemble-averaged conservation equations were closed by a K-epsilon model of turbulence. This K-epsilon model of turbulence was modified to account for some of the effects of compressibility, streamline curvature, low-Reynolds number, and preferential stress dissipation. Numerical solutions to the conservation equations were obtained by the highly efficient implicit-factored method of Beam and Warming. The grid system needed to obtain solutions were generated by an algebraic grid generation technique based on transfinite interpolation. Results of the numerical study are presented in graphical form illustrating the flow patterns during intake, compression, gaseous fuel injection, expansion, and exhaust.

  16. Uncertainty Quantification of Non-linear Oscillation Triggering in a Multi-injector Liquid-propellant Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Pavel; Sideris, Athanasios; Sirignano, William

    2014-11-01

    We examine the non-linear dynamics of the transverse modes of combustion-driven acoustic instability in a liquid-propellant rocket engine. Triggering can occur, whereby small perturbations from mean conditions decay, while larger disturbances grow to a limit-cycle of amplitude that may compare to the mean pressure. For a deterministic perturbation, the system is also deterministic, computed by coupled finite-volume solvers at low computational cost for a single realization. The randomness of the triggering disturbance is captured by treating the injector flow rates, local pressure disturbances, and sudden acceleration of the entire combustion chamber as random variables. The combustor chamber with its many sub-fields resulting from many injector ports may be viewed as a multi-scale complex system wherein the developing acoustic oscillation is the emergent structure. Numerical simulation of the resulting stochastic PDE system is performed using the polynomial chaos expansion method. The overall probability of unstable growth is assessed in different regions of the parameter space. We address, in particular, the seven-injector, rectangular Purdue University experimental combustion chamber. In addition to the novel geometry, new features include disturbances caused by engine acceleration and unsteady thruster nozzle flow.

  17. Variation of diesel soot characteristics by different types and blends of biodiesel in a laboratory combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Omidvarborna, Hamid; Kumar, Ashok; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-02-15

    Very little information is available on the physical and chemical properties of soot particles produced in the combustion of different types and blends of biodiesel fuels. A variety of feedstock can be used to produce biodiesel, and it is necessary to better understand the effects of feedstock-specific characteristics on soot particle emissions. Characteristics of soot particles, collected from a laboratory combustion chamber, are investigated from the blends of ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel with various proportions. Biodiesel samples were derived from three different feedstocks, soybean methyl ester (SME), tallow oil (TO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Experimental results showed a significant reduction in soot particle emissions when using biodiesel compared with ULSD. For the pure biodiesel, no soot particles were observed from the combustion regardless of their feedstock origins. The overall morphology of soot particles showed that the average diameter of ULSD soot particles is greater than the average soot particles from the biodiesel blends. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of oxidized soot particles are presented to investigate how the addition of biodiesel fuels may affect structures of soot particles. In addition, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted for characterization of soot particles. Unsaturated methyl esters and high oxygen content of biodiesel are thought to be the major factors that help reduce the formation of soot particles in a laboratory combustion chamber. PMID:26657390

  18. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.; Bastein, L.; Price, P.N.

    2010-02-19

    This review examines current approximations and approaches that underlie the evaluation of transport properties for combustion modeling applications. Discussed in the review are: the intermolecular potential and its descriptive molecular parameters; various approaches to evaluating collision integrals; supporting data required for the evaluation of transport properties; commonly used computer programs for predicting transport properties; the quality of experimental measurements and their importance for validating or rejecting approximations to property estimation; the interpretation of corresponding states; combination rules that yield pair molecular potential parameters for unlike species from like species parameters; and mixture approximations. The insensitivity of transport properties to intermolecular forces is noted, especially the non-uniqueness of the supporting potential parameters. Viscosity experiments of pure substances and binary mixtures measured post 1970 are used to evaluate a number of approximations; the intermediate temperature range 1 < T* < 10, where T* is kT/{var_epsilon}, is emphasized since this is where rich data sets are available. When suitable potential parameters are used, errors in transport property predictions for pure substances and binary mixtures are less than 5 %, when they are calculated using the approaches of Kee et al.; Mason, Kestin, and Uribe; Paul and Warnatz; or Ern and Giovangigli. Recommendations stemming from the review include (1) revisiting the supporting data required by the various computational approaches, and updating the data sets with accurate potential parameters, dipole moments, and polarizabilities; (2) characterizing the range of parameter space over which the fit to experimental data is good, rather than the current practice of reporting only the parameter set that best fits the data; (3) looking for improved combining rules, since existing rules were found to under-predict the viscosity in most cases; (4

  19. Modelling new particle formation from Jülich plant atmosphere chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Li; Boy, Michael; Mogensen, Ditte; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Franchin, Alessandro; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kleist, Einhard; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kulmala, Markku; dal Maso, Miikka

    2013-05-01

    An MALTE-BOX model is used to study the effects of oxidation of SO2 and BVOCs to new particle formation from Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements. Several days of continuously measurements were chosen for the simulation. Our preliminary results show that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in nucleation process. Nucleation involving the oxidation of BVOCs shows better agreements with measurements.

  20. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Emissions of Combustion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu Hemant

    Atmospheric aerosols exert a large influence on the Earth's climate and cause adverse public health effects, reduced visibility and material degradation. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), defined as the aerosol mass arising from the oxidation products of gas-phase organic species, accounts for a significant fraction of the submicron atmospheric aerosol mass. Yet, there are large uncertainties surrounding the sources, atmospheric evolution and properties of SOA. This thesis combines laboratory experiments, extensive data analysis and global modeling to investigate the contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SVOC and IVOC) from combustion sources to SOA formation. The goals are to quantify the contribution of these emissions to ambient PM and to evaluate and improve models to simulate its formation. To create a database for model development and evaluation, a series of smog chamber experiments were conducted on evaporated fuel, which served as surrogates for real-world combustion emissions. Diesel formed the most SOA followed by conventional jet fuel / jet fuel derived from natural gas, gasoline and jet fuel derived from coal. The variability in SOA formation from actual combustion emissions can be partially explained by the composition of the fuel. Several models were developed and tested along with existing models using SOA data from smog chamber experiments conducted using evaporated fuel (this work, gasoline, fischertropschs, jet fuel, diesels) and published data on dilute combustion emissions (aircraft, on- and off-road gasoline, on- and off-road diesel, wood burning, biomass burning). For all of the SOA data, existing models under-predicted SOA formation if SVOC/IVOC were not included. For the evaporated fuel experiments, when SVOC/IVOC were included predictions using the existing SOA model were brought to within a factor of two of measurements with minor adjustments to model parameterizations. Further, a volatility

  1. Acoustic tuning of gas liquid scheme injectors for acoustic damping in a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Chae Hoon; Park, I.-Sun; Kim, Seong-Ku; Jip Kim, Hong

    2007-07-01

    In a combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine, acoustic fine-tuning of gas-liquid scheme injectors is studied numerically for acoustic stability by adopting a linear acoustic analysis. Injector length and blockage ratio at gas inlet are adjusted for fine-tuning. First, acoustic behavior in the combustor with a single injector is investigated and acoustic-damping effect of the injector is evaluated for cold condition by the quantitative parameter of damping factor as a function of injector length. From the numerical results, it is found that the injector can play a significant role in acoustic damping when it is tuned finely. The optimum tuning-length of the injector to maximize the damping capacity corresponds to half of a full wavelength of the first longitudinal overtone mode traveling in the injector with the acoustic frequency intended for damping in the chamber. In baffled chamber, the optimum lengths of the injector are calculated as a function of baffle length for both cold and hot conditions. Next, in the combustor with numerous resonators, peculiar acoustic coupling between a combustion chamber and injectors is observed. As the injector length approaches a half-wavelength, the new injector-coupled acoustic mode shows up and thereby, the acoustic-damping effect of the tuned injectors is appreciably degraded. And, damping factor maintains a near-constant value with blockage ratio and then, decreases rapidly. Blockage ratio affects also acoustic damping and should be considered for acoustic tuning.

  2. High-pressure calorimeter chamber tests for liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Philip A.; Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Price, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the rocket combustion and heat transfer characteristics of liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) mixtures at high chamber pressures. Two water-cooled calorimeter chambers of different combustion lengths were tested using 37- and 61-element oxidizer-fuel-oxidizer triplet injectors. The tests were conducted at nominal chamber pressures of 4.1, 8.3, and 13.8 MPa abs (600, 1200, and 2000 psia). Heat flux Q/A data were obtained for the entire calorimeter length for oxygen/fuel mixture ratios of 1.8 to 3.3. Test data at 4.1 MPa abs compared favorably with previous test data from another source. Using an injector with a fuel-rich outer zone reduced the throat heat flux by 47 percent with only a 4.5 percent reduction in the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency C* sub eff. The throat heat transfer coefficient was reduced approximately 40 percent because of carbon deposits on the chamber wall.

  3. The Evaluation of High Temperature Adhesive Bonding Processes for Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Daniel; Smith, Jeffrey; Rice, Brian; Blohowiak, Kay; Anderson, Robert; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda; Sutter, James

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is currently evaluating the possibility of using high- temperature polymer matrix composites to reinforce the combustion chamber of a rocket engine. One potential design utilizes a honeycomb structure composed of a PMR-II- 50/M40J 4HS composite facesheet and titanium honeycomb core to reinforce a stainless steel shell. In order to properly fabricate this structure, adhesive bond PMR-II-50 composite. Proper prebond surface preparation is critical in order to obtain an acceptable adhesive bond. Improperly treated surfaces will exhibit decreased bond strength and durability, especially in metallic bonds where interface are susceptible to degradation due to heat and moisture. Most treatments for titanium and stainless steel alloys require the use of strong chemicals to etch and clean the surface. This processes are difficult to perform due to limited processing facilities as well as safety and environmental risks and they do not consistently yield optimum bond durability. Boeing Phantom Works previously developed sol-gel surface preparations for titanium alloys using a PETI-5 based polyimide adhesive. In support of part of NASA Glenn Research Center, UDRI and Boeing Phantom Works evaluated variations of this high temperature sol-gel surface preparation, primer type, and primer cure conditions on the adhesion performance of titanium and stainless steel using Cytec FM 680-1 polyimide adhesive. It was also found that a modified cure cycle of the FM 680-1 adhesive, i.e., 4 hrs at 370 F in vacuum + post cure, significantly increased the adhesion strength compared to the manufacturer's suggested cure cycle. In addition, the surface preparation of the PMR-II-50 composite was evaluated in terms of surface cleanness and roughness. This presentation will discuss the results of strength and durability testing conducted on titanium, stainless steel, and PMR-II-50 composite adherends to evaluate possible bonding processes.

  4. Design Analysis and Thermo-mechanical Fatigue of a Polyimide Composite for Combustion Chamber Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, J. C.; Melis, M.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J.; Burke, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Polyimide composites are being evaluated for use in lightweight support structures designed to preserve the ideal flow geometry within thin shell combustion chambers of future space launch propulsion systems. Principles of lightweight design and innovative manufacturing techniques have yielded a sandwich structure with an outer face sheet of carbon fiber polyimide matrix composite. While the continuous carbon fiber enables laminated skin of high specific stiffness; the polyimide matrix materials ensure that the rigidity and durability is maintained at operation temperatures of 316 C. Significant weight savings over all metal support structures are expected. The protypical structure is the result of ongoing collaboration, between Boeing and NASA-GRC seeking to introduce polyimide composites to the harsh environmental and loads familiar to space launch propulsion systems. Design trade analyses were carried out using relevant closed form solutions, approximations for sandwich beams/panels and finite element analysis. Analyses confirm the significant thermal stresses exist when combining materials whose coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) differ by a factor of about 10 for materials such as a polymer composite and metallic structures. The ramifications on design and manufacturing alternatives are reviewed and discussed. Due to stringent durability and safety requirements, serious consideration is being given to the synergistic effects of temperature and mechanical loads. The candidate structure operates at 316 C, about 80% of the glass transition temperature T(sub g). Earlier thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) investigations of chopped fiber polyimide composites made this near to T(sub g), showed that cyclic temperature and stress promoted excessive creep damage and strain accumulation. Here it is important to verify that such response is limited in continuous fiber laminates.

  5. Validation of High Aspect Ratio Cooling in a 89 kN (20,000 lb(sub f)) Thrust Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    In order to validate the benefits of high aspect ratio cooling channels in a large scale rocket combustion chamber, a high pressure, 89 kN (20,000 lbf) thrust, contoured combustion chamber was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Rocket Engine Test Facility. The combustion chamber was tested at chamber pressures from 5.5 to 11.0 MPa (800-1600 psia). The propellants were gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen at a nominal mixture ratio of six, and liquid hydrogen was used as the coolant. The combustion chamber was extensively instrumented with 30 backside skin thermocouples, 9 coolant channel rib thermocouples, and 10 coolant channel pressure taps. A total of 29 thermal cycles, each with one second of steady state combustion, were completed on the chamber. For 25 thermal cycles, the coolant mass flow rate was equal to the fuel mass flow rate. During the remaining four thermal cycles, the coolant mass flow rate was progressively reduced by 5, 6, 11, and 20 percent. Computer analysis agreed with coolant channel rib thermocouples within an average of 9 percent and with coolant channel pressure drops within an average of 20 percent. Hot-gas-side wall temperatures of the chamber showed up to 25 percent reduction, in the throat region, over that of a conventionally cooled combustion chamber. Reducing coolant mass flow yielded a reduction of up to 27 percent of the coolant pressure drop from that of a full flow case, while still maintaining up to a 13 percent reduction in a hot-gas-side wall temperature from that of a conventionally cooled combustion chamber.

  6. Discharge Chamber Primary Electron Modeling Activities in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steuber, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Designing discharge chambers for ion thrusters involves many geometric configuration decisions. Various decisions will impact discharge chamber performance with respect to propellant utilization efficiency, ion production costs, and grid lifetime. These hardware design decisions can benefit from the assistance of computational modeling. Computational modeling for discharge chambers has been limited to two-dimensional codes that leveraged symmetry for interpretation into three-dimensional analysis. This paper presents model development activities towards a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation to aid discharge chamber design decisions. Specifically, of the many geometric configuration decisions toward attainment of a worthy discharge chamber, this paper focuses on addressing magnetic circuit considerations with a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation as a tool. With this tool, candidate discharge chamber magnetic circuit designs can be analyzed computationally to gain insight into factors that may influence discharge chamber performance such as: primary electron loss width in magnetic cusps, cathode tip position with respect to the low magnetic field volume, definition of a low magnetic field region, and maintenance of a low magnetic field region across the grid span. Corroborating experimental data will be obtained from mockup hardware tests. Initially, simulated candidate magnetic circuit designs will resemble previous successful thruster designs. To provide opportunity to improve beyond previous performance benchmarks, off-design modifications will be simulated and experimentally tested.

  7. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 2: a Study of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in Rocket Engine Preburners Using a Heterogeneous Stirred Tank Reactor Model. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.

    1988-01-01

    During the shutdown of the space shuttle main engine, oxygen flow is shut off from the fuel preburner and helium is used to push the residual oxygen into the combustion chamber. During this process a low frequency combustion instability, or chug, occurs. This chug has resulted in damage to the engine's augmented spark igniter due to backflow of the contents of the preburner combustion chamber into the oxidizer feed system. To determine possible causes and fixes for the chug, the fuel preburner was modeled as a heterogeneous stirred tank combustion chamber, a variable mass flow rate oxidizer feed system, a constant mass flow rate fuel feed system and an exit turbine. Within the combustion chamber gases were assumed perfectly mixed. To account for liquid in the combustion chamber, a uniform droplet distribution was assumed to exist in the chamber, with mean droplet diameter determined from an empirical relation. A computer program was written to integrate the resulting differential equations. Because chamber contents were assumed perfectly mixed, the fuel preburner model erroneously predicted that combustion would not take place during shutdown. The combustion rate model was modified to assume that all liquid oxygen that vaporized instantaneously combusted with fuel. Using this combustion model, the effect of engine parameters on chamber pressure oscillations during the SSME shutdown was calculated.

  8. Source term evaluation for combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Myles A.

    1993-01-01

    A modification is developed for application to the source terms used in combustion modeling. The modification accounts for the error of the finite difference scheme in regions where chain-branching chemical reactions produce exponential growth of species densities. The modification is first applied to a one-dimensional scalar model problem. It is then generalized to multiple chemical species, and used in quasi-one-dimensional computations of shock-induced combustion in a channel. Grid refinement studies demonstrate the improved accuracy of the method using this modification. The algorithm is applied in two spatial dimensions and used in simulations of steady and unsteady shock-induced combustion. Comparisons with ballistic range experiments give confidence in the numerical technique and the 9-species hydrogen-air chemistry model.

  9. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism. PMID:24486615

  10. Multimodality imaging in an orthotopic mammary window chamber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Rachel; Leung, Hui Min; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-02-01

    Window chamber models have been utilized for many years to investigate cancer development and the tumor microenvironment. Orthotopic mammary window chamber model have been developed for detailed study of breast cancer. Orthotopic window chamber models, due to the native environment, support more realistic growth and tumor behavior than ectopic models. The work by other groups thus far utilizing mammary window chamber models has focused solely on optical imaging techniques, limited to probing the first millimeter or less of tissue. These techniques do not take full advantage of the unrestricted, three-dimensional tumor growth the model supports. We have developed a custom plastic structure compatible with multimodality imaging. We present in this work the implementation of our custom window chamber in a mouse model and the successful imaging of the window chamber cancer model with MRI, nuclear imaging, and optical techniques. MRI provides a full three-dimensional view of the tumor growth and allows for additional, potentially clinically translatable, approaches to be utilized in investigating the cancer microenvironment. Nuclear imaging is accomplished using the Beta Imager, which is a novel approach to nuclear imaging of window chambers. The Beta Imager detects photons after the interaction of a single positron with a scintillator, instead of the coincidence detection of annihilation gamma ray pairs. We utilized the radioisotope glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2- (18F)fluoro-D-glucose or FDG, with the Beta Imager to obtain information on the glycolytic metabolism of the tumor and surrounding region.

  11. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  12. Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Overlay Coatings for GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liners for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Barrett, C.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B.; Robinson,; Thorn, G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as combustor chamber liners and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. Protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The development of this coatings technology has involved a combination of modeling, coatings development and characterization, and process optimization. Coatings have been low pressure plasma sprayed on GRCop-84 substrates of various geometries and shapes. Microstructural, mechanical property data and thermophysical results on the coated substrates are presented and discussed.

  13. Numerical simulations and modeling of turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, B.

    Turbulent combustion is the basic physical phenomenon responsible for efficient energy release by any internal combustion engine. However it is accompanied by other undesirable phenomena such as noise, pollutant species emission or damaging instabilities that may even lead to the system desctruction. It is then crucial to control this phenomenon, to understand all its mecanisms and to master it in industrial systems. For long time turbulent combustion has been explored only through theory and experiment. But the rapid increase of computers power during the last years has allowed an important development of numerical simulation, that has become today an essential tool for research and technical design. Direct numerical simulation has then allowed to rapidly progress in the knowledge of turbulent flame structures, leading to new modelisations for steady averaged simulations. Recently large eddy simulation has made a new step forward by refining the description of complex and unsteady flames. The main problem that arises when performing numerical simulation of turbulent combustion is linked to the description of the flame front. Being very thin, it can not however be reduced to a simple interface as it is the location of intense chemical transformation and of strong variations of thermodynamical quantities. Capturing the internal structure of a zone with a thickness of the order of 0.1 mm in a computation with a mesh step 10 times larger being impossible, it is necessary to model the turbulent flame. Models depend on the chemical structure of the flame, on the ambiant turbulence, on the combustion regime (flamelets, distributed combustion, etc.) and on the reactants injection mode (premixed or not). One finds then a large class of models, from the most simple algebraic model with a one-step chemical kinetics, to the most complex model involving probablity density functions, cross-correlations and multiple-step or fully complex chemical kinetics.

  14. High-Area-Ratio Rocket Nozzle at High Combustion Chamber Pressure: Experimental and Analytical Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smith, Timothy D.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on an optimally contoured nozzle with an area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 1800 to 2400 psia and mixture ratios of 3.89 to 6.15. This report compares the experimental performance, heat transfer, and boundary layer total pressure measurements with theoretical predictions of the current Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) developed methodology. This methodology makes use of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle performance code. Comparisons of the TDK-predicted performance to experimentally attained thrust performance indicated that both the vacuum thrust coefficient and the vacuum specific impulse values were approximately 2.0-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 1025:1 configurations, and approximately 0.25-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 440:1 configuration. Nozzle wall temperatures were measured on the outside of a thin-walled heat sink nozzle during the test fittings. Nozzle heat fluxes were calculated front the time histories of these temperatures and compared with predictions made with the TDK code. The heat flux values were overpredicted for all cases. The results range from nearly 100 percent at an area ratio of 50 to only approximately 3 percent at an area ratio of 975. Values of the integral of the heat flux as a function of nozzle surface area were also calculated. Comparisons of the experiment with analyses of the heat flux and the heat rate per axial length also show that the experimental values were lower than the predicted value. Three boundary layer rakes mounted on the nozzle exit were used for boundary layer measurements. This arrangement allowed total pressure measurements to be obtained at 14 different distances from the nozzle wall. A comparison of boundary layer total pressure profiles and analytical

  15. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described; it was developed to explain experimental results and to provide guidance for developing active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a PC. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with bimolecular reaction between fuel and air. Although focus is on the model, it and experimental results are compared to understand effects of inlet air temperature and open loop control schemes. The model shows that both are related to changes in transport time.

  16. A two-phase restricted equilibrium model for combustion of metalized solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, J. S.; Dejong, F. J.; Gibeling, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase approach was adopted to model the multi-phase reacting internal flow in a solid rocket with a metalized propellant. An Eulerian description was used to analyze the motion of the continuous phase which includes the gas as well as the small (micron-sized) particulates, while a Lagrangian description is used for the analysis of the discrete phase which consists of the larger particulates in the motor chamber. The particulates consist of Al and Al2O3 such that the particulate composition is 100 percent Al at injection from the propellant surface with Al2O3 fraction increasing due to combustion along the particle trajectory. An empirical model is used to compute the combustion rate for agglomerates while the continuous phase chemistry is treated using chemical equilibrium. The computer code was used to simulate the reacting flow in a solid rocket motor with an AP/HTPB/Al propellant. The computed results show the existence of an extended combustion zone in the chamber rather than a thin reaction region. The presence of the extended combustion zone results in the chamber flow field and chemical being far from isothermal (as would be predicted by a surface combustion assumption). The temperature in the chamber increases from about 2600 K at the propellant surface to about 3350 K in the core. Similarly the chemical composition and the density of the propellant gas also show spatially non-uniform distribution in the chamber. The analysis developed under the present effort provides a more sophisticated tool for solid rocket internal flow predictions than is presently available, and can be useful in studying apparent anomalies and improving the simple correlations currently in use. The code can be used in the analysis of combustion efficiency, thermal load in the internal insulation, plume radiation, etc.

  17. Tabulated Combustion Model Development For Non-Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prithwish

    Turbulent non-premixed flames play a very important role in the field of engineering ranging from power generation to propulsion. The coupling of fluid mechanics and complicated combustion chemistry of fuels pose a challenge for the numerical modeling of these type of problems. Combustion modeling in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the most important tools used for predictive modeling of complex systems and to understand the basic fundamentals of combustion. Traditional combustion models solve a transport equation of each species with a source term. In order to resolve the complex chemistry accurately it is important to include a large number of species. However, the computational cost is generally proportional to the cube of number of species. The presence of a large number of species in a flame makes the use of CFD computationally expensive and beyond reach for some applications or inaccurate when solved with simplified chemistry. For highly turbulent flows, it also becomes important to incorporate the effects of turbulence chemistry interaction (TCI). The aim of this work is to develop high fidelity combustion models based on the flamelet concept and to significantly advance the existing capabilities. A thorough investigation of existing models (Finite-rate chemistry and Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)) and comparative study of combustion models was done initially on a constant volume combustion chamber with diesel fuel injection. The CFD modeling was validated with experimental results and was also successfully applied to a single cylinder diesel engine. The effect of number of flamelets on the RIF model and flamelet initialization strategies were studied. The RIF model with multiple flamelets is computationally expensive and a model was proposed on the frame work of RIF. The new model was based on tabulated chemistry and incorporated TCI effects. A multidimensional tabulated chemistry database generation code was developed based on the 1

  18. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of a continuously rotating detonation in the annular combustion chamber with a wide gap and separate delivery of fuel and oxidizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. M.; Dubrovskii, A. V.; Ivanov, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of integrating the Continuous Detonation Chamber (CDC) in a gas turbine engine (GTE) is demonstrated by means of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations, i. e., the feasibility of the operation process in the annular combustion chamber with a wide gap and with separate feeding of fuel (hydrogen) and oxidizer (air) is proved computationally. The CDC with an upstream isolator damping pressure disturbances propagating towards the compressor is shown to exhibit a gain in the total pressure of 15% as compared with the same combustion chamber operating in the deflagration mode.

  19. Experimental and modeling study on char combustion

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yu; M.C. Zhang

    2009-05-15

    In this study, on the basis of experimental verifications with an FTIR online measurement system, theoretical calculations by using the strict continuous-film model were first compared with those by the simple single-film model that is still widely used in mathematical modeling of pulverized coal flames. The results indicated that the single-film model has some significant errors in its predictions of the ignition temperature and the combustion following ignition and hence should have some restrictions on its application. Then an improved char combustion model has been presented, taking into consideration the influence of the finite-rate heterogeneous reduction and oxidation reactions. This model gives the explicit algebraic expressions for the overall rate of combustion, the surface temperature of the particle, and the gas temperature at the flame sheet. Compared with the single-film model, predictions by the present model were in much better agreement with those predicted by the continuous-film model and the experimental data. The novel model is also much easier to be integrated into the comprehensive computing codes for industrial pulverized coal flame than the continuous-film model. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  20. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

  1. Improving the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder diesel engine having reentrant combustion chamber using diesel and Jatropha methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Premnath, S; Devaradjane, G

    2015-11-01

    The emissions from the Compression ignition (CI) engines introduce toxicity to the atmosphere. The undesirable carbon deposits from these engines are realized in the nearby static or dynamic systems such as vehicles, inhabitants, etc. The objective of this research work is to improve the performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine in the modified re-entrant combustion chamber using a diesel and Jatropha methyl ester blend (J20) at three different injection pressures. From the literature, it is revealed that the shape of the combustion chamber and the fuel injection pressure have an impact on the performance and emission parameters of the CI engine. In this work, a re-entrant combustion chamber with three different fuel injection pressures (200, 220 and 240bars) has been used in the place of the conventional hemispherical combustion chamber for diesel and J20. From the experimental results, it is found that the re-entrant chamber improves the brake thermal efficiency of diesel and J20 in all the tested conditions. It is also found that the 20% blend of Jatropha methyl ester showed 4% improvement in the brake thermal efficiency in the re-entrant chamber at the maximum injection pressure. Environmental safety directly relates to the reduction in the undesirable effects on both living and non-living things. Currently environmental pollution is of major concern. Even with the stringent emission norms new methods are required to reduce the harmful effects from automobiles. The toxicity of carbon monoxide (CO) is well known. In the re-entrant combustion chamber, the amount of CO emission is reduced by 26% when compared with the conventional fuel operation of the engine. Moreover, the amount of smoke is reduced by 24% and hydrocarbons (HC) emission by 24%. Thus, the modified re-entrant combustion chamber reduces harmful pollutants such as unburned HC and CO as well as toxic smoke emissions. PMID:26256249

  2. Modeling LiH Combustion in Solid Fuelled Scramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, Domenico; Bruno, Claudio

    Lithium Hydride is a hydrogen-rich compound with potential application as fuel, thanks to its high density and low molecular weight. It reacts exothermically with many substances and contains H2, suggesting its use where a much higher density (compared to that of LH2) would be beneficial. In this work LiH (solid at STP) has thus investigated as potential candidate for solid fuelled scramjets (SFSCRJ). Its thermochemical properties and issues associated to its combustion in a hot supersonic stream have been investigated; results show clearly that Li, released by thermal decomposition, plays a key role in the LiH performance. In fact, above the auto-ignition point liquid Li combustion with air increases local temperature and promotes LiH decomposition. To understand quantitatively these effects, a simplified physical model describing LiH “vaporization” and combustion was built and used in simulations of a notional SCRJ chamber by means of a CFD code. Results are intriguing: an intense and stable flame zone is predicted to be present over and downstream of the grain and high temperatures (of order 2900 K) are obtainable. Moreover, specific impulse and thrust density predicted at a flight Mach = 7 are also interesting, being 10,000 m/s and 200-300 m/s, respectively.

