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Sample records for model dental multilayer

  1. Bio-inspired design of dental multilayers: experiments and model.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xinrui; Rahbar, Nima; Farias, Stephen; Soboyejo, Wole

    2009-12-01

    This paper combines experiments, simulations and analytical modeling that are inspired by the stress reductions associated with the functionally graded structures of the dentin-enamel-junctions (DEJs) in natural teeth. Unlike conventional crown structures in which ceramic crowns are bonded to the bottom layer with an adhesive layer, real teeth do not have a distinct "adhesive layer" between the enamel and the dentin layers. Instead, there is a graded transition from enamel to dentin within a approximately 10 to 100 microm thick regime that is called the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). In this paper, a micro-scale, bio-inspired functionally graded structure is used to bond the top ceramic layer (zirconia) to a dentin-like ceramic-filled polymer substrate. The bio-inspired functionally graded material (FGM) is shown to exhibit higher critical loads over a wide range of loading rates. The measured critical loads are predicted using a rate dependent slow crack growth (RDEASCG) model. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of bio-inspired dental multilayers. PMID:19716103

  2. Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

    2006-10-09

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} < 60 N (Pm is the maximum magnitude of cyclic load). But at relatively high load levels i.e. P{sub m} > 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

  3. Creep-assisted slow crack growth in bio-inspired dental multilayers.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Niu, Xinrui; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-06-01

    Ceramic crown structures under occlusal contact are often idealized as flat multilayered structures that are deformed under Hertzian contact loading. Previous models treated each layer as linear elastic materials and resulted in differences between the measured and predicted critical loads. This paper examines the combined effects of creep (in the adhesive and substrate layers) and creep-assisted slow crack growth (in the ceramic layer) on the contact-induced deformation of bio-inspired, functionally graded multilayer (FGM) structures and the conventional tri-layers. The time-dependent moduli of each of the layers were determined from constant load creep tests. The resulting modulus-time characteristics were modeled using Prony series. These were then incorporated into a finite element model for the computation of stress distributions in the sub-surface regions of the top ceramic layer, in which sub-surface radial cracks, are observed as the clinical failure mode. The time-dependent stresses are incorporated into a slow crack growth (SCG) model that is used to predict the critical loads of the dental multilayers under Hertzian contact loading. The predicted loading rate dependence of the critical loads is shown to be consistent with experimental results. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust dental multilayers. PMID:25771255

  4. Multilayer weighted social network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Török, János; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2014-11-01

    Recent empirical studies using large-scale data sets have validated the Granovetter hypothesis on the structure of the society in that there are strongly wired communities connected by weak ties. However, as interaction between individuals takes place in diverse contexts, these communities turn out to be overlapping. This implies that the society has a multilayered structure, where the layers represent the different contexts. To model this structure we begin with a single-layer weighted social network (WSN) model showing the Granovetterian structure. We find that when merging such WSN models, a sufficient amount of interlayer correlation is needed to maintain the relationship between topology and link weights, while these correlations destroy the enhancement in the community overlap due to multiple layers. To resolve this, we devise a geographic multilayer WSN model, where the indirect interlayer correlations due to the geographic constraints of individuals enhance the overlaps between the communities and, at the same time, the Granovetterian structure is preserved.

  5. Dental cell sheet biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) - dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 10(6)/cm(2)) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation. PMID:27565550

  6. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 1. MODEL FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multilayer biochemical dry deposition model has been developed based on the NOAA Multilayer Model (MLM) to study gaseous exchanges between the soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Most of the parameterizations and submodels have been updated or replaced. The numerical integration ...

  7. Multilayered models for electromagnetic reflection amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    The remote sensing of snowpack characteristics with surface installations or with an airborne system could have important applications in water resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayer snow models is analyzed. Normally incident plane waves are assumed at frequencies ranging from 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 10th power Hz, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice sheets. Layers are defined by a thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients, versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the reflection coefficient variations as a function of frequency.

  8. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multilayer biochemical dry deposition model (MLBC) described in the accompanying paper was tested against half-hourly eddy correlation data from six field sites under a wide range of climate conditions with various plant types. Modeled CO2, O3, SO2<...

  9. Epidemic Model with Isolation in Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zuzek, L. G. Alvarez; Stanley, H. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model has successfully mimicked the propagation of such airborne diseases as influenza A (H1N1). Although the SIR model has recently been studied in a multilayer networks configuration, in almost all the research the isolation of infected individuals is disregarded. Hence we focus our study in an epidemic model in a two-layer network, and we use an isolation parameter w to measure the effect of quarantining infected individuals from both layers during an isolation period tw. We call this process the Susceptible-Infected-Isolated-Recovered (SIIR) model. Using the framework of link percolation we find that isolation increases the critical epidemic threshold of the disease because the time in which infection can spread is reduced. In this scenario we find that this threshold increases with w and tw. When the isolation period is maximum there is a critical threshold for w above which the disease never becomes an epidemic. We simulate the process and find an excellent agreement with the theoretical results. PMID:26173897

  10. Epidemic Model with Isolation in Multilayer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzek, L. G. Alvarez; Stanley, H. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2015-07-01

    The Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model has successfully mimicked the propagation of such airborne diseases as influenza A (H1N1). Although the SIR model has recently been studied in a multilayer networks configuration, in almost all the research the isolation of infected individuals is disregarded. Hence we focus our study in an epidemic model in a two-layer network, and we use an isolation parameter w to measure the effect of quarantining infected individuals from both layers during an isolation period tw. We call this process the Susceptible-Infected-Isolated-Recovered (SIIR) model. Using the framework of link percolation we find that isolation increases the critical epidemic threshold of the disease because the time in which infection can spread is reduced. In this scenario we find that this threshold increases with w and tw. When the isolation period is maximum there is a critical threshold for w above which the disease never becomes an epidemic. We simulate the process and find an excellent agreement with the theoretical results.

  11. A refined model for characterizing x-ray multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, A.L.; Henke, B.L.

    1987-12-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately characterize arbitrary multilayers is very valuable for not only can we use the characterizations to predict the reflectivity of a multilayer for any soft x-ray wavelength, we also can generalize the results to apply to other multilayers of the same type. In addition, we can use the characterizations as a means of evaluating various sputtering environments and refining sputtering techniques to obtain better multilayers. In this report we have obtained improved characterizations for sample molybdenum-silicon and vanadium-silicon multilayers. However, we only examined five crystals overall, so the conclusions that we could draw about the structure of general multilayers is limited. Research involving many multilayers manufactured under the same sputtering conditions is clearly in order. In order to best understand multilayer structures it may be necessary to further refine our model, e.g., adopting a Gaussian form for the interface regions. With such improvements we can expect even better agreement with experimental values and continued concurrence with other characterization techniques. 18 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Characterization Of Multilayer X-Ray Analyzers: Models And Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, B. L.; Uejio, J. Y.; Yamada, H. T.; Tackaberry, R. E.

    1986-08-01

    A procedure is described for a detailed characterization of multilayer analyzers that can be effectively applied to their design, optimization, and application for absolute x-ray spectrometry in the 100 to 10,000 eV photon energy region. An accurate analytical model has been developed that is based upon a simple modification of the dynamical Darwin-Prins theory to extend its application to finite multilayer systems and to the low energy x-ray region. Its equivalence to the optical E&M solution of the Fresnel equations at each interface is demonstrated by detailed comparisons for the reflectivity of a multilayer throughout the angular range of incidence of 0° to 90°. A special spectrograph and an experimental method are described for the measurement of the absolute reflectivity characteristics of the multilayer. The experimental measurements at three photon energies in the 100 to 2000 eV region are fit by the analytical modified Darwin-Prins equation (MDP) for 1(0), generating a detailed characterization of two state-of-the-art multilayers: sputtered tungsten-carbon with 2d 70 A and a molecular lead stearate with 2d 100 A. The fitting parameters that are determined by this procedure are applied to help establish the structural characteristics of these multilayers.

  13. Dental time study results in relation to a model for a dental health related patient group system.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Y

    1995-01-01

    Using a time study method, dental care treatment resources were studied concerning different caries groups of children and adolescents 3-19 years of age. The results were applied to a model for a dental health related patient group system as a tool for presenting the dental care situation. Quality assurance aspects of a dental health related patient group system, adapted for use in general dental care, had led to a suggested model system: "Dental Visiting Groups" (DVG). The DVG system takes into consideration the fact that dental care was performed by three dental care-giving personnel groups--dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants--giving dental care in three main areas of dental procedures: diagnostic, prevention and intervention. The DVG system implied a model of Swedish dentistry in change, and presented the relationships among the dental health related patient groups, the three main areas of dental procedures, and the tasks of the dental care-givers. Applied over time, the DVG system illustrated the efficiency of the dental care model used. PMID:7676387

  14. Modeling of thermal stresses in elastic multilayer coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunxue; Zhao, Zhiwei; Li, Xuehua

    2015-02-01

    The performance and reliability of multilayer coating systems are strongly influenced by thermal stresses. The present study develops an alternative analytical model to predict the thermal stresses in elastic multilayer coating systems. An exact closed-form solution is obtained which is independent of the number of coating layers. In addition, with the definition of the coordinate system, the closed-form solution is concisely formulated. Specific results are calculated for thermal stresses in HfO2/SiO2 multilayer optical coatings, and a finite element analysis is performed to confirm the analytical results. The two results agree fairly well with each other. Also, when the thicknesses of the coating layers are much less than the substrate thickness, the approximate solution is obtained based on the exact closed-form solution, and its accuracy is examined.

  15. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  16. The Arizona model: a new paradigm for dental schools.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kneka P; Woldt, Janet L; Cottam, Wayne W; Cederberg, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The traditional method for the delivery of didactic instruction and patient care in dental schools has come under fire from a number of sources over the past several years. The American Dental Education Association and others have outlined numerous issues impeding the swift progression of student learning through the dental curriculum. Declining state revenues allotted to dental education, the increasing shortage of dental faculty, and the management of student learning in an already overcrowded dental school curriculum have led to the investigation of strategies that address solutions to these and other shortcomings in the current milieu of dental education. To address these deficiencies, strategies for change have been suggested. This article describes the development, implementation, and assessment of a new dental school that addresses these and other challenges to the education of today's dental student, thus creating the Arizona Model. Following seven years of operation, outcomes analysis at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health has shown positive trends in controlling educational costs, a shift to a modular curriculum, increasing student clinical experiences, and, consistent with the mission of the school, producing dentists who are well prepared for dental public health service. PMID:21205723

  17. Numerical modeling of hydrofracturing in a multilayer coal seam

    SciTech Connect

    Nasedkina, A.A.; Trufanov, V.N.

    2006-01-15

    The mathematical model of the process for hydrodynamic fracturing in a multilayer coal seam is proposed. The model is based on the equation of continuity and Darcy's law. The filtration-temperature analogy allows solving the obtained non-linear, non-stationary problem in an axisymmetric statement for the pressure function as the heat-conductivity problem, by the finite-element method. The calculation results yield estimation of the radius of degassing borehole influence zone.

  18. A Model Program for Dental Assisting Education in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    Intended to provide assistance for developing new programs and improving existing ones, the guide was constructed by dental assisting instructors and other professional participants in a 196 5 workshop conference. Elements of the model program were derived from a statistical analysis of California junior colleg e programs in dental assisting and…

  19. Dental Hygiene Curriculum Model for Transition to Future Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paarmann, Carlene S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of the baccalaureate degree as the minimum entry level for dental hygiene practice centers around three main concerns: changes in health care delivery, awarding of a degree commensurate with students' educational background, and the credibility of dental hygiene as a profession. A curriculum model is discussed. (MLW)

  20. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dufek, Eric J.

    2014-08-28

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF₆ shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  1. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek

    2014-08-01

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF6 shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  2. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  3. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. A. S.; Rokosz, M. K.; Correia, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  4. Preventive Dental Practices Motivational Model for Elementary Teachers in Training Institutions; Dental Health Instruction Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Darwin

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of instruction upon the dental health behavior of university students. The experimental group of 68 subjects, all elementary education majors, were exposed to a three--stage dental health motivational model: Dental Health Skills Instruction (four hours of laboratory instruction), Cognitive…

  5. Interactive Tooth Separation from Dental Model Using Segmentation Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tooth segmentation on dental model is an essential step of computer-aided-design systems for orthodontic virtual treatment planning. However, fast and accurate identifying cutting boundary to separate teeth from dental model still remains a challenge, due to various geometrical shapes of teeth, complex tooth arrangements, different dental model qualities, and varying degrees of crowding problems. Most segmentation approaches presented before are not able to achieve a balance between fine segmentation results and simple operating procedures with less time consumption. In this article, we present a novel, effective and efficient framework that achieves tooth segmentation based on a segmentation field, which is solved by a linear system defined by a discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A set of contour lines are sampled from the smooth scalar field, and candidate cutting boundaries can be detected from concave regions with large variations of field data. The sensitivity to concave seams of the segmentation field facilitates effective tooth partition, as well as avoids obtaining appropriate curvature threshold value, which is unreliable in some case. Our tooth segmentation algorithm is robust to dental models with low quality, as well as is effective to dental models with different levels of crowding problems. The experiments, including segmentation tests of varying dental models with different complexity, experiments on dental meshes with different modeling resolutions and surface noises and comparison between our method and the morphologic skeleton segmentation method are conducted, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of our method. PMID:27532266

  6. Interactive Tooth Separation from Dental Model Using Segmentation Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tooth segmentation on dental model is an essential step of computer-aided-design systems for orthodontic virtual treatment planning. However, fast and accurate identifying cutting boundary to separate teeth from dental model still remains a challenge, due to various geometrical shapes of teeth, complex tooth arrangements, different dental model qualities, and varying degrees of crowding problems. Most segmentation approaches presented before are not able to achieve a balance between fine segmentation results and simple operating procedures with less time consumption. In this article, we present a novel, effective and efficient framework that achieves tooth segmentation based on a segmentation field, which is solved by a linear system defined by a discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A set of contour lines are sampled from the smooth scalar field, and candidate cutting boundaries can be detected from concave regions with large variations of field data. The sensitivity to concave seams of the segmentation field facilitates effective tooth partition, as well as avoids obtaining appropriate curvature threshold value, which is unreliable in some case. Our tooth segmentation algorithm is robust to dental models with low quality, as well as is effective to dental models with different levels of crowding problems. The experiments, including segmentation tests of varying dental models with different complexity, experiments on dental meshes with different modeling resolutions and surface noises and comparison between our method and the morphologic skeleton segmentation method are conducted, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of our method. PMID:27532266

  7. Multilayer model of photon diffusion in skin

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J.M.; Zhou, G.X.; Walker, E.C.; Wall, R.T. )

    1990-11-01

    A diffusion model describing the propagation of photon flux in the epidermal, dermal, and subcutaneous tissue layers of the skin is presented. Assuming that the skin is illuminated by a collimated, finite-aperture source, we develop expressions relating photon flux density within the skin and intensities re-emitted from the skin surface to the optical properties of the individual layers. Model simulations show that the rate at which re-emitted intensities diminish with radial distance away from the source can provide information about absorption and scattering in underlying tissues. Re-emitted intensities measured from homogeneous and two-layer tissue phantoms compare favorably with model predictions. We demonstrate potential applications of the model by estimating the absorption (sigma a) and transport-corrected scattering (sigma's) coefficients of dermis and subcutis from intensities measured from intact skin and by predicting the magnitude of the optical-density variations measured by a photoplethysmograph.

  8. Modelling of the Peltier effect in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez-Acosta, Isaac; Olivares-Robles, Miguel A.; Bosu, Subrojati; Sakuraba, Yuya; Kubota, Takahide; Takahashi, Saburo; Takanashi, Koki; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2016-02-01

    We model the charge, spin, and heat currents in ferromagnetic metal|normal metal|normal metal trilayer structures in the two current model, taking into account bulk and interface thermoelectric properties as well as Joule heating. The results include the temperature distribution as well as resistance-current curves that reproduce the observed shifted parabolic characteristics. Thin tunneling barriers can enhance the apparent Peltier cooling. The model agrees with the experimental results for wide multilayer pillars, but the giant effects observed for diameters ≲100 nm are still under discussion.

  9. Stacked Multilayer Self-Organizing Map for Background Modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjie; Zhang, Xuebo; Fang, Yongchun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a new background modeling method called stacked multilayer self-organizing map background model (SMSOM-BM) is proposed, which presents several merits such as strong representative ability for complex scenarios, easy to use, and so on. In order to enhance the representative ability of the background model and make the parameters learned automatically, the recently developed idea of representative learning (or deep learning) is elegantly employed to extend the existing single-layer self-organizing map background model to a multilayer one (namely, the proposed SMSOM-BM). As a consequence, the SMSOM-BM gains several merits including strong representative ability to learn background model of challenging scenarios, and automatic determination for most network parameters. More specifically, every pixel is modeled by a SMSOM, and spatial consistency is considered at each layer. By introducing a novel over-layer filtering process, we can train the background model layer by layer in an efficient manner. Furthermore, for real-time performance consideration, we have implemented the proposed method using NVIDIA CUDA platform. Comparative experimental results show superior performance of the proposed approach. PMID:25935034

  10. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

  11. Modeling of multilayered piezoelectric transducers with ultrasonic welding application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney, Murat; Eskinat, Esref

    2007-04-01

    Mechanical components of sandwiched piezoelectric transducers are modeled using one-dimensional wave transmission and piezoelectric equations. Using the impedance method, resonance frequencies, stress and displacement distributions along the multilayered piezoelectric transducers of different dimensions and materials are obtained. The calculated resonance frequencies and the impedances are experimentally verified. For ultrasonic welding of plastics, the effect of the parts to be welded on the resonance frequency of the whole system is investigated regarding both material damping and piezoelectric losses. Using the methods developed, several piezoelectric transducers are analysed for different designs. The obtained results can be used to better understand the qualitative relations between the design variables of ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers.

  12. Treating dental caries as an infectious disease. Applying the medical model in practice to prevent dental caries.

    PubMed

    Limeback, H

    1996-01-01

    The above diagnostic and treatment principles may be self evident to most dental practitioners. To many, however, this treatment philosophy is a new one. Continuing dental education and quality assurance programs will play a significant role in helping dentists make the philosophical shift from a highly technical restorative approach to one that uses the medical model and treats dental caries as an infectious disease. While a total cure in humans suffering from dental disease may never be attainable, dental practitioners should soon be better able to direct more of their attention to the patients who already demonstrate a high incidence of dental decay and to those who are clearly at risk to develop future dental decay. PMID:9470624

  13. Finite element modeling of multilayered structures of fish scales.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Kennedy, Alan J

    2014-12-01

    The interlinked fish scales of Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar) and Polypterus senegalus (gray and albino bichir) are effective multilayered armor systems for protecting fish from threats such as aggressive conspecific interactions or predation. Both types of fish scales have multi-layered structures with a harder and stiffer outer layer, and softer and more compliant inner layers. However, there are differences in relative layer thickness, property mismatch between layers, the property gradations and nanostructures in each layer. The fracture paths and patterns of both scales under microindentation loads were different. In this work, finite element models of fish scales of A. spatula and P. senegalus were built to investigate the mechanics of their multi-layered structures under penetration loads. The models simulate a rigid microindenter penetrating the fish scales quasi-statically to understand the observed experimental results. Study results indicate that the different fracture patterns and crack paths observed in the experiments were related to the different stress fields caused by the differences in layer thickness, and spatial distribution of the elastic and plastic properties in the layers, and the differences in interface properties. The parametric studies and experimental results suggest that smaller fish such as P. senegalus may have adopted a thinner outer layer for light-weighting and improved mobility, and meanwhile adopted higher strength and higher modulus at the outer layer, and stronger interface properties to prevent ring cracking and interface cracking, and larger fish such as A. spatula and Arapaima gigas have lower strength and lower modulus at the outer layers and weaker interface properties, but have adopted thicker outer layers to provide adequate protection against ring cracking and interface cracking, possibly because weight is less of a concern relative to the smaller fish such as P. senegalus. PMID:25300062

  14. Light dosimetry for focused and defocused beam irradiation in multi-layered tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Kremena S.; Stoykova, Elena V.

    2006-09-01

    Treatment of acupuncture points, trigger points, joint inflammations in low level laser therapy as well as various applications of lasers for treatment of soft tissues in dental medicine, require irradiation by a narrow converging laser beam. The aim of this study is to compare light delivery produced by focused or defocused narrow beam irradiation in a multi-layered skin tissue model at increasing depth of the target. The task is solved by 3-D Monte-Carlo simulation for matched and mismatched refractive indices at the tissue/ambient medium interface. The modeled light beams have a circular cross-section at the tissue entrance with uniform or Gaussian intensity distribution. Three are the tissue models used in simulation : i) a bloodless skin layer; ii) a bloodless skin layer with embedded scattering object; iii) a skin layer with small blood vessels of varying size, which are modeled as infinite cylinders parallel to the tissue surface located at different depths. Optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, anisotropy factor, g, and index of refraction) of different tissue constituents are chosen from the literature.

  15. Multilayer analytic element modeling of radial collector wells.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Mark; Kelson, Victor A; Luther, Kenneth H

    2005-01-01

    A new multilayer approach is presented for the modeling of ground water flow to radial collector wells. The approach allows for the inclusion of all aspects of the unique boundary condition along the lateral arms of a collector well, including skin effect and internal friction losses due to flow in the arms. The hydraulic conductivity may differ between horizontal layers within the aquifer, and vertical anisotropy can be taken into account. The approach is based on the multilayer analytic element method, such that regional flow and local three-dimensional detail may be simulated simultaneously and accurately within one regional model. Horizontal flow inside a layer is computed analytically, while vertical flow is approximated with a standard finite-difference scheme. Results obtained with the proposed approach compare well to results obtained with three-dimensional analytic element solutions for flow in unconfined aquifers. The presented approach may be applied to predict the yield of a collector well in a regional setting and to compute the origin and residence time, and thus the quality, of water pumped by the collector well. As an example, the addition of three lateral arms to a collector well that already has three laterals is investigated. The new arms are added at an elevation of 2 m above the existing laterals. The yield increase of the collector well is computed as a function of the lengths of the three new arms. PMID:16324013

  16. Multilayer Stock Forecasting Model Using Fuzzy Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Javedani Sadaei, Hossein; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2014-01-01

    After reviewing the vast body of literature on using FTS in stock market forecasting, certain deficiencies are distinguished in the hybridization of findings. In addition, the lack of constructive systematic framework, which can be helpful to indicate direction of growth in entire FTS forecasting systems, is outstanding. In this study, we propose a multilayer model for stock market forecasting including five logical significant layers. Every single layer has its detailed concern to assist forecast development by reconciling certain problems exclusively. To verify the model, a set of huge data containing Taiwan Stock Index (TAIEX), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJI), and S&P 500 have been chosen as experimental datasets. The results indicate that the proposed methodology has the potential to be accepted as a framework for model development in stock market forecasts using FTS. PMID:24605058

  17. Multilayer stock forecasting model using fuzzy time series.

    PubMed

    Javedani Sadaei, Hossein; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2014-01-01

    After reviewing the vast body of literature on using FTS in stock market forecasting, certain deficiencies are distinguished in the hybridization of findings. In addition, the lack of constructive systematic framework, which can be helpful to indicate direction of growth in entire FTS forecasting systems, is outstanding. In this study, we propose a multilayer model for stock market forecasting including five logical significant layers. Every single layer has its detailed concern to assist forecast development by reconciling certain problems exclusively. To verify the model, a set of huge data containing Taiwan Stock Index (TAIEX), National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ), Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJI), and S&P 500 have been chosen as experimental datasets. The results indicate that the proposed methodology has the potential to be accepted as a framework for model development in stock market forecasts using FTS. PMID:24605058

  18. Model Teacher - School Dental Hygiene Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lowell W.

    The purpose of this study, which was carried out during the 1972-73 school year at three parochial schools in the Houston area, was to determine the effectiveness of the Toothkeeper Program, a multimedia program of oral hygiene training carefully developed and packaged to establish effective long-term dental hygiene practice. The study population…

  19. Multilayer adsorption model for the protein-ligand interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, L. M.; Garcia, M.; Perez-Rodriguez, M.; Taboada, P.; Ruso, J. M.; Mosquera, V.

    2001-05-01

    In the present work we present a theoretical formalism based on the combination of the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller multilayer adsorption model with an electrolytic adsorbate, and the results are used to predict binding isotherms of several synthetic penicillin drugs onto human serum albumin. The occurrence of adsorption maxima in these binding processes is correctly predicted by this noncooperative binding model and it is demonstrated to be due to the ionic character of the adsorbate. The effect of the hydrophobic interactions between adsorbate monomers on the value of the maximum number of adsorbed particles is also a matter of study, and it is proven that this number increases with increasing hydrophobic character of the adsorbate.

  20. A Reproducible Oral Microcosm Biofilm Model for Testing Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rudney, J.D.; Chen, R.; Lenton, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Jones, R.S.; Reilly, C.; Fok, A.S.; Aparicio, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Methods and Results Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite disks were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms were analyzed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose-pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veilonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. Conclusions This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. PMID:22925110

  1. Soil moisture dynamics modeling considering multi-layer root zone.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shankar, V; Jat, M K

    2013-01-01

    The moisture uptake by plant from soil is a key process for plant growth and movement of water in the soil-plant system. A non-linear root water uptake (RWU) model was developed for a multi-layer crop root zone. The model comprised two parts: (1) model formulation and (2) moisture flow prediction. The developed model was tested for its efficiency in predicting moisture depletion in a non-uniform root zone. A field experiment on wheat (Triticum aestivum) was conducted in the sub-temperate sub-humid agro-climate of Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India. Model-predicted soil moisture parameters, i.e., moisture status at various depths, moisture depletion and soil moisture profile in the root zone, are in good agreement with experiment results. The results of simulation emphasize the utility of the RWU model across different agro-climatic regions. The model can be used for sound irrigation management especially in water-scarce humid, temperate, arid and semi-arid regions and can also be integrated with a water transport equation to predict the solute uptake by plant biomass. PMID:23579833

  2. Analytical Modeling of Variable Density Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Brown, T.; Cruit, Wendy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique foam/Multilayer Insulation (MLI) combination concept for orbital cryogenic storage was experimentally evaluated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB). The MLI was designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days and included several unique features such as: a variable layer density and larger but fewer perforations for venting during ascent to orbit. Test results with liquid hydrogen indicated that the MLI weight or heat leak is reduced by about half in comparison with standard MLI. The focus of this paper is on analytical modeling of the Variable Density MLI (VD-MLI) on-orbit performance (i.e. vacuum/low pressure environment). The foam/VD-MLI combination model is considered to have five segments. The first segment represents the optional foam layer. The second, third, and fourth segments represent three MLI segments with different layer densities. The last segment is considered to be a shroud that surrounds the last MLI layer. Two approaches are considered. In the first approach, the variable density MLI is modeled layer by layer while in the second approach, a semi-empirical model is applied. Both models account for thermal radiation between shields, gas conduction, and solid conduction through the layer separator materials.

  3. SENSITIVITY OF THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION MULTILAYER MODEL TO INSTRUMENT ERROR AND PARAMETERIZATION UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The response of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration multilayer inferential dry deposition velocity model (NOAA-MLM) to error in meteorological inputs and model parameterization is reported. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess the uncertainty in NOA...

  4. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  5. NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models and computer program for operational prediction of toxic fuel hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.; Bowers, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models are discribed which are used in applying meteorological information to the estimation of toxic fuel hazards resulting from the launch of rocket vehicle and from accidental cold spills and leaks of toxic fuels. Background information, definitions of terms, description of the multilayer concept are presented along with formulas for determining the buoyant rise of hot exhaust clouds or plumes from conflagrations, and descriptions of the multilayer diffusion models. A brief description of the computer program is given, and sample problems and their solutions are included. Derivations of the cloud rise formulas, users instructions, and computer program output lists are also included.

  6. EUV multilayer defect compensation (MDC): latest progress on model and compensation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Satake, Masaki; Li, Ying; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Chen, Dongxue; Tolani, Vikram

    2013-09-01

    Making a multilayer defect-free extreme ultraviolet (EUV) blank is not possible today, and is unlikely to happen in the next few years. The method proposed by Luminescent is to compensate effects of multilayer defects on images by modifying the absorber patterns. Progress in MDC is the subject of this paper. The multilayer growth model was calibrated using real data - the top layer profile captured by AFM and cross section captured by TEM for programmed defects. Multilayer defect profiles on repair sites were recovered by applying inverse methods with the calibrated model to AFM surface scans. The recovered defect profiles were fed into the MDC engine to calculate modified absorber patterns that would compensate for the defects. Further, new methods to compensate for phase errors by depositing materials or peeling multilayers in addition to absorber modifications have been developed. Different options of multilayer peeling for compensating phase error are also evaluated through simulation. A case study was performed to find out what is the maximum pit and bump defects that can be compensated by all options available. It shows absorber pattern modification plus material deposition is the most effective option for pit defect, while absorber pattern modification plus layer-by-layer multilayer peeling is the most effective option for bump defect. Either of these methods can fix defects up to four times larger than those that can be fixed by only modifying absorber patterns near them.

  7. Application of the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene to the role of the clinician : part II.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M M; Darby, M

    1993-01-01

    In summary, the theories of Maslow and of Yura and Walsh have been highlighted as background for understanding the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene. In addition, 11 human needs have been identified and defined as being especially related to dental hygiene care, and a sample evaluation tool for their clinical assessment and a dental hygiene care plan have been presented. The four concepts of client, environment, health/oral health, and dental hygiene actions explained in terms of human need theory, and the 11 human needs related to dental hygiene care constitute the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene. Within the framework of the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene, the dental hygiene process is a systematic approach to dental hygiene care that involves assessment of the 11 human needs related to dental hygiene care; analysis of deficits in these needs; determination of the dental hygiene care plan based on identified deficits; implementation of dental hygiene interventions stated in the care plan; and evaluation of the effectiveness of dental hygiene interventions in achieving specific goals, including subsequent reassessment and revision of the dental hygiene care plan. This human needs conceptual model for dental hygiene provides a guide for comprehensive and humanistic client care. This model allows the dental hygienist to view each client (whether an individual or a group) holistically to prevent oral disease and to promote health and wellness. Dental hygiene theorists are encouraged to expand this model or to develop additional conceptual models based on dental hygiene's paradigm. PMID:17233167

  8. The application of multilevel modelling to dental caries data.

    PubMed

    Burnside, G; Pine, C M; Williamson, P R

    2007-09-30

    Clinical studies of dental caries experience generate multiple outcome data for each participant, with information collected for each individual tooth surface. This paper investigates multilevel modelling as a method of analysis for dental caries data, allowing for full use of the data collected at surface level. Data from a clinical trial of a caries preventive agent in adolescents are modelled. The effect of tooth position within the mouth on the development of dental caries is investigated, with the results showing the importance of differentiating between the upper and lower arches, when modelling the probabilities of caries developing on teeth. Calculation of the intracluster correlation using the threshold model is suggested for use in multilevel logistic regression modelling of caries data. This model, which assumes that a dichotomous outcome is based on an underlying continuous variable with a threshold point where the outcome changes from zero to one, is identified to be appropriate for the analysis of caries which is a continuous process, but is only identified as present in a clinical trial when it has reached a certain level of severity. PMID:17340596

  9. A model for forensic dental education in the predoctoral dental school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Kenneth P; Johnson, J Dane

    2012-05-01

    Forensic odontologists play an important role locally and nationally in assisting in the identification of the victims of mass fatality incidents, whether natural or human-made. With the recent passage of legislation by Congress identifying dentists as a first-responder resource, knowledge of their expanding role in disaster response is particularly important. The purpose of this article is to describe the forensic dental course being taught at Creighton University School of Dentistry in Omaha, Nebraska, as a model for providing a fundamental education in forensic dentistry and disaster preparedness at the predoctoral dental level. This model is designed to 1) provide students with a broad view of forensic odontology; 2) give them a functional knowledge of the tools and techniques of the modern forensic dentist; 3) provide basic knowledge of their potential role in disaster preparedness and response; and 4) encourage students to pursue further forensic education, become active in national forensic organizations, and get involved in disaster preparedness/response in their home communities following graduation. This article includes lecture topics, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises being used at Creighton to teach students the fundamentals of forensic odontology and disaster preparedness. PMID:22550101

  10. Simple solutions of multilayered discs subjected to biaxial moment loading.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Kelly, J R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive a simple closed-form solution for the stress distribution through the thickness of multilayered discs subjected to biaxial moment loading, such that it can be used readily to evaluate the biaxial strength of multilayered dental ceramics using biaxial flexure tests. Methods A simple analytical model was developed to derive the stress distribution through the thickness of multilayered discs subjected to biaxial moment loading. The accuracy of the solution was verified by comparing with previous rigorous analytical solutions and finite element results. The results obtained from Roark's formulas for bilayered discs were also included for comparison.

  11. Comparing multilayer and single layer canopy photosynthesis models with measured data at multiple time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoy, P. C.; Schäfer, K. V.; Katul, G. G.; Oren, R.

    2002-05-01

    Models of gas exchange are necessary to understand interactions between biosphere and atmosphere, but the effectiveness of multilayer vs. single-layer canopy models is still a matter of debate. Previous studies have discussed benefits and drawbacks of both approaches with reference to one another or have analytically compared single and multilayer models over a single growing season. Here, we critically analyze the performance of both approaches at multiple time scales with respect to 4.5 years of eddy covariance measurement of carbon exchange in a Pinus taeda forest using orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT). OWT compares model performance at time scales from minutes to years and can identify time scales at which models perform poorly, aiding in the choice between multilayer and single-layer models and identifying areas of model improvement.

  12. NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models and computer programs, version 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The transport and diffusion models and algorithms developed for use by NASA in predicting concentrations and dosages downwind from normal and abnormal launches of rocket vehicles are described along with the associated computer programs for use in performing the calculations. Topics discussed include: the mathematical specifications and procedures used in the Preprocessor Program to calculate rocket exhaust cloud rise, cloud dimensions, and other input parameters to the transport and diffusion models; the revised mathematical specifications for the Multilayer Diffusion Models; users' instructions for implementing the Preprocessor and Multilayer Diffusion Models Programs; and worked example problems illustrating the use of the models and computer programs.

  13. Nonlinear finite element modeling of dental composite polymerization behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, Gayle A.

    2003-07-01

    Polymerization shrinkage has been one of the primary shortcomings preventing the use of resin composites as a universal dental restorative material. This shrinkage of the bonded restoration causes residual stresses in the composite which in turn are transferred to the adhesive interface. The deleterious effects of this stress environment include compromise of the interface itself and the decrease in the mechanical properties of the cured composite. Novel materials which claim to produce less shrinkage have been presented as a new class of restorative materials that could reduce the effects of this problem. One difficulty in assessing the actual in vivo benefits of these new materials is the fact that there is currently no direct way to measure the stress environment at the composite/tooth clinical interface. Computer modeling using finite element analysis (FEA) could provide helpful information regarding the clinical stress performance of dental composites. The purpose of this study was to develop a model that accurately simulates the nonlinear polymerization behavior of light-cured dental composites using a commercial FEA program, which could be accessible for future research. Two phases were needed to accomplish this purpose. First, a data collection phase included volumetric shrinkage, shrinkage stress, tooth analog strain, and dynamic mechanical analysis experiments. Three composites, a standard methacrylate(Z250) and two experimental low stress epoxy-based composites (oxirane and silorane), were tested. The experimental results revealed an intriguing range of polymerization behavior exhibited by the three composites, indicating that the development of a low stress composite is possible. The information gathered from this phase supplied the necessary material input for the computer modeling, and provided empirical validation data for the model solutions. In the second modeling phase, an FEA approach based on a elastic/viscoplastic material model was used to

  14. Metrological validation for 3D modeling of dental plaster casts.

    PubMed

    Brusco, Nicola; Andreetto, Marco; Lucchese, Luca; Carmignato, Simone; Cortelazzo, Guido M

    2007-11-01

    The contribution of this paper is twofold: (1) it presents an automatic 3D modeling technique and (2) it advances a procedure for its metrological evaluation in the context of a medical application, the 3D modeling of dental plaster casts. The motivation for this work is the creation of a "virtual gypsotheque" where cumbersome dental plaster casts can be replaced by numerical 3D models, thereby alleviating storage and access problems and allowing dentists and orthodontists the use of novel and unprecedented software tools for their medical evaluations. Modeling free-form surfaces of anatomical interest is an intriguing mixture of open issues concerning 3D modeling, geometrical metrology, and medicine. Of general interest is both the fact that a widespread use of 3D modeling in non-engineering applications requires automatic procedures of the kind presented in this work and the adopted validation paradigm for free-form surfaces, rather useful for practical purposes. In this latter respect, the metrological analysis we advance is the first seminal attempt in the field of 3D modeling and can be readily extended to contexts other than the medical one discussed in this paper. PMID:17126062

  15. Modeling of light intensification by conical pits within multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wolfe, J E; Monterrosa, A; Feit, M D; Pistor, T V; Stolz, C J

    2009-11-02

    Removal of laser-induced damage sites provides a possible mitigation pathway to improve damage resistance of coated multilayer dielectric mirrors. In an effort to determine the optimal mitigation geometry which will not generate secondary damage precursors, the electric field distribution within the coating layers for a variety of mitigation shapes under different irradiation angles has been estimated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The coating consists of twenty-four alternating layers of hafnia and silica with a quarter-wave reflector design. A conical geometrical shape with different cone angles is investigated in the present study. Beam incident angles range from 0{sup o} to 60{sup o} at 5{sup o} increments. We find that light intensification (square of electric field, |E|{sup 2}) within the multilayers depends strongly on the beam incident direction and the cone angle. By comparing the field intensification for each cone angle under all angles of incidence, we find that a 30{sup o} conical pit generates the least field intensification within the multilayer film. Our results suggest that conical pits with shallow cone angles ({le} 30{sup o}) can be used as potential optimal mitigation structures.

  16. A 3-D elasticity theory based model for acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2014-05-01

    A theoretical model built upon three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed to investigate the acoustic radiation from multilayered anisotropic plates subjected to a harmonic point force excitation. Fourier transform technique and stationary phase method are combined to predict the far-field radiated sound pressure of one-side water immersed plate. Compared to equivalent single-layer plate models, the present model based on elasticity theory can differentiate radiated sound pressure between dry-side and wet-side excited cases, as well as discrepancies induced by different layer sequences for multilayered anisotropic plates. These results highlight the superiority of the present theoretical model especially for handling multilayered anisotropic structures. PMID:24815294

  17. Developing an Alternative Model for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayborn, G. Wayne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The restructuring of the oral health sciences program at the University of Alberta (Canada), in response to drastically reduced funding, is described. Major objectives were to reduce program cost to the university and enhance the institution's scholarly/research profile. The model, used in other countries, separates clinical from academic costs.…

  18. Multilayer models in the piezo-PAS analysis of AII-BVI compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliński, M.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the results of computations of the photoacoustic piezoelectric spectra, both amplitude and phase, of a series of AII-BVI compounds and their comparison with experimental results. For the interpretation of experimental spectra several multilayer models were developed and applied. Computer analysis showed that it was not possible to interpret the experimental results in the model of a single layer in the case of real samples. In this article three multilayer models are presented and illustrated by experimental results and numerical characteristics.

  19. Hybrid Finite Element-Fast Spectral Domain Multilayer Boundary Integral Modeling of Doubly Periodic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Eibert; J.L. Volakis; Y.E. Erdemli

    2002-03-03

    Hybrid finite element (FE)--boundary integral (BI) analysis of infinite periodic arrays is extended to include planar multilayered Green's functions. In this manner, a portion of the volumetric dielectric region can be modeled via the finite element method whereas uniform multilayered regions can be modeled using a multilayered Green's function. As such, thick uniform substrates can be modeled without loss of efficiency and accuracy. The multilayered Green's function is analytically computed in the spectral domain and the resulting BI matrix-vector products are evaluated via the fast spectral domain algorithm (FSDA). As a result, the computational cost of the matrix-vector products is kept at O(N). Furthermore, the number of Floquet modes in the expansion are kept very few by placing the BI surfaces within the computational unit cell. Examples of frequency selective surface (FSS) arrays are analyzed with this method to demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the approach. One example involves complicated multilayered substrates above and below an inhomogeneous filter element and the other is an optical ring-slot array on a substrate several hundred wavelengths in thickness. Comparisons with measurements are included.

  20. Continuum damage modeling and simulation of hierarchical dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-05-01

    Dental enamel exhibits high fracture toughness and stiffness due to a complex hierarchical and graded microstructure, optimally organized from nano- to macro-scale. In this study, a 3D representative volume element (RVE) model is adopted to study the deformation and damage behavior of the fibrous microstructure. A continuum damage mechanics model coupled to hyperelasticity is developed for modeling the initiation and evolution of damage in the mineral fibers as well as protein matrix. Moreover, debonding of the interface between mineral fiber and protein is captured by employing a cohesive zone model. The dependence of the failure mechanism on the aspect ratio of the mineral fibers is investigated. In addition, the effect of the interface strength on the damage behavior is studied with respect to geometric features of enamel. Further, the effect of an initial flaw on the overall mechanical properties is analyzed to understand the superior damage tolerance of dental enamel. The simulation results are validated by comparison to experimental data from micro-cantilever beam testing at two hierarchical levels. The transition of the failure mechanism at different hierarchical levels is also well reproduced in the simulations.

  1. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation. PMID:26945598

  2. A mathematical model for the progression of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Fabregas, L Rene I; Rubinstein, J

    2014-12-01

    A model for the progression of dental caries is derived. The analysis starts at the microscopic reaction and diffusion process. The local equations are averaged to derive a set of macroscopic equations. The global system includes features such as anisotropic diffusion and local changes in the geometry due to the melting of the enamel. The equations are then solved numerically. The simulations highlight the effect of anisotropy. In addition, we draw conclusions on the progression rate of caries, and discuss them in light of a number of experiments. PMID:23803287

  3. Multilayer Joint Gait-Pose Manifolds for Human Gait Motion Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Meng; Fan, Guolian

    2015-11-01

    We present new multilayer joint gait-pose manifolds (multilayer JGPMs) for complex human gait motion modeling, where three latent variables are defined jointly in a low-dimensional manifold to represent a variety of body configurations. Specifically, the pose variable (along the pose manifold) denotes a specific stage in a walking cycle; the gait variable (along the gait manifold) represents different walking styles; and the linear scale variable characterizes the maximum stride in a walking cycle. We discuss two kinds of topological priors for coupling the pose and gait manifolds, i.e., cylindrical and toroidal, to examine their effectiveness and suitability for motion modeling. We resort to a topologically-constrained Gaussian process (GP) latent variable model to learn the multilayer JGPMs where two new techniques are introduced to facilitate model learning under limited training data. First is training data diversification that creates a set of simulated motion data with different strides. Second is the topology-aware local learning to speed up model learning by taking advantage of the local topological structure. The experimental results on the Carnegie Mellon University motion capture data demonstrate the advantages of our proposed multilayer models over several existing GP-based motion models in terms of the overall performance of human gait motion modeling. PMID:25532201

  4. Modeling and characterization of multilayered d 15 mode piezoelectric energy harvesters in series and parallel connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. K.; Yu, Y. G.; Li, L.; Jiang, T.; Wang, X. Y.; Zheng, X. J.

    2016-07-01

    A Timoshenko beam model combined with piezoelectric constitutive equations and an electrical model was proposed to describe the energy harvesting performances of multilayered d 15 mode PZT-51 piezoelectric bimorphs in series and parallel connections. The effect of different clamped conditions was considered for non-piezoelectric and piezoelectric layers in the theoretical model. The frequency dependences of output peak voltage and power at different load resistances and excitation voltages were studied theoretically, and the results were verified by finite element modeling (FEM) simulation and experimental measurements. Results show that the theoretical model considering different clamped conditions for non-piezoelectric and piezoelectric layers could make a reliable prediction for the energy harvesting performances of multilayered d 15 mode piezoelectric bimorphs. The multilayered d 15 mode piezoelectric bimorph in a series connection exhibits a higher output peak voltage and power than that of a parallel connection at a load resistance of 1 MΩ. A criterion for choosing a series or parallel connection for a multilayered d 15 mode piezoelectric bimorph is dependent on the comparison of applied load resistance with the critical resistance of about 55 kΩ. The proposed model may provide some useful guidelines for the design and performance optimization of d 15 mode piezoelectric energy harvesters.

  5. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  6. [Polarization Modeling and Analysis of Light Scattering Properties of Multilayer Films on Slightly Rough Substrate].

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Gao, Jun; Wang, Ling-mei; Wang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    To satisfy the demand of multilayer films on polarization detection, polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function of multilayer films on slightly rough substrate is established on the basis of first-order vector perturbation theory and polarization transfer matrix. Due to the function, light scattering polarization properties are studied under multi-factor impacts of two typical targets-monolayer anti-reflection film and multilayer high-reflection films. The result shows that for monolayer anti-reflection film, observing positions have a great influence on the degree of polarization, for the left of the peak increased and right decreased compared with the substrate target. Film target and bare substrate can be distinguished by the degree of polarization in different observation angles. For multilayer high-reflection films, the degree of polarization is significantly associated with the number and optical thickness of layers at different wavelengths of incident light and scattering angles. With the increase of the layer number, the degree of polarization near the mirror reflection area decreases. It reveals that the calculated results coincide with the experimental data, which validates the correctness and rationality of the model. This paper provides a theoretical method for polarization detection of multilayer films target and reflection stealth technology. PMID:27400497

  7. New models of dental education and curricular change: their potential impact on dental education.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Marsha A

    2012-01-01

    The collective body of work over the last seventy-five years in the Journal of Dental Education has chronicled the ongoing critical issues and trends in dental education. The evolution of the curriculum has run in fits and starts across the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. Today, there has been a resurgence in the introspective work of the profession to examine what is taught, how it is taught, in what sequence it is taught, and the context relating dental education to other health professions and the global reach of the educational and professional environment. In the context of contemporary times, individual as well as organizational leadership has refocused the educational environment from teaching to learning. This article discusses the types of curricular changes documented in the Journal of Dental Education. PMID:22262553

  8. The research Of Multilayer Thermal Insulation With Mechanical Properties Based On Model Analysis Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianhua, Yin

    The heat shield of aircraft is made of the major thrusts structure with multilayer thermal insulation part. For protecting against thermo-radiation from larger thrusting force engine,the heat shield is installed around this engine nearby.The multilayer thermal insulation part with multilayer radiation/reflection structure is made of reflection layer and interval layer.At vacuum condition,these materials is higher heat insulation capability than other material,is applied for lots of pats on aircraft extensively.But because of these material is made of metal and nonmetal,it is impossible to receive it's mechanical properties of materials from mechanical tests.These paper describes a new measure of mechanical properties of materials in the heat shield based on model analysis test.At the requirement for the first order lateral frequency,these measure provide for the FEM analysis foundation on the optimization structure of the heat shield.

  9. Modelling self-assembling of colloid particles in multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł; Barbasz, Jakub; Kolasińska, Marta

    2007-04-01

    Simulations of particle multilayer build-up in the layer by layer (LbL) self-assembling processes have been performed according to the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) scheme. The first (precursor) layer having an arbitrary coverage of adsorption centers was generated using the standard RSA scheme pertinent to homogeneous surface. Formation of the consecutive layers (up to 20) was simulated by assuming short-range interaction potentials for two kinds of particles of equal size. Interaction of two particles of different kind resulted in irreversible and localized adsorption upon their contact, whereas particles of the same kind were assumed to interact via the hard potential (no adsorption possible). Using this algorithm theoretical simulations were performed aimed at determining the particle volume fraction as a function of the distance from the interface, as well as the multilayer film roughness and thickness as a function of the number of layers. The simulations revealed that particle concentration distribution in the film was more uniform for low precursor layer density than for higher density, where well-defined layers of closely packed particles appeared. On the other hand, the roughness of the film was the lowest at the highest precursor layer density. It was also predicted theoretically that for low precursor layer density the film thickness increased with the number of layers in a non-linear way. However, for high precursor layer density, the film thickness increased linearly with the number of layers and the average layer thickness was equal to 1.58 of the particle radius, which is close to the closely packed hexagonal layer thickness equal to 1.73. It was concluded by analysing the existing data for colloid particles and polyelectrolytes that the theoretical results can be effectively exploited for interpretation of the LbL processes involving colloid particles and molecular species like polymers or proteins.

  10. Beam-tracing model for predicting sound fields in rooms with multilayer bounding surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, Andrew; Hodgson, Murray

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a wave-based room-prediction model for predicting steady-state sound fields in empty rooms with specularly reflecting, multilayer surfaces. A triangular beam-tracing model with phase, and a transfer-matrix approach to model the surfaces, were involved. Room surfaces were modeled as multilayers of fluid, solid, or porous materials. Biot theory was used in the transfer-matrix formulation of the porous layer. The new model consisted of the transfer-matrix model integrated into the beam-tracing algorithm. The transfer-matrix model was validated by comparing predictions with those by theory, and with experiment. The test surfaces were a glass plate, double drywall panels, double steel panels, a carpeted floor, and a suspended-acoustical ceiling. The beam-tracing model was validated in the cases of three idealized room configurations-a small office, a corridor, and a small industrial workroom-with simple boundary conditions. The number of beams, the reflection order, and the frequency resolution required to obtain accurate results were investigated. Beam-tracing predictions were compared with those by a method-of-images model with phase. The model will be used to study sound fields in rooms with local- or extended-reaction multilayer surfaces.

  11. Testing and numerical modeling of hypervelocity impact damaged Space Station multilayer insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of experiments measuring the degradation of the insulating capabilities of the multilayer insulation (MLI) of the Space Station Freedom, when subjected to hypervelocity impact damage. A simple numerical model was developed for use in an engineering design environment for quick assessment of thermal effect of the impact. The model was validated using results from thermal vacuum tests on MLI with simulated damage. The numerical model results agreed with experimental data.

  12. Analytical Modeling for the Bending Resonant Frequency of Multilayered Microresonators with Variable Cross-Section

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; Plascencia-Mora, Hector; Rodríguez-Morales, Ángel L.; Lu, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered microresonators commonly use sensitive coating or piezoelectric layers for detection of mass and gas. Most of these microresonators have a variable cross-section that complicates the prediction of their fundamental resonant frequency (generally of the bending mode) through conventional analytical models. In this paper, we present an analytical model to estimate the first resonant frequency and deflection curve of single-clamped multilayered microresonators with variable cross-section. The analytical model is obtained using the Rayleigh and Macaulay methods, as well as the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Our model is applied to two multilayered microresonators with piezoelectric excitation reported in the literature. Both microresonators are composed by layers of seven different materials. The results of our analytical model agree very well with those obtained from finite element models (FEMs) and experimental data. Our analytical model can be used to determine the suitable dimensions of the microresonator’s layers in order to obtain a microresonator that operates at a resonant frequency necessary for a particular application. PMID:22164071

  13. Modeling Multilayer Antireflection Coating Systems Based on LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaomerlioglu, Filiz

    Antireflection coatings have had the greatest impact on optics. The antireflection (AR) coating is the critically important technology in obtaining high performance of optoelectronic devices. In the present paper, characteristics of the ferroelectric based multilayered antireflection coating systems are investigated. Multilayer antireflection coatings consisting of insulator thin films have been modeled in the region between the 400 nm and 800 nm visible bands of electromagnetic spectrum to reduce reflectance from ferroelectric based substrate. In this type of antireflection coating we can regulate the optical properties of a system by external electric (or thermal field) and design a broadband low reflection coating system for optoelectronic devices. In order to design and simulate the normal incidence wideband visible multilayer AR coatings, we have developed a Fortran software program based upon Fresnell equations. Different types of layers which are two-different materials like ZnSe and ZrO2 for even-folded multilayer (two-, four-, six-, eight-, ten-, and twelve-layer) antireflection coatings are used. Ferroelectric material, LiNbO3 is used as the substrate. The optical thicknesses of each layer are equal to a quarter-wave thick at a certain wavelength.

  14. Use and Application of Structural Models in Dental Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Rosario H. Yap; McDonald, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Latent abilities of dental students were analyzed as causes and professional achievements as effects, with preadmission performances as indicators of latent abilities. The results demonstrate that structural analysis focuses on the direct impact of the quality of dental school education. (Author/MLW)

  15. A General Reliability Model for Ni-BaTiO3-Based Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Donhang

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with Ni electrode and BaTiO3 dielectric material for potential space project applications requires an in-depth understanding of their reliability. A general reliability model for Ni-BaTiO3 MLCC is developed and discussed. The model consists of three parts: a statistical distribution; an acceleration function that describes how a capacitor's reliability life responds to the external stresses, and an empirical function that defines contribution of the structural and constructional characteristics of a multilayer capacitor device, such as the number of dielectric layers N, dielectric thickness d, average grain size, and capacitor chip size A. Application examples are also discussed based on the proposed reliability model for Ni-BaTiO3 MLCCs.

  16. Modeling and sensitivity analysis of mass transfer in active multilayer polymeric film for food applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bedane, T.; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L. Marra, F.

    2015-12-17

    The barrier performance of multilayer polymeric films for food applications has been significantly improved by incorporating oxygen scavenging materials. The scavenging activity depends on parameters such as diffusion coefficient, solubility, concentration of scavenger loaded and the number of available reactive sites. These parameters influence the barrier performance of the film in different ways. Virtualization of the process is useful to characterize, design and optimize the barrier performance based on physical configuration of the films. Also, the knowledge of values of parameters is important to predict the performances. Inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis are sole way to find reasonable values of poorly defined, unmeasured parameters and to analyze the most influencing parameters. Thus, the objective of this work was to develop a model to predict barrier properties of multilayer film incorporated with reactive layers and to analyze and characterize their performances. Polymeric film based on three layers of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), with a core reactive layer, at different thickness configurations was considered in the model. A one dimensional diffusion equation with reaction was solved numerically to predict the concentration of oxygen diffused into the polymer taking into account the reactive ability of the core layer. The model was solved using commercial software for different film layer configurations and sensitivity analysis based on inverse modeling was carried out to understand the effect of physical parameters. The results have shown that the use of sensitivity analysis can provide physical understanding of the parameters which highly affect the gas permeation into the film. Solubility and the number of available reactive sites were the factors mainly influencing the barrier performance of three layered polymeric film. Multilayer films slightly modified the steady transport properties in comparison to net PET, giving a small reduction

  17. Modeling and sensitivity analysis of mass transfer in active multilayer polymeric film for food applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedane, T.; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.; Marra, F.

    2015-12-01

    The barrier performance of multilayer polymeric films for food applications has been significantly improved by incorporating oxygen scavenging materials. The scavenging activity depends on parameters such as diffusion coefficient, solubility, concentration of scavenger loaded and the number of available reactive sites. These parameters influence the barrier performance of the film in different ways. Virtualization of the process is useful to characterize, design and optimize the barrier performance based on physical configuration of the films. Also, the knowledge of values of parameters is important to predict the performances. Inverse modeling and sensitivity analysis are sole way to find reasonable values of poorly defined, unmeasured parameters and to analyze the most influencing parameters. Thus, the objective of this work was to develop a model to predict barrier properties of multilayer film incorporated with reactive layers and to analyze and characterize their performances. Polymeric film based on three layers of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), with a core reactive layer, at different thickness configurations was considered in the model. A one dimensional diffusion equation with reaction was solved numerically to predict the concentration of oxygen diffused into the polymer taking into account the reactive ability of the core layer. The model was solved using commercial software for different film layer configurations and sensitivity analysis based on inverse modeling was carried out to understand the effect of physical parameters. The results have shown that the use of sensitivity analysis can provide physical understanding of the parameters which highly affect the gas permeation into the film. Solubility and the number of available reactive sites were the factors mainly influencing the barrier performance of three layered polymeric film. Multilayer films slightly modified the steady transport properties in comparison to net PET, giving a small reduction

  18. Reduction of fear-related dental management problems with use of filmed modeling.

    PubMed

    Melamed, B G; Weinstein, D; Katin-Borland, M; Hawes, R

    1975-04-01

    In this study of the modification of anxiety-related disruptive behavior in dental treatment, matched groups of inner-city children attending a pedodontic clinic were shown a videotaped demonstration of a 4-year-old black child undergoing a dental restorative procedure or were given an unrelated drawing task before dental treatment. Children who viewed the videotape demonstration of a peer model coping with dental procedures showed significantly fewer fear-related disruptive behaviors during restoration of lesions. Observations of children's anxiety levels made by dentists and independent observers validated the effectiveness of viewing the videotaped demonstration. No significant correlation was found between the children's reports of their anxiety and their behavior during dental treatment. PMID:123932

  19. Modeling of the Thermal Protection of a Multilayer Material Under Fire Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, V. A.; Yakimov, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of the theoretical and known experimental results, a refined mathematical model of the thermochemical destruction of a multilayer heat-shield coating has been developed. Account of the flow across the body has made it possible to forecast more exactly the state of the protected structure under fire conditions. A comparison between the results of numerical calculations and the known data has been made.

  20. Modeling of the Thermal Protection of a Multilayer Material Under Fire Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, V. A.; Yakimov, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of the theoretical and known experimental results, a refined mathematical model of the thermochemical destruction of a multilayer heat-shield coating has been developed. Account of the flow across the body has made it possible to forecast more exactly the state of the protected structure under fire conditions. A comparison between the results of numerical calculations and the known data has been made.

  1. An Evaluation of in Vivo Desensitization and Video Modeling to Increase Compliance with Dental Procedures in Persons with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Peterson, Blake; Gubin, Amber; Jurgens, Mandy; Selders, Andrew; Dickinson, Jessica; Barenz, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Fear of dental procedures deters many individuals with mental retardation from accepting dental treatment. This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of two procedures, in vivo desensitization and video modeling, for increasing compliance with dental procedures in participants with severe or profound mental retardation. Desensitization…

  2. Multi-layer model of correlated energy prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grine, Slimane; Diko, Pavel

    2010-03-01

    In this article we develop an extension of the affine jump-diffusion modeling framework and use it to build an intuitive and tractable model of an energy price complex. The development is motivated by the need to model prices of electricity while capturing their dependence on the price of other energy commodities. Such a model is essential for valuing a range of typical derivatives traded in the electricity markets: cross-commodity spread options, cross-location spread options, fuel-switching powerplants, etc. We give an approximate pricing method for these derivatives together with precise error bound estimates.

  3. Material parameter computation for multi-layered vocal fold models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bastian; Stingl, Michael; Leugering, Günter; Berry, David A.; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Today, the prevention and treatment of voice disorders is an ever-increasing health concern. Since many occupations rely on verbal communication, vocal health is necessary just to maintain one’s livelihood. Commonly applied models to study vocal fold vibrations and air flow distributions are self sustained physical models of the larynx composed of artificial silicone vocal folds. Choosing appropriate mechanical parameters for these vocal fold models while considering simplifications due to manufacturing restrictions is difficult but crucial for achieving realistic behavior. In the present work, a combination of experimental and numerical approaches to compute material parameters for synthetic vocal fold models is presented. The material parameters are derived from deformation behaviors of excised human larynges. The resulting deformations are used as reference displacements for a tracking functional to be optimized. Material optimization was applied to three-dimensional vocal fold models based on isotropic and transverse-isotropic material laws, considering both a layered model with homogeneous material properties on each layer and an inhomogeneous model. The best results exhibited a transversal-isotropic inhomogeneous (i.e., not producible) model. For the homogeneous model (three layers), the transversal-isotropic material parameters were also computed for each layer yielding deformations similar to the measured human vocal fold deformations. PMID:21476672

  4. Finite element analysis and equivalent parallel-resistance model for conductive multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The standard collinear four-point probe method is an indispensable tool and has been extensively used for characterizing conductive thin films with homogeneous and isotropic electrical properties. In this paper, we conduct three-dimensional (3D) finite element simulations on conductive multilayer films to study the relationship between the reading of the four-point probe and the conductivity of the individual layers. We find that a multilayer film may be modeled as a simple equivalent circuit with multiple resistances, connected in parallel for a wide range of resistivity and thickness ratios, as long as its total thickness is smaller than approximately half of the probe spacing. As a result, we may determine the resistivity of each layer sequentially by applying the four-point probe, with the original correction factor π/ln(2), after deposition of each layer.

  5. Improvement of the multilayer perceptron for air quality modelling through an adaptive learning scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, K. I.; Yuen, K. V.; Mok, K. M.

    2013-09-01

    Multilayer perceptron (MLP), normally trained by the offline backpropagation algorithm, could not adapt to the changing air quality system and subsequently underperforms. To improve this, the extended Kalman filter is adopted into the learning algorithm to build a time-varying multilayer perceptron (TVMLP) in this study. Application of the TVMLP to model the daily averaged concentration of the respirable suspended particulates with aerodynamic diameter of not more than 10 µm (PM10) in Macau shows statistically significant improvement on the performance indicators over the MLP counterpart. In addition, the adaptive learning algorithm could also address explicitly the uncertainty of the prediction so that confidence intervals can be provided. More importantly, the adaptiveness of the TVMLP gives prediction improvement on the region of higher particulate concentrations that the public concerns.

  6. Modeling of Multi-Layered Protection Systems for Chloride Penetration in Concrete Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harajli, Ali A.

    Modeling of Multi-Layered Protection Systems for Chloride Penetration in Concrete Bridge Decks. This paper covers the development of a new methodology for predicting the chloride concentration and corrosion initiation times for a multi-layer protection overlay system. The first topic will be presenting an innovative method to predict the chloride concentrations using different diffusion coefficients for each protective layer. The new method covers the cases where the applied surface chloride concentrations are either a constant or linear functions with time. The second topic will implement the results from field data about the chloride variations due to the presence of applied topical layers for comparison with the theoretical models. This section will also apply damage factors that are time-dependent to simulate external factors such as traffic loading or vibrations. The third topic will investigate the sensitivity of the single and multi-layer systems due to diffusivity parameter changes. The fourth topic will analyze the random variation of the diffusivity values to predict the mean and standard deviation of chloride concentrations. The diffusivity values are selected from published values by NIST and are based on certain water cement (w/c) ratios.

  7. The feature-based modeling of standard tooth in a dental prosthetic database.

    PubMed

    Song, Ya-Li; Li, Jia; Huang, Tian; Gao, Ping

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a feature-based approach that creates standard teeth models in database to provide the topological construction of the model for dental CAD. The approach arises from the basic idea that every tooth has its individual features and can be implemented in three steps. In the first step, the features on teeth are defined according to the oral anatomy. In the second step, Nurbs surfaces are applied so that the forms of standard teeth can be represented via establishing the topological relationship of features. Here, these feature-based surfaces have the capability of being local controlled that guarantees the accuracy of dental design. In the last step, feature curves are presented to describe the topological construction of dental ridges and grooves. Through these curves, the occlusal surface can be changed globally, simplifying dental design. It is finished with the establishment of standard database composed of 28 standard models constructed by feature-based surfaces and feature curves. PMID:17281869

  8. Advertising, Consensus, and Aging in Multilayer Sznajd Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Christian

    In the Sznajd consensus model on the square lattice, two people who agree in their opinions convince their neighbors of this opinion. We generalize it to many layers representing many age levels, and check if a consensus among all layers is possible. Advertising sometimes, but not always, produces a consensus on the advertised opinion.

  9. Inverse Monte Carlo method in a multilayered tissue model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    Model based data analysis of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy data enables the estimation of optical and structural tissue parameters. The aim of this study was to present an inverse Monte Carlo method based on spectra from two source-detector distances (0.4 and 1.2 mm), using a multilayered tissue model. The tissue model variables include geometrical properties, light scattering properties, tissue chromophores such as melanin and hemoglobin, oxygen saturation and average vessel diameter. The method utilizes a small set of presimulated Monte Carlo data for combinations of different levels of epidermal thickness and tissue scattering. The path length distributions in the different layers are stored and the effect of the other parameters is added in the post-processing. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of tissue-like models containing discrete blood vessels, evaluating blood tissue fraction and oxygenation. It was also compared to a homogeneous model. The multilayer model performed better than the homogeneous model and all tissue parameters significantly improved spectral fitting. Recorded in vivo spectra were fitted well at both distances, which we previously found was not possible with a homogeneous model. No absolute intensity calibration is needed and the algorithm is fast enough for real-time processing. PMID:22559695

  10. Analytical modeling of multi-layered Printed Circuit Board dedicated to electronic component thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier-Vinard, Eric; Laraqi, Najib; Dia, Cheikh-Tidiane; Nguyen, Minh-Nhat; Bissuel, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Electronic components are continuously getting smaller and embedding more and more powered functions which exacerbate the temperature rise in component/board interconnect areas. For still air conditions, the heat spreading of the component power is mainly done through the surrounding metallic planes of its electronic board. Their design optimization is henceforth mandatory to control the temperature and to preserve component reliability. To allow the electronic designer to early analyze the limits of the power dissipation of miniaturized devices, an analytical model of a multi-layered electronic board was established with the purpose to assess the validity of conventional board modeling approach. For decades, numerous authors have been promoting a homogenous single layer model that summed up the layers of the board using effective orthotropic thermal properties. The derived compact model depends on thermal properties approximation which is commonly based on parallel conduction model given a linear rule of mixture. The work presents the thermal behavior comparison of a detailed multi-layer representation to its deducted compact model for an extensive set of variable parameters, such as heat transfer coefficients, effective thermal conductivities calculation models, number of trace layers, trace coverage or source size. The results highlight the fact that the conventional practices for PCB modeling can dramatically underestimate source temperatures when their size is getting very small.

  11. Modelling the Longevity of Dental Restorations by means of a CBR System

    PubMed Central

    Aliaga, Ignacio J.; Vera, Vicente; García, Alvaro E.

    2015-01-01

    The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network. PMID:25866792

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of New Approach to Digital Dental Model Articulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Bing; Xia, James J.; Gateno, Jaime; Xiong, Zixiang; Teichgraeber, John F.; Lasky, Robert E.; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of our newly developed approach to digital dental model articulation. Materials and Methods Twelve sets of stone dental models from patients with craniomaxillofacial deformities were used for validation. All the models had stable occlusion and no evidence of early contact. The stone models were hand articulated to the maximal intercuspation (MI) position and scanned using a 3-dimensional surface laser scanner. These digital dental models at the MI position served as the control group. To establish an experimental group, each mandibular dental model was disarticulated from its original MI position to 80 initial positions. Using a regular office personal computer, they were digitally articulated to the MI position using our newly developed approach. These rearticulated mandibular models served as the experimental group. Finally, the translational, rotational, and surface deviations in the mandibular position were calculated between the experimental and control groups, and statistical analyses were performed. Results All the digital dental models were successfully articulated. Between the control and experimental groups, the largest translational difference in mandibular position was within 0.2 mm ± 0.6 mm. The largest rotational difference was within 0.1° ± 1.1°. The averaged surface deviation was 0.08 ± 0.07. The results of the Bland and Altman method of assessing measurement agreement showed tight limits for the translational, rotational, and surface deviations. In addition, the final positions of the mandibular articulated from the 80 initial positions were absolutely agreed on. Conclusion The results of our study have demonstrated that using our approach, the digital dental models can be accurately and effectively articulated to the MI position. In addition, the 3-dimensional surface geometry of the mandibular teeth played a more important role in digital dental articulation than the

  13. Continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials and its application to multilayer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellmann, Roman; Ricoeur, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a micromechanical continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials is presented. As a constitutive law it is implemented into a finite element (FE) code. The model is based on micromechanical considerations of domain switching and its interaction with microcrack growth and coalescence. A FE analysis of a multilayer actuator is performed, showing the initiation of damage zones at the electrode tips during the poling process. Further, the influence of mechanical pre-stressing on damage evolution and actuating properties is investigated. The results provided in this work give useful information on the damage of advanced piezoelectric devices and their optimization.

  14. Arcjet Testing and Thermal Model Development for Multilayer Felt Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Scott, Carl Douglas; Papa, Steven V.

    2012-01-01

    Felt Reusable Surface Insulation was used extensively on leeward external surfaces of the Shuttle Orbiter, where the material is reusable for temperatures up to 670 K. For application on leeward surfaces of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, where predicted temperatures reach 1620 K, the material functions as a pyrolyzing conformal ablator. An arcjet test series was conducted to assess the performance of multilayer Felt Reusable Surface Insulation at high temperatures, and a thermal-response, pyrolysis, and ablation model was developed. Model predictions compare favorably with the arcjet test data

  15. Mass Conservation in Modeling Moisture Diffusion in Multi-Layer Carbon Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2009-01-01

    Moisture diffusion in multi-layer carbon composite structures is difficult to model using finite difference methods due to the discontinuity in concentrations between adjacent layers of differing materials. Applying a mass conserving approach at these boundaries proved to be effective at accurately predicting moisture uptake for a sample exposed to a fixed temperature and relative humidity. Details of the model developed are presented and compared with actual moisture uptake data gathered over 130 days from a graphite epoxy composite sandwich coupon with a Rohacell foam core.

  16. A multilayer shallow model for dry granular flows with the -rheology: application to granular collapse on erodible beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Garres-Díaz, J.; Mangeney, A.; Narbona-Reina, G.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present a multilayer shallow model to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations with hydrostatic pressure and the $\\mu(I)$-rheology. The main advantages of this approximation are (i) the low cost associated with the numerical treatment of the free surface of the modelled flows, (ii) exact conservation of mass and (iii) the ability to compute 3D profiles of the velocities in the directions along and normal to the slope. The derivation of the model follows [14] and introduces a dimensional analysis based on the shallow flow hypothesis. The proposed first order multilayer model fully satisfies a dissipative energy equation. A comparison with an analytical solution with a non-constant normal profile of the downslope velocity demonstrates the accuracy of the numerical model. Finally, by comparing the numerical results with experimental data, we show that the proposed multilayer model with the $\\mu(I)$-rheology reproduces qualitatively the effect of the erodible bed on granular flow dynamics and deposits, such as the increase of runout distance with increasing thickness of the erodible bed. We show that the use of a constant friction coefficient in the multilayer model leads to the opposite behaviour. This multilayer model captures the different normal profiles of the downslope velocity during the different phases of the flow (acceleration, stopping, etc.) including the presence of static and flowing zones within the granular column.

  17. Modeling of the photodetector based on the multilayer graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiyue; Niu, Yanxiong; Yin, Yiheng; Liu, Shuai

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nanoribbon (GNR), which has unique properties and advantages, is a crucial component of nanoelectornic devices, especially in the development of photoelectric detectors. In this work, an infrared photodetector based on the structure of stacked multiple-GNRs, which is separated by a little thick barrier layers (made of tungsten disulfide or related materials) to prevent tunneling current, is proposed and modeled. Operation of photoelectric detector is related to the electron cascaded radiative transition in the adjacent GNRs strengthened by the electrons heated due to the incident light. With a developed model, the working principle is analyzed and the relationships for the photocurrent and dark current as functions of the intensity of the incident radiation are derived. The spectral dependence of the responsivity and detectivity for graphene nanoribbons photodetector (GNRs-PT) with different Fermi energy, band gaps and numbers of GNRs layers are analyzed as well. The results demonstrate that the spectral characteristics depend on the GNRs band gap, which shows a potential on GNRs-PT application in the multi-wavelength systems. In addition, GNRs-PT has a better spectrum property and higher responsivity compared to photodetectors based on InxGaxAs in room temperature.

  18. FPGA Implementation of Multilayer Perceptron for Modeling of Photovoltaic panel

    SciTech Connect

    Mekki, H.; Belhout, K.; Mellit, A.; Salhi, H.

    2008-06-12

    The Number of electronic applications using artificial neural network-based solutions has increased considerably in the last few years. However, their applications in photovoltaic systems are very limited. This paper introduces the preliminary result of the modeling and simulation of photovoltaic panel based on neural network and VHDL-language. In fact, an experimental database of meteorological data (irradiation, temperature) and output electrical generation signals of the PV-panel (current and voltage) has been used in this study. The inputs of the ANN-PV-panel are the daily total irradiation and mean average temperature while the outputs are the current and voltage generated from the panel. Firstly, a dataset of 4x364 have been used for training the network. Subsequently, the neural network (MLP) corresponding to PV-panel is simulated using VHDL language based on the saved weights and bias of the network. Simulation results of the trained MLP-PV panel based on Matlab and VHDL are presented. The proposed PV-panel model based ANN and VHDL permit to evaluate the performance PV-panel using only the environmental factors and involves less computational efforts, and it can be used for predicting the output electrical energy from the PV-panel.

  19. Density functional theory modeling of multilayer "epitaxial" graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si; Bongiorno, Angelo

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Graphene oxide (GO) is a complex material of both fundamental and applied interest. Elucidating the structure of GO is crucial to achieve control over its properties and technological applications. GO is a nonstoichiometric and hygroscopic material with a lamellar structure, and its physical chemical properties depend critically on synthesis procedures and postsynthesis treatments. Numerous efforts are in place to both understand and exploit this versatile layered carbon material. This Account reports on recent density functional theory (DFT) studies of "epitaxial" graphene oxide (hereafter EGO), a type of GO obtained by oxidation of graphene films grown epitaxially on silicon carbide. Here, we rely on selected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of EGO, and we discuss in great detail how we utilized DFT-based techniques to project out from the experimental data basic atomistic information about the chemistry and structure of these films. This Account provides an example as to how DFT modeling can be used to elucidate complex materials such as GO from a limited set of experimental information. EGO exhibits a uniform layered structure, consisting of a stack of graphene planes hosting predominantly epoxide and hydroxyl groups, and water molecules intercalated between the oxidized carbon layers. Here, we first focus on XPS measurements of EGO, and we use DFT to generate realistic model structures, calculate core-level chemical shifts, and through the comparison with experiment, gain insight on the chemical composition and metastability characteristics of EGO. DFT calculations are then used to devise a simplistic but accurate simulation scheme to study thermodynamic and kinetic stability and to predict the intralayer structure of EGO films aged at room temperature. Our simulations show that aged EGO encompasses layers with nanosized oxidized domains presenting a high concentration of

  20. Multilayer Markov Random Field models for change detection in optical remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, Csaba; Shadaydeh, Maha; Kato, Zoltan; Szirányi, Tamás; Zerubia, Josiane

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we give a comparative study on three Multilayer Markov Random Field (MRF) based solutions proposed for change detection in optical remote sensing images, called Multicue MRF, Conditional Mixed Markov model, and Fusion MRF. Our purposes are twofold. On one hand, we highlight the significance of the focused model family and we set them against various state-of-the-art approaches through a thematic analysis and quantitative tests. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of class comparison vs. direct approaches, usage of training data, various targeted application fields and different ways of Ground Truth generation, meantime informing the Reader in which roles the Multilayer MRFs can be efficiently applied. On the other hand we also emphasize the differences between the three focused models at various levels, considering the model structures, feature extraction, layer interpretation, change concept definition, parameter tuning and performance. We provide qualitative and quantitative comparison results using principally a publicly available change detection database which contains aerial image pairs and Ground Truth change masks. We conclude that the discussed models are competitive against alternative state-of-the-art solutions, if one uses them as pre-processing filters in multitemporal optical image analysis. In addition, they cover together a large range of applications, considering the different usage options of the three approaches.

  1. Nonlinear numerical modelling and experimental validation of multilayer piezoelectric vibration energy scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blažević, D.; Zelenika, S.

    2015-05-01

    Scavenging of low-level ambient vibrations i.e. the conversion of kinetic into electric energy, is proven as effective means of powering low consumption electronic devices such as wireless sensor nodes. Cantilever based scavengers are characterised by several advantages and thus thoroughly investigated; analytical models based on a distributed parameter approach, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and eigenvalue analysis have thus been developed and experimentally verified. Finite element models (FEM) have also been proposed employing different modelling approaches and commercial software packages with coupled analysis capabilities. An approach of using a FEM analysis of a piezoelectric cantilever bimorph under harmonic excitation is used in this work. Modal, harmonic and linear and nonlinear transient analyses are performed. Different complex dynamic effects are observed and compared to the results obtained by using a distributed parameter model. The influence of two types of finite elements and three mesh densities is also investigated. A complex bimorph cantilever, based on commercially available Midé Technology® Volture energy scavengers, is then considered. These scavengers are characterised by an intricate multilayer structure not investigated so far in literature. An experimental set-up is developed to evaluate the behaviour of the considered class of devices. The results of the modal and the harmonic FEM analyses of the behaviour of the multilayer scavengers are verified experimentally for three different tip masses and 12 different electrical load values. A satisfying agreement between numerical and experimental results is achieved.

  2. Accuracy of lumped-parameter representations for heat conduction modeling in multilayer slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Paola; Guattari, Claudia; de Lieto Vollaro, Roberto; Evangelisti, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Heat conduction in homogeneous solids can be studied by resorting to one-dimensional schemes, as is often done, e.g., for building construction elements. In such situations, a simple model often employed makes use of an electrical analogy between temperature and heat flux, on one side, and voltage and electrical current on the other side. Within this framework, a few lumped-parameter representations have been described in literature to describe the thermal behavior of a single homogeneous slab or of multilayer slabs. Such models have the advantage of providing some physical insight into the phenomenon of one-dimensional heat conduction, by conveying the concepts of thermal resistance and thermal capacitance, the latter related to heat storage ability. There is, however, a certain degree of approximation in such models. The simplifying assumptions and approximations underlying these approaches will be reviewed and discussed in this contribution. The accuracy of some lumped-parameter model will be analyzed in order to show under which circumstances the approximate solutions can be satisfactorily employed. In particular, the focus will be on the comparison of the predictions that approximate and accurate methods provide when studying the influence of layer order and distribution on the thermal performance of multilayer structures.

  3. Interdependent Multi-Layer Networks: Modeling and Survivability Analysis with Applications to Space-Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Castet, Jean-Francois; Saleh, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a novel approach and algorithmic tools for the modeling and survivability analysis of networks with heterogeneous nodes, and examines their application to space-based networks. Space-based networks (SBNs) allow the sharing of spacecraft on-orbit resources, such as data storage, processing, and downlink. Each spacecraft in the network can have different subsystem composition and functionality, thus resulting in node heterogeneity. Most traditional survivability analyses of networks assume node homogeneity and as a result, are not suited for the analysis of SBNs. This work proposes that heterogeneous networks can be modeled as interdependent multi-layer networks, which enables their survivability analysis. The multi-layer aspect captures the breakdown of the network according to common functionalities across the different nodes, and it allows the emergence of homogeneous sub-networks, while the interdependency aspect constrains the network to capture the physical characteristics of each node. Definitions of primitives of failure propagation are devised. Formal characterization of interdependent multi-layer networks, as well as algorithmic tools for the analysis of failure propagation across the network are developed and illustrated with space applications. The SBN applications considered consist of several networked spacecraft that can tap into each other's Command and Data Handling subsystem, in case of failure of its own, including the Telemetry, Tracking and Command, the Control Processor, and the Data Handling sub-subsystems. Various design insights are derived and discussed, and the capability to perform trade-space analysis with the proposed approach for various network characteristics is indicated. The select results here shown quantify the incremental survivability gains (with respect to a particular class of threats) of the SBN over the traditional monolith spacecraft. Failure of the connectivity between nodes is also examined, and the

  4. Experimental validation of coupled heat, air and moisture transfer modeling in multilayer building components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroukhi, M. Y.; Abahri, K.; Belarbi, R.; Limam, K.; Nouviaire, A.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper lies to study the coupled heat, air and moisture transfer in multi-layer building materials. Concerning the modeling part, the interest is to predict the hygrothermal behavior, by developing a macroscopic model that incorporates simultaneously the diffusive, convective and conductive effects on the building elements. Heat transfer is considered in the strongly coupled situation where the mass and heat flux are temperature, vapor pressure and total pressure dependents. The model input parameters are evaluated experimentally through the development of various experimental prototypes in the laboratory. Thereafter, an experimental setup has been established in order to evaluate the hygrothermal process of several multilayer walls configurations. The experimental procedure consists to follow the temperature and relative humidity evolutions within the samples thickness, submitted to controlled and fixed boundary conditions. This procedure points out diverging conclusion between different testing materials combinations (e.g. red-brick and polystyrene). In fact, the hygrothermal behavior of the tested configurations is completely dependent on both materials selection and their thermophysical properties. Finally, comparison between numerical and experimental results showed good agreement with acceptable errors margins with an average of 3 %.

  5. Fundamental studies of interfacial rheology at multilayered model polymers for coextrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huagui; Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim

    2015-05-01

    Fundamental studies have been devoted to the interfacial phenomena at multilayered systems based on two model compatible polymers of PVDF and PMMA with varying molar masses. Linear and nonlinear rheology are demonstrated to be sensitive to the presence of diffuse interphase triggered at polymer/polymer interface. Firstly, the interdiffusion kinetics as well as the interphase development have been investigated using SAOS measurements with results analyzed under Doi-Edwards theory. The PMMA/PVDF mixture, has been examined to own close component monomeric friction coefficients. Based on this physics, a new rheological model was developed to quantify the interdiffusion coefficients. Thereby, rheological and geometrical properties of the interphase have been quantified, as validated by SEM-EDX. Secondly, step strain, shear and uniaxial extension startup were carried out to investigate their sensitivity to the diffuse interphase. An original model was proposed for the stress relaxation of multilayer and that of the interphase. Entanglement lack and weak entanglement intensity at the interface/diffuse interphase make them to be subsequently readily to suffer from interfacial yielding under large deformations. Finally, the interphase development coupled to flow in coextrusion has been considered. Net result between negative effect of chain orientation and favorable effect of flow has been shown to broaden the interphase. Its presence during coextrusion process was demonstrated to significantly weaken the interfacial instabilities.

  6. Modeling Dental Health Care Workers' Risk of Occupational Infection from Bloodborne Pathogens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capilouto, Eli; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The brief paper offers a model which permits quantification of the dental health care workers' risk of occupationally acquiring infection from bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus. The model incorporates five parameters such as the probability that any individual patient is infected and number of patients…

  7. Modeling and Measurement of the Response of Small Antennas Near Multilayered Two or Three-Dimensional Dielectric Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, Lorenzo Angel

    1992-09-01

    A theory of the circular loop antenna constructed from finite conductivity wire is developed via a Fourier series expansion of the currents in the loop. Models for a family of small loop antennas are also presented. A new high sensitivity and selectivity heterodyne fiber optic based electromagnetic field detector is developed compatible with open antenna range measurements made at low signal levels and in the presence of strong interfering signals. A new analytical solution pertaining to the response of a disk loaded dipole antenna representing a dipole configured on a lossy dielectric medium is developed using a field compensation theorem and a geometrical theory of diffraction. The multipole expansions for the scattered fields of a multilayered infinite cylinder illuminated by oblique incidence plane wave are formulated and programmed for numerical analysis. The response of cylinders with constitutive parameters reflecting those used in human phantoms are calculated. The response of a small antenna proximal to a multilayered cylinder is analyzed. The scattered fields from multilayered bodies are coupled to a small wire antenna using a combined methods induced electromagnetic force (EMF) technique. New results concerning the response of a loop antenna near a multilayered body obtained via a zero and first phase current model are presented. The new technique is applied in the analysis of human phantoms tested in an open field antenna range. Validation of the theory of multilayered human phantoms with measurements using the new detector is demonstrated.

  8. Assessment of coastal management options by means of multilayered ecosystem models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobre, Ana M.; Ferreira, João G.; Nunes, João P.; Yan, Xiaojun; Bricker, Suzanne; Corner, Richard; Groom, Steve; Gu, Haifeng; Hawkins, Anthony J. S.; Hutson, Rory; Lan, Dongzhao; Silva, João D. Lencart e.; Pascoe, Philip; Telfer, Trevor; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a multilayered ecosystem modelling approach that combines the simulation of the biogeochemistry of a coastal ecosystem with the simulation of the main forcing functions, such as catchment loading and aquaculture activities. This approach was developed as a tool for sustainable management of coastal ecosystems. A key feature is to simulate management scenarios that account for changes in multiple uses and enable assessment of cumulative impacts of coastal activities. The model was applied to a coastal zone in China with large aquaculture production and multiple catchment uses, and where management efforts to improve water quality are under way. Development scenarios designed in conjunction with local managers and aquaculture producers include the reduction of fish cages and treatment of wastewater. Despite the reduction in nutrient loading simulated in three different scenarios, inorganic nutrient concentrations in the bay were predicted to exceed the thresholds for poor quality defined by Chinese seawater quality legislation. For all scenarios there is still a Moderate High to High nutrient loading from the catchment, so further reductions might be enacted, together with additional decreases in fish cage culture. The model predicts that overall, shellfish production decreases by 10%-28% using any of these development scenarios, principally because shellfish growth is being sustained by the substances to be reduced for improvement of water quality. The model outcomes indicate that this may be counteracted by zoning of shellfish aquaculture at the ecosystem level in order to optimize trade-offs between productivity and environmental effects. The present case study exemplifies the value of multilayered ecosystem modelling as a tool for Integrated Coastal Zone Management and for the adoption of ecosystem approaches for marine resource management. This modelling approach can be applied worldwide, and may be particularly useful for the application of

  9. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. PMID:27294283

  10. A Corrected Formulation of the Multilayer Model (MLM) for Inferring Gaseous Dry Deposition to Vegetated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Rick D.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Meyers, Tilden P.; Hicks, Bruce B.

    2014-01-01

    The Multilayer Model (MLM) has been used for many years to infer dry deposition fluxes from measured trace species concentrations and standard meteorological measurements for national networks in the U.S., including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet). MLM utilizes a resistance analogy to calculate deposition velocities appropriate for whole vegetative canopies, while employing a multilayer integration to account for vertically varying meteorology, canopy morphology and radiative transfer within the canopy. However, the MLM formulation, as it was originally presented and as it has been subsequently employed, contains a non-physical representation related to the leaf-level quasi-laminar boundary layer resistance that affects the calculation of the total canopy resistance. In this note, the non-physical representation of the canopy resistance as originally formulated in MLM is discussed and a revised, physically consistent, formulation is suggested as a replacement. The revised canopy resistance formulation reduces estimates of HNO3 deposition velocities by as much as 38% during mid-day as compared to values generated by the original formulation. Inferred deposition velocities for SO2 and O3 are not significantly altered by the change in formulation (less than 3%). Inferred deposition loadings of oxidized and total nitrogen from CASTNet data may be reduced by 10-20% and 5-10%, respectively, for the Eastern U. S. when employing the revised formulation of MLM as compared to the original formulation.

  11. The Integration of Ecological processes into a Multi-layer Higher order closure Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. Y.; Paw U, K. T.; Chen, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    The ecological impacts on biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes were investigated by a series of simulations conducted by a multi-layer higher order closure land surface model (UCD-ACASA) driven by a variety of meteorological and ecological conditions. The results show that the implementation of a more realistic ecological dataset, once carefully quality controlled, can significantly improve the biogeophysical and biogeochemical simulations, which suggests that the ecological impacts on surface layer simulations are as important as the reliability of the selected land surface model. Therefore, the ability to simulate realistic ecological conditions is imperative and beneficial to improve weather and climate simulations. We coupled the ecological processes in UCD-ACASA by adapting the fully prognostic plant carbon and nitrogen dynamics from the version 4.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). The simulated ecological conditions are sensitive to both radiative transfer processes and leaf distribution inside the canopy, and the multi-layer feature built in UCD-ACASA enables it to describe these properties more realistically as compared to the other big-leaf models. We conducted another set of simulations to examine the reliability of the simulated biogeophysical, biogeochemical and ecological results. The simulated Leaf Area Index (LAI) was compared with a high resolution remotely sensed LAI dataset, and the results show that the simulated LAI tends to overestimate mean LAI and underestimate annual LAI variation at the selected sites. However, the simulated LAI is reasonable enough to produce comparable simulation results against the simulations driven directly by remotely sensed LAI for the tested biogeophysical and biogeochemical fluxes. The results show that ecological impacts on biogeophysical and biogeochemical simulations are significant, and the implementation of biogeochemical processes into a land surface model has the potential to improve weather and

  12. A multilayer model of time dependent deformation following an earthquake on a strike-slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer model of the Earth to calculate finite element of time dependent deformation and stress following an earthquake on a strike slip fault is discussed. The model involves shear properties of an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard viscoelastic linear solid lower lithosphere, a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere and an elastic mesosphere. Systematic variations of fault and layer depths and comparisons with simpler elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic asthenosphere calculations are analyzed. Both the creep of the lower lithosphere and astenosphere contribute to the postseismic deformation. The magnitude of the deformation is enhanced by a short distance between the bottom of the fault (slip zone) and the top of the creep region but is less sensitive to the thickness of the creeping layer. Postseismic restressing is increased as the lower lithosphere becomes more viscoelastic, but the tendency for the width of the restressed zone to growth with time is retarded.

  13. Tyre/road interaction noise—A 3D viscoelastic multilayer model of a tyre belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boy, D. J.; Dowling, A. P.

    2009-05-01

    Vehicle noise is an increasing local environmental problem. For cars, above a steady speed of 40 km/h the noise produced by the interaction of the tyres with the road surface is the dominant noise source. In order to be able to predict this noise, the vibration characteristics of a stationary tyre must be determined. A multilayer viscoelastic cylindrical representation of the tyre belt, located between the sidewalls of the tyre and excluding the tread, is provided which yields the displacement and velocity response of the tyre belt when excited in the radial or tangential directions for a wide range of excitation frequencies, using only data from the design process. This model includes a representation of an air cavity and sidewalls and the response of the tyre belt is determined in both the frequency-wavenumber and time-spatial domains. The model can then be used to determine the noise of a tyre rolling on a rough road.

  14. A generalized voter model with time-decaying memory on a multilayer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Xu, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Da; Zhong, Chen-Yang; Qiu, Tian; Shi, Yong-Dong; Wang, Li-Liang

    2016-09-01

    By incorporating a multilayer network and time-decaying memory into the original voter model, we investigate the coupled effects of spatial and temporal accumulation of peer pressure on the consensus. Heterogeneity in peer pressure and the time-decaying mechanism are both shown to be detrimental to the consensus. We find the transition points below which a consensus can always be reached and above which two opposed opinions are more likely to coexist. Our mean-field analysis indicates that the phase transitions in the present model are governed by the cumulative influence of peer pressure and the updating threshold. We find a functional relation between the consensus threshold and the decay rate of the influence of peer is found. As to the pressure. The time required to reach a consensus is governed by the coupling of the memory length and the decay rate. An intermediate decay rate may greatly reduce the time required to reach a consensus.

  15. Establishment of theoretical model and experimental equipment for researching on carbon contamination of EUV multi-layer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xuepeng; Lu, Qipeng; Lu, Guoqing

    2015-02-01

    Carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multi-layer mirror is a seriously restrictive factor for lithography quality, chip output and life of lithography machine. In order to estimate the carbon contamination of EUV multi-layer and study the mechanism of carbon contamination deeply, an effective theoretical model of the carbon deposition on the multi-layer surface and experimental equipment for studying the carbon contamination are established. The theoretical model describes the transport of residual hydrocarbons to the irradiated area and the subsequent dissociation of the hydrocarbon by direct EUV radiation and secondary electron excitation, and indicates that the direct EUV radiation is the primary reason to dissociate the hydrocarbon, and makes the carbon deposited on the surface of multi-layer. Various carbon deposition states are simulated by the theoretical model, and some effective simulated results are obtained. Optical design scheme and structure design scheme of the experimental equipment are presented. The optical system includes two spherical multi-layer mirrors and a plane mirror multi-layer mirror. Ray trace and EUV intensity on sample are calculated, the light spot on sample is about Φ10mm and the EUV intensity is about 0.126mW/mm2. Structure of the experimental equipment includes adjusting mechanism of two spherical mirrors, rotary mechanism of plane mirror, alignment mechanism of EUV source, adjusting mechanism of sample, and so on. After testing, linear resolution and angle resolution of two spherical mirrors adjusting mechanism are 1μm and 5μrad respectively; linear displacement and linear resolution of sample adjusting mechanism are 50mm and 1μm respectively. The structure design scheme meets the requirement of the carbon contamination experiment.

  16. Single-element modeling of multilayer constrained-layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.

    1995-05-01

    The use of multi-layer constrained layer damping treatments on plate-like structures provides broadband vibration damping over a wide temperature range. A difficulty with the design of such treatments is their modeling. The current state of the art requires a separate plate element for each constraining layer plus a solid element for each viscoelastic layer in the thickness direction. The number of degrees of freedom is large conflicting with the iterative approach necessitated by the frequency and temperature dependance of the material properties which dictates that a small model size must be maintained. The large model size also slows optimization. The goal of this research was to produce a true plate finite element model which uses only a few degrees of freedom per node. This model is obtained by using a variational asymptotical theory to correctly capture the layerwise jumps in the stress and strain fields. A model is developed for simply supported plates which can later be extended to a more general finite element. Results are compared with the exact elasticity solution of Pagano. They show an excellent match exists in the predicted stress and strain field. The model is also compared with RKU analysis for plates again demonstrating its accuracy. A future finite element model based on this theory would require only six extra degrees of freedom per node with only one element in the thickness direction, thus simplifying the modeling of constrained layer damping treatments.

  17. Phase constitution and interface structure of nano-sized Ag-Cu/AlN multilayers: Experiment and ab initio modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pigozzi, Giancarlo; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta; Passerone, Daniele; Antonio Pignedoli, Carlo; Patscheider, Joerg; Jeurgens, Lars P. H.; Antusek, Andrej; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Bissig, Vinzenz

    2012-10-29

    Nano-sized Ag-Cu{sub 8nm}/AlN{sub 10nm} multilayers were deposited by reactive DC sputtering on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. Investigation of the phase constitution and interface structure of the multilayers evidences a phase separation of the alloy sublayers into nanosized grains of Ag and Cu. The interfaces between the Ag grains and the quasi-single-crystalline AlN sublayers are semi-coherent, whereas the corresponding Cu/AlN interfaces are incoherent. The orientation relationship between Ag and AlN is constant throughout the entire multilayer stack. These observations are consistent with atomistic models of the interfaces as obtained by ab initio calculations.

  18. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  19. In-to-Out Body Antenna-Independent Path Loss Model for Multilayered Tissues and Heterogeneous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Divya; Vermeeren, Günter; Tanghe, Emmeric; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate multilayered lossy and heterogeneous media for wireless body area networks (WBAN) to develop a simple, fast and efficient analytical in-to-out body path loss (PL) model at 2.45 GHz and, thus, avoid time-consuming simulations. The PL model is an antenna-independent model and is validated with simulations in layered medium, as well as in a 3D human model using electromagnetic solvers. PMID:25551483

  20. In-to-out body antenna-independent path loss model for multilayered tissues and heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Divya; Vermeeren, Günter; Tanghe, Emmeric; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate multilayered lossy and heterogeneous media for wireless body area networks (WBAN) to develop a simple, fast and efficient analytical in-to-out body path loss (PL) model at 2.45 GHz and, thus, avoid time-consuming simulations. The PL model is an antenna-independent model and is validated with simulations in layered medium, as well as in a 3D human model using electromagnetic solvers. PMID:25551483

  1. An Articulation Model in Dental Assisting for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A Continuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylves, Jane M.; Boody, Sandra

    A curriculum development project was conducted to generate additional competency-based modules to be used within the articulation model for Pennsylvania dental assisting programs, established in 1988. Project activities included reviewing, modifying, and providing parallel competency-based structure for the courses at the A.W. Beattie Technical…

  2. Climate studies with a multilayer energy balance model. III - Climatic impact of stratospheric volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.; Peng, L.

    1984-01-01

    A multilayer energy balance model is applied in an examination of the sensitivity of climate to stratospheric aerosols induced by volcanic eruptions. Zonally and annually averaged quantities are considered, with ocean and land temperatures computed separately and the atmosphere below the 200 mb level divided into eight layers of 24 sublayers each. The aerosol is assumed to form in the 150-200 mb range. Aerosol parameters for radiative transfer calculations are reflection in the solar spectral region and absorption in the solar and IR regions. A 75 percent aqueous solution of sulfuric acid is assumed for the aerosols. The sensitivity of the hemispherically averaged surface temperature is enhanced 37 percent, with a 20 percent uncertainty, when the thermal IR radiation is excluded. The solar radiation enhances the surface temperatures to a higher degree than the thermal radiation. The maximum response to the evenly distributed aerosols is in the 60-70 deg N latitudes and propagates, weakening, to lower latitudes.

  3. A multilayer evaluation approach for protein structure prediction and model quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfen; Wang, Qingguo; Vantasin, Kittinun; Zhang, Jiong; He, Zhiquan; Kosztin, Ioan; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Protein tertiary structures are essential for studying functions of proteins at molecular level. An indispensable approach for protein structure solution is computational prediction. Most protein structure prediction methods generate candidate models first and select the best candidates by model quality assessment (QA). In many cases, good models can be produced, but the QA tools fail to select the best ones from the candidate model pool. Because of incomplete understanding of protein folding, each QA method only reflects partial facets of a structure model and thus has limited discerning power with no one consistently outperforming others. In this article, we developed a set of new QA methods, including two QA methods for evaluating target/template alignments, a molecular dynamics (MD)-based QA method, and three consensus QA methods with selected references to reveal new facets of protein structures complementary to the existing methods. Moreover, the underlying relationship among different QA methods were analyzed and then integrated into a multilayer evaluation approach to guide the model generation and model selection in prediction. All methods are integrated and implemented into an innovative and improved prediction system hereafter referred to as MUFOLD. In CASP8 and CASP9, MUFOLD has demonstrated the proof of the principles in terms of both QA discerning power and structure prediction accuracy. PMID:21997706

  4. AFM characterization of model nuclear fuel oxide multilayer structures modified by heavy ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, M. E.; Devlin, D. J.; Reichhardt, C. J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Usov, I. O.; Valdez, J. A.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2010-10-01

    This work explored a potential new model dispersion fuel form consisting of an actinide material embedded in a radiation tolerant matrix that captures fission products (FPs) and is easily separated chemically as waste from the fuel material. To understand the stability of this proposed dispersion fuel form design, an idealized model system composed of a multilayer film was studied. This system consisted of a tri-layer structure of an MgO layer sandwiched between two HfO 2 layers. HfO 2 served as a surrogate fissile material for UO 2 while MgO represented a stable, fissile product (FP) getter that is easily separated from the fissile material. This type of multilayer film structure allowed us to control the size of and spacing between each layer. The films were grown at room temperature by e-beam deposition on a Si(1 1 1) substrate and post-annealed annealing at a range of temperatures to crystallize the HfO 2 layers. The 550 °C annealed sample was subsequently irradiated with 10 MeV Au 3+ ions at a range of fluences from 5 × 10 13 to 3.74 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Separate single layer constituent films and the substrate were also irradiated at 5 × 10 15 and 8 × 10 14 and 2 × 10 16, respectively. After annealing and irradiation, the samples were characterized using atomic force imaging techniques to determine local changes in microstructure and mechanical properties. All samples annealed above 550 °C cracked. From the AFM results we observed both crack healing and significant modification of the surface at higher fluences.

  5. A multilayer model for inferring dry deposition using standard meteorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Tilden P.; Finkelstein, Peter; Clarke, John; Ellestad, Thomas G.; Sims, Pamela F.

    1998-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the latest version of the dry deposition inferential model, which is used to estimate the deposition velocities (Vd) for SO2, O3, HNO3, and particles with diameters less than 2 μm. The dry deposition networks operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) use this model to estimate dry deposition on a weekly basis. This model uses a multilayer approach, discretizing the vegetated canopy into 20 layers. The use of canopy radiative transfer and simple wind profile models allows for estimates of stomatal (rs) and leaf boundary layer (rb) resistances to be determined at each layer in the plant canopy for both sunlit and shaded leaves. The effect of temperature, water stress, and vapor pressure deficits on the stomatal resistance (rs) have been included. Comparisons of modeled deposition velocities are made with extensive direct measurements performed at three different locations with different crops. The field experiment is discussed in some detail. Overall, modeled O3 deposition velocities are in good agreement with measured values with the average mean bias for all surfaces of the order of 0.01 cm/s or less. For SO2, mean biases range from -0.05 for corn to 0.15 cm/s for soybeans, while for HNO3, they range from 0.09 for corn to 0.47 cm/s for pasture.

  6. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  7. Analytical Modeling and Test Correlation of Variable Density Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Brown, T. M.

    2004-01-01

    A unique foam/multilayer insulation (MLI) combination concept for orbital cryogenic storage was experimentally evaluated using a large-scale hydrogen tank. The foam substrate insulates for ground-hold periods and enables a gaseous nitrogen purge as opposed to helium. The MLI, designed for an on-orbit storage period for 45 days, includes several unique features including a variable layer density and larger but fewer perforations for venting during ascent to orbit. Test results with liquid hydrogen indicated that the MLI weight or tank heat leak is reduced by about half in comparison with standard MLI. The focus of this effort is on analytical modeling of the variable density MLI (VD-MLI) on-orbit performance. The foam/VD-MLI model is considered to have five segments. The first segment represents the optional foam layer. The second, third, and fourth segments represent three different MLI layer densities. The last segment is an environmental boundary or shroud that surrounds the last MLI layer. Two approaches are considered: a variable density MLI modeled layer by layer and a semiempirical model or "modified Lockheed equation." Results from the two models were very comparable and were within 5-8 percent of the measured data at the 300 K boundary condition.

  8. Analytical modeling and optimization of DEAP-based multilayer stack-transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Transducers based on dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAP) use electrostatic pressure to convert electrical into mechanical energy or vice versa. To scale up the actuation or the energy gain, multilayer transducers like DEAP stack transducers are appropriate. Within this contribution, a model of such a stack transducer is derived and experimentally validated. The model is based on a multi-domain approach to describe the mechanical dynamics and the electrical behavior of the DEAP. Since these two domains influence each other they are coupled afterwards by a novel approach using interchanging power flows. To parametrize this model, tensile and compression tests for different polymer materials were performed under static and transient considerations. The results of these experiments show that the parameters obtained from the tensile test sufficiently describe the compression mode and can therefore be used for the model. Based on this transducer model the overall energy and the different parts of the multi-domain are analytically determined for arbitrary operating points. These expressions for the energies are finally used to optimize well-defined coupling coefficients, by which a maximum part of the electrical input energy is converted to mechanical energy, especially mechanical work.

  9. Analytical Models for Variable Density Multilayer Insulation Used in Cryogenic Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Brown, T.

    2001-01-01

    A unique multilayer insulation concept for orbital cryogenic storage was experimentally evaluated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB). A combination of foam/Multi layer Insulation (MLI) was used. The MLI (45 layers of Double Aluminized Mylar (DAM) with Dacron net spacers) was designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days and included several unique features such as: a variable layer density and larger but fewer DAM perforations for venting during ascent to orbit. The focus of this paper is on analytical modeling of the variable density MLI performance during orbital coast periods. The foam/MLI combination model is considered to have five segments. The first segment represents the foam layer. The second, third, and fourth segments represent the three layers of MLI with different layer densities and number of shields. Finally, the last segment is considered to be a shroud that surrounds the last MLI layer. The hot boundary temperature is allowed to vary from 164 K to 305 K. To simulate MLI performance, two approaches are considered. In the first approach, the variable density MLI is modeled layer by layer while in the second approach, a semi-empirical model is applied. Both models account for thermal radiation between shields, gas conduction, and solid conduction through the separator materials. The heat flux values predicted by each approach are compared for different boundary temperatures and MLI systems with 30, 45, 60, and 75 layers.

  10. A multiple degree of freedom modeling approach of piezoelectret foam in a multilayer stack configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefft, Edward C.; Anton, Steven R.

    2016-04-01

    As electronic devices become both ubiquitous and more energy efficient, powering them with energy harvested from, for example, piezoelectric materials has become a subject of much interest. The field does indeed show promise, as harvesting energy from smart materials has the potential to replace batteries completely in some low-power applications. This paper presents modeling of piezo-electret foam assembled in a multilayer stack configuration, with the required adhesives and conductors, as a multiple degree of freedom (MDOF) system. The benefits of using the foam over some piezo-ceramics include its high flexibility, its light weight, and its lead-free composition. This model predicts the mechanical and electromechanical response to base excitation for any number of layers of piezo-electret foam. Building upon previous work which modeled the piezo-electret stack as a single degree of freedom (SDOF) system, the MDOF model provides information concerning the response of internal stack layers. The MDOF model is validated against the experimentally determined mechanical and electrical responses of a 20-layer piezo-electret foam stack. Also, the internal stack dynamics at higher order vibration modes suggest that charge cancellation is a serious outcome of vibration at these modes that designers need to consider.

  11. A predictive model for reach morphology classification in mountain streams using multilayer perceptron methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunkaynak, Abdüsselam; Strom, Kyle B.

    2009-12-01

    This study uses multilayer perceptron (MP) methods to develop classification models for predicting cascade, step-pool, plane bed, and pool-riffle type reach morphologies in mountain streams. Several models were developed with MP and classical linear regression methods on the basis of the following input variables: channel slope (S), sediment size (d84), bankfull depth (h), and bankfull width (w). Data for model calibration and testing were compiled from previous studies in mountain environments. The data were divided into separate calibration (training) and testing (prediction) sets for both the MP and classical linear regression methods; model performance was based on the percentage of accurately predicted reach morphologies using the testing portion of the data. The results indicate that (1) the MP models outperformed the linear regression models for reach morphology classification; (2) relative submergence (h/d84) was useful for classifying step-pool and pool-riffle reaches but performed poorly in discriminating cascade and plane bed type reaches; (3) inclusion of channel slope in models was important for classifying cascade type reaches; and (4) plane bed reaches were the most difficult to classify and delineate from pool-riffle reaches. The two best performing MP models included the input variables (S, h/d84) and (S, h/d84, w). The overall predictive accuracy for classification of reach type for the two models was 81% and 83%, respectively, with predictive accuracies by reach type as follows: cascade, 100%; step-pool, 81%; plane bed, 67%; pool-riffle, 88% (first model) and cascade, 100%; step-pool, 87%; plane bed, 70%; pool-riffle, 90% (second model).