  3. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Biofuel Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarathy, Subram Maniam

    Bioalcohols, such as bioethanol and biobutanol, are suitable replacements for gasoline, while biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This study's contribution is experimentally validated chemical kinetic combustion mechanisms for biobutanol and biodiesel. Fundamental combustion data and chemical kinetic mechanisms are presented and discussed to improve our understanding of biofuel combustion. The net environmental impact of biobutanol (i.e., n-butanol) has not been studied extensively, so this study first assesses the sustainability of n-butanol derived from corn. The results indicate that technical advances in fuel production are required before commercializing biobutanol. The primary contribution of this research is new experimental data and a novel chemical kinetic mechanism for n-butanol combustion. The results indicate that under the given experimental conditions, n-butanol is consumed primarily via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radical molecules, which subsequently decompose to smaller hydrocarbon and oxygenated species. The hydroxyl moiety in n-butanol results in the direct production of the oxygenated species such as butanal, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde. The formation of these compounds sequesters carbon from forming soot precursors, but they may introduce other adverse environmental and health effects. Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents high quality experimental data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and models its combustion using an improved skeletal mechanism. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which ultimately lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular

  4. Biomass downdraft gasifier with internal cyclonic combustion chamber: design, construction, and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Patil, Krushna; Bhoi, Prakash; Huhnke, Raymond; Bellmer, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    An exploratory downdraft gasifier design with unique biomass pyrolysis and tar cracking mechanism is evolved at Oklahoma State University. This design has an internal separate combustion section where turbulent, swirling high-temperature combustion flows are generated. A series of research trials were conducted using wood shavings as the gasifier feedstock. Maximum tar cracking temperatures were above 1100°C. Average volumetric concentration levels of major combustible components in the product gas were 22% CO and 11% H(2). Hot and cold gas efficiencies were 72% and 66%, respectively. PMID:21463935

  5. A statistical model for combustion resonance from a DI diesel engine with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodisco, Timothy; Low Choy, Samantha; Masri, Assaad; Brown, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Introduced in this paper is a Bayesian model for isolating the resonant frequency from combustion chamber resonance. The model shown in this paper focused on characterising the initial rise in the resonant frequency to investigate the rise of in-cylinder bulk temperature associated with combustion. By resolving the model parameters, it is possible to determine: the start of pre-mixed combustion, the start of diffusion combustion, the initial resonant frequency, the resonant frequency as a function of crank angle, the in-cylinder bulk temperature as a function of crank angle and the trapped mass as a function of crank angle. The Bayesian method allows for individual cycles to be examined without cycle-averaging-allowing inter-cycle variability studies. Results are shown for a turbo-charged, common-rail compression ignition engine run at 2000 rpm and full load.

  6. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  7. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. V; Combustion-Chamber Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gensenheyner, Robert M.; Berdysz, Joseph J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of the TG-1OOA gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet rm-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and.correcte& horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, over-all total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, ana the frac%ional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. The scatter of combustion- efficiency data tended to obscure any effect of altitude or ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horse-powers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio an& the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horse-powers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.

  8. Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

  9. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  10. On mathematical modelling of flameless combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Marco; Schwoeppe, Patrick; Weber, Roman; Orsino, Stefano

    2007-07-15

    A further analysis of the IFRF semi-industrial-scale experiments on flameless (mild) combustion of natural gas is carried out. The experimental burner features a strong oxidizer jet and two weak natural gas jets. Numerous publications have shown the inability of various RANS-based mathematical models to predict the structure of the weak jet. We have proven that the failure is in error predictions of the entrainment and therefore is not related to any chemistry submodels, as has been postulated. (author)

  11. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  12. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. 5; Combustion-Chamber Characterisitcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisenheyner, Robert M.; Berdysz, Joseph J.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and corrected horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, overall total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horsepowers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horsepowers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.

  13. Modeling Gas Exchange in a Closed Plant Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. D.; Hendrix, J. E.; Wheeler, R. M.; Ross, C. W.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid transport models for fluxes of water vapor and CO2 have been developed for one crop of wheat and three crops of soybean grown in a closed plant a growth chamber. Correspondence among these fluxes is discussed. Maximum fluxes of gases are provided for engineering design requirements of fluid recycling equipment in growth chambers. Furthermore, to investigate the feasibility of generalized crop models, dimensionless representations of water vapor fluxes are presented. The feasibility of such generalized models and the need for additional data are discussed.

  14. Modeling gas exchange in a closed plant growth chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, J. D.; Hendrix, J. E.; Wheeler, R. M.; Ross, C. W.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid transport models for fluxes of water vapor and CO2 have been developed for one crop of wheat and three crops of soybean grown in a closed plant growth chamber. Correspondence among these fluxes is discussed. Maximum fluxes of gases are provided for engineering design requirements of fluid recycling equipment in growth chambers. Furthermore, to investigate the feasibility of generalized crop models, dimensionless representations of water vapor fluxes are presented. The feasibility of such generalized models and the need for additional data are discussed.

  15. Comparison of High Aspect Ratio Cooling Channel Designs for a Rocket Combustion Chamber with Development of an Optimized Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadel, Mary F.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical investigation on the effect of high aspect ratio (height/width) cooling channels, considering different coolant channel designs, on hot-gas-side wall temperature and coolant pressure drop for a liquid hydrogen cooled rocket combustion chamber, was performed. Coolant channel design elements considered were: length of combustion chamber in which high aspect ratio cooling was applied, number of coolant channels, and coolant channel shape. Seven coolant channel designs were investigated using a coupling of the Rocket Thermal Evaluation code and the Two-Dimensional Kinetics code. Initially, each coolant channel design was developed, without consideration for fabrication, to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature from a given conventional cooling channel baseline. These designs produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions up to 22 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 7.5 percent from the baseline. Fabrication constraints for milled channels were applied to the seven designs. These produced hot-gas-side wall temperature reductions of up to 20 percent, with coolant pressure drop increases as low as 2 percent. Using high aspect ratio cooling channels for the entire length of the combustion chamber had no additional benefit on hot-gas-side wall temperature over using high aspect ratio cooling channels only in the throat region, but increased coolant pressure drop 33 percent. Independent of coolant channel shape, high aspect ratio cooling was able to reduce the hot-gas-side wall temperature by at least 8 percent, with as low as a 2 percent increase in coolant pressure drop. ne design with the highest overall benefit to hot-gas-side wall temperature and minimal coolant pressure drop increase was the design which used bifurcated cooling channels and high aspect ratio cooling in the throat region. An optimized bifurcated high aspect ratio cooling channel design was developed which reduced the hot-gas-side wall temperature by 18 percent and

  16. Turbulence modeling in supersonic combusting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, Tawit

    1991-01-01

    To support the National Aerospace Plane project, the RPLUS3D CFD code has been developed at NASA Lewis. The code has the ability to solve three-dimensional flowfields with finite rate combustion of hydrogen and air. The combustion processes of the hydrogen-air system are simulated by an 18-reaction path, 8-species chemical kinetic mechanism. The code uses a Lower-Upper (LU) decomposition numerical algorithm as its basis, making it a very efficient and robust code. Except for the Jacobian matrix for the implicit chemistry source terms, there is no inversion of a matrix even though it uses a fully implicit numerical algorithm. A k-epsilon (two equation) turbulence model is incorporated into the RPLUS3D code.

  17. RSRM Chamber Pressure Oscillations: Transit Time Models and Unsteady CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Stewart, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle solid rocket motor low frequency internal pressure oscillations have been observed since early testing. The same type of oscillations also are present in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). The oscillations, which occur during RSRM burn, are predominantly at the first three motor cavity longitudinal acoustic mode frequencies. Broadband flow and combustion noise provide the energy to excite these modes at low levels throughout motor burn, however, at certain times during burn the fluctuating pressure amplitude increases significantly. The increased fluctuations at these times suggests an additional excitation mechanism. The RSRM has inhibitors on the propellant forward facing surface of each motor segment. The inhibitors are in a slot at the segment field joints to prevent burning at that surface. The aft facing segment surface at a field joint slot burns and forms a cavity of time varying size. Initially the inhibitor is recessed in the field joint cavity. As propellant burns away the inhibitor begins to protrude into the bore flow. Two mechanisms (transit time models) that are considered potential pressure oscillation excitations are cavity-edge tones, and inhibitor hole-tones. Estimates of frequency variation with time of longitudinal acoustic modes, cavity edge-tones, and hole-tones compare favorably with frequencies measured during motor hot firing. It is believed that the highest oscillation amplitudes occur when vortex shedding frequencies coincide with motor longitudinal acoustic modes. A time accurate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was made to replicate the observations from motor firings and to observe the transit time mechanisms in detail. FDNS is the flow solver used to detail the time varying aspects of the flow. The fluid is approximated as a single-phase ideal gas. The CFD model was an axisymmetric representation of the RSRM at 80 seconds into burn.Deformation of the inhibitors by the internal flow was determined

  18. Gas-phase measurements of combustion interaction with materials for radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, R. S.; Lucht, R. P.; Jassowski, D. M.; Rosenberg, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Foil samples of Ir and Pt are exposed to combustion products in a controlled premixed environment at atmospheric pressure. Electrical heating of the foil samples is used to control the surface temperature and to elevate it above the radiative equilibrium temperature within the test apparatus. Profiles of temperature and OH concentration in the boundary layer adjacent to the specimen surface are measured by laser-induced fluorescence. Measured OH concentrations are significantly higher than equilibrium concentrations calculated for the known mixture ratio and the measured temperature profiles. This result indicates that superequilibrium concentrations of H-atoms and O-atoms are also present in the boundary layer, due to partial equilibrium of the rapid binary reactions of the H2/O2 chemical kinetic system. These experiments are conducted as part of a research program to investigate fundamental aspects of the interaction of combustion gases with advanced high-temperature materials for radiation-cooled thrusters.

  19. A review of acoustic dampers applied to combustion chambers in aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Li, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    In engine combustion systems such as rockets, aero-engines and gas turbines, pressure fluctuations are always present, even during normal operation. One of design prerequisites for the engine combustors is stable operation, since large-amplitude self-sustained pressure fluctuations (also known as combustion instability) have the potential to cause serious structural damage and catastrophic engine failure. To dampen pressure fluctuations and to reduce noise, acoustic dampers are widely applied as a passive control means to stabilize combustion/engine systems. However, they cannot respond to the dynamic changes of operating conditions and tend to be effective over certain narrow range of frequencies. To maintain their optimum damping performance over a broad frequency range, extensive researches have been conducted during the past four decades. The present work is to summarize the status, challenges and progress of implementing such acoustic dampers on engine systems. The damping effect and mechanism of various acoustic dampers, such as Helmholtz resonators, perforated liners, baffles, half- and quarter-wave tube are introduced first. A summary of numerical, experimental and theoretical studies are then presented to review the progress made so far. Finally, as an alternative means, ';tunable acoustic dampers' are discussed. Potential, challenges and issues associated with the dampers practical implementation are highlighted.

  20. The influence of some synfuels on the performance and thermal loading of a pre-combustion chamber diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Radwan, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Blends of different proportions of straight run naphtha/gas oil and BTX/Gas oil were used in a four-stroke pre-combustion chamber diesel engine in order to illustrate the aspects of performance and thermal loading likely to arise when using syncrudes, multifuel or coal derived fuel. The engine was instrumented for performance monitoring as well as for heat flux and metal temperature measurement and the results were compared with those obtained with gas oil. Correlations were found for the heat flux level in the cylinder head, piston and cylinder liner with the various blends employed. It was concluded that engines running on syncrudes, multifuel or coal derived fuel shall require greater attention in design and/or development since the higher heat flux prevailing in certain conditions will encourage fatigue induced cracking or liner scuffing. Also the larger heat flux differential across the component will exacerbate the thermal stress problem.

  1. Effect of Combustion-chamber Shape on the Performance of a Prechamber Compression-ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C S; Collins, J H , Jr

    1934-01-01

    The effect on engine performance of variations in the shape of the prechamber, the shape and direction of the connecting passage, the chamber volume using a tangential passage, the injection system, and the direction od the fuel spray in the chamber was investigated using a 5 by 7 inch single-cylinder compression-ignition engine. The results show that the performance of this engine can be considerably improved by selecting the best combination of variables and incorporating them in a single design. The best combination as determined from these tests consisted of a disk-shaped chamber connected to the cylinder by means of a flared tangential passage. The fuel was injected through a single-orifice nozzle directed normal to the air swirl and in the same plane. At an engine speed of 1,500 r.p.m. and with the theoretical fuel quantity for no excess air, the engine developed a brake mean effective pressure of 115 pounds per square inch with a fuel consumption of 0.49 pound per brake horsepower-hour and an explosion pressure of 820 pounds per square inch. A brake mean effective pressure of 100 pounds per square inch with a brake-fuel consumption of 0.44 pound per horsepower-hour at 1,500 r.p.m. was obtained.

  2. Simulation and modelling of the waves transmission and generation in a stator blade row in a combustion-noise framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyko, Matthieu; Duran, Ignacio; Moreau, Stéphane; Nicoud, Franck; Poinsot, Thierry

    2014-11-01

    The combustion noise in aero-engines is known to have two different origins. First, the direct combustion noise is directly generated by the flame itself. Second, the indirect combustion noise is caused by the acceleration in the turbine stages of entropy spots generated by the combustion. In both cases, the turbo-machinery is involved in the combustion-noise transmission and generation. Numerical simulations are performed in the present study to assess the global noise for a real aeronautical configuration. On the one hand, the acoustic and entropy transfer functions of an isolated blade row are obtained using two-dimensional unsteady simulations. The transfer functions of the blade row are compared with the model of Cumpsty and Marble that assumes an axially compact configuration. On the other hand, the acoustic and entropy sources coming from a combustion chamber are calculated from a three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation (LES). This allows an evaluation of the error introduced by the model for the present combustion chamber using the previous numerical simulations. A significant error is found for the indirect combustion noise, whereas it stays reasonable for the direct one.

  3. Design and testing of a model CELSS chamber robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mark; Dezego, Shawn; Jones, Kinzy; Kewley, Christopher; Langlais, Mike; McCarthy, John; Penny, Damon; Bonner, Tom; Funderburke, C. Ashley; Hailey, Ruth

    1994-08-01

    A robot system for use in an enclosed environment was designed and tested. The conceptual design will be used to assist in research performed by the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Design specifications include maximum load capacity, operation at specified environmental conditions, low maintenance, and safety. The robot system must not be hazardous to the sealed environment, and be capable of stowing and deploying within a minimum area of the CELSS chamber facility. This design consists of a telescoping robot arm that slides vertically on a shaft positioned in the center of the CELSS chamber. The telescoping robot arm consists of a series of links which can be fully extended to a length equal to the radius of the working envelope of the CELSS chamber. The vertical motion of the robot arm is achieved through the use of a combination ball screw/ball spline actuator system. The robot arm rotates cylindrically about the vertical axis through use of a turntable bearing attached to a central mounting structure fitted to the actuator shaft. The shaft is installed in an overhead rail system allowing the entire structure to be stowed and deployed within the CELSS chamber. The overhead rail system is located above the chamber's upper lamps and extends to the center of the CELSS chamber. The mounting interface of the actuator shaft and rail system allows the entire actuator shaft to be detached and removed from the CELSS chamber. When the actuator shaft is deployed, it is held fixed at the bottom of the chamber by placing a square knob on the bottom of the shaft into a recessed square fitting in the bottom of the chamber floor. A support boot ensures the rigidity of the shaft. Three student teams combined into one group designed a model of the CELSS chamber robot that they could build. They investigated materials, availability, and strength in their design. After the model arm and stand were built, the class performed pre-tests on the entire system

  4. Design and testing of a model CELSS chamber robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark; Dezego, Shawn; Jones, Kinzy; Kewley, Christopher; Langlais, Mike; Mccarthy, John; Penny, Damon; Bonner, Tom; Funderburke, C. Ashley; Hailey, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    A robot system for use in an enclosed environment was designed and tested. The conceptual design will be used to assist in research performed by the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Design specifications include maximum load capacity, operation at specified environmental conditions, low maintenance, and safety. The robot system must not be hazardous to the sealed environment, and be capable of stowing and deploying within a minimum area of the CELSS chamber facility. This design consists of a telescoping robot arm that slides vertically on a shaft positioned in the center of the CELSS chamber. The telescoping robot arm consists of a series of links which can be fully extended to a length equal to the radius of the working envelope of the CELSS chamber. The vertical motion of the robot arm is achieved through the use of a combination ball screw/ball spline actuator system. The robot arm rotates cylindrically about the vertical axis through use of a turntable bearing attached to a central mounting structure fitted to the actuator shaft. The shaft is installed in an overhead rail system allowing the entire structure to be stowed and deployed within the CELSS chamber. The overhead rail system is located above the chamber's upper lamps and extends to the center of the CELSS chamber. The mounting interface of the actuator shaft and rail system allows the entire actuator shaft to be detached and removed from the CELSS chamber. When the actuator shaft is deployed, it is held fixed at the bottom of the chamber by placing a square knob on the bottom of the shaft into a recessed square fitting in the bottom of the chamber floor. A support boot ensures the rigidity of the shaft. Three student teams combined into one group designed a model of the CELSS chamber robot that they could build. They investigated materials, availability, and strength in their design. After the model arm and stand were built, the class performed pre-tests on the entire system

  5. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Lean Premixed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, S.L.; •Givi, P.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    The joint velocity-scalar-frequency probability density function (PDF) methodology is employed for prediction of a bluff-body stabilized lean premixed methane-air flame. A reduced mechanism with CO and NO chemistry is used to describe fuel oxidation. The predicted mean and rms values of the velocity, temperature and concentrations of major and minor species are compared with laboratory measurements. This technical effort was performed in support of the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s on-going research in “Assessment of Turbo-Chemistry Models for Gas Turbine Combustion Emissions” under the RDS contract DE-AC26-04NT41817.

  6. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 3000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 3; Analysis of Combustion-Chamber Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Carl E.

    1948-01-01

    Combustion chamber performance properties of a 3000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine were determined. Data are presented for a range of simulated altitudes from 15,000 to 45,0000 feet and a range of Mach numbers from 0.23 to 1.05 for various modifications of the engine.

  7. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  8. Altitude Test Chamber Investigation of Performance of a 28-inch Ram-jet Engine II : Effects of Gutter Width and Blocked Area on Operating Range and Combustion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillito, T B; Jones, W L; Kahn, R W

    1950-01-01

    Altitude-test-chamber investigation of effects of flame-holder blocked area and gutter width on performance of 28-inch diameter ram jet at simulated flight Mach number of 2.0 for altitudes from 40,000 to 55,000 feet was conducted at NACA Lewis laboratory. Ten flame holders investigated covered gutter widths from 1.00 to 2.50 inches and blocked areas from 40.5 to 62.0 percent of combustion-chamber area. Gutter width did not appreciably affect combustion efficiency. Increase in blocked area from 40 to 62 percent resulted in 5- to 10-percent increase in combustion efficiency. Increasing gutter width resulted in improvement in fuel-air-ratio operating range.

  9. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels

  10. Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational concequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. This is Volume 2 of the report, which contains data plots of all the test programs.

  11. Characterization of combustion chamber products by core-level photoabsorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, S. A.; Huff, W. R.A.; Moler, E J; Yeah, S.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    The lubricating performance of motor oil is adversely affected by the carbon soot contamination that is a natural by-product of the combustion process. Particularly in diesel engines, {open_quote}blow-by{close_quote} is a problem that greatly decreases the longevity of the engine-lubricating oil. Motor oil manufacturers spend considerable resources developing new oil formulations that counteract the adverse affects of this combustion soot. At present, the only effective way to test new formulations is in a working engine. This process is obviously expensive and not especially efficient. In this ongoing work in collaboration with Chevron Research and Technology, the authors goal is to find a form of carbon that chemically resembles the soot created by the {open_quote}blow-by{close_quote} in a diesel engine. The chemically correct soot substitute can be used in bench tests to replace the expensive full motor testing for new formulations. The final testing would still be done in the test motors but only with promising candidates. To these ends, Near Edge X-ray Adsorption spectroscopy Extended Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is an attractive technique in that it has chemical specificity through the core-level binding energy and because it probes the chemically important unoccupied molecular orbitals of the material. Core-level photoabsorption has been used to characterize the empty electronic states of a wide variety of materials. Specifically, the near-edge region of the photoabsorption process has been used to determine the relative quantity of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3}bonding in carbon films. The samples were fine grained powders pressed into pellets. The C(1s) absorption spectra were collected from each sample by measuring the total electron yield from the sample as a function of photon energy. The absorption intensity was normalized to the incoming photon flux by measuring the photoyield from a fine gold mesh.

  12. Finite difference seismic modeling of axial magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.; Dougherty, M.E.; Stephen, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors tested the feasibility of using finite difference methods to model seismic propagation at {approximately}10 Hx through a two-dimensional representation of an axial magma chamber with a thin, liquid lid. This technique produces time series of displacement or pressure at seafloor receivers to mimic a seismic refraction experiment and snapshots of P and S energy propagation. The results indicate that the implementation is stable for models with sharp velocity contrasts and complex geometries. The authors observe a high-energy, downward-traveling shear phase, observable only with borehole receivers, that would be useful in studying the nature and shape of magma chambers. The ability of finite difference methods to model high-order wave phenomena makes this method ideal for testing velocity models of spreading axes and for planning near-axis drilling of the East Pacific Rise in order to optimize the benefits from shear wave imaging of sub-axis structure.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Spray Combustion with an Unstructured-Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Liaw, P.; Shih, M. H.; Wang, T. S.

    1996-01-01

    The present unstructured-grid method follows strictly the basic finite volume forms of the conservation laws of the governing equations for the entire flow domain. High-order spatially accurate formulation has been employed for the numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. A two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model is also incorporated in the unstructured-grid solver. The convergence of the resulted linear algebraic equation is accelerated with preconditioned Conjugate Gradient method. A statistical spray combustion model has been incorporated into the present unstructured-grid solver. In this model, spray is represented by discrete particles, rather than by continuous distributions. A finite number of computational particles are used to predict a sample of total population of particles. Particle trajectories are integrated using their momentum and motion equations and particles exchange mass, momentum and energy with the gas within the computational cell in which they are located. The interaction calculations are performed simultaneously and eliminate global iteration for the two-phase momentum exchange. A transient spray flame in a high pressure combustion chamber is predicted and then the solution of liquid-fuel combusting flow with a rotating cup atomizer is presented and compared with the experimental data. The major conclusion of this investigation is that the unstructured-grid method can be employed to study very complicated flow fields of turbulent spray combustion. Grid adaptation can be easily achieved in any flow domain such as droplet evaporation and combustion zone. Future applications of the present model can be found in the full three-dimensional study of flow fields of gas turbine and liquid propulsion engine combustion chambers with multi-injectors.

  14. Analysis of the Effect of Geometry Generated Turbulence on HCCI Combustion by Multi-Zone Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Christensen, M; Johansson, B; Hessel, R P

    2004-12-13

    This paper illustrates the applicability of a sequential fluid mechanics, multi-zone chemical kinetics model to analyze HCCI experimental data for two combustion chamber geometries with different levels of turbulence: a low turbulence disc geometry (flat top piston), and a high turbulence square geometry (piston with a square bowl). The model uses a fluid mechanics code to determine temperature histories in the engine as a function of crank angle. These temperature histories are then fed into a chemical kinetic solver, which determines combustion characteristics for a relatively small number of zones (40). The model makes the assumption that there is no direct linking between turbulence and combustion. The results show that the multi-zone model yields good results for both the disc and the square geometries. The model makes good predictions of pressure traces and heat release rates. The experimental results indicate that the high turbulence square geometry has longer burn duration than the low turbulence disc geometry. This difference can be explained by the sequential multi-zone model, which indicates that the cylinder with the square bowl has a thicker boundary layer that results in a broader temperature distribution. This broader temperature distribution tends to lengthen the combustion, as cold mass within the cylinder takes longer to reach ignition temperature when compressed by the expansion of the first burned gases. The multi-zone model, which makes the basic assumption that HCCI combustion is controlled by chemical kinetics, is therefore capable of explaining the experimental results obtained for different levels of turbulence, without considering a direct interaction between turbulence and combustion. A direct connection between turbulence and HCCI combustion may still exists, but it seems to play a relatively minor role in determining burn duration at the conditions analyzed in this paper.

  15. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbook, C K; Mehl, M

    2008-10-30

    Hydrocarbon fuels for advanced combustion engines consist of complex mixtures of hundreds or even thousands of different components. These components can be grouped into a number of chemically distinct classes, consisting of n-paraffins, branched paraffins, cyclic paraffins, olefins, oxygenates, and aromatics. Biodiesel contains its own unique chemical class called methyl esters. The fractional amounts of these chemical classes are quite different in gasoline, diesel fuel, oil-sand derived fuels and bio-derived fuels, which contributes to the very different combustion characteristics of each of these types of combustion systems. The objectives of this project are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  16. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  17. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

  18. On the TFNS Subgrid Models for Liquid-Fueled Turbulent Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach capable of capturing unsteady flow structures important for turbulent mixing in the combustion chamber and two different subgrid models used to emulate the major processes occurring in the turbulence-chemistry interaction. These two subgrid models are termed as LEM-like model and EUPDF-like model (Eulerian probability density function), respectively. Two-phase turbulent combustion in a single-element lean-direct-injection (LDI) combustor is calculated by employing the TFNS/LEM-like approach as well as the TFNS/EUPDF-like approach. Results obtained from the TFNS approach employing these two different subgrid models are compared with each other, along with the experimental data, followed by more detailed comparison between the results of an updated calculation using the TFNS/LEM-like model and the experimental data.