  12. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2014-12-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has long been based on a "big-leaf approach", with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Such models have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. We here outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multilayer longwave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of tha canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz. As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer term eddy covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of fluxes, as well as the gradients of sensible heat fluxes. However, the model overestimates sensible heat flux against an underestimate of the radiation budget. Improved performance is expected through the implementation of a more detailed calculation of stand albedo and a more up-to-date stomatal conductance calculation.

  13. Dispersion and kinematics of multi-layer non-hydrostatic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yefei; Cheung, Kwok Fai

    2015-08-01

    Multi-layer non-hydrostatic models are gaining popularity in studies of coastal wave processes owing to the resolution of the flow kinematics, but the linear dispersion relation remains the primary criterion for assessment of model convergence. In this paper, we reformulate the linear governing equations of an N-layer model into Boussinesq form by writing the non-hydrostatic terms as high-order derivatives of the horizontal flow velocity. The equation structure allows implementation of Fourier analysis to provide a [2 N - 2, 2N] expansion of the velocity at each layer. A variable transformation converts the governing equations into separate flux- and dispersion-dominated systems, which explicitly give an equivalent Pade´ expansion of the wave celerity for examination of the convergence and asymptotic properties. Flow continuity equates the depth-integrated horizontal velocity to the celerity and verifies the analytical solution. The surface-layer velocity, which is driven by the kinematic free surface boundary condition, shows a positive error and converges monotonically to the solution of Airy wave theory. When the depth parameter kd > 2N, flow reversal occurs in the sub-surface layers to offset overestimation of the surface velocity and to better approximate the flux. This model internal mechanism facilitates convergence of the celerity at large kd and benefits applications on wave transformation. Such non-physical flow reversal, however, might complicate studies that require detailed wave kinematics.

  14. A Multilayer Naïve Bayes Model for Analyzing User's Retweeting Sentiment Tendency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengmeng; Zuo, Wanli; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Today microblogging has increasingly become a means of information diffusion via user's retweeting behavior. Since retweeting content, as context information of microblogging, is an understanding of microblogging, hence, user's retweeting sentiment tendency analysis has gradually become a hot research topic. Targeted at online microblogging, a dynamic social network, we investigate how to exploit dynamic retweeting sentiment features in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. On the basis of time series of user's network structure information and published text information, we first model dynamic retweeting sentiment features. Then we build Naïve Bayes models from profile-, relationship-, and emotion-based dimensions, respectively. Finally, we build a multilayer Naïve Bayes model based on multidimensional Naïve Bayes models to analyze user's retweeting sentiment tendency towards a microblog. Experiments on real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Further experiments are conducted to understand the importance of dynamic retweeting sentiment features and temporal information in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. What is more, we provide a new train of thought for retweeting sentiment tendency analysis in dynamic social networks. PMID:26417367

  15. A Multilayer Naïve Bayes Model for Analyzing User's Retweeting Sentiment Tendency

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengmeng; Zuo, Wanli; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Today microblogging has increasingly become a means of information diffusion via user's retweeting behavior. Since retweeting content, as context information of microblogging, is an understanding of microblogging, hence, user's retweeting sentiment tendency analysis has gradually become a hot research topic. Targeted at online microblogging, a dynamic social network, we investigate how to exploit dynamic retweeting sentiment features in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. On the basis of time series of user's network structure information and published text information, we first model dynamic retweeting sentiment features. Then we build Naïve Bayes models from profile-, relationship-, and emotion-based dimensions, respectively. Finally, we build a multilayer Naïve Bayes model based on multidimensional Naïve Bayes models to analyze user's retweeting sentiment tendency towards a microblog. Experiments on real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Further experiments are conducted to understand the importance of dynamic retweeting sentiment features and temporal information in retweeting sentiment tendency analysis. What is more, we provide a new train of thought for retweeting sentiment tendency analysis in dynamic social networks. PMID:26417367

  16. Multilayer Perceptron Model for Nowcasting Visibility from Surface Observations: Results and Sensitivity to Dissimilar Station Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Das, Debanjana; Sarkar, Ishita; Goswami, Sayantika

    2015-10-01

    The reduction in the visibility during fog significantly influences surface as well as air transport operations. The prediction of fog remains difficult despite improvements in numerical weather prediction models. The present study aims at identifying a suitable neural network model with proper architecture to provide precise nowcast of the horizontal visibility during fog over the airports of three significantly affected metropolises of India, namely: Kolkata (22°32'N; 88°20'E), Delhi (28°38'N; 77°12'E) and Bengaluru (12°95'N; 77°72'E). The investigation shows that the multilayer perceptron (MLP) model provides considerably less error in nowcasting the visibility during fog over the said metropolises than radial basis function network, generalized regression neural network or linear neural network. The MLP models of different architectures are trained with the data and records from 2000 to 2010. The model results are validated with observations from 2011 to 2014. Our results reveal that MLP models with different configurations (1) four input layers, three hidden layers with three hidden nodes in each layer and a single output; (2) four input layers with two hidden layers having one hidden node in the first hidden layer and two hidden nodes in the second hidden layer, and a single output layer; and (3) four input layers with two hidden layers having two hidden nodes in each hidden layer and a single output layer] provide minimum error in nowcasting the visibility during fog over the airports of Kolkata, Delhi and Bengaluru, respectively. The results show that the MLP model is well suited for nowcasting visibility during fog with 6 h lead time, however, the study reveals that the MLP model sensitive to dissimilar station altitudes in nowcasting visibility, as the minimum prediction error for the three metropolises having dissimilar mean sea level altitudes is observed through different configurations of the model.

  17. Analytic Element Modeling of Steady Interface Flow in Multilayer Aquifers Using AnAqSim.

    PubMed

    Fitts, Charles R; Godwin, Joshua; Feiner, Kathleen; McLane, Charles; Mullendore, Seth

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analytic element modeling approach implemented in the software AnAqSim for simulating steady groundwater flow with a sharp fresh-salt interface in multilayer (three-dimensional) aquifer systems. Compared with numerical methods for variable-density interface modeling, this approach allows quick model construction and can yield useful guidance about the three-dimensional configuration of an interface even at a large scale. The approach employs subdomains and multiple layers as outlined by Fitts (2010) with the addition of discharge potentials for shallow interface flow (Strack 1989). The following simplifying assumptions are made: steady flow, a sharp interface between fresh- and salt water, static salt water, and no resistance to vertical flow and hydrostatic heads within each fresh water layer. A key component of this approach is a transition to a thin fixed minimum fresh water thickness mode when the fresh water thickness approaches zero. This allows the solution to converge and determine the steady interface position without a long transient simulation. The approach is checked against the widely used numerical codes SEAWAT and SWI/MODFLOW and a hypothetical application of the method to a coastal wellfield is presented. PMID:24942663

  18. Irreducibility of multilayer network dynamics: the case of the voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, Marina; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-02-01

    We address the issue of the reducibility of the dynamics on a multilayer network to an equivalent process on an aggregated single-layer network. As a typical example of models for opinion formation in social networks, we implement the voter model on a two-layer multiplex network, and we study its dynamics as a function of two control parameters, namely the fraction of edges simultaneously existing in both layers of the network (edge overlap), and the fraction of nodes participating in both layers (interlayer connectivity or degree of multiplexity). We compute the asymptotic value of the number of active links (interface density) in the thermodynamic limit, and the time to reach an absorbing state for finite systems, and we compare the numerical results with the analytical predictions on equivalent single-layer networks obtained through various possible aggregation procedures. We find a large region of parameters where the interface density of large multiplexes gives systematic deviations from that of the aggregates. We show that neither of the standard unweighted aggregation procedures is able to capture the highly nonlinear increase in the lifetime of a finite size multiplex at small interlayer connectivity. These results indicate that multiplexity should be appropriately taken into account when studying voter model dynamics, and that, in general, single-layer approximations might be not accurate enough to properly understand processes occurring on multiplex networks, since they might flatten out relevant dynamical details.

  19. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  20. Synthetic, Multi-Layer, Self-Oscillating Vocal Fold Model Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Preston R.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    , however, have either been homogenous (one-layer models) or have been fabricated using two materials of differing stiffness (two-layer models). This approach does not allow for representation of the actual multi-layer structure of the human vocal folds 1 that plays a central role in governing vocal fold flow-induced vibratory response. Consequently, one- and two-layer synthetic vocal fold models have exhibited disadvantages 3,6,8 such as higher onset pressures than what are typical for human phonation (onset pressure is the minimum lung pressure required to initiate vibration), unnaturally large inferior-superior motion, and lack of a "mucosal wave" (a vertically-traveling wave that is characteristic of healthy human vocal fold vibration). In this paper, fabrication of a model with multiple layers of differing material properties is described. The model layers simulate the multi-layer structure of the human vocal folds, including epithelium, superficial lamina propria (SLP), intermediate and deep lamina propria (i.e., ligament; a fiber is included for anterior-posterior stiffness), and muscle (i.e., body) layers 1. Results are included that show that the model exhibits improved vibratory characteristics over prior one- and two-layer synthetic models, including onset pressure closer to human onset pressure, reduced inferior-superior motion, and evidence of a mucosal wave. PMID:22157812

  1. Synthetic, multi-layer, self-oscillating vocal fold model fabrication.

    PubMed

    Murray, Preston R; Thomson, Scott L

    2011-01-01

    been homogenous (one-layer models) or have been fabricated using two materials of differing stiffness (two-layer models). This approach does not allow for representation of the actual multi-layer structure of the human vocal folds that plays a central role in governing vocal fold flow-induced vibratory response. Consequently, one- and two-layer synthetic vocal fold models have exhibited disadvantages such as higher onset pressures than what are typical for human phonation (onset pressure is the minimum lung pressure required to initiate vibration), unnaturally large inferior-superior motion, and lack of a "mucosal wave" (a vertically-traveling wave that is characteristic of healthy human vocal fold vibration). In this paper, fabrication of a model with multiple layers of differing material properties is described. The model layers simulate the multi-layer structure of the human vocal folds, including epithelium, superficial lamina propria (SLP), intermediate and deep lamina propria (i.e., ligament; a fiber is included for anterior-posterior stiffness), and muscle (i.e., body) layers. Results are included that show that the model exhibits improved vibratory characteristics over prior one- and two-layer synthetic models, including onset pressure closer to human onset pressure, reduced inferior-superior motion, and evidence of a mucosal wave. PMID:22157812

  2. A Multi-layer Radiation Model for Urban Neighbourhoods with Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krayenhoff, E. S.; Christen, A.; Martilli, A.; Oke, T. R.

    2014-04-01

    A neighbourhood-scale multi-layer urban canopy model of shortwave and longwave radiation exchange that explicitly includes the radiative effects of tall vegetation (trees) is presented. Tree foliage is permitted both between and above buildings, and mutual shading, emission and reflection between buildings and trees are included. The basic geometry is a two-dimensional canyon with leaf area density profiles and probabilistic variation of building height. Furthermore, the model accounts for three-dimensional path lengths through the foliage. Ray tracing determines the receipt of direct shortwave irradiance by building and foliage elements. View factors for longwave and shortwave diffuse radiation exchange are computed once at the start of the simulation using a Monte Carlo ray tracing approach; for subsequent model timesteps, matrix inversion rapidly solves infinite reflections and interception of emitted longwave between all elements. The model is designed to simulate any combination of shortwave and longwave radiation frequency bands, and to be portable to any neighbourhood-scale urban canopy geometry based on the urban canyon. Additionally, the model is sufficiently flexible to represent forest and forest-clearing scenarios. Model sensitivity tests demonstrate the model is robust and computationally feasible, and highlight the importance of vertical resolution to the performance of urban canopy radiation models. Full model evaluation is limited by the paucity of within-canyon radiation measurements in urban neighbourhoods with trees. Where appropriate model components are tested against analytic relations and results from an independent urban radiation transfer model. Furthermore, system response tests demonstrate the ability of the model to realistically distribute shortwave radiation among urban elements as a function of built form, solar angle and tree foliage height, density and clumping. Separate modelling of photosynthetically-active and near

  3. Three-dimensional digital models for rating dental arch relationships in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Chawla, O; Atack, N E; Deacon, S A; Leary, S D; Ireland, A J; Sandy, J R

    2013-03-01

    Objective : To determine the reliability and reproducibility of using three-dimensional digital models as an alternative to plaster models for rating dental arch relationships in patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Design : Reliability and reproducibility study. Methods : Study models of 45 patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate were made available in plaster and three-dimensional digital models. Records were scored a week apart by three examiners using the 5-year-olds' index reference models in the same two formats as the patient models. To assess reproducibility the study was repeated 4 weeks later under similar conditions to minimize the influence of memory bias on the results. The reliability of using the three-dimensional digital models was determined by comparing the scores for each examiner with the plaster model scores. Results : Weighted kappa statistics indicated repeatability for the plaster models was very good (.83 to .87). For the three-dimensional digital models it was good to very good (.74 to .83). Overall, the use of the three-dimensional digital models showed good agreement with the plaster model scores on both occasions. Conclusion : Three-dimensional digital models appear to be a good alternative to plaster models for assessing dental arch relationships using the 5-year-olds' index. PMID:22420605

  4. A model describing the microwave emission from a multi-layer snowpack at 37 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelrazik, M.; Ulaby, F.; Stiles, H.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer emission model is described and applied to emission measurements obtained at 37 GHz and H polarization using a microwave radiometer attached to a truck-mounted boom in Steamboat Springs, Colorado in 1977. Estimated absorption and scattering coefficients and their dependence on wetness were obtained using calculated values of the dielectric constant at 37 GHz along with the model. It was found that the scattering coefficient is comparable in value to the absorption coefficient for dry snow however, the absorption coefficient increases linearly with increasing snow wetness while the scattering coefficient decreases linearly with increasing wetness. The emission from each layer of the snowpack was also calculated using the estimated coefficients. It is shown that for dry snow, the ground underneath the snowpack contributes about 45% of all measured emission while the rest is due to emission from all the layers within the snowpack. When the wetness of the top 5 cm layer of snowpack increases to about 2% by volume, this top 5 cm snowlayer contributes more than 90% of all the measured emission.

  5. Examining the impact of multi-layer graphene using cellular and amphibian models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzi, Laura; Mouchet, Florence; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Janowska, Izabela; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Soula, Brigitte; Galibert, Anne-Marie; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    In the last few years, graphene has been defined as the revolutionary material showing an incredible expansion in industrial applications. Different graphene forms have been applied in several contexts, spreading from energy technologies and electronics to food and agriculture technologies. Graphene showed promises also in the biomedical field. Hopeful results have been already obtained in diagnostic, drug delivery, tissue regeneration and photothermal cancer ablation. In view of the enormous development of graphene-based technologies, a careful assessment of its impact on health and environment is demanded. It is evident how investigating the graphene toxicity is of fundamental importance in the context of medical purposes. On the other hand, the nanomaterial present in the environment, likely to be generated all along the industrial life-cycle, may have harmful effects on living organisms. In the present work, an important contribution on the impact of multi-layer graphene (MLG) on health and environment is given by using a multifaceted approach. For the first purpose, the effect of the material on two mammalian cell models was assessed. Key cytotoxicity parameters were considered such as cell viability and inflammatory response induction. This was combined with an evaluation of MLG toxicity towards Xenopus laevis, used as both in vivo and environmental model organism.

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of the wettability of multilayer graphene using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model material.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ali; Wu, Yanbin; Wang, Michael C; Aluru, Narayana R; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Nam, SungWoo

    2014-11-01

    We report the intrinsic water contact angle (WCA) of multilayer graphene, explore different methods of cleaning multilayer graphene, and evaluate the efficiency of those methods on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was used as a model material system to study the wettability of the multilayer graphene surface by WCA measurements. A WCA value of 45° ± 3° was measured for a clean HOPG surface, which can serve as the intrinsic WCA for multilayer graphene. A 1 min plasma treatment (100 W) decreased the WCA to 6°, owing to the creation of surface defects and functionalization by oxygen-containing groups. Molecular dynamics simulations of water droplets on the HOPG surface with or without the oxygen-containing defect sites confirmed the experimental results. Heat treatment at near atmospheric pressure and wet chemical cleaning methods using hydrofluoric acid and chloroform did not change the WCA significantly. Low-pressure, high-temperature annealing under argon and hydrogen reduced the WCA to 54°, close to the intrinsic WCA of HOPG. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy did not show any significant change for the HOPG surface after this treatment, confirming low-pressure, high-temperature annealing as an effective technique to clean multilayer graphene without damaging the surface. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the existence of hydrocarbon species on the surface of the HOPG sample that was exposed to air for <5 min and the absence of these impurities in the bulk. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of the sample surfaces after the different cleaning techniques were performed to correlate the WCA to the surface chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed that the WCA value changed drastically, depending on the amounts of oxygen-containing and hydrocarbon-containing groups on the surface. PMID:25310520

  7. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes) were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P > 0.05) or significantly larger (P < 0.05) than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P < 0.05) rather than the PMMA bead size (P = 0.335). Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins. PMID:24779020

  8. Implementation of a flipped classroom educational model in a predoctoral dental course.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang E; Howell, T Howard

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of a flipped classroom model to promote student-centered learning as part of a predoctoral dental course. This model redesigns the traditional lecture-style classroom into a blended learning model that combines active learning pedagogy with instructional technology and "flips" the sequence so that students use online resources to learn content ahead of class and then use class time for discussion. The dental anatomy portion of a second-year DMD course at Harvard School of Dental Medicine was redesigned using the flipped classroom model. The 36 students in the course viewed online materials before class; then, during class, small groups of students participated in peer teaching and team discussions based on learning objectives under the supervision of faculty. The utilization of pre- and post-class quizzes as well as peer assessments were critical motivating factors that likely contributed to the increase in student participation in class and helped place learning accountability on the students. Student feedback from a survey after the experience was generally positive with regard to the collaborative and interactive aspects of this form of blended learning. PMID:25941150

  9. Low-shrinkage dental restorative composite: modeling viscoelastic behavior during setting.

    PubMed

    Dauvillier, Bibi S; Feilzer, Albert J

    2005-04-01

    Much attention has been directed toward developing dental direct restorative composites that generate less shrinkage stress during setting. The aim of this study was to explore the viscoelastic behavior of a new class of low-shrinkage dental restorative composite during setting. The setting behavior of an experimental oxirane composite has been investigated by analyzing stress-strain data with two-parametric mechanical models. Experimental data were obtained from a dynamic test method, in which the setting light-activated composite was continuously subjected to sinusoidal strain cycles. The material parameters and the model's predictive capacity were analyzed with validated modeling procedures. The light-activated oxirane composite exhibited shrinkage delay and low polymerization shrinkage strain and stresses when compared with conventional light-activated composite. Noise in the stress data restricted the predictive ability of the Maxwell model to the elastic modulus development of the composite only. Evaluation tests of their potential as restorative material are required, to examine if the biocompatibility and mechanical properties after setting of oxirane composites are acceptable for dental use. PMID:15685614

  10. Geometrical modeling of complete dental shapes by using panoramic X-ray, digital mouth data and anatomical templates.

    PubMed

    Barone, Sandro; Paoli, Alessandro; Razionale, Armando Viviano

    2015-07-01

    In the field of orthodontic planning, the creation of a complete digital dental model to simulate and predict treatments is of utmost importance. Nowadays, orthodontists use panoramic radiographs (PAN) and dental crown representations obtained by optical scanning. However, these data do not contain any 3D information regarding tooth root geometries. A reliable orthodontic treatment should instead take into account entire geometrical models of dental shapes in order to better predict tooth movements. This paper presents a methodology to create complete 3D patient dental anatomies by combining digital mouth models and panoramic radiographs. The modeling process is based on using crown surfaces, reconstructed by optical scanning, and root geometries, obtained by adapting anatomical CAD templates over patient specific information extracted from radiographic data. The radiographic process is virtually replicated on crown digital geometries through the Discrete Radon Transform (DRT). The resulting virtual PAN image is used to integrate the actual radiographic data and the digital mouth model. This procedure provides the root references on the 3D digital crown models, which guide a shape adjustment of the dental CAD templates. The entire geometrical models are finally created by merging dental crowns, captured by optical scanning, and root geometries, obtained from the CAD templates. PMID:25670149

  11. Recent Advances in Modeling Stress Distributions in Multilayers Subjected to Biaxial Flexure Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Luttrell, Claire Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Although biaxial flexure tests have been used extensively to measure the strength of brittle materials, the tests and analyses have been limited to materials of uniform properties. Despite the increasing applications of multilayered structures, characterization of their strengths using biaxial flexure tests has been difficult because the analytical description of the strength-fracture load relation for multilayers subjected to biaxial flexure tests is unavailable. The newly derived closed-form solutions for the elastic stress distributions in multilayered discs subjected to ring-on-ring tests are summarized here. These solutions are obtained by (i) finding the correlation between monolayered and multilayered discs subjected to biaxial bending moment and (ii) conversion from the existing solutions for monolayers. Using this methodology, the closed-form solutions for multilayers subjected to other biaxial flexure tests can also be obtained. Finite element results for ring-on-rings tests performed on (i) porcelain/zirconia bilayered discs and (ii) solid oxide fuel cells trilayered discs are also presented to validate the closed-form solutions. The closed-form solutions hence provide a basis for evaluating biaxial strength of multilayers using biaxial flexure tests.

  12. Possibility of reconstruction of dental plaster cast from 3D digital study models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare traditional plaster casts, digital models and 3D printed copies of dental plaster casts based on various criteria. To determine whether 3D printed copies obtained using open source system RepRap can replace traditional plaster casts in dental practice. To compare and contrast the qualities of two possible 3D printing options – open source system RepRap and commercially available 3D printing. Design and settings A method comparison study on 10 dental plaster casts from the Orthodontic department, Department of Stomatology, 2nd medical Faulty, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. Material and methods Each of 10 plaster casts were scanned by inEos Blue scanner and the printed on 3D printer RepRap [10 models] and ProJet HD3000 3D printer [1 model]. Linear measurements between selected points on the dental arches of upper and lower jaws on plaster casts and its 3D copy were recorded and statistically analyzed. Results 3D printed copies have many advantages over traditional plaster casts. The precision and accuracy of the RepRap 3D printed copies of plaster casts were confirmed based on the statistical analysis. Although the commercially available 3D printing enables to print more details than the RepRap system, it is expensive and for the purpose of clinical use can be replaced by the cheaper prints obtained from RepRap printed copies. Conclusions Scanning of the traditional plaster casts to obtain a digital model offers a pragmatic approach. The scans can subsequently be used as a template to print the plaster casts as required. Using 3D printers can replace traditional plaster casts primarily due to their accuracy and price. PMID:23721330

  13. Acoustical characteristic predictions of a multi-layer system of a submerged vehicle hull mounted sonar simplified to an infinite planar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun; Kil, Hyun-Gwon; Jeon, Jae Jin; Seo, Young-Soo

    2012-06-01

    Hull Mounted Sonar (HMS) is a long range submerged vehicle's hull-mounted passive sonar system which detects low-frequency noise caused by machineries of enemy ships or submerged vehicles. The HMS needs a sound absorption /insulation multi-layer structure to shut out the self-noise from own machineries and to amplify signals from outside. Therefore, acoustic analysis of the multi-layer system should be performed when the HMS is designed. This paper simplified the HMS multi-layer system to be an infinite planar multi-layer model. Also, main excitations that influence the HMS were classified into mechanical, plane wave and turbulent flow excitation, and the investigations for each excitation were performed for various models. Stiffened multi-layer analysis for mechanical excitation and general multi-layer analysis for turbulent flow excitation were developed. The infinite planar multi-layer analysis was expected to be more useful for preliminary design stage of HMS system than the infinite cylindrical model because of short analysis time and easiness of parameter study.

  14. A ceramic damage model for analyses of multi-layered ceramic-core sandwich panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keejoo

    2005-11-01

    A damage model for ceramic materials is developed and incorporated into the geometrically nonlinear solid shell element formulation for dynamic analyses of multi-layered ceramic armor panels under blast wave pressure loading. The damage model takes into account material behaviors observed from multi-axial dynamic tests on Aluminum Nitride (AlN) ceramic. The ceramic fails in a brittle or gradual fashion, depending upon the hydrostatic pressure and applied strain-rate. In the model, the gradual failure is represented by two states: the initial and final failure states. These states are described by two separate failure surfaces that are pressure-dependent and strain-rate-dependent. A scalar damage parameter is defined via using the two failure surfaces, based on the assumption that the local stress state determines material damage and its level. In addition, the damage model accounts for the effect of existing material damage on the new damage. The multi-layered armor panel of interest is comprised of an AlN-core sandwich with unidirectional composite skins and a woven composite back-plate. To accommodate the material damage effect of composite layers, a composite failure model in the open literature is adopted and modified into two separate failure models to address different failure mechanisms of the unidirectional and woven composites. In addition, the effect of strain-rates on the material strengths is incorporated into the composite failure models. For finite element modeling, multiple eighteen-node elements are used in the thickness direction to properly describe mechanics of the multi-layered panel. Dynamic analyses of a multi-layered armor panel are conducted under blast wave pressure loadings. The resulting dynamic responses of the panel demonstrate that dynamic analyses that do not take into account material damage and failure significantly under-predict the peak displacement. The under-prediction becomes more pronounced as the blast load level increases

  15. Improved classification and visualization of healthy and pathological hard dental tissues by modeling specular reflections in NIR hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots, which are difficult to diagnose. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization which can classify healthy and pathological dental tissues. However, due to non-ideal illumination of the tooth surface the hyperspectral images can exhibit specular reflections, in particular around the edges and the ridges of the teeth. These reflections significantly affect the performance of automated classification and visualization methods. Cross polarized imaging setup can effectively remove the specular reflections, however is due to the complexity and other imaging setup limitations not always possible. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on modeling the specular reflections of hard dental tissues, which significantly improves the classification accuracy in the presence of specular reflections. The method was evaluated on five extracted human teeth with corresponding gold standard for 6 different healthy and pathological hard dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. The classification was performed by employing multiple discriminant analysis. Based on the obtained results we believe the proposed method can be considered as an effective alternative to the complex cross polarized imaging setups.

  16. APPRAISAL OF ACCESS TO DENTAL SERVICES IN SOUTH EAST OF IRAN USING FIVE AS MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Sara; Arabpoor, Mahboobeh; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Access to dental services not only refers to utilization but also to the extent by which the utilization is judged according to professional norms. This study aimed to study the access to dental services using the Five As model. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in southeast of Iran. A sample of 400 subjects participated in the study according to a multistage sampling method. A questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using independent T test, ANOVA and multivariate linear regression models by means of SPSS V.20 software. Findings: Affordability, availability, accessibility, accommodation and acceptability mean scores were 58.2±12.2, 53.9±12.9, 59.4±15.7, 60.2±8.6, 70±11.5 and 60.3±7.4 respectively. According to multivariate linear regression models, there was significant associations between affordability and age, education level, having basic insurance and family income. Moreover, total accessibility was significantly correlated with education and monthly family income. Conclusion: This study showed that access to dental services was at the moderate level among the studied population. It also revealed that age, basic insurance coverage, family income and level of education, are determinants of this accessibility. PMID:27482161

  17. Modeling and finite element analysis of the nonstationary action on a multi-layer poroelastic seam with nonlinear geomechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nasedkina, A.A.; Nasedkin, A.V.; Iovane, G.

    2009-07-15

    The paper discusses modeling of a multi-layer coal seam under hydrodynamic action based on the coupled equations of poroelasticity and filtration with the nonlinear relationship of permeability and porous pressure. The calculations by the finite element method use correspondence between the poroelasticity and thermoelasticity equations. The influence of input data on the size of a degassing hole area is analyzed for the couple problem and pure filtration problem.

  18. Reconstruction of Layer Densities in a Multilayer Snowpack using a Bayesian Approach to Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, M.; Marshall, H.; McNamara, J. P.; Mead, J.; Flores, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    Estimation of snowpack parameters such as depth, density and grain structure is a central focus of hydrology in seasonally snow-covered lands. These parameters are directly estimated by field observations, indirectly estimated from other parameters using statistical correlations, or simulated with a model. Difficulty in sampling thin layers and uncertainty in the transition between layers can cause significant uncertainty in measurements of these parameters. Snow density is one of the most important parameters to measure because it is strictly related with snow water content, an important component of the global water balance. We develop a mathematical framework to estimate snow density from measurements of temperature and thickness of snowpack layers over a particular time period, in conjunction with a physics-based model of snowpack evolution. We formulate a Bayesian approach to estimate the snowpack density profile, using a full range of possible simulations that incorporate key sources of uncertainty to build in prior snowpack knowledge. The posterior probability density function of the snow density, conditioned on snowpack temperature measurements, is computed by multiplying the likelihoods and assumed prior distribution function. Random sampling is used to generate a range of densities with same probability when prior uniform probability function is assumed. A posterior probability density function calculated directly via Bayes' theorem is used to calculate the probability of every sample generated. The forward model is a 1D, multilayer snow energy and mass balance model, which solves for snow temperature, density, and liquid water content on a finite element mesh. The surface and ground temperature data of snowpack (boundary conditions), are provided by the Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies (CSAS), Silverton CO, from snow pits made at Swamp Angel and Senator Beck study plot sites. Standard errors between field observations and results computed denote the

  19. Implementation of a Multi-Layer Soil Model Into Biome-BGC - Calibration and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhlmann, M.; Jochheim, H.

    2007-05-01

    As a consequence of global warming the average annual temperature in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany will probably increase by about 3 degrees Celsius until the end of the current century. Furthermore, precipitation is expected to shift from summer to winter. 35 % of Brandenburg is covered with forests, predominantly pine (P. sylvestris) accompanied by oak (Q. robur, Q. petraea) and beech (F. sylvatica). The forests are mainly located at sandy and loamy substrates with a low available water capacity. Hence, with an increase in temperature and a decrease in summer precipitation, water stress will occur more frequently or prolonged. This may lead to an alteration in groundwater recharge and tree composition and will be important for establishing sustainable forest management concepts. For an improved estimation of the potential effects of increased water stress on forests in Brandenburg, the one layer soil model of the biogeochemical and ecophysiological model Biome-BGC was replaced by a one dimensional multi-layer approach with an arbitrary number of soil layers of variable layer thickness. The model changes cover particularly soil hydrology and soil temperature processes, but also decomposition and the distribution of soil organic matter. Additional changes were implemented for enabling downward root growth and an improved interaction between vegetation and soil related water processes. The improved Biome-BGC model was calibrated by using data of a beech and a pine stand in north-eastern Brandenburg. Besides stand information (C and N stocks, growth measurements, etc.) and detailed soil information (horizon specific soil parameters), sap flow and throughfall measurements were available. Weather data were provided by nearby weather stations. With a focus on soil water budget, the most important results of the calibration will be shown. Furthermore, a global warming scenario simulation was carried out using a data set which is based on the A1B IPCC

  20. Radiation field in a multilayered geophysical medium: Ice-water-aerosol-vegetation-soil (IWAVES) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaquinta, Jean; Pinty, Bernard

    1997-06-01

    Multiangular data which will be available with the upcoming satellite platforms (EOS, ENVISAT, ADEOS) offer a great potential for monitoring land surfaces on the global scale to the extent that physically based models describing the transfer of radiation can be developed. The present study constitutes an additional step toward modeling this radiative transfer with in particular the physical processes involved at the boundary between land vegetated surfaces and the atmospheric layer above. Our primary objectives are to address issues related to the perturbation by an atmospheric layer of the solar radiance field incident on the top of the vegetation canopy and the interpretation of the radiance field emerging from the atmospheric layer when isotropic scattering from the surface is a priori assumed. Indeed, the application of an inappropriate model for the interpretation of remotely sensed data can produce inaccurate retrievals of both the surface and atmosphere characteristics. In the present study the radiation transport problem in this coupled system is solved analytically for uncollided and first collided radiation and uses a discrete ordinates method for multiple-scattered radiation. A sensitivity analysis of the multilayered ice-water-aerosol-vegetation-soil model is conducted in order to quantify the effects of atmospheric and surface perturbations within the whole system. The results are essentially reported in terms of bidirectional reflectance factors at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, which allows the use of very different radiative properties of the vegetation layer. The consequences of assumptions made on one or the other of these media are investigated through an inversion experiment.

  1. Dynamics of multilayer, multidisc viscoelastic rotor - An operator based higher order classical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, H.; Chandraker, S.; Dutt, J. K.; Roy, T.

    2016-05-01

    Inherent material damping plays a very significant role on dynamic behaviour of rotors. The material damping in a spinning rotor produces a tangential force along the whirl direction and its magnitude being proportional to spin speed. After certain value of spin speed, decided by the characteristic of the system, the tangential force becomes strong enough to throw the rotor centre out of the whirl orbit by inflating it progressively. This leads to destabilization of the system and corresponding speed is known as stability limit of spin speed. Stability limit of spin speed for Jeffcott rotor, by using viscous form of material damping model is straight forward and has been reported by several researchers, however the same analysis for viscoelastic material characteristics is not reported much. This analysis is very relevant for industrial requirements to replace bulky and heavy metal rotor by light but strong rotors. This is achieved either by reinforcing fibre or multi layering arrangements. Both of which are represented by viscoelastic constitutive behaviour. This paper gives mathematical derivation of equations of motion for multi-disc, multi-layered rotor-shaft-system. Both lumped mass and discretized approach (finite element) are presented here mathematically and numerical simulation results are compared. The lumped mass approach gives a concise yet acceptable accuracy of the results.

  2. Compensated Row-Column Ultrasound Imaging System Using Fisher Tippett Multilayered Conditional Random Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Ben Daya, Ibrahim; Chen, Albert I. H.; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Wong, Alexander; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    3-D ultrasound imaging offers unique opportunities in the field of non destructive testing that cannot be easily found in A-mode and B-mode images. To acquire a 3-D ultrasound image without a mechanically moving transducer, a 2-D array can be used. The row column technique is preferred over a fully addressed 2-D array as it requires a significantly lower number of interconnections. Recent advances in 3-D row-column ultrasound imaging systems were largely focused on sensor design. However, these imaging systems face three intrinsic challenges that cannot be addressed by improving sensor design alone: speckle noise, sparsity of data in the imaged volume, and the spatially dependent point spread function of the imaging system. In this paper, we propose a compensated row-column ultrasound image reconstruction system using Fisher-Tippett multilayered conditional random field model. Tests carried out on both simulated and real row-column ultrasound images show the effectiveness of our proposed system as opposed to other published systems. Visual assessment of the results show our proposed system’s potential at preserving detail and reducing speckle. Quantitative analysis shows that our proposed system outperforms previously published systems when evaluated with metrics such as Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Coefficient of Correlation, and Effective Number of Looks. These results show the potential of our proposed system as an effective tool for enhancing 3-D row-column imaging. PMID:26658577

  3. Model independent x-ray standing wave analysis of periodic multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, S. N.; Pashaev, E. M.; Subbotin, I. A.; Makhotkin, I. A.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Zoethout, E.; Chuev, M. A.; Louis, E.; Seregin, S. Yu.; Novikov, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2014-04-07

    We present a model independent approach for the analysis of X-ray fluorescence yield modulated by an X-ray standing wave (XSW), that allow a fast reconstruction of the atomic distribution function inside a sample without fitting procedure. The approach is based on the direct regularized solution of the system of linear equations that characterizes the fluorescence yield. The suggested technique was optimized for, but not limited to, the analysis of periodic layered structures where the XSW is formed under Bragg conditions. The developed approach was applied to the reconstruction of the atomic distribution function for LaN/BN multilayers with 50 periods of 43 Å thick layers. The object is especially difficult to analyze with traditional methods, as the estimated thickness of the interface region between the constituent materials is comparable to the individual layer thicknesses. However, using the suggested technique, it was possible to reconstruct width of the La atomic distribution showing that the La atoms stay localized within the LaN layers and interfaces and do not diffuse into the BN layer. The analysis of the reconstructed profiles showed that the positions of the center of the atomic distribution function can be estimated with an accuracy of 1 Å.

  4. Development and Evaluation of an Endodontic Simulation Model for Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Wolgin, Michael; Wiedemann, Paul; Frank, Wilhelm; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to develop an endodontic simulation model able to implement the electronic method of working length determination (electronic apex locators, EALs) in a dental school, to evaluate the practicality of this tool for dental students, and to compare the accuracy of working length measurements achieved by the EAL and the radiographic method. A new simulation model was constructed by embedding extracted human teeth in a self-cured resin, along with a conductive medium. After radiographic and electronic working length determinations, root canal instrumentation was performed by students at a dental school in Austria according to the working lengths obtained from the EAL. Subsequently, root apices (n=44) were longitudinally sectioned using a diamond coated bur. Measurements of the distance between the anatomical root apex (ARA) and the apical constriction (AC) as well as between ARA and the ascertained apical point of endodontic instrumentation were performed using digital photography and a 3D computer-assisted design software. The distance between ARA and the radiologic (ARA-R) or electrometric (ARA-EL) readings of the apical point of endodontic instrumentation was compared with the actual distance ARA-AC. The accuracy of both methods was determined. The difference between the actual distance ARA-AC and the targeted radiological distance was statistically significant (p=0.0001), as was the measured distance between ARA-R and ARA-EL (p=0.016). The electronic method seems to be more precisely referring to the AC (R(2)=0.0198) than the radiographic method (R(2)=0.0019). These results suggest that the endodontic simulation model described in this study can be successfully used in preclinical dental education. PMID:26522643

  5. A model-based, Bayesian characterization of subsurface corrosion parameters in composite multi-layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Heather; Hoppe, Wally

    2016-02-01

    Thermographic NDE approaches to detect subsurface corrosion defects of multi-layered structures with composite top layers have proven difficult due to the fact that the thermal conductivity of composite materials is larger in lateral directions (the plane parallel to the surface) than in the through-thickness directions. This causes heat to dissipate faster laterally than through the thickness when a heat source is applied to the surface of the structure, making it difficult for subsurface damage effects to manifest on the surface, where the heat source and inspection typically occur. To address this, a heat induction approach is presented that excites the damaged, metallic bottom layer directly by Joule heating, resulting in more observable damage effects on the surface than what could be expected for traditional thermographic methods on this type of structure. To characterize the subsurface damage parameters (defect location, diameter, and depth), Bayesian inversion of numerically-simulated noisy data, using a high-fidelity, coupled electromagnetic-heat transfer model is employed. Stochastic estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) allow for quantification of uncertainty surrounding the damage parameters, which is important as this directly translates into uncertainty surrounding the component reliability. However, because thousands of high-fidelity finite element models are computationally costly to evaluate, as is typical in most MCMC methods, the use of Bayesian inversion is rarely feasible in real-time. To address this, a projection-based reduced order modeling (ROM) tracking and interpolation scheme is formulated within the MCMC sampling method for the multi-physics problem, resulting in significant speedup of solution time with little loss of accuracy, enabling near-real time stochastic estimation of damage.

  6. Modeling the electromechanical impedance technique for the assessment of dental implant stability.

    PubMed

    LaMalfa Ribolla, Emma; Rizzo, Piervincenzo

    2015-07-16

    We simulated the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique to assess the stability of dental implants. The technique consists of bonding a piezoelectric transducer to the element to be monitored. When subjected to an electric field, the transducer induces structural excitations which, in turn, affect the transducer's electrical admittance. As the structural vibrations depend on the mechanical impedance of the element, the measurement of the transducer's admittance can be exploited to assess the element's health. In the study presented in this paper, we created a 3D finite element model to mimic a transducer bonded to the abutment of a dental implant placed in a host bone site. We simulated the healing that occurs after surgery by changing Young's modulus of the bone-implant interface. The results show that as Young's modulus of the interface increases, i.e. as the mechanical interlock of the implant within the bone is achieved, the electromechanical characteristic of the transducer changes. The model and the findings of this numerical study may be used in the future to predict and interpret experimental data, and to develop a robust and cost-effective method for the assessment of primary and secondary dental implant stability. PMID:26070645

  7. A Fully Self-consistent Multi-layered Model of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-08-01

    We construct a three-dimensional, fully self-consistent, multi-layered, non-spheroidal model of Jupiter consisting of an inner core, a metallic electrically conducting dynamo region, and an outer molecular electrically insulating envelope. We assume that the Jovian zonal winds are on cylinders parallel to the rotation axis but, due to the effect of magnetic braking, are confined within the outer molecular envelope. We also assume that the location of the molecular-metallic interface is characterized by its equatorial radius {{HR}}e, where R e is the equatorial radius of Jupiter at the 1 bar pressure level and H is treated as a parameter of the model. We solve the relevant mathematical problem via a perturbation approach. The leading-order problem determines the density, size, and shape of the inner core, the irregular shape of the 1 bar pressure level, and the internal structure of Jupiter that accounts for the full effect of rotational distortion, but without the influence of the zonal winds; the next-order problem determines the variation of the gravitational field solely caused by the effect of the zonal winds on the rotationally distorted non-spheroidal Jupiter. The leading-order solution produces the known mass, the known equatorial and polar radii, and the known zonal gravitational coefficient J 2 of Jupiter within their error bars; it also yields the coefficients J 4 and J 6 within about 5% accuracy, the core equatorial radius 0.09{R}e and the core density {ρ }c=2.0× {10}4 {{kg}} {{{m}}}-3 corresponding to 3.73 Earth masses; the next-order solution yields the wind-induced variation of the zonal gravitational coefficients of Jupiter.

  8. Modeling of time-resolved coupled radiative and conductive heat transfer in multilayer semitransparent materials up to very high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezgoda, M.; Rochais, D.; Enguehard, F.; Echegut, P.; Rousseau, B.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents an original modeling approach that enables the calculation of the temperature field within multilayer materials submitted to the flash method. The model takes into account the time-resolved coupled conducto-radiative heat transfer and the temperature of experiments. The compound can be subdivided into as many layers as desired, and their thicknesses and relevant physical properties can be chosen arbitrarily. Unconventional experimental thermograms can be reproduced faithfully by the calculations. This model, thus, makes it possible to correctly estimate the effective thermal diffusivity of semitransparent materials, thereby providing a deeper insight into the analysis of the physical phenomena involved.

  9. A Finite Difference Method for Modeling Migration of Impurities in Multilayer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosa, V.; Kovacs, Katalin; Mercea, P.; Piringer, O.

    2008-09-01

    A finite difference method to solve the one-dimensional diffusion of impurities in a multilayer system was developed for the special case in which a partition coefficient K impose a ratio of the concentrations at the interface between two adiacent layers. The fictitious point method was applied to derive the algebraic equations for the mesh points at the interface, while for the non-uniform mesh points within the layers a combined method was used. The method was tested and then applied to calculate migration of impurities from multilayer systems into liquids or solids samples, in migration experiments performed for quality testing purposes. An application was developed in the field of impurities migrations from multilayer plastic packagings into food, a problem of increasing importance in food industry.

  10. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced from scanned impressions and scanned stone casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subeihi, Haitham

    Introduction: Digital models of dental arches play a more and more important role in dentistry. A digital dental model can be generated by directly scanning intraoral structures, by scanning a conventional impression of oral structures or by scanning a stone cast poured from the conventional impression. An accurate digital scan model is a fundamental part for the fabrication of dental restorations. Aims: 1. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions versus scanning of stone casts. 2. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions made of three different materials (polyvinyl siloxane, polyether or vinyl polyether silicone). Methods and Materials: This laboratory study included taking addition silicone, polyether and vinyl polyether silicone impressions from an epoxy reference model that was created from an original typodont. Teeth number 28 and 30 on the typodont with a missing tooth number 29 were prepared for a metal-ceramic three-unit fixed dental prosthesis with tooth #29 being a pontic. After tooth preparation, an epoxy resin reference model was fabricated by duplicating the typodont quadrant that included the tooth preparations. From this reference model 12 polyvinyl siloxane impressions, 12 polyether impressions and 12 vinyl polyether silicone impressions were made. All 36 impressions were scanned before pouring them with dental stone. The 36 dental stone casts were, in turn, scanned to produce digital models. A reference digital model was made by scanning the reference model. Six groups of digital models were produced. Three groups were made by scanning of the impressions obtained with the three different materials, the other three groups involved the scanning of the dental casts that resulted from pouring the impressions made with the three different materials. Groups of digital models were compared using Root Mean

  11. Multiscale Simulation and Modeling of Multilayer Heteroepitactic Growth of C60 on Pentacene.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Yaset M; Cantrell, Rebecca A; Berard, Philip G; Koch, Donald L; Clancy, Paulette

    2016-03-29

    We apply multiscale methods to describe the strained growth of multiple layers of C60 on a thin film of pentacene. We study this growth in the presence of a monolayer pentacene step to compare our simulations to recent experimental studies by Breuer and Witte of submonolayer growth in the presence of monolayer steps. The molecular-level details of this organic semiconductor interface have ramifications on the macroscale structural and electronic behavior of this system and allow us to describe several unexplained experimental observations for this system. The growth of a C60 thin film on a pentacene surface is complicated by the differing crystal habits of the two component species, leading to heteroepitactical growth. In order to probe this growth, we use three computational methods that offer different approaches to coarse-graining the system and differing degrees of computational efficiency. We present a new, efficient reaction-diffusion continuum model for 2D systems whose results compare well with mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) results for submonolayer growth. KMC extends our ability to simulate multiple layers but requires a library of predefined rates for event transitions. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) circumvents KMC's need for predefined lattices, allowing defects and grain boundaries to provide a more realistic thin film morphology. For multilayer growth, in this particularly suitable candidate for coarse-graining, CGMD is a preferable approach to KMC. Combining the results from these three methods, we show that the lattice strain induced by heteroepitactical growth promotes 3D growth and the creation of defects in the first monolayer. The CGMD results are consistent with experimental results on the same system by Conrad et al. and by Breuer and Witte in which C60 aggregates change from a 2D structure at low temperature to 3D clusters along the pentacene step edges at higher temperatures. PMID:26937559

  12. Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models of multilayer detachment folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts are dominated by folding and exhibit a fairly regular fold-spacing. Yet, in map-view, the aspect ratio of doubly-plunging anticlines varies considerably from very elongated, and sometimes slightly curved, cylindrical folds to nearly circular, dome-like structures. In addition, the fold spacing often varies significantly around an average value. So far, it remains unclear whether these features are consistent with a folding instability. Therefore, we here study the dynamics of multilayer detachment folding, process by which shortening can be accommodated in thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts. We start by analysing the physics of this process by using both a semi-analytical thick plate theory and numerical simulations. Results show that several different folding modes occur, about half of which are affected by gravity and have a wavelength that depends on the background deformation rate. Non-dimensional expressions are derived that predict the dominant wavelength and growth rate of each of these folding modes and mechanical phase diagrams are presented that illustrate the applicability of each of the modes. Next, we perform 3D simulations and compare the results with those of 2D models and analytical theory. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulations have wavelengths that are in good agreement with the analytical predictions. In the high-resolution 3D simulations the lateral growth of folds is studied, in particular with respect to fold segment interactions and evolution of fold width-length aspect ratio. The numerical simulations show a number of similarities with the Fars region of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt including a large range of fold aspect ratio and a normally distributed fold wavelength around a dominant one.

  13. Implementation of a 3d numerical model of a folded multilayer carbonate aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Salvo, Cristina; Guyennon, Nicolas; Romano, Emanuele; Bruna Petrangeli, Anna; Preziosi, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to present a case study of the numerical model implementation of a complex carbonate, structurally folded aquifer, with a finite difference, porous equivalent model. The case study aquifer (which extends over 235 km2 in the Apennine chain, Central Italy) provides a long term average of 3.5 m3/s of good quality groundwater to the surface river network, sustaining the minimum vital flow, and it is planned to be exploited in the next years for public water supply. In the downstream part of the river in the study area, a "Site of Community Importance" include the Nera River for its valuable aquatic fauna. However, the possible negative effects of the foreseen exploitation on groundwater dependent ecosystems are a great concern and model grounded scenarios are needed. This multilayer aquifer was conceptualized as five hydrostratigraphic units: three main aquifers (the uppermost unconfined, the central and the deepest partly confined), are separated by two locally discontinuous aquitards. The Nera river cuts through the two upper aquifers and acts as the main natural sink for groundwater. An equivalent porous medium approach was chosen. The complex tectonic structure of the aquifer requires several steps in defining the conceptual model; the presence of strongly dipping layers with very heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity, results in different thicknesses of saturated portions. Aquifers can have both unconfined or confined zones; drying and rewetting must be allowed when considering recharge/discharge cycles. All these characteristics can be included in the conceptual and numerical model; however, being the number of flow and head target scarce, the over-parametrization of the model must be avoided. Following the principle of parsimony, three steady state numerical models were developed, starting from a simple model, and then adding complexity: 2D (single layer), QUASI -3D (with leackage term simulating flow through aquitards) and

  14. A dynamic Monte Carlo model for predicting radiant exposure distribution in dental composites: model development and verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chu; Ferracane, Jack L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    2005-03-01

    Photo-cured dental composites are widely used in dental practices to restore teeth due to the esthetic appearance of the composites and the ability to cure in situ. However, their complex optical characteristics make it difficult to understand the light transport within the composites and to predict the depth of cure. Our previous work showed that the absorption and scattering coefficients of the composite changed after the composite was cured. The static Monte Carlo simulation showed that the penetration of radiant exposures differed significantly for cured and uncured optical properties. This means that a dynamic model is required for accurate prediction of radiant exposure in the composites. The purpose of this study was to develop and verify a dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) model simulating light propagation in dental composites that have dynamic optical properties while photons are absorbed. The composite was divided into many small cubes, each of which had its own scattering and absorption coefficients. As light passed through the composite, the light was scattered and absorbed. The amount of light absorbed in each cube was calculated using Beer's Law and was used to determine the next optical properties in that cube. Finally, the predicted total reflectance and transmittance as well as the optical property during curing were verified numerically and experimentally. Our results showed that the model predicted values agreed with the theoretical values within 1% difference. The DMC model results are comparable with experimental results within 5% differences.

  15. Mathematical modeling to predict the sub-bandage pressure on a conical limb for multi-layer bandaging.

    PubMed

    Sikka, M P; Ghosh, S; Mukhopadhyay, A

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of the compression treatment by a medical compression bandage is dependent on the pressure generated at the interface between the bandage and the skin. This pressure is called interface pressure or sub-bandage pressure. The performance of a bandage depends upon the level of interface pressure applied by the bandage and the sustenance of this pressure over time. The interface pressure exerted by the bandage depends on several other factors like limb shape or size, application technique, physical and structural properties of the bandage, physical activities taken by the patient, etc. The current understanding of how bandages apply pressure to a limb is based on the Law of Laplace, which states that tension in the walls of a container is dependent on both the pressure of the container's content and its radius. This concept was translated mathematically into equation relating pressure to tension and radius by Thomas. In addition, a modified equation was generated by multiplying the model with a constant that represents the number of bandage layers in order to use the model to estimate the pressure applied by multi-layer bandages. This simple multiplication adjustment was questioned by researchers. They had doubts about the model validity and whether it can be used to predict the sub-bandage pressure applied by pressure garments. One of the questions that were raised regarding the bandage thickness affecting the sub-bandage pressure has been recently explored by Al Khaburi where he used the thin and thick cylinder shell theory to study the effect of Multi Component Bandage's (MCB) thickness on the sub-bandage pressure. The model by Al Khaburi and the earlier models developed for pressure prediction are all based on calculations considering the cylindrical limb shapes although the human limb normally is wider at the calf and reduces in circumference towards the ankle. So in our approach, the bandage is assumed to take a conical shape during application

  16. Transient thermal behavior of multilayer media: Modeling and application to stratified moulds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazard, M.

    2006-07-01

    Transient and steady-state heat transfer in multilayer media is investigated by the thermal quadrupole method. A semi-analytical solution is proposed for the cases of layers parallel or orthogonal to the main heat-flux direction. The principal application is the study of the effect of the brazing metal used in stratified steel moulds.

  17. Multidimensional causal model of dental caries development in low-income preschool children.

    PubMed Central

    Litt, M D; Reisine, S; Tinanoff, N

    1995-01-01

    Despite the decline in the incidence of dental caries in the United States over the past several years, the condition remains a significant problem for the nation's poor children. Efforts to identify the factors responsible for caries development in samples of children of low socioeconomic status have primarily focused on a limited number of variables, and those have been predominantly biological (mutans streptococci, for example). Resulting models of caries development have usually shown good sensitivity but poor specificity. They have had limited implications for treatment. In an effort to produce a comprehensive model of caries development, 184 low-income preschool children were clinically assessed for mutans streptococci and for decayed, missing, or filled surfaces of deciduous teeth twice, first at age 4 years (baseline) and again a year later (year 1 assessment). As the clinical assessments were being done, caretakers were being interviewed to obtain data from five domains: demographics, social status, dental health behaviors, cognitive factors such as self-efficacy (self-confidence) and controllability, and perceived life stress. Data were analyzed using a structural equations modeling approach in which variables from all domains, plus baseline decayed missing and filled surfaces and baseline mutants, were used together to create a model of caries development in the year 1 assessment. Results confirmed earlier work that suggested that caries development at a 1-year followup was strongly dependent on earlier caries development. Early caries development in this sample was determined in part by mutans levels and by dental health behaviors. These behaviors themselves were accounted for partly by a cognitive factor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7480616

  18. First Principles Modeling of Metal/Ceramic Multilayer Nano-heterostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Satyesh K.; Wang, Jian; Misra, Amit; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2012-07-31

    Nanoscaled multilayer films composed of metals and ceramics have been explored for their potential applications as ductile, yet strong, materials. It is believed that at the nanoscale, the interfaces between the two materials constituting the multilayer assume an increasingly important role in determining the properties, as they comprise a more significant volume fraction of the multilayer with decreasing layer thickness. In this ab initio work, density functional theory was used to calculate the ideal shear strengths of pure Al, pure TiN, the Al/TiN interfacial region, and Al/TiN multilayers. The ideal shear strength of the Al/TiN interface was found to vary from very low (on the order of the ideal shear strength of Al) to very high (on the order of the ideal shear strength of TiN), depending on whether the TiN at the interface was Ti- or N-terminated, respectively. The results suggest that the shear properties of Al/TiN depend strongly on the chemistry of the interface, Al:N versus Al:Ti terminations. Nevertheless, for the Al/TiN multilayers, the ideal shear strength was limited by shear in the Al layer away from the interface, even when the individual layer thickness is less than a nanometer. Further we found an unusual structural rotation of bulk single-crystal Al under uniaxial compressive strains. It was found that under strains either along the <11-2> or the <111> directions, beyond a critical stress of about 13 GPa, the Al crystal can rotate through shear in the Shockley partial direction (i.e.,<11-2>) on the {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane, in an attempt to relieve internal stresses. This phenomenon reveals a possible mechanism leading to the onset of homogeneous dislocation nucleation in Al under high uniaxial compressions.

  19. Analysis of the factors that affect dental health behaviour and attendance at scheduled dental check-ups using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimiko; Oda, Megumi

    2011-04-01

    A questionnaire survey was administered to 317 parents who attended infant health check-ups in City B, Okayama Prefecture between October, 2008 and March, 2009. The questionnaire survey studied 7 factors based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model. We analysed factors that affected oral health behaviour and attendance at scheduled dental health check-ups. The survey containing 22 items concerning matters such as 'QOL' and 'health problems' was posted to parents and guardians in advance, and then collected on the day of the medical check-up. The collected data was analysed using the t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, following which we conducted a covariance structure analysis. The results showed that dental health behaviour was directly affected by reinforcing factors, and indirectly associated with enabling and predisposing factors influenced by reinforcing factors. It was also shown that predisposing factors and oral health behaviour were associated with attendance at scheduled oral health check-ups. The results indicated that strengthening oral health education by sharing knowledge that acts as predisposing factors and introducing adaptations of oral health behaviour that that fit individual lives will lead to improved attendance at scheduled dental health check-ups. PMID:21519364

  20. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  1. Ex Vivo Modeling of Multidomain Peptide Hydrogels with Intact Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Moore, A N; Perez, S C; Hartgerink, J D; D'Souza, R N; Colombo, J S

    2015-12-01

    Preservation of a vital dental pulp is a central goal of restorative dentistry. Currently, there is significant interest in the development of tissue engineering scaffolds that can serve as biocompatible and bioactive pulp-capping materials, driving dentin bridge formation without causing cytotoxic effects. Our earlier in vitro studies described the biocompatibility of multidomain peptide (MDP) hydrogel scaffolds with dental pulp-derived cells but were limited in their ability to model contact with intact 3-dimensional pulp tissues. Here, we utilize an established ex vivo mandible organ culture model to model these complex interactions. MDP hydrogel scaffolds were injected either at the interface of the odontoblasts and the dentin or into the pulp core of mandible slices and subsequently cultured for up to 10 d. Histology reveals minimal disruption of tissue architecture adjacent to MDP scaffolds injected into the pulp core or odontoblast space. Additionally, the odontoblast layer is structurally preserved in apposition to the MDP scaffold, despite being separated from the dentin. Alizarin red staining suggests mineralization at the periphery of MDP scaffolds injected into the odontoblast space. Immunohistochemistry reveals deposition of dentin sialophosphoprotein by odontoblasts into the adjacent MDP hydrogel, indicating continued functionality. In contrast, no mineralization or dentin sialophosphoprotein deposition is evident around MDP scaffolds injected into the pulp core. Collagen III expression is seen in apposition to gels at all experimental time points. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression is observed associated with centrally injected MDP scaffolds at early time points, indicating proteolytic digestion of scaffolds. Thus, MDP scaffolds delivered centrally and peripherally within whole dental pulp tissue are shown to be biocompatible, preserving local tissue architecture. Additionally, odontoblast function and pulp vitality are sustained when MDP

  2. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  3. Modelling ice layer formation using a preferential flow formulation in the physics based multi-layer SNOWPACK model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, Nander; Würzer, Sebastian; Fierz, Charles; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For physics based snow cover models, simulating the formation of dense ice layers inside the snowpack has been a long time challenge. In spite of their small vertical extend, the presence of ice lenses inside the snowpack can have a profound impact on vapor, heat and liquid water flow. These effects may ultimately influence processes on larger scales when, for example, looking at hydrological processes or wet snow avalanche formation. Also microwave emission signals from the snowpack are strongly influenced by the presence of ice layers. Recent laboratory experiments and modelling techniques of liquid water flow in snow have advanced the understanding of liquid water flow in snow, in particular the formation of preferential flow paths. We present a modelling approach in the one-dimensional, multi-layer snow cover model SNOWPACK for preferential flow that is based on a dual-domain approach (i.e., separation into a matrix flow and a preferential flow domain) and solving Richards equation for both. In recently published laboratory experiments, water ponding inside the snowpack has been identified to initiate preferential flow. Those studies also quantified the part of the snowpack involved in preferential flow as a function of grain size. By combining these concepts with an empirical function to determine refreezing of preferential flow water inside the snowpack, we are able to simulate preferential water flow in the model. We found that preferential flow paths arriving at a layer transition in the snowpack may lead to ponding conditions. Subsequent refreezing then may form dense ice layers (>700 kg/m3). We compare the simulations to 14 years of biweekly snow profiles made at the Weissfluhjoch study plot at 2540m altitude in the Eastern Swiss Alps. We show that we are able to reproduce several ice lenses that were observed in the field, whereas some profiles remain challenging to simulate.

  4. Physical model for non-steady-state dissolution of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Patel, M V; Fox, J L; Higuchi, W I

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a rigorous theoretical understanding of the dissolution behavior of dental enamel over the entire time-course of demineralization and to simulate by computer an erosion-type caries lesion according to the physical "hydroxyapatite model". The appropriate diffusion equations which account for simultaneous diffusion and equilibrium of all species in enamel pores, boundary layer, and bulk solution, and which also take into consideration surface reaction kinetics, were employed to allow for calculation of the micro-environmental solution concentration and changes in the mineral density as a function of time and distance within the enamel. This comprehensive physical model for non-steady-state enamel dissolution also explicitly takes into account changes in the diffusivity and the dissolution rate constant as a function of mineral density. Demineralization experiments were conducted in 0.1 mol/L sink acetate buffer (pH = 4.50, mu = 0.50), with ground bovine dental enamel blocks of known surface area mounted (with beeswax) in a rotating disk apparatus. Mineral density profiles were quantified by means of contact x-ray microradiography. The physical model was used to predict mineral density profiles for given demineralization treatments. The experimental profiles agreed quite well with the predicted profiles, when the effective diffusivity of the enamel was assumed to be a function of porosity and when changes in surface area of the crystallites were taken into consideration. PMID:3476613

  5. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  6. SSIC model: A multi-layer model for intervention of online rumors spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ru-Ya; Zhang, Xue-Fu; Liu, Yi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    SIR model is a classical model to simulate rumor spreading, while the supernetwork is an effective tool for modeling complex systems. Based on the Opinion SuperNetwork involving Social Sub-network, Environmental Sub-network, Psychological Sub-network, and Viewpoint Sub-network, drawing from the modeling idea of SIR model, this paper designs super SIC model (SSIC model) and its evolution rules, and also analyzes intervention effects on public opinion of four elements of supernetwork, which are opinion agent, opinion environment, agent's psychology and viewpoint. Studies show that, the SSIC model based on supernetwork has effective intervention effects on rumor spreading. It is worth noting that (i) identifying rumor spreaders in Social Sub-network and isolating them can achieve desired intervention results, (ii) improving environmental information transparency so that the public knows as much information as possible to reduce the rumors is a feasible way to intervene, (iii) persuading wavering neutrals has better intervention effects than clarifying rumors already spread everywhere, so rumors should be intervened in properly in time by psychology counseling.

  7. Limit analysis of multi-layered plates. Part I: The homogenized Love-Kirchhoff model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallot, Julien; Sab, Karam

    The purpose of this paper is to determine Gphom, the overall homogenized Love-Kirchhoff strength domain of a rigid perfectly plastic multi-layered plate, and to study the relationship between the 3D and the homogenized Love-Kirchhoff plate limit analysis problems. In the Love-Kirchhoff model, the generalized stresses are the in-plane (membrane) and the out-of-plane (flexural) stress field resultants. The homogenization method proposed by Bourgeois [1997. Modélisation numérique des panneaux structuraux légers. Ph.D. Thesis, University Aix-Marseille] and Sab [2003. Yield design of thin periodic plates by a homogenization technique and an application to masonry wall. C. R. Méc. 331, 641-646] for in-plane periodic rigid perfectly plastic plates is justified using the asymptotic expansion method. For laminated plates, an explicit parametric representation of the yield surface ∂Gphom is given thanks to the π-function (the plastic dissipation power density function) that describes the local strength domain at each point of the plate. This representation also provides a localization method for the determination of the 3D stress components corresponding to every generalized stress belonging to ∂Gphom. For a laminated plate described with a yield function of the form F(x3,σ)=σu(x3)F^(σ), where σu is a positive even function of the out-of-plane coordinate x3 and F^ is a convex function of the local stress σ, two effective constants and a normalization procedure are introduced. A symmetric sandwich plate consisting of two Von-Mises materials ( σu=σ1u in the skins and σu=σ2u in the core) is studied. It is found that, for small enough contrast ratios ( r=σ1u/σ2u≤5), the normalized strength domain G^phom is close to the one corresponding to a homogeneous Von-Mises plate [Ilyushin, A.-A., 1956. Plasticité. Eyrolles, Paris].

  8. Thermal Depth Profiling Reconstruction by Multilayer Thermal Quadrupole Modeling and Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao-Jiang; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2010-02-01

    A new hybrid inversion method for depth profiling reconstruction of thermal conductivities of inhomogeneous solids is proposed based on multilayer quadrupole formalism of thermal waves, particle swarm optimization and sequential quadratic programming. The reconstruction simulations for several thermal conductivity profiles are performed to evaluate the applicability of the method. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the precision and insensitivity to noise of the inversion method are very satisfactory.

  9. Climate warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2 - Simulations with a multilayer coupled atmosphere-ocean seasonal energy balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Peng; Chou, Ming-Dah; Arking, Albert

    1987-01-01

    The transient response of the climate to increasing CO2 is studied using a modified version of the multilayer energy balance model of Peng et al. (1982). The main characteristics of the model are described. Latitudinal and seasonal distributions of planetary albedo, latitude-time distributions of zonal mean temperatures, and latitudinal distributions of evaporation, water vapor transport, and snow cover generated from the model and derived from actual observations are analyzed and compared. It is observed that in response to an atmospheric doubling of CO2, the model reaches within 1/e of the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature in 9-35 years for the probable range of vertical heat diffusivity in the ocean. For CO2 increases projected by the National Research Council (1983), the model's transient response in annually and globally averaged surface temperatures is 60-75 percent of the corresponding equilibrium response, and the disequilibrium increases with increasing heat diffusivity of the ocean.

  10. A Multi-layer Dynamic Model for Coordination Based Group Decision Making in Water Resource Allocation and Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xingnan; Li, Chenming; Wang, Jianying

    Management of group decision-making is an important issue in water source management development. In order to overcome the defects in lacking of effective communication and cooperation in the existing decision-making models, this paper proposes a multi-layer dynamic model for coordination in water resource allocation and scheduling based group decision making. By introducing the scheme-recognized cooperative satisfaction index and scheme-adjusted rationality index, the proposed model can solve the problem of poor convergence of multi-round decision-making process in water resource allocation and scheduling. Furthermore, the problem about coordination of limited resources-based group decision-making process can be solved based on the effectiveness of distance-based group of conflict resolution. The simulation results show that the proposed model has better convergence than the existing models.

  11. 77 FR 20648 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental Positioning Adjustment Appliances, the Appliances Made Therefrom, and Methods of Making the Same; Institution... of certain digital models, digital data, and treatment plans for use in making incremental...

  12. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeida, Yousif; Pinfield, Valerie J.; Challis, Richard E.

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite.

  13. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  14. Modeling of viscoelastic behavior of dental chemically activated resin composites during curing.

    PubMed

    Dauvillier, B S; Hübsch, P F; Aarnts, M P; Feilzer, A J

    2001-01-01

    Shrinkage stresses generated in dental resin composites during curing are among the major problems in adhesive dentistry, because they interfere with the integrity of the restored tooth. The aim of this study was to find a mechanical model to describe the viscoelastic behavior of a two-paste resin composite during curing, to aid our understanding of the process of shrinkage stress development. In this study, stress-strain data on Clearfil F2 during curing were obtained by a dynamic test method and analyzed using three mechanical models (Maxwell, Kelvin, and the Standard Linear Solid model). With a modeling procedure, the model's stress response was compared with the experimental stress data, and the material parameters were calculated. On the basis of the modeling and evaluation results, a model for describing the viscoelastic behavior of the shrinking resin composite was selected. The validation results showed that the modeling procedure is free of error, and that it was capable of finding material parameters associated with a two-parametric model with a high degree of accuracy. The viscoelastic behavior of the shrinking resin composite, as excited by the conditions of the test method, cannot be described by a single mechanical model. In the early stage of curing, the most accurate prediction was achieved by the Maxwell model, while during the remainder of the curing process the Kelvin model can be used to describe the viscoelastic behavior of the two-paste resin composite. PMID:11152993

  15. Analytical modeling of drug dynamics induced by eluting stents in the coronary multi-layered curved domain.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Michele; Sammarco, Paolo; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Pharmacokinetics induced by drug eluting stents (DES) in coronary walls is modeled by means of a one-dimensional multi-layered model, accounting for vessel curvature and non-homogeneous properties of the arterial tissues. The model includes diffusion mechanisms, advection effects related to plasma filtration through the walls, and bio-chemical drug reactions. A non-classical Sturm-Liouville problem with discontinuous coefficients is derived, whose closed-form analytical solution is obtained via an eigenfunction expansion. Soundness and consistency of the proposed approach are shown by numerical computations based on possible clinical treatments involving both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. The influence of the main model parameters on drug delivery mechanisms is analyzed, highlighting the effects induced by vessel curvature and yielding comparative indications and useful insights into the concurring mechanisms governing the pharmacokinetics. PMID:26162517

  16. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. Materials and methods A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1–7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8–11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS® (1,806±165 N) and e.max® ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM® 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. Conclusion The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass–ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use

  17. Statistical power of multilevel modelling in dental caries clinical trials: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Burnside, G; Pine, C M; Williamson, P R

    2014-01-01

    Outcome data from dental caries clinical trials have a naturally hierarchical structure, with surfaces clustered within teeth, clustered within individuals. Data are often aggregated into the DMF index for each individual, losing tooth- and surface-specific information. If these data are to be analysed by tooth or surface, allowing exploration of effects of interventions on different teeth and surfaces, appropriate methods must be used to adjust for the clustered nature of the data. Multilevel modelling allows analysis of clustered data using individual observations without aggregating data, and has been little used in the field of dental caries. A simulation study was conducted to investigate the performance of multilevel modelling methods and standard caries increment analysis. Data sets were simulated from a three-level binomial distribution based on analysis of a caries clinical trial in Scottish adolescents, with varying sample sizes, treatment effects and random tooth level effects based on trials reported in Cochrane reviews of topical fluoride, and analysed to compare the power of multilevel models and traditional analysis. 40,500 data sets were simulated. Analysis showed that estimated power for the traditional caries increment method was similar to that for multilevel modelling, with more variation in smaller data sets. Multilevel modelling may not allow significant reductions in the number of participants required in a caries clinical trial, compared to the use of traditional analyses, but investigators interested in exploring the effect of their intervention in more detail may wish to consider the application of multilevel modelling to their clinical trial data. PMID:24216573

  18. Multiresponse multilayer vadose zone model calibration using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and field water retention data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöHling, Thomas; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2011-04-01

    In the past two decades significant progress has been made toward the application of inverse modeling to estimate the water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions of the vadose zone at different spatial scales. Many of these contributions have focused on estimating only a few soil hydraulic parameters, without recourse to appropriately capturing and addressing spatial variability. The assumption of a homogeneous medium significantly simplifies the complexity of the resulting inverse problem, allowing the use of classical parameter estimation algorithms. Here we present an inverse modeling study with a high degree of vertical complexity that involves calibration of a 25 parameter Richards'-based HYDRUS-1D model using in situ measurements of volumetric water content and pressure head from multiple depths in a heterogeneous vadose zone in New Zealand. We first determine the trade-off in the fitting of both data types using the AMALGAM multiple objective evolutionary search algorithm. Then we adopt a Bayesian framework and derive posterior probability density functions of parameter and model predictive uncertainty using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis, DREAMZS adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme. We use four different formulations of the likelihood function each differing in their underlying assumption about the statistical properties of the error residual and data used for calibration. We show that AMALGAM and DREAMZS can solve for the 25 hydraulic parameters describing the water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions of the multilayer heterogeneous vadose zone. Our study clearly highlights that multiple data types are simultaneously required in the likelihood function to result in an accurate soil hydraulic characterization of the vadose zone of interest. Remaining error residuals are most likely caused by model deficiencies that are not encapsulated by the multilayer model and can not be accessed by the

  19. Experimental model to measure the increase of dental pulp temperature in vivo during laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Junqueira, Silvio L. M.; Busato, Mara S.

    1994-09-01

    Carbon dioxide laser has been used in dental surgery. The existence of healthy teeth, which have pulp vitality needing to be preserved, is observed in a great number of cases. In this work we describe an experimental model which provides the measurement of temperature in pulp chamber `in vivo,' during oral surgeries in which the CO2 laser beam is applied to gingival tissue. The problems met during the search for the best way to place the thermal probe regarding the diameter and depth of pulp chamber and the thickness of the tissue layer formed by gum and maxillary bone are discussed. We use a thermocouple placed in the pulp chamber of superior canine teeth in dogs. After that, the probe was also placed between gum and dental root. Since the temperature at gingival surface was known, it was easy to determine the rise in temperature at pulp chamber and also to observe the thermal gradient from gum to tissue to bone, thus avoiding pulp damage during laser applications.

  20. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  1. Framework for e-learning assessment in dental education: a global model for the future.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Carolina R; Bayne, Stephen C; Beeley, Josie A; Brayshaw, Christine J; Cox, Margaret J; Donaldson, Nora H; Elson, Bruce S; Grayden, Sharon K; Hatzipanagos, Stylianos; Johnson, Lynn A; Reynolds, Patricia A; Schönwetter, Dieter J

    2013-05-01

    The framework presented in this article demonstrates strategies for a global approach to e-curricula in dental education by considering a collection of outcome assessment tools. By combining the outcomes for overall assessment, a global model for a pilot project that applies e-assessment tools to virtual learning environments (VLE), including haptics, is presented. Assessment strategies from two projects, HapTEL (Haptics in Technology Enhanced Learning) and UDENTE (Universal Dental E-learning), act as case-user studies that have helped develop the proposed global framework. They incorporate additional assessment tools and include evaluations from questionnaires and stakeholders' focus groups. These measure each of the factors affecting the classical teaching/learning theory framework as defined by Entwistle in a standardized manner. A mathematical combinatorial approach is proposed to join these results together as a global assessment. With the use of haptic-based simulation learning, exercises for tooth preparation assessing enamel and dentine were compared to plastic teeth in manikins. Equivalence for student performance for haptic versus traditional preparation methods was established, thus establishing the validity of the haptic solution for performing these exercises. Further data collected from HapTEL are still being analyzed, and pilots are being conducted to validate the proposed test measures. Initial results have been encouraging, but clearly the need persists to develop additional e-assessment methods for new learning domains. PMID:23658401

  2. Dental impaction pain model as a potential tool to evaluate drugs with efficacy in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Kotey, Paul; McGratty, Megan; Ramakrishnan, Rohini; Gottesdiener, Keith; Reicin, Alise; Wagner, John A

    2006-08-01

    Intravenous lidocaine, a nonspecific Na-channel blocker, was used to assess the dental impaction model for evaluation of neuropathic pain drugs. Sixty patients, experiencing moderate or severe pain after removal of > or = 2 third molars, were randomized (2:2:1:1) to lidocaine (4 mg/kg; maximal dose 300 mg), oxycodone/acetaminophen (10/650 mg), placebo, and active placebo (diphenhydramine, 50 mg). Lidocaine provided a modest degree of pain relief. Predefined endpoints of total pain relief and sum of pain intensity at 2, 4, and 6 hours showed numerically, not statistically significantly, greater pain relief versus placebo. A significantly greater effect over placebo was observed in peak effect and at shorter time points (30 minutes and 1 hour), consistent with the pharmacokinetic profile (plasma concentration of approximately 2 mug/mL). Oxycodone/acetaminophen provided significantly greater analgesia versus placebo, validating study conduct, and significantly greater pain relief was observed versus lidocaine, which is consistent with a smaller portion of dental extraction pain being of neuropathic origin. PMID:16855076

  3. Anisotropic viscoelastic shell modeling technique of copper patterns/photoimageable solder resist composite for warpage simulation of multi-layer printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Joo, Sung-Jun; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the warpage simulation of a multi-layer printed circuit board (PCB) was performed as a function of various copper (Cu) patterns/photoimageable solder resist (PSR) composite patterns and their anisotropic viscoelastic properties. The thermo-mechanical properties of Cu/PSR patterns were obtained from finite element analysis (virtual test) and homogenized with anisotropic composite shell models that considered the viscoelastic properties. The multi-layer PCB model was simplified based on the unit Cu/PSR patterns and the warpage simulation during the reflow process was performed by using ABAQUS combined with a user-defined subroutine. From these results, it was demonstrated that the proposed anisotropic viscoelastic composite shell simulation technique can be successfully used to predict warpage of multi-layer PCBs during the reflow process.

  4. Wavelength selection and evolution in high-resolution 3D numerical models of multilayer detachment folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B. J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts are dominated by crustal scale folding that exhibits fairly regular fold spacing. For example, the Fars region in the Zagros Mountains shows a fold spacing with a normal distribution around a dominant wavelength of 14 Km ± 3 Km, yet having a wide variability of aspect ratios (length to wavelength ratios; Yamato et al., 2011). To which extend this is consistent with a crustal-scale folding instability or how the regional spacing of folding can be used to constrain regional rheological parameters are not fully resolved questions. To get insights into these problems we have investigated the dominant wavelength selection and evolution in a true multilayer system (Schmid and Podlachikov, 2006) with three different viscosities: lower salt layer (ηs), and overlying weak layers (ηw) and competent layers (ηc). This has been done by means of two tools: a semi-analytical solution and numerical models. The 2D semi-analytical approach was applied to derive mechanical phase diagrams that can be used to distinguish different folding modes using two viscosity ratios (R1= ηc/ ηs and R2= ηc/ ηw). To test the validity of the phase diagrams beyond the initial stages of folding for which the analytical approach is valid, we performed several 3D high-resolution forward numerical runs using a finite element code (LaMEM). Additionally, irregular bottom topography was implemented in the numerical runs in order to account for variable salt thickness distribution and consequently study its effect on the wavelength selection. A straight but gradual salt thickness variation, sudden thickness variations due to a basement step or an arc shaped salt basin among other cases could be investigated. It was observed that the bottom topography exerts an impact on the velocity field of the different folding modes and as a result, its influence can be observed on the resulting topography. However, not all the folding modes exhibit an initial wavelength that is dependent

  5. Aspects of Integrating Functional Electroceramic Material in Multilayer Thin Films for Image Sensing: Modeling and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, M. A.; Oishi, K.; Katsuta, A.; Akai, D.; Sawada, K.; Ishida, M.

    2015-07-01

    Using combined experimental and simulation techniques, this study addresses the critical stress for peeling off crucial layer(s) in multilayered epitaxial functional thin films on n-Si(001) substrate. The thickness of platinum (Pt) and PZT thin films was varied from 22 nm to 142 nm and 90 nm to 450 nm, respectively. Residual stresses were measured by analyzing captured fringes using Newton's rings technique. Advanced finite element computation was next conducted to predict the evolution of residual stresses. Induced stresses in Pt thin film were found to be decreased with decreasing the thickness of film from 72 nm to 40 nm. In contrast, stresses are shown to be decreased with increasing the thickness of PZT film from 240 nm to 450 nm. The design of the pyroelectric multilayered sensors was thus optimized employing finite element (FE) simulation. Computed stresses were found to correlate well with that observed in experiments. FE simulations can thus be used as a tool to a priori predict the evolution of residual stresses, which may allow a fail-safe design before the fabrication of pyroelectric image sensors.

  6. 78 FR 46610 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental Appliances, the Appliances Made Therefrom, and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Commission Determination To... (``Align''), on March 1, 2012, as corrected on March 22, 2012. 77 FR 20648 (April 5, 2012). The...

  7. 78 FR 29157 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use, in Making Incremental Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use, in Making Incremental Dental Positioning Adjustment Appliances Made Therefrom, and Methods of Making the Same Investigation No. 337-...

  8. 78 FR 46611 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use in Making Incremental Dental Appliances, the Appliances Made Therefrom, and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Commission Determination To... (``Align''), on March 1, 2012, as corrected on March 22, 2012. 77 FR 20648 (April 5, 2012). The...

  9. Toward an Innovative, Basic Program Model for the Improvement of Professional Instruction in Dental Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the massive amount of literature pertaining to the improvement of professional instruction in dental education resulted in the formation of a comprehensive model of 10 categories, including Delphi technique; systems approach; agencies; workshops; multi-media, self-instruction; evaluation paradigms, measurement, courses, and…

  10. Modeling mixed clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis in multi-layer materials by using a generalized Jiles-Atherton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, Petru; Mehta, Mohit; Dimian, Mihai

    2014-02-01

    A generalized Jiles-Atherton model is proposed to describe mixed clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops. While it is physically inconsistent for homogeneous magnetic materials, this mixed type of hysteresis is exhibited by several multi-layer and superlattice materials with antiferromagnetic coupling. The modeling approach is based on a newly developed clockwise hysteretic model using the Jiles-Atherton framework and its linear superposition to the classical counter-clockwise version. The resulting technique is implemented in open-access academic software for hysteresis and simulation samples are presented in the paper.

  11. Characterization of thin-film multilayers using magnetization curves and modeling of low-angle X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.; Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    We have characterized thin-film multilayers grown by ion-beam sputtering using magnetization curves and modeling of low-angle x-ray diffraction data. In our films, we use ferromagnetic layer = Co, Fe, and NiFe and spacer layer = Si, Ge, FeSi{sub 2}, and CoSi{sub 2}. We have studied the effects of (1) deposition conditions; (2) thickness of layers; (3) different layer materials; and (4) annealing. We find higher magnetization in films grown at 1000V rather than 500V and in films with spacer layers of 50{angstrom} rather than 100{angstrom}. We find higher coercivity in films with cobalt grown on germanium rather than silicon, metal grown on gold underlayers rather than on glass substrates, and when using thinner spacer layers. Finally, modeling reveals that films grown with disilicide layers are more thermally stable than films grown with silicon spacer layers.

  12. A model for longitudinal optical phonons and electron-phonon coupling in GaAs/GaAlAs multilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, C.; Clerot, F.

    A new model for long-wavelength longitudinal optical phonons in GaAsGaAlAs multi-layer structures is presented. Depending on the layer, the relative ionic displacements are written on the basis of GaAs or GaAs-type longitudinal optical phonons and treated in the framework of the Born-Huang model generalized to include isotropic dispersion effects in the Brillouin zone centre. For double heterostructures, a finite number of quantized confined modes is found. Interplay between the long range Coulomb interaction, which couples the vibrations of adjacent GaAs layers, and confinement effects, which prevent the displacements of adjacent GaAs layers to overlap, is evidenced in the case of superlattices. The strength of the electron-phonon coupling in double heterostructures stays within a factor of 2 of the electron-bulk phonon effective coupling strength for practical values of the parameters.

  13. Bayesian dynamic regression models for interval censored survival data with application to children dental health.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Ming-Hui; Yan, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Cox models with time-varying coefficients offer great flexibility in capturing the temporal dynamics of covariate effects on event times, which could be hidden from a Cox proportional hazards model. Methodology development for varying coefficient Cox models, however, has been largely limited to right censored data; only limited work on interval censored data has been done. In most existing methods for varying coefficient models, analysts need to specify which covariate coefficients are time-varying and which are not at the time of fitting. We propose a dynamic Cox regression model for interval censored data in a Bayesian framework, where the coefficient curves are piecewise constant but the number of pieces and the jump points are covariate specific and estimated from the data. The model automatically determines the extent to which the temporal dynamics is needed for each covariate, resulting in smoother and more stable curve estimates. The posterior computation is carried out via an efficient reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Inference of each coefficient is based on an average of models with different number of pieces and jump points. A simulation study with three covariates, each with a coefficient of different degree in temporal dynamics, confirmed that the dynamic model is preferred to the existing time-varying model in terms of model comparison criteria through conditional predictive ordinate. When applied to a dental health data of children with age between 7 and 12 years, the dynamic model reveals that the relative risk of emergence of permanent tooth 24 between children with and without an infected primary predecessor is the highest at around age 7.5, and that it gradually reduces to one after age 11. These findings were not seen from the existing studies with Cox proportional hazards models. PMID:23389549

  14. Utility of coactive neuro-fuzzy inference system for pan evaporation modeling in comparison with multilayer perceptron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabari, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh Talaee, P.; Abghari, Hirad

    2012-05-01

    Estimation of pan evaporation ( E pan) using black-box models has received a great deal of attention in developing countries where measurements of E pan are spatially and temporally limited. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) and coactive neuro-fuzzy inference system (CANFIS) models were used to predict daily E pan for a semi-arid region of Iran. Six MLP and CANFIS models comprising various combinations of daily meteorological parameters were developed. The performances of the models were tested using correlation coefficient ( r), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and percentage error of estimate (PE). It was found that the MLP6 model with the Momentum learning algorithm and the Tanh activation function, which requires all input parameters, presented the most accurate E pan predictions ( r = 0.97, RMSE = 0.81 mm day-1, MAE = 0.63 mm day-1 and PE = 0.58 %). The results also showed that the most accurate E pan predictions with a CANFIS model can be achieved with the Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy model and the Gaussian membership function. Overall performances revealed that the MLP method was better suited than CANFIS method for modeling the E pan process.

  15. Ultrasonic NDE of Multilayered Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Fisher, K A; Lehman, S K

    2005-02-14

    This project developed ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques based on guided and bulk waves in multilayered structures using arrays. First, a guided wave technique was developed by preferentially exciting dominant modes with energy in the layer of interest via an ultrasonic array. Second, a bulk wave technique uses Fermat's principle of least time as well as wave-based properties to reconstruct array data and image the multilayered structure. The guided wave technique enables the inspection of inaccessible areas of a multilayered structure without disassembling it. Guided waves propagate using the multilayer as a waveguide into the inaccessible areas from an accessible position. Inspecting multi-layered structures with a guided wave relies on exciting modes with sufficient energy in the layer of interest. Multilayered structures are modeled to determine the possible modes and their distribution of energy across the thickness. Suitable modes were determined and excited by designing arrays with the proper element spacing and frequency. Bulk wave imaging algorithms were developed to overcome the difficulties of multiple reflections and refractions at interfaces. Reconstruction algorithms were developed to detect and localize flaws. A bent-ray algorithm incorporates Fermat's principle to correct time delays in the ultrasonic data that result from the difference in wave speeds in each layer and refractions at the interfaces. A planar wave-based algorithm was developed using the Green function for the multilayer structure to enhance focusing on reception for improved imaging.

  16. Dental arch changes associated with rapid maxillary expansion: A retrospective model analysis study

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Ivor M; Kumar, H. C. Kiran; Shetty, K. Sadashiva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Transverse deficiency of the maxilla is a common clinical problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Transverse maxillary deficiency, isolated or associated with other dentofacial deformities, results in esthetic and functional impairment giving rise to several clinical manifestations such as asymmetrical facial growth, positional and functional mandibular deviations, altered dentofacial esthetics, adverse periodontal responses, unstable dental tipping, and other functional problems. Orthopedic maxillary expansion is the preferred treatment approach to increase the maxillary transverse dimension in young patients by splitting of the mid palatal suture. This orthopedic procedure has lately been subject of renewed interest in orthodontic treatment mechanics because of its potential for increasing arch perimeter to alleviate crowding in the maxillary arch without adversely affecting facial profile. Hence, the present investigation was conducted to establish a correlation between transverse expansion and changes in the arch perimeter, arch width and arch length. Methods: For this purpose, 10 subjects (five males, five females) were selected who had been treated by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using hyrax rapid palatal expander followed by fixed mechanotherapy (PEA). Pretreatment (T1), postexpansion (T2), and posttreatment (T3) dental models were compared for dental changes brought about by RME treatment and its stability at the end of fixed mechanotherapy. After model measurements were made, the changes between T1–T2, T2–T3 and T1–T3 were determined for each patient. The mean difference between T1–T2, T2–T3 and T1–T3 were compared to assess the effects of RME on dental arch measurements. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation and are compared by repeated measures analysis of variance followed by a post-hoc test. Arch perimeter changes are correlated with changes in arch widths at the canine, premolar and molar regions

  17. A Multi-Layered Computational Model of Coupled Elastin Degradation, Vasoactive Dysfunction, and Collagenous Stiffening in Aortic Aging

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J.D.; Holzapfel, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Arterial responses to diverse pathologies and insults likely occur via similar mechanisms. For example, many studies suggest that the natural process of aging and isolated systolic hypertension share many characteristics in arteries, including loss of functional elastin, decreased smooth muscle tone, and altered rates of deposition and/or cross-linking of fibrillar collagen. Our aim is to show computationally how these coupled effects can impact evolving aortic geometry and mechanical behavior. Employing a thick-walled, multi-layered constrained mixture model, we suggest that a coupled loss of elastin and vasoactive function are fundamental mechanisms by which aortic aging occurs. Moreover, it is suggested that collagenous stiffening, although itself generally an undesirable process, can play a key role in attenuating excessive dilatation, perhaps including the enlargement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. PMID:21380570

  18. Antimicrobial polypeptide multilayer nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Dave, Komal; Haynie, Donald T

    2006-01-01

    A multilayer coating (or film) of nanometer-thick layers can be made by sequential adsorption of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on a solid support. The method is known as layer-by-layer assembly (LBL). No special apparatus is required for LBL and nanofilms can be prepared under mild, physiological conditions. A multilayer nanofilm in which at least one of the constituent species is a polypeptide is a polypeptide multilayer nanofilm. The present work was aimed at assessing whether polypeptide multilayer nanofilms with specific antimicrobial properties could be prepared by incorporation of a known antimicrobial agent in the film structure, in this case the edible protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The chicken enzyme is widely employed as a human food preservative. An advantage of LBL in this context is that the nanofilm is fabricated directly on the surface of interest, eliminating the need to incorporate the antimicrobial in other packaging materials. Here, nanofilms were made of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA), which is highly negatively charged in the mildly acidic pH range, and HEWL, which has a high net positive charge at acidic pH. We show that PLGA/HEWL nanofilms inhibit growth of the model microbe Microccocus luteus in the surrounding liquid medium. The amount of HEWL released from PLGA/HEWL films depends on the number of HEWL layers and therefore on the total quantity of HEWL in the films. This initial study provides a sketch of the scope for further development of LBL in the area of antimicrobial polypeptide multilayer films. Potential applications of such films include strategies for food preservation and coatings for implant devices. PMID:17176751

  19. Damage modeling of small-scale experiments on dental enamel with hierarchical microstructure.

    PubMed

    Scheider, I; Xiao, T; Yilmaz, E; Schneider, G A; Huber, N; Bargmann, S

    2015-03-01

    Dental enamel is a highly anisotropic and heterogeneous material, which exhibits an optimal reliability with respect to the various loads occurring over years. In this work, enamel's microstructure of parallel aligned rods of mineral fibers is modeled and mechanical properties are evaluated in terms of strength and toughness with the help of a multiscale modeling method. The established model is validated by comparing it with the stress-strain curves identified by microcantilever beam experiments extracted from these rods. Moreover, in order to gain further insight in the damage-tolerant behavior of enamel, the size of crystallites below which the structure becomes insensitive to flaws is studied by a microstructural finite element model. The assumption regarding the fiber strength is verified by a numerical study leading to accordance of fiber size and flaw tolerance size, and the debonding strength is estimated by optimizing the failure behavior of the microstructure on the hierarchical level above the individual fibers. Based on these well-grounded properties, the material behavior is predicted well by homogenization of a representative unit cell including damage, taking imperfections (like microcracks in the present case) into account. PMID:25484332

  20. Mathematical modeling of cross-linking monomer elution from resin-based dental composites.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, Dragica; Radisic, Marina; Lausevic, Mila; Zivkovic, Slavoljub; Miletic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Elution of potentially toxic substances, including monomers, from resin-based dental composites may affect the biocompatibility of these materials in clinical conditions. In addition to the amounts of eluted monomers, mathematical modeling of elution kinetics reveals composite restorations as potential chronic sources of leachable monomers. The aim of this work was to experimentally quantify elution of main cross-linking monomers from four commercial composites and offer a mathematical model of elution kinetics. Composite samples (n = 7 per group) of Filtek Supreme XT (3M ESPE), Tetric EvoCeram (Ivoclar Vivadent), Admira (Voco), and Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) were prepared in 2-mm thick Teflon moulds and cured with halogen or light-emitting diode light. Monomer elution in ethanol and water was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography up to 28 days postimmersion. The mathematical model was expressed as a sum of two exponential regression functions representing the first-order kinetics law. Elution kinetics in all cases followed the same mathematical model though differences in rate constants as well as the extent of monomer elution were material-, LCU-, medium-dependent. The proposed mechanisms of elution indicate fast elution from surface and subsurface layers and up to 100 times slower monomer extraction from the bulk polymer. PMID:22997145

  1. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  2. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  3. Modeling multi-layer effects in passive microwave remote sensing of dry snow using Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory (DMRT) based on quasicrystalline approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liang, D.; Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Dense Media Radiative Transfer theory (DMRT) of Quasicrystalline Approximation of Mie scattering by sticky particles is used to study the multiple scattering effects in layered snow in microwave remote sensing. Results are illustrated for various snow profile characteristics. Polarization differences and frequency dependences of multilayer snow model are significantly different from that of the single-layer snow model. Comparisons are also made with CLPX data using snow parameters as given by the VIC model. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  4. A new multilayered visco-elasto-plastic experimental model to study strike-slip fault seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Marchandon, M.; Romano, C.; Strak, V.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, technological advances in satellite imagery measurements as well as the development of dense geodetic and seismologic networks allow for a detailed analysis of surface deformation associated with active fault seismic cycle. However, the study of earthquake dynamics faces several limiting factors related to the difficulty to access the deep source of earthquake and to integrate the characteristic time scales of deformation processes that extend from seconds to thousands of years. To overcome part of these limitations and better constrain the role and couplings between kinematic and mechanical parameters, we have developed a new experimental approach allowing for the simulation of strike-slip fault earthquakes and analyze in detail hundreds of successive seismic cycle. Model rheology is made of multilayered visco-elasto-plastic analog materials to account for the mechanical behavior of the upper and lower crust and to allow simulating brittle/ductile coupling, postseismic deformation phase and far-field stress transfers. The kinematic evolution of the model surface is monitored using an optical system, based on subpixel spectral correlation of high-resolution digital images. First, results show that the model succeed in reproducing the deformation mechanisms and surface kinematics associated to the main phases of the seismic cycle indicating that model scaling is satisfactory. These results are comforted by using numerical algorithms to study the strain and stress distribution at the surface and at depth, along the fault plane. Our analog modeling approach appears, then, as an efficient complementary approach to investigate earthquake dynamics.

  5. A dynamic model of the fate of organic chemicals in a multilayered air/soil system: development and illustrative application.

    PubMed

    Ghirardello, Davide; Morselli, Melissa; Semplice, Matteo; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    A new site-specific, dynamic model (SoilPlus) was developed to simulate the fate of nonionized organic chemicals in the air/litter/soil system; key features of the model are the double-layered air compartment interacting dynamically with multilayered litter and soil compartments, with seasonal dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes. The model describes the soil environment calculating separate mass balances for water, chemical, and organic matter. SoilPlus underwent a process of benchmarking and evaluation in order to reach a satisfying confirmation of its predictive capability. Several simulations were performed to estimate the role of litter and DOC in affecting the fate of a model contaminant for POPs (hexachlorobenzene). The model shows that litter can behave as a buffer in the process of transferring hexachlorobenzene from air to the mineral soil and as a trap when hexachlorobenzene tends to move from a contaminated field toward clean air. DOC seems to behave as a leaching-enhancer in certain climatic conditions (heavy rainfall, high DOC concentrations), but it does not appear to move significant amounts of HCB in a year calculation. PMID:21053937

  6. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer model aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Masserey, Bernard; Fromme, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Especially for ageing aircraft the development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration and varying loading conditions constitutes a significant maintenance problem. High frequency guided waves offer a potential compromise between the capabilities of local bulk ultrasonic measurements with proven defect detection sensitivity and the large area coverage of lower frequency guided ultrasonic waves. High frequency guided waves have energy distributed through all layers of the specimen thickness, allowing in principle hidden (2nd layer) fatigue damage monitoring. For the integration into structural health monitoring systems the sensitivity for the detection of hidden fatigue damage in inaccessible locations of the multi-layered components from a stand-off distance has to be ascertained. The multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two aluminium plate-strips with an epoxy sealant layer. During cyclic loading fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole was monitored. Specific guided wave modes (combination of fundamental A0 and S0 Lamb modes) were selectively excited above the cut-off frequencies of higher modes using a standard ultrasonic wedge transducer. Non-contact laser measurements close to the defect were performed to qualify the influence of a fatigue crack in one aluminium layer on the guided wave scattering. Fatigue crack growth monitoring using laser interferometry showed good sensitivity and repeatability for the reliable detection of small, quarter-elliptical cracks. Standard ultrasonic pulse-echo equipment was employed to monitor hidden fatigue damage from a stand-off distance without access to the damaged specimen layer. Sufficient sensitivity for the detection of fatigue cracks located in the inaccessible aluminium layer was verified, allowing in principle practical in situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth.

  7. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. PMID:23910263

  8. Finite element modeling of dental restoration through multi-material laser densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kun

    To provide guidance for intelligent selection of various parameters in the Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process for dental restorations, finite element modeling (FEM) has been carried out to investigate the MMLD process. These modeling investigations include the thermal analysis of the nominal surface temperature that should be adopted during experiments in order to achieve the desired microstructure; the effects of the volume shrinkage due to transformation from a powder compact to dense liquid on the temperature distribution and the size of the transformation zone; the evolution of transient temperature, transient stresses, residual stresses and distortions; and the effects of laser processing conditions, such as fabrication sequences, laser scanning patterns, component sizes, preheating temperatures, laser scanning rates, initial porosities, and thicknesses of each powder layer, on the final quality of the component fabricated via the MMLD process. The simulation results are compared with the experiments. It is found that the predicted temperature distribution matches the experiments very well. The nominal surface temperature applied on the dental porcelain body should be below 1273 K to prevent the forming of the un-desired microstructure (i.e., a leucite-free glassy phase). The simplified models that do not include the volume shrinkage effect provide good estimations of the temperature field and the size of the laser-densified body, although the shape of the laser-densified body predicted is different from that obtained in the experiment. It is also fount that warping and residual thermal stresses of the laser-densified component are more sensitive to the chamber preheating temperature and the thickness of each powder layer than to the laser scanning rate and the initial porosity of the powder layer. The major mechanism responsible for these phenomena is identified to be related to the change of the temperature gradient induced by these laser

  9. Modeling Hydrogeological and Geomenchanical Processes Related toCO2 Injection in a Faulted Multilayer System

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of coupled hydrological and geomechanical processes during a deep underground injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} in a hypothetical brine aquifer. We consider a multilayer system in which the injection zone is situated below a sequence of caprock and aquifer layers that are intersected by a vertical fault zone. The fault zone consists of highly fractured shale across the first caprock layers that are located just above the injection zone. Initially, the fractured shale zones are considered sealed with minerals, but we allow fractures (and the fractured zones) to open as a result of injection induced reductions in effective stresses. Our results indicate that even when assuming a very sensitive relationship between effective stress and fractured-zone permeability, the injection-induced changes in permeability across are only moderate with largest changes occurring in the first caprock layer, just above the injection zone. As a result, the upward leakage rate remains relatively small and therefore changes in fluid pressure and hydromechanical effects in overlying zones are also relatively small for the case studied in this paper.

  10. Modeling of the Light Speckle Field Structure Inside a Multilayer Human Skin Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Dik, S. K.; Ivanov, A. P.; Abramovich, N. D.

    2013-11-01

    We present an analytic method and the results of investigating the characteristics of the interference pattern formed by multiply scattered light in a multilayer biological tissue of the type of human skin at the wavelengths of the visible and neat IR spectral regions under laser irradiation. Calculations were performed with the use of the known solutions of the equations of radiation transfer in the biotissue and the relation between the theory of propagation of light in a scattering medium and the coherence theory. The radial structure of the light field in the depth of the human skin formed by coherent and incoherent radiation depending on its biophysical parameters has been investigated. The characteristic sizes of speckles in each layer of the skin have been estimated. The biophysical factors connected with the volume concentration of blood in the dermis and the degree of its oxygenation influencing the contrast of the speckle pattern in the dermis have been discussed. The possibility of formulating and solving inverse problems of biomedical optics on the restoration of blood parameters from measurements of speckle characteristics has been shown.

  11. A multilayer anisotropic plate model with warping functions for the study of vibrations reformulated from Woodcock's work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, A.; Castel, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a suitable model for static and dynamic analysis of inhomogeneous anisotropic multilayered plates is described. This model takes into account the variations of the transverse shear strains through the thickness of the plate by means of warping functions. Warping functions are determined by enforcing kinematic and static assumptions at the interfaces. This model leads to: a 10×10 stiffness matrix coupling to each other the membrane strains, the bending and torsion curvatures, and the x and y-derivatives of the transverse shear strains; and a classical 2×2 transverse shear stiffness matrix. This model has been proven to be very efficient, especially when high ratios between the stiffnesses of layers - up to 106 - are present. This work is related to Woodcock's model, so it can be seen as a reformulation of his work. However, it brings several enhancements: the displacement field is made explicit; it is reformulated with commonly used plate notations; laminate equations of motion are fully detailed; the place of this model among other plate models is now easy to see and is discussed; the link between this formulation and the original one is completely written with all necessary proofs; misses and errors have been found in the energy coefficients of the original work and have been corrected; it is now easy to improve or to adapt the model for specific applications with the choice of refined or specific warping functions. Static deflection and natural frequencies for isotropic and anisotropic sandwich plates are given and compared to other models: they show that the present model is very accurate for the simulation of such structures.

  12. Adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks for Dark-Spot Detection from SAR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Taravat, Alireza; Oppelt, Natascha

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills represent a major threat to ocean ecosystems and their environmental status. Previous studies have shown that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), as its recording is independent of clouds and weather, can be effectively used for the detection and classification of oil spills. Dark formation detection is the first and critical stage in oil-spill detection procedures. In this paper, a novel approach for automated dark-spot detection in SAR imagery is presented. A new approach from the combination of adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM) and MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks is proposed to differentiate between dark spots and the background. The results have been compared with the results of a model combining non-adaptive WMM and pulse coupled neural networks. The presented approach overcomes the non-adaptive WMM filter setting parameters by developing an adaptive WMM model which is a step ahead towards a full automatic dark spot detection. The proposed approach was tested on 60 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. For the overall dataset, an average accuracy of 94.65% was obtained. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very robust and effective where the non-adaptive WMM & pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) model generates poor accuracies. PMID:25474376

  13. Modeling of a three-source perfusion and blood oxygenation sensor for transplant monitoring using multilayer Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Lee, Seungjoon; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2004-06-01

    A Multi-Layer Monte Carlo (MLMC) model was developed to predict the results of in vivo blood perfusion and oxygenation measurement of transplanted organs as measured by an indwelling optical sensor. A sensor has been developed which uses three-source excitation in the red and infrared ranges (660, 810, 940 nm). In vitro data was taken using this sensor by changing the oxygenation state of whole blood and passing it through a single-tube pump system wrapped in bovine liver tissue. The collected data showed that the red signal increased as blood oxygenation increased and infrared signal decreased. The center wavelength of 810 nanometers was shown to be quite indifferent to blood oxygenation change. A model was developed using MLMC code that sampled the wavelength range from 600-1000 nanometers every 6 nanometers. Using scattering and absorption data for blood and liver tissue within this wavelength range, a five-layer model was developed (tissue, clear tubing, blood, clear tubing, tissue). The theoretical data generated from this model was compared to the in vitro data and showed good correlation with changing blood oxygenation.

  14. Adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model and Multilayer Perceptron neural networks for dark-spot detection from SAR imagery.

    PubMed

    Taravat, Alireza; Oppelt, Natascha

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills represent a major threat to ocean ecosystems and their environmental status. Previous studies have shown that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), as its recording is independent of clouds and weather, can be effectively used for the detection and classification of oil spills. Dark formation detection is the first and critical stage in oil-spill detection procedures. In this paper, a novel approach for automated dark-spot detection in SAR imagery is presented. A new approach from the combination of adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM) and MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks is proposed to differentiate between dark spots and the background. The results have been compared with the results of a model combining non-adaptive WMM and pulse coupled neural networks. The presented approach overcomes the non-adaptive WMM filter setting parameters by developing an adaptive WMM model which is a step ahead towards a full automatic dark spot detection. The proposed approach was tested on 60 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. For the overall dataset, an average accuracy of 94.65% was obtained. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very robust and effective where the non-adaptive WMM & pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) model generates poor accuracies. PMID:25474376

  15. 3D-VAR multilayer assimilation of X-band SAR data into a detailed snowpack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, X. V.; Ferro-Famil, L.; Gay, M.; Durand, Y.; Dumont, M.; Morin, S.; Allain, S.; D'Urso, G.; Girard, A.

    2013-10-01

    We introduce a variational data assimilation scheme to assimilate X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data into a snowpack evolution model. The structure properties of a snowpack, such as snow density and grain optical diameter of each layer, are simulated over a period of time by the snow metamorphism model Crocus, fed by the local reanalysis SAFRAN at a French alpine location. These parameters are used as inputs of an Electromagnetic Backscattering Model (EBM) based on Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory, which calculates the simulated total backscattering coefficient. Next, 3D-VAR data assimilation is implemented in order to minimize the discrepancies between model simulations and observations obtained from SAR acquisitions, by modifying the parameters of a multilayer snowpack calculated by Crocus. The algorithm then reinitializes Crocus with the optimized snowpack structure properties, and therefore allows it to continue the simulation of snowpack evolution where adjustments based on remote sensing data has been taken into account. Results obtained using TerraSAR-X acquisitions on Argentière Glacier (Mont-Blanc massif, French Alps) show the high potential of this method for improving snow cover simulation.

  16. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  17. Detecting reduced bone mineral density from dental radiographs using statistical shape models.

    PubMed

    Allen, P Danny; Graham, Jim; Farnell, Damian J J; Harrison, Elizabeth J; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Nicopolou-Karayianni, Kety; Lindh, Christina; van der Stelt, Paul F; Horner, Keith; Devlin, Hugh

    2007-11-01

    We describe a novel method of estimating reduced bone mineral density (BMD) from dental panoramic tomograms (DPTs), which show the entire mandible. Careful expert width measurement of the inferior mandibular cortex has been shown to be predictive of BMD in hip and spine osteopenia and osteoporosis. We have implemented a method of automatic measurement of the width by active shape model search, using as training data 132 DPTs of female subjects whose BMD has been established by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We demonstrate that widths measured after fully automatic search are significantly correlated with BMD, and exhibit less variability than manual measurements made by different experts. The correlation is highest towards the lateral region of the mandible, in a position different from that previously employed for manual width measurement. An receiver-operator characterstic (ROC) analysis for identifying osteopenia (T < -1: BMD more than one standard deviation below that of young healthy females) gives an area under curve (AUC) value of 0.64. Using a minimal interaction to initiate active shape model (ASM) search, the measurement can be made at the optimum region of the mandible, resulting in an AUC value of 0.71. Using an independent test set, AUC for detection of osteoporosis (T < -2.5) is 0.81. PMID:18046935

  18. Influence of peak power in ablation rate of dental hard tissues: mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; Gabay, Shimon; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed Er:YAG and CO2 lasers should be suitable instruments for dentin and enamel ablation because both tissues have absorption peaks for radiation at 2.9 and 9.6 micrometers wavelengths. This is the context of our research that emphasizes the way in which the diameter and the depth of the crater made in enamel and dentin with the laser Er:YAG and CO2 is influenced in quantity and quality. Freshly extracted human third molar were used for this experiment. The laser source is Er:YAG Kavo Key dental model 1240 and CO2 Laser Sonics LS 860. The dimensions of the obtained craters were measured using the optical microscopy method. The obtained results were modelled experimentally with programs: GRAPHER and STATGRAPHICS. After the mathematical processing to the results what we obtain is relevant regarding the influence of the key parameters in the efficiency of the ablation according to the type of laser. On the whole, from our research results that both lasers ablate efficiently the dentin when the laser energy is between 200 and 300 mJ.