  19. Sub-grid scale combustion models for large eddy simulation of unsteady premixed flame propagation around obstacles.

    PubMed

    Di Sarli, Valeria; Di Benedetto, Almerinda; Russo, Gennaro

    2010-08-15

    In this work, an assessment of different sub-grid scale (sgs) combustion models proposed for large eddy simulation (LES) of steady turbulent premixed combustion (Colin et al., Phys. Fluids 12 (2000) 1843-1863; Flohr and Pitsch, Proc. CTR Summer Program, 2000, pp. 61-82; Kim and Menon, Combust. Sci. Technol. 160 (2000) 119-150; Charlette et al., Combust. Flame 131 (2002) 159-180; Pitsch and Duchamp de Lageneste, Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 2001-2008) was performed to identify the model that best predicts unsteady flame propagation in gas explosions. Numerical results were compared to the experimental data by Patel et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002) 1849-1854) for premixed deflagrating flame in a vented chamber in the presence of three sequential obstacles. It is found that all sgs combustion models are able to reproduce qualitatively the experiment in terms of step of flame acceleration and deceleration around each obstacle, and shape of the propagating flame. Without adjusting any constants and parameters, the sgs model by Charlette et al. also provides satisfactory quantitative predictions for flame speed and pressure peak. Conversely, the sgs combustion models other than Charlette et al. give correct predictions only after an ad hoc tuning of constants and parameters. PMID:20471163

  20. Modeling complex chemical effects in turbulent nonpremixed combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nigel S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Virtually all of the energy derived from the consumption of combustibles occurs in systems which utilize turbulent fluid motion. Since combustion is largely related to the mixing of fluids and mixing processes are orders of magnitude more rapid when enhanced by turbulent motion, efficiency criteria dictate that chemically powered devices necessarily involve fluid turbulence. Where combustion occurs concurrently with mixing at an interface between two reactive fluid bodies, this mode of combustion is called nonpremixed combustion. This is distinct from premixed combustion where flame-fronts propagate into a homogeneous mixture of reactants. These two modes are limiting cases in the range of temporal lag between mixing of reactants and the onset of reaction. Nonpremixed combustion occurs where this lag tends to zero, while premixed combustion occurs where this lag tends to infinity. Many combustion processes are hybrids of these two extremes with finite non-zero lag times. Turbulent nonpremixed combustion is important from a practical standpoint because it occurs in gas fired boilers, furnaces, waste incinerators, diesel engines, gas turbine combustors, and afterburners etc. To a large extent, past development of these practical systems involved an empirical methodology. Presently, efficiency standards and emission regulations are being further tightened (Correa 1993), and empiricism has had to give way to more fundamental research in order to understand and effectively model practical combustion processes (Pope 1991). A key element in effective modeling of turbulent combustion is making use of a sufficiently detailed chemical kinetic mechanism. The prediction of pollutant emission such as oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) and sulphur (SO(x)) unburned hydrocarbons, and particulates demands the use of detailed chemical mechanisms. It is essential that practical models for turbulent nonpremixed combustion are capable of handling large numbers of 'stiff' chemical species

  1. Development of a CuNiCrAl Bond Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings in Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Torben; Rösler, Joachim; Bäker, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The lifetime of rocket combustion chambers can be increased by applying thermal barrier coatings. The standard coating systems usually used in gas turbines or aero engines will fail at the bond coat/substrate interface due to the chemical difference as well as the different thermal expansion between the copper liner and the applied NiCrAlY bond coat. A new bond coat alloy for rocket engine applications was designed previously with a chemical composition and coefficient of thermal expansion more similar to the copper substrate. Since a comparable material has not been applied by thermal spraying before, coating tests have to be carried out. In this work, the new Ni-30%Cu-6%Al-5%Cr bond coat alloy is applied via high velocity oxygen fuel spraying. In a first step, the influence of different coating parameters on, e.g., porosity, amount of unmolten particles, and coating roughness is investigated and a suitable parameter set for further studies is chosen. In a second step, copper substrates are coated with the chosen parameters to test the feasibility of the process. The high-temperature behavior and adhesion is tested with laser cycling experiments. The new coatings showed good adhesion even at temperatures beyond the maximum test temperatures of the NiCrAlY bond coat in previous studies.

  2. A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2011-01-15

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  3. Scale-up and advanced performance analysis of boiler combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, W.

    1985-12-31

    This paper discusses methods for evaluation of thermal performance of large boiler furnaces. Merits and limitations of pilot-scale testing and mathematical modeling are pointed out. Available computer models for furnace performance predictions are reviewed according to their classification into finite-difference methods and zone methods. Current state of the art models for industrial application are predominantly zone methods based on advanced Monte-Carlo type techniques for calculation of radiation heat transfer. A representation of this model type is described in more detail together with examples of its practical application. It is also shown, how pilot-scale results can be scaled-up with help of the model to predict full-scale performance of particular boiler furnaces.

  4. Thermal radiation of heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. A.; Maratkanova, E. I.; Zagray, I. A.; Rukavishnikova, R. V.

    2015-05-01

    The work presents a method of complex investigation of thermal radiation emitted by heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume. Realization of the method has allowed us to obtain full information on the results in all stages of calculations. Dependence of the optical properties (complex refractive index), the radiation characteristics (coefficients and cross sections) and emission characteristics (flux densities, emissivity factors) of the main determining factors and parameters was analyzed. It was found by the method of computational experiment that the presence of the gaseous phase in the combustion products causes a strongly marked selectivity of emission, due to which the use of gray approximation in the calculation of thermal radiation is unnecessary. The influence of the optical properties, mass fraction, the function of particle size distribution, and the temperature of combustion products on thermal radiation in the model rocket engine plume was investigated. The role of "spotlight" effect-increasing the amount of energy of emission exhaust combustion products due to scattering by condensate particles radiation from the combustion chamber-was established quantitatively.

  5. Simulations of Turbulent Spray Combustion in a Constant-Volume Chamber for Diesel-Engine-Like Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Haworth, D. C.

    2010-11-01

    In-cylinder aero-thermal-chemical processes in piston engines are rich and complex, and modern engines are already at a high level of refinement. Further increases in performance, reductions in fuel consumption and emissions, and accommodation of nontraditional fuels will require the effective use of high-spatial-and-temporal-resolution optical diagnostics and numerical simulations. In this research, computational fluid dynamics tools are being developed to explore the influences of fuel properties on autoignition, combustion, and pollutant emissions in compression-ignition engines. The modeling includes a transported probability density function method to account for turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature, detailed soot models with a method of moments for soot aerosol dynamics, a stochastic photon Monte Carlo method for participating-medium radiation heat transfer, and line-by-line spectral properties for mixtures of molecular gases and soot. The models are applied to a constant-volume spray combustion bomb where measurements are available for a range of thermochemical conditions and for a variety of fuels. Parametric studies of the influences of key physical and numerical parameters are performed to determine sensitivities and to establish best practices to be carried forward into subsequent modeling studies of real engines.

  6. INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS (ICE) MODEL, VERSION 6.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) Model was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for use by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) in preparing future assessments of industrial boiler emissions. The ICE Model user's manual includes a summar...

  7. Mathematical modelling of post combustion in Dofasco's KOBM

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, H.; Irons, G.A.; Lu, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    In the AISI Direct Steelmaking program, trials were undertaken in Dofasco's 300 Tonne KOBM to examine post combustion. To support this work, a two-dimensional turbulent mathematical model has been developed to describe gas flow, combustion reactions and heat transfer (radiation and convection) in converter-type steelmaking processes. Gaseous flow patterns, temperature and heat flux distributions in the furnace were calculated with this model. Key findings are: The post combustion ratio is determined from the rates of oxygen supply, oxygen used for decarburization and the remainder available for post combustion, i.e. deducible from a mass balance calculation, comparison between the heat transfer fluxes calculated based on the model and those measured industrially indicates that the conventionally defined heat transfer efficiency over-estimates the heat recovered by the bath by about 20%, and the location of the combustion zone can be controlled, to a certain extent, by adjusting the lance practice.

  8. Mathematical modelling of post combustion in Dofasco`s KOBM

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, H.; Irons, G.A.; Lu, W.K.

    1992-12-31

    In the AISI Direct Steelmaking program, trials were undertaken in Dofasco`s 300 Tonne KOBM to examine post combustion. To support this work, a two-dimensional turbulent mathematical model has been developed to describe gas flow, combustion reactions and heat transfer (radiation and convection) in converter-type steelmaking processes. Gaseous flow patterns, temperature and heat flux distributions in the furnace were calculated with this model. Key findings are: The post combustion ratio is determined from the rates of oxygen supply, oxygen used for decarburization and the remainder available for post combustion, i.e. deducible from a mass balance calculation, comparison between the heat transfer fluxes calculated based on the model and those measured industrially indicates that the conventionally defined heat transfer efficiency over-estimates the heat recovered by the bath by about 20%, and the location of the combustion zone can be controlled, to a certain extent, by adjusting the lance practice.

  9. Combustion modeling for experimentation in a space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The merits of combustion experimentation in a space environment are assessed, and the impact of such experimentation on current theoretical models is considered. It is noted that combustion theory and experimentation for less than normal gravitational conditions are incomplete, inadequate, or nonexistent. Extensive and systematic experimentation in a space environment is viewed as essential for more adequate and complete theoretical models of such processes as premixed flame propagation and extinction limits, premixed flame propagation in droplet and particle clouds, ignition and autoignition in premixed combustible media, and gas jet combustion of unpremixed reactants. Current theories and models in these areas are described, and some combustion studies that can be undertaken in the Space Shuttle Program are proposed, including crossed molecular beam, turbulence, and upper pressure limit (of gases) studies.

  10. Modeling smog chamber measurements of vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Nance, B.I.; Kelly, N.A.

    1997-12-31

    Vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities, measured at GM`s smog chamber facility, have been modeled using the SAPRC93 photochemical mechanism. The vehicle exhaust mixtures were generated by a single vehicle run over a portion of the Federal Test Procedure using three Auto/Oil reformulated test gasolines. For each run, up to 156 individual VOC species were identified. Initial HONO concentrations are needed to simulate reactivity measurement runs. (HONO is expected to be generated in a Tedlar bag holding the exhaust sample prior to its transfer to the smog chambers.) Measured and simulated relative incremental reactivities for the three exhaust mixtures are highly consistent. However, measured relative incremental reactivities are more sensitive to fuel effects than simulated ones. The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR)-based relative incremental reactivities, derived from individual species concentrations and MIR factors, are very close to simulated ones. A number of sensitivity simulation runs have been carried out to investigate the impact of HONO and other variables. Results show that relative reactivities of actual vehicle exhaust emissions can be measured by chamber runs in spite of the HONO effect.

  11. Influence of air-staging on the concentration profiles of NH{sub 3} and HCN in the combustion chamber of a CFB boiler burning coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kassman, H.; Karlsson, M.; Aamand, L.E.

    1999-07-01

    The characterization of the concentration profiles of NH{sub 3} and HCN are of great importance for increasing the knowledge of the formation and destruction pathways of NO and N{sub 2}O in a fluidized bed boiler. Further improvements of the sampling methods for the determination of both NH{sub 3} and HCN in the combustion chamber in full-scale CFB boilers are also needed. A gas-sampling probe connected to a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) instrument and a gas-quenching (GQ) probe in which the sample is quenched directly in the probe tip by a circulating trapper solution were used. The FTIR technique is based on analysis of hot combustion gases, whereas the trapper solutions from the GQ probe were analyzed by means of wet chemistry. The tests were performed during coal combustion in a 12 MW CFB boiler, which was operated at three air-staging cases with the addition of limestone for sulfur capture. The concentration profiles of NH{sub 3} and HCN in the combustion chamber showed a different pattern concerning the influence of air-staging. The highest levels of NH{sub 3} were observed during reducing condition (severe air-staging), and the lowest were found under oxidizing conditions (no air-staging). The levels of HCN were much lower than those measured for NH{sub 3}. The highest levels of HCN were observed for reversed air-staging and severe air-staging showed almost no HCN. The potential reactors involving NH{sub 3} and HCN in the combustion chamber as well as the potential measurement errors in each sampling technique are discussed for the three air-staging cases.

  12. Modelling the combustion of charcoal in a model blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yansong; Shiozawa, Tomo; Yu, Aibing; Austin, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The pulverized charcoal (PCH) combustion in ironmaking blast furnaces is abstracting remarkable attention due to various benefits such as lowering CO2 emission. In this study, a three-dimensional CFD model is used to simulate the flow and thermo-chemical behaviours in this process. The model is validated against the experimental results from a pilot-scale combustion test rig for a range of conditions. The typical flow and thermo-chemical phenomena is simulated. The effect of charcoal type, i.e. VM content is examined, showing that the burnout increases with VM content in a linear relationship. This model provides an effective way for designing and optimizing PCH operation in blast furnace practice.

  13. A practical approach to estimate emission rates of indoor air pollutants due to the use of personal combustible products based on small-chamber studies.

    PubMed

    Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    As emission rates of airborne pollutants are commonly measured from combusting substances placed inside small chambers, those values need to be re-evaluated for the possible significance under practical conditions. Here, a simple numerical procedure is investigated to extrapolate the chamber-based emission rates of formaldehyde that can be released from various combustible sources including e-cigarettes, conventional cigarettes, or scented candles to their concentration levels in a small room with relatively poor ventilation. This simple procedure relies on a mass balance approach by considering the masses of pollutants emitted from source and lost through ventilation under the assumption that mixing occurs instantaneously in the room without chemical reactions or surface sorption. The results of our study provide valuable insights into re-evaluation procedure of chamber data to allow comparison between extrapolated and recommended values to judge the safe use of various combustible products in confined spaces. If two scented candles with a formaldehyde emission rate of 310 µg h(-1) each were lit for 4 h in a small 20 m(3) room with an air change rate of 0.5 h(-1), then the 4-h (candle lit) and 8-h (up to 8 h after candle lighting) TWA [FA] were determined to be 28.5 and 23.5 ppb, respectively. This is clearly above the 8-h NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) time weighted average of 16 ppb. PMID:26495830

  14. Mathematical modelling of particle mixing effect on the combustion of municipal solid wastes in a packed-bed furnace.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao Bin; Swithenbank, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Packed bed combustion is still the most common way to burn municipal solid wastes. In this paper, a dispersion model for particle mixing, mainly caused by the movement of the grate in a moving-burning bed, has been proposed and transport equations for the continuity, momentum, species, and energy conservation are described. Particle-mixing coefficients obtained from model tests range from 2.0x10(-6) to 3.0x10(-5)m2/s. A numerical solution is sought to simulate the combustion behaviour of a full-scale 12-tonne-per-h waste incineration furnace at different levels of bed mixing. It is found that an increase in mixing causes a slight delay in the bed ignition but greatly enhances the combustion processes during the main combustion period in the bed. A medium-level mixing produces a combustion profile that is positioned more at the central part of the combustion chamber, and any leftover combustible gases (mainly CO) enter directly into the most intensive turbulence area created by the opposing secondary-air jets and thus are consumed quickly. Generally, the specific arrangement of the impinging secondary-air jets dumps most of the non-uniformity in temperature and CO into the gas flow coming from the bed-top, while medium-level mixing results in the lowest CO emission at the furnace exit and the highest combustion efficiency in the bed. PMID:17697769

  15. Modeling of Nonacoustic Combustion Instability in Simulations of Hybrid Motor Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, M.

    2000-01-01

    A transient model of a hybrid motor was formulated to study the cause and elimination of nonacoustic combustion instability. The transient model was used to simulate four key tests out of a series of seventeen hybrid motor tests conducted by Thiokol, Rocketdyne, and Martin Marietta at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These tests were performed under the Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Launch Vehicle Boosters (HPTLVB) program. The first test resulted in stable combustion. The second test resulted in large-amplitude, 6.5-Hz chamber pressure oscillations that gradually damped away by the end of the test. The third test resulted in large-amplitude, 7.5-Hz chamber pressure oscillations that were sustained throughout the test. The seventh test resulted in elimination of combustion instability with the installation of an orifice immediately upstream of the injector. Formulation and implementation of the model are the scope of this presentation. The current model is an independent continuation of modeling presented previously by joint Thiokol-Rocketdyne collaborators Boardman, Hawkins, Wassom. and Claflin. The previous model simulated an unstable independent research and development (IR&D) hybrid motor test performed by Thiokol. There was very good agreement between the model and test data. Like the previous model, the current model was developed using Matrix-x simulation software. However, tests performed at MSFC under the HPTLVB program were actually simulated. ln the current model, the hybrid motor, consisting of the liquid oxygen (lox) injector, the multiport solid fuel grain, and nozzle, was simulated. The lox feedsystem, consisting of the tank, venturi. valve, and feed lines, was also simulated in the model. All components of the hybrid motor and lox feedsystem are treated by a lumped-parameter approach. Agreement between the results of the transient model and actual test data was very good. This agreement between simulated and actual test data indicated

  16. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  17. Modelling NOx emissions of single droplet combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesl, Klaus G.; Schwing, Joachim E.; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    An approach for modelling and simulation of the generation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) in the gas phase surrounding single burning droplets is presented. Assuming spherical symmetry (no gravity, no forced convection), the governing equations are derived first. Then simplifications are introduced and it is proven that they are appropriate. The influences of the initial droplet diameter, the ambient conditions, and the droplet pre-vapourisation on NOx are investigated. The fuel of choice is n-decane (C10H22) as it resembles kerosene and diesel fuel best, and the complexity of the reaction mechanism is manageable. Combinations of C10H22 mechanisms and well-established NOx kinetics are evaluated in detail and validated for their applicability in the context of this work. The conducted simulations of droplet combustion in an atmosphere of hot exhaust gas show that NOx formation (by mass of fuel) increases linearly with the droplet diameter. There is a trade-off between available oxygen and ambient temperature. Increasing the equivalence ratio of the exhaust gas leads to higher NOx emissions in the very lean regime, but to lower emissions if the equivalence ratio exceeds 0.85. Pre-vapourisation of fuel at ambient conditions becomes beneficial with respect to NOx emissions only if the degree of vapourisation is above a minimum limit. If less fuel is vapourised before ignition, the NOx emissions remain almost unaffected.

  18. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  19. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  20. Tripropellant combustion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T. D.; Carroll, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of hydrogen to the combustion of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants in large rocket booster engines has the potential to enhance the system stability. Programs being conducted to evaluate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants at supercritical pressures are described. Combustion instability has been a problem during the development of large hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. At the higher combustion chamber pressures expected for the next generation of booster engines, the effect of unstable combustion could be even more destructive. The tripropellant engine cycle takes advantage of the superior cooling characteristics of hydrogen to cool the combustion chamber and a small amount of the hydrogen coolant can be used in the combustion process to enhance the system stability. Three aspects of work that will be accomplished to evaluate tripropellant combustion are described. The first is laboratory demonstration of the benefits through the evaluation of drop size, ignition delay and burning rate. The second is analytical modeling of the combustion process using the empirical relationship determined in the laboratory. The third is a subscale demonstration in which the system stability will be evaluated. The approach for each aspect is described and the analytical models that will be used are presented.

  1. Oxy-combustion of pulverized coal : modeling of char-combustion kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Haynes, Brian S.; Geier, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    In this study, char combustion of pulverized coal under oxy-fuel combustion conditions was investigated on the basis of experimentally observed temperature-size characteristics and corresponding predictions of numerical simulations. Using a combustion-driven entrained flow reactor equipped with an optical particle-sizing pyrometer, combustion characteristics (particle temperatures and apparent size) of pulverized coal char particles was determined for combustion in both reduced oxygen and oxygen-enriched atmospheres with either a N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} bath gas. The two coals investigated were a low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous coal (Utah Skyline) and a low-sulfur subbituminous coal (North Antelope), both size-classified to 75-106 {micro}m. A particular focus of this study lies in the analysis of the predictive modeling capabilities of simplified models that capture char combustion characteristics but exhibit the lowest possible complexity and thus facilitate incorporation in existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation codes. For this purpose, char consumption characteristics were calculated for char particles in the size range 10-200 {micro}m using (1) single-film, apparent kinetic models with a chemically 'frozen' boundary layer, and (2) a reacting porous particle model with detailed gas-phase kinetics and three separate heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of char-oxidation and gasification. A comparison of model results with experimental data suggests that single-film models with reaction orders between 0.5 and 1 with respect to the surface oxygen partial pressure may be capable of adequately predicting the temperature-size characteristics of char consumption, provided heterogeneous (steam and CO{sub 2}) gasification reactions are accounted for.

  2. Oxy-combustion of pulverized coal : modeling of char combustion kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Haynes, Brian S.; Geier, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    In this study, char combustion of pulverized coal under oxy-fuel combustion conditions was investigated on the basis of experimentally observed temperature-size characteristics and corresponding predictions of numerical simulations. Using a combustion-driven entrained flow reactor equipped with an optical particle-sizing pyrometer, combustion characteristics (particle temperatures and apparent size) of pulverized coal char particles was determined for combustion in both reduced oxygen and oxygen-enriched atmospheres with either a N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} bath gas. The two coals investigated were a low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous coal (Utah Skyline) and a low-sulfur subbituminous coal (North Antelope), both size-classified to 75-106 {micro}m. A particular focus of this study lies in the analysis of the predictive modeling capabilities of simplified models that capture char combustion characteristics but exhibit the lowest possible complexity and thus facilitate incorporation in existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation codes. For this purpose, char consumption characteristics were calculated for char particles in the size range 10-200 {micro}m using (1) single-film, apparent kinetic models with a chemically 'frozen' boundary layer, and (2) a reacting porous particle model with detailed gas-phase kinetics and three separate heterogeneous reaction mechanisms of char-oxidation and gasification. A comparison of model results with experimental data suggests that single-film models with reaction orders between 0.5 and 1 with respect to the surface oxygen partial pressure may be capable of adequately predicting the temperature-size characteristics of char consumption, provided heterogeneous (steam and CO{sub 2}) gasification reactions are accounted for.

  3. Computational experience with a three-dimensional rotary engine combustion model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Willis, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to analyze the chemically reactive flow and spray combustion processes occurring inside a stratified-charge rotary engine. Mathematical and numerical details of the new code were recently described by the present authors. The results are presented of limited, initial computational trials as a first step in a long-term assessment/validation process. The engine configuration studied was chosen to approximate existing rotary engine flow visualization and hot firing test rigs. Typical results include: (1) pressure and temperature histories, (2) torque generated by the nonuniform pressure distribution within the chamber, (3) energy release rates, and (4) various flow-related phenomena. These are discussed and compared with other predictions reported in the literature. The adequacy or need for improvement in the spray/combustion models and the need for incorporating an appropriate turbulence model are also discussed.

  4. Characteristics modeling for supercritical circulating fluidized bed boiler working in oxy-combustion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balicki, Adrian; Bartela, Łukasz

    2014-06-01

    Among the technologies which allow to reduce greenhouse gas emission, mainly carbon dioxide, special attention deserves the idea of `zeroemission' technology based on boilers working in oxy-combustion technology. In the paper the results of analyses of the influence of changing two quantities, namely oxygen share in oxidant produced in the air separation unit, and oxygen share in oxidant supplied to the furnace chamber on the selected characteristics of a steam boiler including the degree of exhaust gas recirculation, boiler efficiency and adiabatic flame temperature, was examined. Due to the possibility of the integration of boiler model with carbon dioxide capture, separation and storage installation, the subject of the analysis was also to determine composition of the flue gas at the outlet of a moisture condensation installation. Required calculations were made using a model of a supercritical circulating fluidized bed boiler working in oxy-combustion technology, which was built in a commercial software and in-house codes.

  5. Two-Phase Model of Combustion in Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B; Bell, J

    2006-06-19

    A two-phase model for Aluminum particle combustion in explosions is proposed. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with the continuum mechanics laws of multi-phase media, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by the Khasainov model. Combustion is specified as material transformations in the Le Chatelier diagram which depicts the locus of thermodynamic states in the internal energy-temperature plane according to Kuhl. Numerical simulations are used to show the evolution of two-phase combustion fields generated by the explosive dissemination of a powdered Al fuel.

  6. A model for electron/ion recombination in ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, W.C.

    1988-05-01

    The recombination of free electrons and positive ions along charged particle tracks in gases has been modeled using electron tranport equations, which assume homogeneous distribution in the vicinity of the tracks. The equations include space charge terms, which have been negelected in previous models. A formula for the electron yield as a function of detector applied potential is obtained from a perturbation solution valid when the ratio of the Debye length to the charge column radius is larger then unity. When this ratio is very large, the formula reduces to that of previous models. Pulse height measurements in a /sup 3/He ionization chamber indicate 2% to 30% losses to recombination which vary with applied field, particle type, and energy. Using reasonable values for the electron transport coefficients, the calculated loss of signal to recommendation is generally in agreement with experiment, but the variation with applied bias is stronger in the experiment.

  7. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H J; Fisher, E M; Glaude, P-A; Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Flynn, P F; Durrett, R P; zur Loye, A O; Akinyemi, O C; Dryer, F L

    2000-01-11

    Emission standards for diesel engines in vehicles have been steadily reduced in recent years, and a great deal of research and development effort has been focused on reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. One promising approach to reducing emissions involves the addition of oxygen to the fuel, generally by adding an oxygenated compound to the normal diesel fuel. Miyamoto et al. [1] showed experimentally that particulate levels can be significantly reduced by adding oxygenated species to the fuel. They found the Bosch smoke number (a measure of the particulate or soot levels in diesel exhaust) falls from about 55% for conventional diesel fuel to less than 1% when the oxygen content of the fuel is above about 25% by mass, as shown in Figure 1. It has been well established that addition of oxygenates to automotive fuel, including both diesel fuel as well as gasoline, reduces NOx and CO emissions by reducing flame temperatures. This is the basis for addition of oxygenates to produce reformulated gasoline in selected portions of the country. Of course, this is also accompanied by a slight reduction in fuel economy. A new overall picture of diesel combustion has been developed by Dec [2], in which laser diagnostic studies identified stages in diesel combustion that had not previously been recognized. These stages are summarized in Figure 2. The evolution of the diesel spray is shown, starting as a liquid jet that vaporizes and entrains hot air from the combustion chamber. This relatively steady process continues as long as fuel is being injected. In particular, Dec showed that the fuel spray vaporizes and mixes with air and products of earlier combustion to provide a region in which a gas phase, premixed fuel-rich ignition and burn occurs. The products of this ignition are then observed experimentally to lead rapidly to formation of soot particles, which subsequently are consumed in a diffusion flame. Recently, Flynn et al. [3] used a chemical kinetic and

  8. A model for steady-state HNF combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L.; Brewster, M.Q.; Son, S.F.

    1997-09-01

    A simple model for the combustion of solid monopropellants is presented. The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: high activation energy, and low activation energy. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of the model are compared with experimental results of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF) combustion.