  19. Craniofacial and Dental Defects in the Col1a1Jrt/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Eimar, H; Tamimi, F; Retrouvey, J-M; Rauch, F; Aubin, J E; McKee, M D

    2016-07-01

    Certain mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes produce clinical symptoms of both osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) that include abnormal craniofacial growth, dental malocclusion, and dentinogenesis imperfecta. A mouse model (Col1a1(Jrt)/+) was recently developed that had a skeletal phenotype and other features consistent with moderate-to-severe OI and also with EDS. The craniofacial phenotype of 4- and 20-wk-old Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice and wild-type littermates was assessed by micro-computed tomography (µCT) and morphometry. Teeth and the periodontal ligament compartment were analyzed by µCT, light microscopy/histomorphometry, and electron microscopy. Over time, at 20 wk, Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice developed smaller heads, a shortened anterior cranial base, class III occlusion, and a mandibular side shift with shorter morphology in the masticatory region (maxilla and mandible). Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice also had changes in the periodontal compartment and abnormalities in the dentin matrix and mineralization. These findings validate Col1a1(Jrt)/+ mice as a model for OI and EDS in humans. PMID:26951553

  20. Magnetic multilayer structure

    DOEpatents

    Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

    2016-07-05

    A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

  1. Application of third molar development and eruption models in estimating dental age in Malay sub-adults.

    PubMed

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yusmiaidil Putera; Cauwels, Rita; Deschepper, Ellen; Martens, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The third molar development (TMD) has been widely utilized as one of the radiographic method for dental age estimation. By using the same radiograph of the same individual, third molar eruption (TME) information can be incorporated to the TMD regression model. This study aims to evaluate the performance of dental age estimation in individual method models and the combined model (TMD and TME) based on the classic regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. A sample of 705 digital panoramic radiographs of Malay sub-adults aged between 14.1 and 23.8 years was collected. The techniques described by Gleiser and Hunt (modified by Kohler) and Olze were employed to stage the TMD and TME, respectively. The data was divided to develop three respective models based on the two regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. The trained models were then validated on the test sample and the accuracy of age prediction was compared between each model. The coefficient of determination (R²) and root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated. In both genders, adjusted R² yielded an increment in the linear regressions of combined model as compared to the individual models. The overall decrease in RMSE was detected in combined model as compared to TMD (0.03-0.06) and TME (0.2-0.8). In principal component regression, low value of adjusted R(2) and high RMSE except in male were exhibited in combined model. Dental age estimation is better predicted using combined model in multiple linear regression models. PMID:26165657

  2. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of the efficiency roll-off in a multilayer white organic light-emitting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesta, M.; van Eersel, H.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) and triplet-polaron quenching (TPQ) in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) lead to a roll-off of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) with increasing current density J. We employ a kinetic Monte Carlo modeling study to analyze the measured IQE and color balance as a function of J in a multilayer hybrid white OLED that combines fluorescent blue with phosphorescent green and red emission. We investigate two models for TTA and TPQ involving the phosphorescent green and red emitters: short-range nearest-neighbor quenching and long-range Förster-type quenching. Short-range quenching predicts roll-off to occur at much higher J than measured. Taking long-range quenching with Förster radii for TTA and TPQ equal to twice the Förster radii for exciton transfer leads to a fair description of the measured IQE-J curve, with the major contribution to the roll-off coming from TPQ. The measured decrease of the ratio of phosphorescent to fluorescent component of the emitted light with increasing J is correctly predicted. A proper description of the J-dependence of the ratio of red and green phosphorescent emission needs further model refinements.

  3. Kids get care: integrating preventive dental and medical care using a public health case management model.

    PubMed

    Wysen, Kirsten H; Hennessy, Patricia M; Lieberman, Martin I; Garland, Tracy E; Johnson, Susan M

    2004-05-01

    Kids Get Care is a public health-based program in the Seattle area designed to ensure that low-income children, regardless of insurance status, receive early integrated preventive medical, dental, and developmental health services through attachment to medical and dental homes (the usual sources of medical or dental care). The oral health component of the program focuses on cross-training medical and dental providers, providing partner medical clinics with a case manager, and educating staff in nearby community-based organizations about how to identify incipient dental disease and possible early childhood developmental delays. The program identifies a local, well-respected dentist to champion the delivery of oral health screening within a medical clinic and to provide oral health training to medical clinic staff. The program works with community agencies to educate families on the importance of healthy baby teeth, routine dental care beginning at age one, and general prevention. In its first year, the program trained 355 community staff and 184 primary care providers on how to conduct an oral health assessment. These staff and providers screened more than 5,500 children for oral health problems. One medical clinic more than doubled the number of fluoride varnishes it provided, increasing from 80 to 167 during a nine-month pilot phase. Other outcome studies are in progress. PMID:15186069

  4. Modelling of pain intensity and informative dropout in a dental pain model after naproxcinod, naproxen and placebo administration

    PubMed Central

    Björnsson, Marcus A; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To describe pain intensity (PI) measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and dropout due to request for rescue medication after administration of naproxcinod, naproxen or placebo in 242 patients after wisdom tooth removal. METHODS Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to describe the plasma concentrations of naproxen, either formed from naproxcinod or from naproxen itself, and their relationship to PI and dropout. Goodness of fit was assessed by simultaneous simulations of PI and dropout. RESULTS Baseline PI for the typical patient was 52.7 mm. The PI was influenced by placebo effects, using an exponential model, and by naproxen concentrations using a sigmoid Emax model. Typical maximal placebo effect was a decrease in PI by 20.2%, with an onset rate constant of 0.237 h−1. EC50 was 0.135 µmol l−1. A Weibull time-to-event model was used for the dropout, where the hazard was dependent on the predicted PI and by the PI at baseline. Since the dropout was not at random, it was necessary to include the simulated dropout in visual predictive checks (VPC) of PI. CONCLUSIONS This model describes the relationship between drug effects, PI and the likelihood of dropout after naproxcinod, naproxen and placebo administration. The model provides an opportunity to describe the effects of other doses or formulations, after dental extraction. VPC created by simultaneous simulations of PI and dropout provides a good way of assessing the goodness of fit when there is informative dropout. PMID:21272053

  5. Rapid calculation of diffuse reflectance from a multilayered model by combination of the white Monte Carlo and adding-doubling methods

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Nishidate, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    To rapidly derive a result for diffuse reflectance from a multilayered model that is equivalent to that of a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS), we propose a combination of a layered white MCS and the adding-doubling method. For slabs with various scattering coefficients assuming a certain anisotropy factor and without absorption, we calculate the transition matrices for light flow with respect to the incident and exit angles. From this series of precalculated transition matrices, we can calculate the transition matrices for the multilayered model with the specific anisotropy factor. The relative errors of the results of this method compared to a conventional MCS were less than 1%. We successfully used this method to estimate the chromophore concentration from the reflectance spectrum of a numerical model of skin and in vivo human skin tissue. PMID:25426319

  6. Modeling the Optical Response to a Near-Field Probe Tip from a Generalized Multilayer Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, A. J.

    The contrast mechanism in Kerr imaging is the apparent angle through which the plane of polarization is rotated upon reflection from a magnetic surface. This can be calculated for a well characterized surface given the polarization state of the incident light. As in traditional optical microscopy, the spatial resolution is limited by diffraction to roughly half the wavelength of the illumination light. The diffraction limit can be circumvented through the use of near-field scanning optical microscopy, in which the illumination source is an evanescent field at the tip of a tapered optical fiber. A novel probe design for near-field optical imaging in reflection mode will be proposed, and experimental work on the development of a near-field Kerr microscope performed up to this point will be presented. The complication in merging these two techniques arises from the complex polarization profile of the evanescent field. This profile can be characterized for a given probe geometry with the use of electromagnetic field modeling software, allowing for subsequent modeling of the polarization profile of the optical response. An algorithm for predicting the optical response to a near-field probe tip from a generalized multilayer thin-film is presented.

  7. The role of mesoscopic modelling in understanding the response of dental enamel to mid-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila Verde, A.; Ramos, M. M. D.; Stoneham, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Human dental enamel has a porous mesostructure at the nanometre to micrometre scales that affects its thermal and mechanical properties relevant to laser treatment. We exploit finite-element models to investigate the response of this mesostructured enamel to mid-infrared lasers (CO2 at 10.6 µm and Er:YAG at 2.94 µm). Our models might easily be adapted to investigate ablation of other brittle composite materials. The studies clarify the role of pore water in ablation, and lead to an understanding of the different responses of enamel to CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, even though enamel has very similar average properties at the two wavelengths. We are able to suggest effective operating parameters for dental laser ablation, which should aid the introduction of minimally-invasive laser dentistry. In particular, our results indicate that, if pulses of ap10 µs are used, the CO2 laser can ablate dental enamel without melting, and with minimal damage to the pulp of the tooth. Our results also suggest that pulses with 0.1-1 µs duration can induce high stress transients which may cause unwanted cracking.

  8. Strong nonlinear saturation absorption-induced optical pinhole channel and super-resolution effects: a multi-layer system model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingsong; Yan, Hui

    2014-11-15

    This work focuses on the strong nonlinear saturation absorption (NSA)-induced optical super-resolution effect. A multi-layer system model is proposed to understand the strong NSA-induced formation of an optical pinhole channel and the generation of a super-resolution spot. Taking a Sb2Te3 thin film as an example, numerical simulations were conducted. The results illustrate that an optical pinhole channel is clearly formed by the NSA characteristics. This pinhole channel is similar to a near-field light probe. Light travels through the pinhole channel, and a super-resolution spot is generated at its apex. The near-field spot scanning experimental results show that the reduction ratio of the spot is approximately 44.8%, which is basically consistent with the numerical simulation result of 43%. This work is helpful for understanding optical nonlinear super-resolution effects and developing nanolithography, nanodata storage, high-resolution optical imaging technologies with nonlinear thin films. PMID:25490475

  9. A Multilayered Cell Culture Model for Transport Study in Solid Tumors: Evaluation of Tissue Penetration of Polyethyleneimine Based Cationic Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Seiji; Suzuki, Hidenori; Bae, You Han

    2014-01-01

    Limited drug distribution is partially responsible for the efficacy gap between preclinical and clinical studies of nano-sized drug carriers for cancer therapy. In this study, we examined the transport behavior of cationic micelles formed from a triblock copolymer of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-branched polyethyleneimine-block-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) using a unique in vitro tumor model composed of a multilayered cell culture (MCC) and an Ussing chamber system. The Cy3-labeled cationic micelles showed remarkable Cy3 distribution in the MCC whereas charge-shielded micelles with a poly(ethylene glycol) surface accumulated on the surface of the MCC. Penetration occurred against convectional flow caused by a hydraulic pressure gradient. The study using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) showed that the cationic micelles dissociate at the interface between the culture media and the MCC or possibly inside of the first-layer cells and penetrates into the MCC as unimers. The penetration and distribution were energy-dependent and suppressed by various endocytic inhibitors. These suggest that cationic unimers mainly utilized clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis for cellular entry and a significant fraction were exocytosed by an unknown mechanism. PMID:25866552

  10. Time series modeling with pruned multi-layer perceptron and 2-stage damped least-squares method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyant, Cyril; Tamas, Wani; Paoli, Christophe; Balu, Aurélia; Muselli, Marc; Nivet, Marie-Laure; Notton, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) defines a family of artificial neural networks often used in TS modeling and forecasting. Because of its "black box" aspect, many researchers refuse to use it. Moreover, the optimization (often based on the exhaustive approach where "all" configurations are tested) and learning phases of this artificial intelligence tool (often based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm; LMA) are weaknesses of this approach (exhaustively and local minima). These two tasks must be repeated depending on the knowledge of each new problem studied, making the process, long, laborious and not systematically robust. In this paper a pruning process is proposed. This method allows, during the training phase, to carry out an inputs selecting method activating (or not) inter-nodes connections in order to verify if forecasting is improved. We propose to use iteratively the popular damped least-squares method to activate inputs and neurons. A first pass is applied to 10% of the learning sample to determine weights significantly different from 0 and delete other. Then a classical batch process based on LMA is used with the new MLP. The validation is done using 25 measured meteorological TS and cross-comparing the prediction results of the classical LMA and the 2-stage LMA.

  11. Homology modeling and virtual screening of inhibitors against TEM- and SHV-type-resistant mutants: A multilayer filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mohammad H; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Khan, Asad U

    2015-01-01

    TEM and SHV are class-A-type β-lactamases commonly found in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Previous studies reported S130G and K234R mutations in SHVs to be 41- and 10-fold more resistant toward clavulanic acid than SHV-1, respectively, whereas TEM S130G and R244S also showed the same level of resistance. These selected mutants confer higher level of resistance against clavulanic acid. They also show little susceptibility against other commercially available β-lactamase inhibitors. In this study, we have used docking-based virtual screening approach in order to screen potential inhibitors against some of the major resistant mutants of SHV and TEM types β-lactamase. Two different inhibitor-resistant mutants from SHV and TEM were selected. Moreover, we have retained the active site water molecules within each enzyme. Active site water molecules were placed within modeled structure of the mutant whose structure was unavailable with protein databank. The novelty of this work lies in the use of multilayer virtual screening approach for the prediction of best and accurate results. We are reporting five inhibitors on the basis of their efficacy against all the selected resistant mutants. These inhibitors were selected on the basis of their binding efficacies and pharmacophore features. PMID:25779642

  12. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  13. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  14. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  15. Climate warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2: Simulations With a multilayer coupled atmosphere-ocean seasonal energy balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Li; Chou, Ming-Dah; Arking, Albert

    1987-05-01

    The multilayer energy balance model of Peng et al. (1982) has been further developed to include a simple two-dimensional advective-diffusive deep ocean and to allow seasonal variation in order to study long-term transient climate response to a CO2 increase as well as its seasonal pattern. Comparisons between the model-simulated present climate and conventional and satellite data show that the model can simulate well the annual cycle of the surface temperature and the radiation budget of the atmosphere. In response to a hypothetical step function doubling of atmospheric CO2, the model reaches within 1/e of the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature (2.6°C) in 9-35 years for the probable range of vertical heat diffusivity in the ocean. This large range of response time underlies the importance of properly using the heat diffusion coefficient in ocean models. In response to a projected CO2 trend based on estimates by the Carbon Dioxide Assessment Committee (National Research Council 1983), the model's transient response in annually and globally averaged surface temperature is 60-75% of the corresponding equilibrium response. The disequilibrium increases with increasing oceanic heat diffusivity. When the atmospheric CO2 level reaches twice the current level, in about a century, the global mean surface temperature increases by 1.5°-2.0°C, depending on the heat diffusivity of the ocean. Local warming at certain times of the year, however, may be 2-3 times greater than the annual and global average. In the northern high latitudes the response undergoes significant seasonal and latitudinal variations. A maximum occurs in the early winter, and a secondary maximum occurs in the spring. In the southern hemisphere, large responses are confined to a narrow latitude zone bordering Antarctica and occur only in the cold months. The pattern of the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of the transient response remarkably resembles that of the equilibrium

  16. Synchronous chaos and broad band gamma rhythm in a minimal multi-layer model of primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Demian; Hansel, David

    2011-10-01

    Visually induced neuronal activity in V1 displays a marked gamma-band component which is modulated by stimulus properties. It has been argued that synchronized oscillations contribute to these gamma-band activity. However, analysis of Local Field Potentials (LFPs) across different experiments reveals considerable diversity in the degree of oscillatory behavior of this induced activity. Contrast-dependent power enhancements can indeed occur over a broad band in the gamma frequency range and spectral peaks may not arise at all. Furthermore, even when oscillations are observed, they undergo temporal decorrelation over very few cycles. This is not easily accounted for in previous network modeling of gamma oscillations. We argue here that interactions between cortical layers can be responsible for this fast decorrelation. We study a model of a V1 hypercolumn, embedding a simplified description of the multi-layered structure of the cortex. When the stimulus contrast is low, the induced activity is only weakly synchronous and the network resonates transiently without developing collective oscillations. When the contrast is high, on the other hand, the induced activity undergoes synchronous oscillations with an irregular spatiotemporal structure expressing a synchronous chaotic state. As a consequence the population activity undergoes fast temporal decorrelation, with concomitant rapid damping of the oscillations in LFPs autocorrelograms and peak broadening in LFPs power spectra. We show that the strength of the inter-layer coupling crucially affects this spatiotemporal structure. We predict that layer VI inactivation should induce global changes in the spectral properties of induced LFPs, reflecting their slower temporal decorrelation in the absence of inter-layer feedback. Finally, we argue that the mechanism underlying the emergence of synchronous chaos in our model is in fact very general. It stems from the fact that gamma oscillations induced by local delayed

  17. Comparative analysis of sensitivity of different light-scattering techniques to blood oxygenation on the basis of multilayer tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Yu.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    This paper compares sensitivity to blood oxygenation of different schemes of detecting light scattered from or transmitted through a slab of tissue considered in the frames of a multilayer model. Comparison is made from the viewpoint of the sensitivity to oxygen saturation of certain blood volume confined within lower layers of different average thicknesses mimicking the upper and lower plexuses of skin, dermis and hypodermis. The model also includes upper layers, mimicking stratum corneum and epidermis, consisting of prickle and basal cell layers. The following signals were simulated with Monte Carlo technique and compared: diffuse scattering indicatrice, OCT signal, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance, time-of-flight and spectrophotometry signals. The optical parameters of the layers were chosen within the ranges corresponding to experimental data published in literature and our own OCT measurements. Heyney-Greenstein function was used as a phase function for all considered layers with anisotropy factor value varying for various layers. Blood fractions of different layers were chosen according to available data for diastolic state. We considered two wavelengths of 660 and 890 nm, located at different sides of the isobestic point of 805 nm, where the absorption coefficients of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin are equal. These wavelengths are used in pulse oximetry. Our simulation results show, that the highest sensitivity to changes in oxygen content in blood is at the wavelength of 660 nm, where the difference between absorption coefficient values is significant. For this wavelength all the techniques except OCT show good sensitivity to blood oxygenation in the model tissue. For the second wavelength goniophotometry, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance, and spectorphotometry exhibit sensitivity to oxygenation, but it is lower than for 660 nm due to a smaller absorption coefficient mismatch.

  18. The influence of CSF on EEG sensitivity distributions of multilayered head models.

    PubMed

    Wendel, K; Narra, N G; Hannula, M; Kauppinen, P; Malmivuo, J

    2008-04-01

    We examined how the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) affects the distribution of electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement sensitivity. We used concentric spheres and realistic head models to investigate the difference between computed-tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) models that exclude the CSF layer. The cortical EEG sensitivity distributions support these phenomena and show that the CSF layer significantly influences them, thus identifying the importance of including the CSF layer inside the head volume conductor models. The results show that the highly conductive CSF channels the current, thus decreasing the maximum cortical current density relative to models that do not include the CSF. We found that the MRI and CT models yielded HSV results 20% and 45%, respectively, too small when compared with CSF-inclusive models. PMID:18390339

  19. 3D-FE analysis of functionally graded structured dental posts.

    PubMed

    Abu Kasim, Noor H; Madfa, Ahmed A; Hamdi, Mohd; Rahbari, Ghahnavyeh R

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the biomechanical behaviour of functionally graded structured posts (FGSPs) and homogenous-type posts in simulated models of a maxillary central incisor. Two models of FGSPs consisting of a multilayer xTi-yHA composite design, where zirconia and alumina was added as the first layer for models A and B respectively were compared to homogenous zirconia post (model C) and a titanium post (model D). The amount of Ti and HA in the FGSP models was varied in gradations. 3D-FEA was performed on all models and stress distributions were investigated along the dental post. In addition, interface stresses between the posts and their surrounding structures were investigated under vertical, oblique, and horizontal loadings. Strain distribution along the post-dentine interface was also investigated. The results showed that FGSPs models, A and B demonstrated better stress distribution than models C and D, indicating that dental posts with multilayered structure dissipate localized and interfacial stress and strain more efficiently than homogenous-type posts. PMID:22123011

  20. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  1. Dental peculiarities in the silvery mole-rat: an original model for studying the evolutionary and biological origins of continuous dental generation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Šumbera, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Unravelling the evolutionary and developmental mechanisms that have impacted the mammalian dentition, since more than 200 Ma, is an intricate issue. Interestingly, a few mammal species, including the silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus, are able to replace their dentition by the addition of supernumerary molars at the back of jaw migrating then toward the front. The aim here was to demonstrate the potential interest of further studying this rodent in order to better understand the origins of continuous dental replacement in mammals, which could also provide interesting data concerning the evolution of limited dental generation occurring in first mammals. In the present study, we described the main stages of the dental eruptive sequence in the silvery mole-rat and the associated characteristics of horizontal replacement using X-ray microtomography. This was coupled to the investigation of other African mole-rats which have no dental replacement. This method permitted to establish evidence that the initial development of the dentition in Heliophobius is comparable to what it is observed in most of African mole-rats. This rodent first has premolars, but then identical additional molars, a mechanism convergent to manatees and the pygmy rock-wallaby. Evidence of continuous replacement and strong dental dynamics were also illustrated in Heliophobius, and stressed the need to deeply investigate these aspects for evolutionary, functional and developmental purposes. We also noticed that two groups of extinct non-mammalian synapsids convergently acquired this dental mechanism, but in a way differing from extant mammals. The discussion on the diverse evolutionary origins of horizontal dental replacement put emphasis on the necessity of focusing on biological parameters potentially involved in both continuous and limited developments of teeth in mammals. In that context, the silvery mole-rat could appear as the most appropriate candidate to do so. PMID:26401449

  2. Dental peculiarities in the silvery mole-rat: an original model for studying the evolutionary and biological origins of continuous dental generation in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Šumbera, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Unravelling the evolutionary and developmental mechanisms that have impacted the mammalian dentition, since more than 200 Ma, is an intricate issue. Interestingly, a few mammal species, including the silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus, are able to replace their dentition by the addition of supernumerary molars at the back of jaw migrating then toward the front. The aim here was to demonstrate the potential interest of further studying this rodent in order to better understand the origins of continuous dental replacement in mammals, which could also provide interesting data concerning the evolution of limited dental generation occurring in first mammals. In the present study, we described the main stages of the dental eruptive sequence in the silvery mole-rat and the associated characteristics of horizontal replacement using X-ray microtomography. This was coupled to the investigation of other African mole-rats which have no dental replacement. This method permitted to establish evidence that the initial development of the dentition in Heliophobius is comparable to what it is observed in most of African mole-rats. This rodent first has premolars, but then identical additional molars, a mechanism convergent to manatees and the pygmy rock-wallaby. Evidence of continuous replacement and strong dental dynamics were also illustrated in Heliophobius, and stressed the need to deeply investigate these aspects for evolutionary, functional and developmental purposes. We also noticed that two groups of extinct non-mammalian synapsids convergently acquired this dental mechanism, but in a way differing from extant mammals. The discussion on the diverse evolutionary origins of horizontal dental replacement put emphasis on the necessity of focusing on biological parameters potentially involved in both continuous and limited developments of teeth in mammals. In that context, the silvery mole-rat could appear as the most appropriate candidate to do so. PMID:26401449

  3. Effect of immersion in various media on the sorption, solubility, elution of unreacted monomers, and flexural properties of two model dental composite compositions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujie; Xu, Jingwei

    2008-06-01

    Immersion in various media has different effect on the properties of dental composites, such as sorption, solubility, elution of unreacted monomers, flexural strength, and flexural elastic modulus. In the present work, the effect of immersion in various media and the relationship between the variation of these properties and the components of dental composite were investigated. Two model dental composites were immersed in three different media-distilled water, artificial saliva, and ethanol/water, respectively, for a certain time. Their sorption, solubility, flexural strength, and flexural elastic modulus were tested according to the international standard. Elution of unreacted monomers was analyzed by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the surface morphology of samples after immersion was observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the effect on properties depended on the immersion media where ethanol/water had the most significant effect and these properties were related to the components of dental composite. PMID:18253815

  4. Vadose Zone Contaminant Migration Multi-Layer Model Software (Version 4.0)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-08-12

    The Version 4.0 model is designed to improve functionality and addresses a greater range of unsaturated zone scenarios than previous versions. The additional flexibility is accomplished in the model by including user-defined hydraulic layer functions and hydraulic parameters.

  5. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  6. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  7. Comparison of measured reactive trace gas profiles with a multi-layer canopy chemical exchange model in an Amazonian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Stefan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Pöhlker, Christopher; de Abreu Sá, Leonardo Deane; Ocimar Manzi, Antonio; Souza, Rodrigo; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, an 80 m high walk up tower for atmospheric research was erected at the ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) site (02°08'38.8''S, 58°59'59.5''W) in the remote Amazonian rainforest. The nearly pristine environment allows biosphere-atmosphere studies within an ecosystem far away from large anthropogenic emission sources. Since April 2012 vertical mixing ratio profiles of H2O, CO2 and O3 were measured at 8 different heights between 0.05 m and 79.3 m. During five intensive campaigns (Oct-Dec 2012, Oct-Nov 2013, Mar 2014, Aug-Sep 2014, Oct-Dec 2015) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were also measured. We applied the Multi-layer Canopy Chemical Exchange Model - MLC-CHEM to support the analysis of the observed profiles of NOx and O3. This includes inferring bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes as well as the role of the canopy interactions between the emissions, dry deposition, chemistry and turbulent transport of trace gases. During our investigation of diurnal and seasonal differences between model and measurements, we conducted a set of sensitivity studies to analyse the effects of changes in NOx-soil emissions, in-canopy turbulence and resistances for O3 and NO2 uptake on wet surfaces. These analyses suggest some modification in the representation of some of the poorly constrained canopy processes resulting in a significantly better comparison between the simulated and measured exchange fluxes and concentrations.

  8. Dynamic Systems (Complexity) theory as a new conceptual model for researching PBL in dental education.

    PubMed

    Townsend, G C; Kim, M; Sankey, D

    2012-02-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) was introduced into dental education some 20 years ago, there have been relatively few well-designed studies carried out to clarify whether, how or why it works in a dental context. This paper introduces the Dynamic Systems (Complexity) theory as a new and potentially productive theoretical framework for researching PBL in dental education. This framework emphasises the importance of emergent self-organisation, perception and brain plasticity in learning. In this paper, a brief overview of the history of PBL in dentistry is presented and then the fundamentals of a Dynamic Systems Approach (DSA) are explained, drawing on two recently published papers advocating the DSA in medical education and teacher education. We focus on three key points related to this new approach: emergent self-organisation rather than simple construction of knowledge; the notion that perception drives the learning process; and the brain as the substrate of all learning. The paper also suggests how the DSA can help us move forward, both in terms of the future application of PBL in dental education and also in relation to posing new types of research questions. PMID:22251326

  9. Modeling of water absorption induced cracks in resin-based composite supported ceramic layer structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Thompson, V P; Rekow, E D; Soboyejo, W O

    2008-01-01

    Cracking patterns in the top ceramic layers of the modeled dental multilayers with polymer foundation are observed when they are immersed in water. This article developed a model to understand this cracking mechanism. When water diffuses into the polymer foundation of dental restorations, the foundation will expand; as a result, the stress will build up in the top ceramic layer because of the bending and stretching. A finite element model based on this mechanism is built to predict the stress build-up and the slow crack growth in the top ceramic layers during the water absorption. Our simulations show that the stress build-up by this mechanism is high enough to cause the cracking in the top ceramic layers and the cracking patterns predicted by our model are well consistent with those observed in experiments on glass/epoxy/polymer multilayers. The model is then used to discuss the life prediction of different dental ceramics. PMID:17497681

  10. A diffusion approximation model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makropoulou, M.; Kaselouris, E.; Drakaki, E.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Sianoudis, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    In dermatology, biophotonic methods offer high sensitivity and non-invasive measurements of skin tissue optical properties, in various physiological and pathological conditions. There are numerous skin processes, which can be examined and characterized using diagnostic optical spectroscopy, as the monitoring of skin aging, diagnosis of benign and malignant cutaneous lesions, dosimetry in photodynamic therapy (PDT), etc. Several mathematical models have been used to calculate the tissue optical properties from experimental measurements and to predict the light propagation in soft tissues, like skin, based on transport theory or Monte Carlo modeling. This work analyses the phenomena which are observed experimentally during the irradiation of skin, such as the absorption, reflectance, scattering, fluorescence and transmission of laser light. The study was carried out on animal skin samples, extracted post-mortem. In this work we also tried to evaluate the utility of diffusion approximation modeling for measuring the light intensity distribution in the skin samples with cw visible laser beam (λ=632.8 nm). The diffusion theory model was tested for the simulation results of the spatial light distribution within a five-layer model of animal skin tissue. We have studied the dependence towards the depth and the radial distance of the photon density of the incident radiation.

  11. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  12. Multilayer sea ice in the Arctic - Model- and satellite-derived

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, John E.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of sea ice is a strong function of ice strength which, in the central Arctic, depends on the relative fractions of multiyear and first-year ice coverage. A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model has been configured to include both multiyear and first-year ice. The model has been run for a 7-year period, 1979-1985, for which a satellite microwave record of multiyear sea ice coverage is available. The simulated concentrations of multiyear ice are slightly higher than the satellite-derived concentrations, although the total coverage of simulated multiyear ice agrees well with the satellite-derived coverage. Both the simulated and the satellite-derived coverages in the early 1980s show large interannual variations that represent potentially large perturbations in the mass balance of Arctic pack ice. These fluctuations are generally consistent in the model and satellite data, and they are generally consistent with year-to-year differences in the large-scale wind forcing. In at least some cases the wintertime distribution of multiyear ice is influenced by the pattern of ice drift as far back as the previous summer. The late December coverage of multiyear ice in the Alaskan region appears to foreshadow summer ice conditions in the same region. The short-term response to an intense synoptic system is considerably larger in the satellite data than in the model results.

  13. Nonlinear continuum growth model of multiscale reliefs as applied to rigorous analysis of multilayer short-wave scattering intensity. I. Gratings.

    PubMed

    Goray, Leonid; Lubov, Maxim

    2013-08-01

    It is shown that taking into proper account certain terms in the nonlinear continuum equation of thin-film growth makes it applicable to the simulation of the surface of multilayer gratings with large boundary profile heights and/or gradient jumps. The proposed model describes smoothing and displacement of Mo/Si and Al/Zr boundaries of gratings grown on Si substrates with a blazed groove profile by magnetron sputtering and ion-beam deposition. Computer simulation of the growth of multilayer Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings has been conducted. Absolute diffraction efficiencies of Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings in the extreme UV range have been found within the framework of boundary integral equations applied to the calculated boundary profiles. It has been demonstrated that the integrated approach to the calculation of boundary profiles and of the intensity of short-wave scattering by multilayer gratings developed here opens up a way to perform studies comparable in accuracy to measurements with synchrotron radiation, at least for known materials and growth techniques. PMID:24046500

  14. Nonlinear continuum growth model of multiscale reliefs as applied to rigorous analysis of multilayer short-wave scattering intensity. I. Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Goray, Leonid; Lubov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that taking into proper account certain terms in the nonlinear continuum equation of thin-film growth makes it applicable to the simulation of the surface of multilayer gratings with large boundary profile heights and/or gradient jumps. The proposed model describes smoothing and displacement of Mo/Si and Al/Zr boundaries of gratings grown on Si substrates with a blazed groove profile by magnetron sputtering and ion-beam deposition. Computer simulation of the growth of multilayer Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings has been conducted. Absolute diffraction efficiencies of Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings in the extreme UV range have been found within the framework of boundary integral equations applied to the calculated boundary profiles. It has been demonstrated that the integrated approach to the calculation of boundary profiles and of the intensity of short-wave scattering by multilayer gratings developed here opens up a way to perform studies comparable in accuracy to measurements with synchrotron radiation, at least for known materials and growth techniques. PMID:24046500

  15. Antibacterial Efficacy of Silver-Impregnated Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Immobilized on a Biological Dressing in a Murine Wound Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Kathleen M.; Agarwal, Ankit; Tackes, Dana S.; Johnson, Kevin W.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial effect of augmenting a biological dressing with polymer films containing silver nanoparticles. Background Biological dressings, such as Biobrane, are commonly used for treating partial-thickness wounds and burn injuries. Biological dressings have several advantages over traditional wound dressings. However, as many as 19% of wounds treated with Biobrane become infected, and, once infected, the Biobrane must be removed and a traditional dressing approach should be employed. Silver is a commonly used antimicrobial in wound care products, but current technology uses cytotoxic concentrations of silver in these dressings. We have developed a novel and facile technology that allows immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surfaces of soft materials, demonstrated here by augmentation of Biobrane with nanoparticulate silver. Surfaces modified with nanometer-thick polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) impregnated with silver nanoparticles have been shown previously to result in in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis at loadings of silver that are noncytotoxic. Methods We demonstrated that silver-impregnated PEMs can be nondestructively immobilized onto the surface of Biobrane (Biobrane-Ag) and determined the in vitro antibacterial activity of Biobrane-Ag with Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we used an in vivo wound infection model in mice induced by topical inoculation of S aureus onto full-thickness 6-mm diameter wounds. After 72 hours, bacterial quantification was performed. Results Wounds treated with Biobrane-Ag had significantly (P < 0.001) fewer colony-forming units than wounds treated with unmodified Biobrane (more than 4 log10 difference). Conclusions The results of our study indicate that immobilizing silver-impregnated PEMs on the wound-contact surface of Biobrane significantly reduces bacterial bioburden in full-thickness murine skin wounds. Further research will investigate whether

  16. Mobile and Portable Dental Services Catering to the Basic Oral Health Needs of the Underserved Population in Developing Countries: A Proposed Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganavadiya, R; Chandrashekar, BR; Goel, P; Hongal, SG; Jain, M

    2014-01-01

    (adding each of these terms in a sequential order). Based on the review of the programs successfully implemented in developed countries, we propose a model to cater to the basic oral health needs of an extensive underserved population in India that may be pilot tested. The increasing dental manpower can best be utilized for the promotion of oral health through mobile and portable dental services. The professional dental organizations should have a strong motive to translate this into reality. PMID:24971198

  17. Mobile and portable dental services catering to the basic oral health needs of the underserved population in developing countries: a proposed model.

    PubMed

    Ganavadiya, R; Chandrashekar, Br; Goel, P; Hongal, Sg; Jain, M

    2014-05-01

    (adding each of these terms in a sequential order). Based on the review of the programs successfully implemented in developed countries, we propose a model to cater to the basic oral health needs of an extensive underserved population in India that may be pilot tested. The increasing dental manpower can best be utilized for the promotion of oral health through mobile and portable dental services. The professional dental organizations should have a strong motive to translate this into reality. PMID:24971198

  18. Multilayer limb quasi-static electromagnetic modeling with experiments for Galvanic coupling type IBC.

    PubMed

    Pun, S H; Gao, Y M; Mou, P A; Mak, P U; Vai, M I; Du, M

    2010-01-01

    Intra-body communication (IBC) is a new, emerging, short-range and human body based communication methodology. It is a technique to network various devices on human body, by utilizing the conducting properties of human tissues. For currently fast developed Body area network(BAN)/Body sensor network(BSN), IBC is believed to have advantages in power consumption, electromagnetic radiation, interference from external electromagnetic noise, security, and restriction in spectrum resource. In this article, the authors propose an improved mathematical model, which includes both electrical properties and proportion of human tissues, for IBC on a human limb. By solving the mathematical model analytically on four-layer system (skin, fat, muscle, and bone) and conducting in-vivo experiment, a comparison has been conducted. PMID:21097189

  19. Computer modelling of aluminum-gallium arsenide/gallium arsenide multilayer photovoltaics. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Michael Broderick

    1987-01-01

    The modeled cascade cells offer an alternative to conventional series cascade designs that require a monolithic intercell ohmic contact. Selective electrodes provide a simple means of fabricating three-terminal devices, which can be configured in complementary pairs to circumvent the attendant losses and fabrication complexities of intercell ohmic contacts. Moreover, selective electrodes allow incorporation of additional layers in the upper subcell which can improve spectral response and increase radiation tolerance. Realistic simulations of such cells operating under one-sun AMO conditions show that the seven-layer structure is optimum from the standpoint of beginning-of-life efficiency and radiation tolerance. Projected efficiencies exceed 26 percent. Under higher concentration factors, it should be possible to achieve efficiencies beyond 30 percent. However, to simulate operation at high concentration will require a model for resistive losses. Overall, these devices appear to be a promising contender for future space applications.

  20. Theoretical model for thin ferroelectric films and the multilayer structures based on them

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, A. S. Pakhomov, O. V.; Starkov, I. A.

    2013-06-15

    A modified Weiss mean-field theory is used to study the dependence of the properties of a thin ferroelectric film on its thickness. The possibility of introducing gradient terms into the thermodynamic potential is analyzed using the calculus of variations. An integral equation is introduced to generalize the well-known Langevin equation to the case of the boundaries of a ferroelectric. An analysis of this equation leads to the existence of a transition layer at the interface between ferroelectrics or a ferroelectric and a dielectric. The permittivity of this layer is shown to depend on the electric field direction even if the ferroelectrics in contact are homogeneous. The results obtained in terms of the Weiss model are compared with the results of the models based on the correlation effect and the presence of a dielectric layer at the boundary of a ferroelectric and with experimental data.

  1. An analytical model for predicting LNAPL distribution and recovery from multi-layered soils.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaehak; Charbeneau, Randall J

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for estimating the distribution and recovery of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPL) in heterogeneous aquifers. Various scenarios of LNAPL recovery may be simulated using LDRM for LNAPL recovery systems such as skimmer wells, water-enhanced wells, air-enhanced wells, and trenches from heterogeneous aquifers. LDRM uses multiple horizontal soil layers to model a heterogeneous aquifer. Up to three soil layers may be configured with unique soil properties for each layer. Simulation results suggest that LNAPL distribution and its recovery volume are highly affected by soil properties. In sandy soils LNAPL can be highly mobile and the recovery efficiency can be high. In contrast, even at high LNAPL saturations, LNAPL mobility is typically low in fine-grained soils. This characteristic of LNAPL with respect to soil texture has to be carefully accounted for in the model to better predict the recovery of LNAPL from heterogeneous soils. The impact of vertical hydraulic gradient in fine grain zone was assessed. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the formation LNAPL volume can be significantly affected by a downward vertical hydraulic gradient if the magnitude is near a critical amount (=ρr-1). Sensitivity of input parameters with respect to LNAPL formation in soils and LNAPL recovery volume were identified through a sensitivity analysis. The performance of LDRM on predicting the distribution and recovery of LNAP was reasonably accurate for a short-term analysis as demonstrated in a case study. However, further validation is needed to ascertain the model's performance in long-term simulations. PMID:24262305

  2. Oral health care for children in countries using dental therapists in public, school-based programs, contrasted with that of the United States, using dentists in a private practice model.

    PubMed

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita R; Friedman, Jay W; Nash, David A

    2013-09-01

    The United States faces a significant problem with access to oral health care, particularly for children. More than 50 countries have developed an alternative dental provider, a dental therapist, practicing in public, school-based programs, to address children's access to care. This delivery model has been demonstrated to improve access to care and oral health outcomes while providing quality care economically. We summarize elements of a recent major review of the global literature on the use of dental therapists, "A Review of the Global Literature on Dental Therapists: In the Context of the Movement to Add Dental Therapists to the Oral Health Workforce in the United States." We contrast the success of a school-based model of caring for children by dental therapists with that of the US model of dentists providing care for children in private practices. PMID:23865650

  3. Oral Health Care for Children in Countries Using Dental Therapists in Public, School-Based Programs, Contrasted with That of the United States, Using Dentists in a Private Practice Model

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jay W.; Nash, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The United States faces a significant problem with access to oral health care, particularly for children. More than 50 countries have developed an alternative dental provider, a dental therapist, practicing in public, school-based programs, to address children’s access to care. This delivery model has been demonstrated to improve access to care and oral health outcomes while providing quality care economically. We summarize elements of a recent major review of the global literature on the use of dental therapists, “A Review of the Global Literature on Dental Therapists: In the Context of the Movement to Add Dental Therapists to the Oral Health Workforce in the United States.” We contrast the success of a school-based model of caring for children by dental therapists with that of the US model of dentists providing care for children in private practices. PMID:23865650

  4. SENCA: A Multilayered Codon Model to Study the Origins and Dynamics of Codon Usage.

    PubMed

    Pouyet, Fanny; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Mouchiroud, Dominique; Guéguen, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Gene sequences are the target of evolution operating at different levels, including the nucleotide, codon, and amino acid levels. Disentangling the impact of those different levels on gene sequences requires developing a probabilistic model with three layers. Here we present SENCA (site evolution of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids), a codon substitution model that separately describes 1) nucleotide processes which apply on all sites of a sequence such as the mutational bias, 2) preferences between synonymous codons, and 3) preferences among amino acids. We argue that most synonymous substitutions are not neutral and that SENCA provides more accurate estimates of selection compared with more classical codon sequence models. We study the forces that drive the genomic content evolution, intraspecifically in the core genome of 21 prokaryotes and interspecifically for five Enterobacteria. We retrieve the existence of a universal mutational bias toward AT, and that taking into account selection on synonymous codon usage has consequences on the measurement of selection on nonsynonymous substitutions. We also confirm that codon usage bias is mostly driven by selection on preferred codons. We propose new summary statistics to measure the relative importance of the different evolutionary processes acting on sequences. PMID:27401173

  5. A multilayer micromechanical model of the cuticle of Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Andrew Jansen, M; Singh, Sudhanshu S; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Franz, Nico M

    2016-08-01

    Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a weevil species common throughout the southwestern United States that uses its rostrum - a very slender, curved, beak-like projection of the head - to excavate tunnels in plant organs (such as acorns) for egg laying (oviposition). Once the apical portion of the rostrum has been inserted into the preferred substrate for oviposition, the female begins rotating around the perimeter of the hole, elevating her head by extending the fore-legs, and rotating the head in place in a drilling motion. This action causes significant elastic deformation of the rostrum, which will bend until it becomes completely straight. To better understand the mechanical behavior of the cuticle as it undergoes deformation during the preparation of oviposition sites, we develop a comprehensive micro/macro model of the micromechanical structure and properties of the cuticle, spanning across all cuticular regions, and reliably mirroring the resultant macroscale properties of the cuticle. Our modeling approach relies on the use of multi-scale, hierarchical biomaterial representation, and employs various micromechanical schemata - e.g., Mori-Tanaka, effective field, and Maxwell - to calculate the homogenized properties of representative volume elements at each level in the hierarchy. We describe the configuration and behavior of this model in detail, and discuss the theoretical implications and limitations of this approach with emphasis on future biomechanical and comparative evolutionary research. Our detailed account of this approach can thereby serve as a methodological template for exploring the biomechanical behavior of new insect structures. PMID:27189867

  6. SENCA: A Multilayered Codon Model to Study the Origins and Dynamics of Codon Usage

    PubMed Central

    Pouyet, Fanny; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Mouchiroud, Dominique; Guéguen, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Gene sequences are the target of evolution operating at different levels, including the nucleotide, codon, and amino acid levels. Disentangling the impact of those different levels on gene sequences requires developing a probabilistic model with three layers. Here we present SENCA (site evolution of nucleotides, codons, and amino acids), a codon substitution model that separately describes 1) nucleotide processes which apply on all sites of a sequence such as the mutational bias, 2) preferences between synonymous codons, and 3) preferences among amino acids. We argue that most synonymous substitutions are not neutral and that SENCA provides more accurate estimates of selection compared with more classical codon sequence models. We study the forces that drive the genomic content evolution, intraspecifically in the core genome of 21 prokaryotes and interspecifically for five Enterobacteria. We retrieve the existence of a universal mutational bias toward AT, and that taking into account selection on synonymous codon usage has consequences on the measurement of selection on nonsynonymous substitutions. We also confirm that codon usage bias is mostly driven by selection on preferred codons. We propose new summary statistics to measure the relative importance of the different evolutionary processes acting on sequences. PMID:27401173

  7. Verification of the multi-layer SNOWPACK model with different water transport schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, N.; Schmid, L.; Heilig, A.; Eisen, O.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2015-04-01

    The widely-used detailed SNOWPACK model has undergone constant development over the years. A notable recent extension is the introduction of a Richards Equation (RE) solver as an alternative for the bucket-type approach for describing water transport in the snow and soil layers. In addition, continuous updates of snow settling and new snow density parametrisations have changed model behaviour. This study presents a detailed evaluation of model performance against a comprehensive multi-year data set from Weissfluhjoch near Davos, Switzerland. The data set is collected by automatic meteorological and snowpack measurements and manual snow profiles. During the main winter season, snow height (RMSE: <4.2 cm), snow water equivalent (SWE, RMSE: <40 mm w.e.), snow temperature distributions (typical deviation with measurements: <1.0 °C) and snow density (typical deviation with observations: <50 kg m-3) as well as their temporal evolution are well simulated in the model and the influence of the two water transport schemes is small. The RE approach reproduces internal differences over capillary barriers but fails to predict enough grain growth since the growth routines have been calibrated using the bucket scheme in the original SNOWPACK model. The agreement in both density and grain size is sufficient to parametrise the hydraulic properties. In the melt season, a more pronounced underestimation of typically 200 mm w.e. in SWE is found. The discrepancies between the simulations and the field data are generally larger than the differences between the two water transport schemes. Nevertheless, the detailed comparison of the internal snowpack structure shows that the timing of internal temperature and water dynamics is adequately and better represented with the new RE approach when compared to the conventional bucket scheme. On the contrary, the progress of the meltwater front in the snowpack as detected by radar and the temporal evolution of the vertical distribution of melt

  8. Verification of the multi-layer SNOWPACK model with different water transport schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, N.; Schmid, L.; Heilig, A.; Eisen, O.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2015-12-01

    The widely used detailed SNOWPACK model has undergone constant development over the years. A notable recent extension is the introduction of a Richards equation (RE) solver as an alternative for the bucket-type approach for describing water transport in the snow and soil layers. In addition, continuous updates of snow settling and new snow density parameterizations have changed model behavior. This study presents a detailed evaluation of model performance against a comprehensive multiyear data set from Weissfluhjoch near Davos, Switzerland. The data set is collected by automatic meteorological and snowpack measurements and manual snow profiles. During the main winter season, snow height (RMSE: < 4.2 cm), snow water equivalent (SWE, RMSE: < 40 mm w.e.), snow temperature distributions (typical deviation with measurements: < 1.0 °C) and snow density (typical deviation with observations: < 50 kg m-3) as well as their temporal evolution are well simulated in the model and the influence of the two water transport schemes is small. The RE approach reproduces internal differences over capillary barriers but fails to predict enough grain growth since the growth routines have been calibrated using the bucket scheme in the original SNOWPACK model. However, the agreement in both density and grain size is sufficient to parameterize the hydraulic properties successfully. In the melt season, a pronounced underestimation of typically 200 mm w.e. in SWE is found. The discrepancies between the simulations and the field data are generally larger than the differences between the two water transport schemes. Nevertheless, the detailed comparison of the internal snowpack structure shows that the timing of internal temperature and water dynamics is adequately and better represented with the new RE approach when compared to the conventional bucket scheme. On the contrary, the progress of the meltwater front in the snowpack as detected by radar and the temporal evolution of the vertical

  9. Application of the ultrasound hyperthermia model for a multi-layered tissue system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lörincz, A.

    2004-01-01

    This work models the thermal effect of several planar transducers targeting the tumour interactively in a ceramics-coupling-skin-muscle-tumour system. The most important inputs of the model include the following: emitted electric output, J/s; mechanical efficiency, %; number of transducers, pieces; surface area of the transducer, m2; area, m2 and temperature, K of the cooling surface, attenuation coefficients, Np/cm MHz; specific heats, J/gK; densities, g/cm3; heat conductivities, J/msK; sound velocities m/s; flow rate of blood in the tissues, ml/gtissue/min; sound path in the tissues and in the blood flowing through the tissues, m. From the inputs, a number of intermediate data are determined, e.g. the geometry of the irradiated bodies that are in the path of ultrasound, acoustic hardness, Pas/m; sound reflection and sound transmission occurring at the interfaces, Np; heat exchanger wall thickness of the irradiated bodies, m; heat dissipation and heat exchanger surface areas, m2; flow rate of blood in the tissues located in the path of ultrasound, ml/tissue mass in g/min; and the sound attenuation of the tissues, Np. The amount of generated heat, K/s decreased by the heat energy transported, J/s to the surrounding tissues by blood and heat conductivity, and the actual temperature, K of the irradiated tissue are the output parameters calculated by the model. The output results are available in the form of functions. The expected temperature of the target area, K can be set to either the denaturation temperature or to the respiratory decomposition temperature (43.5°C) without damaging the surrounding tissues by setting in the following parameters properly: electric output power, W; the number and surface area, m2 of the transducers; the area, m2 and temperature, K of the cooling surfaces. After further development, the model will be suitable for handling more than three tissue layers, increased blood flow rates different angles of incidence, and tumours having

  10. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  11. A Multilayered Box Model for Calculating Preliminary RemediationGoals in Soil Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao; Javandel, Iraj

    2004-05-21

    In the process of screening a soil against a certain contaminant, we define the health-risk based preliminary remediation goal (PRG) as the contaminant concentration above which some remedial action may be required. PRG is thus the first standard (or guidance) for judging a site. An over-estimated PRG (a too-large value) may cause us to miss some contaminated sites that can threaten human health and the environment. An under-estimated PRG (a too-small value), on the other hand, may lead to unnecessary cleanup and waste tremendous resources. The PRGs for soils are often calculated on the assumption that the contaminant concentration in soil does not change with time. However, that concentration usually decreases with time as a result of different chemical and transport mechanisms. The static assumption thus exaggerates the long-term exposure dose and results in a too-small PRG. We present a box model that considers all important transport processes and obeys the law of mass conservation. We can use the model as a tool to estimate the transient contaminant concentrations in air, soil and groundwater. Using these concentrations in conjunction with appropriate health risk parameters, we may estimate the PRGs for different contaminants. As an example, we calculated the tritium PRG for residential soils. The result is quite different from, but within the range of, the two versions of the corresponding PRG previously recommended by the U.S. EPA.

  12. A Case Study of Using a Multilayered Thermodynamical Snow Model for Radiance Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toure, Ally M.; Goita, Kalifa; Royer, Alain; Kim, Edward J.; Durand, Michael; Margulis, Steven A.; Lu, Huizhong

    2011-01-01

    A microwave radiance assimilation (RA) scheme for the retrieval of snow physical state variables requires a snowpack physical model (SM) coupled to a radiative transfer model. In order to assimilate microwave brightness temperatures (Tbs) at horizontal polarization (h-pol), an SM capable of resolving melt-refreeze crusts is required. To date, it has not been shown whether an RA scheme is tractable with the large number of state variables present in such an SM or whether melt-refreeze crust densities can be estimated. In this paper, an RA scheme is presented using the CROCUS SM which is capable of resolving melt-refreeze crusts. We assimilated both vertical (v) and horizontal (h) Tbs at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz. We found that assimilating Tb at both h-pol and vertical polarization (v-pol) into CROCUS dramatically improved snow depth estimates, with a bias of 1.4 cm compared to-7.3 cm reported by previous studies. Assimilation of both h-pol and v-pol led to more accurate results than assimilation of v-pol alone. The snow water equivalent (SWE) bias of the RA scheme was 0.4 cm, while the bias of the SWE estimated by an empirical retrieval algorithm was -2.9 cm. Characterization of melt-refreeze crusts via an RA scheme is demonstrated here for the first time; the RA scheme correctly identified the location of melt-refreeze crusts observed in situ.