  9. A numerical model of combustion in gasless pyrotechnic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boddington, T.; Cottrell, A.; Laye, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    A simple numerical model has been developed for the propagation of a combustion wave through a gasless pyrotechnic mixture. A pseudo one-dimensional approach has been adopted in which an allowance for heat loss has been made by the inclusion of a simple Newtonian heat transfer term. Implementation requires a knowledge of the thermal and kinetic properties of the pyrotechnic mixture. The model reproduces the observed trends in burning velocity and predicts conditions leading to combustion failure.

  10. Kinetic data base for combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, W.; Herron, J.T.

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a set of evaluated rate constants for use in the simulation of hydrocarbon combustion. The approach has been to begin with the small molecules and then introduce larger species with the various structural elements that can be found in all hydrocarbon fuels and decomposition products. Currently, the data base contains most of the species present in combustion systems with up to four carbon atoms. Thus, practically all the structural grouping found in aliphatic compounds have now been captured. The direction of future work is the addition of aromatic compounds to the data base.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Film Cooling with Tangential Slot Injection in a LOX/CH4 Subscale Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Richard; Suslov, Dmitry I.; Haidn, Oskar J.

    Within the frame of a broader activity towards research into the application of methane in cryogenic liquid rocket engines, the efficiency of film cooling was studied in a LOX/CH4 fired subscale sized model combustor. Aiming at booster as well as upper stage applications, the combustion pressure levels have been varied between 4 MPa and 7 MPa. The effectiveness of the ambient temperature film was determined in axial and circumferential directions by measuring temperature gradients in the copper liner material. The experiments revealed remarkable circumferential differences of the film cooling efficiency which remain existent far downstream. However, circumferential film cooling varieties are more pronounced at close proximity of the point of film coolant injection.

  12. The study of PDF turbulence models in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1991-01-01

    The accurate prediction of turbulent combustion is still beyond reach for today's computation techniques. It is the consensus of the combustion profession that the predictions of chemically reacting flow were poor if conventional turbulence models were used. The main difficulty lies in the fact that the reaction rate is highly nonlinear, and the use of averaged temperature, pressure, and density produces excessively large errors. The probability density function (PDF) method is the only alternative at the present time that uses local instant values of the temperature, density, etc. in predicting chemical reaction rate, and thus it is the only viable approach for turbulent combustion calculations.

  13. Thermodynamic Model of Aluminum Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, . L

    2006-06-19

    Thermodynamic states encountered during combustion of Aluminum powder in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions were analyzed with the Cheetah code. Results are displayed in the Le Chatelier diagram: the locus of states of specific internal energy versus temperature. Accuracy of the results was confirmed by comparing the fuel and products curves with the heats of detonation and combustion, and species composition as measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Results were fit with analytic functions u = f(T) suitable for specifying the thermodynamic properties required for gas-dynamic models of combustion in explosions.

  14. Operating manual for coaxial injection combustion model. [for the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. D.; Schuman, M. D.; Chadwick, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    An operating manual for the coaxial injection combustion model (CICM) is presented as the final report for an eleven month effort designed to provide improvement, to verify, and to document the comprehensive computer program for analyzing the performance of thrust chamber operation with gas/liquid coaxial jet injection. The effort culminated in delivery of an operation FORTRAN IV computer program and associated documentation pertaining to the combustion conditions in the space shuttle main engine. The computer program is structured for compatibility with the standardized Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) performance evaluation procedure. Use of the CICM in conjunction with the JANNAF procedure allows the analysis of engine systems using coaxial gas/liquid injection.

  15. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  16. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to the increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations, and to provide guidance for the development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, and other pertinent factors. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bi- molecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, the effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and the effectiveness of active control schemes. The technique used in the model may also be valuable to understand oscillations in low NO{sub x} industrial burners.

  17. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  18. 'Bubble chamber model' of fast atom bombardment induced processes.

    PubMed

    Kosevich, Marina V; Shelkovsky, Vadim S; Boryak, Oleg A; Orlov, Vadim V

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning FAB mechanisms, referred to as a 'bubble chamber FAB model', is proposed. This model can provide an answer to the long-standing question as to how fragile biomolecules and weakly bound clusters can survive under high-energy particle impact on liquids. The basis of this model is a simple estimation of saturated vapour pressure over the surface of liquids, which shows that all liquids ever tested by fast atom bombardment (FAB) and liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were in the superheated state under the experimental conditions applied. The result of the interaction of the energetic particles with superheated liquids is known to be qualitatively different from that with equilibrium liquids. It consists of initiation of local boiling, i.e., in formation of vapour bubbles along the track of the energetic particle. This phenomenon has been extensively studied in the framework of nuclear physics and provides the basis for construction of the well-known bubble chamber detectors. The possibility of occurrence of similar processes under FAB of superheated liquids substantiates a conceptual model of emission of secondary ions suggested by Vestal in 1983, which assumes formation of bubbles beneath the liquid surface, followed by their bursting accompanied by release of microdroplets and clusters as a necessary intermediate step for the creation of molecular ions. The main distinctive feature of the bubble chamber FAB model, proposed here, is that the bubbles are formed not in the space and time-restricted impact-excited zone, but in the nearby liquid as a 'normal' boiling event, which implies that the temperature both within the bubble and in the droplets emerging on its burst is practically the same as that of the bulk liquid sample. This concept can resolve the paradox of survival of intact biomolecules under FAB, since the part of the sample participating in the liquid-gas transition via the bubble mechanism has an ambient temperature

  19. Up the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Scale to Demonstrate a Robust, Long Life, Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber, or...Up the Downstairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Advanced vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technology, utilized to successfully apply thermal barrier coatings to space shuttle main engine turbine blades, was further refined as a functional gradient material (FGM) process for space furnace cartridge experiments at 1600 C and for robust, long life combustion chambers for liquid rocket engines. A VPS/FGM 5K (5,000 lb. thrust) thruster has undergone 220 hot firing tests, in pristine condition, showing no wear, blanching or cooling channel cracks. Most recently, this technology has been applied to a 40K thruster, with scale up planned for a 194K Ares I, J-2X engine.

  20. Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustor performance. Parametric screening studies for the calculation of heat transfer in combustion chambers. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, W.

    1982-01-01

    The screening studies performed to identify those parameters most influencing the thermal performance of full-scale combustion chambers, such as those of industrial furnaces or utility boilers are presented. Special attention is given to pulverized-coal (p.f.) firing. The report consists basically of two parts. Part one deals with overall thermal behavior, expressed in terms of a furnace efficiency and a furnace exit temperature. In part two, local heat transfer, characterized by local temperature and heat flux distributions, is investigated. It is also shown how these local inhomogeneities may influence the overall performance. The screening studies are carried out analytically.

  1. Large eddy simulation modelling of combustion for propulsion applications.

    PubMed

    Fureby, C

    2009-07-28

    Predictive modelling of turbulent combustion is important for the development of air-breathing engines, internal combustion engines, furnaces and for power generation. Significant advances in modelling non-reactive turbulent flows are now possible with the development of large eddy simulation (LES), in which the large energetic scales of the flow are resolved on the grid while modelling the effects of the small scales. Here, we discuss the use of combustion LES in predictive modelling of propulsion applications such as gas turbine, ramjet and scramjet engines. The LES models used are described in some detail and are validated against laboratory data-of which results from two cases are presented. These validated LES models are then applied to an annular multi-burner gas turbine combustor and a simplified scramjet combustor, for which some additional experimental data are available. For these cases, good agreement with the available reference data is obtained, and the LES predictions are used to elucidate the flow physics in such devices to further enhance our knowledge of these propulsion systems. Particular attention is focused on the influence of the combustion chemistry, turbulence-chemistry interaction, self-ignition, flame holding burner-to-burner interactions and combustion oscillations. PMID:19531515

  2. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  3. Combustion model for staged circulating fluidized bed boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jianhua; Lu, Qinggang; Wang, Bo; Pan, Zhonggang; Wang, Dasan

    1997-03-01

    A mathematical model for atmospheric staged circulating fluidized bed combustion, which takes fluid dynamics, combustion, heat transfer, pollutants formation and retention, into account was developed in the Institute of Engineering Thermophysics (IET) recently. The model of gas solid flow at the bottom of the combustor was treated by the two-phase theory of fluidized bed and in the upper region as a core-annulus flow structure. The chemical species CO, CO2, H2, H2O, CH4, O2 and N2 were considered in the reaction process. The mathematical model consisted of sub-models of fluid namics, coal heterogeneous and gas homogeneous chemical reactions, heat transfer, particle fragmentation and attrition, mass and energy balance etc. The developed code was applied to simulate an operating staged circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler of early design and the results were in good agreement with the operating data. The main submodels and simulation results are given in this paper.

  4. On-line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Ferge, T; Maguhn, J; Hafner, K; Mühlberger, F; Davidovic, M; Warnecke, R; Zimmermann, R

    2005-03-15

    The emission of particulate matter and gaseous compounds during combustion of wood and refuse-derived fuel in a small batch reactor is investigated by laser mass-spectrometric on-line measurement techniques for gas-phase analysis and simultaneous registration of physical aerosol properties (number size distribution). The gas-phase composition is addressed by a laser-based mass spectrometric method, namely, vacuum-UV single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (VUV-SPI-TOFMS). Particle-size distributions are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. Furthermore, a photoelectric aerosol sensor is applied for detection of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The different phases of wood combustion are distinguishable by both the chemical profiles of gas-phase components (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH) and the particle-size distribution. Furthermore, short disturbances of the combustion process due to air supply shortages are investigated regarding their effect on particle-size distribution and gas-phase composition, respectively. It is shown that the combustion conditions strongly influence the particle-size distribution as well as on the emission of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:15819190

  5. 3-DIMENSIONAL Numerical Modeling on the Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Biodiesel in Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenming; An, Hui; Amin, Maghbouli; Li, Jing

    2014-11-01

    A 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling is conducted on a direct injection diesel engine fueled by biodiesel using multi-dimensional software KIVA4 coupled with CHEMKIN. To accurately predict the oxidation of saturated and unsaturated agents of the biodiesel fuel, a multicomponent advanced combustion model consisting of 69 species and 204 reactions combined with detailed oxidation pathways of methyl decenoate (C11H22O2), methyl-9-decenoate (C11H20O2) and n-heptane (C7H16) is employed in this work. In order to better represent the real fuel properties, the detailed chemical and thermo-physical properties of biodiesel such as vapor pressure, latent heat of vaporization, liquid viscosity and surface tension were calculated and compiled into the KIVA4 fuel library. The nitrogen monoxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) formation mechanisms were also embedded. After validating the numerical simulation model by comparing the in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate curves with experimental results, further studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of combustion chamber design on flow field, subsequently on the combustion process and performance of diesel engine fueled by biodiesel. Research has also been done to investigate the impact of fuel injector location on the performance and emissions formation of diesel engine.

  6. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Joel Meier; Mosbacher, David Matthew; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  7. Modeling the effects of auxiliary gas injection and fuel injection rate shape on diesel engine combustion and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Daniel Kelly

    1998-11-01

    The effect of auxiliary gas injection and fuel injection rate-shaping on diesel engine combustion and emissions was studied using KIVA a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics code. Auxiliary gas injection (AGI) is the injection of a gas, in addition to the fuel injection, directly into the combustion chamber of a diesel engine. The objective of AGI is to influence the diesel combustion via mixing to reduce emissions of pollutants (soot and NO x). In this study, the accuracy of modeling high speed gas jets on very coarse computational grids was addressed. KIVA was found to inaccurately resolve the jet flows near walls. The cause of this inaccuracy was traced to the RNG k - ɛ turbulence model with the law-of-the-wall boundary condition used by KIVA. By prescribing the lengthscale near the nozzle exit, excellent agreement between computed and theoretical jet penetration was attained for a transient gas jet into a quiescent chamber at various operating conditions. The effect of AGI on diesel engine combustion and emissions was studied by incorporating the coarse grid gas jet model into a detailed multidimensional simulation of a Caterpillar 3401 heavy-duty diesel engine. The effects of AGI timing, composition, amount, orientation, and location were investigated. The effects of AGI and split fuel injection were also investigated. AGI was found to be effective at reducing soot emissions by increasing mixing within the combustion chamber. AGI of inert gas was found to be effective at reducing emissions of NOx by depressing the peak combustion temperatures. Finally, comparison of AGI simulations with experiments were conducted for a TACOM-LABECO engine. The results showed that AGI improved soot oxidation throughout the engine cycle. Simulation of fuel injection rate-shaping investigated the effects of three injection velocity profiles typical of unit-injector type, high-pressure common-rail type, and accumulator-type fuel injectors in the Caterpillar 3401 heavy

  8. Modeling of Transient Flow Mixing of Streams Injected into a Mixing Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voytovych, Dmytro M.; Merkle, Charles L.; Lucht, Robert P.; Hulka, James R.; Jones, Gregg W.

    2006-01-01

    Ignition is recognized as one the critical drivers in the reliability of multiple-start rocket engines. Residual combustion products from previous engine operation can condense on valves and related structures thereby creating difficulties for subsequent starting procedures. Alternative ignition methods that require fewer valves can mitigate the valve reliability problem, but require improved understanding of the spatial and temporal propellant distribution in the pre-ignition chamber. Current design tools based mainly on one-dimensional analysis and empirical models cannot predict local details of the injection and ignition processes. The goal of this work is to evaluate the capability of the modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools in predicting the transient flow mixing in pre-ignition environment by comparing the results with the experimental data. This study is a part of a program to improve analytical methods and methodologies to analyze reliability and durability of combustion devices. In the present paper we describe a series of detailed computational simulations of the unsteady mixing events as the cold propellants are first introduced into the chamber as a first step in providing this necessary environmental description. The present computational modeling represents a complement to parallel experimental simulations' and includes comparisons with experimental results from that effort. A large number of rocket engine ignition studies has been previously reported. Here we limit our discussion to the work discussed in Refs. 2, 3 and 4 which is both similar to and different from the present approach. The similarities arise from the fact that both efforts involve detailed experimental/computational simulations of the ignition problem. The differences arise from the underlying philosophy of the two endeavors. The approach in Refs. 2 to 4 is a classical ignition study in which the focus is on the response of a propellant mixture to an ignition source, with

  9. KINETIC MODELING OF NOX FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION AND COMBUSTIBLES BURNOUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a model of the gas-phase chemistry involved in the combustion of simple hydrocarbon fuels and the interconversion of fixed nitrogen species. One focus of the work was on modeling the chemistry involved in reburning and other advanced NOx control strategies. A...

  10. Free surface modeling in OWC chamber with parabolic side walls using 3D BEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanabad, Madjid Ghodsi

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, BEM was used for free surface modeling in OWC chamber and out of it. Linear kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions were used for free surface out of OWC chamber and nonlinear forms were used for free surface in the chamber. These boundary conditions were discretized by finite differences method. Also, some thermodynamics relations were applied for trapped air behavior modeling in OWC chamber. Wave specifications in Chabahar region were used in modeling because these waves have an acceptable power for electricity generation. The results show a good agreement with results of other researches.

  11. Thermophysics Characterization of Kerosene Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2001-01-01

    A one-formula surrogate fuel formulation and its quasi-global combustion kinetics model are developed to support the design of injectors and thrust chambers of kerosene-fueled rocket engines. This surrogate fuel model depicts a fuel blend that properly represents the general physical and chemical properties of kerosene. The accompanying gaseous-phase thermodynamics of the surrogate fuel is anchored with the heat of formation of kerosene and verified by comparing a series of one-dimensional rocket thrust chamber calculations. The quasi-global combustion kinetics model consists of several global steps for parent fuel decomposition, soot formation, and soot oxidation and a detailed wet-CO mechanism to complete the combustion process. The final thermophysics formulations are incorporated with a computational fluid dynamics model for prediction of the combustion efficiency of an unielement, tripropellant combustor and the radiation of a kerosene-fueled thruster plume. The model predictions agreed reasonably well with those of the tests.

  12. Supercomputer modeling of hydrogen combustion in rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Altukhov, D. I.; Dushin, V. R.; Koo, Jaye

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen being an ecological fuel is very attractive now for rocket engines designers. However, peculiarities of hydrogen combustion kinetics, the presence of zones of inverse dependence of reaction rate on pressure, etc. prevents from using hydrogen engines in all stages not being supported by other types of engines, which often brings the ecological gains back to zero from using hydrogen. Computer aided design of new effective and clean hydrogen engines needs mathematical tools for supercomputer modeling of hydrogen-oxygen components mixing and combustion in rocket engines. The paper presents the results of developing verification and validation of mathematical model making it possible to simulate unsteady processes of ignition and combustion in rocket engines.

  13. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  14. STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-09-11

    Progress was made this period on a number of tasks. A significant advance was made in the incorporation of macrostructural ideas into high temperature combustion models. Work at OSU by R. Essenhigh in collaboration with the University of Stuttgart has led to a theory that the zone I / II transition in char combustion lies within the range of conditions of interest for pulverized char combustion. The group has presented evidence that some combustion data, previously interpreted with zone II models, in fact takes place in the transition from zone II to zone 1. This idea was used at Brown to make modifications to the CBK model (a char kinetics package specially designed for carbon burnout prediction, currently used by a number of research and furnace modeling groups in academia and industry). The resulting new model version, CBK8, shows improved ability to predict extinction behavior in the late stages of combustion, especially for particles with low ash content. The full development and release of CBK8, along with detailed descriptions of the role of the zone 1/2 transition will be reported on in subsequent reports. ABB-CE is currently implementing CBK7 into a special version of the CFD code Fluent for use in the modeling and design of their boilers. They have been appraised of the development, and have expressed interest in incorporating the new feature, realizing full CBK8 capabilities into their combustion codes. The computational chemistry task at OSU continued to study oxidative pathways for PAH, with emphasis this period on heteroatom containing ring compounds. Preliminary XPS studies were also carried out. Combustion experiments were also carried out at OSU this period, leading to the acquisition of samples at various residence times and the measurement of their oxidation reactivity by nonisothermal TGA techniques. Several members of the project team attended the Carbon Conference this period and made contacts with representatives from the new FETC Consortium

  15. Neural Transplantation Model Using Integration Co-culture Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimba, Kenta; Saito, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akimasa; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Regenerative medicine is a promising therapy for injuries and diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Implantation of stem cell-derived neurons into the recipient tissue is one of the key processes of the therapy. How the implanted cells establish functional connections with the intact neurons, and whether the established connections are maintained stably for a long time, remain unknown. Here, we report a novel co-culture device for visualizing interconnections between primary and differentiated neuronal cultures, and long-term monitoring of neuronal activity. A circular micro-chamber surrounded by another chamber is aligned on a microelectrode array (MEA). These chambers are interconnected through 36 micro-tunnels. Stem cell-derived neurons were cultured in the inner circular chamber, and primary neurons taken from mouse cortices were cultured in the surrounding chamber. Neurites outgrew into the micro-tunnels from both primary and differentiated neurons. The immunofluorescence images indicate that synaptic connections are formed between them. Propagation of electrical activity was observed 6 days after starting co-culture. More than half of the spontaneous activity was initiated from primary neurons, and probability of activity propagation to the stem cell-derived neurons gradually increased with culture days. These results suggest that our device is feasible for long-term monitoring of interaction between stem cell-derived cells and the recipient tissue.

  16. A Nonlinear Model for Fuel Atomization in Spray Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey (Technical Monitor); Ibrahim, Essam A.; Sree, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Most gas turbine combustion codes rely on ad-hoc statistical assumptions regarding the outcome of fuel atomization processes. The modeling effort proposed in this project is aimed at developing a realistic model to produce accurate predictions of fuel atomization parameters. The model involves application of the nonlinear stability theory to analyze the instability and subsequent disintegration of the liquid fuel sheet that is produced by fuel injection nozzles in gas turbine combustors. The fuel sheet is atomized into a multiplicity of small drops of large surface area to volume ratio to enhance the evaporation rate and combustion performance. The proposed model will effect predictions of fuel sheet atomization parameters such as drop size, velocity, and orientation as well as sheet penetration depth, breakup time and thickness. These parameters are essential for combustion simulation codes to perform a controlled and optimized design of gas turbine fuel injectors. Optimizing fuel injection processes is crucial to improving combustion efficiency and hence reducing fuel consumption and pollutants emissions.

  17. Modeling of combustion processes in a solid fuel particle

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    During the production of granules or uranium oxide, granules of ion-exchange resin, loaded with uranium ions, are burned to remove the resin matrix and leave a uranium oxide ''ash''. Under some conditions of combustion, the oxide granules are produced in a highly fractured, porous state, while other conditions result in hard, dense, solid granules. ABAQUS was used to model the physical processes occurring during combustion: heat transfer with a very non-linear temperature dependent rate of heat generation, diffusion of reactants and products, and stress/strain resulting from the differential temperatures and from the phase changes during the combustion. The ABAQUS simulation was very successful in explaining the differences in morphology of the granules under different conditions, and in leading to control strategies to produce the desired morphology. However, some of the limitations of ABAQUS prevented obtaining as accurate a simulation as desired. 10 figs.

  18. Modeling of combustion processes in a solid fuel particle

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    During the production of granules of uranium oxide, granules of ion exchange resin, loaded with uranium ions, are burned to remove the resin matrix and leave a uranium oxide ash''. Under some conditions of combustion, the oxide granules are produced in a highly fractured, porous state, while other conditions result in hard, dense, solid granules. ABAQUS, a commercial finite-element code, run on an IBM 3090, was used to model the physical processes occurring during combustion: heat transfer with a very nonlinear temperature-dependent rate of heat generation, diffusion of reactants and products, and stress/strain resulting from the differential temperatures and from the phase changes during the combustion. The ABAQUS simulation successfully explained the differences in morphology of the granules under different conditions, and lead to control strategies to produce the desired morphology. 10 figs.

  19. Geometric and number effect on damping capacity of Helmholtz resonators in a model chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Cha, J.-P.; Song, J.-K.; Ko, Y. S.

    2010-08-01

    An acoustic cavity was selected as a stabilization device to control high-frequency combustion instabilities in gas turbines or liquid rocket engine combustors, and the acoustic damping capacity of the acoustic cavity was investigated for various geometric configurations under atmospheric non-reacting conditions. The tuning frequency of the acoustic cavity and the acoustic responses of a model chamber with a single acoustic cavity were studied first. Damping capacity was initially quantified through the frequency width of two split modes and the amplitude-damped ratio. The results showed that the cavity with the largest orifice area or the shortest orifice length was the most effective in acoustic damping of the harmful resonant mode. The effect of the number of cavities on acoustic damping capacity was also studied. Damping capacity was improved by increasing the number of cavities. For a better evaluation of acoustic damping capacity, two quantified parameters; the acoustic absorption, meaning the damping efficiency, and acoustic conductance, meaning the acoustic power loss, were introduced. The case was observed that has had insufficient loss of acoustic power in spite of having the highest absorption efficiency. As a result, fine geometric tuning for the acoustic cavity is required for the sufficient passive control. Also, the choice of the number of cavities is important to optimize the damping efficiency and absolute damping loss in consideration of the restriction of the cavity volume.

  20. Numerical simulation and modeling of combustion in scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ryan James

    In the last fifteen years the development of a viable scramjet has quickly approached the following long term goals: responsive sub-orbital space access; long-range, prompt global strike; and high-speed transportation. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges that need to be resolved. These challenges include high skin friction drag and high heat transfer rates, inherent to vehicles in sustained, hypersonic flight. Another challenge is sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation and modeling was performed to provide insight into reducing skin friction drag and sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation was used to investigate boundary layer combustion, which has been shown to reduce skin friction drag. The objective of the numerical simulations was to quantify the effect of fuel injection parameters on boundary layer combustion and ultimately on the change in the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. A qualitative analysis of the results suggest that the reduction in the skin friction coefficient depends on multiple parameters and potentially an interaction between parameters. Sustained combustion can be achieved through a stabilized detonation wave. Additionally, stabilizing a detonation wave will yield rapid combustion. This will allow for a shorter and lighter-weight engine system, resulting in less required combustor cooling. A stabilized detonation wave was numerically modeled for various inlet and geometric cases. The effect of fuel concentration, inlet Mach number, and geometric configuration on the stability of a detonation wave was quantified. Correlations were established between fuel concentration, inlet speed, geometric configuration and parameters characterizing the detonation wave. A linear relationship was quantified between the fuel concentration and the parameters characterizing the detonation wave.

  1. Particle-Turbulence Interaction Model for Aluminum Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Calhoon, William; Tomes, Jeremy

    2011-06-01

    Particle-turbulence interactions will have a substantial impact on the performance of thermobaric explosives that rely on the particle combustion for secondary heat release. Modeling these interactions from a fundamental perspective is very difficult and intractable for large-scale problems of practical interest. Alternatively, these interactions may be modeled from a macroscopic perspective that seeks to account for the probability distribution function (PDF) of variables within the modeled laminar burning rate for the particulates. Such a formulation would account for the first order effect of turbulent fluctuations on the burning rate within a computationally affordable model. This paper will describe the development of such a model for aluminum particle combustion in both the diffusion and kinetic burning regimes. This formulation is based on an assumed PDF method that may be parameterized into a database that may be deployed within a flow solver. As a result, the formulation is computational efficient and affordable for large-scale simulations.

  2. LES Modeling of Oxy-combustion of Pulverized Coal: Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2009-12-01

    The paper presents preliminary results of pulverized coal combustion process modeling using Large Eddy Simulation. First the methodology for the testing of mesh resolution is presented. The combustion process was carried out using equilibrium model with single mixture fraction approach.

  3. Hydrogen program combustion research: Three dimensional computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.

    1995-05-01

    We have significantly increased our computational modeling capability by the addition of a vertical valve model in KIVA-3, code used internationally for engine design. In this report the implementation and application of the valve model is described. The model is shown to reproduce the experimentally verified intake flow problem examined by Hessel. Furthermore, the sensitivity and performance of the model is examined for the geometry and conditions of the hydrogen-fueled Onan engine in development at Sandia National Laboratory. Overall the valve model is shown to have comparable accuracy as the general flow simulation capability in KIVA-3, which has been well validated by past comparisons to experiments. In the exploratory simulations of the Onan engine, the standard use of the single kinetic reaction for hydrogen oxidation was found to be inadequate for modeling the hydrogen combustion because of its inability to describe both the observed laminar flame speed and the absence of autoignition in the Onan engine. We propose a temporary solution that inhibits the autoignition without sacrificing the ability to model spark ignition. In the absence of experimental data on the Onan engine, a computational investigation was undertaken to evaluate the importance of modeling the intake flow on the combustion and NO{sub x} emissions. A simulation that began with the compression of a quiescent hydrogen-air mixture was compared to a simulation of the full induction process with resolved opening and closing of the intake valve. Although minor differences were observed in the cylinder-averaged pressure, temperature, bulk-flow kinetic energy and turbulent kinetic energy, large differences where observed in the hydrogen combustion rate and NO{sub x} emissions. The flow state at combustion is highly heterogeneous and sensitive to the details of the bulk and turbulent flow and that an accurate simulation of the Onan engine must include the modeling of the air-fuel induction.

  4. Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2002-08-02

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  5. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  6. A comprehensive combustion model for biodiesel-fueled engine simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakora, Jessica L.

    Engine models for alternative fuels are available, but few are comprehensive, well-validated models that include accurate physical property data as well as a detailed description of the fuel chemistry. In this work, a comprehensive biodiesel combustion model was created for use in multi-dimensional engine simulations, specifically the KIVA3v R2 code. The model incorporates realistic physical properties in a vaporization model developed for multi-component fuel sprays and applies an improved mechanism for biodiesel combustion chemistry. A reduced mechanism was generated from the methyl decanoate (MD) and methyl-9-decenoate (MD9D) mechanism developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It was combined with a multi-component mechanism to include n-heptane in the fuel chemistry. The biodiesel chemistry was represented using a combination of MD, MD9D and n-heptane, which varied for a given fuel source. The reduced mechanism, which contained 63 species, accurately predicted ignition delay times of the detailed mechanism over a range of engine-specific operating conditions. Physical property data for the five methyl ester components of biodiesel were added to the KIVA library. Spray simulations were performed to ensure that the models adequately reproduce liquid penetration observed in biodiesel spray experiments. Fuel composition impacted liquid length as expected, with saturated species vaporizing more and penetrating less. Distillation curves were created to ensure the fuel vaporization process was comparable to available data. Engine validation was performed against a low-speed, high-load, conventional combustion experiments and the model was able to predict the performance and NOx formation seen in the experiment. High-speed, low-load, low-temperature combustion conditions were also modeled, and the emissions (HC, CO, NOx) and fuel consumption were well-predicted for a sweep of injection timings. Finally, comparisons were made between the results of biodiesel

  7. COMPENSATING FOR WALL EFFECTS IN IAQ (INDOOR AIR QUALITY) CHAMBER TESTS BY MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents mechanistic mathematical models that account for two phenomena: interior surfaces of a state-of-the-art emissions test chamber acting as a transient sink for organic emissions; the effect of increasing chamber concentration on the emission rate of the source. A...

  8. Chemical Looping Combustion System-Fuel Reactor Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Jung, J.; Anderson, R.R.; Soong, Y.

    2007-04-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a process in which an oxygen carrier is used for fuel combustion instead of air or pure oxygen as shown in the figure below. The combustion is split into air and fuel reactors where the oxidation of the oxygen carrier and the reduction of the oxidized metal occur respectively. The CLC system provides a sequestration-ready CO2 stream with no additional energy required for separation. This major advantage places combustion looping at the leading edge of a possible shift in strict control of CO2 emissions from power plants. Research in this novel technology has been focused in three distinct areas: techno-economic evaluations, integration of the system into power plant concepts, and experimental development of oxygen carrier metals such as Fe, Ni, Mn, Cu, and Ca. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase fluid dynamics modeling for CLC is not available in the open literature. Here, we have modified the MFIX code to model fluid dynamic in the fuel reactor. A computer generated movie of our simulation shows bubble behavior consistent with experimental observations.

  9. Develop an alternate energy source thru use of a poultry litter pelletizer and a combustion chamber to heat poultry houses. Final technical project report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, M.W.; Mercier, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Poultry litter in a pelletized form is an acceptable energy source. The machinery and mechanism to process the litter, the combustion chamber with supporting controls and equipment, is practical and marketable. The controlling factor is economic demand. With the price of fossil fuel diminishing and with the labor cost and energy cost to process the litter, it is not economically desirable to pay the equivalent of $1.50 per gallon. It would not be economically competitive with present heating power plants because of its high initial cost, the cost of labor to maintain a pellet supply and the undesirable feature of solid fuel versus liquid fuel. This system could not be fully competitive with present systems until fuel pric

  10. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Combustion of Automotive Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Silke, E J

    2006-11-10

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of fuels, including olefins and cycloalkanes used in diesel, spark-ignition and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate mixtures of hydrocarbon components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on production of emissions from practical automotive engines.

  11. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NO(x), and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model, and preliminary soot modeling results are described. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme was developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations were made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-value engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons were made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results were obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  13. Boiler using combustible fluid

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  14. Numerical modeling of LOX/methane impingement, evaporation, and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpal, Naimishkumar

    A computational fluid dynamics approach is used to model the impingement and subsequent combustion of LOX/LCH4 "green" propellants. The objective of this investigation is to assess the capabilities of current state-of-the-art CFD codes, here STAR-CCM+ v5.2, to model the associated multi-phase, multi-component, reacting flow field. The two multiphase methods, Volume of Fluid and Lagrangian Discrete Droplet, are evaluated to model the like-on-like and unlike doublet impingement configurations. Subsequently, droplet combustion simulation is performed in Lagrangian-Eulerian coupled framework using integrated models including Standard Eddy Break-Up combustion, quasi-steady evaporation, and RANS k-epsilon turbulence models. For an oxidizer-to-fuel ratio of3.4, flame temperatures of2880 K and 2670 K are predicted for two different kinds of Lagrangian injectors, point and cone, respectively, which, as expected, is less than the Chemical Equilibrium Analysis prediction of 3000 K. Besides recommendations in current methodology, an outline of modeling multi-species reaction in immiscible multiphase domain is presented.

  15. Modeling Interface Motion Of Combustion (MINOC). A computer code for two-dimensional, unsteady turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoneim, A. F.; Marek, C. J.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    A computer code for calculating the flow field and flame propagation in a turbulent combustion tunnel is described. The model used in the analysis is the random vortex model, which allows the turbulent field to evolve as a fundamental solution to the Navier-Stokes equations without averaging or closure modeling. The program was used to study the flow field in a model combustor, formed by a rearward-facing step in a channel, in terms of the vorticity field, the turbulent shear stresses, the flame contours, and the concentration field. Results for the vorticity field reveal the formation of large-scale eddy structures in the turbulent flow downstream from the step. The concentration field contours indicate that most burning occurred around the outer edges of the large eddies of the shear layer.

  16. A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorina, B.; Auzillon, P.; Darabiha, N.; Gicquel, O.; Veynante, D.; Vicquelin, R.

    2010-03-15

    A new modeling strategy called F-TACLES (Filtered Tabulated Chemistry for Large Eddy Simulation) is developed to introduce tabulated chemistry methods in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed combustion. The objective is to recover the correct laminar flame propagation speed of the filtered flame front when subgrid scale turbulence vanishes as LES should tend toward Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). The filtered flame structure is mapped using 1-D filtered laminar premixed flames. Closure of the filtered progress variable and the energy balance equations are carefully addressed in a fully compressible formulation. The methodology is first applied to 1-D filtered laminar flames, showing the ability of the model to recover the laminar flame speed and the correct chemical structure when the flame wrinkling is completely resolved. The model is then extended to turbulent combustion regimes by including subgrid scale wrinkling effects in the flame front propagation. Finally, preliminary tests of LES in a 3-D turbulent premixed flame are performed. (author)

  17. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion in cement rotary kiln

    SciTech Connect

    Shijie Wang; Jidong Lu; Weijie Li; Jie Li; Zhijuan Hu

    2006-12-15

    In this paper, based on analysis of the chemical and physical processes of clinker formation, a heat flux function was introduced to take account of the thermal effect of clinker formation. Combining the models of gas-solid flow, heat and mass transfer, and pulverized coal combustion, a set of mathematical models for a full-scale cement rotary kiln were established. In terms of commercial CFD code (FLUENT), the distributions of gas velocity, gas temperature, and gas components in a cement rotary kiln were obtained by numerical simulation of a 3000 t/d rotary kiln with a four-channel burner. The predicted results indicated that the improved model accounts for the thermal enthalpy of the clinker formation process and can give more insight (such as fluid flow, temperature, etc,) from within the cement rotary kiln, which is a benefit to better understanding of combustion behavior and an improvement of burner and rotary kiln technology. 25 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Modelling spontaneous combustion in wet lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Rose; Burnell, John G.; Wake, Graeme C.

    1999-06-01

    A model of self-heating of wet coal is presented. This involves coupled heat and mass transport within a coal pile, together with an exothermic reaction and phase changes of water. There are four state variables: temperature, oxygen, water vapour and liquid water concentrations. Heat and mass are conducted or diffused through the pile, while simultaneously undergoing chemical reaction. As demonstrated by experiment, the heat release rate depends in a quadratic fashion on the liquid water content and this feature is a distinctive aspect of the model. After development of the model, an illustrative spatially uniform model of just three state variables (temperature, oxygen and liquid water concentrations) is analysed for its bifurcational structure of steady states, periodic solutions and their stability. By this means, thresholds for the onset of ignition can be determined as a function of the physical and chemical parameters.

  19. Image-based flow modeling in a two-chamber model of the left heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Seo, Jung-Hee; Shoele, Kourosh; George, Richard; Younes, Laurent; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Computational modeling of cardiac flows has been an active topic of discussion over the past decade. Modeling approaches have been consistently improved by inclusion of additional complexities and these continue to provide new insights into the dynamics of blood flow in health and disease. The vast majority of cardiac models have been single-chamber models, which have typically focused on the left or right ventricles, and in these models, the atria are modeled in highly simplistic ways. However, the left atrium acts as a mixing chamber and works with the left ventricle in a highly coordinated fashion to move the blood from the pulmonary veins to the aorta. The flow dynamics associated with this two-chamber interaction is not well understood. In addition, the flow in the left atrium has by itself significant clinical implications and our understanding of this is far less than that of the left ventricle. In the current study, we use 4D CT to create a physiological heart model that is functionally normal and use an experimentally validated sharp-interface immersed boundary flow solver to explore the atrio-ventricular interaction and develop insights into some of the questions addressed above. This research is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through NSF Grants IOS-1124804 and IIS-1344772. Computational resources are provided in part through the NSF XSEDE grants TG-CTS100002 and TG-CTS130064.

  20. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    今村, 宰; 石川, 雄太; 鈴木, 俊介; 福本, 皓士郎; 西田, 俊介; 氏家, 康成; 津江, 光洋

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  1. Tissue Destruction Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in a Mouse Chamber Model Is Associated with Host Tumor Necrosis Factor Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuh-Yih; Huang, Jan-Hung; Lai, Yo-Yin; Huang, Han-Ching; Hu, Suh-Woan

    2005-01-01

    Intrachamber challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis strain 381 in a mouse subcutaneous chamber model results in a local infection that progresses to exfoliation of the chambers within 15 days. This study was designed to elucidate the contribution of host reactions to tissue destruction manifested by chamber exfoliation in animals infected with P. gingivalis. Chamber fluids showed increasing levels of prostaglandin E2 with infection, and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in chamber fluids peaked just before chamber exfoliation. Intraperitoneal injection of a TNF inhibitor, thalidomide (TH), reduced the number of exfoliated chambers, while indomethacin had no effect. Exogenous TNF in chambers without bacterial infection did not cause chamber exfoliation but induced neutrophil infiltration. In a dual-chamber model, two chambers were implanted in the same mouse. One chamber was infected with P. gingivalis, and 9 days later exogenous TNF was added to the other chamber. Altogether, 66.67% of uninfected chambers were exfoliated between day 11 and day 16, although no bacteria were recovered from uninfected chambers. TH treatment alleviated both infected and uninfected chamber exfoliation. In this study, tissue destruction caused by P. gingivalis 381 infection was due to the elevation of the TNF levels and not due to local bacterial activities. Our results further indicate that local infection by P. gingivalis 381, a nondisseminating strain, actually has systemic effects on the host pathological outcome. PMID:16299286

  2. Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Krishnasamy; Ra, youngchul; Reitz, Rolf; Bunting, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

  3. Performance and combustion modeling of heterogeneous charge engines

    SciTech Connect

    Primus, R.J.; Wong, V.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the phenomoneological modeling of the combustion processes for the diesel and fuel-injected stratified charge engines. Distinctions are made between phenomenological and multi-dimensional finite-difference approaches. The modeling methodologies and the basic components in these models are described. These include characterization of the fuel spray, fuel-air mixing, ignition, burning and heat transfer processes. An attempt is made in the paper to highlight the similarities and contrasts of various models and relate to their utility in addressing emission research and engine performance development objectives.

  4. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2008-04-02

    A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

  5. Concerning the problem of dynamic damping of the vibration combustion self-oscillations in a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basok, B. I.; Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2012-11-01

    The reason for the decrease in the amplitude of longitudinal vibration combustion self-oscillations in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine by means of antipulse partitions has been justified. A mathematical model of the development of combustion instability in such a chamber on attachment of a Helmholtz resonator to it has been obtained. The character of the damping of vibration combustion self-oscillations excited by the action of the Crocco mechanisms and negative thermal resistance, when varying the acoustic parameters of the resonator and of the pressure head characteristics of combustion chamber is established.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF THE FATE OF MERCURY IN A COAL COMBUSTION PLUME USING A STATIC PLUME DILUTION CHAMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis L. Laudal

    2001-11-01

    The overall goal of the project was to further develop and then verify SPDC's ability to determine the physical and chemical transformations of mercury in combustion stack plumes. Specific objectives of the project were to perform controlled tests at the pilot scale using dynamic spiking of known mercury compounds (i.e., Hg{sup 0} and HgCl{sub 2}) to prove the ability of the SPDC to determine the following: whether mercury condenses onto particulate matter in a cooling plume; whether there is reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} occurring in hygroscopic aerosols; whether condensed Hg{sup 2+} on particles is photochemically reduced to Hg{sup 0}; and whether or not the Solid Ontario Hydro mercury speciation method (SOH) provides the same results as the Ontario Hydro (OH) mercury speciation method.

  7. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Fluids Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is one of two racks in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. The FIR is dedicated to the scientific investigation of space system fluids management supporting NASA s Exploration of Space Initiative. The FIR hardware was modal tested and FIR finite element model updated to satisfy the International Space Station model correlation criteria. The final cross-orthogonality results between the correlated model and test mode shapes was greater than 90 percent for all primary target modes.

  8. Analytical model of the combustion of multicomponent solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Price, C. F.; Strand, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple flame models derived for simple composite propellants are extended to describe the combustion of propellants containing multimodal particle sizes, mixed oxidizers and monopropellant binders. Models combining the component contributions to propellant surface structure, flame structure and energy distribution are based in part upon experimental observations and in part upon hypotheses constrained to provide reasonable agreement with measured burning rate characteristics. The methods employed consist of superposition, interaction and iteration. The computerized model is applied to explain the effects of multiple ingredients and to discuss burning rate tailoring problems of current interest.

  9. Characterization and wall compatibility testing of a 40K pound thrust class swirl-coaxial injector and calorimeter combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, E. L.; Rozelle, R.; Borgel, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Subscale injector-combustor tests under the NASA Space Transportation Engine Thrust Chamber Technology program measured characteristic velocity (c-asterisk) efficiencies and wall heat fluxes for the pressure range 1710 psia to 2360 psia and for the overall O2/H2 mixture ratio range 5.5 to 6.4. Tests involving radially-uniform mixture ratio profiles produced c-asterisk efficiencies above 99 percent; nonuniform profiles associated with wall durability-enhancement schemes resulted in lower efficiencies. Though all three wall protection methods proved successful at reducing wall heat flux, scarfing of the outer-row, swirl-coaxial injection elements was the technique which resulted in the least debit in c-asterisk per unit reduction in heat flux.

  10. Modeling propellant combustion interacting with an eroding solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1980-05-06

    A computatonal model of turbulent combustion flow acting on and influenced by an eroding wall surface is introduced. The combustion flow field is particle laden. Significant particulate mass loading occurs in the immediate neighborhood of the wall as a result of erosion products issuing from the deteriorating solid surface. In addition, cases are considered in which a substantial particle mass loading develops near the wall as a result of finely divided (sub micron diameter) particulates such as TiO/sub 2/ and talcum powder which are added to suppress erosion. In addition to statistical turbulent field particle flow interaction, the model includes multi-component molecular diffusion processes, and gas phase, gas/surface and or solid surface chemical reactions. Results indicate that despite the unsteady flow conditions, a limiting erosion rate is approached. This occurs as a result of the effective blowing off of the issing vapor phase products. The blowing reduces the gradients driving the incident combustion heat and mass transfer. An analogy is drawn to unsteady, ablative, heat transfer and thermal/material response in hypersonic aerodynamics. Surfaces investigated, at present, include bare steel and refractory metal coated steel walls.

  11. Development of Supersonic Combustion Experiments for CFD Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, Robert; Bivolaru, Daniel; Tedder, Sarah; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an experiment to acquire data for developing and validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence in supersonic combusting flows. The intent is that the flow field would be simple yet relevant to flows within hypersonic air-breathing engine combustors undergoing testing in vitiated-air ground-testing facilities. Specifically, it describes development of laboratory-scale hardware to produce a supersonic combusting coaxial jet, discusses design calculations, operability and types of flames observed. These flames are studied using the dual-pump coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) - interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. This technique simultaneously and instantaneously measures temperature, composition, and velocity in the flow, from which many of the important turbulence statistics can be found. Some preliminary CARS data are presented.

  12. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  13. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  14. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    1990-01-01

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  15. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee; Wey, Ming-Jyh

    1990-01-01

    Two-dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  16. Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Colo, J; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C; Stanley, E.

    1997-09-24

    During the third quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made in the chemistry department at OSU on the calculation of thermodynamic properties for a number of model organic compounds. Modelling work was carried out at Brown to adapt a thermodynamic model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally applied to pitch carbonization, to the prediction of coke texture in coal combustion. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. This modelling approach shows promise for the mechanistic prediction of the rank dependence of char structure and will therefore be pursued further. Crystalline ordering phenomena were also observed in a model char prepared from phenol-formaldehyde carbonized at 900{degrees}C and 1300{degrees}C using high-resolution TEM fringe imaging. Dramatic changes occur in the structure between 900 and 1300{degrees}C, making this char a suitable candidate for upcoming in situ work on the hot stage TEM. Work also proceeded on molecular dynamics simulations at Boston University and on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at Ohio State.

  17. Progress in the development of PDF turbulence models for combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1991-01-01

    A combined Monte Carlo-computational fluid dynamic (CFD) algorithm was developed recently at Lewis Research Center (LeRC) for turbulent reacting flows. In this algorithm, conventional CFD schemes are employed to obtain the velocity field and other velocity related turbulent quantities, and a Monte Carlo scheme is used to solve the evolution equation for the probability density function (pdf) of species mass fraction and temperature. In combustion computations, the predictions of chemical reaction rates (the source terms in the species conservation equation) are poor if conventional turbulence modles are used. The main difficulty lies in the fact that the reaction rate is highly nonlinear, and the use of averaged temperature produces excessively large errors. Moment closure models for the source terms have attained only limited success. The probability density function (pdf) method seems to be the only alternative at the present time that uses local instantaneous values of the temperature, density, etc., in predicting chemical reaction rates, and thus may be the only viable approach for more accurate turbulent combustion calculations. Assumed pdf's are useful in simple problems; however, for more general combustion problems, the solution of an evolution equation for the pdf is necessary.

  18. Structure Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

    2000-12-30

    This unique collaborative project has taken a very fundamental look at the origin of structure, and combustion reactivity of coal chars. It was a combined experimental and theoretical effort involving three universities and collaborators from universities outside the U.S. and from U.S. National Laboratories and contract research companies. The project goal was to improve our understanding of char structure and behavior by examining the fundamental chemistry of its polyaromatic building blocks. The project team investigated the elementary oxidative attack on polyaromatic systems, and coupled with a study of the assembly processes that convert these polyaromatic clusters to mature carbon materials (or chars). We believe that the work done in this project has defined a powerful new science-based approach to the understanding of char behavior. The work on aromatic oxidation pathways made extensive use of computational chemistry, and was led by Professor Christopher Hadad in the Department of Chemistry at Ohio State University. Laboratory experiments on char structure, properties, and combustion reactivity were carried out at both OSU and Brown, led by Principle Investigators Joseph Calo, Robert Essenhigh, and Robert Hurt. Modeling activities were divided into two parts: first unique models of crystal structure development were formulated by the team at Brown (PI'S Hurt and Calo) with input from Boston University and significant collaboration with Dr. Alan Kerstein at Sandia and with Dr. Zhong-Ying chen at SAIC. Secondly, new combustion models were developed and tested, led by Professor Essenhigh at OSU, Dieter Foertsch (a collaborator at the University of Stuttgart), and Professor Hurt at Brown. One product of this work is the CBK8 model of carbon burnout, which has already found practical use in CFD codes and in other numerical models of pulverized fuel combustion processes, such as EPRI's NOxLOI Predictor. The remainder of the report consists of detailed technical

  19. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  20. Modeling and simulation of combustion dynamics in lean-premixed swirl-stabilized gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying

    state to an unstable state indicates that the inlet flow temperature and equivalence ratio are the two most important variables determining the stability characteristics of the combustor. Under unstable operating conditions, several physical processes responsible for driving combustion instabilities in the chamber have been identified and quantified. These processes include vortex shedding and acoustic interaction, coupling between the flame evolution and local flow oscillations, vortex and flame interaction and coupling between heat release and acoustic motions. The effects of inlet swirl number on the flow development and flame dynamics in the chamber are also carefully studied. In the last part of this thesis, an analytical model is developed using triple decomposition techniques to model the combustion response of turbulent premixed flames to acoustic oscillations.

  1. Complex Wall Boundary Conditions for Modeling Combustion in Catalytic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huayang; Jackson, Gregory

    2000-11-01

    Monolith catalytic reactors for exothermic oxidation are being used in automobile exhaust clean-up and ultra-low emissions combustion systems. The reactors present a unique coupling between mass, heat, and momentum transport in a channel flow configuration. The use of porous catalytic coatings along the channel wall presents a complex boundary condition when modeled with the two-dimensional channel flow. This current work presents a 2-D transient model for predicting the performance of catalytic combustion systems for methane oxidation on Pd catalysts. The model solves the 2-D compressible transport equations for momentum, species, and energy, which are solved with a porous washcoat model for the wall boundary conditions. A time-splitting algorithm is used to separate the stiff chemical reactions from the convective/diffusive equations for the channel flow. A detailed surface chemistry mechanism is incorporated for the catalytic wall model and is used to predict transient ignition and steady-state conversion of CH4-air flows in the catalytic reactor.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Combustion of a Mixture of Ultradisperse Aluminum Powder with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, A. Yu.; Krainov, D. A.; Poryazov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    The authors present a physicomathematical model of combustion of a mixed solid fuel in the form of a mixture of ultradisperse aluminum powder with gel-like water. The model takes account of the combustion of aluminum particles in steam, the motion of combustion products, and the lag of the velocity of motion of the particles behind that of the gas. The results of calculating the combustion rate are consistent with experimental data on the dependence of the rate of combustion of the mixture of ultradisperse aluminum powder with water on pressure.

  3. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this paper reviews new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions. PMID:21597604

  4. Assessment of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) - Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas Changju; Liu, Nan-suey

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementations of the linear-eddy model (LEM) and an Eulerian FDF/PDF model in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of turbulent combustion. The impacts of these two models, along with the so called laminar chemistry model, are then illustrated via the preliminary results from two combustion systems: a nine-element gas fueled combustor and a single-element liquid fueled combustor.

  5. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous flow model of spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C. P.; Szekely, G. A., Jr.; Faeth, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of spray combustion which employs a second-order turbulence model was developed. The assumption of locally homogeneous flow is made, implying infinitely fast transport rates between the phase. Measurements to test the model were completed for a gaseous n-propane flame and an air atomized n-pentane spray flame, burning in stagnant air at atmospheric pressure. Profiles of mean velocity and temperature, as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured in the flames. The predictions for the gas flame were in excellent agreement with the measurements. The predictions for the spray were qualitatively correct, but effects of finite rate interphase transport were evident, resulting in a overstimation of the rate development of the flow. Predictions of spray penetration length at high pressures, including supercritical combustion conditions, were also completed for comparison with earlier measurements. Test conditions involved a pressure atomized n-pentane spray, burning in stagnant air at pressures of 3, 5, and 9 MPa. The comparison between predictions and measurements was fair. This is not a very sensitive test of the model, however, and further high pressure experimental and theoretical results are needed before a satisfactory assessment of the locally homogeneous flow approximation can be made.

  6. Internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  7. Four-chamber heart modeling and automatic segmentation for 3D cardiac CT volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Barbu, Adrian; Scheuering, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2008-03-01

    Multi-chamber heart segmentation is a prerequisite for quantification of the cardiac function. In this paper, we propose an automatic heart chamber segmentation system. There are two closely related tasks to develop such a system: heart modeling and automatic model fitting to an unseen volume. The heart is a complicated non-rigid organ with four chambers and several major vessel trunks attached. A flexible and accurate model is necessary to capture the heart chamber shape at an appropriate level of details. In our four-chamber surface mesh model, the following two factors are considered and traded-off: 1) accuracy in anatomy and 2) easiness for both annotation and automatic detection. Important landmarks such as valves and cusp points on the interventricular septum are explicitly represented in our model. These landmarks can be detected reliably to guide the automatic model fitting process. We also propose two mechanisms, the rotation-axis based and parallel-slice based resampling methods, to establish mesh point correspondence, which is necessary to build a statistical shape model to enforce priori shape constraints in the model fitting procedure. Using this model, we develop an efficient and robust approach for automatic heart chamber segmentation in 3D computed tomography (CT) volumes. Our approach is based on recent advances in learning discriminative object models and we exploit a large database of annotated CT volumes. We formulate the segmentation as a two step learning problem: anatomical structure localization and boundary delineation. A novel algorithm, Marginal Space Learning (MSL), is introduced to solve the 9-dimensional similarity transformation search problem for localizing the heart chambers. After determining the pose of the heart chambers, we estimate the 3D shape through learning-based boundary delineation. Extensive experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the proposed approach, comparing favorably to the state-of-the-art. This

  8. What is Air? A Standard Model for Combustion Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    2001-08-01

    Most combustion devices utilize air as the oxidizer. Thus, reactive flow simulations of these devices require the specification of the composition of air as part of the physicochemical input. A mixture of only oxygen and nitrogen often is used, although in reality air is a more complex mixture of somewhat variable composition. We summarize some useful parameters describing a standard model of dry air. Then we consider modifications to include water vapor for creating the desired level of humidity. The ''minor'' constituents of air, especially argon and water vapor, can affect the composition by as much as about 5 percent in the mole fractions.

  9. Comparison of simplified models for nitramine propellant combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce Whitson, L.; Son, Steven Forrest

    2016-01-01

    Although 1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) are very similar molecularly and their burning rates as a function of pressure are nearly identical, it is well known that they differ significantly in temperature sensitivity, especially at low pressures. To understand these differences better, three simple models were applied to HMX and RDX combustion. Both the Denison-Baum-Williams and Li-Williams-Margolis models have previously been calibrated for use with RDX. However, the RDX calibration of the Ward-Son-Brewster model was developed in the present work. All three models were compared with relevant measured data including: burning rate, flame stand-off/thickness, combustion stability, and temperature sensitivity. It was shown that all models are capable of accurately determining the burning rate of HMX and RDX as a function of pressure at the baseline initial temperature, but only two of the models are capable of capturing the variation in temperature sensitivity for both HMX and RDX, and only one model can replicate all the other measured characteristics within experimental uncertainty. Analysis using this model suggests that the surface reaction of RDX is much less exothermic than HMX and that there is a shifting between the gas phase and surface reaction dominance with pressure for HMX. This explains why the temperature sensitivity for RDX is nearly flat for low pressures while the temperature sensitivity for HMX increases significantly as the pressure decreases. Importantly, these trends are achieved without adding significant model complexity or having parameters change with pressure or initial temperature.