  13. Multivariate Geostatistical Analysis of Uncertainty for the Hydrodynamic Model of a Geological Trap for Carbon Dioxide Storage. Case study: Multilayered Geological Structure Vest Valcele, ROMANIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scradeanu, D.; Pagnejer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the works is to evaluate the uncertainty of the hydrodynamic model for a multilayered geological structure, a potential trap for carbon dioxide storage. The hydrodynamic model is based on a conceptual model of the multilayered hydrostructure with three components: 1) spatial model; 2) parametric model and 3) energy model. The necessary data to achieve the three components of the conceptual model are obtained from: 240 boreholes explored by geophysical logging and seismic investigation, for the first two components, and an experimental water injection test for the last one. The hydrodinamic model is a finite difference numerical model based on a 3D stratigraphic model with nine stratigraphic units (Badenian and Oligocene) and a 3D multiparameter model (porosity, permeability, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, leakage etc.). The uncertainty of the two 3D models was evaluated using multivariate geostatistical tools: a)cross-semivariogram for structural analysis, especially the study of anisotropy and b)cokriging to reduce estimation variances in a specific situation where is a cross-correlation between a variable and one or more variables that are undersampled. It has been identified important differences between univariate and bivariate anisotropy. The minimised uncertainty of the parametric model (by cokriging) was transferred to hydrodynamic model. The uncertainty distribution of the pressures generated by the water injection test has been additional filtered by the sensitivity of the numerical model. The obtained relative errors of the pressure distribution in the hydrodynamic model are 15-20%. The scientific research was performed in the frame of the European FP7 project "A multiple space and time scale approach for the quantification of deep saline formation for CO2 storage(MUSTANG)".

  14. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, October 22, 1976-February 24, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    The Dental Auxiliary Department of the University of Puerto Rico designed a career option dental auxiliary training program which is a step ladder program with three exit points over a period of two academic years. The first option is a six-month track to train a traditional chairside dental auxiliary. The second option is a nine-month track to…

  15. Variations among the primary maxillary dental arch forms using a polynominal equation model.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Huey

    2003-01-01

    This study identifies arch symmetry and describes arch form variations in normal primary maxillary dental casts. Sixty-two percent of casts had asymmetrical arches, and 38% had symmetrical arches. Six types of arch form were identified according to the ratio of arch width to length. There were more long types than short types. The rounded and short types tended to have a more-symmetrical arch than did the long type. PMID:12739689

  16. Encouraging early preventive dental visits for preschool-aged children enrolled in Medicaid: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to conduct formative research

    PubMed Central

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Chi, Donald L.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Kuthy, Raymond A.; Ortiz, Cristina (Nina); Hanson, Jessica D.; Damiano, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective Preventive dental visits for preschool-aged children can result in better oral health outcomes, especially for children from lower income families. Many children, however, still do not see a dentist for preventive visits. This qualitative study examined the potential for the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) to be used to uncover potential antecedents to parents’ decisions about seeking preventive dental care. Methods Seventeen focus groups including 41 parents were conducted. The focus group protocol centered on constructs (perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, perceived self-efficacy, and perceived response efficacy) of the EPPM. Transcripts were analyzed by 3 coders who employed closed coding strategies. Results Parents’ perceptions of severity of dental issues were high, particularly regarding negative health and appearance outcomes. Parents perceived susceptibility of their children to dental problems as low, primarily because most children in this study received preventive care, which parents viewed as highly efficacious. Parents’ self-efficacy to obtain preventive care for their children was high. However, they were concerned about barriers including lack of dentists, especially dentists who are good with young children. Conclusions Findings were consistent with EPPM, which suggests this model is a potential tool for understanding parents’ decisions about seeking preventive dental care for their young children. Future research should utilize quantitative methods to test this model. PMID:22994600

  17. Enzyme replacement therapy prevents dental defects in a model of hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    McKee, M D; Nakano, Y; Masica, D L; Gray, J J; Lemire, I; Heft, R; Whyte, M P; Crine, P; Millán, J L

    2011-04-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) occurs from loss-of-function mutation in the tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) gene, resulting in extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation that inhibits skeletal and dental mineralization. TNALP-null mice (Akp2(-/-)) phenocopy human infantile hypophosphatasia; they develop rickets at 1 week of age, and die before being weaned, having severe skeletal and dental hypomineralization and episodes of apnea and vitamin B(6)-responsive seizures. Delay and defects in dentin mineralization, together with a deficiency in acellular cementum, are characteristic. We report the prevention of these dental abnormalities in Akp2(-/-) mice receiving treatment from birth with daily injections of a mineral-targeting, human TNALP (sALP-FcD(10)). sALP-FcD(10) prevented hypomineralization of alveolar bone, dentin, and cementum as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Osteopontin--a marker of acellular cementum--was immuno-localized along root surfaces, confirming that acellular cementum, typically missing or reduced in Akp2(-/-) mice, formed normally. Our findings provide insight concerning how acellular cementum is formed on tooth surfaces to effect periodontal ligament attachment to retain teeth in their osseous alveolar sockets. Furthermore, they provide evidence that this enzyme-replacement therapy, applied early in post-natal life--where the majority of tooth root development occurs, including acellular cementum formation--could prevent the accelerated tooth loss seen in individuals with HPP. PMID:21212313

  18. Early patient contact in undergraduate dental education in Germany--'The Greifswald Model'.

    PubMed

    Ratzmann, A; Wiesmann, U; Gedrange, T; Kordass, B

    2007-05-01

    Revised regulations in Germany have allowed new curricular concepts to be introduced into the undergraduate dental curriculum. In the first 2 years of the dental curriculum at the University of Greifswald, a new teaching concept which is based on the interactions between Community Medicine and Dentistry has been introduced. It emphasises the importance of early patient contact in providing experience for students. The course consists of three principal elements: student-patient contacts in the patient's home; problem-based learning tutorials to discuss patient cases; and special training in communication skills. The aim of the course is to give students an insight into the patient's view of the illness and treatment, and the effect of their condition on his or her lifestyle. The students also learn about the communal perspective (health survey, intervention planning and implementation in a community). The first four courses were evaluated by questionnaires from the students before and after the 2-year course to assess the concept from the students' perspective. The results indicate that it is possible to provide considerable improvement of the medical/dental education as regards communication skills and understanding of the patients' perceptions, by letting the student establish contact with patients at the very beginning of the curriculum. PMID:17445005

  19. A model for cultivating dental hygiene faculty development within a community of practice.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Doucette, Heather; Neish, Nancy R; Maillet, J Peggy

    2012-03-01

    There is a need to explore approaches in faculty development that will foster change in actual teaching practices. The literature suggests that there should be more deliberate use of theory in faculty development research. This study addressed this gap in the literature by exploring social learning theory in the context of communities of practice and applying this theory to a dental hygiene faculty development program. The purpose of the study was to determine if participation in a community of practice helped dental hygiene clinical instructors implement new teaching strategies by providing ongoing support for their learning. In addition, the study explored whether the level of participation in the community changed over time. A retrospective self-assessment questionnaire consisting of four open-ended questions was administered to a group of clinical dental hygiene instructors at the end of the 2010 academic year. The narrative data were analyzed thematically using qualitative methodology. The results indicated that participation in the community of practice helped clinical instructors make effective changes in their teaching practices by optimizing social learning opportunities. The responses also revealed that instructors became more comfortable participating in discussions as they identified with other members of this unique community. PMID:22383599

  20. Models of stratum corneum intercellular membranes: 2H NMR of macroscopically oriented multilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, D B; Thewalt, J L; Bloom, M; Kitson, N

    1994-01-01

    Deuterium NMR was used to characterize model membrane systems approximating the composition of the intercellular lipid lamellae of mammalian stratum corneum (SC). The SC models, equimolar mixtures of ceramide:cholesterol:palmitic acid (CER:CHOL:PA) at pH 5.2, were contrasted with the sphingomyelin:CHOL:PA (SPM:CHOL:PA) system, where the SPM differs from the CER only in the presence of a phosphocholine headgroup. The lipids were prepared both as oriented samples and as multilamellar dispersions, and contained either perdeuterated palmitic acid (PA-d31) or [2,2,3,4,6-2H5]CHOL (CHOL-d5). SPM:CHOL:PA-d31 formed liquid-ordered membranes over a wide range of temperatures, with a maximum order parameter of approximately 0.4 at 50 degrees C for positions C3-C10 (the plateau region). The quadrupolar splitting at C2 was significantly smaller, suggesting an orientational change at this position, possibly because of hydrogen bonding with water and/or other surface components. A comparison of the longitudinal relaxation times obtained at theta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees (where theta is the angle between the normal to the glass plates and the magnetic field) revealed a significant T1Z anisotropy for all positions. In contrast to the behavior observed with the SPM system, lipid mixtures containing CER exhibited a complex polymorphism. Between 20 and 50 degrees C, a significant portion of the entire membrane (as monitored by both PA-d31 and CHOL-d5) was found to exist as a solid phase, with the remainder either a gel or liquid-ordered phase. The proportion of solid decreased as the temperature was increased and disappeared entirely above 50 degrees C. Between 50 and 70 degrees C, the membrane underwent a liquid-ordered to isotropic phase transition. These transitions were reversible but displayed considerable hysteresis, especially the conversion from a fluid phase to solid. The order profiles, relaxation behavior, and angular dependence of these parameters suggest strongly that

  1. Models of stratum corneum intercellular membranes: 2H NMR of macroscopically oriented multilayers.

    PubMed

    Fenske, D B; Thewalt, J L; Bloom, M; Kitson, N

    1994-10-01

    Deuterium NMR was used to characterize model membrane systems approximating the composition of the intercellular lipid lamellae of mammalian stratum corneum (SC). The SC models, equimolar mixtures of ceramide:cholesterol:palmitic acid (CER:CHOL:PA) at pH 5.2, were contrasted with the sphingomyelin:CHOL:PA (SPM:CHOL:PA) system, where the SPM differs from the CER only in the presence of a phosphocholine headgroup. The lipids were prepared both as oriented samples and as multilamellar dispersions, and contained either perdeuterated palmitic acid (PA-d31) or [2,2,3,4,6-2H5]CHOL (CHOL-d5). SPM:CHOL:PA-d31 formed liquid-ordered membranes over a wide range of temperatures, with a maximum order parameter of approximately 0.4 at 50 degrees C for positions C3-C10 (the plateau region). The quadrupolar splitting at C2 was significantly smaller, suggesting an orientational change at this position, possibly because of hydrogen bonding with water and/or other surface components. A comparison of the longitudinal relaxation times obtained at theta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees (where theta is the angle between the normal to the glass plates and the magnetic field) revealed a significant T1Z anisotropy for all positions. In contrast to the behavior observed with the SPM system, lipid mixtures containing CER exhibited a complex polymorphism. Between 20 and 50 degrees C, a significant portion of the entire membrane (as monitored by both PA-d31 and CHOL-d5) was found to exist as a solid phase, with the remainder either a gel or liquid-ordered phase. The proportion of solid decreased as the temperature was increased and disappeared entirely above 50 degrees C. Between 50 and 70 degrees C, the membrane underwent a liquid-ordered to isotropic phase transition. These transitions were reversible but displayed considerable hysteresis, especially the conversion from a fluid phase to solid. The order profiles, relaxation behavior, and angular dependence of these parameters suggest strongly that

  2. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  3. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  4. Dental Support Organizations.

    PubMed

    Dufurrena, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Dental Support Organizations is a recently formed association of 33 companies representing a range of management and support services for dental practices. These organizations do not engage in the practice of dentistry, although in some cases they operate as holding companies for practices that do, thus separating the legal responsibility of providing treatment from the management and flow of funds. This report summarizes some of the recent trends in oral health care and dentists' practice patterns that are prompting the increased prevalence of this model. The general functioning of the DSO model is described, including some common variations, and the core values of ADSO are featured. PMID:26455048

  5. Finite-element modeling method for the study of dielectric relaxation at high frequencies of heterostructures made of multilayered particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourn, Cédric; Lasquellec, Sophie; Brosseau, Christian

    2007-12-01

    There has been much recent interest in how morphological descriptors may affect the electromagnetic wave transport in particulate composite mediums. In this work, we present results of finite-element simulations that model the permittivity of two-dimensional (or cross sections of infinite three-dimensional parallel, infinitely long, identical, circular cylinders, where the properties and characteristics are invariant along the perpendicular cross-sectional plane) three-phase heterostructures made of a multilayered discoidal particle. While strictly valid only in a direct current situation, our analysis can be extended to treat electric fields that oscillate with time provided that the wavelengths and attenuation lengths associated with the fields are much larger than the microstructure dimension in order that the homogeneous (effective medium) representation of the composite structure makes sense. From simulations over a range of parameters, our analysis evaluates the effect of the surface fraction of inclusion, the conductivity, and thickness (relative to the particle radius) of the particle conductive coating on the effective complex permittivity of isotropic heterostructures in which the filler particles have a core-shell structure. Four main effects are found. First, the importance of the surface fraction of inclusion on the effective complex permittivity at high frequencies (from microwave to infrared) is illustrated over a broad range of coating thicknesses and conductivities. Second, the encapsulation phase (metallic coating) conductivity is identified as the key property controlling the dielectric relaxation due to interfacial polarization. Third, a simple parametrization of the high-frequency effective permittivity spectrum allowed us to obtain a reliable modelization of the Debye-type relaxation processes. From the least-squares fit of the effective complex permittivity data, we extract information on these relaxation processes, i.e., relaxation

  6. YASEIS: Yet Another computer program to calculate synthetic SEISmograms for a spherically multi-layered Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanlu

    2013-04-01

    Although most researches focus on the lateral heterogeneity of 3D Earth nowadays, a spherically multi-layered model where the parameters depend only on depth still represents a good first order approximation of real Earth. Such 1D models could be used as starting models for seismic tomographic inversion or as background model where the source mechanisms are inverted. The problem of wave propagation in a spherically layered model had been solved theoretically long time ago (Takeuchi and Saito, 1972). The existing computer programs such as Mineos (developed by G. Master, J. Woodhouse and F. Gilbert), Gemini (Friederich and Dalkolmo 1995), DSM (Kawai et. al. 2006) and QSSP (Wang 1999) tackled the computational aspects of the problem. A new simple and fast program for computing the Green's function of a stack of spherical dissipative layers is presented here. The analytical solutions within each homogeneous spherical layer are joined through the continuous boundary conditions and propagated from the center of model up to the level of source depth. Another solution is built by propagating downwardly from the free surface of model to the source level. The final solution is then constructed in frequency domain from the previous two solutions to satisfy the discontinuities of displacements and stresses at the source level which are required by the focal mechanism. The numerical instability in the propagator approach is solved by complementing the matrix propagating with an orthonormalization procedure (Wang 1999). Another unstable difficulty due to the high attenuation in the upper mantle low velocity zone is overcome by switching the bases of solutions from the spherical Bessel functions to the spherical Hankel functions when necessary. We compared the synthetic seismograms obtained from the new program YASEIS with those computed by Gemini and QSSP. In the range of near distances, the synthetics by a reflectivity code for the horizontally layers are also compared with

  7. Microbiological aspects of an in situ model to study effects of antimicrobial agents on dental plaque ecology.

    PubMed

    Giertsen, E; Guggenheim, B; Thurnheer, T; Gmür, R

    2000-10-01

    This study validates an in situ model for ecological studies of dental plaque exposed to various antimicrobial agents with different modes of action on plaque bacteria. Eleven subjects wore two acrylic appliances, each containing two bovine enamel discs, during two 1-wk test periods. Using a split-mouth crossover design, the appliances were dipped twice daily for 1 min into water (control; treatment A), fluoride (26.3 mM NaF; B), zinc acetate (20.0 mM; C), or fluoride plus zinc acetate (D). Four of the subjects used also chlorhexidine diacetate (2.2 mM; E) and chlorhexidine plus fluoride (F). At the end of each period, plaque was collected from the discs, after which the microbiota were analyzed by culture, automated quantitative immunofluorescence, and a viability fluorescence stain. As compared to control, treatments B, C, and D resulted in a significant reduction of individual taxa as detected by immunofluorescence, whereas similar bacterial viability and total bacterial numbers were observed. In contrast, chlorhexidine significantly reduced bacterial viability, total cell numbers, and the abundance of most of the enumerated taxa. We conclude that this in situ model is well suited to study effects of antimicrobial agents on dental plaque ecology. Combined with viability testing, immunofluorescence is obviously superior to culture in detecting taxa-specific shifts caused by antimicrobial agents. PMID:11037756

  8. Registration of the Cone Beam CT and Blue-Ray Scanned Dental Model Based on the Improved ICP Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xue; Li, Zhenhua; Xu, Songsong; Guo, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality image registration and fusion has complementary significance for guiding dental implant surgery. As the needs of the different resolution image registration, we develop an improved Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm that focuses on the registration of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CT) image and high-resolution Blue-light scanner image. The proposed algorithm includes two major phases, coarse and precise registration. Firstly, for reducing the matching interference of human subjective factors, we extract feature points based on curvature characteristics and use the improved three point's translational transformation method to realize coarse registration. Then, the feature point set and reference point set, obtained by the initial registered transformation, are processed in the precise registration step. Even with the unsatisfactory initial values, this two steps registration method can guarantee the global convergence and the convergence precision. Experimental results demonstrate that the method has successfully realized the registration of the Cone Beam CT dental model and the blue-ray scanner model with higher accuracy. So the method could provide researching foundation for the relevant software development in terms of the registration of multi-modality medical data. PMID:24511309

  9. Ethical decisions in dental treatment planning using the Ozar model: a descriptive study of fifty-two consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Schuman, N J; Turner, J E

    1997-01-01

    Chairside dental ethics necessitates special consideration by the faculty member-dentist, the dental student, and the patient. The patient must always be aware of treatment options, in addition to learning the health status of the oral hard and soft tissues, costs, and time to be involved to accomplish proposed treatment. What may seem like a burden to an individual practitioner is actually only the necessities incurred by any self governing profession. Fifty-two consecutive dental patients had their cases reviewed for the ethical behavior of the dentist-practitioner, student, and patient. Categories reviewed were informed consent (100%), agreement, compromise, economic issues, conflict, and institutional issues. The results were: 1. Agreement: 17 cases, 2. Compromise: 21 cases, 3. Economic Issues: 4 cases, 4. Conflict: 6 cases, and 5. Institutional Issues: 4 cases. Fourteen percent of all patients were minors. Ninety percent of the patients were treated. Of those 10% not treated, five percent were for medical reasons, and five percent of the patients refused treatment. These results were placed in the Ozar Model 9 and were categorized as follows: 1. Appropriate pain free oral function: 22 cases, 2. Patient Autonomy: 14 cases, 3. Life and health: 9 cases, 4. Preferred practice values: 6 cases, and 5. Other external considerations: 1 case. This template demonstrated appropriate ethical behavior on the part of dentists, students, and patients, especially with a 90% treatment group, and only 5% refusing treatment. The 52 consecutive patients were characteristic of the University of Tennessee's overall patient pool. No identifiable differences were found between patients regardless of gender, age, or race. PMID:9484127

  10. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  11. Magneto-optic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Samuel D.

    1992-08-01

    Magneto-optical multilayers are of interest to the optical data storage community as a possible second-generation medium of the future. The important Co/Pt-superlattice system is introduced in this respect, and an extensive reference listing is provided to previous research. Magneto-optical modeling studies of Co/Pt are presented, and it is concluded that the interfacial Pt is magnetized and is magneto-optically active at the short wavelengths of interest (approximately 4 eV) for applications. Magneto-optics in the ultrathin limit are discussed, and an additivity law is presented and verified experimentally utilizing data for epitaxial Fe/Ag(111) superlattices. Finally, the surface magnetic anisotropy that provides the vertical easy axes of magnetization in candidate superlattice systems is discussed and illustrated experimentally using ultrathin epitaxial films of Fe grown on a variety of substrates. It is concluded that magneto-optic multilayers will provide many stimulating basic and applied challenges in the years ahead.

  12. The use of in vitro model systems to study dental biofilms associated with caries: a short review

    PubMed Central

    Salli, Krista M.; Ouwehand, Arthur C.

    2015-01-01

    A dental biofilm forms a distinct environment where microorganisms live in a matrix of extracellular polysaccharides. The biofilm favors certain bacteria and creates a habitat that functions differently compared to planktonic bacteria. Reproducible model systems which help to address various questions related to biofilm formation, the process of caries development, and its prevention are needed and are continuously developed. Recent research using both batch culture, continuous culture and flow cells in caries biofilm formation is presented. The development of new techniques and equipment has led to a deeper understanding of how caries biofilms function. Biofilm models have also been used in the development of materials inhibiting secondary caries. This short review summarizes available models to study these questions. PMID:25740099

  13. Spherical cloaking with homogeneous isotropic multilayered structures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hu, Li; Xu, Xiaofei; Feng, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    We propose a practical realization of electromagnetic spherical cloaking by layered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials. By mimicking the classic anisotropic cloak by many alternating thin layers of isotropic dielectrics, the permittivity and permeability in each isotropic layer can be properly determined by effective medium theory in order to achieve invisibility. The model greatly facilitates modeling by Mie theory and realization by multilayer coating of dielectrics. Eigenmode analysis is also presented to provide insights of the discretization in multilayers. PMID:19518392

  14. Quantitative analysis of electron energy loss spectra and modelling of optical properties of multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet radiation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Reinert, F.; Handick, E.

    2014-03-28

    Ruthenium capped multilayer coatings for use in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation regime have manifold applications in science and industry. Although the Ru cap shall protect the reflecting multilayers, the surface of the heterostructures suffers from contamination issues and surface degradation. In order to get a better understanding of the effects of these impurities on the optical parameters, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) measurements of contaminated and H cleaned Ru multilayer coatings were taken at various primary electron beam energies. Experiments conducted at low primary beam energies between 100 eV and 1000 eV are very surface sensitive due to the short inelastic mean free path of the electrons in this energy range. Therefore, influences of the surface condition on the above mentioned characteristics can be appraised. In this paper, it can be shown that carbon and oxide impurities on the mirror surface decrease the transmission of the Ru cap by about 0.75% and the overall reflectance of the device is impaired as the main share of the non-transmitted EUV light is absorbed in the contamination layer.

  15. Multilevel modelling of clustered grouped survival data using Cox regression model: an application to ART dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Wong, May C M; Lam, K F; Lo, Edward C M

    2006-02-15

    In some controlled clinical trials in dental research, multiple failure time data from the same patient are frequently observed that result in clustered multiple failure time. Moreover, the treatments are often delivered by more than one operator and thus the multiple failure times are clustered according to a multilevel structure when the operator effects are assumed to be random. In practice, it is often too expensive or even impossible to monitor the study subjects continuously, but they are examined periodically at some regular pre-scheduled visits. Hence, discrete or grouped clustered failure time data are collected. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) approach and non-informative prior in a Bayesian framework to mimic the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation in a frequentist approach in multilevel modelling of clustered grouped survival data. A three-level model with additive variance components model for the random effects is considered in this paper. Both the grouped proportional hazards model and the dynamic logistic regression model are used. The approximate intra-cluster correlation of the log failure times can be estimated when the grouped proportional hazards model is used. The statistical package WinBUGS is adopted to estimate the parameter of interest based on the MCMC method. The models and method are applied to a data set obtained from a prospective clinical study on a cohort of Chinese school children that atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations were placed on permanent teeth with carious lesions. Altogether 284 ART restorations were placed by five dentists and clinical status of the ART restorations was evaluated annually for 6 years after placement, thus clustered grouped failure times of the restorations were recorded. Results based on the grouped proportional hazards model revealed that clustering effect among the log failure times of the different restorations from the same child was

  16. Bi-directional homogenization equivalent modeling for the prediction of thermo-mechanical properties of a multi-layered printed circuit board (PCB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sung-Jun; Park, Buhm; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kwak, Dong-Ok; Park, Junhong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-04-01

    Warpage of multi-layered printed circuit boards (PCB) during the reflow process is a serious problem which affects the reliability of solder ball connections between the PCB and the mounted semi-conductor packages in electronic devices. It is essential to predict the warpage of the PCB accurately; however, the complicated copper patterns in multi-layered PCBs render a full modeling analysis impossible due to the excessive computing time required. To overcome this problem, we have developed analytical equations of three Cu patterns (line, square, and grid) for the application of thermo-mechanical properties simply by equivalent modeling of Cu patterns. In the proposed equations, the effect of thermo-viscoelastic properties as well as the influence of surrounding layers such as woven glass fabric/BT (bismaleimide triazine), composite laminate (BT core), and photoimageable solder resist (PSR) were considered. To verify the developed equations, vibration tests based on the wave propagation approach were performed at various temperatures. Good agreement was observed between the equivalent model and the experimental results.

  17. Approximate Formula of Peak Frequency of H/V Ratio Curve in Multilayered Model and Its Use in H/V Ratio Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Tran Thanh; Vinh, Pham Chi; Malischewsky, P.; Aoudia, Abdelkrim

    2016-02-01

    The main peak frequency of the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) ratio curve is the key factor used in the H/V ratio technique since the resonance frequency of the transmission response of the site is estimated from this frequency. However, there has not been explicit formula of the main peak frequency of the H/V ratio curve in multilayered models. In the present study, an approximate explicit equation of the peak frequency of H/V ratio is derived for the multilayered models of high impedance contrast between the half-space and surface layers. This approximate equation is then generalized for model of an functionally graded material (FGM) layer over half-space. Then, the approximate equation is used to obtain an explicit approximate formula of the main peak frequency of H/V ratio curve. The principle formula of H/V ratio technique is used along with the obtained approximate formula of the main peak frequency to formulate a new average formula of the shear-wave velocity of a composite layer composed of an arbitrary number of horizontal, homogeneous layers. The new average formula is shown to be more suitable in the use of H/V ratio technique than the currently used ones in the sense that it takes into account the effect of the mass density and the position of sublayers. Finally, some numerical calculation to illustrate the application of the peak formula and the new average formula of shear-wave velocity is presented.

  18. ThE Alaska Native Tribal Health System Dental Health Aide Therapist as a dentist-centric model.

    PubMed

    Williard, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Differences in disease patterns and living circumstances should play no role in the quality of oral health care or in dentists' role in directing this care. Such differences, however, very likely suggest that the delivery model that works in many circumstances may not be best in all. The Alaska Tribal Health System Dental Health Aide Therapist (DHAT) model is one alternative whose potential is being evaluated. These teams are managed by dentists and have several features in common with general practice residency training programs. Alaska dentists supervising DHATs customize their practice protocols based on the skills of the therapists and the needs of the communities served. The emphasis of therapists is on prevention and basic oral health services, leaving the dentists to focus on higher level treatment that better uses the skills for which they have been trained. The characteristics of effective dentist team managers and the economic and social realities of this program are discussed. PMID:22856051

  19. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  20. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasveer; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  1. Quantifying spatio-temporal stream-aquifer water exchanges along a multi-layer aquifer system using LOMOS and hydro-thermo modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhri, Amer; flipo, Nicolas; Rejiba, Fayçal; Bodet, Ludovic; Jost, Anne; Goblet, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the spatial and temporal variability of stream-aquifer water exchanges along a 6 km-stream network in a multi-layer aquifer system using both LOcal MOnitoring Stations (LOMOSs) coupled with the optimization of a hydro-thermo model per LOMOS. With an area of 45 km2, the Orgeval experimental basin is located 70 km east from Paris. It drains a multi-layer aquifer system, which is composed of two main geological formations: the Oligocene (upper aquifer unit) and the Eocene (lower aquifer unit). These two aquifer units are separated by a clayey aquitard. The connectivity status between streams and aquifer units has been evaluated using near surface geophysical investigations as well as drill cores. Five LOMOSs of the stream-aquifer exchanges have been deployed along the stream-network to monitor stream-aquifer exchanges over years, based on continuous pressure and temperature measurements (15 min-time step). Each LOMOS is composed of one or two shallow piezometers located 2 to 3 m away from the river edge; one surface water monitoring system; two hyporheic zone temperature profiles located close to each river bank. The five LOMOSs are distributed in two upstream, two intermediate, and one downstream site. The two upstream sites are connected to the upper aquifer unit, and the downstream one is connected to the lower aquifer unit. The 2012-April - 2013-december period of hydrological data are hereafter analyzed. We first focus on the spatial distribution of the stream-aquifer exchanges along the multi-layer aquifer system during the low flow period. Results display an upstream-downstream functional gradient, with upstream gaining stream and downstream losing stream. This spatial distribution is due to the multi-layer nature of the aquifer system, whose lower aquifer unit is depleted. Then it appears that the downstream losing streams temporally switch into gaining ones during extreme hydrological events, while the upstream streams

  2. Weibull models of fracture strengths and fatigue behavior of dental resins in flexure and shear.

    PubMed

    Baran, G R; McCool, J I; Paul, D; Boberick, K; Wunder, S

    1998-01-01

    In estimating lifetimes of dental restorative materials, it is useful to have available data on the fatigue behavior of these materials. Current efforts at estimation include several untested assumptions related to the equivalence of flaw distributions sampled by shear, tensile, and compressive stresses. Environmental influences on material properties are not accounted for, and it is unclear if fatigue limits exist. In this study, the shear and flexural strengths of three resins used as matrices in dental restorative composite materials were characterized by Weibull parameters. It was found that shear strengths were lower than flexural strengths, liquid sorption had a profound effect on characteristic strengths, and the Weibull shape parameter obtained from shear data differed for some materials from that obtained in flexure. In shear and flexural fatigue, a power law relationship applied for up to 250,000 cycles; no fatigue limits were found, and the data thus imply only one flaw population is responsible for failure. Again, liquid sorption adversely affected strength levels in most materials (decreasing shear strengths and flexural strengths by factors of 2-3) and to a greater extent than did the degree of cure or material chemistry. PMID:9730059

  3. On the reporting of dental health, time for dental care, and the treatment panorama.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Y

    1999-01-01

    The thesis included five methodological studies and one caries epidemiological investigation, the general aim being to study how to measure and report dental health, time for dental care, treatment panorama, and dental care outcomes, within a Public Dental Service organization. The specific aims were to monitor dental clinic activities using a time study method, to apply time study results of a dental health-related patient group system for the 3-19 year age groups, and to compare time study results with corresponding results from computerized systems used for reporting dental care. Other specific aims were to compare longitudinal caries index data results between cohort and cross-sectional samples, to analyse caries index for extreme caries groups among adolescents leaving organized dental care, and--using time series methods--to analyse dental health development of the 15-19 year age groups. Results from the time studies portrayed the dental clinic as a working unit, showed that reported values can represent dental care only for intervention procedures, and indicated that clinic patterns were not adapted to the health situation of the patient groups. Longitudinal cohort attempts gave different values from those of the cross-sectional year classes, which should be the primary focus when presenting caries index mean values in dental health reviews. Caries-free groups from 15 to 19 years of age seem to be stable in their caries development in about 60%-80% of cases; while the 20% groups with the highest index values accounted for about 80% of all approximal lesions. In times of major economic adjustment, dental health for adolescents in Göteborg was an example of sustainable dental health development. A model system for monitoring, analysing, and reporting dental health and dental care outcomes within a dental care-giving organization calls for several conditions, for example, a dental health-related patient group system, and a rationale for the choice of dental

  4. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  5. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  6. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  7. Numerical modelling of GPR ground-matching enhancement by a chirped multilayer structure - output of cooperation within COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovik V.; Knyazyan, Tamara M.; Hovhannisyan, Tamara. T.; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    As is well know, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an electromagnetic technique for the detection and imaging of buried objects, with resolution ranging from centimeters to few meters [1, 2]. Though this technique is mature enough and different types of GPR devices are already in use, some problems are still waiting for their solution [3]. One of them is to achieve a better matching of transmitting GPR antenna to the ground, that will increase the signal penetration depth and the signal/noise ratio at the receiving end. In the current work, a full-wave electromagnetic modelling of the interaction of a plane wave with a chirped multilayered structure on the ground is performed, via numerical simulation. The method of single expression is used, which is a suitable technique for multi-boundary problems solution [4, 5]. The considered multilayer consists of two different dielectric slabs of low and high permittivity, where the highest value of permittivity doesn't exceed the permittivity of the ground. The losses in the ground are suitably taken into account. Two types of multilayers are analysed. Numerical results are obtained for the reflectance from the structure, as well as for the distributions of electric field components and power flow density in both the considered structures and the ground. The obtained results indicate that, for a better matching with the ground, the layer closer to the ground should be the high-permittivity one. Acknowledgement This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu, www.cost.eu). Part of this work was developed during the Short-Term Scientific Mission COST-STSM-TU1208-25016, carried out by Prof. Baghdasaryan in the National Institute of Telecommunications in Warsaw, Poland. References [1] H. M. Jol. Ground Penetrating Radar: Theory and Applications. Elsevier, 2009. 509 pp. [2] R. Persico. Introduction to

  8. Modelling and simulation of low-density lipoprotein transport through multi-layered wall of an anatomically realistic carotid artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Kenjereš, Saša; de Loor, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    A high concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is recognized as one of the principal risk factors for development of atherosclerosis. This paper reports on modelling and simulations of the coupled mass (LDL concentration) and momentum transport through the arterial lumen and the multi-layered arterial wall of an anatomically realistic carotid bifurcation. The mathematical model includes equations for conservation of mass, momentum and concentration, which take into account a porous layer structure, the biological membranes and reactive source/sink terms in different layers of the arterial wall, as proposed in Yang & Vafai (2006). A four-layer wall model of an arterial wall with constant thickness is introduced and initially tested on a simple cylinder geometry where realistic layer properties are specified. Comparative assessment with previously published results demonstrated proper implementation of the mathematical model. Excellent agreement for the velocity and LDL concentration distributions in the arterial lumen and in the artery wall are obtained. Then, an anatomically realistic carotid artery bifurcation is studied. This is the main novelty of the presented research. We find a strong dependence between underlying blood flow pattern (and consequently the wall shear stress distributions) and the uptake of the LDL concentration in the artery wall. The radial dependency of interactions between the diffusion, convection and chemical reactions within the multi-layered artery wall is crucial for accurate predictions of the LDL concentration in the media. It is shown that a four-layer wall model produced qualitatively good agreement with the experimental results of Meyer et al. (1996) in predicting levels of LDL within the media of a rabbit aorta under identical transmural pressure conditions. Finally, it is demonstrated that the adopted model represents a good initial platform for future numerical investigations of the initial stage of atherosclerosis for

  9. A multilayered sharp interface model of coupled freshwater and saltwater flow in coastal systems: model development and application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1990-01-01

    The model allows for regional simulation of coastal groundwater conditions, including the effects of saltwater dynamics on the freshwater system. Vertically integrated freshwater and saltwater flow equations incorporating the interface boundary condition are solved within each aquifer. Leakage through confining layers is calculated by Darcy's law, accounting for density differences across the layer. The locations of the interface tip and toe, within grid blocks, are tracked by linearly extrapolating the position of the interface. The model has been verified using available analytical solutions and experimental results and applied to the Soquel-Aptos basin, Santa Cruz County, California. -from Author

  10. The use of dental services for children: implications of the 2010 dental reform in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri; Machnes, Yaffa; Gal, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Routine dental examinations for children are important for early diagnosis and treatment of dental problems. The level of dental morbidity among Israeli children is higher than the global average. A July 2010 reform of Israel's National Health Insurance Law gradually offers free dental services for children up to age 12. The study examines the use of dental services for children and the factors affecting mothers' decision to take their children for routine checkups. In addition, the study examines the impact of the reform on dental checkups for children in various populations groups. A national representative sample comprising 618 mothers of children aged 5-18 was surveyed by telephone. The survey integrated the principles of the health beliefs model and socio-demographic characteristics. The results show that mothers' decision to take their children for dental checkups is affected by their socio-demographic status and by their health beliefs with respect to dental health. After the reform, the frequency of children's dental checkups significantly increased among vulnerable populations. Therefore, the reform has helped reduce gaps in Israeli society regarding children's dental health. Raising families' awareness of the reform and of the importance of dental health care together with expanding national distribution of approved dental clinics can increase the frequency of dental checkups among children in Israel. PMID:25465981

  11. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda Cassiano, Deisemar; Arruda Correa, Samanda Cristine; de Souza, Edmilson Monteiro; da Silva, Ademir Xaxier; Pereira Peixoto, José Guilherme; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-02-01

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved.

  12. Protective effect of chitosan oligosaccharide lactate against DNA double-strand breaks induced by a model methacrylate dental adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanska, Joanna; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Synowiec, Ewelina; Czarny, Piotr; Rekas, Marek; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jacek Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Monomers of methacrylates used in restorative dentistry have been recently reported to induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) in vitro. Because such monomers may penetrate the pulp and oral cavity due to the incompleteness of polymerization and polymer degradation, they may induce a similar effect in vivo. DSBs are the most serious type of DNA damage and if misrepaired or not repaired may lead to mutation, cancer transformation and cell death. Therefore, the protection against DSBs induced by methacrylate monomers released from dental restorations is imperative. Material/Methods We examined the protective action of chitosan oligosaccharide lactate (ChOL) against cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by monomers of the model adhesive consisting of 55% bisphenol A-diglycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA) and 45% 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). We evaluated the extent of DSBs by the neutral comet assay and the phosphorylation of the H2AX histone test. Results ChOL increased the viability of HGFs exposed to Bis-GMA/HEMA as assessed by flow cytometry. ChOL decreased the extent of DSBs induced by Bis-GMA/HEMA as evaluated by neutral comet assay and phosphorylation of the H2AX histone. ChOL did not change mechanical properties of the model adhesive, as checked by the shear bond test. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a better sealing of the dentinal microtubules in the presence of ChOL, which may protect pulp cells against the harmful action of the monomers. Conclusions ChOL can be considered as an additive to methacrylate-based dental materials to prevent DSBs induction, but further studies are needed on its formulation with the methacrylates. PMID:21804456

  13. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  14. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  15. Modeling and Validation of Multilayer Poly(Lactide-Co-Glycolide) Scaffolds for In Vitro Directed Differentiation of Juxtaposed Cartilage and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George X.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric scaffolds, which release growth factors in a temporally controlled manner, have successfully directed the differentiation of stem cells into monolithic tissues of a single lineage. However, engineering precise boundaries in multilineage functional tissues, such as the juxtaposed cartilaginous and osseous tissue present in articulated joints, often remains a challenge. This work demonstrates a precise materials system for in vitro reconstruction of the three-dimensional architecture of these types of human tissues. Multilayer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffolds were used to produce spatiotemporal gradients to direct the differentiation of an initially uniform population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into juxtaposed cartilage and bone. Specifically, growth factors (chondrogenic transforming growth factor-β3 and osteogenic bone morphogenetic protein-4) and their neutralizing antibodies were incorporated within distinct layers of the PLG scaffolds to create spatially segregated morphogen fields within the scaffold volume. The multilayer PLG scaffold designs were optimized by mathematical modeling, and generation of spatially segregated morphogen gradients was validated by assessing activity of luciferase reporter cell lines responsive to each growth factor. Scaffolds seeded with MSCs demonstrated production of juxtaposed cartilage and bone, as evaluated by biochemical staining and western blotting for tissue-specific matrix proteins. This work demonstrates a significant advance for the engineering of implantable constructs comprising tissues of multiple lineages, with potential applications in orthopedic regenerative medicine. PMID:25923238

  16. Multilayer Kohonen network and its separability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-yuan; Li, Jie-Gu

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents a model of a multilayer Kohonen network. Because of obeying the winner- take-all learning rule and projecting high dimensional patterns into one or two dimensional space, the conventional Kohonen network has many limitations in its applications, such as pattern separability limitation and open ended limitation. Taking advantage of the innovation for learning method and its multilayer structure, the multilayer Kohonen network has the performance of nonlinear pattern partition. Owing to labeling pattern clusters with appropriate category names or numbers only, the network is an open ended system, so it is far more powerful than the conventional Kohonen network. The mechanism of the multilayer Kohonen network is explained in detail, and its nonlinear pattern separability is analyzed theoretically. As a result of an experiment made by two layer Kohonen network, a set of human head contour figures assigned into diverse by categories is shown.

  17. Modeling of gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials using multilayer perceptron neural network: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Nil; Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, L.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, multilayered perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) were presented for the computation of the gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors (BA) of seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials [LiF, BeO, Na2B4O7, CaSO4, Li2B4O7, KMgF3, Ca3(PO4)2] in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 10 mfp (mean-free-path). The MLPNNs have been trained by a Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm. The developed model is in 99% agreement with the ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 standard data set. Furthermore, the model is fast and does not require tremendous computational efforts. The estimated BA data for TLD materials have been given with penetration depth and incident photon energy as comparative to the results of the interpolation method using the Geometrical Progression (G-P) fitting formula.

  18. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  19. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  20. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  1. Oral Lactobacilli and Dental Caries: A Model for Niche Adaptation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Caufield, P W; Schön, C N; Saraithong, P; Li, Y; Argimón, S

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacilli have been associated with dental caries for over a century. Here, we review the pertinent literature along with findings from our own study to formulate a working hypothesis about the natural history and role of lactobacilli. Unlike most indigenous microbes that stably colonize a host, lactobacilli appear to be planktonic, opportunistic settlers that can gather and multiply only in certain restrictive niches of the host, at least within the oral cavity. We postulate that the following essential requirements are necessary for sustained colonization of lactobacilli in humans: 1) a stagnant, retentive niche that is mostly anaerobic; 2) a low pH milieu; and 3) ready access to carbohydrates. Three sites on the human body meet these specifications: caries lesions, the stomach, and the vagina. Only a handful of Lactobacillus species is found in caries lesions, but they are largely absent in caries-free children. Lactobacilli present in caries lesions represent both a major contributor to caries progression and a major reservoir to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We extend the assertion from other investigators that lactobacilli found in the GI tract originate in the oral cavity by proposing that lactobacilli in the oral cavity arise from caries lesions. This, in turn, leads us to reflect on the health implications of the lactobacilli in the mouth and downstream GI and to ponder whether these or any of the Lactobacillus species are truly indigenous to the human GI tract or the oral cavity. PMID:25758458

  2. To explore and develop a model to maintain and build upon a dental clinic open for all in developing regions, with a primary focus on India

    PubMed Central

    Sugandhi, Ayushi; Mangal, Brijesh; Mishra, Amit Kumar; Sethia, Bhavna

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study a service model that enables a clinic to be open to all members of the community, irrespective of their ability to pay. METHODS: Sampling methodology was used to gather information in two phases, with the city of Indore as the target region. In the first phase, dental professionals were surveyed to gather the cost of the facility, land and equipment and the cost of sustaining the practice. In the second phase, the residents of Indore were surveyed to collect information regarding their oral health problems and their expenditure for the same. Assessing the current situation, the questions to answer are related to the issues of dental health care access problems and the resources required, human and financial. RESULTS: (1) People younger than 20 years of age form a large proportion (43%) of the population of the city and also a large proportion (54%) of people who visit dental clinics; (2) Dental caries are commonly found in the population younger than 20 years of age and mobile teeth in those older than 50 years of age; (3) Dental caries and mobile teeth are almost equally found in people of the age group 20-50 years old; (4) A significantly large proportion of those older than 50 years old have had all their teeth extracted; and (5) A significantly large proportion of the 20-30 years of age group has had no teeth extracted. CONCLUSION: The model which we propose works well for low income patients; however, it places a lot of extra burden on the higher income group. A lot of effort can be put into generating revenue from other sources, including events and donations. PMID:25232547

  3. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  4. Dental and allied dental students' attitudes towards and perceptions of intraprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Brame, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Shannon H; Wilder, Rebecca S; Sams, Lattice D

    2015-06-01

    Interprofessional and intraprofessional learning opportunities in health professions education are vital to emphasize evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and cost-effectiveness in patients' oral health care. The aim of this study was to assess dental, dental hygiene, and dental assisting students' readiness for intraprofessional education and to evaluate their attitudes towards and perceptions of intraprofessional teamwork, communication, respect, and understanding of professional roles. In 2013, students at one dental school (N=247) were surveyed, and focus groups were conducted for this convergent parallel mixed-methods study. Survey response rates were as follows: senior dental students 54.4% (N=43), senior dental hygiene students 100% (N=32), dental assisting students 95% (N=19), junior dental students 51.8% (N=42), and junior dental hygiene students 100% (N=33). The results showed that the dental hygiene students had more positive responses about intraprofessional education than the dental and dental assisting students (p<0.05). Most (94%, N=160) of the respondents in the combined groups agreed that intraprofessional learning would help them become more effective members of the oral health care team. The three focus group sessions (N=17) revealed consistency among the groups regarding the value of an integrated clinical design and intraprofessional education. These students were eager and positive about intraprofessional learning and agreed that a shared learning model can improve communication and respect among team members, provide a better understanding of roles, and ultimately enhance patient care. PMID:26034025

  5. Non-Lethal Control of the Cariogenic Potential of an Agent-Based Model for Dental Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Head, David A.; Marsh, Phil D.; Devine, Deirdre A.

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries or tooth decay is a prevalent global disease whose causative agent is the oral biofilm known as plaque. According to the ecological plaque hypothesis, this biofilm becomes pathogenic when external challenges drive it towards a state with a high proportion of acid-producing bacteria. Determining which factors control biofilm composition is therefore desirable when developing novel clinical treatments to combat caries, but is also challenging due to the system complexity and the existence of multiple bacterial species performing similar functions. Here we employ agent-based mathematical modelling to simulate a biofilm consisting of two competing, distinct types of bacterial populations, each parameterised by their nutrient uptake and aciduricity, periodically subjected to an acid challenge resulting from the metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. It was found that one population was progressively eliminated from the system to give either a benign or a pathogenic biofilm, with a tipping point between these two fates depending on a multiplicity of factors relating to microbial physiology and biofilm geometry. Parameter sensitivity was quantified by individually varying the model parameters against putative experimental measures, suggesting non-lethal interventions that can favourably modulate biofilm composition. We discuss how the same parameter sensitivity data can be used to guide the design of validation experiments, and argue for the benefits of in silico modelling in providing an additional predictive capability upstream from in vitro experiments. PMID:25144538

  6. Non-lethal control of the cariogenic potential of an agent-based model for dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Head, David A; Marsh, Phil D; Devine, Deirdre A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries or tooth decay is a prevalent global disease whose causative agent is the oral biofilm known as plaque. According to the ecological plaque hypothesis, this biofilm becomes pathogenic when external challenges drive it towards a state with a high proportion of acid-producing bacteria. Determining which factors control biofilm composition is therefore desirable when developing novel clinical treatments to combat caries, but is also challenging due to the system complexity and the existence of multiple bacterial species performing similar functions. Here we employ agent-based mathematical modelling to simulate a biofilm consisting of two competing, distinct types of bacterial populations, each parameterised by their nutrient uptake and aciduricity, periodically subjected to an acid challenge resulting from the metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. It was found that one population was progressively eliminated from the system to give either a benign or a pathogenic biofilm, with a tipping point between these two fates depending on a multiplicity of factors relating to microbial physiology and biofilm geometry. Parameter sensitivity was quantified by individually varying the model parameters against putative experimental measures, suggesting non-lethal interventions that can favourably modulate biofilm composition. We discuss how the same parameter sensitivity data can be used to guide the design of validation experiments, and argue for the benefits of in silico modelling in providing an additional predictive capability upstream from in vitro experiments. PMID:25144538

  7. The Development of Dental Anesthesiology As a Discipline and Its Role As a Model of Interdisciplinary Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Giovannitti, Joseph A; Montandon, Richard J; Herlich, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The majority of dental procedures can be performed with an awake patient and the use of a local anesthetic, but when deep sedation and general anesthesia are needed, they typically are provided by those dentists with advanced training in anesthesiology, i.e., oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentist anesthesiologists. Dental anesthesiology began with the discovery of anesthesia by a dentist in 1844 and has been recognized as a separate discipline in dentistry for nearly 70 years. Training over this time evolved from apprenticeships to one-year training programs, and in 2007, the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) began accrediting two-year dental anesthesiology training programs. Since 2015, in recognition of the increasing complexity of the discipline, training has required three years of postgraduate study. The number of dentist anesthesiologists has grown with the increasing demand for anesthesia services by both the public and the profession. However, the present number of dentist anesthesiologists is not sufficient to meet the demand, so additional programs and growth in current programs are needed. Another valuable aspect of this discipline is its role as a positive example of interdepartmental collaboration since dental anesthesiology faculty, as members of a support discipline, typically work across many of the other departments in a dental school. This article reviews the history of the discipline, describes the educational goals and CODA standards for dental anesthesiology programs, using one program as an example, and discusses the needs and challenges that will shape the discipline's development in the future. PMID:27480705

  8. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  9. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Schachtel, B P; Cooper, S A; Gatoulis, S C

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011. PMID:26603742

  10. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models. Materials and Methods Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model) of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model. Results There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models. PMID:27304976

  11. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  12. Parallelisation and application of a multi-layer atmospheric transport model to quantify dispersion and deposition of ammonia over the British Isles.

    PubMed

    Fournier, N; Pais, V A; Sutton, M A; Weston, K J; Dragosits, U; Tang, S Y; Aherne, J

    2002-01-01

    An atmospheric transport model, FRAME (Fine Resolution AMmonia Exchange), has been used to model the spatial pattern of ammonia concentrations and deposition over the British Isles for the first time. The model uses a multi-layer approach with diffusion through 33 layers to describe vertical concentration profiles in the atmosphere explicitly. Together with the necessary description of atmospheric reactions with sulphur and oxidised nitrogen, this imposes a major computational requirement, with the model having a run-time of 8.5 days on a mid-range workstation. Improvement in the model run-time was sought by developing a parallel implementation coded in a data-parallel approach using High Performance Fortran. Running the code on a Cray T3E with 128 processors provided a speedup by a factor of 69. The code's portability, its validation with measurements and new maps of its application to the British Isles, are presented. Good agreement is found with measured NH3 concentrations, while wet de-position is underestimated. In addition to model uncertainties, this may be due to an underestimation of the NH3 emissions input data. PMID:11808558

  13. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Lauze, François

    2014-03-01

    In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  14. The relationship between dental anxiety and dental decay experience in antenatal mothers.

    PubMed

    Esa, Rashidah; Savithri, Vengadasalam; Humphris, Gerry; Freeman, Ruth

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental anxiety and dental decay experience among antenatal mothers attending Maternal and Child Health clinics in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a consecutive sample of 407 antenatal mothers in Seremban, Malaysia. The questionnaire consisted of participants' demographic profile and the Dental Fear Survey. The D(3cv)MFS was employed as the outcome measure and was assessed by a single examiner (intraclass correlation = 0.98). A structural equation model was designed to inspect the relationship between dental anxiety and dental decay experience. The mean Dental Fear Survey score for all participants was 35.1 [95% confidence interval (34.0, 36.3)]. The mean D(3cv)MFS score was 10.8 [95% confidence interval (9.5, 12.1)]. Participants from low socio-economic status groups had significantly higher D(3cv)MFS counts than those from high socio-economic status groups. The path model with dental anxiety and socio-economic status as predictors of D(3cv)MFS showed satisfactory fit. The correlation between dental anxiety and dental decay experience was 0.30 (standardized estimate), indicating a positive association. Socio-economic status was also statistically significantly associated with the D(3cv)MFS count (beta = 0.19). This study presented robust evidence for the significant relationship between dental anxiety and dental decay experience in antenatal mothers. PMID:20156266

  15. An In vivo Model for Short-Term Evaluation of the Implantation Effects of Biomolecules or Stem Cells in the Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda-Pinheiro, Sally; Marchadier, Arnaud; Donãs, Patricio; Septier, Dominique; Benhamou, Laurent; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel; Poliard, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The continuously growing rodent incisor is a widely used model to investigate odontogenesis and mineralized tissue formation. This study focused on evaluating the mouse mandibular incisor as an experimental biological tool for analyzing in vivo the capacity of odontoblast-like progenitors or bioactive molecules to contribute to reparative dentinogenesis. We describe here a surgical procedure allowing direct access to the forming part of the incisor dental pulp Amelogenin peptide A+4 adsorbed on agarose beads, or dental pulp progenitor cells were implanted in the pulp following this procedure. After 10 days A+4 induced the formation of an osteodentin occluding almost the totality of the pulp compartment. Implantation of progenitor cells leads to formation of islets of osteodentin-like structures located centrally in the pulp. These pilot studies validate the incisor as an experimental model to test the capacity of progenitor cells or bioactive molecules to induce the formation of reparative dentin. PMID:19088885

  16. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. Results The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. Conclusions The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models. PMID:24696823

  17. The Importance of Efficacy: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Examine Factors Related to Preschool-Age Children Enrolled in Medicaid Receiving Preventive Dental Visits.