  10. Numerical modeling of spray combustion with an advanced VOF method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Liaw, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the technical development and validation of a multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical method using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) model and a Lagrangian tracking model which can be employed to analyze general multiphase flow problems with free surface mechanism. The gas-liquid interface mass, momentum and energy conservation relationships are modeled by continuum surface mechanisms. A new solution method is developed such that the present VOF model can be applied for all-speed flow regimes. The objectives of the present study are to develop and verify the fractional volume-of-fluid cell partitioning approach into a predictor-corrector algorithm and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach by simulating benchmark problems including laminar impinging jets, shear coaxial jet atomization and shear coaxial spray combustion flows.

  11. The study of PDF turbulence models in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1991-01-01

    In combustion computations, it is known that the predictions of chemical reaction rates are poor if conventional turbulence models are used. The probability density function (pdf) method seems to be the only alternative that uses local instantaneous values of the temperature, density, etc., in predicting chemical reaction rates, and thus is the only viable approach for more accurate turbulent combustion calculations. The fact that the pdf equation has a very large dimensionality renders finite difference schemes extremely demanding on computer memories and thus impractical. A logical alternative is the Monte Carlo scheme. Since CFD has a certain maturity as well as acceptance, it seems that the use of a combined CFD and Monte Carlo scheme is more beneficial. Therefore, a scheme is chosen that uses a conventional CFD flow solver in calculating the flow field properties such as velocity, pressure, etc., while the chemical reaction part is solved using a Monte Carlo scheme. The discharge of a heated turbulent plane jet into quiescent air was studied. Experimental data for this problem shows that when the temperature difference between the jet and the surrounding air is small, buoyancy effect can be neglected and the temperature can be treated as a passive scalar. The fact that jet flows have a self-similar solution lends convenience in the modeling study. Futhermore, the existence of experimental data for turbulent shear stress and temperature variance make the case ideal for the testing of pdf models wherein these values can be directly evaluated.

  12. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework [1, 2, 3]. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick [4, 5]. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluates the gas flow inside of a SRM using St. Robert's law to model the solid propellant burn rate, no slip boundary conditions, and the hybrid outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are verified by comparing the pertinent ballistics parameters with the industry standard code outputs (i.e. pressure drop, thrust, ect.). These results are then used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the complex eigenvalues of the

  13. Combustion-gas recirculation system

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean

    2007-10-09

    A combustion-gas recirculation system has a mixing chamber with a mixing-chamber inlet and a mixing-chamber outlet. The combustion-gas recirculation system may further include a duct connected to the mixing-chamber inlet. Additionally, the combustion-gas recirculation system may include an open inlet channel with a solid outer wall. The open inlet channel may extend into the mixing chamber such that an end of the open inlet channel is disposed between the mixing-chamber inlet and the mixing-chamber outlet. Furthermore, air within the open inlet channel may be at a pressure near or below atmospheric pressure.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of the SiFRP Ablator for the Combustion Chamber Heat Shields of Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Kenichi

    To design the LOX/LNG ablative combustor, it is indispensable to build up the mathematical ablation model. In this paper, the mathematical model of SiFRP has been developed, which successfully predicts the penetration depth of both charred and decomposed zones and also the temperature profiles in the various kinds of experimental results which have been conducted to verify the model. Using this model, the peripheral-zone temperature profiles in the combustor, that is to say, combustor wall heat flux profiles, are estimated to reproduce the char penetration depth which has encountered in the ground firing tests, and the model has been successfully applied to design a LOX/LNG combustor.

  15. Validation of model based active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Fleifil, M.; Ghoneim, Z.; Ghoniem, A.F.

    1998-07-01

    The demand for efficient, company and clean combustion systems have spurred research into the fundamental mechanisms governing their performance and means of interactively changing their performance characteristics. Thermoacoustic instability which is frequently observed in combustion systems with high power density, when burning close to the lean flammability limit, or using exhaust gas recirculation to meet more stringent emissions regulations, etc. Its occurrence and/or means to mitigate them passively lead to performance degradation such as reduced combustion efficiency, high local heat transfer rates, increase in the mixture equivalence ratio or system failure due to structural damage. This paper reports on their study of the origin of thermoacoustic instability, its dependence on system parameters and the means of actively controlling it. The authors have developed an analytical model of thermoacoustic instability in premixed combustors. The model combines a heat release dynamics model constructed using the kinematics of a premixed flame stabilized behind a perforated plate with the linearized conservation equations governing the system acoustics. This formulation allows model based controller design. In order to test the performance of the analytical model, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing the system has been carried out using the principle of harmonic separation and focusing on the dominant unstable mode. This leads to a system of ODEs governing the thermofluid variables. Analytical predictions of the frequency and growth ate of the unstable mode are shown to be in good agreement with the numerical simulations as well s with those obtained using experimental identification techniques when applied to a laboratory combustor. The authors use these results to confirm the validity of the assumptions used in formulating the analytical model. A controller based on the minimization of a cost function using the LQR technique has

  16. A chemical kinetic modeling study of chlorinated hydrocarbon combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1990-09-05

    The combustion of chloroethane is modeled as a stirred reactor so that we can study critical emission characteristics of the reactor as a function of residence time. We examine important operating conditions such as pressure, temperature, and equivalence ratio and their influence on destructive efficiency of chloroethane. The model uses a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism that we have developed previously for C{sub 3} hydrocarbons. We have added to this mechanism the chemical kinetic mechanism for C{sub 2} chlorinated hydrocarbons developed by Senkan and coworkers. In the modeling calculations, sensitivity coefficients are determined to find which reaction-rate constants have the largest effect on destructive efficiency. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Kinetic Modeling of Combustion Characteristics of Real Biodiesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C V; Westbrook, C K

    2009-04-08

    Biodiesel fuels are of much interest today either for replacing or blending with conventional fuels for automotive applications. Predicting engine effects of using biodiesel fuel requires accurate understanding of the combustion characteristics of the fuel, which can be acquired through analysis using reliable detailed reaction mechanisms. Unlike gasoline or diesel that consists of hundreds of chemical compounds, biodiesel fuels contain only a limited number of compounds. Over 90% of the biodiesel fraction is composed of 5 unique long-chain C{sub 18} and C{sub 16} saturated and unsaturated methyl esters. This makes modeling of real biodiesel fuel possible without the need for a fuel surrogate. To this end, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed for determining the combustion characteristics of a pure biodiesel (B100) fuel, applicable from low- to high-temperature oxidation regimes. This model has been built based on reaction rate rules established in previous studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Computed results are compared with the few fundamental experimental data that exist for biodiesel fuel and its components. In addition, computed results have been compared with experimental data for other long-chain hydrocarbons that are similar in structure to the biodiesel components.

  18. CARS study of linewidths of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules at high temperatures in a pulsed high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M

    2005-03-31

    The results of measurements of individual line widths of the Q-branch of a hydrogen molecule and the corresponding coefficients of broadening caused by collisions with water molecules at T = 2700 K in a repetitively pulsed high-pressure (50-200 atm) hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber are presented. CARS spectra of individual Q{sub 1}-Q{sub 7} hydrogen lines, pressure pulses, and the broadband CARS spectra of the entire Q-branch of hydrogen are recorded simultaneously during a single laser pulse. The shape of line profiles was analysed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The temperature in the volume being probed was determined from the 'broadband' CARS spectra. The entire body of the experimental results gives information on the spectral linewidths, temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber during CARS probing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of an explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility outside the firing chamber must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation while the chamber door is open. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured to provide information for the final design. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic.

  20. High fidelity chemistry and radiation modeling for oxy -- combustion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Sater, Hassan A.

    To account for the thermal and chemical effects associated with the high CO2 concentrations in an oxy-combustion atmosphere, several refined gas-phase chemistry and radiative property models have been formulated for laminar to highly turbulent systems. This thesis examines the accuracies of several chemistry and radiative property models employed in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of laminar to transitional oxy-methane diffusion flames by comparing their predictions against experimental data. Literature review about chemistry and radiation modeling in oxy-combustion atmospheres considered turbulent systems where the predictions are impacted by the interplay and accuracies of the turbulence, radiation and chemistry models. Thus, by considering a laminar system we minimize the impact of turbulence and the uncertainties associated with turbulence models. In the first section of this thesis, an assessment and validation of gray and non-gray formulations of a recently proposed weighted-sum-of-gray gas model in oxy-combustion scenarios was undertaken. Predictions of gas, wall temperatures and flame lengths were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The temperature and flame length predictions were not sensitive to the radiative property model employed. However, there were significant variations between the gray and non-gray model radiant fraction predictions with the variations in general increasing with decrease in Reynolds numbers possibly attributed to shorter flames and steeper temperature gradients. The results of this section confirm that non-gray model predictions of radiative heat fluxes are more accurate than gray model predictions especially at steeper temperature gradients. In the second section, the accuracies of three gas-phase chemistry models were assessed by comparing their predictions against experimental measurements of temperature, species concentrations and flame lengths. The chemistry was modeled employing the Eddy

  1. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus; Zhang, Hongzhi R.; Kubo, Shuichi; Kim, Kyoung-Oh

    2009-06-15

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot

  2. MODELS AND STATISTICAL METHODS FOR GASEOUS EMISSION TESTING OF FINITE SOURCES IN WELL-MIXED CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper proposes two families of mathematical models to represent either the concentration of a gaseous emission in (or the accumulated amount exiting from) a well-mixed, environmentally controlled test chamber. A thin film model, which seems applicable to such sources as carpe...

  3. A model for the origin of large silicic magma chambers: precursors of caldera-forming eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, A. Mark; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-01-02

    The relatively low rates of magma production in island arcs and continental extensional settings require that the volume of silicic magma involved in large catastrophic caldera-forming (CCF) eruptions must accumulate over periods of 10(5) to 10(6) years. We address the question of why buoyant and otherwise eruptible high silica magma should accumulate for long times in shallow chambers rather than erupt more continuously as magma is supplied from greater depths. Our hypothesis is that the viscoelastic behavior of magma chamber wall rocks may prevent an accumulation of overpressure sufficient to generate rhyolite dikes that can propagate to the surface and cause an eruption. The critical overpressure required for eruption is based on the model of Rubin (1995a). An approximate analytical model is used to evaluate the controls on magma overpressure for a continuously or episodically replenished spherical magma chamber contained in wall rocks with a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology. The governing parameters are the long-term magma supply, the magma chamber volume, and the effective viscosity of the wall rocks. The long-term magma supply, a parameter that is not typically incorporated into dike formation models, can be constrained from observations and melt generation models. For effective wall-rock viscosities in the range 10(18) to 10(20) Pa s(-1), dynamical regimes are identified that lead to the suppression of dikes capable of propagating to the surface. Frequent small eruptions that relieve magma chamber overpressure are favored when the chamber volume is small relative to the magma supply and when the wall rocks are cool. Magma storage, leading to conditions suitable for a CCF eruption, is favored for larger magma chambers (>10(2) km(3)) with warm wall rocks that have a low effective viscosity. Magma storage is further enhanced by regional tectonic extension, high magma crystal contents, and if the effective wall-rock viscosity is lowered by microfracturing, fluid

  4. Spray Combustion Modeling with VOF and Finite-Rate Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Liaw, Paul; Wang, Ten-See

    1996-01-01

    A spray atomization and combustion model is developed based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) transport equation with finite-rate chemistry model. The gas-liquid interface mass, momentum and energy conservation laws are modeled by continuum surface force mechanisms. A new solution method is developed such that the present VOF model can be applied for all-speed range flows. The objectives of the present study are: (1) to develop and verify the fractional volume-of-fluid (VOF) cell partitioning approach into a predictor-corrector algorithm to deal with multiphase (gas-liquid) free surface flow problems; (2) to implement the developed unified algorithm in a general purpose computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), with droplet dynamics and finite-rate chemistry models; and (3) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach by simulating benchmark problems of jet breakup/spray atomization and combustion. Modeling multiphase fluid flows poses a significant challenge because a required boundary must be applied to a transient, irregular surface that is discontinuous, and the flow regimes considered can range from incompressible to highspeed compressible flows. The flow-process modeling is further complicated by surface tension, interfacial heat and mass transfer, spray formation and turbulence, and their interactions. The major contribution of the present method is to combine the novel feature of the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method and the Eulerian/Lagrangian method into a unified algorithm for efficient noniterative, time-accurate calculations of multiphase free surface flows valid at all speeds. The proposed method reformulated the VOF equation to strongly couple two distinct phases (liquid and gas), and tracks droplets on a Lagrangian frame when spray model is required, using a unified predictor-corrector technique to account for the non-linear linkages through the convective contributions of VOF. The discontinuities within the

  5. Thrust Chamber Modeling Using Navier-Stokes Equations: Code Documentation and Listings. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daley, P. L.; Owens, S. F.

    1988-01-01

    A copy of the PHOENICS input files and FORTRAN code developed for the modeling of thrust chambers is given. These copies are contained in the Appendices. The listings are contained in Appendices A through E. Appendix A describes the input statements relevant to thrust chamber modeling as well as the FORTRAN code developed for the Satellite program. Appendix B describes the FORTRAN code developed for the Ground program. Appendices C through E contain copies of the Q1 (input) file, the Satellite program, and the Ground program respectively.

  6. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of the Magma Chamber at Mount Hood (Oregon, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degruyter, W.; Huber, C.; Cooper, K. M.; Kent, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of shallow magma reservoirs is complex as new mass is added intermittently and phase proportions (crystals, melt and bubbles) vary because of cooling or mass removal (eruptions). One requirement for eruptions to occur is that the crystal content during storage is low enough (< 0.4-0.6) such that the magma is mobile. Thermal modeling and geochemical data suggest these chambers are mobile only a very small fraction of their lifetime. Data from uranium-series disequilibria, crystal size distributions, and zoning of trace elements in crystals collected at Mount Hood (Oregon, USA) provide constraints on the thermal evolution of this system over the past 21 kyrs years and suggest <10% of this time the magma was mobile. This system also produced at least 3 significant eruptions over the last 10 kyrs based on the stratigraphic record (~220 and ~1500, and ~7700 years ago). Here we investigate the physical conditions of an open-system magma chamber that are in agreement with the thermal history inferred from the crystal record and with the eruption sequence. What are the magma recharge fluxes that are required to keep a system such as Mount Hood active but predominantly crystal-rich over the last 21 kyrs and what combination of processes produces the observed eruption frequency? To answer these questions we use an idealized magma chamber model to solve for the evolution of the thermodynamical state of the chamber (pressure, temperature, gas and crystal content) as new magma is injected into the chamber. Heat is lost to the surrounding colder crust, which responds visco-elastically to the pressure accumulated during recharge and volatile exsolution. If the crystal volume fraction is lower than 0.5 and chamber overpressure reaches 20 MPa we assume an eruption occurs. We analyze what type of injection (constant, periodic, magma lensing), injection rate, and magma chamber volume yields trends consistent with the timescales found at Mount Hood.

  7. Composite propellant combustion modeling with a porous plate burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R. N.; Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    A burner is designed to model on a large scale (millimeters) the complex vapor phase processes that take place on awkwardly small scales (about a hundred microns) in the combustion of practical AP/ composite propellants at conventional pressures. Binder vapor evolution is modeled with gaseous fuel (ethane in the experiments reported) flow through a porous plate and oxidizer vapor with the flow of a gaseous oxidizer (air and enriched air in the experiments reported) through discrete holes in the porous plate. Measured flame standoff distance and surface temperature variations are consistent with theoretical predictions at atmospheric pressure. Data obtained at several atmospheres are discussed in the light of the current theories of propellant burning that place varying emphasis on the roles of chemical kinetics and fluid dynamic diffusion/mixing in the vapor phase of a burning composite propellant. The potential and proposed future applications of the burner are indicated.

  8. Low-frequency combustion oscillations in a model afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Macquisten, M.A.; Dowling, A.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Low-frequency combustion oscillations, involving the interaction between longitudinal acoustic waves and unsteady combustion, are investigated for a model afterburner. An experimental rig, in which a confined flame is stabilized in the wake of a conical gutter, is run with inlet conditions representative of an engine afterburner. Results are presented for inlet Mach numbers in the range of 0.15--0.27, with inlet temperatures up to 630 K. Comparison is made between theory and experiment. Although the theory was developed from low Mach number data, it is found to apply equally well at these faster flow rates. The theory is able to predict the frequency of the instability and the mode shape, accurately reproducing the changes due to variations in the inlet Mach number and temperature. The effect of altering the downstream boundary condition by replacing the open end by a choked nozzle is also investigated. Such a change is found to be highly destabilizing, both experimentally and theoretically. Again, predictions from the theory are in good agreement with the observations.

  9. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  10. Fluidized bed combustion of solid organic wastes and low-grade coals: Research and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Borodulya, V.A.; Dikalenko, V.I.; Palchonok, G.I.; Stanchits, L.K.

    1995-12-31

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate devolatilization and combustion of single spherical particles of wood, hydrolytic lignin from ethanol production, leather processing sewage sludge, and low-grade Belarusian brown coals in a fluidized bed of sand. A two-phase model of fluidized bed combustion of biowaste is proposed. The model takes into account combustion of both volatiles and char in the bed as well as in the freeboard. Experimentally obtained characteristics of devolatilization and char combustion are used as parameters of the model proposed.

  11. Thermal analysis simulation for a spin-motor used in the advanced main combustion chamber vacuum plasma spray project using the SINDA computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Gary H.

    1990-01-01

    One of the many design challenges of this project is predicting the thermal effects due to the environment inside the vacuum chamber on the turntable and spin motor spindle assembly. The objective of the study is to model the spin motor using the computer program System Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA). By formulating the appropriate input information concerning the motor's geometry, coolant flow path, material composition, and bearing and motor winding characteristics, SINDA should predict temperatures at various predefined nodes. From these temperatures, hopefully, one can predict if the coolant flow rate is sufficient or if certain mechanical elements such as bearings, O ring seals, or motor windings will exceed maximum design temperatures.

  12. A numerical model for coupling between atomization and spray dynamics in liquid rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method of coupling the atomization and spray combustion processes encountered in coaxial injection elements of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers. This method is based on the Jet-Embedding technique in which the liquid jet core equations and the gas phase equations are solved separately. The liquid and gas phase solutions, however, are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface between the phases. The computational grid for the gas phase calculations are adapted to the shape of the liquid jet core. The axial variation of droplet sizes are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet breakup. The predictions of this method have been validated with experimental data on low speed water jets. Using this method, calculations are performed for the SSME fuel preburner single injector flow field. The results obtained are in good agreement with the predictions of the volume-of-fluid method.

  13. MODELING OF AUTO EXHAUST SMOG CHAMBER DATA FOR EKMA DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generalized mechanism for photochemical smog has been developed. The mechanism is suitable for use in the Empirical Kinetics Modeling Approach (EKMA) to estimate the control of volatile organic compounds that is needed to achieve the National Ambient Air Quality Standard fo...

  14. Tissue Engineering Chamber Promotes Adipose Tissue Regeneration in Adipose Tissue Engineering Models Through Induced Aseptic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin− perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34−/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction. PMID:24559078

  15. Combustion particulate emissions in Africa: regional climate modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konare, A.; Liousse, C.; Guillaume, B.; Solmon, F.; Assamoi, P.; Rosset, R.; Gregoire, J. M.; Giorgi, F.

    2008-04-01

    Africa, as a major aerosol source in the world, plays a key role in regional and global geochemical cycles and climate change. Combustion carbonaceous particles, central in this context through their radiative and hygroscopic properties, require ad hoc emission inventories. These inventories must incorporate fossil fuels FF (industries, traffic,...), biofuels BF (charcoal, wood burning,... quite common in Africa for domestic use), and biomass burning BB regularly occurring over vast areas all over the African continent. This latter, subject to rapid massive demographic, migratory, industrial and socio-economic changes, requires continuous emission inventories updating, so as to keep pace with this evolution. Two such different inventories, L96 and L06 with main focus on BB emissions, have been implemented for comparison within the regional climate model RegCM3 endowed with a specialized carbonaceous aerosol module. Resulting modeled black carbon BC and organic carbon OC fields have been compared to past and present composite data set available in Africa. This data set includes measurements from intensive field campaigns (EXPRESSO 1996, SAFARI 2000), from the IDAF/DEBITS surface network and from MODIS, focused on selected west, central and southern African sub-domains. This composite approach has been adopted to take advantage of possible combinations between satellite high-resolution coverage of Africa, regional modeling, use of an established surface network, together with the patchy detailed knowledge issued from past short intensive regional field experiments. Stemming from these particular comparisons, one prominent conclusion is the need for continuous detailed time and spatial updating of combustion emission inventories apt to reflect the rapid transformations of the African continent.

  16. High speed OH-PLIF measurement of self-excited circumferential instabilities in an annular combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James

    2012-11-01

    Self-excited thermo-acoustic instabilities are a significant issue in the development of lean burn gas turbine combustors. Such instabilities arise through coupling of the unsteady heat release and acoustic waves, which can propagate both longitudinally and circumferentially in annular combustor geometries. Although a large number of studies have investigated longitudinal fluctuations in single axisymmetric flames, it is currently uncertain whether these results can be used to emulate circumferential oscillations in annular geometry. Therefore, the aim of the current project is to investigate the flame dynamics in an annular model gas turbine combustor during self-excited circumferential oscillations. Pressure measurements are used to characterise the circumferential oscillations, with high-speed OH chemiluminescence and OH-PLIF used to capture the flame dynamics. The flame structure and dynamics are significantly affected by both the proximity of neighbouring flames and the excitation mode; with different responses observed for small and large separation distances, and standing and spinning modes. These observations indicate that results from single flame investigations may only be representative of self-excited flames in annular geometry under in a limited set of conditions.

  17. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications.

    PubMed

    Golovitchev, Valeri I; Yang, Junfeng

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously. We compiled the liquid fuel properties, and the existing detailed mechanism of methyl butanoate ester (MB, C(5)H(10)O(2)) oxidation was supplemented by sub-mechanisms for two proposed fuel constituent components, C(7)H(16) and C(7)H(8)O (and then, by mp2d, C(4)H(6)O(2) and propyne, C(3)H(4)) to represent the combustion model for rapeseed methyl ester described by the chemical formula, C(19)H(34)O(2) (or C(19)H(36)O(2)). The main fuel vapor thermal properties were taken as those of methyl palmitate C(19)H(36)O(2) in the NASA polynomial form of the Burcat database. The special global reaction was introduced to "crack" the main fuel into its constituent components. This general reaction included 309 species and 1472 reactions, including soot and NO(x) formation processes. The detailed combustion mechanism was validated using shock-tube ignition-delay data under diesel engine conditions. For constant volume and diesel engine (Volvo D12C) combustion modeling, this mechanism could be reduced to 88 species participating in 363 reactions. PMID:19409477

  18. Incorporating advanced combustion models to study power density in diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel Michael

    A new combustion model is presented that can be used to simulate the diesel combustion process. This combustion process is broken into three phases: low temperature ignition kinetics, premixed burn and high temperature diffusion burn. The low temperature ignition kinetics are modeled using the Shell model. For combustion limited by diffusion, a probability density function (PDF) combustion model is utilized. In this model, the turbulent reacting flow is assumed to be an ensemble of locally laminar flamelets. With this methodology, species mass fractions obtained from the solution of laminar flamelet equations can be conditioned to generate a flamelet library. For kinetically limited (premixed) combustion, an Arrhenius rate is used. To transition between the premixed and diffusion burning modes, a transport equation for premixed fuel was implemented. The ratio of fuel in a computational cell that is premixed is used to determine the contribution of each combustion mode. Results show that this combustion model accurately simulates the diesel combustion process. Furthermore, the simulated results are in agreement with the recent conceptual picture of diesel combustion based upon experimental observations. Large eddy simulation (LES) models for momentum exchange and scalar flux were incorporated into the KIVA solver. In this formulation, the turbulent viscosity, μt, is determined as a function of the sub- grid turbulent kinetic energy, which is in turn determined from a one equation model. The formulation for the scalar transfer coefficient, μs, is similar to that of the turbulent viscosity, yet is made to be consistent with scalar transport. Test cases were run verifying that both momentum and scalar flux can be accurately predicted using LES. Once verified, these LES models were used to simulate the diesel combustion process for a Caterpillar 3400 series engine. Results for the engine simulations were in good agreement with experimental data.

  19. Outdoor smog chamber experiments to test photochemical models. Final report May 78-May 81

    SciTech Connect

    Feffries, H.E.; Kamens, R.M.; Sexron, K.G.; Gerhardt, A.A.

    1982-04-01

    The smog chamber facility of the University of North Carolina was used in a study to provide experimental data for developing and testing kinetic mechanisms of photochemical smog formation. The smog chamber, located outdoors in rural North Carolina, is an A-frame structure covered with Teflon film. Because the chamber is partitioned into two sections, each with a volume of 156 cu m, two experiments can be conducted simultaneously. The dual chamber is operated under natural conditions of solar radiation, temperature, and relative humidity. In this study, 115 dual all-day experiments were conducted using NOx and a variety of organic species. The organic compounds investigated included various paraffins, olefins, aromatics and oxygenates, both singly and in mixtures of two or more components. In this report the data collected over the three-year period of the study are described. The experimental procedures and analytical methods used in this study and the limitations and uncertainties of the data are discussed. Guidance for modeling of the data is also given, including a detailed discussion of how to estimate photolytic rate constants from the available UV and total solar radiation data and how to treat such chamber artifacts as dilution, wall sources and losses of pollutants, and reactivity of the background air.

  20. The Fluids and Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack and The Multi-User Droplet Combustion Apparatus: Microgravity Combustion Science Using A Modular Multi-User Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, T. F.; Myhre, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a multi-rack payload planned for the International Space Station that will enable the study of fluid physics and combustion science in a microgravity environment. The Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) is one of two International Standard Payload Racks of the FCF and is being designed primarily to support combustion science experiments. It is currently in the Flight Unit Build phase. The Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) is a multi-user facility designed to accommodate four different droplet combustion science experiments and is the first payload for CIR. MDCA is currently in the Engineering Model build phase. Launch of the CIR and MDCA is planned for 2004. The CIR will function independently until the later launch of the Fluids Integrated Rack component of the FCF. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities and the development status of the CIR and MDCA. The CIR will contain the hardware and software required to support combustion experiments in space. It will contain an optics bench, combustion chamber, fuel oxidizer and management assembly, exhaust vent system, diagnostic cameras, power, environment control system, command and data management system, and a passive rack isolation system. Additional hardware will be installed in the chamber and on the optics bench that is customized for each science investigation. The chamber insert may provide the sample holder, small ignition source, and small diagnostics such as thermocouples and radiometers. The combustion experiments that may be conducted in the FCF include, but are not limited to, the study of laminar flames, reaction kinetics, droplet and spray combustion, flame spread, fire and fire suppressants, condensed phase organic fuel combustion, turbulent combustion, soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and materials synthesis. It is expected that the facility will provide most of the hardware, with a small amount of unique hardware developed for

  1. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. This work builds upon previous efforts to verify the use of the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) laid out by Campos. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, del squared psi - (lambda/c) squared psi - M x [M x del((del)(psi))] - 2((lambda)(M)/c + M x del(M) x (del)(psi) - 2(lambda)(psi)[M x del(1/c)] = 0. with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and ? as the complex eigenvalue. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF

  2. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  3. Thermophysics Characterization of Kerosene Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2000-01-01

    A one-formula surrogate fuel formulation and its quasi-global combustion kinetics model are developed to support the design of injectors and thrust chambers of kerosene-fueled rocket engines. This surrogate fuel model depicts a fuel blend that properly represents the general physical and chemical properties of kerosene. The accompanying gaseous-phase thermodynamics of the surrogate fuel is anchored with the heat of formation of kerosene and verified by comparing a series of one-dimensional rocket thrust chamber calculations. The quasi-global combustion kinetics model consists of several global steps for parent fuel decomposition, soot formation, and soot oxidation, and a detailed wet-CO mechanism. The final thermophysics formulations are incorporated with a computational fluid dynamics model for prediction of the combustor efficiency of an uni-element, tri-propellant combustor and the radiation of a kerosene-fueled thruster plume. The model predictions agreed reasonably well with those of the tests.

  4. SOYCHMBR.I - A model designed for the study of plant growth in a closed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1982-01-01

    The analytical model SOYCHMBER.I, an update and alteration of the SOYMOD/OARDC model, for describing the total processes experienced by a plant in a controlled mass environment is outlined. The model is intended for use with growth chambers for examining plant growth in a completely controlled environment, leading toward a data base for the design of spacecraft food supply systems. SOYCHMBER.I accounts for the assimilation, respiration, and partitioning of photosynthate and nitrogen compounds among leaves, stems, roots, and potentially, flowers of the soybean plant. The derivation of the governing equations is traced, and the results of the prediction of CO2 dynamics for a seven day experiment with rice in a closed chamber are reported, together with data from three model runs for soybean. It is concluded that the model needs expansion to account for factors such as relative humidity.

  5. Spatial Analysis of Emissions Sources for HCCI Combustion at Low Loads Using a Multi-Zone Model

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Espinosa-Loza, F; Martinez-Frias, J; Dec, J E; Sjoberg, M; Dibble, R W; Hessel, R P

    2004-02-20

    We have conducted a detailed numerical analysis of HCCI engine operation at low loads to investigate the sources of HC and CO emissions and the associated combustion inefficiencies. Engine performance and emissions are evaluated as fueling is reduced from typical HCCI conditions, with an equivalence ratio f = 0.26 to very low loads (f = 0.04). Calculations are conducted using a segregated multi-zone methodology and a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for iso-octane with 859 chemical species. The computational results agree very well with recent experimental results. Pressure traces, heat release rates, burn duration, combustion efficiency and emissions of hydrocarbon, oxygenated hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide are generally well predicted for the whole range of equivalence ratios. The computational model also shows where the pollutants originate within the combustion chamber, thereby explaining the changes in the HC and CO emissions as a function of equivalence ratio. The results of this paper contribute to the understanding of the high emission behavior of HCCI engines at low equivalence ratios and are important for characterizing this previously little explored, yet important range of operation.

  6. Interactive computer modeling of combustion chemistry and coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computer code for simulation of a high-intensity turbulent combustor as a single point inhomogeneous stirred reactor was developed from an existing batch processing computer code CDPSR. The interactive CDPSR code was used as a guide for interpretation and direction of DOE-sponsored companion experiments utilizing Xenon tracer with optical laser diagnostic techniques to experimentally determine the appropriate mixing frequency, and for validation of CDPSR as a mixing-chemistry model for a laboratory jet-stirred reactor. The coalescence-dispersion model for finite rate mixing was incorporated into an existing interactive code AVCO-MARK I, to enable simulation of a combustor as a modular array of stirred flow and plug flow elements, each having a prescribed finite mixing frequency, or axial distribution of mixing frequency, as appropriate. Further increase the speed and reliability of the batch kinetics integrator code CREKID was increased by rewriting in vectorized form for execution on a vector or parallel processor, and by incorporating numerical techniques which enhance execution speed by permitting specification of a very low accuracy tolerance.

  7. Symposium (International) on Combustion, 18th, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1980-08-01

    This conference proceedings contains 196 papers. 181 papers are indexed separately. Topics covered include: combustion generated pollution; propellant combustion; fluidized bed combustion; combustion of droplets and spray; premixed flame studies; fire studies; flame stabilization; coal flammability; chemical kinetics; turbulent combustion; soot; coal combustion; modeling of combustion processes; combustion diagnostics; detonations and explosions; ignition; internal combustion engines; combustion studies; and furnaces.

  8. Characterization of Low-Frequency Combustion Stability of the Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Jones, Preston (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the combustion performance of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. During mainstage, the thrust chamber exhibited no large-amplitude chamber pressure oscillations that could be identified as low-frequency combustion instability or 'chug'. However, during start-up and shutdown, the thrust chamber very briefly exhibited large-amplitude chamber pressure oscillations that were identified as chug. These instabilities during start-up and shutdown were regarded as benign due to their brevity. Linear models of the thrust chamber and the propellant feed systems were formulated for both the thrust chamber component tests and the flight engine tests. These linear models determined the frequency and decay rate of chamber pressure oscillations given the design and operating conditions of the thrust chamber and feed system. The frequency of chamber pressure oscillations determined from the model closely matched the frequency of low-amplitude, low-frequency chamber pressure oscillations exhibited in some of the later thrust chamber mainstage tests. The decay rate of the chamber pressure oscillations determined from the models indicated that these low-frequency oscillations were stable. Likewise, the decay rate, determined from the model of the flight engine tests indicated that the low-frequency chamber pressure oscillations would be stable.

  9. Experimental investigation of a lightweight rocket chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgleish, John E; Tischler, Adelbert O

    1953-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a jacketed rocket combustion chamber that was fabricated by hydraulic-forming from sheet metal. Rocket combustion chambers made by this method have been used successfully. Runs with these combustion chambers have been made at over-all heat-transfer rates 1.7 Btu per square inch per second with water cooling and also ammonia as a regenerative coolant.

  10. Study on the potential of BML-approach and G-equation concept-based models for predicting swirling partially premixed combustion systems: URANS computations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.; Maltsev, A.; Sadiki, A.; Janicka, J.

    2008-03-15

    In this work the potential of two combustion modeling approaches (BML and G-equation based models) for partially premixed flames in combustion systems of various complexities is investigated using URANS computations. The first configuration consists of a nonconfined swirled premixed methane/air flame (swirl number 0.75) exhibiting partially premixed effects due to coflowing. The system is studied either in the isothermal case or in the reacting mode and for different thermal powers. The second configuration represents a model GT combustion chamber and features the main properties of real GT combustors: a confined swirled flow with multiple recirculation zones and reattachment points, resulting in a partially premixed methane/air aerodynamically stabilized flame and an additional diffusion flame formed by the fuel and oxidizer not consumed in the premixed flame. This makes it possible to subject the modeling to variation of different parameters, such as confinement, Re-number or flame power, or adiabatic or nonadiabatic conditions. For this purpose an extended Bray-Moss-Libby model and a G-equation-based approach, both coupled to the mixture fraction transport equation to account for partially premixed effects, are used following the so-called conditional progress variable approach (CPVA). The radiation effects are also taken into account. To account for the turbulence-chemistry interaction, a (multivariate) presumed PDF approach is applied. The results are compared with LDV, Raman, and PLIF measurements. Beyond a pure validation, the URANS is used to capture the presence of the precessing vortex core and to analyze the performance of different modeling strategies of partially premixed combustion in capturing the expansion ratio, species formation conditioned on the flame front, and flame front stabilization. It appears that the combustion models used are able to achieve plausible results in the complex combustion systems under study, while the BML-based model

  11. A model for eruption frequency of upper crustal silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degruyter, W.; Huber, C.

    2014-10-01

    Whether a magma body is able to produce eruptions and at what frequency remains a challenging problem in volcanology as it involves the nonlinear interplay of different processes acting over different time scales. Due to their complexity these are often considered independently in spite of their coupled nature. Here we consider an idealized model that focuses on the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the chamber (pressure, temperature, gas and crystal content) as new magma is injected into the chamber. The magma chamber cools in contact with the crust, which responds viscoelastically to the pressure accumulated during recharge and volatile exsolution. The magma is considered eruptible if the crystal volume fraction is smaller than 0.5. If a critical overpressure is reached, mass is released from the magma chamber until the lithostatic pressure is recovered. The setup of the model allows for rapid calculations that provide the opportunity to test the influence of competing processes on the evolution of the magma reservoir. We show how the frequency of eruptions depends on the timescale of injection, cooling, and viscous relaxation and develop a scaling law that relates these timescales to the eruption frequency. Based on these timescales we place different eruption triggering mechanisms (second boiling, mass injection, and buoyancy) in a coherent framework and evaluate the conditions needed to grow large magma reservoirs.

  12. The utility of diffusion chambers as models for the description of drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Ganzinger, U; Schiel, H; Georgopoulos, A; Gumhold, G

    1986-07-01

    Tissue cages were employed to explore the diffusion processes of several cephalosporins into extravascular fluids. Concentrations of cefotaxime in serum and in subcutaneous chambers increased proportionally to the amount of the drug injected. Administration of single equal doses of cephalothin, cephaloridine and cefotaxime resulted in different concentration-time courses in the serum and in diffusion chambers. These observations suggest that diffusion chambers are linked to the tissue at the implantation site. None of the classical compartmental approaches can be applied to evaluate the kinetics of drug diffusion into tissue cages. Correlations of total or non-protein bound drug concentrations in tissue cages to those in the peripheral compartment assumed concentration and time dependent diffusion processes. No specific diffusion constant based on the law of Fick could be derived for the diffusion chambers used in this study. Concentration-time courses in serum and interstitial fluid can be simultaneously evaluated according to pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models. Based on the equation describing the effect site this model can be used to simulate drug concentrations in tissue cages by varying the dose size or the dose interval. PMID:3759726

  13. Modeling of temperature fields in the working chamber of the process furnace for REE synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbel, B. M.; Yu, Ageev A.; Yu, Payusov A.; Katsnelson, L. M.; Tereshchenko, E. V.; Verkhoturova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of mathematical modeling of temperature fields in the working chamber of the process furnace for special purposes are shown. Studied laboratory furnace is test equipment, which is used for practicing the stages of the technological process of continuous solid-phase synthesis of nanopowders of various purpose, such as obtaining of luminophore powders with rare earth elements oxides in its composition. Mathematical model adequacy is tested empirically

  14. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout. PMID:23278063

  15. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout.

  16. Numerical modeling of combustion dynamics in a lean premixed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.M.; Smith, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a time-accurate, 2-D axi-symmetric CFD model to accurately predict combustion dynamics in a premixed pipe combustor driven by mixture feed variation. Independently measured data, including the magnitude and frequency of combustor pressure, were used to evaluate the model. The Smagorinsky, RGN k-{var{underscore}epsilon}, and molecular viscosity models were used to describe the subgrid turbulence, and a one-step, finite-rate reaction to equilibrium products model was used to describe the subgrid chemistry. Swirl source terms were included within the premix passage's computational domain and allowed the model to retain known boundary conditions at the choked flow inlet and the constant pressure exit. To ensure pressure waves were accurately captured, 1-D numerical analyses were first performed to assess the effects of boundary conditions, temporal and spatial differencing, time step, and grid size. It was found that the selected numerical details produced little numerical dissipation of the pressure waves. Then, 2-D axisymmetric analyses were performed in which the inlet temperature was varied. It was found that increases in the inlet temperature (keeping a constant mass flow rate) had a large effect on the unsteady combustor behavior since reaction and advection rates were increased. The correct trend of decreasing rms pressures with increasing inlet temperature was predicted. This agreement in rms pressure behavior supports the ability of the CFD model to accurately capture unsteady heat release and its coupling with resonant acoustic waves in multi-dimensional combustor systems. The effect of subgrid turbulence model was small for the unstable cases studied here.

  17. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of a 60-kg explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for, most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic. During tension, the reinforcing steel remained elastic, but the concrete elastic limit was exceeded in two areas, the center spans of the ceiling and the north wall, where elastic safety factors as low as 0.66 were obtained, thus indicating that the concrete would be expected to crack in those areas. Indeed, visual post-test inspection of those areas revealed tight cracks in the concrete.

  18. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation. PMID:26678825

  19. Computational Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  20. STRUCTURE-BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTOPHER M. HADAD; JOSEPH M. CALO; ROBERT H. ESSENHIGH; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-06-04

    During the past quarter of this project, significant progress continued was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made at OSU on advancing the application of computational chemistry to oxidative attack on model polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and graphitic structures. This work is directed at the application of quantitative ab initio molecular orbital theory to address the decomposition products and mechanisms of coal char reactivity. Previously, it was shown that the �hybrid� B3LYP method can be used to provide quantitative information concerning the stability of the corresponding radicals that arise by hydrogen atom abstraction from monocyclic aromatic rings. In the most recent quarter, these approaches have been extended to larger carbocyclic ring systems, such as coronene, in order to compare the properties of a large carbonaceous PAH to that of the smaller, monocyclic aromatic systems. It was concluded that, at least for bond dissociation energy considerations, the properties of the large PAHs can be modeled reasonably well by smaller systems. In addition to the preceding work, investigations were initiated on the interaction of selected radicals in the �radical pool� with the different types of aromatic structures. In particular, the different pathways for addition vs. abstraction to benzene and furan by H and OH radicals were examined. Thus far, the addition channel appears to be significantly favored over abstraction on both kinetic and thermochemical grounds. Experimental work at Brown University in support of the development of predictive structural models of coal char combustion was focused on elucidating the role of coal mineral matter impurities on reactivity. An �inverse� approach was used where a carbon material was doped with coal mineral matter. The carbon material was derived from a high carbon content fly ash (Fly Ash 23 from the Salem Basin Power Plant. The ash was obtained from Pittsburgh #8 coal (PSOC 1451). Doped

  1. A Two-Zone Multigrid Model for SI Engine Combustion Simulation Using Detailed Chemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Juneja, Harmit; Shi, Yu; Yang, Shiyou; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-01-01

    An efficient multigrid (MG) model was implemented for spark-ignited (SI) engine combustion modeling using detailed chemistry. The model is designed to be coupled with a level-set-G-equation model for flame propagation (GAMUT combustion model) for highly efficient engine simulation. The model was explored for a gasoline direct-injection SI engine with knocking combustion. The numerical results using the MG model were compared with the results of the original GAMUT combustion model. A simpler one-zone MG model was found to be unable to reproduce the results of the original GAMUT model. However, a two-zone MG model, which treats the burned and unburned regionsmore » separately, was found to provide much better accuracy and efficiency than the one-zone MG model. Without loss in accuracy, an order of magnitude speedup was achieved in terms of CPU and wall times. To reproduce the results of the original GAMUT combustion model, either a low searching level or a procedure to exclude high-temperature computational cells from the grouping should be applied to the unburned region, which was found to be more sensitive to the combustion model details.« less

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS MODEL FOR ACID RAIN ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses forecasts of industrial combustion emissions being developed by the U.S. EPA as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) Model will estimate sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and p...

  3. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  4. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Oxidizer-Rich Staged Combustion Injector Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Canino, J. V.; Heister, S. D.; Garrison, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the unsteady hydrodynamic characteristics of coaxial swirl atomizers of interest in oxidizer-rich staged combustion (ORSC) liquid rocket engines. To this end, the pseudo-density (homogeneous flow) treatment combined with the Marker-and-Cell (MAC) numerical algorithm has been used to develop an axisymmetric with swirl, two-phase, unsteady model. The numerical model is capable of assessing the time-dependent orifice exit conditions and internal mixing for arbitrary fuel and oxidizer gas injection conditions. Parametric studies have been conducted to determine the effect of geometry, gas properties, and liquid properties on the exit massflow rate and velocity. It has been found that the frequency at which the liquid film oscillates increases as the density ratio and thickness increase, decreases as film thickness and liquid swirl velocity increase, and is unaffected by the mixing length. Additionally, it has been determined that the variation in the massflow rate increases as the liquid swirl velocity and liquid film thickness increase, and decreases as the density ratio, collar thickness, and mixing length increase.

  5. Multi-dimensional modelling of gas turbine combustion using a flame sheet model in KIVA II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, W. K.; Lai, M.-C.; Chue, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A flame sheet model for heat release is incorporated into a multi-dimensional fluid mechanical simulation for gas turbine application. The model assumes that the chemical reaction takes place in thin sheets compared to the length scale of mixing, which is valid for the primary combustion zone in a gas turbine combustor. In this paper, the details of the model are described and computational results are discussed.

  6. Hypersonic combustion of hydrogen in a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Stalker, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported on shock-tunnel experiments testing the feasibility of hypersonic combustion and thrust generation in a hydrogen scramjet model. Tests with a constant-area duct show that hypersonic combustion is possible with a central injection at static intake pressures of about 20 kPa. The results of a comparison made between model configurations with nominal combustion-chamber intake Mach numbers of 4 and 6 indicated that the hypersonic duct gives a better performance at flight enthalpies above 7 mJ/kg. It is argued that the lower temperatures associated with hypersonic flow produce more efficient combustion.

  7. Longitudinal-Mode Combustion Instabilities: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion instabilities can lead to increased development time and cost for aeroengine gas turbines. This problem has been evident in the development of very-low emissions stationary gas turbines, and will likely be encountered in the newer, more aggressive aeroengine designs. In order to minimize development time and cost, it is imperative that potential combustion dynamics issues be resolved using analyses and smaller-scale experimentation. This paper discusses a methodology through which a problem in a full-scale engine was replicated in a single-nozzle laboratory combustor. Specifically, this approach is valid for longitudinal and "bulk" mode combustion instabilities. An explanation and partial validation of the acoustic analyses that were used to achieve this replication are also included. This approach yields a testbed for the diagnosis of combustion dynamics problems and for their solution through passive and active control techniques.

  8. Modeling aerosol emissions from the combustion of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roop, J. A.; Caldwell, D. J.; Kuhlmann, K. J.

    1994-01-01

    The use of advanced composite materials (ACM) in the B-2 bomber, composite armored vehicle, and F-22 advanced tactical fighter has rekindled interest concerning the health risk of burned or burning ACM. The objective of this work was to determine smoke production from burning ACM and its toxicity. A commercial version of the UPITT II combustion toxicity method developed at the University of Pittsburgh, and subsequently refined through a US Army-funded basic research project, was used to established controlled combustion conditions which were selected to evaluate real-world exposure scenarios. Production and yield of toxic species varied with the combustion conditions. Previous work with this method showed that the combustion conditions directly influenced the toxicity of the decomposition products from a variety of materials.

  9. Towards a consistent approach of measuring and modelling CO2 exchange with manual chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Vytas; Vaidya, Shrijana; Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Günther, Anke; Gundlach, Laura; Hagemann, Ulrike; Elsgaard, Lars; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Determining ecosystem CO2 exchange with the manual closed chamber method has been applied in the past for e.g. plant, soil or treatment on a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems. Its major limitation is the discontinuous data acquisation challenging any gap-filling procedures. In addition, both data acquisition and gap-filling of closed chamber data have been carried out in different ways in the past. The reliability and comparability of the derived results from different closed chamber studies has therefore remained unclear. Hence, this study compares two different approaches of obtaining fluxes of gross primary production (GPP) either via sunrise to noon or via gradually-shaded mid-day measurements of transparent chamber fluxes (i.e. net ecosystem exchange, NEE) and opaque chamber fluxes (i.e., ecosystem respiration, RECO) on a field experiment plot in NE Germany cropped with a lucerne-clover-grass mix. Additionally, we compare three approaches of pooling RECO data for consecutive modelling of annual balances of NEE, i.e. campaign-wise (single measurement day RECO models), seasonal-wise (one RECO model for the entire study period), and cluster-wise (two RECO models representing low-/high-vegetation-stage data) modelling. The annual NEE balances of the sunrise to noon measurements are insensitive towards differing RECO modelling approaches (-101 to -131 g C m‑2), whereas the choice of modelling annual NEE balances with the shaded mid-day measurements must be taken carefully (-200 to 425 g C m‑2). In addition, the campaign-wise RECO modelling approach is very sensitive to daily data pooling (sunrise vs. mid-day) and only advisable when the diurnal variability of CO2 fluxes and environmental parameters (i.e. photosynthetically active radiation, temperature) is sufficiently covered. The seasonal- and cluster-wise approaches lead to robust NEE balances with only little variation in terms of daily data collection. We therefore recommend sunrise to noon measurements

  10. Dynamic oxygenation measurements using a phosphorescent coating within a mammary window chamber mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorescent lifetime imaging was employed to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of oxygen partial pressure in tissue under the coverslip of a mammary window chamber breast cancer mouse model. A thin platinum-porphyrin coating, whose phosphorescent lifetime varies monotonically with oxygen partial pressure, was applied to the coverslip surface. Dynamic temporal responses to induced modulations in oxygenation levels were measured using this approach. PMID:25780753

  11. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials.

  12. A model of smoldering combustion applied to flexible polyurethane foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlemiller, T. J.; Rogers, F.; Bellan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Smoldering combustion, particularly in upholstery and bedding materials, has been proven a serious life hazard. The simplest representation of this hazard situation is one-dimensional downward propagation of a smolder wave against a buoyant upflow (cocurrent smolder); the configuration treated here is identical in all respects to this except for the presence of a forced flow replacing the buoyant one. The complex degradation chemistry of the polyurethanes is here reduced to the two major overall reactions of char formation and char oxidation. The model solutions, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results, show the smolder process to be oxygen-limited, which leads to some very simple trends. More subtle behavior aspects determine actual propagation velocity, fraction of fuel consumed, and apparent equivalence ratio (all of which are variable). The self-insulating character of the smolder wave makes it viable in a wide-ranging set of conditions if the igniting stimulus is sufficiently long. These results have significant implications regarding the problem of smolder prevention or hindrance.

  13. Heat regenerative external combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duva, Anthony W.

    1993-10-01

    A heat regenerative external combustion engine is disclosed. The engine includes fuel inlet means which extends along the exhaust passage and/or combustion chamber in order to preheat the fuel, To provide for preheating by gases in both the combustion chamber and the exhaust passage, the combustion chamber is arranged annularly around the drive shaft and between the cylinders. This configuration also is advantageous in that it reduces the noise of combustion. The engine of the invention is particularly well-suited for use in a torpedo.

  14. Engine Combustion Network Experimental Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Maintained by the Engine Combustion Department of Sandia National Laboratories, data currently available on the website includes reacting and non-reacting sprays in a constant-volume chamber at conditions typical of diesel combustion. The data are useful for model development and validation because of the well-defined boundary conditions and the wide range of conditions employed. A search utility displays data based on experimental conditions such as ambient temperature, ambient density, injection pressure, nozzle size, fuel, etc. Experiment-related visualizations are also available. (Specialized Interface)

  15. Study of radiation heat transfer and the temperature state in the combustion chambers of small-size gas-turbine engines (GTEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukash, V. P.

    1993-03-01

    The experimental data on the radiation flux surface density distribution in the combusion chamber of a small-size gas-turbine engine are presented. Experiments are made at elevated pressures and temperatures of the stagnated flow at the chamber inlet. Satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  16. Multiphase CFD-based models for chemical looping combustion process: Fuel reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jonghwun; Gamwo, I.K.

    2008-04-21

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a flameless two-step fuel combustion that produces a pure CO2 stream, ready for compression and sequestration. The process is composed of two interconnected fluidized bed reactors. The air reactor which is a conventional circulating fluidized bed and the fuel reactor which is a bubbling fluidized bed. The basic principle is to avoid the direct contact of air and fuel during the combustion by introducing a highly-reactive metal particle, referred to as oxygen carrier, to transport oxygen from the air to the fuel. In the process, the products from combustion are kept separated from the rest of the flue gases namely nitrogen and excess oxygen. This process eliminates the energy intensive step to separate the CO2 from nitrogen-rich flue gas that reduce the thermal efficiency. Fundamental knowledge of multiphase reactive fluid dynamic behavior of the gas–solid flow is essential for the optimization and operation of a chemical looping combustor. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase CFD-based models have not been adapted to chemical looping combustion processes in the open literature. In this study, we have developed the reaction kinetics model of the fuel reactor and implemented the kinetic model into a multiphase hydrodynamic model, MFIX, developed earlier at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Simulated fuel reactor flows revealed high weight fraction of unburned methane fuel in the flue gas along with CO2 and H2O. This behavior implies high fuel loss at the exit of the reactor and indicates the necessity to increase the residence time, say by decreasing the fuel flow rate, or to recirculate the unburned methane after condensing and removing CO2.

  17. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  18. Simulating Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, G.; Schwarz, C.; Stiesch, G.; Otto, F.

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be used as the engineers testbench following the rules and recommendations described here.

  19. Accuracy Quantification of the Loci-CHEM Code for Chamber Wall Heat Fluxes in a G02/GH2 Single Element Injector Model Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Westra, Doug; Lin, Jeff; Tucker, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A robust rocket engine combustor design and development process must include tools which can accurately predict the multi-dimensional thermal environments imposed on solid surfaces by the hot combustion products. Currently, empirical methods used in the design process are typically one dimensional and do not adequately account for the heat flux rise rate in the near-injector region of the chamber. Computational Fluid Dynamics holds promise to meet the design tool requirement, but requires accuracy quantification, or validation, before it can be confidently applied in the design process. This effort presents the beginning of such a validation process for the Loci- CHEM CPD code. The model problem examined here is a gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) shear coaxial single element injector operating at a chamber pressure of 5.42 MPa. The GO2/GH2 propellant combination in this geometry represents one the simplest rocket model problems and is thus foundational to subsequent validation efforts for more complex injectors. Multiple steady state solutions have been produced with Loci-CHEM employing different hybrid grids and two-equation turbulence models. Iterative convergence for each solution is demonstrated via mass conservation, flow variable monitoring at discrete flow field locations as a function of solution iteration and overall residual performance. A baseline hybrid grid was used and then locally refined to demonstrate grid convergence. Solutions were also obtained with three variations of the k-omega turbulence model.