    PubMed

    Askelson, Natoshia M; Chi, Donald L; Momany, Elizabeth T; Kuthy, Raymond A; Carter, Knute D; Field, Kathryn; Damiano, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Early preventive dental visits are vital to the oral health of children. Yet many children, especially preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid, do not receive early visits. This study attempts to uncover factors that can be used to encourage parents to seek preventive dental care for preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid. The extended parallel process model was used as a theoretical framework for this research. This model suggests that people will act if the perceived threat (severity and susceptibility) is high enough and if efficacy levels (self-efficacy and response efficacy) are likewise high. Following Witte's method of categorizing people's perceptions and emotions into one of four categories based on levels of threat and efficacy, this article describes four groups (high threat/high efficacy, high threat/low efficacy, low threat/high efficacy, and low threat/low efficacy) of parents and how they compare to each other. Using logistic regression to model if a child had a preventive visit, results indicate that parents with low threat/high efficacy and parents with high threat/high efficacy had approximately 2.5 times the odds of having a child with a preventive oral health visit compared to parents with low threat/low efficacy, when controlling for perceived oral health status, health literacy, and child's age. The importance of efficacy needs to be incorporated in interventions aimed at increasing preventive dental visits for young children. PMID:25862302

  18. Natural Convection in a rotating multilayer spherical shell system with self gravity: A simplified global circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira Rangel, Francisco Javier; Avila Rodriguez, Ruben; Cabello, Ares

    2014-11-01

    The onset of thermal convection in rotating multilayer spherical shells is investigated. The system consist of six concentric shells. The first spherical gap has an aspect ratio equal to 0.35, the following four spherical gaps have different aspect ratio and the sixth gap has an aspect ratio equal to 0.8. The inner and the outer spherical gaps confine Boussinesq fluids while the middle spherical gaps are treated as a thermal conductor solid. The investigation is performed for Taylor numbers between 7.E4 and 1.E6 and Rayleigh numbers between 3.E3 and 1.E6. The convective patterns and the temperature fields are presented in the most inner and outer spherical gaps. Convection is driven by the temperature difference between the inner and outer spheres and a gravitational field wich varies like r and 1 /r2 . The fluid equations are solved by using the spectral element method (SEM). The mesh is generated by using the cubed-sphere algorithm to avoid the singularity at the poles. To the knowledge of the autors the convection-conduction-convection problem presented in this paper has not been investigated previously. Acknowledgment: DGAPA-PAPIIT Project: IN117314-3.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of a multilayer, finite-difference model of the Southeastern Coastal Plain regional aquifer system; Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pernik, Meribeth

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity of a multilayer finite-difference regional flow model was tested by changing the calibrated values for five parameters in the steady-state model and one in the transient-state model. The parameters that changed under the steady-state condition were those that had been routinely adjusted during the calibration process as part of the effort to match pre-development potentiometric surfaces, and elements of the water budget. The tested steady-state parameters include: recharge, riverbed conductance, transmissivity, confining unit leakance, and boundary location. In the transient-state model, the storage coefficient was adjusted. The sensitivity of the model to changes in the calibrated values of these parameters was evaluated with respect to the simulated response of net base flow to the rivers, and the mean value of the absolute head residual. To provide a standard measurement of sensitivity from one parameter to another, the standard deviation of the absolute head residual was calculated. The steady-state model was shown to be most sensitive to changes in rates of recharge. When the recharge rate was held constant, the model was more sensitive to variations in transmissivity. Near the rivers, the riverbed conductance becomes the dominant parameter in controlling the heads. Changes in confining unit leakance had little effect on simulated base flow, but greatly affected head residuals. The model was relatively insensitive to changes in the location of no-flow boundaries and to moderate changes in the altitude of constant head boundaries. The storage coefficient was adjusted under transient conditions to illustrate the model 's sensitivity to changes in storativity. The model is less sensitive to an increase in storage coefficient than it is to a decrease in storage coefficient. As the storage coefficient decreased, the aquifer drawdown increases, the base flow decreased. The opposite response occurred when the storage coefficient was increased. (Author

  20. Structural dynamics of electric machine stators: Modelling guidelines and identification of three-dimensional equivalent material properties for multi-layered orthotropic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millithaler, P.; Sadoulet-Reboul, É.; Ouisse, M.; Dupont, J.-B.; Bouhaddi, N.

    2015-07-01

    Simulating the dynamic behaviour of heterogeneous finite-element structures such as electric motors often requires to homogenise the models in the first place. Current homogenisation methods do not always imply computing an equivalent homogeneous material's elasticity matrix and are often restrained to specific uses. In this document, a novel approach of equivalent material identification is developed for multi-layered orthotropic structures. A finite-element model of a 3D stratified structure is created, as well as its equivalent homogeneous medium. The dynamic behaviour of the homogeneous structure with the equivalent material identified by the new method is compared at low frequencies to the reference stack and to equivalent materials created using other existing homogenisation techniques. It is shown that this approach is more accurate than existing reference homogenisation methods. Applied to the magnetic core's finite-element model of a real laminated electric machine stator, the method enables simulating the experimental behaviour with good accuracy, without need of time-consuming model updating procedures.

  1. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G.D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented. Objective The purpose of this study was to further analyze the edge chipping resistance of the brittle materials evaluated in Part 1. One objective was to determine why some force-distance trends were linear and others were nonlinear. A second objective was to account for differences in chipping resistance with indenter type. Methods Edge chipping experiments were conducted with different indenters, including some custom-made sharp conical indenters. A new force – distance quadratic expression was correlated to the data and compared to the linear and power law trends. Results The new quadratic function was an excellent fit in every instance. It can account for why some materials can be fit by a linear trend, while others can be fit by the power law trend. The effects of indenter type are accounted for variations in crack initiation and by the wedging stresses once an indentation hole is created. Significance The new quadratic force – edge distance function can be used with edge chipping data for all brittle materials, not just those evaluated in this study. The data trends vary from linear to nonlinear depending upon the material’s hardness, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus. PMID:24685179

  2. Analyzing patients' values by applying cluster analysis and LRFM model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study combines cluster analysis and LRFM (length, recency, frequency, and monetary) model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan to analyze patients' values. A two-stage approach by self-organizing maps and K-means method is applied to segment 1,462 patients into twelve clusters. The average values of L, R, and F excluding monetary covered by national health insurance program are computed for each cluster. In addition, customer value matrix is used to analyze customer values of twelve clusters in terms of frequency and monetary. Customer relationship matrix considering length and recency is also applied to classify different types of customers from these twelve clusters. The results show that three clusters can be classified into loyal patients with L, R, and F values greater than the respective average L, R, and F values, while three clusters can be viewed as lost patients without any variable above the average values of L, R, and F. When different types of patients are identified, marketing strategies can be designed to meet different patients' needs. PMID:25045741

  3. Analyzing Patients' Values by Applying Cluster Analysis and LRFM Model in a Pediatric Dental Clinic in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study combines cluster analysis and LRFM (length, recency, frequency, and monetary) model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan to analyze patients' values. A two-stage approach by self-organizing maps and K-means method is applied to segment 1,462 patients into twelve clusters. The average values of L, R, and F excluding monetary covered by national health insurance program are computed for each cluster. In addition, customer value matrix is used to analyze customer values of twelve clusters in terms of frequency and monetary. Customer relationship matrix considering length and recency is also applied to classify different types of customers from these twelve clusters. The results show that three clusters can be classified into loyal patients with L, R, and F values greater than the respective average L, R, and F values, while three clusters can be viewed as lost patients without any variable above the average values of L, R, and F. When different types of patients are identified, marketing strategies can be designed to meet different patients' needs. PMID:25045741

  4. Bi-phase transition diagrams of metallic thin multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.C.; Liu, W.; Jiang, Q. . E-mail: jiangq@jlu.edu.cn

    2005-02-01

    Phase transitions of metallic multilayers induced by differences in interface energy are considered thermodynamically, based on a thermodynamic model for interface energy and the Goldschmidt premise for lattice contraction. Bi-phase transition diagrams of Co/Cr, Zr/Nb, Ti/Nb and Ti/Al multilayers are constructed, which are in agreement with experimental results.

  5. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  6. The rural dental health program: the effect of a school-based, dental health education program on children's utilization of dental services.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, J M; Cormier, P; Oler, J

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen-hundred rural children ages five through thirteen were randomly assigned for dental treatment to a school-based practice, and to private practitioners in the community. Simultaneously, five of the nine public schools attended by the children offered an enriched program of dental education while the remaining schools taught the regular health education courses. All children participated in a school based fluoride program and their dental treatment was provided without charge. Data indicating how the children utilized dental services were collected over the three-year treatment phase of the study. Evidence from the third treatment year indicates that children assigned to the school based practice who also attended a school offering enriched dental health education used dental services on a more regular basis than children in the other three groups. Evidence obtained from log-linear modeling supports the hypothesis that dental health education had a positive effect on children's utilization of dental service. PMID:6837813

  7. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  8. A simple theoretical model of heat and moisture transport in multi-layer garments in cool ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wissler, Eugene H; Havenith, George

    2009-03-01

    Overall resistances for heat and vapor transport in a multilayer garment depend on the properties of individual layers and the thickness of any air space between layers. Under uncomplicated, steady-state conditions, thermal and mass fluxes are uniform within the garment, and the rate of transport is simply computed as the overall temperature or water concentration difference divided by the appropriate resistance. However, that simple computation is not valid under cool ambient conditions when the vapor permeability of the garment is low, and condensation occurs within the garment. Several recent studies have measured heat and vapor transport when condensation occurs within the garment (Richards et al. in Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002; Havenith et al. in J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). In addition to measuring cooling rates for ensembles when the skin was either wet or dry, both studies employed a flat-plate apparatus to measure resistances of individual layers. Those data provide information required to define the properties of an ensemble in terms of its individual layers. We have extended the work of previous investigators by developing a rather simple technique for analyzing heat and water vapor transport when condensation occurs within a garment. Computed results agree well with experimental results reported by Richards et al. (Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002) and Havenith et al. (J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). We discuss application of the method to human subjects for whom the rate of sweat secretion, instead of the partial pressure of water on the skin, is specified. Analysis of a more complicated five-layer system studied by Yoo and Kim (Text Res J 78:189-197, 2008) required an iterative computation based on principles defined in this paper. PMID:19125281

  9. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  10. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  11. Control of Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Dall’Asta, Luca; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-01-01

    The controllability of a network is a theoretical problem of relevance in a variety of contexts ranging from financial markets to the brain. Until now, network controllability has been characterized only on isolated networks, while the vast majority of complex systems are formed by multilayer networks. Here we build a theoretical framework for the linear controllability of multilayer networks by mapping the problem into a combinatorial matching problem. We found that correlating the external signals in the different layers can significantly reduce the multiplex network robustness to node removal, as it can be seen in conjunction with a hybrid phase transition occurring in interacting Poisson networks. Moreover we observe that multilayer networks can stabilize the fully controllable multiplex network configuration that can be stable also when the full controllability of the single network is not stable. PMID:26869210

  12. Multilayered Graphene in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhir, P.; Volynets, N.; Maksimenko, S.; Kaplas, T.; Svirko, Yu.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the experimental study of electromagnetic (EM) properties of multilayered graphene in Ka-band synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in between nanometrically thin Cu catalyst film and dielectric (SiO2) substrate. The quality of the produced multilayered graphene samples were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The thickness of graphene films was controlled by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was found to be a few nanometers (up to 5 nm). We discovered, that the fabricated graphene provided remarkably high EM shielding efficiency caused by absorption losses at the level of 35-43% of incident power. Being highly conductive at room temperature, multi-layer graphene emerges as a promising material for manufacturing ultrathin microwave coatings to be used in aerospace applications.

  13. Magnetic multilayer interface anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Pechan, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ni/Mo and Ni/V multilayer magnetic anisotropy has been investigated as a function of Ni layer thickness, frequency and temperature. Variable frequency ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements show, for the first time, significant frequency dependence associated with the multilayer magnetic anisotropy. The thickness dependence allows one to extract the interface contribution from the total anisotropy. Temperature dependent FMR (9 GHz) and room temperature magnetization indicate that strain between Ni and the non-magnetic layers is contributing significantly to the source of the interface anisotropy and the state of the interfacial magnetization. In order to examine the interface properties of other transition metal multilayer systems, investigations on Fe/Cu are underway and CoCr/Ag is being proposed. ESR measurements have been reported on Gd substituted YBaCuO superconductors and a novel quasi-equilibrium method has been developed to determine quickly and precisely the ransition temperature.

  14. Dental Disease: A Continuing Education Problem for the Disabled Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, William P.

    1983-01-01

    The author cites the incidence and types of dental diseases among disabled persons; discusses such contributing factors as low income and absence of comprehensive dental services; and describes a low-cost model interdisciplinary dental hygiene program involving special education, rehabilitation, and dentistry. (MC)

  15. Apple Tree Dental: An Innovative Oral Health Solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Deborah; Helgeson, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health called attention to the "silent epidemic" of dental disease. Older adults and other vulnerable people continue to suffer disproportionately from dental disease and inadequate access to care. As a society and as dental professionals, we face multiple challenges to care for our aging patients, parents and grandparents. Apple Tree Dental's community collaborative practice model illustrates a sustainable, patient-centered approach to overcoming barriers to care across the lifespan. PMID:26357816

  16. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  17. Sunspot: A program to model the behavior of hypervelocity impact damaged multilayer insulation in the Sunspot thermal vacuum chamber of Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Hayashida, K. B.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a computer program to predict the degradation of the insulating capabilities of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket of Space Station Freedom due to a hypervelocity impact with a space debris particle is described. A finite difference scheme is used for the calculations. The computer program was written in Microsoft BASIC. Also described is a test program that was undertaken to validate the numerical model. Twelve MLI specimens were impacted at hypervelocities with simulated debris particles using a light gas gun at Marshall Space Flight Center. The impact-damaged MLI specimens were then tested for insulating capability in the space environment of the Sunspot thermal vacuum chamber at MSFC. Two undamaged MLI specimens were also tested for comparison with the test results of the damaged specimens. The numerical model was found to adequately predict behavior of the MLI specimens in the Sunspot chamber. A parameter, called diameter ratio, was developed to relate the nominal MLI impact damage to the apparent (for thermal analysis purposes) impact damage based on the hypervelocity impact conditions of a specimen.

  18. A structural model for multi-layered ceramic cylinders and its application to silicon carbide cladding of light water reactor fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youho; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2015-03-01

    A thermo-mechanical model for stress distribution and Weibull statistical fracture of a multi-layered SiC cladding for LWR fuel is developed. The model is validated by comparing its results to those of the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) code ANSYS. In steady-state operation, the temperature sensitive swelling may lead to undesirable tensile stresses which is anticipated to challenge the structural integrity of the fission-gas retaining inner layer of CVD-SiC monolith in a triple layer design with the composite being the middle layer. The stress distribution is sensitive to potential differences in the swelling of the monolith from that of the composite layer. The sensitivity is discussed in this work. A double-layered SiC cladding that employs the inner SiCf /SiC composite layer, and the outer CVD-SiC layer has also been analyzed. This SiC cladding design significantly reduces failure probability as it appropriately allocates peak tensile stresses in the inner composite while significantly reducing tensile stress levels of the CVD-SiC monolith.

  19. An efficient model to predict guided wave radiation by finite-sized sources in multilayered anisotropic plates with account of caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stévenin, M.; Lhémery, A.; Grondel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic guided waves (GW) are used in various non-destructive testing (NDT) methods to inspect plate-like structures, generated by finite-sized transducers. Thanks to GW long range propagation, using a few transducers at permanent positions can provide a full coverage of the plate. Transducer diffraction effects take place, leading to complex radiated fields. Optimizing transducers positioning makes it necessary to accurately predict the GW field radiated by a transducer. Fraunhofer-like approximations applied to GW in isotropic homogeneous plates lead to fast and accurate field computation but can fail when applied to multi-layered anisotropic composite plates, as shown by some examples given. Here, a model is proposed for composite plates, based on the computation of the approximate Green's tensor describing modal propagation from a source point, with account of caustics typically seen when strong anisotropy is concerned. Modal solutions are otherwise obtained by the Semi-Analytic Finite Element method. Transducer diffraction effects are accounted for by means of an angular integration over the transducer surface as seen from the calculation point, that is, over energy paths involved, which are mode-dependent. The model is validated by comparing its predictions with those computed by means of a full convolution integration of the Green's tensor with the source over transducer surface. Examples given concern disk and rectangular shaped transducers commonly used in NDT.

  20. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  1. Dental care utilization over time.

    PubMed

    Beazoglou, T; Brown, L J; Heffley, D

    1993-12-01

    Between 1950 and 1978, per capita real dental expenditures in the U.S. grew at an average annual rate of 3.33%. Between 1978 and 1989 there was virtually no net growth in this measure of dental care utilization. This sharp curtailment of utilization growth has promoted debate about the sources of this change. Possible explanations include, among others, a reduction in dental disease due to increased exposure to fluoridation, the substitution of noncaloric sweeteners for refined sugar, preventive dentistry, , improved oral health habits, an increase in the net price of dental services, and the cost-containment efforts of insurers and employers. Changes have occurred in all of these variables, but little has done to isolate and quantify the individual effects. This decomposition is difficult, in part, because of the lack of an established model for time-series analysis of dental care utilization. A model of dental care demand, incorporating economic factors (out-of-pocket or net dental prices, per capita income, and nondental prices) as well as dietary factors (refined sugar consumption, noncaloric sweeteners, and exposure to fluoridated water), is combined with a simple model of dental care supply within an equilibrium framework. A two-stage estimation procedure is applied, using U.S. aggregate time-series data for the period 1950-89. Results show that economic and dietary factors are significantly related to changes in utilization. Net price and income elasticities of demand exhibit the expected signs and are compatible with estimates from cross-sectional studies. Decreases in cane and beet sugar consumption, facilitated by the increase in the use of noncaloric sweeteners, are associated with reductions in utilization. Fluoridation appears to be weakly but positively related to utilization. There also appears to have been a significant structural shift in demand since 1978. Overall goodness-of-fit is strong and the model accurately tracks the 1978-89 flattening of

  2. Integration of Basic-Clinical Sciences, PBL, CBL, and IPE in U.S. Dental Schools' Curricula and a Proposed Integrated Curriculum Model for the Future.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Venugopalan, Shankar Rengasamy; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Weistroffer, Paula; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2016-03-01

    The integration of basic and clinical sciences in dental curricula enhances the application of basic science principles to clinical decision making and improves students' critical thinking. The aim of this study was to define the characteristics of U.S. dental schools' curricula with regard to level of course integration and degree of incorporation of problem-based and case-based learning. A second aim was to propose a dental curriculum that supports effective integration of courses and addresses some of the concerns facing academic dentistry. A survey was sent to 58 academic deans in U.S. dental schools. The survey included questions about integrating courses in the schools' curricula and major changes in curricular structure or teaching pedagogy that respondents anticipated in the immediate future. A total of 31 schools responded to the survey, for a 53.4% response rate. The results showed that three-quarters of the responding schools still teach basic and clinical sciences separately, although 61.3% reported having an integrated curriculum. Among the responding schools, 16 had a PBL component integrated into their curricula (two had integrated PBL in all courses and 14 used a hybrid PBL approach). Two schools had CBL integrated in all courses, and ten had CBL integrated in >75% of courses. Only slightly more than half agreed that their curricula foster students' thinking "outside the box." Faculty shortages and lack of protected time and resources were the most frequent reasons given for a lack of integrated courses. The integrated model proposed in this article has the potential to provide a low stress environment for students and to address important issues like faculty shortages. PMID:26933103

  3. Pain relief model for a COX-2 inhibitor in patients with postoperative dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Rohatagi, Shashank; Kastrissios, Helen; Sasahara, Kunihiro; Truitt, Kenneth; Moberly, James B; Wada, Russell; Salazar, Daniel E

    2008-01-01

    AIM To develop a pain relief model for a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, CS-706, that permits prediction of doses for acute pain relief in Japanese and Western populations. METHODS A categorical response model was developed to describe the probability of pain relief (PR) over time for a Phase 2a study. Models were also developed to describe patient's use of rescue medication and onset of pain relief. RESULTS The placebo response was described by a first-order increase in PR that achieved a stable response after 4 h. The effect of CS-706 on PR was described using an Emax model; the plasma concentration of CS-706 producing 50% of the maximum response was estimated to be 87 ng ml−1, the median peak plasma concentration achieved after a 50-mg oral dose. The probability of rescue medication (REMD) decreased over time and was a function of the last observed PR score. This probability was < 16% for patients with a PR score ≥2. The probability of experiencing meaningful PR was 98% in patients who did not require REMD and 47% in those who required REMD. For patients who did not require REMD, the median onset time of meaningful pain relief (TMPR) decreased with increasing doses. In patients who required REMD, there was a saturable decline in TMPR, with the greatest improvement occurring from placebo to 50-mg doses. CONCLUSIONS The set of models developed permitted compilation of multiple dose–response curves for dose selection of CS-706 in Westerners and facilitated scaling of doses to a Japanese population. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Modelling and simulation are being increasingly used to support decision-making in new drug development.Novel modelling methods are required to capture the complexity of multiple end-points for a disease and to address questions such as dose selection in various populations.The focus of this study was to present a novel pain relief model to address such questions. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS New contributions of this work to the

  4. Unfolding single- and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Bons, Paul D.; Griera, Albert; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    When planar structures (e.g. sedimentary layers, veins, dykes, cleavages, etc.) are subjected to deformation, they have about equal chances to be shortened or stretched. The most common shortening and stretching structures are folds and boudinage, respectively. However, boudinage requires additional deformation mechanisms apart from viscous flow, like formation of fractures or strain localization. When folded layers are subjected to extension, they could potentially unfold back to straight layers. Although probably not uncommon, this would be difficult to recognize. Open questions are whether folded layers can unfold, what determines their mechanical behaviour and how we can recognize them in the field. In order to approach these questions, we present a series of numerical experiments that simulate stretching of previously folded single- and multi-layers in simple shear, using the two dimensional numerical modelling platform ELLE, including the finite element module BASIL that calculates viscous deformation. We investigate the parameters that affect a fold train once it rotates into the extensional field. The results show that the unfolding process strongly depends on the viscosity contrast between the layer and matrix (Llorens et al., 2013). Layers do not completely unfold when they experience softening before or during the stretching process or when other neighbouring competent layers prevent them from unfolding. The foliation refraction patterns are the main indicators of unfolded folds. Additionally, intrafolial folds and cusp-like folds adjacent to straight layers, as well as variations in fold amplitudes and limb lengths of irregular folds can also be used as indicators of stretching of a layer after shortening and folding. References: Llorens, M-.G., Bons, P.D., Griera, A. and Gomez-Rivas, E. 2013. When do folds unfold during progressive shear?. Geology, 41, 563-566.

  5. An Analysis of Graduates from a Non-Traditional Model of Dental Hygiene Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies document the need to increase the racial and ethnic diversity of the health care workforce. Different approaches to increase the diversity of the healthcare workforce include implementing bridge, transitional and academic enrichment programs; diversifying college admissions criteria; and developing models of education that enhance…

  6. Reliable Communications Using Multi-layer Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assimi, Abdel-Nasser; Poulliat, Charly; Fijalkow, Inbar

    In this paper, we propose a MIMO approach for packet combining in hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) protocols using single-carrier multi-layer transmission over block fading channels. Based on this model, the problem of the optimization of the linear superposition coefficients is briefly addressed.

  7. Effect of initiator on photopolymerization of acidic, aqueous dental model adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinglin; Peng, Zhonghua; Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated different initiator systems in self-etching model adhesives, in which camphorquinone (CQ) or [3-(3,4-dimethyl-9-oxo-9H-thioxanthen-2-yloxy)-2-hydroxylpropy] trimethylammonium chloride (QTX) was employed as a photoinitiator (dye). N-phenylglycine (NPG), ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E) or 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was used as the coinitiator (CI). The role of diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP) in the polymerization process was also studied. The concentrations of dye, CI, and DPIHP in model adhesives were all maintained at 0.022 mmol per gram monomer. The model adhesive contained two monomers: (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate) (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) whose mass ratio was 1:1, thus representing an acidic and hydrophilic formulation. The polymerization rate and the degree of conversion (DC) of the model adhesives with 5, 15, or 25% water content were determined using FTIR/ATR with a time-based spectrum analysis. The results indicated that with CQ as the photoinitiator, 4E appeared to be the most efficient CI, whereas the CQ-DMAEMA combination led to very low radical generation efficiency (DC < 5%). DPIHP exhibited little effect on the polymerization process. With QTX as the photoinitiator, however, DPIHP played an essential role. Without DPIHP, all three QTX-CI systems failed to initiate polymerization (DC < 5%). The QTX-DPIHP combination, on the other hand, was found to be a viable initiator system. The above results provide the critical information for the development of self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:18671261

  8. [Dental records and responsibility].

    PubMed

    Brands, W G

    2006-03-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist is responsible for the mistakes of his assistant. Contrary to their American colleagues, Dutch dental assistants and dental hygienists cannot be summoned before a disciplinary court. As these para-medics perform more and more dental treatment, independently or after delegation, they should be assigned there own disciplinary responsibility. PMID:16566401

  9. Temperature profile retrieval in axisymmetric combustion plumes using multilayer perceptron modeling and spectral feature selection in the infrared CO2 emission band.

    PubMed

    García-Cuesta, Esteban; de Castro, Antonio J; Galván, Inés M; López, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a methodology based on the combined use of a multilayer perceptron model fed using selected spectral information is presented to invert the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and to recover the spatial temperature profile inside an axisymmetric flame. The spectral information is provided by the measurement of the infrared CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral region. A guided spectral feature selection was carried out using a joint criterion of principal component analysis and a priori physical knowledge of the radiative problem. After applying this guided feature selection, a subset of 17 wavenumbers was selected. The proposed methodology was applied over synthetic scenarios. Also, an experimental validation was carried out by measuring the spectral emission of the exhaust hot gas plume in a microjet engine with a Fourier transform-based spectroradiometer. Temperatures retrieved using the proposed methodology were compared with classical thermocouple measurements, showing a good agreement between them. Results obtained using the proposed methodology are very promising and can encourage the use of sensor systems based on the spectral measurement of the CO2 emission band in the 3-5 μm spectral window to monitor combustion processes in a nonintrusive way. PMID:25061791

  10. Laser beam induced nanoscale spot through nonlinear “thick” samples: A multi-layer thin lens self-focusing model

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jingsong; Yan, Hui

    2014-08-14

    Self-focusing is a well-researched phenomenon. Nanoscale spots can be achieved through self-focusing, which is an alternative method for achieving high-density data storage, high-resolution light imaging, and maskless nanolithography. Several research groups have observed that self-focusing spots can be reduced to nanoscale levels via incident laser power manipulation. Self-focusing spots can be analyzed by solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the finite difference time domain method. However, both procedures are complex and time-consuming. In the present work, a multi-layer thin-lens self-focusing model that considers diffraction effects and changes of refractive index along the radial and film thickness directions is proposed to analyze the self-focusing behavior and traveling process of light beams intuitively. The self-focusing behaviors of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} are simulated, and results show that a nanoscale self-focusing spot with a radius of about 0.12 μm can be formed at the bottom of nonlinear sample when the incident laser power exceeds 4.25 mW. Our findings are basically consistent with experimental reports and provide a good method for analyzing and understanding the self-focusing process. An appropriate application schematic design is also provided.

  11. Model for longitudinal-optical phonons and electron-phonon coupling in GaAs-Ga1-xAlxAs multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, C.; Clérot, F.

    1991-09-01

    A continuum theory is developed to investigate the properties of the long-wavelength longitudinal-optical phonons in GaAs-Ga1-xAlxAs multilayer structures and the associated electron-phonon interaction. Depending on the layer, the relative ionic displacements are related to GaAs or GaAs-type longitudinal-optical phonons and treated in the framework of the Born-Huang model, generalized to include isotropic dispersion effects in the Brillouin-zone center. For double heterostructures, a finite number of quantized confined modes is found. The interplay between the long-range Coulomb interaction, which couples the vibrations of adjacent GaAs layers, and confinement effects, which prevent the displacements of adjacent GaAs layers to overlap, is elucidated in the case of superlattices. The strength of the electron-phonon coupling in double heterostructures is reduced as compared with the electron-bulk-phonon effective coupling strength for quantum-well widths smaller than 100 Å.

  12. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  13. Model-based vision system for automatic recognition of structures in dental radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Raj S.; Samarabandu, Jagath K.; Hausmann, E.; Allen, K. A.

    1991-07-01

    X-ray diagnosis of destructive periodontal disease requires assessing serial radiographs by an expert to determine the change in the distance between cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and the bone crest. To achieve this without the subjectivity of a human expert, a knowledge based system is proposed to automatically locate the two landmarks which are the CEJ and the level of alveolar crest at its junction with the periodontal ligament space. This work is a part of an ongoing project to automatically measure the distance between CEJ and the bone crest along a line parallel to the axis of the tooth. The approach presented in this paper is based on identifying a prominent feature such as the tooth boundary using local edge detection and edge thresholding to establish a reference and then using model knowledge to process sub-regions in locating the landmarks. Segmentation techniques invoked around these regions consists of a neural-network like hierarchical refinement scheme together with local gradient extraction, multilevel thresholding and ridge tracking. Recognition accuracy is further improved by first locating the easily identifiable parts of the bone surface and the interface between the enamel and the dentine and then extending these boundaries towards the periodontal ligament space and the tooth boundary respectively. The system is realized as a collection of tools (or knowledge sources) for pre-processing, segmentation, primary and secondary feature detection and a control structure based on the blackboard model to coordinate the activities of these tools.

  14. Competition of Fracture Mechanisms in Monolithic Dental Ceramics: Flat Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Kim, Jae-Won; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Thompson, Van P.; Rekow, E. Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic (single layer) glass-ceramic restorations often fail from chipping and fracture. Using blunt indentation of a model flat porcelain-like brittle layer bonded onto a dentin-like polymer support system, a variety of fatigue fracture modes has been identified and analyzed: outer cone, inner cone, and median cracks developing in the near-contact region at the occlusal surface; radial cracks developing at the internal cementation surface along the loading axis. Our findings indicate that monolithic glass-ceramic layers are vulnerable to both occlusal surface damage and cementation internal surface fracture. Clinical issues in the longevity of ceramic restorations are discussed in relation to biting force, physical properties of ceramic crowns and luting cement, and thicknesses of ceramic and cement layers. PMID:18478533

  15. Modeling the dental development of fossil hominins through the inhibitory cascade.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Kes; Wood, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitory cascade is a mathematical model for interpreting the relative size of the occlusal surfaces of mammalian molars in terms of developmental mechanisms. The cascade is derived from experimental studies of mouse molars developed in culture, and has been tested and applied to the dentitions of rodents, ungulates, carnivores, and platyrrhines. Results from such applications have provided new information regarding the origins of plesiomorphic traits in mammalian clade and how derived morphologies may arise. In this study we apply the inhibitory cascade model to the postcanine dentition of a sample of Old World primates that includes fossil hominins. The results of this study suggest that the inhibitory cascade (i.e. M1 < M2 < M3 ) describes the relative sizes of the molar occlusal areas of Old World primates and is likely the plesiomorphic condition for this clade. Within that clade, whereas most Old World monkeys have a M1 < M2 < M3 pattern, most apes have a M1 < M2 ≈ M3 pattern. This modified cascade suggests that greater levels of inhibition (or less activation) are acting on the posterior molars of apes, thus facilitating the reduction of M3 s within the apes. With the exception of the baboon genus Papio, extant congeners typically share the same molar inhibitory cascade. The differences in the relative size relationships observed in the molar and premolar-molar cascades of the species included in the fossil hominin genus Paranthropus suggest that although large postcanine teeth are a shared derived trait within this genus, the developmental basis for postcanine megadontia may not be the same in these two Paranthropus taxa. Our results show that phenotypic characters such as postcanine megadontia may not reflect common development. PMID:25420453

  16. CT segmentation of dental shapes by anatomy-driven reformation imaging and B-spline modelling.

    PubMed

    Barone, S; Paoli, A; Razionale, A V

    2016-06-01

    Dedicated imaging methods are among the most important tools of modern computer-aided medical applications. In the last few years, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained popularity in digital dentistry for 3D imaging of jawbones and teeth. However, the anatomy of a maxillofacial region complicates the assessment of tooth geometry and anatomical location when using standard orthogonal views of the CT data set. In particular, a tooth is defined by a sub-region, which cannot be easily separated from surrounding tissues by only considering pixel grey-intensity values. For this reason, an image enhancement is usually necessary in order to properly segment tooth geometries. In this paper, an anatomy-driven methodology to reconstruct individual 3D tooth anatomies by processing CBCT data is presented. The main concept is to generate a small set of multi-planar reformation images along significant views for each target tooth, driven by the individual anatomical geometry of a specific patient. The reformation images greatly enhance the clearness of the target tooth contours. A set of meaningful 2D tooth contours is extracted and used to automatically model the overall 3D tooth shape through a B-spline representation. The effectiveness of the methodology has been verified by comparing some anatomy-driven reconstructions of anterior and premolar teeth with those obtained by using standard tooth segmentation tools. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26418417

  17. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  18. Dental education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem. PMID:24984634

  19. Dental education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

  20. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... work hard to help your students fulfill their dreams, and play a crucial... Learn more Dental School ... Terms of Use | Website Feedback | Website Help ©2016 American Dental Education Association® (ADEA), 655 K Street, NW, ...

  1. Integrating Social Activity Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis: A Multilayered Methodological Model for Examining Knowledge Mediation in Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becher, Ayelet; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests an integrative qualitative methodological framework for capturing complexity in mentoring activity. Specifically, the model examines how historical developments of a discipline direct mentors' mediation of professional knowledge through the language that they use. The model integrates social activity theory and a framework of…

  2. Micro-computed tomography (CT) based assessment of dental regenerative therapy in the canine mandible model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khobragade, P.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Andreana, S.; Dziak, R.; Sunkara, S. K.; Sunkara, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution 3D bone-tissue structure measurements may provide information critical to the understanding of the bone regeneration processes and to the bone strength assessment. Tissue engineering studies rely on such nondestructive measurements to monitor bone graft regeneration area. In this study, we measured bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness through micro-CT slices for different grafts and controls. Eight canines underwent surgery to remove a bone volume (defect) in the canine's jaw at a total of 44 different locations. We kept 11 defects empty for control and filled the remaining ones with three regenerative materials; NanoGen (NG), a FDA-approved material (n=11), a novel NanoCalcium Sulfate (NCS) material (n=11) and NCS alginate (NCS+alg) material (n=11). After a minimum of four and eight weeks, the canines were sacrificed and the jaw samples were extracted. We used a custombuilt micro-CT system to acquire the data volume and developed software to measure the bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness. The software used a segmentation algorithm based on histograms derived from volumes of interest indicated by the operator. Using bone yield and fractal dimension as indices we are able to differentiate between the control and regenerative material (p<0.005). Regenerative material NCS showed an average 63.15% bone yield improvement over the control sample, NCS+alg showed 55.55% and NanoGen showed 37.5%. The bone regeneration process and quality of bone were dependent upon the position of defect and time period of healing. This study presents one of the first quantitative comparisons using non-destructive Micro-CT analysis for bone regenerative material in a large animal with a critical defect model. Our results indicate that Micro-CT measurement could be used to monitor invivo bone regeneration studies for greater regenerative process understanding.

  3. Impact on multilayered composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, B. S.; Moon, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    Stress wave propagation in a multilayer composite plate due to impact was examined by means of the anisotropic elasticity theory. The plate was modelled as a number of identical anisotropic layers and the approximate plate theory of Mindlin was then applied to each layer to obtain a set of difference-differential equations of motion. Dispersion relations for harmonic waves and correction factors were found. The governing equations were reduced to difference equations via integral transforms. With given impact boundary conditions these equations were solved for an arbitrary number of layers in the plate and the transient propagation of waves was calculated by means of a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The multilayered plate problem was extended to examine the effect of damping layers present between two elastic layers. A reduction of the interlaminar normal stress was significant when the thickness of damping layer was increased but the effect was mostly due to the softness of the damping layer. Finally, the problem of a composite plate with a crack on the interlaminar boundary was formulated.

  4. Multi-Layer, Sharp-Interface Models of Pore Pressure Buildup within the Illinois Basin due to Basin-Wide CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Person, M. A.; Gable, C. W.; Celia, M. A.; Nordbotten, J. M.; Bandilla, K.; Elliot, T. R.; Rupp, J.; Ellett, K. M.; Bowen, B.; Pickett, W.; Woolsey, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    We recently developed and applied a new parallel, multi-layer, finite-element model to the Illinois Basin in order to assess the spatial extent and magnitude of pore pressure increases resulting from the annual projected injection of 100 million metric tons of CO2. One focus of this work is to assess the potential for inducing a seismic event associated with low effective stress conditions around CO2 injection wells in the southern Illinois Basin where Mt Simon permeability is relatively low (< 50 mD). We used a sharp-interface formulation to represent a CO2, freshwater, and brine transport within each layer. A simple parallelization scheme was used in which fluid transport in each layer is solved on a separate processor. The layers are linked at the after each time step through vertical fluxes of fresh and saline water across their respective confining units. This model was validated, in part, by comparison to computed pore pressure distributions from a published 8-layer test case. Our Illinois Basin model represents spatial variations in porosity using a modified form of Athy's law. Permeability is logarithmically related to porosity so that permeability. Principal reservoirs represented in our model include the Mt. Simon Formation, the Knox Dolomite, Ordovician carbonates, Silurian-Devonian and Mississippian-Pennsylvanian sandstone/carbonates units. Key confining unit represented include the Eau Claire, Maquoketa, and New Albany Shales. A limited number of low-permeability faults were also included in the model. The permeability of fault elements were set to between 10-100 times lower than surrounding sediments. We calibrated our model using historical freshwater pumping data from the Chicago area (128 million gallons per day of H2O) as well as the salinity distribution across the Illinois Basin. We found that incorporating a stream network which included the Rock River near Chicago was important in reproducing pre-development head patterns in the Cambro

  5. Simulation of Seasonal Snow Microwave TB Using Coupled Multi-Layered Snow Evolution and Microwave Emission Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Royer, Alain; Picard, Ghislain; Langlois, Alex; Fily, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The accurate quantification of SWE has important societal benefits, including improving domestic and agricultural water planning, flood forecasting and electric power generation. However, passive-microwave SWE algorithms suffer from variations in TB due to snow metamorphism, difficult to distinguish from those due to SWE variations. Coupled snow evolution-emission models are able to predict snow metamorphism, allowing us to account for emissivity changes. They can also be used to identify weaknesses in the snow evolution model. Moreover, thoroughly evaluating coupled models is a contribution toward the assimilation of TB, which leads to a significant increase in the accuracy of SWE estimates.

  6. Optimization of metformin HCl 500 mg sustained release matrix tablets using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based on Multilayer Perceptrons (MLP) model.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Uttam; Gowda, Veeran; Ghosh, Animesh; Bose, Anirbandeep; Bhaumik, Uttam; Chatterjee, Bappaditya; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to apply the simultaneous optimization method incorporating Artificial Neural Network (ANN) using Multi-layer Perceptron (MLP) model to the development of a metformin HCl 500 mg sustained release matrix tablets with an optimized in vitro release profile. The amounts of HPMC K15M and PVP K30 at three levels (-1, 0, +1) for each were selected as casual factors. In vitro dissolution time profiles at four different sampling times (1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 8 h) were chosen as output variables. 13 kinds of metformin matrix tablets were prepared according to a 2(3) factorial design (central composite) with five extra center points, and their dissolution tests were performed. Commercially available STATISTICA Neural Network software (Stat Soft, Inc., Tulsa, OK, U.S.A.) was used throughout the study. The training process of MLP was completed until a satisfactory value of root square mean (RSM) for the test data was obtained using feed forward back propagation method. The root mean square value for the trained network was 0.000097, which indicated that the optimal MLP model was reached. The optimal tablet formulation based on some predetermined release criteria predicted by MLP was 336 mg of HPMC K15M and 130 mg of PVP K30. Calculated difference (f(1) 2.19) and similarity (f(2) 89.79) factors indicated that there was no difference between predicted and experimentally observed drug release profiles for the optimal formulation. This work illustrates the potential for an artificial neural network with MLP, to assist in development of sustained release dosage forms. PMID:18239298

  7. Subspacing Based on Connected Opening Spaces and for Different Locomotion Types Using Geometric and Graph Based Representation in Multilayered Space-Event Model (mlsem)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. A.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2013-09-01

    Indoor navigation has to deal with more issues as compared to outdoor navigation. Those issues include but are not limited to; need more level of detail to process enclosing area around navigating subject or object, consideration of the context of navigation (about locomotion type and its operating environment), and dealing with unconstrained indoor space for accurate results. Because of these complex issues, most of the frameworks for indoor navigation support for only one single type of locomotion, i.e. either walking, driving, or flying. And this decision to select a specific type of locomotion results in restricting the use of representation of indoor space for other types of locomotion e.g. graph-based abstraction of indoor space for driving cannot be used for flying. In this work, we addressed the problem of supporting different types of locomotion in indoor space by determining 3D navigable subspace for the given locomotion type based on its physical constraints. While determining 3D subspace, we focused on some issues that include indoor space representation, precision of subspace computation, and "the consideration of the context of navigation" (about indoor space and the locomotion type). To achieve better representation of indoor space, the subspaces are determined based on the connected opening spaces. And for precise subspace computation according to the given locomotion type, we used the geometric methods i.e. configuration space from robotics field. Furthermore, a semantically enriched 3D indoor virtual model in CityGML format and different locomotion types (flying, driving, and walking) containing information (semantics, geometry, and topology) were considered to examine the context of navigation. Last but not least, the subspacing procedure was presented and implemented in a sound mathematical framework i.e. Multilayered Space-Event Model (MLSEM) as proposed by Becker, Nagel, and Kolbe in 2008 and 2009.

  8. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  9. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  10. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  11. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  12. Exploration of complex multilayer film growth morphologies: STM analysis and predictive atomistic modeling for Ag on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Chung, P.W.; Cox, E.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Evans, J.W.

    2008-01-03

    Scanning tunneling microscopy studies are integrated with development of a realistic atomistic model to both characterize and elucidate the complex mounded morphologies formed by deposition of Ag on Ag(111) at 150 and 180 K. Threefold symmetric lateral shapes of islands and mounds are shown to reflect the influence of a nonuniform step edge barrier inhibiting interlayer transport. Modeling of structure at the mound peaks leads to a sensitive estimate of the magnitude of this large barrier.

  13. Developmental delays and dental caries in low-income preschoolers in the USA: a pilot cross-sectional study and preliminary explanatory model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggests that low-income preschoolers with developmental delays are at increased risk for dental caries and poor oral health, but there are no published studies based on empirical data. The purpose of this pilot study was two-fold: to examine the relationship between developmental delays and dental caries in low-income preschoolers and to present a preliminary explanatory model on the determinants of caries for enrollees in Head Start, a U.S. school readiness program for low-income preschool-aged children. Methods Data were collected on preschoolers ages 3–5 years at two Head Start centers in Washington, USA (N = 115). The predictor variable was developmental delay status (no/yes). The outcome variable was the prevalence of decayed, missing, and filled surfaces (dmfs) on primary teeth. We used multiple variable Poisson regression models to test the hypothesis that within a population of low-income preschoolers, those with developmental delays would have increased dmfs prevalence than those without developmental delays. Results Seventeen percent of preschoolers had a developmental delay and 51.3% of preschoolers had ≥1 dmfs. Preschoolers with developmental delays had a dmfs prevalence ratio that was 1.26 times as high as preschoolers without developmental delays (95% CI: 1.01, 1.58; P < .04). Other factors associated with increased dmfs prevalence ratios included: not having a dental home (P = .01); low caregiver education (P < .001); and living in a non-fluoridated community (P < .001). Conclusions Our pilot data suggest that developmental delays among low-income preschoolers are associated with increased primary tooth dmfs. Additional research is needed to further examine this relationship. Future interventions and policies should focus on caries prevention strategies within settings like Head Start classrooms that serve low-income preschool-aged children with additional targeted home- and community

  14. Using peer-assisted learning and role-playing to teach generic skills to dental students: the health care simulation model.

    PubMed

    El Tantawi, Maha M A; Abdelaziz, Hytham; AbdelRaheem, Amira S; Mahrous, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing importance is attached to teaching generic skills to undergraduate students in various disciplines. This article describes an extracurricular, student-led activity for teaching generic skills using the Model United Nations over three months. The activity used the Health Care Simulation Model (HCSM) with peer learning and role-playing to accomplish its objectives. An interview was used to select from undergraduate and postgraduate dental students at Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt, to develop a group of staff to act as peer teachers after receiving training (n=77). These peer teachers provided training for 123 undergraduate dental students to serve as delegates who acted as trainees or peer learners. At the end of the training sessions, a conference was held in which the students played the roles of delegates representing officials responsible for health care systems in ten countries. The students reported improvement in generic skills, enjoyed several aspects of the experience, and disliked other aspects of the model to a lesser extent. In multivariate analysis, perceived usefulness of the HCSM was significantly greater for staff than delegates and increased as self-reported improvement in knowledge of health care systems increased. This study suggests that innovative, student-centered educational methods can be effective for teaching generic skills and factual information. PMID:24385528

  15. Nesting High-resolution Multi-layer Photosynthesis Approaches in Current Forest Productivity Models: A Cost-Benefit Analysis in the Time-Frequency Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, M.; Katul, G.; Sampson, D. A.; Stoy, P.; Juang, J.; Oren, R.

    2004-12-01

    Ecosystem processes relevant to carbon transfer and storage are known to vary over many time and space scales. In the time domain, processes ranging from seconds, such as turbulent transport, to seasons, such as plant phenology, affect assimilation and respiration, which in turn, control carbon allocation over time scales of days to years. These inter-related processes contribute to the forest development (often measured in years to decades) and long-term carbon sequestration. To date, no single model captures the entire spectrum of variability of these processes; rather, a modular approach is adopted in which the forcing and response variables are mechanistically coupled over an inherent or assumed time scale that is then integrated to longer time scales. The effect of such modular parameterization of the "fast" processes and their cross-scale interaction with the slowly varying processes on long-term carbon sequestration remains a subject of investigation. We address this problem in two ways. First, we perform a multi-model inter-comparison in the time and frequency domains to assess how different parameterizations of photosynthesis and water vapor fluxes in forest growth models (e.g. BGC, SECRETS, PnET and 3PG) reproduce the observed spectrum of these two fluxes from hours to years. These models were chosen because they significantly vary in complexity and integration time step, thereby "filtering" the flux spectrum differently. Next, we explore the consequences of this filtering on cross-scale information flow using a newly proposed nested scheme that employs multi-species allocation routines with assimilation calculated with CANVEG. CANVEG is a multi-layer and multi-species model that resolves the entire canopy microclimate and uses a dynamic leaf area density as an input. The analysis is done in a cost-benefit fashion evaluating the gain in predictive skills of long-term carbon sequestration as result of extra model complexity and added parameterizations. As

  16. American Dental Association White Paper Targets Dental Care for the Underserved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthold, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Reaffirming its leadership role toward better oral health for all Americans, the ADA has produced a white paper that also challenges policy-makers and the US to improve access to dental services. The white paper, "State and Community Models for Improving Access to Dental Care for the Underserved," was presented October 1 to the House of Delegates…

  17. Joint detection of anatomical points on surface meshes and color images for visual registration of 3D dental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destrez, Raphaël.; Albouy-Kissi, Benjamin; Treuillet, Sylvie; Lucas, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Computer aided planning for orthodontic treatment requires knowing occlusion of separately scanned dental casts. A visual guided registration is conducted starting by extracting corresponding features in both photographs and 3D scans. To achieve this, dental neck and occlusion surface are firstly extracted by image segmentation and 3D curvature analysis. Then, an iterative registration process is conducted during which feature positions are refined, guided by previously found anatomic edges. The occlusal edge image detection is improved by an original algorithm which follows Canny's poorly detected edges using a priori knowledge of tooth shapes. Finally, the influence of feature extraction and position optimization is evaluated in terms of the quality of the induced registration. Best combination of feature detection and optimization leads to a positioning average error of 1.10 mm and 2.03°.

  18. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  19. The multi-scattering model for calculations of positron spatial distribution in the multilayer stacks, useful for conventional positron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Institute of Physics, Opole University, ul. Oleska 48, 45-052 Opole ; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-08-21

    The spatial distribution of positrons emitted from radioactive isotopes into stacks or layered samples is a subject of the presented report. It was found that Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using GEANT4 code are not able to describe correctly the experimental data of the positron fractions in stacks. The mathematical model was proposed for calculations of the implantation profile or positron fractions in separated layers or foils being components of a stack. The model takes into account only two processes, i.e., the positron absorption and backscattering at interfaces. The mathematical formulas were applied in the computer program called LYS-1 (layers profile analysis). The theoretical predictions of the model were in the good agreement with the results of the MC simulations for the semi infinite sample. The experimental verifications of the model were performed on the symmetrical and non-symmetrical stacks of different foils. The good agreement between the experimental and calculated fractions of positrons in components of a stack was achieved. Also the experimental implantation profile obtained using the depth scanning of positron implantation technique is very well described by the theoretical profile obtained within the proposed model. The LYS-1 program allows us also to calculate the fraction of positrons which annihilate in the source, which can be useful in the positron spectroscopy.

  20. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. M.; Revilock, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Under the Federal Aviation Administration's Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center collaborated with Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services, and SRI International to develop improved computational models for designing fabric-based engine containment systems. In the study described in this report, ballistic impact tests were conducted on layered dry fabric rings to provide impact response data for calibrating and verifying the improved numerical models. This report provides data on projectile velocity, impact and residual energy, and fabric deformation for a number of different test conditions.

  1. Application of a Gaussian multilayer diffusion model to characterize dispersion of vertical HCl column density in rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Staton, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Solid rocket exhaust cloud dispersion cases, based on seven meteorological regimes for overland advection in the Cape Canaveral, Florida, area, are examined for launch vehicle environmental impacts. They include a space shuttle case and all seven meteorological cases for the Titan 3, which exhausts 60% less HC1. The C(HC1) decays are also compared with recent in cloud peak HC1 data from eight Titan 3 launches. It is stipulated that while good overall agreement provides validation of the model, its limitations are considerable and a dynamics model is needed to handle local convective situations.

  2. Size dependent gold nanoparticle interaction at nano-micro interface using both monolayer and multilayer (tissue-like) cell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohan, Darren; Yang, Celina; Lu, Xiaofeng; Chithrani, Devika B.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as a model NP system to improve the interface between nanotechnology and medicine since their size and surface properties can be tailored easily. GNPs are being used as radiation dose enhancers and as drug carriers in cancer research. Hence, it is important to know the optimum NP size for uptake not only at monolayer level but also at tissue level. Once GNPs leave tumor vasculature, they enter the tumor tissue. Success of any therapeutic technique using NPs depends on how well NPs penetrate the tumor tissue and reach individual tumor cells. In this work, multicellular layers (MCLs) were grown to model the post-vascular tumor environment. GNPs of 20 nm and 50 nm diameters were used to elucidate the effects of size on the GNP penetration and distribution dynamics. Larger NPs (50 nm) were better at monolayer level, but smaller NPs (20 nm) were at tissue level. The MCLs exhibited a much more extensive extracellular matrix (ECM) than monolayer cell cultures. This increased ECM created a barrier for NP transport and ECM was also dependent on the tumor cell lines. Smaller NPs penetrated better compared to larger NPs. Transport of NPs was better in MDA-MB231 vs MCF-7. This MCL model tissue structures are better tools to optimize NP transport through tissue before using them in animal models. Based on our study, we believe that smaller NPs are better for improved outcome in future cancer therapeutics.

  3. Measurement of surface energy fluxes in a rangeland ecosystem and comparison with a multi-layer canopy model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland ecosystems are often characterized by a patchy mosaic of vegetation types, making measurement and modeling of surface energy fluxes particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface energy fluxes measured using eddy correlation at three rangeland sites, and use ...

  4. Predicting the dry deposition of atmospheric aerosol particles onto forests using a size-resolved multi-layer second-order closure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Launianen, S.; Gronholm, T.; Katul, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    Biological aerosol particles are now receiving significant attention given their role in air quality, climate change, and spreading of allergens and other communicable diseases. A major uncertainty in their quantification is associated with complex transport processes governing their generation and removal inside canopies. It has been known for some time now that the commonly used first-order closure to link mean concentration gradients with turbulent fluxes is problematic. The presence of a mean counter-gradient momentum transport in an open trunk space exemplifies such failure. Here, instead of employing K-theory, a size-resolved second-order multilayer model for dry particle deposition is proposed. The starting point of the proposed model is a particle flux budget in which the production, transport, and dissipation terms are modeled. Because these terms require higher-order velocity statistics, this flux budget is coupled with a conventional second-order closure scheme for the flow field within the canopy sub-layer. The failure of conventional K-theory for particle fluxes are explicitly linked to the onset of a mean counter or zero - gradient flow attributed to a significant particle flux transport term. The relative importance of these terms in the particle flux budget and their effects on the foliage particle collection terms for also discussed for each particle size. The proposed model is evaluated against published multi-level measurements of sized-resolved particle fluxes and mean concentration profiles collected within and above a tall Scots pine forest in Hyytiala, Southern Finland. The main findings are that (1) first-order closure schemes may be still plausible for modeling particle deposition velocity, especially in the particle size range smaller than 1 μm when the turbulent particle diffusivity is estimated from higher order flow statistics; (2) the mechanisms leading to the increased trend of particle deposition velocity with increasing friction

  5. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Harris R.; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Sutton, Mark; Ross, Amber D.