  20. Accuracy Quantification of the Loci-CHEM Code for Chamber Wall Heat Transfer in a GO2/GH2 Single Element Injector Model Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Westra, Doug; Lin, Jeff; Tucker, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A robust rocket engine combustor design and development process must include tools which can accurately predict the multi-dimensional thermal environments imposed on solid surfaces by the hot combustion products. Currently, empirical methods used in the design process are typically one dimensional and do not adequately account for the heat flux rise rate in the near-injector region of the chamber. Computational Fluid Dynamics holds promise to meet the design tool requirement, but requires accuracy quantification, or validation, before it can be confidently applied in the design process. This effort presents the beginning of such a validation process for the Loci-CHEM CFD code. The model problem examined here is a gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) shear coaxial single element injector operating at a chamber pressure of 5.42 MPa. The GO2/GH2 propellant combination in this geometry represents one the simplest rocket model problems and is thus foundational to subsequent validation efforts for more complex injectors. Multiple steady state solutions have been produced with Loci-CHEM employing different hybrid grids and two-equation turbulence models. Iterative convergence for each solution is demonstrated via mass conservation, flow variable monitoring at discrete flow field locations as a function of solution iteration and overall residual performance. A baseline hybrid was used and then locally refined to demonstrate grid convergence. Solutions were obtained with three variations of the k-omega turbulence model.

  1. A hierarchical modeling approach to estimating soil trace gas fluxes from static chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, K.; Ryan, E.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.

    2014-12-01

    Static chambers are often employed to measure soil trace gas fluxes. Gas concentrations (C) in the headspace are sampled at different times (t), and for each group of chamber measurements, flux rates are frequently calculated as the slope of linear regressions of C versus t (ultimately, statistical analyses are performed with the flux rate "data"). While non-linear regressions are recognized to be more accurate than linear regressions, a trade-off with precision can arise due to variability in raw data leading to poor curve fits, and groups of data with too few observations or with poor regression fits (i.e., low R2) are often discarded. We solve these problems via a hierarchical Bayesian approach that fits a simple, dynamic non-linear model of C versus t based on Fick's law. Data are from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) study that involves manipulations of atmospheric CO2, temperature, soil moisture, and vegetation. CO2, CH4, and N2O gas samples were collected from static chambers bi-weekly during five growing seasons, resulting in >12,000 individual gas samples and >3100 groups of samples and associated fluxes. Using these data, we compare flux estimates from our non-linear model to those obtained from a linear model, and we evaluate the effect of conducting independent regressions for each group of samples versus simultaneously estimating the fluxes for all groups within a hierarchical framework motivated by the PHACE experimental design. The CO2 flux estimates from the hierarchical linear and non-linear models fit the observed CO2 data well (R2 = 0.97) and were highly correlated with each other (r = 0.99), but the linear model resulted in estimates that were ~10% lower than the non-linear model. The hierarchical versus non-hierarchical models also produced similar flux estimates (r = 0.94), but the non-hierarchical version yielded notably less precise estimates (the 95% CIs for its fluxes were 1-2 orders of magnitude wider that the hierarchical

  2. Gaseous Tracers in Receptor Modeling: Methyl - Emission from Wood Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgerton, Sylvia Anne

    The model and the statistical and experimental techniques for using gaseous species to trace sources of particulate air pollution are developed. The model is implemented in a simple environment and the results are compared with those obtained from the concurrent application of other models. In particular, measurements of elevated concentrations of the gas methyl chloride, CH(,3)Cl, in the Portland, Oregon area are used to quantify the contribution of residential wood combustion to fine particulate pollution. The method requires accurate measurements of the gas to aerosol ratios in the source emissions and knowledge of all sources contributing to the ambient concentrations of the gases. The source emission factors for the ratio of CH(,3)Cl to aerosol from woodburning are presented for different types of wood and burn conditions along with measurements of the background concentrations of CH(,3)Cl at both an urban and a remote global site. The advantages of using gaseous tracers to apportion the sources of particulate pollution include: (1) the continuous in situ monitoring which provides real time estimates of the source contributions and therefore of personal exposures, and (2) the inclusion of a gaseous species, such as CH(,3)Cl for woodburning, in the multicomponent Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model can help distinguish source contributions among sources with similar elemental characterizations. The results of using CH(,3)Cl to estimate the contribution of woodburning to particulate air pollution show that the evening, wintertime averaged concentrations of fine particles from woodburning ranges from 10 (mu)g/m('3) in a hilly, windy neighborhood to 50-73 (mu)g/m('3) in neighborhoods on low terrain subject to poor meteorological dispersion. Woodburning emissions may be a major cause of the nonattainment of air quality standards in many urban areas. The uncertainty of the woodburning contribution using CH(,3)Cl measurements is generally less than 30%. The

  3. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  4. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy; Kakwani, Ramesh M.; Valdmanis, Edgars; Woods, Melvins E.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Upset-Inducing Disturbances for Digital Systems in an Electromagnetic Reverberation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a modeling and simulation approach for disturbance patterns representative of the environment experienced by a digital system in an electromagnetic reverberation chamber. The disturbance is modeled by a multi-variate statistical distribution based on empirical observations. Extended versions of the Rejection Samping and Inverse Transform Sampling techniques are developed to generate multi-variate random samples of the disturbance. The results show that Inverse Transform Sampling returns samples with higher fidelity relative to the empirical distribution. This work is part of an ongoing effort to develop a resilience assessment methodology for complex safety-critical distributed systems.

  6. Comprehensive mechanisms for combustion chemistry: Experiment, modeling, and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F.L.; Yetter, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work are conducted in large diameter flow reactors, at pressures from one to twenty atmospheres, temperatures from 550 K to 1200 K, and with observed reaction times from 10{sup {minus}2} to 5 seconds. Gas sampling of stable reactant, intermediate, and product species concentrations provides not only substantial definition of the phenomenology of reaction mechanisms, but a significantly constrained set of kinetic information with negligible diffusive coupling. Analytical techniques used for detecting hydrocarbons and carbon oxides include gas chromatography (GC), and gas infrared (NDIR) and FTIR methods are utilized for continuous on-line sample detection of light absorption measurements of OH have also been performed in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR), and a variable pressure flow (VPFR) reactor is presently being instrumented to perform optical measurements of radicals and highly reactive molecular intermediates. The numerical aspects of the work utilize zero and one-dimensional pre-mixed, detailed kinetic studies, including path, elemental gradient sensitivity, and feature sensitivity analyses. The program emphasizes the use of hierarchical mechanistic construction to understand and develop detailed kinetic mechanisms. Numerical studies are utilized for guiding experimental parameter selections, for interpreting observations, for extending the predictive range of mechanism constructs, and to study the effects of diffusive transport coupling on reaction behavior in flames. Modeling using well defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H{sub 2}/oxidant systems.

  7. A Polyethylene Chamber for Use in Physical Modelling of the Heat Exchange on Surfaces Exposed to a Radiation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Maki; Okada, Masumi; Kusaka, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    Bodies located in outdoor environments are radiatively heated in the daytime and cooled at night. Convective heat transfer is subsequently activated between the body surface and the surrounding air. To investigate these heat-exchange processes, we developed a new apparatus, referred to as a "polyethylene chamber", for use in physical model experiments. The chamber is a 1.51-m-long tube with the ends serving as the air inlet and outlet, and is ventilated in the longitudinal direction by using an exhaust fan. The measurement section of the chamber is open but otherwise the device is covered with 0.02-mm-thick polyethylene film. Because such thin polyethylene film transmits approximately 85 % of both shortwave and longwave radiation, the model surface in the chamber is exposed to a radiation level almost equivalent to the outdoor radiation level. For example, at night the surface of the model is cooled by radiation, and subsequently, the air inside the chamber is cooled by the surface. Consequently, the outlet air temperature becomes lower than the inlet air temperature. The use of this temperature difference between the air inlet and outlet, together with other heat balance components, is a unique approach to the chamber technique for evaluating the heat exchange rate at a model's surface. This report describes the design and heat balance of the chamber, and compares the heat-balance-based approach with another approach based on the radiation-convection balance on the model surface. To demonstrate the performance of the polyethylene chamber, two chambers were exposed to outdoor radiation on a clear night; one contained a leaf model. Air and surface temperatures were measured and the convective heat flux at the surfaces of the model and floor surface were calculated from the heat balance components of the chambers by assuming steady-state heat transfer. The fluxes agreed closely with those obtained from the radiation-convection balance at the model or floor surface

  8. Beam Window for Pressure Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Austin, J. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Window resists products of combustion experiments. Sodium chloride window seals over chamber pressures from 0.1 to 13.8 MPa while absorbing minimal energy from CO2 laser beam that passes through it into chamber. Window inexpensive and easily replacable.

  9. Heat exchange model in absorption chamber of water-direct-absorption-typed laser energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Wei, Ji; Qun Sun, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hu, XiaoYang; Zhou, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between laser and water flow is very complicated in the absorption chamber of a high energy laser (HEL) energy meter which directly uses water as an absorbing medium. Therefore, the heat exchange model cannot be studied through traditional methods, but it is the most important factor to improve heat exchange efficiency in the absorption chamber. After the exchanges of heat and mass were deeply analyzed, experimental study and numerical fitting were brought out. The original testing data of laser power and water flow temperature at one moment were utilized to calculate those at the next moment, and then the calculated temperature curve was compared with the measured one. If the two curves matched well, the corresponding coefficient was obtained. Meanwhile, numerous experiments were performed to study the effects of laser power, duration, focal spot scale, and water flow rate on heat exchange coefficient. In addition, the relationship between water phase change and heat exchange was analyzed. The heat exchange coefficient was increased by optimizing the construction of the absorption chamber or increasing water flow rate. The results provide the reference for design of water-direct-absorption-typed HEL energy meters, as well as for analysis of the interaction between other similar lasers and water flow.

  10. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Peter M.

    2014-03-31

    The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecule’s structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecule’s structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of

  11. Dry low combustion system with means for eliminating combustion noise

    DOEpatents

    Verdouw, Albert J.; Smith, Duane; McCormick, Keith; Razdan, Mohan K.

    2004-02-17

    A combustion system including a plurality of axially staged tubular premixers to control emissions and minimize combustion noise. The combustion system includes a radial inflow premixer that delivers the combustion mixture across a contoured dome into the combustion chamber. The axially staged premixers having a twist mixing apparatus to rotate the fluid flow and cause improved mixing without causing flow recirculation that could lead to pre-ignition or flashback.

  12. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  13. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  14. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat; Naser, Jamal

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO2 emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can't model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  15. Experimental and kinetic modeling study of the combustion of Jet-A and S-8 fuels in laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiie, Takayuki

    Laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths of Jet-A/air, and S-8/air flames at an elevated initial temperature and various initial pressures were measured using spherically expanding premixed flames. The experimental facility has been developed to study the combustion behaviors of high-boiling-point and low-vapor-pressure liquid fuels. The experiment used a spherical combustion chamber housed inside a customized oven, which provides a uniform temperature distribution inside the chamber for fuel evaporation. Two different fuel injection systems -- the partial pressure method and the volume method, were used to measure the fuel to air ratio of the mixture, and the flame speeds from these methods were compared. There was large discrepancy in the flame speeds between the two methods for multi-component fuel, such as Jet-A. The measured flame speed data of Jet-A/air and S-8/air flames were compared to those by other researchers as well as numerical simulation results using several existing kinetic mechanisms and surrogate models. The results show that the flame speed data in present measurements were slightly lower than those by other researchers using the counterflow flame methods. Moreover, the results show the large discrepancies between present measured flame speed data and numerically calculated data. The Markstein lengths of heavy hydrocarbons including Jet-A and S-8 show that the value decreases as the equivalence ratio. The flame instabilities were observed for the flames with negative Markstein lengths. The pressure increase decreases the flame speeds throughout the stoichiometory. The pressure increase also decreases the Markstein lengths throughout the stoichiometory, and enhances the hydrodynamic instability on the flame.

  16. HCCI Combustion: Analysis and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador M. Aceves; Daniel L. Flowers; Joel Martinez-Frias; J. Ray Smith; Robert Dibble; Michael Au; James Girard

    2001-05-14

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work. On analysis, we have developed two powerful tools: a single zone model and a multi-zone model. The single zone model has proven very successful in predicting start of combustion and providing reasonable estimates for peak cylinder pressure, indicated efficiency and NOX emissions. This model is being applied to develop detailed engine performance maps and control strategies, and to analyze the problem of engine startability. The multi-zone model is capable of very accurate predictions of the combustion process, including HC and CO emissions. The multi-zone model h as applicability to the optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions to achieve controlled combustion at high efficiency and low emissions. On experimental work, we have done a thorough evaluation of operating conditions in a 4-cylinder Volkswagen TDI engine. The engine has been operated over a wide range of conditions by adjusting the intake temperature and the fuel flow rate. Satisfactory operation has been obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. Cylinder-to-cylinder variations play an important role in limiting maximum power, and should be controlled to achieve satisfactory performance.

  17. HCCl Combustion: Analysis and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Au, M; Girard, J

    2001-05-04

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work. On analysis, we have developed two powerful tools: a single zone model and a multi-zone model. The single zone model has proven very successful in predicting start of combustion and providing reasonable estimates for peak cylinder pressure, indicated efficiency and NOX emissions. This model is being applied to develop detailed engine performance maps and control strategies, and to analyze the problem of engine startability. The multi-zone model is capable of very accurate predictions of the combustion process, including HC and CO emissions. The multi-zone model has applicability to the optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions to achieve controlled combustion at high efficiency and low emissions. On experimental work, we have done a thorough evaluation of operating conditions in a 4-cylinder Volkswagen TDI engine. The engine has been operated over a wide range of conditions by adjusting the intake temperature and the fuel flow rate. Satisfactory operation has been obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. Cylinder-to-cylinder variations play an important role in limiting maximum power, and should be controlled to achieve satisfactory performance.

  18. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-03-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  19. An Integrated Model of Coal/Coke Combustion in a Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. S.; Guo, B. Y.; Yu, A. B.; Austin, P.; Zulli, P.

    2010-03-01

    A three-dimensional integrated mathematical model of the combustion of pulverized coal and coke is developed. The model is applied to the region of lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway-coke bed to simulate the operation of pulverized coal injection in an ironmaking blast furnace. The model integrates two parts: pulverized coal combustion model in the blowpipe-tuyere-raceway-coke bed and the coke combustion model in the coke bed. The model is validated against the measurements in terms of coal burnout and gas composition, respectively. The comprehensive in-furnace phenomena are simulated in the raceway and coke bed, in terms of flow, temperature, gas composition, and coal burning characteristics. In addition, underlying mechanisms for the in-furnace phenomena are analyzed. The model provides a cost-effective tool for understanding and optimizing the in-furnace flow-thermo-chemical characteristics of the PCI process in full-scale blast furnaces.

  20. Fluorescence and reflectance spectral imaging system for a murine mammary window chamber model

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hui Min; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    A spectral imaging system was developed to study the development of breast cancer xenografts in a murine mammary window chamber model. The instrument is configured to work with either a laser to excite fluorescence or a broadband light source for diffuse reflectance imaging. Two applications were demonstrated. First, spectral imaging of fluorescence signals was demonstrated with a GFP-breast cancer tumor and fluorescein injection. Second, based on the principles of broadband reflectance spectroscopy, the instrument was used to monitor dynamic changes of tissue absorbance to yield tissue oxygenation maps at different time points during tumor progression. PMID:26309753

  1. Fundamentals of Gas Turbine combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, M.

    1979-01-01

    Combustion problems and research recommendations are discussed in the areas of atomization and vaporization, combustion chemistry, combustion dynamics, and combustion modelling. The recommendations considered of highest priority in these areas are presented.

  2. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  3. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-07-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  4. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  5. A computer model for liquid jet atomization in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H. Q.; Ibrahim, E.; Chuech, S.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-12-01

    The process of atomization has been used as an efficient means of burning liquid fuels in rocket engines, gas turbine engines, internal combustion engines, and industrial furnaces. Despite its widespread application, this complex hydrodynamic phenomenon has not been well understood, and predictive models for this process are still in their infancy. The difficulty in simulating the atomization process arises from the relatively large number of parameters that influence it, including the details of the injector geometry, liquid and gas turbulence, and the operating conditions. In this study, numerical models are developed from first principles, to quantify factors influencing atomization. For example, the surface wave dynamics theory is used for modeling the primary atomization and the droplet energy conservation principle is applied for modeling the secondary atomization. The use of empirical correlations has been minimized by shifting the analyses to fundamental levels. During applications of these models, parametric studies are performed to understand and correlate the influence of relevant parameters on the atomization process. The predictions of these models are compared with existing experimental data. The main tasks of this study were the following: development of a primary atomization model; development of a secondary atomization model; development of a model for impinging jets; development of a model for swirling jets; and coupling of the primary atomization model with a CFD code.

  6. Stochastic modelling of turbulent combustion for design optimization of gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehanna Ismail, Mohammed Ali

    The present work covers the development and the implementation of an efficient algorithm for the design optimization of gas turbine combustors. The purpose is to explore the possibilities and indicate constructive suggestions for optimization techniques as alternative methods for designing gas turbine combustors. The algorithm is general to the extent that no constraints are imposed on the combustion phenomena or on the combustor configuration. The optimization problem is broken down into two elementary problems: the first is the optimum search algorithm, and the second is the turbulent combustion model used to determine the combustor performance parameters. These performance parameters constitute the objective and physical constraints in the optimization problem formulation. The examination of both turbulent combustion phenomena and the gas turbine design process suggests that the turbulent combustion model represents a crucial part of the optimization algorithm. The basic requirements needed for a turbulent combustion model to be successfully used in a practical optimization algorithm are discussed. In principle, the combustion model should comply with the conflicting requirements of high fidelity, robustness and computational efficiency. To that end, the problem of turbulent combustion is discussed and the current state of the art of turbulent combustion modelling is reviewed. According to this review, turbulent combustion models based on the composition PDF transport equation are found to be good candidates for application in the present context. However, these models are computationally expensive. To overcome this difficulty, two different models based on the composition PDF transport equation were developed: an improved Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF algorithm and the generalized stochastic reactor model. Improvements in the Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF model performance and its computational efficiency were achieved through the

  7. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation [Ref 1]. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet

  8. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara A.; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet conduction as

  9. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, G.; Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G.; Soria, J.

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, R. D.; Rutland, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer code (KIVA) is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion: spray atomization, drop breakup/coalescence, multi-component fuel vaporization, spray/wall interaction, ignition and combustion, wall heat transfer, unburned HC and NOx formation, soot and radiation, and the intake flow process. Improved and/or new submodels which were completed are: wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo'vich NOx, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Results to date show that adding the effects of unsteadiness and compressibility improves the accuracy of heat transfer predictions; spray drop rebound can occur from walls at low impingement velocities (e.g., in cold-starting); larger spray drops are formed at the nozzle due to the influence of vaporization on the atomization process; a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model has the flexibility to match measured engine combustion data over a wide range of operating conditions; and finally, the characteristic time combustion model can also be extended to allow predictions of ignition. The accuracy of the predictions is being assessed by comparisons with available measurements. Additional supporting experiments are also described briefly. To date, comparisons with measured engine cylinder pressure and heat flux data were made for homogeneous charge, spark-ignited and compression-ignited engines. The model results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  11. Combustion physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  12. Reduced model for combustion of a small biomass particle at high operating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Y; van Oijen, J A; de Goey, L P H

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate a model for a spherical biomass particle combusting at high temperatures with reduced number of variables. The model is based on the observation that combustion of a small particle includes three main phases: heating up, pyrolysis, and char conversion. It is assumed that the pyrolysis begins as soon as the particle surface attains a pyrolysis temperature, yielding a char front, moving towards the center of particle as time passes. The formulation of the heating up and pyrolysis phases is based on an integral method which allows describing the energy conservation with an ordinary differential equation. The char combustion model is according to the shrinking core approximation. Model validation is carried out by comparing the predictions with experiments of sawdust particles taken from the literature, and with computations of partial differential equation-based models. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the predictions and experimental data. PMID:23376204

  13. Study of ignition, combustion, and production of harmful substances upon burning solid organic fuel at a test bench with a vortex chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukov, A. P.; Chernetskiy, M. Yu.; Dekterev, A. A.; Anufriev, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Greben'kov, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Results of investigation of furnace processes upon burning of pulverized fuel at a test bench with a power of 5 MW are presented. The test bench consists of two stages with tangential air and pulverized coal feed, and it is equipped by a vibrocentrifugal mill and a disintegrator. Such milling devices have an intensive mechanical impact on solid organic fuel, which, in a number of cases, increases the reactivity of ground material. The processes of ignition and stable combustion of a mixture of gas coal and sludge (wastes of concentration plant), as well as Ekibastus coal, ground in the disintegrator, were studied at the test bench. The results of experimental burning demonstrated that preliminary fuel grinding in the disintegrator provides autothermal combustion mode even for hardly inflammable organic fuels. Experimental combustion of biomass, wheat straw with different lignin content (18, 30, 60%) after grinding in the disintegrator, was performed at the test bench in order to determine the possibility of supporting stable autothermal burning. Stable biofuel combustion mode without lighting by highly reactive fuel was achieved in the experiments. The influence of the additive GTS-Powder (L.O.M. Leaders Co., Ltd., Republic of Korea) in the solid and liquid state on reducing sulfur oxide production upon burning Mugun coal was studied. The results of experimental combustion testify that, for an additive concentration from 1 to 15% of the total mass of the burned mixture, the maximum SO2 concentration reduction in ejected gases was not more than 18% with respect to the amount for the case of burning pure coal.

  14. Modeling and dynamic properties of dual-chamber solid and liquid mixture vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F. S.; Chen, Q.; Zhou, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    The dual-chamber solid and liquid mixture (SALiM) vibration isolator, mainly proposed for vibration isolation of heavy machines with low frequency, consists of four principle parts: SALiM working media including elastic elements and incompressible oil, multi-layers bellows container, rigid reservoir and the oil tube connecting the two vessels. The isolation system under study is governed by a two-degrees-of-freedom (2-DOF) nonlinear equation including quadratic damping. Simplifying the nonlinear damping into viscous damping, the equivalent stiffness and damping model is derived from the equation for the response amplitude. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation reveal that the isolator's stiffness and damping have multiple properties with different parameters, among which the effects of exciting frequency, vibrating amplitude, quadratic damping coefficient and equivalent stiffness of the two chambers on the isolator's dynamics are discussed in depth. Based on the boundary characteristics of stiffness and damping and the main causes for stiffness hardening effect, improvement strategies are proposed to obtain better dynamic properties. At last, experiments were implemented and the test results were generally consistent with the theoretical ones, which verified the reliability of the nonlinear dynamic model.

  15. Simulated Altitude Investigation of Stewart-Warner Model 906-B Combustion Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersbach, Frederick R.; Cervenka, Adolph J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine thermal and pressure-drop performance and the operational characteristics of a Stewart-Warner model 906-B combustion heater. The performance tests covered a range of ventilating-air flows from 500 to 3185 pounds per hour, combustion-air pressure drops from 5 to 35 inches of water, and pressure altitudes from sea level to 41,000 feet. The operational characteristics investigated were the combustion-air flows for sustained combustion and for consistent ignition covering fuel-air ratios ranging from 0.033 to 0.10 and pressure altitudes from sea level to 45,000 feet. Rated heat output of 50,000 Btu per hour was obtained at pressure altitudes up to 27,000 feet for ventilating-air flows greater than 800 pounds per hour; rated output was not obtained at ventilating-air flow below 800 pounds per hour at any altitude. The maximum heater efficiency was found to be 60.7 percent at a fuel-air ratio of 0.050, a sea-level pressure altitude, a ventilating-air temperature of 0 F, combustion-air temperature of 14 F, a ventilating-air flow of 690 pounds per hour, and a combustion-air flow of 72.7 pounds per hour. The minimum combustion-air flow for sustained combustion at a pressure altitude of 25,000 feet was about 9 pounds per hour for fuel-air ratios between 0.037 and 0.099 and at a pressure altitude of 45,000 feet increased to 18 pounds per hour at a fuel-air ratio of 0.099 and 55 pounds per hour at a fuel-air ratio of 0.036. Combustion could be sustained at combustion-air flows above values of practical interest. The maximum flow was limited, however, by excessively high exhaust-gas temperature or high pressure drop. Both maximum and minimum combustion-air flows for consistent ignition decrease with increasing pressure altitude and the two curves intersect at a pressure altitude of approximately 25,000 feet and a combustion-air flow of approximately 28 pounds per hour.

  16. Automated modeling of ecosystem CO2 fluxes based on closed chamber measurements: A standardized conceptual and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements are widely used for determining the CO2 exchange of small-scale or heterogeneous ecosystems. Among the chamber design and operational handling, the data processing procedure is a considerable source of uncertainty of obtained results. We developed a standardized automatic data processing algorithm, based on the language and statistical computing environment R© to (i) calculate measured CO2 flux rates, (ii) parameterize ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP) models, (iii) optionally compute an adaptive temperature model, (iv) model Reco, GPP and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and (v) evaluate model uncertainty (calibration, validation and uncertainty prediction). The algorithm was tested for different manual and automatic chamber measurement systems (such as e.g. automated NEE-chambers and the LI-8100A soil CO2 Flux system) and ecosystems. Our study shows that even minor changes within the modelling approach may result in considerable differences of calculated flux rates, derived photosynthetic active radiation and temperature dependencies and subsequently modeled Reco, GPP and NEE balance of up to 25%. Thus, certain modeling implications will be given, since automated and standardized data processing procedures, based on clearly defined criteria, such as statistical parameters and thresholds are a prerequisite and highly desirable to guarantee the reproducibility, traceability of modelling results and encourage a better comparability between closed chamber based CO2 measurements.

  17. Regularities of heat transfer in the gas layers of a steam boiler furnace flame. Part II. Gas layer radiation laws and the procedure for calculating heat transfer in furnaces, fire boxes, and combustion chambers developed on the basis of these laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The article presents the results stemming from the scientific discovery of laws relating to radiation from the gas layers generated during flame combustion of fuel and when electric arc burns in electric-arc steel-melting furnaces. The procedure for calculating heat transfer in electric-arc and torch furnaces, fire-boxes, and combustion chambers elaborated on the basis of this discovery is described.

  18. Modeling of diesel/CNG mixing in a pre-injection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Wahhab, H. A.; Aziz, A. R. A.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Nasif, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel engines performance can be improved by adding combustible gases to the liquid diesel. In this paper, the propagation of a two phase flow liquid-gas fuel mixture into a pre-mixer is investigated numerically by computational fluid dynamics simulation. CNG was injected into the diesel within a cylindrical conduit operates as pre-mixer. Four injection models of Diesel-CNG were simulated using ANSYS-FLUENT commercial software. Two CNG jet diameters were used of 1 and 2 mm and the diesel pipe diameter was 9 mm. Two configurations were considered for the gas injection. In the first the gas was injected from one side while for the second two side entries were used. The CNG to Diesel pressure ratio was varied between 1.5 and 3. The CNG to Diesel mass flow ratios were varied between 0.7 and 0.9. The results demonstrate that using double-sided injection increased the homogeneity of the mixture due to the swirl and acceleration of the mixture. Mass fraction, in both cases, was found to increase as the mixture flows towards the exit. As a result, this enhanced mixing is likely to lead to improvement in the combustion performance.

  19. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  20. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.