    2012-07-01

    A combination of transient heat transfer analytical solutions for a finite line source, a series of point sources, and a series of parallel infinite line sources were combined with a quasi-steady-state multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered barriers. This evaluation was performed to provide information to scientists and decision makers to compare candidate geologic media for a repository (crystalline rock [granite], clay, salt, and deep borehole), and to provide input for the future evaluation of the trade-off between pre-emplacement surface storage time, waste package size, and repository footprint. This approach was selected in favor of the finite element solution typically used to analyze the temperature response because it allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. The analytical solution approach used to analyze the repository temperature response allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. This approach allowed investigation of the sensitivity of the results to combinations of parameters that show that there is much flexibility to be gained in terms of spent fuel management options by varying a few key parameters. This initial analysis used representative design concepts and thermal constraints based on international design concepts, and it also included waste forms representing future fuel cycles with high burnup fuels. Unlike repository designs with large open tunnels and pre-closure ventilation, all of the disposal concepts

  6. An analysis of short-to-medium-range seismic attenuation tests using a multilayered viscoelastic seismic propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnes, B. L.; Lundien, J. R.

    1984-11-01

    This study was conducted to provide a database from which to draw conclusive results on the efficiencies of seismic wave propagation in natural terrain and the resolution and fidelity of multiple frequency signals, and to supplement data for validation of theoretical models of seismic wave propagation. An extensive test program was conducted at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, using an electrohydraulic vibrator, an impulse loader, and a vehicle as sources of seismic waves over a 5-m to 1-km range and using explosive seismic sources over a 1- to 10-km range. The results are presented for discrete frequency vibration test (1-120 Hz), tone burst tests (1-120 Hz), random noise vibration tests, and background noise tests for vehicle, impulse, and explosive tests. Analysis of data has been performed to correlate frequency, amplitude, range, and other signal characteristics with model predictions for future tests. This study relates the dispersion and attenuation of seismic waves, frequency resolution, and wind and background noise to the refinement of the WES seismic propagation model.

  7. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  8. 1D-Var multilayer assimilation of X-band SAR data into a detailed snowpack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, X. V.; Ferro-Famil, L.; Gay, M.; Durand, Y.; Dumont, M.; Morin, S.; Allain, S.; D'Urso, G.; Girard, A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure and physical properties of a snowpack and their temporal evolution may be simulated using meteorological data and a snow metamorphism model. Such an approach may meet limitations related to potential divergences and accumulated errors, to a limited spatial resolution, to wind or topography-induced local modulations of the physical properties of a snow cover, etc. Exogenous data are then required in order to constrain the simulator and improve its performance over time. Synthetic-aperture radars (SARs) and, in particular, recent sensors provide reflectivity maps of snow-covered environments with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The radiometric properties of a snowpack measured at sufficiently high carrier frequencies are known to be tightly related to some of its main physical parameters, like its depth, snow grain size and density. SAR acquisitions may then be used, together with an electromagnetic backscattering model (EBM) able to simulate the reflectivity of a snowpack from a set of physical descriptors, in order to constrain a physical snowpack model. In this study, we introduce a variational data assimilation scheme coupling TerraSAR-X radiometric data into the snowpack evolution model Crocus. The physical properties of a snowpack, such as snow density and optical diameter of each layer, are simulated by Crocus, fed by the local reanalysis of meteorological data (SAFRAN) at a French Alpine location. These snowpack properties are used as inputs of an EBM based on dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) theory, which simulates the total backscattering coefficient of a dry snow medium at X and higher frequency bands. After evaluating the sensitivity of the EBM to snowpack parameters, a 1D-Var data assimilation scheme is implemented in order to minimize the discrepancies between EBM simulations and observations obtained from TerraSAR-X acquisitions by modifying the physical parameters of the Crocus-simulated snowpack. The algorithm then re

  9. Single half-wavelength ultrasonic particle filter: Predictions of the transfer matrix multilayer resonator model and experimental filtration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Jeremy J.; Coakley, W. Terence; Gröschl, Martin; Benes, Ewald; Armstrong, Sian; Tasker, Paul J.; Nowotny, Helmut

    2002-03-01

    The quantitative performance of a ``single half-wavelength'' acoustic resonator operated at frequencies around 3 MHz as a continuous flow microparticle filter has been investigated. Standing wave acoustic radiation pressure on suspended particles (5-μm latex) drives them towards the center of the half-wavelength separation channel. Clarified suspending phase from the region closest to the filter wall is drawn away through a downstream outlet. The filtration efficiency of the device was established from continuous turbidity measurements at the filter outlet. The frequency dependence of the acoustic energy density in the aqueous particle suspension layer of the filter system was obtained by application of the transfer matrix model [H. Nowotny and E. Benes, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 82, 513-521 (1987)]. Both the measured clearances and the calculated energy density distributions showed a maximum at the fundamental of the piezoceramic transducer and a second, significantly larger, maximum at another system's resonance not coinciding with any of the transducer or empty chamber resonances. The calculated frequency of this principal energy density maximum was in excellent agreement with the optimal clearance frequency for the four tested channel widths. The high-resolution measurements of filter performance provide, for the first time, direct verification of the matrix model predictions of the frequency dependence of acoustic energy density in the water layer.

  10. Coupled DDD-FEM modeling on the mechanical behavior of microlayered metallic multilayer film at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Minsheng; Li, Zhenhuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the mechanical behavior of the microlayered metallic thin films (MMMFs) at elevated temperature, an enhanced discrete-continuous model (DCM), which couples rather than superposes the two-dimensional climb/glide-enabled discrete dislocation dynamics (2D-DDD) with the linearly elastic finite element method (FEM), is developed in this study. In the present coupling scheme, two especial treatments are made. One is to solve how the plastic strain captured by the DDD module is transferred properly to the FEM module as an eigen-strain; the other is to answer how the stress field computationally obtained by the FEM module is transferred accurately to the DDD module to drive those discrete dislocations moving correctly. With these two especial treatments, the interactions between adjacent dislocations and between dislocation pile-ups and inter-phase boundaries (IBs), which are crucial to the strengthening effect in MMMFs, are carefully taken into account. After verified by comparing the computationally predicted results with the theoretical solutions for a dislocation residing in a homogeneous material and nearby a bi-material interface, this 2D-DDD/FEM coupling scheme is used to model the tensile mechanical behaviors of MMMFs at elevated temperature. The strengthening mechanism of MMMFs and the layer thickness effect are studied in detail, with special attentions to the influence of dislocation climb on them.

  11. Topological edge modes in multilayer graphene systems.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lixin; Wang, Li; Xiao, Meng; Wen, Weijia; Chan, C T; Han, Dezhuan

    2015-08-24

    Plasmons can be supported on graphene sheets as the Dirac electrons oscillate collectively. A tight-binding model for graphene plasmons is a good description as the field confinement in the normal direction is strong. With this model, the topological properties of plasmonic bands in multilayer graphene systems are investigated. The Zak phases of periodic graphene sheet arrays are obtained for different configurations. Analogous to Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model in electronic systems, topological edge plasmon modes emerge when two periodic graphene sheet arrays with different Zak phases are connected. Interestingly, the dispersion of these topological edge modes is the same as that in the monolayer graphene and is invariant as the geometric parameters of the structure such as the separation and period change. These plasmonic edge states in multilayer graphene systems can be further tuned by electrical gating or chemical doping. PMID:26368137

  12. Kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF): Reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants and surfactant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Pascale; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Oxidants cause damage to biosurfaces such as the lung epithelium unless they are effectively scavenged. The respiratory tract is covered in a thin layer of fluid which extends from the nasal cavity to the alveoli and contain species that scavenge ozone and other incoming oxidants. The kinetic multi-layer model of the epithelial lining fluid (KM-ELF) has been developed in order to investigate the reactions of ozone and OH with antioxidants (ascorbate, uric acid, glutathione and α-tocopherol) and surfactant lipids and proteins within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The model incorporates different processes: gas phase diffusion, adsorption and desorption from the surface, bulk phase diffusion and known reactions at the surface and in the bulk. The ELF is split into many layers: a sorption layer, a surfactant layer, a near surface bulk layer and several bulk layers. Initial results using KM-ELF indicate that at ELF thicknesses of 80 nm and 1 × 10-4cm the ELF would become rapidly saturated with ozone with saturation occurring in less than a second. However, at an ELF thickness of 1 × 10-3cm concentration gradients were observed throughout the ELF and the presence of antioxidants reduced the O3 reaching the lung cells and tissues by 40% after 1 hour of exposure. In contrast, the antioxidants were efficient scavengers of OH radicals, although the large rate constants of OH reacting with the antioxidants resulted in the antioxidants decaying away rapidly. The chemical half-lives of the antioxidants and surface species were also calculated using KM-ELF as a function of O3 and OH concentration and ELF thickness. Finally, the pH dependence of the products of reactions between antioxidants and O3 were investigated. The KM-ELF model predicted that a harmful ascorbate ozonide product would increase from 1.4 × 1011cm-3at pH 7.4 to 1.1 × 1014 cm-3 at pH 4after 1 hour although a uric acid ozonide product would decrease from 2.0 × 1015cm-3to 5.9 × 1012cm-3.

  13. A multilayer bidirectional reflectance model for the analysis of planetary surface hyperspectral images at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    1998-12-01

    We present a practical, timely, and effective radiative transfer algorithm, suitable for qualitative and quantitative analyses of high-resolution hyperspectral images of planetary surfaces in the visible and near-infrared domains. The bidirectional reflectance of a plane parallel, absorbing, scattering, and slightly stratified medium is generated. The local mean properties of scattering and absorption of such media are obtained apart, using semiempirical approaches. The functions which express the diffuse reflection and transmission behaviors of each homogeneous layer are then derived. For the multiple scattering term, we numerically resolve the equations appearing in the H, X and Y function method of radiative transfer, reducing the real phase function to a simplified one which can nevertheless be anisotropic. A better approach to the physical realism is obtained for the single and double scattering contributions, using their real analytical expressions. This contrasts with the Hapke model dedicated to homogeneous and semi-infinite media, where only an isotropic reduced phase function is adopted and the single scattering correction is applied. The bidirectional reflectance and the derived quantities (albedos) of an optically semi-infinite homogeneous medium are then easily derived from these quantities. For a stratified medium, a simple adding algorithm based on principles of invariance is presented. Compared to earlier and more complete theoretical developments, this model in most cases reproduces the dependence of the bidirectional reflectance according to the different geometrical and radiative parameters with a maximum of 10% relative error. It leads to important gains of computation time and significantly extends the validity of Hapke's or similar practical approaches.

  14. The relationship of dental caries and dental fear in Malaysian adolescents: a latent variable approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of geography (place of residence) as a moderator in the relationship between dental caries disease and treatment experience and dental fear in 16-year-olds living in Malaysia. Methods A multi-stage-stratified sampling method was employed. Five hundred and three, 16-year-olds from 6 government secondary schools participated in this study. The questionnaire examined participants’ demographic profile and assessed their dental fear using the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The clinical examination consisted of the DMFT as the outcome measure of dental caries disease and treatment experience by a single examiner (ICC = 0.98). Structural equation modelling inspected the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience. Results The mean DMFT was 2.76 (SD 3.25). The DT, MT and FT components were 0.64 (SD 1.25), 0.14 (SD 0.56) and 1.98 (SD 2.43) respectively. Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly greater mean numbers of decayed and missing teeth. The mean DFS score was 40.8 (SD 12.4). Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly higher mean scores for physical symptoms of dental fear. The correlation between dental fear (DFS) and dental caries disease and treatment experience (DMFT) was 0.29, p < 0.0001. The structural equation model fitted the raw data well (χ2 = 9.20, df = 8, p = 0.34). All components of DMFT were closely associated in equal strength to the unidimensional hypothetical latent variable of dental caries disease and treatment experience. The strength of the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience varied in accordance with place of residence. Conclusion In conclusion a relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience was shown to exist in 16-year-old adolescents living in Malaysia. This study showed that the rural–urban dichotomy acted as a moderator upon this

  15. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  16. What proportion of dental care in care homes could be met by direct access to dental therapists or dental hygienists?

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, N. P.; Morgan, M. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many care home residents require simple dental treatment which is complicated by the need for extra time to deliver dental care. The proportion of their care which could be delivered wholly by hygienists or therapists is unknown. Method 2010 Welsh dental care home survey data on clinical opinion of treatment need and special care skill level required was cross referenced with General Dental Council guidance on direct access. Results Care home residents treatment needs could be wholly addressed by a generalist dental hygienist or therapist for 22% and 27% of cases respectively. With special care experience these figures increase to 43% and 53%. Discussion A large proportion of need in care homes could be wholly provided by hygienists or therapists, especially those with special care experience. The potential efficiency gain of direct access arises from individuals who do not need to see a dentist for any aspects of their care. Direct access to hygienists/therapists for dental care of care home residents should be piloted and evaluated. Conclusion Hygienists and therapists could make a large contribution to addressing dental treatment needs of care home residents and direct access could be an efficient model of care for this setting. PMID:26657440

  17. Effects of Early Dental Office Visits on Dental Caries Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rozier, R. Gary; Preisser, John S.; Stearns, Sally C.; Lee, Jessica Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the association between timing of a first dentist office visit before age 5 years and dental disease in kindergarten. Methods. We used North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999–2006) linked to state oral health surveillance data to compare caries experience for kindergarten students (2005–2006) who had a visit before age 60 months (n = 11 394) to derive overall exposure effects from a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model. We repeated the analysis separately for children who had preventive and tertiary visits. Results. Children who had a visit at age 37 to 48 and 49 to 60 months had significantly less disease than children with a visit by age 24 months (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81, 0.95; IRR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.69, 0.82, respectively). Disease status did not differ between children who had a tertiary visit by age 24 months and other children. Conclusions. Medicaid-enrolled children in our study followed an urgent care type of utilization, and access to dental care was limited. Children at high risk for dental disease should be given priority for a preventive dental visit before age 3 years. PMID:24134364

  18. Study and modeling of the ironing process on a multi-layered polymer coated low-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selles Canto, Miguel Angel

    The ironing process is the most crucial step in the manufacture of cans. Sheet steel covered by three polymer layers can be used as the starting material, but this coating must neither break nor fail in any manner in order to be considered as a viable and effective alternative to traditional practice. During ironing, the deformations are severe and high pressures exist at the tool-workpiece interface. Thickness reductions inherent in ironing require a large amount of surface generation. Deterioration of the coating in this delicate operation might enable direct contact of the stored food or drink with the metal. As can be appreciated, the key to the use of polymer-coated steel sheets in the manufacture of cans lies in the survival of these layers during the ironing process. Another important issue is the roughness of the newly-generated surface, because it should be possible to decorate the can without any difficulty. Changing the traditional manufacture of metallic containers such as cans and using this new coated material permits great reduction in environmental contaminants produced as a result of avoiding the formation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) during the manufacture of the polymer layers. This reduction is even greater because of not using additional lubricants due to the self-lubricanting property of the solid polymer coating layers during the drawing process. These objectives, together with the improvement of the mechanical characteristics and the adhesion of the painting or decorative priming, are realized by the use of the proposed material. In the existing bibliography about ironing processes on coated materials, some authors propose the use of the Upper Bound Theorem for modeling the material behavior. The present research shows for the first time the modeling of the ironing process on a three-layer polymer coated material. In addition, it takes into account the cases in which successful ironing is produced and those in which ones the ironing

  19. Analytical modeling of Schumann resonance and ELF propagation parameters on Mars with a multi-layered ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    Two electrically conductive planetary spheres, the ionosphere and the ground, form a spherical waveguide. Within such a planetary cavity a phenomenon called Schumann resonance (SR) can occur. It is a resonance of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The resonance parameters are strongly related to the electromagnetic properties of the cavity. On Mars, as there is no liquid water at the planetary surface, the ground has a low conductivity. In such a situation, ELF waves penetrate into the planetary subsurface up to many kilometers depth. To examine the influence of low-conductivity grounds on ELF propagation, we have introduced a recently developed analytical method, which enables to estimate the propagation parameters and explicate their dependence of the ground properties. Since the presented model is fully analytical, it is computationally efficient and can be very useful in finding inverse solutions. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we present the relationship between individual ground properties and the parameters of Schumann resonance. The obtained results indicate that Martian exploration performed by one ELF station located at the planetary surface can reveal, along with the properties of the ionosphere, the existence of liquid water under the Martian surface.

  20. Chiral Symmetry and Many-Body Effect in Multilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yuji; Kawarabayashi, Tohru; Aoki, Hideo; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-01

    Influence of the chiral symmetry on the many-body problem in multilayer graphene in magnetic fields is investigated. For a spinless electron model on the honeycomb lattice the many-body ground state is shown to be a doubly-degenerate chiral condensate irrespective of the number of layers. The energy spectrum calculated numerically with the exact diagonalization method reveals for ABC-stacked multilayer graphenes that the many-body gap decreases monotonically with the number of layers.

  1. Numerical modeling and analysis of static and ballistic behavior of multilayered/multiphase composite materials using detailed microstructural discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovicic, Jovan M.

    The goal of this work is to analyze the static and ballistic performance of multi material systems using a detailed finite element analysis. As more complex materials systems are introduced in engineering practice, the design engineer faces the dilemma of utilizing homogenization techniques or detailed numerical models. The latter offers a number of advantages, such as the ability to introduce separate constitutive laws and failure criteria for each phase, at the expense of computation cost. This is particularly important in ballistic performance of armor where the sequence of failure of each phase plays a major role in the energy absorption. Here, we present an automatic geometry generation algorithm for composite materials that can generate complex composite geometries spanning several unit cells. This capability is utilized to study the following phenomena: (1) Static behavior of textile composites: A comparative study of textile composites with different reinforcement architecture that shows the origins of non-linearity and the dependence of elastic parameters on the geometry of the unit cell; (2) Impact behavior of textile composites: The role of textile architecture in impact energy absorption; (3) Ballistic properties of ceramic sphere composites with textile composite backings. A detailed study of a new gradient design concept is presented using a full finite element discretization method that shows that although ceramic spheres embedded in epoxy exhibit a slightly lower energy absorption than the monolithic ceramic at the same areal density, they provide the advantage of ease of complex shape conformable manufacturing. A comparison with ballistic experiments on such material demonstrates that the analysis captures several aspects of this phenomenon.

  2. SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Todd C.

    2014-06-09

    Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

  3. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1996-01-02

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation. 4 figs.

  4. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation.

  5. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  6. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  7. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  8. Heat Transfer in High Temperature Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Miller, Steve D.; Cunnington, George R.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature multilayer insulations have been investigated as an effective component of thermal-protection systems for atmospheric re-entry of reusable launch vehicles. Heat transfer in multilayer insulations consisting of thin, gold-coated, ceramic reflective foils and Saffil(TradeMark) fibrous insulation spacers was studied both numerically and experimentally. A finite volume numerical thermal model using combined conduction (gaseous and solid) and radiation in porous media was developed. A two-flux model with anisotropic scattering was used for radiation heat transfer in the fibrous insulation spacers between the reflective foils. The thermal model was validated by comparison with effective thermal conductivity measurements in an apparatus based on ASTM standard C201. Measurements were performed at environmental pressures in the range from 1x10(exp -4) to 760 torr over the temperature range from 300 to 1300 K. Four multilayer samples with nominal densities of 48 kg/cu m were tested. The first sample was 13.3 mm thick and had four evenly spaced reflective foils. The other three samples were 26.6 mm thick and utilized either one, two, or four reflective foils, located near the hot boundary with nominal foil spacing of 1.7 mm. The validated thermal model was then used to study relevant design parameters, such as reflective foil spacing and location in the stack-up and coating of one or both sides of foils.

  9. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/sq m, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/sq m). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  10. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  11. Magnetic metallic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, R.Q.

    1994-04-01

    Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

  12. Ultrahard Multilayer Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzan, D.C.; Dugger, M.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Friedmann, T.A.; Knapp, J.A.; McCarty, K.F.; Medlin, D.L.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Missert, N.; Newcomer, P.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tallant, D.R.

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a new multilayer a-tC material that is thick stress-free, adherent, low friction, and with hardness and stiffness near that of diamond. The new a-tC material is deposited by J pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature, and fully stress-relieved by a short thermal anneal at 600°C. A thick multilayer is built up by repeated deposition and annealing steps. We measured 88 GPa hardness, 1100 GPa Young's modulus, and 0.1 friction coefficient (under high load). Significantly, these results are all well within the range reported for crystalline diamond. In fact, this material, if considered separate from crystalline diamond, is the 2nd hardest material known to man. Stress-free a-tC also has important advantages over thin film diamond; namely, it is smooth, processed at lower temperature, and can be grown on a much broader range of substrates. This breakthrough will enable a host of applications that we are actively pursuing in MEMs, sensors, LIGA, etc.

  13. Theory of NMR in Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboki, Kazuhiro; Fukuyama, Hidetoshi

    1988-09-01

    Motivated by experiments of NMR on superconductor(S)-normal-metal(N) multi-layer system, we have calculated the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, T1-1, for both N and S layers based on the bilayer model of McMillan for the proximity effect. The results of calculation are in essential agreement with experiments by Aoki et al. and Imai et al.

  14. Toughening mechanisms in bioinspired multilayered materials

    PubMed Central

    Askarinejad, Sina; Rahbar, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Outstanding mechanical properties of biological multilayered materials are strongly influenced by nanoscale features in their structure. In this study, mechanical behaviour and toughening mechanisms of abalone nacre-inspired multilayered materials are explored. In nacre's structure, the organic matrix, pillars and the roughness of the aragonite platelets play important roles in its overall mechanical performance. A micromechanical model for multilayered biological materials is proposed to simulate their mechanical deformation and toughening mechanisms. The fundamental hypothesis of the model is the inclusion of nanoscale pillars with near theoretical strength (σth ~ E/30). It is also assumed that pillars and asperities confine the organic matrix to the proximity of the platelets, and, hence, increase their stiffness, since it has been previously shown that the organic matrix behaves more stiffly in the proximity of mineral platelets. The modelling results are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data for abalone nacre. The results demonstrate that the aragonite platelets, pillars and organic matrix synergistically affect the stiffness of nacre, and the pillars significantly contribute to the mechanical performance of nacre. It is also shown that the roughness induced interactions between the organic matrix and aragonite platelet, represented in the model by asperity elements, play a key role in strength and toughness of abalone nacre. The highly nonlinear behaviour of the proposed multilayered material is the result of distributed deformation in the nacre-like structure due to the existence of nano-asperities and nanopillars with near theoretical strength. Finally, tensile toughness is studied as a function of the components in the microstructure of nacre. PMID:25551150

  15. EUV-multilayers on grating-like topographies

    SciTech Connect

    van Boogaard, A. J. R.; Louis, E.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Bijkerk, F.

    2010-03-12

    In this study, multilayer morphology near the key anomalies in grating-like structures, namely sharp step-edges and steep walls, are examined. Different deposition schemes are employed. Based on cross section TEM analysis an explanatory model describing the morphology of the successive layers is developed. A further insight into the periodicity and the general performance of the multilayer is obtained by EUV microscopy. The main distortions in multilayer structure and hence EUV performance are found to be restricted to a region within a few hundred nanometers from the anomalies, which is very small compared to the proposed grating period (50-100 {micro}m). These multilayer coated blazed gratings can thus be considered a viable option for spectral purity enhancement of EUV light sources.

  16. Characterization of Mo/Si multilayer growth on stepped topographies

    SciTech Connect

    Boogaard, A. J. R. vcan den; Louis, E.; Zoethout, E.; Goldberg, K. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2011-08-31

    Mo/Si multilayer mirrors with nanoscale bilayer thicknesses have been deposited on stepped substrate topographies, using various deposition angles. The multilayer morphology at the stepedge region was studied by cross section transmission electron microscopy. A transition from a continuous- to columnar layer morphology is observed near the step-edge, as a function of the local angle of incidence of the deposition flux. Taking into account the corresponding kinetics and anisotropy in layer growth, a continuum model has been developed to give a detailed description of the height profiles of the individual continuous layers. Complementary optical characterization of the multilayer system using a microscope operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength range, revealed that the influence of the step-edge on the planar multilayer structure is restricted to a region within 300 nm from the step-edge.

  17. Developing Multilayer Thin Film Strain Sensors With High Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III

    2006-01-01

    A multilayer thin film strain sensor for large temperature range use is under development using a reactively-sputtered process. The sensor is capable of being fabricated in fine line widths utilizing the sacrificial-layer lift-off process that is used for micro-fabricated noble-metal sensors. Tantalum nitride films were optimized using reactive sputtering with an unbalanced magnetron source. A first approximation model of multilayer resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance was used to set the film thicknesses in the multilayer film sensor. Two multifunctional sensors were fabricated using multilayered films of tantalum nitride and palladium chromium, and tested for low temperature resistivity, TCR and strain response. The low temperature coefficient of resistance of the films will result in improved stability in thin film sensors for low to high temperature use.

  18. Phase stability in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, Arda

    this problem has been solved by the correction of the spherical aberration of the microscope using a set of non-round lenses and consequently the information limit in an aberration corrected microscope (<0.1nm) has been pushed beyond an uncorrected microscope (˜0.13nm). In 2007, such a corrector system in the probe-forming lens of a Scanning TEM microscope was successfully installed at The Ohio State University. The preliminary results from this microscope were presented in the content of this work where we have studied the microscope and performed first hand experiments. Finally we have addressed the phase stability in Cu/Nb and Ti/Nb nanoscale metallic multilayers by extensive use of these advance characterization techniques and tools. At reduced layer thickness (<2nm) the change in fcc to bcc phase in Cu and hcp to bcc phase in Ti were experimentally confirmed using X-ray diffraction electron diffraction and electron imaging techniques along the plan-view and cross-section directions. These structural transformations were often referred to as being thermodynamic in nature and a classical thermodynamical model explains and predicts the formation of such pseudomorphic phases through the competition of volumetric and interfacial free energy variables. We have investigated both the structural and chemical changes in the Cu/Nb and Ti/Nb nanoscale metallic mutilayers as a function of length scale in order to understand and predict the phase stability. The important constituents: volumetric free energy and interfacial energy changes were experimentally derived considering the chemistry and structure of the multilayers and competition between these thermodynamic terms well explains the observed structural changes in nanoscale metallic multilayers.

  19. Effect of Nutritional Habits on Dental Caries in Permanent Dentition among Schoolchildren Aged 10–12 Years: A Zero-Inflated Generalized Poisson Regression Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    ALMASI, Afshin; RAHIMIFOROUSHANI, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad Reza; MOHAMMAD, Kazem; PASDAR, Yahya; TARRAHI, Mohammad Javad; MOGHIMBEIGI, Abbas; AHMADI JOUYBARI, Touraj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the associations between nutrition and dental caries in permanent dentition among schoolchildren. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 698 schoolchildren aged 10 to 12 yr from a random sample of primary schools in Kermanshah, western Iran, in 2014. The study was based on the data obtained from the questionnaire containing information on nutritional habits and the outcome of decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) index. The association between predictors and dental caries was modeled using the Zero Inflated Generalized Poisson (ZIGP) regression model. Results: Fourteen percent of the children were caries free. The model was shown that in female children, the odds of being in a caries susceptible sub-group was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08–1.51) times more likely than boys (P=0.041). Additionally, mean caries count in children who consumed the fizzy soft beverages and sweet biscuits more than once daily was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.19–1.63) and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.18–1.37) times more than children that were in category of less than 3 times a week or never, respectively. Conclusions: Girls were at a higher risk of caries than boys were. Since our study showed that nutritional status may have significant effect on caries in permanent teeth, we recommend that health promotion activities in school should be emphasized on healthful eating practices; especially limiting beverages containing sugar to only occasionally between meals. PMID:27141498

  20. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  1. Residual stress of physical vapor-deposited polycrystalline multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Zhang, Hui; Zheng, LiLi

    2015-02-01

    An extended one-dimensional stress model for the deposition of multilayer films is built based on the existing stress model by considering the influence of deposition conditions. Both thermal stress and intrinsic stress are considered to constitute the final residual stress in the model. The deposition process conditions such as deposition temperature, oxygen pressure, and film growth rate are correlated to the full stress model to analyze the final residual stress distribution, and thus the deformation of the deposited multilayer system under different process conditions. Also, the model is numerically realized with in-house built code. A deposition of Ag-Cu multilayer system is simulated with the as-built extended stress model, and the final residual stresses under different deposition conditions are discussed with part of the results compared with experiment from other literature.

  2. Bonding of low-fusing dental porcelain to commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Könönen, M; Kivilahti, J

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the investigation was to study the basic problems related to the firing of dental porcelain to commercially pure titanium. The firing of a low-fusing porcelain to sandblasted or electrolytically polished titanium was carried out in an ordinary dental furnace. The interfacial regions between the ceramic coatings and titanium were analyzed using scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Thermal stresses in the joints were evaluated by means of a finite element model based on multilayer elastic strain analysis. The chemical reactions and their formation sequence at 750 degrees C was predicted thermodynamically and observed experimentally both at 750 and 800 degrees C. The C-SAM results gave evidence that the integrity of the porcelain-titanium joints are better in the sandblasted samples than in the electropolished ones, where defects were larger. SEM analyses of the same samples confirmed the C-SAM findings. Because the reaction layers are more continuous in the electropolished samples, cracks propagated more readily in these samples during the cooling procedure. Both thermodynamic calculations and experimental chemical analyses strongly indicate that the cause for the cracking of the reaction zone is thin layer of Ti (oxo)silicide and/or a relatively thick solid solution layer of Ti and oxygen. PMID:7814430

  3. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  4. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-02

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  5. Dental auscultation for nursing personnel as a model of oral health care education: development, baseline, and 6-month follow-up assessments.

    PubMed

    Wårdh, Inger; Berggren, Ulf; Hallberg, Lillemor R M; Andersson, Lars; Sörensen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Oral health care has been shown to have low priority in nursing and has been only partly successful. To create more positive effects than those achieved through traditional oral health care education, this project tested an educational model for nursing staff personnel. In addition to traditional oral health care education, some of the nursing staff members passed an additional dental auscultation period and served as oral care aides. The aides were responsible for the oral health care of the residents at their nursing facilities (intervention group). The intervention nursing facilities were compared with facilities where nursing personnel only received a traditional oral health care education program. Assessments were made at baseline and at a 6-month follow-up. At follow-up it was shown that the nursing staff in the intervention group gave higher priority to the oral health care work than the nursing staff in the control group. PMID:11905448

  6. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; De Domenico, Manlio; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influent nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  7. Fit accuracy of metal partial removable dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by traditional or light curing modeling material technique: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anan, Mohammad Tarek M.; Al-Saadi, Mohannad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the fit accuracies of metal partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) frameworks fabricated by the traditional technique (TT) or the light-curing modeling material technique (LCMT). Materials and methods A metal model of a Kennedy class III modification 1 mandibular dental arch with two edentulous spaces of different spans, short and long, was used for the study. Thirty identical working casts were used to produce 15 PRDP frameworks each by TT and by LCMT. Every framework was transferred to a metal master cast to measure the gap between the metal base of the framework and the crest of the alveolar ridge of the cast. Gaps were measured at three points on each side by a USB digital intraoral camera at ×16.5 magnification. Images were transferred to a graphics editing program. A single examiner performed all measurements. The two-tailed t-test was performed at the 5% significance level. Results The mean gap value was significantly smaller in the LCMT group compared to the TT group. The mean value of the short edentulous span was significantly smaller than that of the long edentulous span in the LCMT group, whereas the opposite result was obtained in the TT group. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the fit of the LCMT-fabricated frameworks was better than the fit of the TT-fabricated frameworks. The framework fit can differ according to the span of the edentate ridge and the fabrication technique for the metal framework. PMID:26236129

  8. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  9. Quantum Spin Hall phase in multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Noel; Lado, Jose Luis; Fernandez-Rossier, Joaquin; Theory of Nanostructures Team

    2015-03-01

    We address the question of whether multilayer graphene systems are Quantum Spin Hall (QSH) insulators. Since interlayer coupling coples pz orbitals to s orbitals of different layers and Spin-Orbit (SO) couples pz orbitals with px and py of opposite spins, new spins mixing channels appear in the multilayer scenario that were not present in the monolayer. These new spin-mixing channels cast a doubt on the validity of the spin-conserving Kane-Mele model for multilayers and motivates our choice of a four orbital tight-binding model in the Slater-Koster approximation with intrinsic Spin-Orbit interaction. To completely determine if the QSH phase is present we calculate for different number of layers both the Z2 invariant for different stackings (only for inversion symmetric systems), and the density of states at the edge of semi-infinite graphene ribbon with armchair termination. We find that systems with even number of layers are normal insulators while systems with odd number of layers are QSH insulators, regardless of the stacking. We acknowledge financial support by Marie-Curie-ITN 607904-SPINOGRAPH.

  10. Evolutionary games on multilayer networks: a colloquium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-05-01

    Networks form the backbone of many complex systems, ranging from the Internet to human societies. Accordingly, not only is the range of our interactions limited and thus best described and modeled by networks, it is also a fact that the networks that are an integral part of such models are often interdependent or even interconnected. Networks of networks or multilayer networks are therefore a more apt description of social systems. This colloquium is devoted to evolutionary games on multilayer networks, and in particular to the evolution of cooperation as one of the main pillars of modern human societies. We first give an overview of the most significant conceptual differences between single-layer and multilayer networks, and we provide basic definitions and a classification of the most commonly used terms. Subsequently, we review fascinating and counterintuitive evolutionary outcomes that emerge due to different types of interdependencies between otherwise independent populations. The focus is on coupling through the utilities of players, through the flow of information, as well as through the popularity of different strategies on different network layers. The colloquium highlights the importance of pattern formation and collective behavior for the promotion of cooperation under adverse conditions, as well as the synergies between network science and evolutionary game theory.

  11. Symmetric scrolled packings of multilayered carbon nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, A. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Lobzenko, I. P.; Baimova, Yu. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    Scrolled packings of single-layer and multilayer graphene can be used for the creation of supercapacitors, nanopumps, nanofilters, and other nanodevices. The full atomistic simulation of graphene scrolls is restricted to consideration of relatively small systems in small time intervals. To overcome this difficulty, a two-dimensional chain model making possible an efficient calculation of static and dynamic characteristics of nanoribbon scrolls with allowance for the longitudinal and bending stiffness of nanoribbons is proposed. The model is extended to the case of scrolls of multilayer graphene. Possible equilibrium states of symmetric scrolls of multilayer carbon nanotribbons rolled up so that all nanoribbons in the scroll are equivalent are found. Dependences of the number of coils, the inner and outer radii, lowest vibrational eigenfrequencies of rolled packages on the length L of nanoribbons are obtained. It is shown that the lowest vibrational eigenfrequency of a symmetric scroll decreases with a nanoribbon length proportionally to L -1. It is energetically unfavorable for too short nanoribbons to roll up, and their ground state is a stack of plane nanoribbons. With an increasing number k of layers, the nanoribbon length L necessary for creation of symmetric scrolls increases. For a sufficiently small number of layers k and a sufficiently large nanoribbon length L, the scrolled packing has the lowest energy as compared to that of stack of plane nanoribbons and folded structures. The results can be used for development of nanomaterials and nanodevices on the basis of graphene scrolled packings.

  12. A multilayer sonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, L.; Chiroiu, V.; Sireteanu, T.; Dumitriu, D.

    2015-10-01

    A non-periodic multilayer film was analyzed to show that, despite its non-periodicity, the film exhibits full band-gaps and localized modes at its interfaces, as well as in the sonic composites. The film consists of alternating layers of two different materials that follow a triadic Cantor sequence. The Cantor structure shows extremely low thresholds for subharmonic generation of ultrasonic waves, compared with homogeneous and periodic structures. The coupling between the extended-mode (phonon) and the localized-mode (fracton) vibration regimes explains the generation of full band-gaps, for which there are no propagating Lamb waves. The large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction results from a more favorable frequency and spatial matching of coupled modes. A full band-gap that excludes Love waves is also analyzed.

  13. Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, Dejan; Matković, Aleksandar; Milićević, Marijana; Jovanović, Djordje; Gajić, Radoš; Salom, Iva; Spasenović, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Vibrating membranes are the cornerstone of acoustic technology, forming the backbone of modern loudspeakers and microphones. Acoustic performance of a condenser microphone is derived mainly from the membrane’s size, surface mass and achievable static tension. The widely studied and available nickel has been a dominant membrane material for professional microphones for several decades. In this paper we introduce multilayer graphene as a membrane material for condenser microphones. The graphene device outperforms a high end commercial nickel-based microphone over a significant part of the audio spectrum, with a larger than 10 dB enhancement of sensitivity. Our experimental results are supported with numerical simulations, which also show that a 300 layer thick graphene membrane under maximum tension would offer excellent extension of the frequency range, up to 1 MHz.

  14. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  15. Multilayer diamond coated WC tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.D.; Jagannaham, K.; Narayan, J.

    1995-12-31

    To increase adhesion of diamond coatings, a multilayer structure was developed. The multilayer diamond coating consisted of a first discontinuous diamond layer, an interposing layer, and a top continuous diamond layer. The diamond layer was grown on WC substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition and the interposing layer was grown by pulsed laser deposition. Machining tests were used to characterize adhesion properties of the multilayer diamond coatings on WC(Co) substrates. Results indicate that diamond coatings exhibit good adhesion on the WC tool substrates. The wear resistance of the WC tool is improved significantly by the diamond coatings.

  16. Integrated Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Integrated multilayer insulation (IMLI) is being developed as an improved alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI), which is more than 50 years old. A typical conventional MLI blanket comprises between 10 and 120 metallized polymer films separated by polyester nets. MLI is the best thermal- insulation material for use in a vacuum, and is the insulation material of choice for spacecraft and cryogenic systems. However, conventional MLI has several disadvantages: It is difficult or impossible to maintain the desired value of gap distance between the film layers (and consequently, it is difficult or impossible to ensure consistent performance), and fabrication and installation are labor-intensive and difficult. The development of IMLI is intended to overcome these disadvantages to some extent and to offer some additional advantages over conventional MLI. The main difference between IMLI and conventional MLI lies in the method of maintaining the gaps between the film layers. In IMLI, the film layers are separated by what its developers call a micro-molded discrete matrix, which can be loosely characterized as consisting of arrays of highly engineered, small, lightweight, polymer (typically, thermoplastic) frames attached to, and placed between, the film layers. The term "micro-molded" refers to both the smallness of the frames and the fact that they are fabricated in a process that forms precise small features, described below, that are essential to attainment of the desired properties. The term "discrete" refers to the nature of the matrix as consisting of separate frames, in contradistinction to a unitary frame spanning entire volume of an insulation blanket.

  17. Evaluation of field dental equipment in a deployment environment.

    PubMed

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A Dale; Ragain, James C; Lyles, Mark B; Roberts, Howard W

    2006-03-01

    Dental officers and technicians must have reliable, durable, well-performing field dental equipment to enable them to provide dental care to deployed troops in operational environments. Unfortunately, no organized program exists to test such equipment before its purchase and use in the field. This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research and the Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service to evaluate commercially available field dental equipment through laboratory testing and clinical-user evaluations in theater. The purpose of this 2-year project was to identify the best-performing and most cost-effective field dental equipment for possible future procurement. Initial laboratory testing was performed at the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research, and the equipment was then shipped to Kuwait for in-theater environmental and clinical-user testing. A seven-member scientific team of military dental officers and technicians was deployed for 1 month to perform in-theater testing under regional environmental conditions and to coordinate clinical-user evaluations. The testing provided beneficial results by identifying equipment that performed properly and equipment that exhibited shortcomings serious enough to render it inadequate for operational use. It is recommended that the project serve as a model for future testing and evaluation of medical/dental equipment by all of the military services. PMID:16602527

  18. Reactive multilayers fabricated by vapor deposition. A critical review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D. P.

    2014-10-02

    The reactive multilayer thin films are a class of energetic materials that continue to attract attention for use in joining applications and as igniters. Generally composed of two reactants, these heterogeneous solids can be stimulated by an external source to promptly release stored chemical energy in a sudden emission of light and heat. In our critical review article, results from recent investigations of these materials are discussed. Discussion begins with a brief description of the vapor deposition techniques that provide accurate control of layer thickness and film composition. More than 50 reactive film compositions have been reported to date, withmore » most multilayers fabricated by magnetron sputter deposition or electron-beam evaporation. In later sections, we review how multilayer ignition threshold, reaction rate, and total heat are tailored via thin film design. For example, planar multilayers with nanometer-scale periodicity exhibit rapid, self-sustained reactions with wavefront velocities up to 100 m/s. Numeric and analytical models have elucidated many of the fundamental processes that underlie propagating exothermic reactions while demonstrating how reaction rates vary with multilayer design. Recent, time-resolved diffraction and imaging studies have further revealed the phase transformations and the wavefront dynamics associated with propagating chemical reactions. Many reactive multilayers (e.g., Co/Al) form product phases that are consistent with published equilibrium phase diagrams, yet a few systems, such as Pt/Al, develop metastable products. The final section highlights current and emerging applications of reactive multilayers. Examples include reactive Ni(V)/Al and Pd/Al multilayers which have been developed for localized soldering of heat-sensitive components.« less

  19. Reactive multilayers fabricated by vapor deposition. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D. P.

    2014-10-02

    The reactive multilayer thin films are a class of energetic materials that continue to attract attention for use in joining applications and as igniters. Generally composed of two reactants, these heterogeneous solids can be stimulated by an external source to promptly release stored chemical energy in a sudden emission of light and heat. In our critical review article, results from recent investigations of these materials are discussed. Discussion begins with a brief description of the vapor deposition techniques that provide accurate control of layer thickness and film composition. More than 50 reactive film compositions have been reported to date, with most multilayers fabricated by magnetron sputter deposition or electron-beam evaporation. In later sections, we review how multilayer ignition threshold, reaction rate, and total heat are tailored via thin film design. For example, planar multilayers with nanometer-scale periodicity exhibit rapid, self-sustained reactions with wavefront velocities up to 100 m/s. Numeric and analytical models have elucidated many of the fundamental processes that underlie propagating exothermic reactions while demonstrating how reaction rates vary with multilayer design. Recent, time-resolved diffraction and imaging studies have further revealed the phase transformations and the wavefront dynamics associated with propagating chemical reactions. Many reactive multilayers (e.g., Co/Al) form product phases that are consistent with published equilibrium phase diagrams, yet a few systems, such as Pt/Al, develop metastable products. The final section highlights current and emerging applications of reactive multilayers. Examples include reactive Ni(V)/Al and Pd/Al multilayers which have been developed for localized soldering of heat-sensitive components.

  20. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  1. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  2. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  3. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  4. Quality Assurance Decisions with Air Models: A Case Study of ImputatIon of Missing Input Data Using EPA's Multi-Layer Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Environmental models are frequently used within regulatory and policy frameworks to estimate environmental metrics that are difficult or impossible to physically measure. As important decision tools, the uncertainty associated with the model outputs should impact their ...

  5. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  6. The Importance of Efficacy: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Examine Factors Related to Preschool-Age Children Enrolled in Medicaid Receiving Preventive Dental Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Chi, Donald L.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Kuthy, Raymond A.; Carter, Knute D.; Field, Kathryn; Damiano, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Early preventive dental visits are vital to the oral health of children. Yet many children, especially preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid, do not receive early visits. This study attempts to uncover factors that can be used to encourage parents to seek preventive dental care for preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid. The extended…

  7. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-10-21

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial-magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  8. Multilayer liquid metal stretchable inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.; Bedair, S. S.; Nochetto, H.; Kierzewski, I. M.

    2014-08-01

    Liquid metals are ideally suited for creating low resistance traces able to undergo large mechanical strains. In this work, multilayer fluidic channels in soft silicone are used to create two inductor topologies, a solenoid and a double planar coil, based on the liquid metal galinstan. Electromechanical models were developed for the inductance upon stretching for each inductor, finding that the double planar coil has lower strain sensitivity in each direction than the solenoid. A three turn double planar coil and six turn solenoid, with unstretched inductances of approximately 250 nH and 55 nH respectively, were fabricated and tested using custom tensile and compressive strain testing setups and compared with the analytical model. The double planar coil was found to increase in inductance when stretched in either in-plane axes, with a measured rise of approximately 40% for 100% strain. The solenoid decreased in inductance by 24% for 100% strain along the core direction, and increased by 50% for the same strain along the core width.

  9. Satisfaction of active duty soldiers with family dental care.

    PubMed

    Chisick, M C

    1997-02-01

    In the fall of 1992, a random, worldwide sample of 6,442 married and single parent soldiers completed a self-administered survey on satisfaction with 22 attributes of family dental care. Simple descriptive statistics for each attribute were derived, as was a composite overall satisfaction score using factor analysis. Composite scores were regressed on demographics, annual dental utilization, and access barriers to identify those factors having an impact on a soldier's overall satisfaction with family dental care. Separate regression models were constructed for single parents, childless couples, and couples with children. Results show below-average satisfaction with nearly all attributes of family dental care, with access attributes having the lowest average satisfaction scores. Factors influencing satisfaction with family dental care varied by family type with one exception: dependent dental utilization within the past year contributed positively to satisfaction across all family types. PMID:9038028

  10. The USS Iowa disaster: success of the forensic dental team.

    PubMed

    Brannon, Robert B; Morlang, William M

    2004-09-01

    The authors record the contributions of dentistry to the identification of the crew members who were in one of the most significant peacetime military accidents in U.S. Navy history-the April 1989 explosion in a gun turret on the battleship USS Iowa and the deaths of 47 U.S. Navy personnel. Dental identification was the primary means of identification for most because a very high percentage of the bodies were burned or fragmented. The dental-identification team's success was a direct result of its preparedness, its use of dental personnel with mass-disaster experience, and the overall excellent quality of the antemortem dental records. The dental-identification team's successful involvement in the USS Iowa tragedy was considered a model for success and therefore was instrumental in contributing to the development of the American Board of Forensic Odontology "Guidelines for the Development of a Disaster Dental Identification Team." PMID:15461111

  11. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  12. Controlled growth of large area multilayer graphene on copper by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ismet I.; Kasap, Sibel; Khaksaran, Hadi; Celik, Suleyman; Ozkaya, Hasan; Yanik, Cenk; Faculty of Engineering; Natural Sciences Team; Nanotechnology Research; Application Center Team

    2015-03-01

    The growth of multilayer graphene on the surface of a copper foil is studied experimentally. It has been shown that the average film thickness can be controlled by the growth time with a linear trend and the growth can be extended until nearly full coverage of multilayer graphene over the copper surface. It is observed that the impurity particles on the copper surface mediate the multilayer growth. The formation of large multilayer islands is explained by a qualitative model which takes into account the interplay between the length scales governed by the molecular mean free path of gas molecules and the distribution of the impurities.

  13. Holography And Holometry Applications In Dental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenborg, George C.

    1987-06-01

    The earliest reference to holographic applications appeared in the dental literature in 1972 when Wictorin, Bjelkhagen and Abramson described a method to study elastic deformation of defective gold solder joints in simulated fixed bridges. Their paper, published in the Swedish dental literature, offered a concise presentation of the interferometry technique which led to the development of other research applications of holographic interferometry(holometry) in dentistry. In this presentation, the development and application of the interferometry technique in the dental field will be discussed. Various interesting and potentially useful applications of holography have appeared in the dental literature over the past decade. Some of these, which will be discussed, include the use of holograms as a storage medium for dental study models, multiplexing of computer(CT) scan sections to form white light viewable holograms and the potential application of holographic training aids in the teaching of the basic courses of dental anatomy and restorative dentistry. In addition, some unique related applications will be mentioned including a laser reflection method for accurate non-contact measurement of tooth mobility/movement and a technique for contour mapping of occlusal surfaces to measure wear of restorative materials.

  14. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  15. Artificial multilayers and nanomagnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    SHINJO, Teruya

    2013-01-01

    The author has been actively engaged in research on nanomagnetic materials for about 50 years. Nanomagnetic materials are comprised of ferromagnetic systems for which the size and shape are controlled on a nanometer scale. Typical examples are ultrafine particles, ultrathin films, multilayered films and nano-patterned films. In this article, the following four areas of the author’s studies are described. (1) Mössbauer spectroscopic studies of nanomagnetic materials and interface magnetism. (2) Preparation and characterization of metallic multilayers with artificial superstructures. (3) Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in magnetic multilayers. (4) Novel properties of nanostructured ferromagnetic thin films (dots and wires). A subject of particular interest in the author’s research was the artificially prepared multilayers consisting of metallic elements. The motivation to initiate the multilayer investigation is described and the physical properties observed in the artificial multilayers are introduced. The author’s research was initially in the field of pure physical science and gradually extended into applied science. His achievements are highly regarded not only from the fundamental point of view but also from the technological viewpoint. PMID:23391605

  16. Evaluation of periodontal risk assessment model among adults aged 30-60 years attending KLE Dental College, Belgaum: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Eshwar, Shruthi; Ankola, Anil V.; Kumar, Ashok; Hebbal, Mamata

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the periodontal risk of individuals using the modified periodontal risk assessment model. Materials and Methods: Adult subjects aged 30-60 years attending the out patient department of Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum in a week’s period were screened and 30 among those who met the criteria were included in the study. Complete history and examination of the oral cavity was done using mouth mirror and community periodontal index probes. Periodontal status was recorded using community periodontal index. Systemic conditions like hypertension and diabetes was assessed by suitable investigations. All the risk factors were plotted on a model using Microsoft excel and periodontal risk was assessed based on the findings and categorized as low, moderate and high risk. Results: Among 30 patients 13 were in low risk group, 10 in moderate risk group, and 7 in high risk group identified by proposed model given by Vishwa Chandra whereas 20 patients were in low risk group, 5 in moderate risk group and 5 in high risk group when identified Lang and Tonetti model (2003). Conclusion: In conclusion the use of risk assessment tool would result in reduction of complex therapies and would prevent the future effects of periodontal disease such as bone and tooth loss. PMID:21760671

  17. Improved computational model (AQUIFAS) for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems, part II: multilayer biofilm diffusional model.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipankar; Randall, Clifford W

    2008-07-01

    Research was undertaken to develop a diffusional model of the biofilm that can be applied in lieu of a semi-empirical model to upgrade an activated sludge system to an integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) or moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system. The model has been developed to operate with up to 12 cells (reactors) in series, with biofilm media incorporated to one or more of the zone cells, except the anaerobic zone cells. The values of the kinetic parameters for the model were measured using pilot-scale activated sludge, IFAS, and MBBR systems. The biofilm is divided into 12 layers and has a stagnant liquid layer. Diffusion and substrate utilization are calculated for each layer. The equations are solved simultaneously using a finite difference technique. The biofilm flux model is then linked to the activated sludge model. Advanced features include the ability to compute the biofilm thickness and the effect of biofilm thickness on performance. The biofilm diffusional model is also used to provide information and create a table of biofilm yields at different substrate concentrations that can be used in the semi-empirical model. PMID:18710146

  18. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  19. Multilayer volume microwave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdev, V. I.; Smirnov, S. V.; Chernushenko, A. M.

    1985-09-01

    Multilayer volume microwave filters are particularly suitable for miniaturization of radioelectronic devices by way of circuit integration, the principal advantage over planar filters being the much higher Q-factor; Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 3rd power as compared with Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 2nd power. Their metal-dielectric structure forms an array of coupled half-wavelength resonators electrically symmetric with respect to the center layer, coupling being effected by a magnetic field normal to the plane of resonators. The structure consists of an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the input end, followed by a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, a symmetric strip line with conductor, a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, and an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the output end. The size of such a filter depends directly on the number of resonator stages and, without the case, is comparable with the size of conventional filters on symmetric strip lines only but is much smaller than that of conventional filters on asymmetric strip lines only.

  20. Multilayer graphene rubber nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard; Frasca, Daniele; Schulze, Dietmar; Wachtendorf, Volker; Krafft, Bernd; Morys, Michael; Böhning, Martin; Rybak, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer Graphene (MLG), a nanoparticle with a specific surface of BET = 250 m2/g and thus made of only approximately 10 graphene sheets, is proposed as a nanofiller for rubbers. When homogenously dispersed, it works at low loadings enabling the replacement of carbon black (CB), increase in efficiency, or reduction in filler concentration. Actually the appropriate preparation yielded nanocomposites in which just 3 phr are sufficient to significantly improve the rheological, curing and mechanical properties of different rubbers, as shown for Chlorine-Isobutylene-Isoprene Rubber (CIIR), Nitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Natural Rubber (NR), and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR). A mere 3 phr of MLG tripled the Young's modulus of CIIR, an effect equivalent to 20 phr of carbon black. Similar equivalents are observed for MLG/CB mixtures. MLG reduces gas permeability, increases thermal and electrical conductivities, and retards fire behavior. The later shown by the reduction in heat release rate in the cone calorimeter. The higher the nanofiller concentration is (3 phr, 5 phr, and 10 phr was investigated), the greater the improvement in the properties of the nanocomposites. Moreover, the MLG nanocomposites improve stability of mechanical properties against weathering. An increase in UV-absorption as well as a pronounced radical scavenging are proposed and were proved experimentally. To sum up, MLG is interesting as a multifunctional nanofiller and seems to be quite ready for rubber development.